The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00182

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
Jems
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 10 Number 5
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, February 27,1981
6 fnd Sfioch0i
A Special Tribute to Leo
No one is a prophet in his own home
town" Nonsense! This fallacious adage
was finally laid to rest when friends and col-
leagues of Leo Goodman (immediate past
oresident of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale) gathered to honor
him with a testimonial dinner Feb. 5 at
Woodlands Country Club.
Leo Goodman has TWO home towns, and
the civic and philanthropic lives of both
towns have been enriched by Leo's work^
When a capacity crowd of well over 300
Kloridians met to thank Leo for a decade of
devotion to building the Jewish com-
munity, they were augmented by several
dozen people from Leo's other home town,
Teaneck, N.J., including the President Pro
Tern of the Senate of the State of New
Jersey, Sen. Matthew Feldman, who pre-
sented l*o with a copy of a special Senate
|{,".olution, honoring Leo for his many
years of service and leadership in that state.
It is typical of Leo that he was too busy
working for the Greater Fort Lauderdale
community to have told of his distinguished
philanthropic and humanitarian leadership
l>efore moving here. It is typical of Leo, too,
that he briefly thanked everyone for their
accolades, simply saying: "I shall try very
hard to live up to what you have said,-' and
launched immediately into current prob-
lems. "We hope and pray for Israel's sur-
vival," said Leo, adding that "... the
niurgency' will exist every year in the
foreseeable future.'- He then went on to dis-
cuss the "resurfacing" of anti-Semitism and
our role" in organizing to combat it. This
was indeed still the same old Leo giving his
Sadat Suggests Palestinian
Government -in-Exile
time and attention to the work at hand.
The people attending the dinner, all sub-
stantial UJ A-Federation contributors who
had already made their 1981 commitments,
then proceeded to "put their money where
their mouths were" and give additional
funds to UJ A in honor of Leo.
Leo Goodman believes in less talk and
more action, and the assembled gathering
was following the beautiful example he has
lived.
More pictures and information about the
"memorable evening" are on Page 11.
From JTA Services
With Austrian Chancellor Bruno Kreisky
by his side in Cairo, Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat once again called on Pales-
tinians to form a government-in-exile, head-
quartered in Cairo, and suggested that
PLO's Yasser Arafat might not be the best
man to lead that organization.
For vastly different reasons, both the
PLO and Israel rejected Sadat's idea, which
he first advanced in 1972 and resurrected
during his recent visit to Paris. The Paris
visit followed his talk to the European
Parliament during which he emphasized
that the Camp David accords continue to b
the determining factor in the Israel-Egypt
peace talks.
Meanwhile Israeli's Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir was in the U.S. consulting
with U.S. Secretary of State Alexander
Haig and other Reagan Administration of-
ficials while in Jerusalem a political furore
erupted about information concerning
classified diplomatic cables between Sadat
and Israeli Ambassador to Kgypt Eliahu
Ben-Elissar.
Foreign Minister Shamir's office denied
giving information to the press. Several
sources in Israel suggest that Prime
Minister Menachem Begins forces leaked
the cables because they reflected well on the
Likud government's relations with Egypt
. and because Ben-Elissar is expected to
resign as Ambassador in order to run for
election to the Knesset.
Sources have indicated that the leak is an
indication of the nature of Israel's up-
coming Knesset elections when Israelis go
to the voting booths on June 30. All Israeli
polls indicate that Shimon Peres and the
Labor Party he heads may gain, for the first
time in Israel's 33 years of democratic elec-
tions, a clear majority of the 120 Knesset
seats and make Peres the new Prime Minis-
ter of Israel.
The cabled messages indicated that
Sadat had re-affirmed his support of the
Camp David peace and indicated opposition
to European Middle East peace initiatives.
Sadat, however, expressed some reluctance
regarding the resumption of the long-stalled
Palestinian autonomy negotiations. Sadat,
in his talks earlier this month to the Euro-
pean Parliament in Luxembourg and later
in talks with French President Giscard
DeEstaing. is reported to have indicated
that European initiatives could be helpful,
but his suggestion that Jordan and Pales-
tinians join in the talks later was rejected
by Israeli sources.
It was noted that both Sadat and the
Israel government won't resume the Pales-
tine autonomy talks until after the June 30
Israel elections. Although Israel's chief
autonomy negotiator, Dr. Yosef Burg, com-
plained that Egypt was dragging its feet in
not continuing the talks.
Moshe Sasson, a veteran Israeli diplomat
Continued on Page 7
Auction Highlights UJA Fashion Show at Saks Fifth Avenue
At the Saks Fifth Avenue fashion show and fund-raiser:
Ethel Waldman, Fran Smith and Felice Sincoff; Gladys
floor where Ray Garcia musicians
were playing welcoming music.
Immediately the cocktail hour
was underway in three areas of
the floor where tables and chairs
replaced racks of dresses and
mannequins.
Soon Felice Sincoff, chairman
of the Patrons of the Women's
Division, made the welcome
___ I /
Daren with General Jacob Even; Iris Starr accepting an
award from Mrs. Sincoff; one of three fashion floor areas
The new Saks Fifth Avenue at
the Galleria on E. Sunrise Blvd.
closed at 5 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 8.
Hut it came alive at 6 p.m., as
more than 350 people streamed
through opened doors and were
directed by a score of hostesses
from the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale to the fashion
official on the part of the
Division's President Gladys
Daren, the Division's United
Jewish Appeal general chairman
Ethel Waldman, and Fran Smith,
co-chairman of the Patrons, who
introduced the guest speaker,
General Jacob Even of the Israel
Defense Forces.
Moral Majority Leader Offends Jews
Mrs. Sincoff, expressing the
appreciation of the Federation for
the gracious cooperation ex-
tended by Saks Fifth Avenue in
hosting the event presented to
Iris Starr, general manager of the
Saks store, a framed Award of
Merit.
Two highlights of the evening
were the 15 high fashion models
presenting fashions created by
filled with contributors.
Designer Stanley Sherman and
furs from Revillon, followed by
an auction of one of the furs and
one of Sherman's creation which
added more than $2,700 to the
Patrons Division total of com-
mitments by the women who
made a minimum contribution of
$500 to the Women's Division.
, Many of the women, in a show of
appreciation for Saks and for
, UJA, increased their pledges
! during the glamorous evening.
From JTA Services
NEW YORK Another Moral
Majority leader is in trouble with the
Jewish community. The latest contro-
versy arose as a result of an interview
given to the New York Times by the
Rev. Dan C. Fore, head of the Moral
Majority in New York.
During the course of the interview
Rev. Fore said that he was particularlj
exercised about the comments of some
Jewish leaders about his controversial
right-wing group. He specifically men-
tioned Rabbi Alexander Schindler, presi-
dent of the Reform Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, who has said
that the activities of groups like the
Moral Majority have helped foster a cli-
mate in which religious intolerance can
flourish.
"I love the Jewish people deeply,"
Rev. Fore told the Times. "God has
given them talents He has not given to
others. They are His chosen people. Jews
have a God-given ability to make money,
almost a super-natural ability to make
.., money."
jf- He then added, "they control the
media; they control the city."
Reacting to the remarks, the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith
charged that Rev. Fore was playing into
the hands of "haters" by repeating anti-
Semitic cliches and stereotypes.
"It is distressing that someone who
declares that he loves the Jewish people
'deeply' should nevertheless repeat dis-
credited anti-Semitic cliches and stereo-
types that falsely characterize Jews,"
said Nathan Perlmutter, ADL national
director. "He expresses feelings of love,
which we welcome, but his ignorance of
the broad spectrum and diversity of
Jews can be exploited by haters."
New York's freshman Republican
senator, Alphonse D'Amato, also de-
nounced the Rev. Fore's remarks. In a
letter to the Rev. Jerry Falwell, of
Lynchburg, Va., national head of the
Moral Majority, Sen. D'Amato termed
Rev. Fore's statement "dangerous" and
said that it should be "publicly and
forcefully disavowed."
D'Amato also told Rev. Falwell that
he was "very upset and frankly appalled
by the statement. Rev. Fore and your
organization, the Moral Majority," he
added, "owe the Jewish people an
apology for this statement."
Soref Hall Dedication Set for Mar. 1
Samuel M. Soref, benefactor of
Samuel M. Soref Hall, will be honored by
the community on Sunday, March 1, at 2
p.m. in the newly refurbished hall on the
Jewish Community Center's Perlman
Campus, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
According to Evelyn Gross, chairper-
son for the day, "an outstanding musical
program has been plannned." Vicki La
Cava, soprano, and Richard Ryan, bari-
tone, will perform an arrangement by
Irene Unterman. The JCC Choir, under
the direction of Miriam Breitman, will
present its inaugural performance. Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon and Cantor Jerome
Element, both of Temple Emanu-El, will
officiate at the dedication.
"We are just thrilled to be able to
honor Sam Soref who has done so much
for the JCC," added Mrs. Gross.
Working with Evelyn on her com-
mittee are Marianne Falk, Bess Free-
man, Betty Garnitz, Celia Goldfarb,
Dotty Gross, Billie Koffman, Helen
Kuriansky, Sunny Landsman, Hildreth
Levin, Cheryl Irvine, Edith Levine,
Dorothy Rubin, Jean Shapiro. Helene
Soref and Selma Strews.


T=5?2-
I -'-
the Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, February 27, lggi
Federation-UJA
Events Listed
DINNER DANCE
Pictured from left are Sam
Berkman, Ben Steinborn, Gus
Spindler, David Mitchell, and
Alfred Cohen who are co-chairing
the Oakland Hills UJA Com-
mittee sponsoring the SlOO-Plus
Dinner Dance at 6:30 p.m.,
Sunday, March 1, in Temple Beth
Am, Margate Jewish Center,
7205 Royal Palm Blvd. Cohen,
first vice president of the Temple
and a leader and contributor in
many Jewish endeavors, will be
honored. Inspired by his leader-
ship, the 36-member committee
reports more than 90 percent of
the community's Jewish
population has increased its
commitments to the 1981 United
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
OTHER EVENTS
Oakland Hills is one of the
several communities in tht
Greater Margate Area planning
UJA events during March.
Others in the planning stage are
Palm Springs Phase III having a
breakfast at 10 a.m., Sunday,
March 15, at Phase III
Clubhouse. Ephraim (Bud)
Weinstein is chairman of Phase
III UJA committee and Mickie
Grossman is co-chairing the
committee; also Congregation
Beth Hillel of Margate planning a
breakfast for Sunday, March 22;
and Temple Beth Am
congregation having a breakfast
at 10 a.m., Thursday, March 26,
at the synagogue with Florence
and Morris Posner to be honored,
according to Beth Am UJA
Committee Chairman Irving T.
Spivack.
BERMUDA CLUB
Bermuda Club UJA Com-
mittee, headed by Bernard
Simms, will meet at 8 p.m.,
Wednesday, March 4, in the
Bermuda Club Recreation Hall.
Herman Solnit will be the
honoree. Abraham J. Gittelson.
education director of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, will be the speaker.
Gittelson will also speak at the
Sunday, March 8, 10:30 a.m.
brunch meeting for the Pompano
Beach South residents at Temple
Sholom, 132 SE 11th Ave.,
Pompano Beach. Dr. Adolf Lowe
is chairman of the Pompano
South UJA committee.
In Memoriam:
Rabbi David Berent
More than 1500 persons
crowded into Temple Beth
Israel's extended sanctuary
Thursday night, Feb. 19, to pay
tribute to the memory of Rabbi
David Berent, spiritual leader of
Temple Beth Israel, Century
Village, Deerfield Beach. The
service was held to give the
community the opportunity to
pay its respect to the man who
had come out of retirement to
become its rabbi at its inception
six years ago.
Following the service, his
widow, Gertrude Berent, and
other members of the family,
took Rabbi Berent for burial back
to his former hometown,
i Lewis ton, Maine, where he had
gained many honors through his
" Idevoted work in behalf of
m Judaism and serving the state in
3 (several capacities.
Beth Israel's President Joseph
Lovy called on several rabbis
including Rabbi Lavy Becker of
Montreal who had known Rabbi
Berent for 40 years. Rabbi Henry
lialpern, Rabbi A. Plotkin, and
tabbi Morris Skop of Temple
jj Sholom, Pompano Beach, at
vhose synagogue Rabbi Berent
"had been scheduled to speak to a
Mid rash Adult Education group
on Wednesday night, Feb. 18.
Kabbi Skop spoke of his great
friendship with his colleague who
had called him on Tuesday night,
Feb. 17, saying he would be
unable to speak because of a cold.
Rev. Saul Kirschenbaum,
lanted a hymn, arid Beth"
Rabbi David Berent
Israel's Cantor Joseph Pollack
chanted the El Moleh Rachamin.
The Mayor of Deerfield Beach,
other representatives of the
community, and representatives
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, in-
cluding Rabbi Phillip A. Labo-
witz, the Federation's liaison
with North Broward Board of
Rabbis, were in attendance.
Rabbi lialpern, summed up the
feeliings of all at the service,
when he said: "We're all
mourners, because when a
scholar dies, everyone he met is
considered part of the family. His
warmth, his hospitality, his
inspired teaching, his utter
humility, endeared him to all who
knewhhn:"
WYNMOOR
Also having a UJA brunch will
be the Wynmoor Village
residents at 10 a.m., Sunday,
April 5, at Holiday Inn in
Plantation. Louis Schneider is
heading the Wynmoor UJA
Committe which has selected
Judge Leo Brown as its honoree
for his dedication to Judaism.
SANDS POINT MARCH 15
Carolyn Feffer, chairperson of
the Sands Point 1981 United
Jewish Appeal Committee, and
her co-chairman, Reuben Stras-
kinsky, have arranged a special
treat for their Sunday morning,
March 15, breakfast at the
Tamarac Jewish Center: enter-
tainment by the Sands Point
Condeliers and Concert Violinist
George Schwiller.
Chairperson Feffer and Co-
Chairman Straskinsky have a
committee of almost 30 residents,
all of them reaching out to their
neighbors so that in the words of
Esther, at a time of Purim
(March 20 this year), "Let all
among us share with our neigh-
bors especially those who are in
, need."
They pointed out that the
funds contributed to the UJA are
allocated by the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale
primarily for direct support of
humanitarian programs in Israel
and a variety of humanitarian
and social welfare programs and
services in North Broward
county through the Federation's
Chaplaincy Commission,
Education Committee, Nutrition
Program, and through its benefi-
ciaries such as the Jewish
Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, Jewish Family
Service of Broward County,
Hillel Foundation, B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization, Hebrew
Day School, Judaica High
School, North Broward Midrasha
for Adult Education and much
more.
INTERNATIONAL VILLAGE
One score and 10 residents of
International Village have met
with Hilda Leibo, chairman of
Inverrary's International Village
United Jewish Appeal commit-,
tee, to complete plans for three i
fund raisers to be held for resi-1
dents of International Village.
Leading off the series will be a
cocktail party at 5 p.m., March 5
for families making a commit-
ment of at least $100 to the
United Jewish Appeal 1981
campaign on behalf of the
humanitarian needs and social
programs supported by the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale in Israel and in
North Broward county. The
hosts will be Sylvia Karo and
Estell Rosengard.
Next on the agenda will be
Alvera Ackerberg's cocktail
party at 4:30 p.m., Monday,
March 20. A minimum commit-
ment of $250 per family will
enable contributors to attend this
party.
And with everyone welcome, a
wine and cheese gathering,
hosted by Chairperson Leibo's
entire International Village
Committee will be held in the
Main Clubhouse at 4:30 p.m.,
Thursday, April 9.
MARCH 1 FOR 18th HOLE
And over at the main
clubhouse of Inverrary's 18th
Hole residences; the area's UJA
Chairman Jerry Moss and his
committee have planned a "first"
for the residents and prospective
contributors to the 1981 cam-
paign: a wine and cheese gather-
ing at 4:30 p.m., Sunday, March
1. All of 18th Hole's resident*
have been invited.
Families expect more
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More service.
Riverside now has seven chapels to serve the
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counties. But, more convenience is only one of the reasons
why since 1935, Riverside has been the standard by which
people compare funeral service.
At Riverside, families are served by the largest
Jewish staff of any funeral director in Florida. They are
people with a genuine understanding of families' needs,
regardless of financial circumstances.
At Riverside, families find total dedication
to Jewish tradition. And economical help in arranging
service between Florida and New York, or anywhere else
in the world.
Families expect more from Riverside.
We're trying to live up to that trust.
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Circumcision Conference Planned Busy Two Days For Teens
At Mt. Sinai Medical Center Mar. 25
In Israel recently, a surgical
laser was used to circumcise a
thirteen year-old hemophilia
victim. The youth, from an
observant Jewish family, told his
parents he wanted the operation
before his upcoming Bar Mit-
zvah.
Fortunately, most Jewish
males do not have to undergo
such a drastic measure for the
meaningful ceremony of Brit
Milan which takes place eight
days after baby boy's birth. But
there are new challenges to both
ritual and neo-natal circumcision
which have come to light in
recent newspaper and journal
articles and are being addressed
by Jewish community leaders.
In an effort to brifyg
professionals and laymen up-to-
date on the medical and social
concerns surrounding this basic
art of consecration, religious and
medical experts are participating
in a one-day program on cir-
cumcision at Mount Sinai
Medical Center, Miami Beach,
March 25. The conference will be
chaired by Rabbi Solomon Schiff,
director of chaplaincy, Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and
executive vice president. Rab-
binical Assn. of Greater Miami;
and co-chaired by Irwin
Makovsky, M.D., Department of
Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai
Medical Center.
"We are very pleased that a
program of this scope will be held
in Miami," said Rabbi Schiff,
who also serves as chaplain at
Mount Sinai.
There will be input from
nationally recognized religious
leaders such as Rabbi Moses D.
Tendler, Ph.D., professor of
Talmud, Yeshiva University,
chairman, Medical Ethics
Committee, Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies, New York, and
chairman, Bioethics Committee,
Rabbinical Council of America;
and Rabbi Eugene J. Cohen.
Ph.D., Coordinator, Brit Milah
board of America. There will also
be input from local health care
professionals.
The morning session, which is
open to physicians and other
health care professionals, will
address the "Surgical, Medical
and Halachic (religious law)
Aspects of Circumcision."
Speakers include Howard A.
Engle, M.D., Department of
Pediatrics, and Randy
Makovsky, M.D., Department of
Urology, both of Mount Sinai
Medical Center, and Rabbi
Tendler.
The afternoon session will
address "New Challenges to
Ritual Circumcision." The
speakers will be Rabbis Cohen
and Tendler. Franklin D.
Kreutzer, president, Southeast
Region, United Synagogues of
America, will preside, and Mrs.
Iris Franco, president. South
Florida Federation of Reform
Temples, will serve as moderator.
The morning scientific session
requires a $10 registration fee
which includes a Kosher con-
tinental breakfast and luncheon.
The afternoon session is free and
open to the public.
According to Rabbi Schiff, this
program, a first of its kind, will
have the broadest sponsorship
possible including the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, the
Rabbinical Assn. of Greater
Miami and the Brit Milah Board
of America, in addition to Mount
Sinai.
Brochures and further infor-
mation are available at Medical
Center, 576-4000, Ext. 218.
Confronting The Cults
Rabbi Dr. J. Immanuel
Schochet, pictured international
specialist in missionary-cult
counteraction and confrontation,
will speak at 7 p.m., March 3, at
the Jewish Community Center,
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd., Plan-
tation.
This is a return engagement for
the Canadian who is sponsored
by the Chabad House. The
response to his appearances in
South Florida last month were
such that Chabad House is
having him in the area from
March 1 through March 8. On
that day, Sunday, March 8, at
1:30 p.m., he will speak at
Temple Beth Orr in Coral
Springs.
Both the JCC and the Temple
Tzvia Shperber, 16, and Adi
Elkeles, who was 17 last month,
pictured above, were chosen by
the State of Israel Education
Ministry, along with a number of
other Israeli teens, to visit
various cities in the U.S., before
ending their stay in Washington,
DC.
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale and the
Jewish Community Center were
able to have Tzvia and Adi come
to North Broward for a full two-
day stay that will keep them
busy from early in the morning to
late in the evening, Monday,
March 2 and Tuesday, March 3.
Selma Telles, JCC program
director, and Mark Silverman,
Federation staffer, secured the
cooperation of two families to
serve as hosts for the teen-agers
while they are in the area. Shab-
lai and Eli Levy of Plantation
will host Adi who was born in Bat
Yam near Haita, and Gladys
Schleicher, also of Plantation,
will be hostess for Tzvia who was
born in Eilat.
Tzvia is now an 11th grader at
a religious school in Beer Sheva,
and Adi, who has traveled and
lived in Tanzania, Canada and
England because his father's
work took him to those countries,
is in the third year at a high
school in Ramat Gan.
On March 2 both of them will
attend a number of classes during
the school day at Plantation
High School; meet with other
teens in the evening at Temple
Beth Israel, and the next day will
be spent at Coconut Creek High
School, and from 7 to 9 p.m. at
the Judaica High School. They'll
meet Jews and non-Jews during
their stay, talking about Israeli
life, participating in discussion
with their American coun-
terparts.
Beth Orr meetings are open to
the general community.
For the past twenty years.
Rabbi Dr. Schochet has devoted
himself to helping young people
return to their Jewish identity
and traditions.
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absolutely no cost or obligation TO ME.
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Serving chapels throughout the US. and Canada.
Kirschenbaum Bros.. Inc.. in New ibrk.
Piser Memorial Chapels, in Chicago.
Stanetsky-Schlossberg-SolomSh', in Boston.
In Broward, 742-6000. In Dade, 861-7301. In Palm Beach, 833-0887.


Ple2
,cuetiitsn'i wriUMhuJi\yrvuivrroriLiOilaeracue
"Jewish Floridian
ol Greater Fort Lauderdaie
Fred Shocnel
FREDSMOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET MAX LEVINE
Editor and Publisher Executive- Editor Production Editor
Published Bi-Weakly Second Class Postage Paid at Haliandale. Fla USPS (899420
FORT LAUDEHDALE HOLLYWOOD OFFICE. Am Savings 2500 Bldg..
2500 E Haliandale Beach Blvd Suite 707G. Haliandale. Fla 33009 Phone 4540466
Abraham B Halpern. Advertising Supervisor
Mam Office 120 NE 6th St. Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 13734605
oslmasler: Form 3S71 returns to Jewish Fiondim. P.O. Soi 01 2973. Mltmi, F/a. 33101
Member JTA. Seven Arts. WNS. NEA. AJPA and FPA
Jewish Floridian Ooes Not Guarantee Kashruth ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area S3 95 Annual (2 Year Minimum $7 90). or Dy membership Jewish
Federation ot Greater Fort Lauderdaie. 2999 NW 33rd Ave. Fort Lauderdaie. Fla 33311
Phone 4848200 Out ol Town Upon Request
23-1 ADAR5741
Number 5
Friday, February 27. 1981
Volume 10
Time Bomb Ticks Away

A time bomb is ticking away in the still delicate Israeli-
Egyptian relations which could blow up the peace treaty so care-
fully worked out by the two countries with the help of the United
States. This is the U.S. commitment to set up a multinational
force to police the Sinai after Israel's final withdrawal, scheduled
for April, 1982.
Prime Minister Menachem Begin recently pointed out that
the U.S. commitment for the force was "an integral part of the
peace treaty." Begin refused to explain, saying an interpretation
was unnecessary. But he was clearly implying, what some
Israeli officials have threatened publicly, not to go through with
the final withdrawal if the multinational force is not in place.
Creating such a force is not an easy matter. It appears
unlikely that it can be done through the auspices of the United
Nations as originally envisioned. The Arab rejectionist states
still have a majority of support behind them at the UN' in their
efforts to wreck the Camp David process. The Soviet Union is
certain to veto any attempt by the U.S. to have the Security
Council create such a force. So the U.S. must find the members
of the force itself.
That this is a difficult task explains why first the Carter Ad-
ministration and now apparently the Reagan Administration
have put off acting on the problem.
But it won't go away, and April, 1982 is not that far off. The
Begin government is pressing Washington for action, and
should the Labor Party win the June 30 election it is doubtful
they would be any less reluctant to leave the Sinai without an
international force in place.
The time to begin working on creating this force is now, before
the situation has time to develop into a crisis.
New Life Awards
Sunday evening, March 1, is an important date.
The Israel Bonds Organization will present its New
Life Awards at the Konover Hotel. These are im-
portant awards because they recognize those in-
dividuals who suffered the horrors of the
Holocaust, but who were nevertheless able to rebuild
a new life in the United States, distinguishing
themselves in Jewish communal service.
The awards March 1 will be given in two
categories, the Yad Vashem New Life Award and the
Yad Vashem Righteous Christian Award.
The presence of Joel Arnon, consul general of
Israel in the Southeastern United States, and the
sponsorship of the Israel Bonds Organization un-
derscore the relationship between the awards and
Israel itself.
The awards help us keep in mind the bitter
Holocaust past. At the same time, they underscore
the fact that out of the ashes of the European Jewish
tragedy emerged the modern State of Israel so much
of whose latter day economic development can be
traced to the Israel Bonds Organization.
The March 1 event and the Israel Sixth
Development Bond Issue are inextricably in-
tertwined in their purpose. Those to be honored
richly merit their awards. Those who participate in
the event will contribute to the richness of the event
itself and to the ongoing economic progress of the
State of Israel.
Urge Reagan to Conduct
Memorial at White House
A
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Four Senators and five members
of the House, all members of the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council, have asked President
Reagan to conduct this year's
observance of the "Days of
Remembrance" of the Holocaust
in the White House and that he
personally address the gathering.
The co-signers of a letter to the
President making the request are
co-sponsors of the legislation,
passed last year by both houses
of Congress, which'^established
the Holocaust MemorM&Council
as a permanent part of Iht federal
government.
THIS YEAR'S "Days of
Remembrance" will be held from
April 26 to Mav 2. The sigjjers of
the letter are Sens. John Dan-
forth (R., Mo.); Henry Jackson
(D., Wash.); Claiborne Pell (D.,
R.I.); and Rudy Boschwitz (R.,
Minn.)
The others are Reps. William
Lehman II).. Fla.); James
Blanchard ID., Mich.); William
Green (R.. N.Y.); Stephen Solarz
(D., N.Y.); and Sidney Yates 111.).
The letter stated: "For
millions of Americans of all
faiths, the Holocaust is an event
of deep emotional significance
and the effort to commemorate it
is a deeply spiritual one. It would
be uniquely.appropriate, for you,
as our President, to lead the
nation in expressing remem
br- victims of ty: y.'
Working To Save
The Endangered Species
|| MM HIIIUIIN
Plans for the Jewish Family
Life Conference on March 29 are
progressing well enough that the
planners in attendance recently
could take time out for a picture.
Seated are Victor Gruman,
Florrie Strauss and Marcia
Treby. Standing are Abraham J.
Giltelson, Rabbi Albert B.
Schwartz, Ted Sobo, Augusta
Zimmerman, Max Levine, Lorri
Blank, Harold Cohen, Sherwin
Rosenstein.
They represent the sponsoring
organizations for the Sunday,
March 29, session that, according
to a flyer that is being mailed to
interested persons, is aimed at
"YOU who are single, "solo
again," single parent, teen-ager
concerned about yourself and-or
your family, widowed, inter-
married or worried about inter-
marriage, and (most of all) YOU
who are interested in saving The
Endangered Species: The Jewish
Family.' "
The sponsoring organizations
include the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdaie, its
Chaplaincy Commission. its
Education Committee; the
Jewish Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdaie where
the sessions, key noted by Dr.
Carl Sheingold, will be held; the
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, and the
American Jewish Committee,
Florida Area.
Milton Keiner, president of the
Federation; Anita Perlman,
president of JCC, and Fred
Greene, president of JFS, have
given their unqualified endorse-
ment of the Family Life Confer-
ence which will have six
workshops devoted to the various
subjects of concern about today's
Jewish Family and its future.
Admission is open to all with a
$3 registration fee for adults, and
$1.50 for students under 19 years
of age. The fee includes lunch.
Use the coupon on Page 15'.. Full
details are available at the
Federation office, 484-8200, and
at the participating organiza-
tions.
Lorri Blank of AJCommittee,
who arranged for Dr. Sheingold's
attendance as keynote speaker,
said that he is the family life
specialist with AJCommittee and
is in demand to speak at family
life conferences.
Yosef Mendelevich Freed
FROM JTA
VIENNA. Austria Yosef
Mendelevich, a leading Soviet
Jewish dissident who spent 10
years in a labor camp in the Urals
for his part in an abortive hijack
attempt, arrived in Vienna
Wednesday en route to Israel.
In Moscow, Western officials
said they had received no ad-
vance word of his release, with
one saying, "It comes as a
complete surprise." Some
speculated the development
could be construed as an overture
to the Reagan Administration
while others said it may have
been designed to generate
positive news before the 26th
Soviet Party Congress convenes,
or was timed with the European
security and detente conference
in Madrid.
Purim 5741...
Let all among us
share
with our neighbors
especially those
. who are
in need
SHOW YOU CARE!
Make Your Commitment Before Purim March 20
1981 United Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Victor Gruman 6 fl|chard Romanof f
General Chapman Co-Chairman
Ethel waldman. Chairman, Women's Division i
UJA Jewish Federation {Of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
Leslie S. Gottlieb
Milton Keiner
'President
> ,t.r -, Executive Director
2999 NW 33rd Ave., Fort Lauderdaie 33311 Phone 484-8200


Teachers Have In-Service Workshop
"New approaches in the teach-
ing of the festival of PmW h
S2 theme for the fourth
rofessional growth "rservice
workshop for teachers of the
synagogues and day schools in
North Broward and South Palm
Beach counties to be held
Monday, March 9.
Learning centers will be set up,
each designed to concentrate on a
different phase of the holiday,^
including teaching the Hagad-
dah, songs, blessings, crafts,
prayers, history and concepts,
customs, ceremonies of the
festival. Teachers will chose
those areas most relevant to their
own needs, according to the
grade levels and subject areas
they teach.
Earlier in the school year,
teachers attended workshops
about the "Fall Festivals" of
Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur,
Sukkot; "TeachinR the Holiday
3rd Trimester For Judaica
High School Begins Mar. 10
Preparing for the third se-
mester of the Judaica High
School of North Broward.
sponsored by Central Agency for
Jewish Education of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale and North Broward
synagogues, a series of special
gue9t speakers met with the stu-
dents in their classrooms at the
Jewish Community Center, 6501
W. Sunrise Blvd.
And of special interest, prior to
the third semester start on Tues-
day evening, March 10, will be
the meeting, in each of the class-
rooms from 7 to 9 p.m., of the
students with two of their Israeli
counterparts, Tzvia Shperber and
Adi Elkeles, who were chosen by
the State of Israel's Education
Ministry to represent their
country in a teen age exchange
program in the United States.
The two teen-age Israelis will be
meeting Judaica High students
on Tuesday, March 3.
Judaica High includes 175
boys and girls from 8th through
12th grades in a community-wide
program including young
members of Temples Beth Israel,
Emanu-El, Kol Ami, Beth Orr,
Beth Am, Beth Torah, and
Ramat Shalom.
Among recent guest speakers
were Rabbi Ruben Dobin,
community leader involved in
issues relating to cults; a special
emissary who analyzed the
current relationship between
Israel and the United States, and
Israel and its Arab neightbors;
Mark Pollick, who is receiving his
doctorate in Holocaust studies
with Elie Wiesel at Boston
University; and Yossi Schochat,
shliach of CAJE, who spoke to
the classes on contemporary life
in Israel.
Among the third semester JHS
courses will be Comparison of
Jewish and American Law,
Contemporary Jewish Literature,
Books of the Bible, Jewish
Music, Israeli Dancing, Con-
temporary Jewish Thought and a
number of other stimulating and
relevant subjects.
JHS is under the overall
supervision of Rabbi Shimon
Azulay and Dr. Sandy Andron,
CAJE director of high school
programming for South Florida,
with Abraham J. Gittelson, Fed-
eration's director of education,
and Stephanie King, Federation's
curriculum consultant, coordina-
ting the program in cooperation
with the area's educational direc-
tors and congregational rabbis.
Michael Weinberg, chairman of
the Federation's Committee on
Education, noted that "the high
chool years are perhaps the most
vulnerable for the Jewish teen-
ager in choosing those values
which will motivate his life. The
Jewish studies of JHS- provide
the high school students with the
knowledge and attitudes neces-
sary for a commitment to the
Jewish people and Judaism."
of Hanuka", and "Tu B'Shavat
and Creative Teaching."
Michael Weinberg, chairman of
the Committee on Education of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, said that
"professional growth is an
essential element in continuing
effective teaching. The programs
of the workshops during the past
two years have provided teachers
with new insights, skills, and
competencies that are reflected in
enhanced teaching in each of the
schools in our community."
Workshop programs have been
planned by Educational
Directors of the community,
including Moshe Ezry of Temple
Koi Ami, Phyllis Chudnow of
Ramat Shalom, Stanley Cohen of
Beth Israel, Gladys Schleicher of
Emanu-El, Laura Zimmerman
and Ingrid Herman of Beth
Torah, Berte Resnikoff and Ann
Johnes of Beth Am, Barbara
Fellner of Beth Orr. Terri Swartz
of B'nair Torah, Robin Eisenberg
of Beth El, and Fran Merenstein
of Hebrew Day School.
Teachers took part in a special
program Feb. 15 at Temple
Emanu-El that focused on
"Effective Approaches to Use of
Textbooks." The resource leader
was Seymour Rossel, author,
educator, and co-editor of
Behrman Publishing House.
Recognizing the essential role
of the teacher in the educative
process, the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale has
established the Professional In-
centive Program, providing for
grants to those teachers who
participate in the professional
growth programs during the
year.
The entire program is coor-
dinated by Abraham J. Gittel-
son, Federation director of
Education, in conjunction with
Federation's Committee on
Education.
Lecture Series Speaker
Israel Raps Carter
Administration's
Final Rights Report
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Foreign Ministry
spokesman Naftali Lavie
was sharply critical of the
Carter Administration's
final report on human
rights throughout the
world, contending that its
criticism of Israel's policies
in the occupied territories
were unjustified and that
human rights violations in
some Arab acountries were
not sufficiently condemned.
The 1,140-page report on hu-
man rights in 153 nations in 1980
was prepared by the State
Department and released this
week. Its 19-page section on
Israel and the occupied territories
. < -- was longer than for any other
country. It had unstinted praise
for human rights practkes in
Israel which it described a* a
"parliamentary democracy with
high standards of justice and
human rights." But the report
observed that "sharply different
politico-social environments"
prevailed in the "Arab territories
Israel has occupied since the 1967
war."
"WE ARE amazed," Lavie
said, "to what extent they devote
to Israel while other Mid East
'democracies' are hardly men-
tioned." He said the State
Department report overlooked
Iraq's mass deportation of Shiite
Moslems and mass executions in
Syria. He contended that the re-
ports on Saudi Arabia and
Jordan were superficial. But
criticism of Israel's actions in the
territories were "very unjust and
not convincing," he said.
Lavie complained that the
State Department did not make
inquiries about alleged Israeli
misbehavior in the territories be-
fore condemning them. "We
would have expected that if
someone had any charges they
would at least ask for an Israeli
reply," he said. Ha said Israel
was preparing a reply to the re-
port which would be submitted
at the right place." .
Albert Vorspan, long-time vice
president of the Union of
American Hebrew Congre-
gations, director of the Com-
mission on Social Action of
Reform Judaism, author, and
serious, albeit whimsical at
times, lecturer, will be the
speaker, Monday, March 2, at 8
p.m. in the third of the four
community-sponsored lecture
series.
He will be speaking at Temple
Kol Ami, Plantation Jewish
Center, 8200 Peters Rd., Planta-
tion, on "Contemporary Issues of
Jewish Life" and how they affect
Jewish ideals and values, a
subject with which he is eminent-
ly knowledgeable about and with
outstanding credentials that
make his remarks completely
believable.
Author 11 years ago of the
humorous book, "My Rabbi
Doesn't Make House Calls," he
has also authored such serious
works as Great Jewish Debates <
Dilemmas, published by UAHC,
Jewish Values and Social Crisis,
and Giants of Justice.
He has also written on inter-
group relations for nationally-
distributed publications. He was
a leading participant in the civil
rights struggle, the peace
movement and interfaith ac-
tivities.
Series ticket-holders will have
a treat hearing Vorspan. Others
desiring to attend the Vorspan
ecture may do so by getting a
.icket for $2 if they are members
of one of the sponsoring organi-
sations, S3 for non-members at
-he Kol Ami door. Sponsoring
organizations for the series
coordinated by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale (484-8200) are
Temples Beth Am, Beth Israel,
Beth Torah, Emanu-El, Keter
Tikvah, Kol Ami, Sholom of
Pompano, Ramat Shalom of
Plantation, and the Jewish
Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale (792-6700).
12th Century Jew Became Bishop
PARIS (JTA) Catholic sources here recalled
that there is only one other known instance, besides that
of Msgr. Jean-Marie Lustiger, of a converted Jew
becoming Archbishop with the rank of Cardinal. Lustiger
will be officially elevated to the rank of Cardinal at the
next Consistory presided over by Pope John Paul II.
The Catholic church has had several Cardinals of
Jewish origin but only one other, Cardinal Pietro Pier-
leoni, who was born a Jew and later became a Catholic
convert. Pierleoni was baptized when he was 14, just like'
Lustiger, and appointed Cardinal by Pope Honorius II in
HOrx_______________________
F Travel with National council of Jewish women
K New 1981 Travel program available for Brochure call
;FeiiciaB.Sussman, 733-0662 or Ulv Lester, 484-3492
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PageZ
.ta* r-
,IBJ--J;.

'
L_
Biggest Attendance At A UJA Event
7^!
-"-----"KennethTCent (extreme left), of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale staff, presented
awards of merit to the chairmen |
of the five incorporated areas of
Sunrise Lakes III for their splen-
(did efforts in having more than'
650 persons in attendance Feb. 15
to hear Danny Tadmore and
make commitments to UJA
representing almost a 40 percent
[increase over last year's opening
effort. Receiving the awards from
left are Herman Goodman, Inc.
Meyer Cohen, Inc. 1; Connie
Nielsen, Inc. 3; Carl Orkin, Inc.
av Weiss, Inc. 5.
Italian Commies Shun Anti-Zionist Statements
By LISA BILLIG
ROME (JTA) Italian
Communists on principle refrain
from signing anti-Zionist
petitions because they feel such
acts might be interpreted as
being anti-Semitic as well as anti-
Zionist, two visiting Israelis were
told at a meeting at Communist
Party headquarters here. The
visitors are Eliezer Granot and
Dov Zakin, general secretary and
secretary for international af-
fairs, respectively, of Mapam. |
They came to Italy in the wake
Liberation Organization as a
"legitimate" representative of
the Palestinian people, they do
not consider it the "sole" rep-
resentative that the PLO claims
to be.
OBSERVES here have noted
that the Italian Communist
Party is not currently promoting
the Venice summit declaration on
the Middle East made by the
European Economic Community
(EEC) heads of state last June as
a "European alternative" to the
"American sponsored" solutions
for the Middle East. The Venice
of Mapam's affiliated Hashomer
Hatzair movement's over-
whelming victory in the Italian)
Zionist Federation elections and |
used the occasion to make
"cordial" contacts with several
Italian political parties.
Granot and Zakin told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency of
Kemp to Get^
Award
Top
NEW YORK Congressman
Jack Kemp (R., N.Y.) will
receive the 1981 Bnai Zion
America-Israel Friendship
Award on Sunday at the New
York Hilton Hotel before an
expected attendance of more than
1,500 persons in recognition of
Hta "outstanding contributions to
the furtherance of friendship be-
tween the peoples of both
democracies."
Announcement of the Award
was made by Paul Safro ol
Lawrence, N.Y., national pres
ident of Bnai Zion, the oldest
Fraternal Zionist Organization in
the United States, with an annual
membership of more than 30,000
families. Past recipients of the
Award have included Presidents
John F. Kennedy, Lyndon
Johnson and Gerald Ford.
Israel Ambassador to the
United States Ephraim. Evron
will extend greetings on behalf of
the State of Israel.
Congressman Kemp is
chairman of the House
Republican Conference, a
membV of the House Appropri-
ations', Committee, and widely
acclaiftoed as an influential
spokesman for human rights.
the "interesting exchange" that
took place between them and four
top officials of the Communist
Party in the course of a two hour
meeting. The Communist leaders
stated, they said, that while they
recognize the Palestine
Tax
Assistance
If you can use help with your
income tax returns if you have
questions that need answers
come to the following Broward
County libraries: Coral Springs
Branch, 9571 W. Sample Rd.
every Thursday and Saturday,
Feb. 5 through April 11;
Tamarac Branch, 8601 W.
McNab Rd., every Monday, Feb.
2 through April 13; Sunrise
Branch, 6600 Sunset Strip, call
library for information.
This tax help is available
through the Volunteer Income
Tax Assistance Program (VITA).
Find out everything you always
wanted to know about filing your
income tax returns but were
afraid to ask at vour local
library. This service is available
free of charge for anyone who"
needs help with tax questions.
Passover Seders
at Sunrise
Sunrise Jewish Center will
sponsor two Passover Seders to
be held at the Townhouse, 7786
NW 44 St., in Sunrise, on Satur-
day night, Apr. 18, and Sunday
night, Apr. 19. These seders will
be strictly kosher and full-course
dinners.
declaration called for association
of the PLO with the peace
process.
The Italian Communists also
said that they never officially
opposed the Camp David frame-
work, although they felt it was
nearing the exhaustion of its
possibilities, Granot and Zakin
reported. They said they told
their hosts that Zionism should
be considered as one of the move-
ments for national liberation
which incorporates many dif-
ferent shades of political opinion.
They suggested that the
Italian Communist Party
schedule a joint ideological
debate on Zionism at its head-
quarters. While they received no
immediate commitment to that
project, the Party reportedly
seemed open to suggestion.
AN ITALIAN Communist
delegation was due in Israel last
week to attend the Israeli
Communist Party convention.
Observers here believe the
Italians were interested in
meeting non-Communist Israeli
political figures, as well on their
trip.
The Italian Socialist Party
sponsored a Mapam conference
and held a dinner to honor
Granot and Zakin to which the
Israeli Ambassador, Moshe
Allon. was invited.
Ludwik Brodzki, North
Broward County Chairman of the
World Gathering of Jewish Holo-
caust Survivors, handed out
copies of the newly-issued
brochure (Cover pictured) of the
event of major historical signi-
ficance at a meeting last Sunday
morning in Temple Beth Israel,
Deerfield Beach.
The group in attendance was
fortunate in having Ernest W.
Michel, who has been taking time
from his work with the UJA-New
York City Jewish Federation to
assist in the planning of the June
15-18 World Gathering in Jeru-
salem, speak to them.
Michel, who had flown into
West Palm Beach for a meeting
there, graciously consented to
tell survivors of the plans that
are being developed in Israel,
including an all-day meeting of
the Second Generation, the
children of Holocaust survivors.
The Israel government has
authorized the issuance of a
special medal in honor of the
World Gathering.
T
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IIIVHrtVlJWLLET


Friday, February 27, 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page
Bonds Medallion to Entins
ip
*m
*
Roslyn and Edmund Entin
Roslyn and Edmund Entin will
receive the newly created Israel
Bonds 30th Anniversary
Medallion at a tribute dinner to
be held in their honor on March
15, at Woodlands Country Club
in Tamarac. The tribute is being
held in cooperation with the State
of Israel Bonds Organization.
According to Robert Adler,
Israel Bonds General Campaign
Chairman at the Woodlands, the
Entins are richly deserving of
"this great honor which Israel is
bestowing upon them." Adler
noted that the Woodlands
Community has a long record of
support for the Israel Bonds
Program and that this year will
be no different. He said: "We
know that Israel needs bond
Kirkland Urges
Japanese Labor
To Shun Arafat
WASHINGTON, D.C. -
AJ-'L-CIO President Lane Kirk
liitul iiild Japanese labor leaders
in Tokyo, where he visited
ti'iuly before attending ihe-
mization's meeting in South
Florida last week that an im-
pending visit to .Japan by PLO
leader Yasir Arafat at the in-
vitation of some Japanese par-
liamentarians was one (}iey
should shun. He expressed his
personal revulsion against the
PLO.
Kirkland's reiteration of his
past anti-PLO sentiments
sentiments frequently expressed
in both domestic and foreign
speeches was made known to
DOME! and SOHYO labor
officials, counterparts of the
AM.CIO.
Kirkland expressed dismay
that Arafat was scheduled to
meet with the Japanese Premier
and stressed to his labor hosts
that the expected visit could be
interpreted as violating the spirit
ol the Camp David accords as
well as giving respectability to
terrorism.
Kirkland's intercession against
the PLO and its leader Arafat
was revealed to Donald S. Slai-
man, president of Jewish Labor
Committee. Slaiman is an official
at the AFL-CIO headquarters in
Washington.
Leam
Interior
Decorating
Willsev institute
(305)947-4590
Free Brochure
dollars to continue development
of factories and agricultural pro-
jects and we intend to make this
our best campaign ever."
Entin has been Chairman of
Special Bank Purchases for Israel
Bonds in Broward County and
has served as General Chairman
and Dinner Chairman of several
Woodlands Bond campaigns. He
has served as United Jewish
Appeal Initial Gifts Chairman at
Woodlands and was Vice-Presi-
dent of the Board of Governors of
Woodlands Country Club.
He is a member of the Board of
Directors of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale
and chairman of its Community
Relations Committee. He is a
member of B'nai B"rith and an
Associate Fellow of the Anti-
Defamation League, in addition
to being active in numerous other
philanthropic and service organi
zations.
Mrs. Entin has been Co-chair-
man of the Patrons Division for
Woodlands UJA and is Chairman
of the Overall Women's Division
for Woodlands UJA. She is an
Executive Board member of the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale Federation and
Chairman of the Federation's
President's Council. She has been
active with the March of Dimes
and other philanthropic groups.
Co-chairmen of the event are
Sam Leber, Charles Locke, Ben
Eppy and David Miller. Dinner
Chairman is Leo Kaplan and
Women's Division Chairpersons
are Rosa Adler, Blanche Obletz
and Hazel Sharenow.
Novick-Millhauser
Lisa Novick and Howard Millhauser ex-
changed marriage vows on Sunday, Jan. 18, at
the Turnberry Isle Country Club.
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Novick, and attends Miami University
School of Law. Her bridegroom, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Leonard Millhauser, is president of
Capital Management Associates Inc.
Attendants at the ceremony were Karen
Novick, maid of honor, Bettsie Greenbaum,
Debra Rindenau, Gynnis Flood and Sandy
Milhauser, bridesmaids.
Morton Millhauser served as the
bridegroom's best man, and ushers were
William Westrich, Michael Linet, Mark
Silverman and Jeffrey Rubinstein.
**
Lisa Novick
Sadat Suggests Palestinian
Government-in-Exile
who has served previous Labor govern-
ments as well as the present Likud regime,
is expected to replace Ben-Elissar as Am-
bassador to Egypt. Foreign Minister
Shamir is expected to appoint him on his
return from his Washington visit.
The Cabinet, meanwhile, has approved a
206 billion shekel budget for fiscal year
1981-82. There was only a brief discussion,
and only Interior Minister Yosef Burg
voted against the budget on the grounds
that the local authorities were inadequately
Continued from Page 1
provided for. The budget was the first pre-
sented by Finance Minister Yoram Aridor.
Basically the work on it was done under his
predecessor Yigal Hurwitz, but Aridor did
introduce some changes such as a slight
increase in defense spending.
Aridor said the budget was based on pre-
dictions of 120 percent inflation in the 1981
calendary year and a 98 percent inflation in
fiscal 1981-82 a steady drop in inflation
so as to hit the double-digit line by the end
of the calendar year.


rageo
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, February 27,1981
Organizations In The News
rt
Shepard Broad
SHEPARD BROAD
NAMED HONOREE
BY HADASSAH
The Florida Mid-Coast Region
of Hadassah, has named Shepard
Broad, American Zionist activist
during Israel's War of Indepen-
dence, to receive its annual
Myrtle Wreth Award. The cere
monies will take place at a brunch
on Tuesday, March 10, at 11 a.m.
at the Holiday Inn, University
Drive, Plantation.
Esther Cannon, president of
the Region, will make the
presentation to Broad, currently
chairman of the board of
directors of American Savings
and Loan Assn.
Special guests will be
Hadassah Associates and
Hadassah's Life Members.
Membership chairman Adele
Lewis and Life membership
chairman Evelyn Wilpon are in
charge of all arrangements.
Hadassah's birthday this
Purim will also be celebrated at
the brunch. Anna Tulin, national
chairman of Oral History for
Hadassah, will present a nostal-
gic and emotional word picture of
Hadassah's years of splendid
achievements.
Shepard Broad will be remem-
bered as one of 17 influential
Jews in America who met pri-
vately With David Ben-Gurion at
the end of World War II to plan
for the re-establishment of Israel,
the Jewish Homeland. His life
from that time on reads as one of
the most exciting underground
dramas no fiction writer could
create.
Tickets for the brunch are
available from individual chap-
ters throughout Broward County
and South Palm Beach.
NORTH BROWARD ORT
Bea Forrest (pictured) of
Evanston, III., a member of the
Central Board of World ORT
Anna Tulin
(Organization for Rehabilitation
Through Training), was the
speaker at the North Broward
Region ORT "Mother-to-
Another" luncheon Feb. 9 at
Justin's. Georgia Adler was
chairman for the luncheon with
the contributions supporting
ORT's Social Assistance Project.
Her co-chairmen was Fredella
Harden. Fran Nowick entertained
with songs, including Mamaleh
(Mother) in honor of the occasion.
POMPANO JWV
INSTALLATION MAR. 1
. .The Jewish War Veterans
and Ladies Auxiliary Pompano
Beach Post will install officers at
a paid-up membership brunch at
10:30 a.m. Sunday, March 1, at
the Boca Raton Country Club,
7601 N. Country Club Rd.. Boca
Raton. Guests will be charged
S7.25 per person.
Pat Fine will be installed as
commander. Other officers are
Jack Malin, senior vice com-
mander; Al Chardis, first junior
vice commander; Al Rosen,
second junior vice commander;
Louis Eager, quartermaster;
Max Krasner, adjutant; Lester
Cantor, judge advocate; David
Skop, editor; Irving Chook,
David Skop, Milton Weinberg,
trustees.
EDWARD GOLDBERG JWV
Alton Zucker, state com-
mander of the Florida Jewish
War Veterans Department, will
be installing officer at the in-
stallation of officers of the
Edward Goldberg JWV at 10:30
a.m., Sunday, March 8, at Coral
Springs Masonic Lodge, 11030
Wiles Rd. Speaker will be
Mitchell Ceasar, grantsman and
lobbyist for Port Everglades
Authority and the cities of
Tamarac and Lauderhill. He'll
discuss Grants for the Commu-
nity and the Veteran. Willard
Zweig of Tamarac, taking office
as commander for the second
term, heads the list of officers.
NEW OFFICERS
SUNRISE JEWISH
CENTER SISTERHOOD
Rabbi Albert N. Troy, of
Sunrise Jewish Center, installed
the following new officers for the
Sunrise Jewish Center
Sisterhood: Shirley Rubin,
president; Molly Haber, Rene
Cohen, Pearl Altner, vice-
presidents; Fay Solof, treasurer;
Estelle Mitchell, Sarah Canter
Ann Druker, Secretaries.
RAISING FUNDS
fOR YOUR ORGANIZATION
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16548 N.E. 6th Ava., No. Mitfrni Baach 940-0220
CYPRESS
CHASE A PLAYERS
Pictured from left are some of
the Cypress Chase A Players
who'll take part in the three
weekend performances of their
"Star Spangled Revue" begin-
ning Saturday night, Feb. 28 and
Sunday, March 1: George
Vinegar is the Cowardly Lion in
"the Wizard of Oz" segment,
Dave Corell, Tin Man, Fran
Rosen is Dorothy Gayle and Phil
Paul is Strawman. The Male
Chorus includes George Vinegar,
Moe Althoz, Dave Corell, Milton
Steinback, Phil Paul, Dave Tyler.
In the forefront is Jean Gordon,
director and producer of the
show. The musical director is
Ada Greene.
The six performances will be
presented on the Saturdays and
Sundays at 8:30 p.m. in the
Cypress Chase A Clubhouse,
2999 NW 48 Ave., Lauderdale
Lakes. A portion of the proceeds
from the $3 reserved seat ad-
mission will be contributed to the
Israel Emergency Fund. Tickets
are available at the Clubhouse,
Sundays 11 to 1 p.m.; Wed-
nesdays and Thursdays from
6:30 to 8 p.m.
PROFESSIONAL
VARIETY IN MARGATE
Sam Bakal, presidentof B'nai
B'rith Men's lodge in Margate,
and the Margate B'nai B'rith
Women's chapter president,
Irene Berger, are combining the
memberships of their two
organizations to present their
Second Annual International
Musical Extravaganza at 8 p.m.,
Sunday, March 8, at Coral
Springs High School, 7201 W.
Sample Rd., for the benefit of
B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tions, the collegiate counterpart,
Hillel, Israel Children's Home,
and the Anti-Defamation League
(ADD of B'nai B'rith.
Paul Shelly and his Orchestra
will be providing the musical
background and accompaniment
for Rick Terry, multi-dialect
comedian who has appeared on
Broadway and Las Vegas;
Accordionist Frank Capri, also a
Las Vegas entertainer, and Paula
Wayne who co-starred with
Sammy Davis Jr. in Golden Boy.
Tickets are $4 and $5 from Chair-
man David Berger, Rose Gorky,
Lou Rosenberg, Bea Miller.
WYNMOOR ENTERTAINERS
The Wynmoor Entertainers are
presenting an original musical
variety show, written and
produced by Ceil Marlowe, and
directed by Gladys Taylor, four
evenings during the week of
March 31 in the Wynmoor
Village Grand Ballroom. Ceil
Marlowe, who studied under Otto
Cessano at Juilliard. has written
Commissioner Craft Buys First
Ticket For 'Celebration 33'
Lillian Silitsky, Florida Chair-
man for the Women's League for
Israel "Celebration 33" commit-
tee, sells the first ticket to the
Celebration 33 Theatre Party to
Howard Craft, Broward County
Commissioner. Ruth Sperber,
Florida Representative of the
Women's League, looks on.
Mrs. Sperber said that the
Women's League is participating
with 18 other organizations in
celebration of Israel's 33rd anni-
versary with the world premiere
TAPES
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BUSINESS FORMS
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of the motion picture, The
Chosen, based on Chaim Potok's
novel. The movie is expected to
be shown in 1,000 theatres on
May 11. About 500,000 people
worldwide, contributing $100
each, are expected to be in at-
tendance for what has been called
"The Biggest Theatre Party
Ever." j
Commissioner Craft wished all
participating organizations
success in the theatre which will
also include a star-filled enter-
tainment on film.
776-6272
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i



Congressmen Urge Reagan
to Aid Nazi Hunt
Pope Meets With Chief Rabbi

By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON A bi-
partisan bloc of 104 members of
the U.S. House of Representa-
tives has written President
Ronald Reagan asking him to set
aside $3 million in the new U.S.
budget for the continuing
prosecution of 18 cases against
alleged Nazi war criminals living
in the U.S. which are now before
the courts and 210 other cases
presently under investigation.
The investigations, the letter
pointed out, are under a special
unit the Office of Special In-
vestigations established in the
Criminal Division of the Justice
Department. The letter, initialed
by U.S. Reps. William Lehman
(I)., Fla.l and Hamilton Fish, Jr.
(R., N.Y.), said that the
proceedings are being directed
"by an extremely competent and
dedicated attorney. Allan Ryan."
The letter said that "because of
the ages of the suspects and
witnesses and the extremely
complex evidentiary and logistics
problems involved in these cases,
it is essential that prosecution be
brought expeditiously and
professionally.
The Congressmen noted that
the money involved "is a small
price to pay for reaffirming our
nation's commitment at
Nuremberg that none of those
who participated in Nazi
atrocities should escape being
called to account. It will also
serve as a warning that civilized
nations will never again tolerate
such base inhumanity."
Emphasizing that "our
government must not revert to
the intolerable situation of years
past when it seemed to be con-
doning by inaction the horrors of
the Holocaust." the letter
concluded, "We must, in the
limited time remaining, make
clear to the world that the U.S.
has not forgotten this un-
paralleled tragedy."
In a related development, four
Senators and five Represent-
atives, all members of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council,
have asked President Reagan to
conduct this year's observance of
the "Days of Remembrance" of
the Holocaust in the White
House. They also requested that
he address the gathering.
The co-signers of a letter to the
We do business
the right way.
1700 W. Oafclw* '** *
KLliftHllll* "
President making the requests
are co-sponsors of the legislation,
passed last year by both Houses
of Congress, which established
the Holocaust Memorial Council
as a permanent part of the federal
government.
This year's "Days of
Remembrance" will be held from
April 26 to May 2. The signers of
the letter are Sens. John Dan-
forth ((R., Mo.); Henry Jackson
(D., Wash.); Claiborne Pell (D.,
R.I.); and Rudy Boshchwitz (R.,
Minn.). The others are U.S. Reps.
William Lehmen (D., Fla.);
James Blanchard ID., Mich.);
William Green (R., N.Y.);
Stephen Solar/. (D., NY..): and
Sidney YateslD.. 111.).
The letter stated that "for
Millions of Americans of all
faiths, the Holocaust is an event
of deep emotional significance
and the effort to commemorate it
is a deeply spiritual one. It would
be uniquely appropriate for you,
as our President, to lead the
nation in expressing remem-
brance of the victims of tyran-
ny."
Meantime, in Cleveland, the
Justice Department produced
videotaped testimony from a
former German military officer
identifying John Demjanjuk as
"Ivan the Terrible" guard in the
Treblinka death camp. "Ivan"
lied about his Nazi connections to
gain U.S. citizenship. If found
guilty, he could be stripped of his
citizenship and face deportation.
IAKLAND TOYOTA
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Adult Community
4501 Treehouse I Lane
Tamarac
1 and 2 Bedrooms
with-Den
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Walk to Shopping
Telephone:
739-3585
945-5922 (Miami)
ROME (JTA) Pope
John Paul II and the Chief
Rabbi of Rome, Elio Toaff,
have met in what the
Jewish community offi-
cially termed "an event of
historical import" and
which most observers saw
as a calculated effort by the
Vatican to enhance its re-
lations with the Jewish
community which, gen-
erally, have been good.
The encounter took place in a
building adjacent to the Church
of San Carlo Ai Catinari on the
Piazza Cairoli, in the heart of the
Roman ghetto, the oldest in
Europe. The Pontiff was ac-
companied by Cardinal Ugo
Poletti and Msgr. Jorge Mejia,
Secretary of The Vatican
Secretariate for Religious
Relations with the Jews. Toaff
had with him Assistant Chief
Rabbi Alberto Piattelli and a
small delegation representing
Rome's Jewish community.
IT WAS the first time in the
2,000 years of variegated
relations between the Church of
Rome and the Jewish community
that a chief rabbi of the city has
accepted an invitation to meet
with a Pope. Although Rome's
Jews never suffered pogroms oi
similar persecutions, they hav
been, in past centuries, subjected
to many levels of humiliation,
including forced attendance at
sermons aimed at their con-
version in the very church
compound that was the scene of
the meeting.
Just two months ago, the
Pope's second Encyclical dealing
with distortions of justice in the
modern world, drew a sharp
reaction from Jewish circles
because of its reference to the
Biblical injunction, "An eye for
an eye, a tooth for a tooth," as
"the form of distortion of justice"
at the time of Jesus.
The Pope's decision to meet
with the Chief Rabbi of Rome and
the simultaneous publication in
the Vatican newspaper
L'Osservatore Romano of an
editorial entitled "Dives In
Misericordia: An Encyclical for
Chiristians and Jews" indicated
in an oblique way a desire to
assuage the feelings of Jews who
felt offended by the earlier
Encyclical which by the very
nature of an Encyclical, cannot
1 be rewritten.
TOAFF told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency later that
"This was a first contact. To
evaluate its impact, we will have
to wait for future developments."
That cautious appraisal was
shared by others in the Jewish
community who had hoped the
Pople would make some specific
apologetic reference to past
relations between the Church and
the Jewish community.
The Pope, however, limited his
comments to generalities. He
said in effect that it was good for
mutlal relations to emphasize the
present md above all the future.
I ie presented Toaff with a silver
Vatican medal and the other
members with copper medals.
He spoke of the Holocaust,
ihe great sufferings of the Jews,
the common religious heritage
that unites Catholics and Jews
and on themes touched by the
rabbi in his speech which stressed
the issues on which Catholics and
' Jews are united.
"THERE ARE manifold ele-
ments we hold in common in the
struggle we are forced to conduct
in the world surrounding us."
Toaff said, "a struggle for the
affirmation of the dignity of man,
intended as a mirror of the Divine
image, a struggle for the right to
life from its very first conception,
recognizing the right to give or
lake it away only to God."
That reference by Toaff to the
common position taken by
Catholics and Jews, at least the
Orthodox, against abortion was
. evidently appreciated by the
Pope, especially as the right of
choice in this matter has become
a heated political issue in Italy.
Toaff also spoke of a common
"struggle for the affirmation of
the values of the family, its unity
and its morality, a struggle
against the plague oi drugs which
kill the weak and rootless, and a
struggle for the realization of a
society that is more just, where
all can share those goods that
God has conceded to man .
And finally, the struggle for the
rights of man and his religious
liberty."
A STATEMENT issued after
the meeting by the Rome Jewish
Community declared: "In the
moment in which a Roman
Pontiff meets the Chief Rabbi of
Rome and representatives of the
Roman Jewish community near
the area which for over 2,000
years witnessed infinite pain and
both ancient and recent mour-
ning, the Jews of Rome recognize
this encounter as an event of
historical import and the real
point of departure
WORLD GATHERING COMMITTEE
Of North Broward County
Announces The Following
14 Day Package Tours to ISRAEL
From June 10-23,1981
For the World Gathering in Jerusalem of Jewish Holocaust Survivors.
(

WORLD GATHERING OF JEWISH HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS TRAVEL OPTIONS
Prices include: round trip airfare from Miami to Tel Aviv based on Super Apex fares, hotel accommodations,
service charges, daily Israeli breakfast, transfers from and to Ben Gurion Airport AVi days of sightseeing with
licensed guides, tour entrance fee, baggage handling, transfers to and from World Gathering events.
PLAN
"T" deluxe
"V" deluxe
'W" deluxe
'X" deluxe
'Y" 1st class "Z" 1st class
Hotel In
Tel Aviv
Tiberias
Jerusalem
Hilton
Plaza
Hilton
Dan
Plaza
King David
Diplomat
Plaza
Plaza
Diplomat
Plaza
Diplomat
Moriah
Kibbutz
Moriah
Marina
Kibbutz
Ariel
Price
$1,745
$1.717
$1.658
S1.557
$1.577
S1-494
Additional Cost
For Single
Accomodation
$407
$417
$340
$276
$222
$230
'subject to
Availably
Participation in the World Gathering requires a registration fee of $100 per person ($50 for children of sur-
vivors). This fee Is not included in the rate shown above. Departure will be on a specially arranged El AI Israel
Airlines 747 Jumbo Jet. For reservations or further information, you may contact your travel agent or one of the
following travel agents who are cooperating in this historic endeavor.
AIR & SEA TRAVEL SERVICE INC., 6229 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale 33308 491-1500 j
ALL-WAYS TRAVEL SERVICES INC44850 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Lauderdale Lakes 33313-1733-7270
TRIO TRAVEL, 5567 N. University Dr., Tamarac 33321 748-0067
WOODMONT TRAVEL, 6726 N. University Dr., Tamarac 33321 721-9590
TRAVEL TALK, 2542 N. 60th Ave., Hollywood 33021 987-9650
PORTS OF CALL TRAVEL, H20 W. Palmetto Park Rd., Boca Raton 33432 368-0124
North Broward World Gathering Committee
Ludwik Brodzki. Chairman
Jewish Federation Of Greater Fort Lauderdale
2999 N.W. 33rd Ave., Fort Lauderdale 33311
Phone 484-8200
_

.


TSnT


WECARE Recognition Day Draws 300 Volunteers
John DeGroot (left) colunnist for the Fort Lauderdale
Sun-Sentinel, gave a stirring talk to the more than 300
dedicated volunteers (some of them pictured in Soref Hall)
attending the 4th Annual WECARE Recognition Day.
Also pictured are Chairman of the Day Jerry Kaye and his
Co-Chairpersons Anne Gerson and Faye Steiner who pre-
sented awards to the volunteers following greetings and
expressions of appreciation from Rovi Faber, founder of
the concept ot securing volunteers With Energy, Compas-
sion And Responsible Effort (WECARE). Entertainment
was provided by the Lauderdale West Women's Club
members, pictured extreme right, who presented a
"Kooky" Fashion Show.
On behalf of the Jewish Community Center and the
entire community, JCC President Anita Perlman thanked
the volunteers for their service and commitment to the
program.
AT TEMPLE EMANU-EL
The Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-El held its Third Annual
Intra-Faith Workshop and Luncheon last month. The keynote
address was presented by Anita M. Perlman, president of the
JCC, pictured second from right with Estelle Wagner,
Workshop chairperson, Hilda Ivers, Sisterhood President, and
extreme right, Fran Smith, president of Temple Emanu-El.
JCC PROGRAM FEATURES
The Jewish Community Canter of Greater Fort Lauderdale, 6501 W.
Sunrise Blvd., Plantation, has a continuing variety of programs open
to members as well as non-members. For more information on any
program, call JCC, 792-6700.
WANDERLUST CLUB



V.
Wanderlust Club members,
pictured, made plans for two
trips, a "Weekend in Disney
World". March 27, 28 and 29, and
a visit to the Spoleto Festival in
Charleston, May 31 to June 5.
EVOLUTION OF ART
Surrealism will be the topic of
the Wednesday, March 11 lec-
ture, and United States
Creativity of the early 1900's on
Wednesday, March 25. Artist-
Lecturer, Hal Rackin will con-
duct both programs at 8 p.m.
BOOK REVIEW SERIES
Wednesday, March 4, Ben Zion
Eisenberg will review "The
Essential Talmud" by Adin
Stein-Saltz, and Wednesday,
March 18, Dorothy Rubin will
review "The Resorts" by Leo
Stein. Both reviews will begin at
8pm SR. ADULT CLUB
The Senior Adult Club will
meet on Thursday, March 5 at
1:30 p.m. After the business
meeting, the group will be en-
tertained by the "Lime Bay
Choral Group". Refreshments
will be served.
SINGLES 55 PLUS
Dr. Ken Rieger will discuss
"Human Sexuality and Com-
patibility" on Sunday, March 8
> at 7:30 p.m.
EAT AND LOSE WEIGHT
Have you always wished you
could eat what you want and lose
weight? JCC is now offering the
opportunity to do just that!
, Just for the Health of It", is a
lew two-part program designed
or men and women of all ages.
The program will be held on
Vednesday, March 4 and 11,
rom 8-9:30 p.m. Pre-registration
s required. Call Selma at JCC.
GRAPHOLOGY
The course in Graphology (art
f handwriting analysis) will be
eld iW tdneadays, March 4 and
1 fcjpttuced from Tuesdays,
farcftqAnd March 10) at 10 a.m.
eeiM$6.
AEROBIC DANCE
A super exercise class that
uses dance as a form of
movement, that swings, that's
fun, and exercise will begin for
12-week session Tuesday, March
10. The class meets Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 9 to 10 a.m. and
the sessions will continue until
Mfly28 JAZZERCISE
A dance fitness program that
anyone can do, that's
exhilarating but no reality to
work begins March 9 for four
week session, held Monday and
Wednesday, or Tuesday and
Thursday, from 7:30 to 8:15 p.m.
JUNIOR T BALL
This special program, for
children ages 5 years old through
2nd grade, divides the players by
age and grade into teams where
they will learn and develop their
skills. Everyone plays, bats, and
has plenty of fun. The program
begins March 30 through June
, 18, and is held Monday and
Thursday from 4 to 5:30 p.m. All
players will receive team shirts.
PING PONG TABLES
The Physical Education'
Department is in need of used
ping-pong tables and other table
games for the Center's Summer
Sports Camp.
IN CONCERT FEB. 28
Israeli operatic and concert
singers, Tibor Herdan and Stella
Richmond, (pictured), will be
appearing Feb. 28 under the
auspices of the JCC Cultural Arts
Department in Soref Hall.
The artists sing in many
languages: Hungarian, German,
French, Romanian, as well as
English, Hebrew and Yiddish,
and have performed regularly in
the Israel Orange Festival with
many conductors, such as Zubin
Mehta and Rafael Kubelick.
While in Fort Lauderdale, Tibor
and Stella will be the guests of
Mr. and Mrs. Israel Resnikoff.
The concert will take place
Saturday, Feb. 28 at 8 p.m.
Tickets are 96 and $7. ,
Fania Fenelon Speaks Mar. 17
Fania Fenelon. whose best-selling book, "Playing for Time,"
was made into a television film which featured Vanessa Red-
grave, the advocate of the Palestine Liberation Organization,
playing Fania's part, is coming to Greater Fort Lauderdale to
speak at the Jewish Community Center's Samuel M. Soref Hall,
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd., at 8 p.m., Tuesday, March 17.
Fania Fenelon, in 1943, was a Paris cabaret singer, a secret
member of the French Resistance opposed to the Nazi occupa-
tion and Jewish. Captured by the Nazis, she was sent to
Auschwitz where she became one of the legendary "orchestra
girls" who used music to survive the Holocaust. Her story, as a
TV event, produced by CBS-TV, proved to be one of the most
controversial films for TV ever produced because of the casting
of Redgrave in Fania Fenelon's role.
Tickets for the March 17 event are $5 for members, S10 for
non-members. A limited number of Patron Tickets at $18 for
members of JCC only are available. Patrons will attend a wine
and cheese party and have an opportunity to meet Ms. Fenelon.
Tickets are available at the Center.
The Hebrew Day School has
announced its enrollment
campaign for the 1981-82 school
year has begun. The Hebrew Day
School offers the finest quality
education in both the general
studies and secular areas for
children from four years of age
through the fifth grade. The
School, located on the Jewish
Community Center campus, is
completing its sixth year.
Committed to the philosophy
of individualization, class size is
generally limited to 15 children
per group. Holidays (like
Hanukah rehearsal pictured) are
part of the curriculum. In the
Pre-K the class size is 10 children
per teacher and two sections are
open. All teachers are certified,
most of them specialists in
reading, learning disabilities,
other specialties and hold ad-
vanced degrees.
Enrichment programs include
music, art, and a complete P.E.
program. JCC generously per-
mits the School utilization of its
Perlman campus and facilities,
such as the gymnasium, where
play is supervised, and Soref
The Pre-registration period for
current Hebrew Day School
parents and prospective families
continues to March 15. During
this period a generous discount
will be given on the tuition by the
completion of pre-registration
procedures by that date.
Last year there were several
classes that closed and waiting
lists were instituted. To assure a
place for fa child, it is suggested
that interested families contact
the Hebrew Day School office at
583-6100.
LEARN HISTORY
THROUGH PLAY
Robin Hood Players, Inc., on
Feb. 10, presented a play entitled
"Thomas Jefferson" for Hebrew
Day School children with the
three actors, Allen Isaac from
Clare, Mich., Guy Ellis from
Brooklyn, and Paul Buresh from
Feemont, Neb., performing for
the 110 students.
The play, aside from being a
cultural experience, was enrich-
ment for the school's Social
Studies program. Many of the
classes are studying about Pres-
idents of the United States and
American History. The audience
actually had a chance to "be
there" and share some of the
experiences that the country
went through in its infancy.
Audience participation further
heightened the enjoyment of the
program. The children sang
"Yankee Doodle Dandy" and one
student, Jessica Freedman of the
Pre-Kindergarten, even got to
refuse to sign a petition sent
around by the King. The entire
student body helped two rebels
escape one of the King's guards j
POLICE WORK
DETAILED
A representative of the
Plantation Police Department
visited the Hebrew Day School
on Feb. 10, But everything was in
order and there were smiles all
around.
Officer Al Dente, Plantation's
Community Relations officer,
poke to the Kindergarten
children about the role of the
police in their community and
their own personal safety. "If you
don't know, don't go" was Officer
Denies message to the children,
as he explained the reasons
children should not accept candy
or money from strangers, and
never to accompany them
anywhere.
The children were fascinated
with the policeman's equipment.
He passed around real bullets,
and handcuffs and explained why
one must be very careful when
around guns. Guns are not play-
things, the children were taught,
and should never be handled by
anyone except those adults who
have been properly trained in
their use.
Officer Dente left after a
question and answer period, but
promised to return soon with his
police car and let the children
examine it closely. They are all
looking forward to it.
TOUR DENTAL OFFICE
As part of the Social Studies
unit on community helpers, the
Kindergarten class of the Hebrew
Day School took a trip to Dr.
Margolin's dental office which is
located at 3880 Coconut Creek
Parkway, Pompano.
The children actually got to sit
in the dentist's chair while Dr.
Margolin explained what in-
struments he uses to detect
cavities and clean teeth.
Mrs. Sherman, one of the Kin-
dergarten teachers, demon-
strated how the new x-ray
machine is used. Mrs. Rimer's
Kindergarten class was
fascinated by the drill that
squirts water and the suction
instrument that works like a
vacuum inside the patients
mouth. At the end of the tour, the
children got a toothbrush and a
sugarless lolly pop to take home.
.*-


maian of ureater fort
t
A Special Tribute to Leo
T Scores of the more than 300 Keiner and her husband, Milton,
people from the Greater Fort who succeeded Leo as current
Lauderdale area and from president of the Federation; and
Teaneck and Bereen Countv. Ceil and Sam Goldfarb. A few of
N.J., eagerly greeted Carole and
,Leo Goodman as a special tribute
was accorded Leo, the immediate
past president of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. He served two terms
of inspired leadership of
Federation's expanding
programs. Among those present
Hop left standing): were Stella
the more than 30 tables in the
Woodlands Country Club are
pictured top right with table
centerpieces designed by Carole
Goodman.
The second row of pictures
shows Dinner Co-Chairman Jean
Shapiro and Alvin Gross, one of
the tight past presidents of the
Federation at the dinner; Rabbi
Phillip Labowitz of Temple Beth
Israel who spoke. (Other Rabbis
participating in the evening's
program were Rabbi Sheldon
llWIIlllWlliiWllirriiiiririiii
Harr of Temple Kol Ami, Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon of Temple Emanu-
El, Rabbi Israel Zimmerman of
Congregation Beth Hillel.) Anita
Perlman, president of the Jewish
Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, is pictured
slicing more challah after
making the motzi. Next to her are
the Ted Daren and his wife,
Gladys who is president of the
Federation's Women's Division.
And still another Women's
Division leadei gets a greeting
from Carole and Leo Goodman.
Pictured with them is Ethel
Waldman, general chairman of
the Women's Division's 1981
United Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign.
NEW JERSEY HONORS LEO GOODMAN
Third World Aims to Muzzle Free Press
Scarcely noticed in this land of
press freedom while the
presidential election sweepstakes
were conducted was the big news
that the Soviet and Third World
bloc were scoring a victory for
media control.
Our reference is to the outcome
of a meeting in Belgrade lasting
five weeks and bringing some
gAOOO delegates from 154 nations
alMether under auspices of
WNESCO (United Nationa
Educational, Social, and Cultural
Organization.)
While delgates from the free
world struggled to convince those
assembled to protect news-
gathering agencies from govern-
ment control, the Third World
bloc tried to push through a
nefarious resolution calling for
m*M* imposition of official stan-
dards for what the dictator
nations regard as responsible
reporting. It also opts for the
right of governments to license
journalists.
THE U.S., true to its com-
mitment to the UN and that
doddering organization's UNES-
CO, helps finance UNESCO.
Under the new guidelines, a part
of America's coin would be used
to pay for the propaganda
campaigns of the Palestine
Liberation Organization. Further
-damage may ensue when the
USSR uses the resolution to
torpedo any efforts to strengthen
human rights emerging from the
recent Helsinki conference.
Robert
Segal
Thus do the foes of a free press
sharpen their knives for their
battle to aid anarchies in their
efforts to stifle ugly truths about
imprisonment and other forms of
oppression.
Small wonder that as the Third
World bloc loudly championed
the call for government control of
news, the delegate from
Afghanistan Akhtar
Mohammed Paktiawal
declared he could not vote for the
resolution. While Soviet
delegates listened, the coura-
geous Afghan representative,
with the Russian invasion of his
country much in mind, fought for
the right of his news-gathering
media to tell the world the truth
about the USSR's assault on his
homeland. He brought some of
the delegates to their feet when
he said, "We have this problem
today; you will have it
tomorrow."
MEANWHILE, the American
media were making a few gains.
For example, President Carter, in
the fading days of his adminstra-
tion. signed a bill making it ille-
gal for police to invade news-
paper offices armed with
warrants to search at will for
tapes, files, and notes assembled
by news-gathererers. And over in
the Supreme Court, a ruling came
down eliminating an order for
Massachusetts judges to clear
courtroom doors and bar the
press from trials when rape
victims under 18 are testifying. A
few weeks later, a Westchester
County Court Judge refused to
bar the media from pretrial hear-
ings in the Herman Tarnower
murder case.
Along the way, the courts
guarded the public's right to view
videotapes of an Abscam trial
and thus to learn directly how
some of our national law makers
react when bribes are proffered.
This is not to say that
America's trust in the unfettered
right of media to gather and
disseminate news without proper
regard for consequences is not
occasionally put to tough tests.
MANY in this land of freedom
are annoyed by early east coast
conclusions in the presidential
|sweepstakes. It hurts to see the
contest for the White House
develop into a Hollywoodesque
spectacular.
But at least, we continue far a-
head of other nations on the score
of having our right to learn,
through the media, the truth
about almost everything worth
| reporting.
I i Ion

-
...
b;
THE SENATE
TAT* MOUSE THIMTON.
SENATE RESOLUTION
By Senator FiLDMAN
Adopted January 22. 1981
Whereas, Leo Goodman has led a distinguished life as evidenced
bv his numerous philanthropic and humanitarian commit-
ments; and.
Wheieas. Through his untiring efforts on behalf of the United
Jewish Appeal his naim has become synonomous with the
Jewish Federation of Grcan r Fort Lauderdale; and.
VC'heieas, Due to his dynamic leadership as the immediate presi-
dent of the Federation, many innovative programs were
developed; and.
WHIIIAS, Leo Goodman, a builder and realtor has been honored
b> the Societv of Fellows of the Anti-Defamation League;
and.
Wheikas, He is a life board member of the Teaneck Jewish
Community Center and a former Chairman of the Tcancck
United Jewish Appeal; and.
\\ hire as. He not only led the organizations which he has been
affiliated with to great heights hut has instilled in others
tremendous energy and devotion; now-, therefore.
Be II Rewired by the Senate of Sine of Sett Jtriey
That this House hereby honors Leo Goodman for his illustri-
ous achievements, honors him for his extraordinary record, com-
mends hit devotion to the welfare of the community and extends
best wishes for success in his future endeavors; and.
Be ll further Reiolved, That a duly Authenticated copy of
this resolution, signed by the President and attested by the
Secretary, be transmitted to Leo Goodman.
Am:
Preiidtml oj Ike Sen**.
imnmws % m 9mm,


BUaaaaBaBl
the words and music for 16 songs.
POM P ANO B'NAI
B'RITH PRESENTS
"SHOW OF STARS"
Pompano's B'nai B'rith Lodge
is presenting its first "Show of
Stars" at 8:15 p.m., Sunday,
March 29, in the new Omni Audi-
torium of Broward Community
College's North Campus, 1000
Coconut Creek Blvd., opposite
Wynmoor. Proceeds of the show
will benefit B'nai B'rith Founda-
tion, Hillel on the College Cam-
pus, and B'nai B'rith Youth
Organizations.
The performers include: Ben
Zuger conducting the nine-
member Florida Pops Musicale in
solo and ensemble numbers;
Lydia King, songstress; Dark)
Cassini who sings in nine
languages and will join Lydia in
duets, and the Everglades
Harmony Convention, a Barber-
shop quartet.
Reserved section seats are
$7.50. General admission is $5.
Irving Kaplan, 3300 N. Palm Dr.,
Pompano Beach 33060, is ticket
chairman.
TAX FORUM AT
BETH AM MEN'S CLUB
Five certified public ac-
countants: Bruce Shames,
Martin Katz, Irving Levine,
Barry Zimmerman and Ben
Dinkes, all members of the Men's
Club of Temple Beth Am of
Margate, will discuss and answer
questions about the 1980 in-
dividual income tax returns.
Dinkes, who is the Temple's new
office controller, has asked that
questions be submitted to him in
advance of the Men's Club
meeting 9:30 a.m., Sunday,
March 1. The tax forum will
follow the club's brief business
agenda. Wives of Men's Club
members are invited to this
meeting.
BBW
VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR \
A Love Luncheon sponsored
by the Lauderhill B'nai B'rith
Women for the benefit of the
Children's Home in Israel for
emotionally disturbed boys will
be held on March 11 at the
Inverarry Country Club. Ruth
Glassberg will be the recipient of
the Outstanding Volunteer of the
Year award, for her work in B'nai
B'rith, and for service to the
Lauderhill Community, to the
Castle Theater Group, Children's
Theater, Women's Club and
Lauderhill Hebrew Congregation.
International past president of
B'nai B'rith and currently presi-
dent of the Greater Fort Lauder
dale JCC. Lee Wexler past B'nai
B'rith president is chairperson of
the event. The Children's Home,
a unique residential treatment
center attracts mental health
experts from all over the world. It
is supported entirely by the B'nai
B'rith Women.
HONOR PYTHIAS COHEN
In recognition of his exemplary
work as the district deputy of the
10th Florida District Knights of
Pythias, the Margate Lodge
Pythias is sponsoring a testi-
monial dinner dance in honor of
Past Chancellor Bernie H. Cohen,
at 7 p.m. Sunday, March 8, at
Justins, Mercede Americana
Plaza. 3800 N. University Dr.,
Sunrise. AU Pythias Knights are
invited. Donation is $17.50 a
person.
Sarasota Minister
Hits Missionary Plan
B'NAI B'RITH LODGE
HOLDING SEDERS
B'nai B'rith, Plantation Lodge
will hold its Eighth Annual
Passover Seders on Saturday
evening, Apr. 18, and Sunday
evening, Apr. 19, at the Holiday
Inn Plantation, Sunrise Blvd.
and University Drive. Services
will be conducted by Jack Fish-
man, Reb Yoney.
For reservation or information
call: Bob Jackson, Murray
Rosenberg, or Irving Friedman.
NATANYA
PIONEER WOMEN
Natanya Pioneer Women on
Wednesday, March 4, at noon,
will have its Spiritual Adoption
Luncheon at Holiday Inn, 5100
N. State Road 7, for Chai con-
tributors. There will be a musical
program with Mrs. Miriam Breit-
man, soloist, accompanied by
Mrs. Miriam Duke at the piano.
Slides depicting the work of Pio-
neer Women in children's homes
in Israel will be shown by Sylvia
Snyder, a former member of the
National Board of Pioneer
Women.
On Friday evening, March 13,
the group will be hosts at the
Oneg Shabbat following services
at Temple Beth Am in Margate.
Guest speaker will be Mrs.
Mildred Weiss, area coordinator
of Pioneer Women.
Speaking about the Children's
Home will be Anita Perlman,
On Wednesday, March 18, a
regular meeting will be held at
12:30, in the lounge of the Boca
Raton Federal Savings and Loan
Bank, 1334 N. State Road,
Margate. A Purim program has
been arranged featuring Mrs.
Mildred Epstein, Jewish
humorist.
Begin Pleased By
Sadat, But PLO
Words Worry Him
SARASOTA A
Sarasota Reform rabbi re-
ported that a Christian col-
league had shown him a
copy of a letter sent to all
Christian clergymen in the
Sarasota area inviting them
to attend a special event or-
ganized to induce Jews to
convert to Christianity.
The disclosure was made by
Rabbi Ahron Opher in his Temple
Emanuel bulletin and reprinted
in the Sarasota Chronicle, the
publication of the Sarasota
Jewish Federation.
Opher reported that the
message had been sent by Dr.
Robert Shamsey, a missionary to
Jews, for the event to be held on
Feb. 17 in the Sarasota Exhibi-
tion Hall.
IN A circular letter, Opher
wrote, Shamsey had urged the
recipient Christian ministers "to
publicize their proselytizing proj-
ect in their churches to urge their
parishers to bring their Jewish
neighbors to that performance in
order that they be persuaded to
accept Jesus as the Messiah."
Opher reported that Shamsey
sent to the Christian clergy,
along with the invitation, a de-
scription of an organization
"which he heads and calls "Hear
O Israel,' whose purpose it is to
disguise Christian proselytizing-
broadcasts-and telephone-mes-
sages-program 'in the Jewish
frame' so that listeners would
think they are spoken by Jews
and thus be more easily per-
suaded."
Opher wrote that his Christian
colleague commented to the
rabbi, "as you well imagine, I
want absolutely no part, of this
and shall so tell them." Opher
added: "Need I add that no self-
respecting Jew will be seen in the
vicinity of the Exhibition Hall"
on Feb. 17.
THE RABBI said "this Dr.
Shamsey is the same fellow with
whom I corresponded at length
early last year when he first
launched his project of pro-
selytizing Jews. At that time, I
guarded his anonymity. Now I
am no longer obliged to do so."
At that time, Opher wrote, he
took issue with "this born-again
Christian pediatrician on several
points."
Opher reported that, first, he
took exception to the "dis-
honesty in disguising a Christian
program in Jewish terminology
and symbols, thereby intending
to mislead Jewish audiences into
thinking that it is a Jewish radio
program, sponsored by a Jewish
organization called by a Jewish
name which is the watchword of
our faith: Hear O Israel."
He added he told Shamsey that
"the same deception" was in-
volved in calling the Exhibition
Hall program "The Liberated
Wailine Wall, so that Jews may
be won over 'in a non-threatening
atmosphere'-"
SECOND, he wrote, he took
issue with "the missionary's
repeated mistranslations of our
Hebrew Bible to 'prove' a doc-
trine which runs counter to the
very essence of Biblical
teachings."
His third reaction he reported,
was an expression of resentment
"at this person's arrogrance in
claiming that he possessed the
only access to God's truth and
denying other religious folk the
right to their faith."
Opher added that "we Jews
have been exposed to, often
abused by, and sometimes
amused by, those who claim to
have the only key to Heaven,
seeking to persuade us or to
bludgeon us into their brand of
salvation but we will always heed
the teaching of our prophets: Let-
all men walk in the path of their
tradition and we will cleave to our
faith and live by the covenant of
our fathers."
The issue of the Chronicle
which reprinted Opher's report
carried an editorial comment that
"because Federation condemns
what Robert Shamsey stands for,
but condones his right to freedom
of speech, we publicize his acti-'
vities and Rabbi Opher's objec-
tions, trusting our Jewish com-
munity will recognize that we
cannot remain silent and dis-
interested when such a challenge
confronts us."
The comment concluded: "We
have to take care of our own. Let
us continue to fight bigotry and
prejudice with unremitting zeal."
French Jews Accused Of
Exaggering Anti-Semitism
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The Jews
of France have been accused of
having "exaggerated" recent
anti-Semitic incidents in France
and of "exasperating" their non-
Jewish fellow citizens. The ac-
cusation appeared in a front page
article in Le Monde written by
Jean-Marie Paupert. a noted
writer and philosopher, who
stressed that there are Jews in
his family and that he cannot
therefore be suspected of harbor-
ing anti-Semitic sentiments.
Paupert stressed in his article
that there can be no comparison
between what happened at the
time of the bombing of the Rue
Copernic synagogue in Paris last
October and I he situation winch
existed in Germany in the 1930s.
Such a comparison, he wrote,
would seem to indicate that
within Jews, "hidden somewhere
at the bottom of your souls is a
masochistic streak which tries to
discern anti-Semitism in order to
be miserable and unhappy and to
shout for justice."
THE ARTICLE, which ap-
peared as a "private opinion"
column but which was
prominently displayed on the
paper's front page, denounced
the Jewish Defense Organization,
a group of young Jewish mili-
tants which became prominent
after the synagogue bombing for
striing back against those whom
they identified as neo-Nazis.
l'.ni|M'il wrote th.il nieinliersol
lilt l^illl/.ll Mill ll.lM In ll.l\ |i' '
like vulgar Nu/.i hooligans, using
threats, libel, sticks and knives."
lie uddetl that I would have
lieen an anti-Semite if I would not
have pxpnwwd myself clearly on
l lus .lUKJet t.
Sources close to I* Monde U>ld
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that they received "countless"
pleas from readers and contribut-
ing editors to express their exas-
peration with the Jewish com-
munity's reactions following the
synagogue bombing.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Menachetn Begin said
that he was pleased by President
Anwar Sadat's solid commitment
to the Camp David process,
expressed in his speech to the
Parliament of Europe in
Luxembourg. But he was less
happy with Sadat's support of
Palestinian self-determination.
Speaking to reporters, Begin
noted with satisfaction that the
Egyptian leader ignored the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion in his speech and stressed to
the Europeans that ha had "not
Looms sell out Camp David."
That, said Begin, was a "positive
pronouncements"
However, h* availed that at
his summit mon with Sadat
in Ismailia in 14> Camp David, Iaraasuatlly re-
jected Palestinian self-
determination "because it means
in plain terms a Palestinian state
i
which would be a mortal danger
to Israel"
BEGIN APPEARED to be
optimistic of getting the
autonomy talks underway again.
He said if the Egyptians are
ready to resume the negotiations,
significant progress could be
made before the Knesset elec-
tions June 30. Israel has not been
told explicitly by Sadat that he
did not want to resume the talks
at this time. Begin said, adding
that Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir would be discussing that
matter when he meets with
Secretary of State Alexander
Haig in Washington this week.
Asked about prospects of his
meeting with President Reagan,
Begin said that "depends on
Reagan. If he invites me, I will
go." But, he added, he would not
"invite myself, neither directly
nor indirectly." So far, no signals
have emanated from Washington
that Reagan was likely to extend
an invitation at the present time.
*
S
ft
i
i
*<
Southeast District American Red Magen David
For Israel Cordially Invites You to the Annual
ARMDI-Samuel Reinhard
Humanitarian Annual
Award Dinner
Cocktails 7:00 p.m.
Couvert.SlOO
Honoring
Mayor Murray Meyerson
Of Miami Beach
1981 Recipient
Sunday, April 12
Konover Hotel Konover Ballroom
Dinner &00 p.m.
5i
Tibor Hollo
Dinner Chairman
For Reservation Call 9473263
Dietary Laws Strict ley Observed
David Coleman
Southeast District ARMDI Chairman
Robert Schwartz
Southeast ARMDI District Dir.
u;




i>ruary 27,1961
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort
[chools Seek to Correct
Views of Arab Guide
ByALANHITSKY
DETROIT (JTA) -
Jewish teacher's ob-1
tions to omissions and
Accuracies about Jews in
Arab ethnic guide pro-
ced by the Detroit public
tools has led to an official
;ommendation that the
ide be withdrawn and
rected.
[Doris Yehiel, a teacher at the
ayling School, objected to a
ip of the Arab world in the
tide which identified Israel as
krab land occupied by Israel."
i also objected to the listing of
jsalem as a city on the West
ik of Jordan rather than as
irael's capital and the iden-
t'ing of costumes as coming
am Syria and Palestine rather
of Syria and Palestinian
abs.
ludaism was included among
three major religions in the
ea but Jewish holidays were
>( listed with the Christian and
ilamic holidays.
kCCORDING to an article in
Jan. 26 issue of the Detroit
leration of Teachers news-
oer, Yehiel first raised her
objections with the administra-
tion of the Detroit Public Schools
Region (>.
Based on her complaint and
those of other Jewish teachers,
region superintendent Seymour
Gretchko had the guide with-
drawn. Yehiel then took the issue
to Detroit's central administra-
tion. After a review of the guide
4fcMd the objections, Dr. Marvin
Greene, assistant superintendent
for curriculum, and other ad-
ministrators recommended that
the guide be withdrawn.
Abram Sachar
Chancellor Emeritus
WALTHAM, Mass. Dr.
_,m Leon Sachar, founding
ident of Brandeis University
r 1948 until 1968 when he was
named chancellor, has become
chancellor emeritus effective this
week
Acknowledged as the person
most responsible for the quick
financial growth and academic
success of this, the nation's first
jrish-sponsored, nonsectarian
versity, it is estimated he has
several hundred million
. for the institution that
rjed in 1948 with a handful of
buildings, 107 students and a
faculty of 13.
Today, its faculty exceeds 400,
its student population is ap-
r nately 3,500, and its
.aical plant includes more than
Buildings set on 270 acres. It is
ranked among the top
ste, liberal arts institutions
j country, as well,
/hen at 49, he was chosen
Bident of fledgling Brandeis,
Sachar had recently left the
liversity of Illinois on whose
faculty he had served.
iter, he became national
jr of the Hillel Foundation,
fiding it into 186 units on
campuses in America and
eas.
rael Tennis Juniors
it Palm Aire Mar. 4
[Israel Tennis Center's Coach
Jomo Achoff is bringing his
tented junior tennis players
om Israel to put on a series of
nibition matches March 4 at
World of Palm Aire in
operation with the Israel
snnis Organization. The
atches will begin at 1 p.m. at
Oaks Tennis and Racquet
j in Palm Aire. Call Tennis
._ Mike Applebaum at Palm
lire 972-3300 for more uv
Drmation.
"In its place," Greene told the
Detroit teachers' newspaper, "we
are recommending that a writing
team, independent of special
interest groups, utilizing the
services of consultants, develop a
guide that will include the
cultural and historical
development of the various
ethnic groups in the Middle East.
"WE ARE aware that at the
middle and senior high level the
course might have to be taught in
the context of controversial
issues. We would hope that our
students would be well-informed
and yet not captives of any single
disputed point of view."
Greene was not immediately
available for comment, and his
office could not say whether the
guide had already been with-
drawn from Detroit schools.
Yehiel was quoted by the Detroit
teachers' newspaper as saying
that the guide provided valuable
information for students learning
about peoples from Arab lands.
But she said it was insensitive in
its approach to Israel and the
Jewish people.
The Detroit News reported
that the author of the guide and
the leaders of Detroit's Arab
community were upset by the
controversy.
HAIFA FAKHOURI,
executive director of the Arab-
Chaldean Social Services Council,
wrote the guide and said she was
shocked that she had not been
notified of the objection of given
a chance to discuss possible
corrections.
Arab leaders here were out-
spoken about the recom-
mendation to remove the guide
and called for letter-writing
campaigns and bringing the issue
to the attention of the American
Arab Anti-Discrimination
Committee in Washington.
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-I1I -- -
i age
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, February 27, 1
Community
Calendar
B'nai B'rith Inverrary Chapter -
General meeting, Inverrary
Country Club Noon.
Hadassah Inverrary Gilah
Chapter Board meeting, Colo-
Chapter-B.lheHyman interprets nadeS Clubhouse, N.W. 56th
Story of Kathenne Hepburn Ave., Lauderhill -10 a.m.
Castle Garden Clubhouse| National Council of Jewish
MONDAY, March 2
Temple Emanu-El Games 7:15
p.m.
Hadassah Armon Castle Garden
Auditorium Noon.
OUT Ocean Mile Chapter -
General meeting, Jarvis Hall-
11:30 a.m.
Hadassah Bat Ami Tamarac
Chapter General meeting
Tamarac Jewish Center, 9101
N.W. 57th St., Tamarac 12:30
p.m.
Temple Kol Ami Sisterhood -
Plantation Executive meeting
Temple 8 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Chapter 345 Board
meeting, Southern Federal Uni-
versity Dr. & Sunset Strip.
Brandeis Inverrary-Woodlands
Chapter Board meeting 1 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El Couples Club -
Meeting-p.m.
Hadassah Plantation Yachod
Board meeting 12:30 p.m.
Hadassah Boca Raton A viva
Chapter Youth Aliyah Lunch-
eon, Bernards, 11:30 a.m. Guest
speaker & entertainment.
Reservations.
TUESDAY, March 3
Temple Sholom Sisterhood
I'ompano-Board meeting, 10 a.m.
Temple Kol Ami Plantation-
Executive meeting, Temple 8
p.m.
Mizrachi Women Maaada Chap-
ter General meeting, Temple
Beth Israel Noon. Speaker,
Itabbi Albert Schwartz. Refresh-
ments. Husbands and guests
nvited.
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood -
Board meeting 9:45 a.m.
'ioneer Women Sunrise Chap-
er General meeting. Whiting
I.ill Purim program with
I'hoebe Negelon Sunrise Singers -
Mini-lunch- 11:30 a.m.
WEDNESDAY, March 4
Temple Beth Israel Games -
30 p.m.
Hebrew Congregation of I.under
iill Board meeting 9:30 a.m.
Yiddish Culture Club Meeting,
atellite Clubhouse 15 Sunrise
akes Phase I
I'ml B'rith Holiday Springs
odge Board meeting Club
Use (131 Holiday Springs
lvd- 10 a.m.
Women No. Broward Section
Board meeting -10 a.m.
ORT Ramblewood East Chapter
- General meeting, Ramblewood
East Condo 12:30 p.m.
Brandeis Fort Lauderdale-
Pompano Chapter Board
meeting
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael Sis-
terhood Board meeting -1 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El Men's Club -
Board and General meetings 8
p.m.
1 Broward County Commission on
The Status of Women Meeting,
Broward County Courthouse -
7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY. March 5
Temple Beth Israel Games -
12:30 p.m.
ORT No. Broward Region -
Executive Committee meeting,
Women's American ORT Region
Office, 5482 N.W. 19th St.,
Lauderhill -10 a.m.
B'nai B'rith Sunrise Chapter -
Paid-up membership installation
lunch. Nob Hill Recreation Cen-
ter 11:30a.m.
Natanya Pioneer Women Board
meeting, 1303 State Rd. No. 7,
Margate- 12:30 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Lakes Chapter -
Board meeting
Hadassah liana Hawaiian Gar-
dens Chapter Board meeting
B'nai B'rith Plantation Lodge -
Installation, Awards, Speaker,
Hank Meyer, President-elect,
Florida B'nai B'rith Lodges,
Deicke Auditorium, Plantation -
8p.m.
FRIDAY, March 6
Brandeis Fort Lauderdale-
Pompano Chapter New Books
for Old-Sale
SATURDAY, March 7
Jewish Community Center First
Annual Open Air Art Festival
p.m.
Jewish Federation Attorney's
Division Dinner at Justine -
p.m.
Cypress Chase "A" Players
Presenting "A Star Spangled
Revue" 8:30 p.m. Tickets: S3 -
For more information write.
Hadassah Beques'-
50 West 58th Street
New York, N.Y 10019
(212) 355-7900
SUPPORT ISRAEL
rodav,Tomorrow,Forever.
A BEQUEST TO HADASSAH
INSURES THE FUTURE
OF ITS PROGRAMS IN
MEDICINE, EDUCATION &
YOUTH REHABILITATION
Reserved seats. Cypress Chase
"A" Clubhouse. Future dates of
the show are: March 8,14,15.
SUNDAY, March 8
Temple Emanu-El Youth Group -
Meeting
Jewish Community Center First
Annual Open Air Art Festival -
All day.
Temple Beth Torah Tamarac
Games 7 p.m.
Temple Beth Hillel Games
Early Bird 7 p.m. Regular -
7:30 p.m.
ORT Ocean Mile Chapter -
Coconut Grove Theatre All day.
Hadassah Shalom Sunrise
Chapter Musical Extravaganza
- "From Broadway With Love" -
Temple Emanu-El 8 p.m.
MONDAY, March 9
Temple Emanu-El Games -7:15
p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Alione
Group Board meeting, Temple -
7:30 p.m.
Hadassah Kadima Chapter of
Century Village, Deerfield
Board meeting, Temple Beth
Israel, Century Village.
BBYO Board of Directors
Meeting, So. Broward Federation
-8 p.m.
Hadassah Tamar Chapter -
Lauderdale Lakes General
meeting, Lauderdale Lakes City
Hall. Noon.
National Council of Jewish
Women Plantation Board
meeting- 7:30p.m.
B'nai B'rith Deerfield Beach -
Executive meeting. Chamber of
Commerce 1 p.m.
Hadassah Aviva Oakland
Estates Chapter Board meeting,
American Savings Bank, Com-
mercial Blvd. and 441 -1 pjn.
Hadassah Plantation Yachod -
General meeting, Deicke Audi-
torium 12:30 p.m.
American Mizrachi Women -
Golda Meir Chapter Purim
Luncheon and Card Party,
Temple Beth Israel, Century Vil-
lage $3 admission Noon.
National Council of Jewish
Women Gold Coast Section -
General meeting. Coconut Creek
Community Center Auction.
TUESDAY, March 10
Temple Sholom Pompano -
Board meeting 8 p.m.
Hebrew Congregation of Lauder-
hill .Sisterhood Board meeting.
Hebrew Congregation ol Lauder-
hill. 2048 N.W. 49th Ave. 10
a.m.
Hadassah Pine Island Ridge
Chapter General meeting, Club-
house Noon.
Hadassah Rayus Tamarac
Chapter Board meeting, Temple
Beth Torah, 9101 N.W. 57th St. -
Noon.
ORT Inverrary Chapter -
Seminar 8 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, March 11
Temple Beth Israel Games -
7:30 p.m.
Hadassah Bermuda Club Herzl -
Membership meeting, Bermuda
Club Recreution Hall Residents
only 1 p.ih.
Sunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood
Board meeting. Temple 10 a.m.
Natanya Pioneer Women Gen-
eral meeting, 1303 Slate Rd. No.
T.Margate- 12:30 p.m. -
B'nai B'rith Lakes Chapter -
General meeting, Lakes City Hall
-1 p.m.
-WoiWo--
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Large Florida Croup
- HIGH IN THE BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS -
CAMP WOHELO for amis
MORGAN LEVY. DIRECTOR
CAMP COMET fop boys
HARRY PURE, DIRECTOR
COMET TRAILS for teenage boys
QUALITY 8 WEEK CAMPS COMPLETEL Y SEPARA TE FACILITIES
Summti Addriss
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Telephone: (3061 261 1500
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2 photo labs 2 theaters. 3 dining rooms. 320 acres of beaSmSnl ain
forest w.th trails and streams. Mature, well qualified sulfl
Staff Inquiries Invited
B'nai B'rith Inverrary Lodge -
Board meeting, Temple Beth
Israel -8 p.m.
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee W. Brow-
ard Section Meeting 12:30 to 3
p.m.
ORT Woodlands North ORT
Day.
Hadassah Boca Raton Aviva
Chapter Board meeting.
B'nai B'rith Women Lauderhill
Chapter Luncheon honoring
Ruth Glassberg, Inverrary Coun-
try Club. Proceeds for Children's
Home in Israel.
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee W. Brow-
ard Chapter General meeting,
Deicke Auditorium. Guest
Speaker, Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr
of Temple Kol Ami, "Modern
Role of Jewish Women" Noon.
National Council of Jewish
Women No. Broward Section -
Luncheon and Card Party at the
"Bridge Club" 4436 Inverrary
Blvd. Noon.
Pioneer Women Negev Chapter
- Deerfield Beach Jewish Music
Month Program, narrated by
L'stelle Rapapport. sung by Kate
Greenberg with Florence Smith
at the piano. Temple Beth Israel.
Deerfield Beach.
THURSDAY, March 12
Temple Beth Israel Games -
12:30 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Women Hope
Chapter Plantation Board
meeting a.m.
Hadassah Blyma Chapter -
Margate Board meeting, South-
ern Federal Bank, Atlantic Blvd.
and State Rd. No. 7 -10 a.m.
Temple Kol Ami Plantation -
Board meeting, Temple 8 p.m.^
ORT Tamarac Chapter BoilR
meeting. Sambo's 11 a.m.
Temple Emanu-El Executive
Committee Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Hadassah Sunrise Shalom
Chapter Meeting, Tamarac
Jewish Center 9101 N.W. 57th
St. Refreshments.
American Mizrachi Women -
Tamara Chapter Annual Fund-
raising Luncheon and Card
Party, Galahad III Recreation
Room, 3901 S. Ocean Dr., Holly-
wood Noon
Hadassah-Scopus of Deerfield
Beach, Cantata by Ruth Rusoff-
Cohens "Singers in Harmony."
S2.50 contribution to Youth
Aliyah. Temple Beth Israel,
Deerfield Beach 7:30 p.m.
SATURDAY. March 14
National Council of Jewish
Women Plantation Mystery
Night p.m.
Sunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood
- Purim Dance. Temple $3 Re-
freshments 8p.m.
SUNDAY. March 15
Temple Emanu-El Breakfast -
10 a.m.
Temple Beth Torah Tamarac -
Games 7 p.m.
Temple Sholom Men's Club -
Pompano International Theatre
and Musical Festival "La
Bianca" 8 p.m.
Temple Beth Hillel Games -
Early Bird 7 p.m. Regular -
7:30 p.m.
n -
France, Egypt in Agreement
On Eight Nuclear Reactors
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS and Egypt have reached a tenta-
tive agreement for the construc-
tion of eight nuclear power
stations in Egypt. President
Anwar Sadat, on a three-day
visit, announced the project at a
meeting with Egyptian students
here.
The agreement was signed by
French Minister for Energy
Andre Giraud and his Egyptian
counterpart, Ahmed Ez/.edine
llillal. before Sadat'a departure,
ft is understood that the project,
one of the most ambitious yet
developed by a Third World
country, will provide all ol
Egypt* electric needs by the end
French and Egyptian sources
stressed that the Franco-Egypt-
ian nuclear cooperation program
will be geared exclusively to
peaceful usages. Other sources in
Paris stressed, however, that the
development of a nuclear indus-
try
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Our experience and expertise in
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weight reduction or teen tour*.
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ADVISORY SERVICE
ON CAMPS PRIVATE SCHOOLS
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programs of SPORTS. AQUATICS & HOBBIES.
NEW SPECIAL FEATURE!
As part of your 8 week action summer, your choice of
two-week intensive instruction in:
Tennis a Basketball Soccer
Sailing Backpacking Canoeing
Baseball
Flexible "elective" teenage programs also include:
GoH Kayaking Archery Woodshop Sculling
Ecology Creative Arts Photography Ham Radio
Electronics Near Tanglewood Camp Newspaper
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Resident MD & RN's Fully accredited A.CA
For a FREE 24-page brochure detailing our complete
program and facilities, call or write:
20 Allen Court, So. Orange, N.J. 07079 (201) 762-3536
Directors: Joseph Kruger, Robert M. Behrman


To Live With Pride
5y MARTY GALLANTER
The Acre Regional Home is
onsored by the Joint Distri-
\tion Committee which receives
funding partly through the
federation / UJA campaigns.
me of the campaigns is the
pampa Jewish
7ederation United Jewish
\ppeal Campaign now in
progress. y.
ACRE, ISRAEL Jacques is
and his health is failing. His
egs are weak and he can no
[longer stand without assistance.
>nu'times he lacks the strength
move his wheelchair by
imself. But Jacques' mind is
still sharp and with a little en-
Duragement he is happy to tell
stories about the "old days.'*
Jacques came to Israel in 1952,
refugee from Tunisia, bringing
lis wife, two teen-age sons and a
rrown daughter. His only
possessions were a sack of cloth-
and a few books. At age 54,
Jacques was starting over again.
He loves to talk about those
lays, about how he and his
family lived in a tent on the out-
skirts of Haifa, and his years of
ird work to make a new life. He
talk for hours about the small
>use he finally bought on a
loshav near Natanya and the
decent life he was able to help
)uild working together with his
lily.
"We never had much," he
ays, "but we had enough and we
id pride."
His pride in his home, country
id in his sons who served in the
ly is obvious, and Jacques is
kill a proud man. To maintain
it pride, despite the fact that
je and illness have left his body
and dependent upon others,
i very important to him.
Jacques is a resident of the
Ik re Regional Home for the
;ed, part of a new and growing
oncept in care for the elderly in
irael. Opened in March 1979, the
10 bed home is the first in a
ies of new facilities developed
ESHEL, the Association for
the Planning and Development of
/ices for the Aged in Israel,
id organization founded by the
nerican Jewish Joint Disto-
rtion Committee and supported
part by JDC-Israel through
(nds raised in the
FA / Federation campaign.
[The first thing that strikes a
sitor to the Acre Home is the
^cation. The facility is on the
each and a special paved path
ivides access to a stunning
Jiew of the Mediterranean to
iren those in wheelchairs,
ctly across the street is a
rge, noisy elementary school.
["The home was placed here
entionally," says Moshe Dob-
lski, the Director. "It's im-
trtant that the elderly remain
jfolved with the community.
use the young people as
ilunteers in recreation and other
[?grams. The sound of children
lying in the schoolyard and the
Hit of young people in our
plding is good for the morale of
i residents."
[Community involvement ex-
ids beyond the school children,
ilunteers and visitors come to
i facility from every part of the
[ion. They take the residents
walks, play chess and
leers, or come simply to sit
I talk.
!"I believe it is even more
iportant for the community
it they are involved than it is
those who live here," Director
>bzimski continues. "We
jpreciate the volunteers. But
fact is that the young people
getting the best of the
irgain. Where else could they be
iposed to so much experience,
so many years of living all in
e place. The residents have a
.of spirit."
[The physical structure itself
is to be designed with the
\irit of the patients as a prime
isideration. The corridors and
the rooms are bright, painted in
cheerful, non-Institutional colors.
Huge windows allow sunlight
and fresh sea breezes to fill the
rooms. Recreation, activity and
other areas for common use are
spaced all around the facility.
Each cluster of sleeping rooms
has its own dining hall. The
patients live two to a room, and
are carefully matched so that
those who share living space also
share a common culture and
language. The bedrooms are large
and the residents are encouraged
to personalize them with their
own decor. Many have re-
frigerators and other small
appliances.
The home is also equipped with
a synagogue, a barber shop, a
library and a subsidized store
that offers food and cosmetic
items at prices well below retail.
The demand for services in the
area far exceeds the available
facilities. Although the Acre
home handles only the elderly
from local communities, there is a
wait of more than a year for
admittance. To ease the strain,
the home has added an out-
patient clinic and health program
that includes examinations and
home visits by traveling nurses.
Most of those who eventually
become residents have their first
contact through the outpatient
services. To gain admittance, a
prospective resident must be
screened by a committee. Need
and local residency are the only
requirements. Residents pay only
what they can afford.
The Acre Regional Home for
the Aged is the first of many. In
the summer of 1980, a similar
home was opened in Safed and
another is under construction in
Gillo, near Jerusalem. ESHEL is
also helping to develop com-
munity services for the aged to
avoid institutionalization when-
ever possible. The organization is
involved in establishing geriatric
wards in general hospitals and in
the training of professionals and
paraprofessionals in fields related
U) care for the aged. Planning for
the future is high on the list of
ESHEL's priorities. Ten percent
of Israel's population is over 65.
By the turn of the century, that
figure will probably exceed 15
A staff member at the Acre Regional Home for the Aged assist*
l&SSS "** a,wer i8 project. RecreationalIthempys an
aSSSi f ly program- (UJA Photo WWJ
percent.
Today, for 140 elderly Israelis
in Acre, the new program has
filled the need for concerned and
dignified health care. But even
more importantly, it has allowed
a man like Jacques to retain his
pride.
HELP! Save This Endangered Species
~ The
Jewish
Family
YOU can kelp by attending the FIRST NORTH BROWARD
CONFERENCE ON JEWISH FAMILY
SUNDA Y, MARCH29,1981
Registration 10 a.m.. Keynote Speech, Lunch, Workshops, Closing 3 p.m.
Jewish Community Center, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd., Plantation
This conference is for YOU:
YOU who are single, "solo" again, single parent...
YOU who are teen-agers concerned about yourself, your families...
YOU who are widowed
YOU who are concerned about intermarriage...
YOU who are living with children from another marriage...
YOU and ALL OTHERS interested, are cordially invited to the
CONFERENCE ON JEWISH LIFE
sponsored by
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale. Chaplaincy Commission
Jewish Community Center of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Family Service of Broward County
Central Agency for Jewish Kducation. Jewish Federation
American Jewish Committee. Florida Area, with AJC Family Life Specialist, Dr. Carl A. Shcingold as Keynote Speaker.
Registration Fee. including lunch. $3... Students $1.50. (under 19 years old). Clip bottom portion, indicate Workshop you
wish to attend, print name, address, telephone number, and mail with check payable to Jewish Federation.
REGISTRATION REQUESTED BY FRIDAY, MARCH 20,1981
JEWISH FAMILY LIFE CONFERENCE. Jewish Federation
2999 N.W. 33rd Ave., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311
Phone 484-8200
Enclosed in m> check (or S_
for myself.. ind
1/we would like to attend the workshop we have checked:
D 1. SOLO AGAIN-SINGLE PARENT FAMILIES
D 2. YOURS-MINE-OURS (Blended Family)
? 3. ONE IS A WHOLE NUMBER (Widowed)
D 4. THE FAMILY (Survival in todays society)
? 5. INTERMARRIAGE
D 6. YOUTH SPEAKS OUT ..12-14 years of age
for 15-17 years of age 0
NAME
APT. _
ADDKKSS
CITY
_____ PHONE


-ra
5?
77ie- Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort lM.uAp.rdnk>

Browsin' thru
roward
with max levlne
Shoni Labowhi and ha1
husband. Rabbi Phillip A.
Labowits of Temple Beth Israel,
were wished Godspeed on their
journey this weekend to Israel
where the Rabbi will be joining
800 rabbis from around the world
in attendance at the Rabbinical
Assembly in Jerusalem.
Arnold Rouberg of Pompano
Reach takes exception to the
editing in the Jan. 16 issue of The
Jewish Floridian of his talk to the
Men's Club of B'nai Torah in
Boca Raton. The edited version
reported that "Wealthy
Argentina Jews attend High
WORLD
Holy Day services at the Jewish
clubs." Rossberg, who has
contributed funds to Argentina's
"Jentro Union Israelita de Cor-
doba, a synagogue in the central
part of the country, says: "The
wealthy Jews go to private
Jewish clubs where during Yom
Kippiir they eat pork and
whatever. They don't care about
Judaism Jewry is an en-
dangered species in Argentina."
. And at Temple Sholom on
Feb. 26, Rabbi Gunter
Friedlander, former executive
vice-president of B'nai B'rith's
Spanish-Speaking district, talked
BRIEFS
From Combined Jewish Telegraphic Agency Services
CLEVELAND A trial, expected to last as long as
seven weeks, to determine whether John Demjanjuk, a
60-year-old naturalized citizen of Ukrainian origin lied
about his participation in Nazi war crimes when he ap-
plied for citizenship in 1958, has opened in U.S. District
Court here before Federal Judge Frank Battisti.
Demjanjuk, a Ford assembly line worker since 1952,
has been charged by the U.S. Immigration and Naturali-
zation Service (INS) with supplying false information
about his activities in World War II. If the charges are
proven, he could be stripped of citizenship and face de-
portation proceedings.
INS contended that Demjanjuk served as a guard in the Nazi
extermination camps at Treblinka and Sobibor in Poland in 1942-1943,
that he tortured countless inmates and herded Jews into the gas
chambers. Demjanjuk insists that he was a prisoner of war at that
time.
JERUSALEM The Cabinet has approved a 206 billion Shekel
budget for fiscal year 1981-2. There was only a brief discussion, and
only Interior Minister Yosef Burg voted against the budget on the
grounds that the local authorities were inadequately provided for. The
budget was the first presented by Finance Minister Yoram Aridor.
Basically the work on it was done under his predecessor Yigal Hur-
witz, but Aridor did introduce some changes such as a slight in-
crease in defense spending.
Aridor said the budget was based on predictions of 120 percent
inflation in the 1981 calendar year and a 98 percent inflation in fiscal
: 981-2 a steady drop in inflation so as to hit the double-digit line by
i he end of the calendar year.
'about "Latin-American Jewry"
at the meeting of Pompano's
B'nai B'rith lodge This week
the Landardale West ORT
chapter learned about services for
senior citizens from Candy
Reentsdnaffer, acting director of
the Area Agency on Aging of
l Broward County. That's the
agency which has over-all
supervision of Nutrition Sites for
1 the elderly, including the kosher
sites supported by the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
The Ex-Moon Inc., 1712 S St.,
NW, Suite 1010, Washington,
D.C. 20006, is interested in
knowing where and when a
former Lubavitcher, Dr. Moses
Durst, who became president of
Moon's Unification Church,
speaks Another Washington-
based outfit has been organized
to deal with cults and their ef-
fects on individuals and families.
Jean Merritt heads American
Family Foundation at 1800 R St..
NW. Suite 805. Washington,
D.C. 20009 Florida's junior
U.S. Senator, Paula Hawldaa
was one of the new Republicans
who joined a total of 69 of the 100
Senators who signed a request to
the Government of Turkey not to
reduce or terminate normal
diplomatic relations with Israel.
Samuel Lewis Gaber, Anti-
Defamation League's Philadel-
phia director for 18 years, will
soon become director of ADL's
Palm Beach County office .
Financially-troubled Jewish
Daily Forward, believed to be the
only Yiddish newspaper still
publishing after 82 years, needs
$600,000 to keep its New York
publishing plant in operation .
Shimon Peres, seeking to become
Israel's Prime Minister, has a
former aide to U.S. Sen. Ted
Kennedy helping his campaign
. Rudy Boschwitz(R-MN), one
of six Jewish Senators, is now
chairman of Senate Foreign Re-
lation's Subcommittee on Near
Eastern, and South African
Affairs.
Today's dated Floridian, Feb.
27, is final day for mature adults
(60 and over, registered Florida
voters) to seek nomination in
1981 Silver-Haired Legislature.
Area Agency for Aging conducts
.elections April 14 for senators
nd representatives Esther
nnon. Regional President of
i ladassah was speaker at Scopus
Deerfield Beach chapter when
Sylvia Nachbar, editor of Scopus
Bulletin, was honored at lun-
cheon Feb. 9 at Boca Del Mar
FLORIDA
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Country Club Sam Hoffman '
of Sunrise Jewish Center
suggests as required reading for
Jews: Ethical Teachings and The
Ethics of Judaism by Moritz
Lazarus of the United Synagogue
of America Joyce Ruben-
stein, formerly legislative
assistant to Rep. Etfaaheth
Holtxman (D-NY) has joined the
Washington staff of National
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
Atty. Sam Reankoff spoke
about current legal decisions at
the Feb. 22 meeting of the Men's
Club of Sunrise Jewish Center
. Holiday Springs Choral
Group joined Holiday Springs
B'nai B'rith volunteers recently
to entertain and visit with
patients at the Tamarac Con-
valescent Home on Pine Island
Rd. Prizes of $100 and
plaques were awarded by
Plantation B'nai B'rith to
winners of essay contest on The
Ideals of Brotherhood at Planta-
tion and Plantation South High
Schools Broward Federal
hosted the lunch for Hatikvah
Chapter of Women's Leageu of
Israel when the group met for the
first time at the savings institu-
tion's new location on N. Univer-
sity Dr. in Sunrise.
Rabbi Mordeeai Brill, who is
one of the staff of volunteer
chaplains visiting hospitals^,
hhrough the program established
by the Federation's Chaplaincy
Commission and it director,
Rabbi Albert B. Schwarts, visits
Doctors General Hospital
weekly. He said the hospital
expects to open its 250-bed
addition in the near future .
BBYO-ers of the Gold Coast
Council are busy getting rep-
resentation on the steering com-
mittee for all the activities
planned for the 1981 Gold Coast
Council convention April 10-12
. Watch for David, the first
German-made feature film on the
Holocaust, expected to have its
American premiere in New York
City and then released nationally
sometime in May Marda
Kaplan of Jewish Family Service
talked about "Your Children and
Divorce" this week at the meet-
ing of Margate Chapter of
Women's League for Israel in the
Catherine Young Library. Chil-
dren, divorce, and other subjects
will be covered in the Family Life
Conference set for March 29. See
details elsewhere in this issue of
The Jewish Floridian.
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ibs Say Israel Violates Human Rights
,TAMARLEVY
IVA (JTA) -
Impassioned de-
ion of Arab charges
rael violates human
n the occupied terri-
as delivered here by
Novak, the new
the U.S. delegation
United Nations
, Rights Com-
mas shocked at hea'.*
much hatred, so
lies, such squalid
such despicable
smitism all in the
name of human
," Novak delcared.
Lpoke in response to the
by Farouk Kaddoumi,
the Palestine Liberation
ization"s political
.nent. who opened the
fission's debate on alleged
violations with bitter
on Israel and on the
[States for supporting it.
UC'S SPEECH was
with interest by the
i inasmuch as he is the
-ointee of the Reagan Ad-
dition to address the in-
nal forum. They were
taken aback by the
nee with which he
t'd the Arabs and his
unqualified defense of Israel in
terms much stronger than any
used by previous American
delegates.
Novak apparently had in-
structions to take a tough line
against Israel's foes and that is
believed here to signal the tone of
the new Administration's
rhetoric in future debates in UN
lx>dies.
Kaddoumi himself was ex-
tremely harsh, accusing the
former Carter Administration of
advert is in); its hypocritical
campaign for human rights"
while "simultaneously aiding
Israel to build a military
arsenal, to improve methods of
torture, to speed up its process of
Judaizalion" in the territories.
He urged the Reagan
Administration to "begin by
censuring Israel" but observed
that "indeed, this will not take
place as Reagan like Carter will
revel in isolating the Egyptian
regime from the rest of the Arab
nation," a reference to the
Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty.
NOVAK, in response,
declared: "I have heard here
attacks upon Zionism in accents
of a murderous hatred not heard
since the days of the Nazis. It is
though this chamber has
retrogressed by 40 years, as
though this is not 1981 but 1941
and not Geneva but along the
Hitler-Stalin axis."
a theologian and
was a founding
Four JDL'ers Arrested
For 'Harassing' Soviets
By BEN GALLOB
l\\ YORK (JTA) Four
bers of the Jewish Defense
(r have been arrested since
one of them twice, on
BS of harassing a Soviet of-
[in New York, Dov Becker.
pacutive director, reported.
kw said he himself had
jnrved by the FBI with a
Sna to appear before e
jury here to answer the
'charge. He said his at-
appeared for him and
the Fith Amendment on
alf. Becker said he did not
adding that he has also
Even a subpoena to appear
peprints and fingerprints.
FOUR ,11)1, members are
rd Perel, 19; Rafi Medoff.
lira Goldstein, 17; and
ra Herzka,21.
and Medoff were arrested
,k near the Soviet Mission
lhatlan. They were accused
passing a Soviet diplomat
h resisting arrest. Later,
said, the two JDL
ims learned they were also
charged by the FBI with
ter said the harassment
as had been going on for
time" in a JDL effort to
the freedom of Anatoly
laky, the Soviet Jewish
?r of Conscience.
ker said that on Feb. I,
JDL members were
by City police around
Mission. Three of them.
U Perel, were charged
ly with harassment and
led on their own
bizance, Becker said.
THREE have been or-
> appear March 3 in City
lal Court to answer to the
iment and resisting arrest
s.
1 and Medoff appeared
a Federal Judge on the
II harassment charges. They
freed after posting a $25,000
fral bond for Medoff and a
collateral bond for Perel,
said.
Ire-trial hearing has been set
lb. 25 before a Federal judge
pre! and Medoff. Until then.
ire required, to. report each
y to a federal pre-trial
at the Seventh District
I Court. They also are
limited in travel to the metro-
jxilitan area and Westchester,
Becker said.
Novak,
journalist, was a
member of the Coalition for a
Democratic Majority and sup-
ported Reagan's election. He is of
Czech origin and non-Jewish. He
opened his speech my remarking:
"I was touched when the Pope
(John Paul II) went to Ausch-
witz. In an address to the UN he
called attention to the Human
Rights Declaration. That
declaration, he said, rose above
every other factor from the
millions of victims of the
Holocaust. 1 cannot forget that
we sit in this room because of the
suffering of millions of people,
many of whom might have lived
as long as we but were not
permitted to live. Our work here
flows from their interrupted lives.
The Declaration of Human
Rights is a memorial to their
sacrifice."
WITH RESPECT to Israel, he
said: "There is an ancient saying
about Israel. The Lord promised
Moses a land of milk and honey.
A wry joke in Israel notes that
unfortunately the Lord did not
promise oil.' Israel is not a land of
rich resources, yet the Israelis
have built a nation to rival any in
the world in its science, arts,
symphonies, free press and just
and human procedures. When
colleagues here attempt to por-
tray Israel as a land without
human rights, we must ask,
compared to what? Few nations
can exhibit a record of human
rights practices as developed as
those of Israel."
Continuing, Novak said: "The
charges heaped against Israel at
the Commission are old. The
State of Israel is a fact; the peace
treaty with Egypt a fact. These
are realities to which passion
must accommodate itself. "
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JERUSALEM AND
CELEBRATE THE
HEBREW UNIVERSITY'S
HISTORIC RETURN
TO MOUNT SCOPUS.
THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL
CONFERENCE OF THE FRIENDS
OF THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY
JUNE 28-JULY 4,1981
This conference will bring together hundreds ot Friends tor
an in-depth look at the role the University plays in the life of
the State of Israel, as well as its profound ties with Jewish
communities everywhere.
Meet distinguished scholars and scientists in their class-
rooms, attend gala events, including a concert and July
Fourth Ball, a reception with Yitzhak Navon, the President
of Israel, tours and many other special events.
Join groups from Miami, Holly wood/Hal landale, Boca
Raton, and Palm Beach for special Florida Friends activi-
ties, including dedication of Florida House, a key link in the
University's historic rebuilding Of Mount Scopus.
'
I am interested in attending the First International Confer
ence. Please send further information.
NAME _____
ADDRESS
CITY________
BUS PHONE
!
STATE
ZIP
HOME PHONE
Send to: American Friends of the Habraw Unlwralty
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The Jewish FTnritiinn of r;~r"W./^r' fr~,VZI^X... U~w
riRiBy, reuiuaiy e.i, ijqi
EMANU-EL
Roberta Dodero, daughter of
Pietro and Natalie Dodero, will
be called to the Torah, at 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Feb. 28, at worship
service at Temple Emanu-El,
3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. to
celebrate her Bat Mitzvah.
KOLAMI
Marcy Hart will celebrate r>"~
Bat Mitzvah at Shabbat serVrC? '
at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 28,
at Temple Kol Ami, Plantation
Jewish Center, 8200 Peters Rd.
BETH ISRAEL
The Beth Abraham Chorale o
Dayton, Ohio, founded by it:
director Cantor Jerome B
Kopmar in 1972, will be making
its only Broward County ap
pearance in concert at Temph
Beth Israel, 7100 W. Oakland
Park Blvd., with two per
formances on Sunday, March 8:
one designed primarily for
children under 18 years of age at
2 p.m., and at 8 p.m. for the
general public. The afternoon
performance is priced at $1 for
children under 18. General ad
mission for the evening per
foimance, and also for the af
ternoon, if an adult accompanies
a child, is S3, with reserved seats
for the evening priced at $5.
Proceeds will benefit the
synagogue's Religious School.
Acclaimed by critics as "the
foremost synagogue youth choir
in the country,*' the Chorale has
established a record of accom-
plishments that is unique in the
American synagogue. With a
total membership of 90 young
people ranging in ages 9 through
18, the Chorale is represented by
members of all four of Dayton's
synagogues with the majority
coming from Beth Abraham
Synagogue, Dayton's only
Conservative congregation.
Guest artist with the young
people is Cantor David.
Lefkowitz.
The Chorale has traveled andi
toured perhaps more than anyl
other Jewish choir. They have
appeared in the United States|
coast-to-coast and have the
distinction of being the first
American synagogue youth choir
to perform in Israel. They have
visited Israel twice, in 1973 and
again in 1977 when they were
representatives of the United
States to the International
Festival of Choirs (Zimriya).
They also performed in England,
with a series of concerts in
London, Birmingham and Leeds.
Although their musical accom-
plishments are great, perhaps the
most important factor in the
success of the Beth Abraham
Youth Chorale is the lesson they
expound that Jewish music can
be a vital and powerful force in
the lives of American Jewish
Youth, and that the traditions
and legacies of Jewish life can be
taught through music.
BETH ISRAEL
United Synagogue Youth,
students in 8th through 12
grades, of Temple Beth Israel,
7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., will
celebrate USY Shabbat tonight,
Friday, Feb. 27, at 8 p.m., and
again at the Shabbat morning
services at 8:45. Rabbi Phillip A.
Labowitz on Friday night will
talk about "A Not So Funny
Thing Happened on the Way."
EMANU-EL
ART AWARDS
At the Art Show conducted by
Temple Emanu-El in January,
students of the synagogue's
Religious School showed their
own works of art which were
judged with the following
results: Claudine Mandel of the
third grade was awarded the first
prize; Melanie Rashall, also 3rd
grade, second; Maria Smith, 2nd
grade, third; Cyndi Rashall,
kindergarten, fourth; Amy
Block, 7th grade, fifth. Prizes
were awarded by Temple Emanu-
El *s Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon.
POETRY AND MUSIC
AT EMANU-EL
Sunday, Mrach 1, at 9:30 a.m..
the major Jewish American poet-
critic, Laurence Liberman, in a
special guest appearance in the
All-Purpose Room dL Temple
Emanu-El, 3245 Wv Oakland
Park Blvd., Fort LauderuM will
discuss selections from his pest
work, "God's Measurements.1^
Sunday, March 8, at 9:30 a.m.,
the International musician and '
lecturer from Mexico City, David l
Prensky, will play excerpts on
the recorder and speak on the
"Joy of Music."
HEBREW CONGREGATION
The Hebrew Congregation of
Lauderhill installed their officers
at their sixth annual dinner Feb.
2 at Temple Beth Israel, 7200 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Maxwell
Gilbert is president of the con-
gregation. Other officers are Jack
Krulik, executive, vice president;
Al Neber, vice president; Al BU-
zin, Ben Schneider, William
Harris, secretaries. Sisterhood
officers are Fannie Hochman,
president; Gertrude Axelrod,
Pearl Dornfeld, Kitty Saks, vice
presidents; Mildred Kronish,
Alice Waxman, Frieda Welsh,
secretaries; Mae Mendes,
treasurer. -----
Plaques were presented to Max
Axelrod, Harry Fogler, Abe Fox,
Al Haber, Fred Keery, George
Shalon, Chaim Stein, Moses
Steinberg, Morris Konsker, Al
Neber, Jules Saks, Ben
Schneider, Joe Stauber. Edith
Dubin accepted a plaque
presented posthumously to her
late husband Charles Dubin.
Also honored was the retiring
president, Sol Cohen.
Cantors Lebele Feldman, S.
Ackerman, and Phil Erstlingl
sang. I
RAMAT SHALOM
Friday night at 8:15 the
service at Ramat Shalom, The
Reconstructionist Synagogue,
7473 N.W. 4th St., Plantation,
will be conducted by the children
of the 6th Grade Torah School
Class. The study period will be
led by Bob and Sue Segaul with
the topic, "Trip and Mission To
Israel".
Saturday evening, March 21,
the Synagogue will host a Monte
Carlo Night at 8 p.m. An $8 per
person admission charge includes
chips and desserts. Door prizes
include a cruise to the Bahamas.
Further information on this and
other Synagogue activities can be
had by calling the Synagogue
583-7770 Monday through Friday
from 9 to noon.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
Dr. Lewis Berlin, a historian,
will speak about "The Bible and
the Koran" at the Friday, Feb. 27
service at 8 p.m. at Temple Beth
Torah, Tamarac Jewish Center,
9101 NW 57th St. This is the fifth
in the synagogue's series of
Friday night lectures.
The following night, Feb. 28, at
8:30 p.m., Beth Torah s Men's
Club is sponsoring a three-act
show. Refreshments will be
served. Donation is $3.50.
SUNRISE JC
David Louis Drut, son of Mr.
and Mrs. William Drut, will
become a Bar Mitzvah at
Saturday morning service, Feb.
28, at Sunrise Jewish Center,
8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Israel Must Consider Diaspora
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Former Sen. Jacob Javits (R.,
N.Y.) has warned here that the
attitudes of Americans and
others toward Israel is in-
creasingly affecting their at-
titude toward Jews in the
diaspora.
"Israel must take account of
what happens to the Jewish
communities of the dispora,''
Javits stressed, as he received
the first Philip Klutznick Service
Award from the B'nai B'rith
Board of Governors. He said
Israel should consider the views
of dispora Jewry, although it
need not accept them.
Javits said that while he
believes the Reagan Administra-
tion is "deeply committed Co
Israel, the new wealthy Arab
countries have begun to compete
for Israel's friends,-even in the
United States."
I
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once the food culprit is
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bruary 27,1961
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
mm
it is Reconstructionism?
It is Reconstructionism?
jan A. Schulberg,
iy chairman of Ramat
L The Reconstructionist
Egue in Plantation, says
jnagogue gets calls from
lies" wanting to know "if
iJesus Freaks, Jews for
etc." In response, he
| the following;
close to 60 years Recon-
lonist Judaism has been
its contribution (to the
rof the Jewish experience)
Laving together strands of
Jewish past and of con-
rary Jewish reality.
genius of the Jewish
created Judaism, and it
pally evolved out of fee
scope of history and
6. The social acceptance,
ctual freedom, and esthetic
characteristic of modern,
fr, democratic society have
nged Jewish traditions over
centuries. Can Judaism
Israel Bond Events
survive amidst our everyday
lives? The Reconstructionist
response is yes: not only can it
survive; it will be enriched. Re-
constructionists utilize the full
range of their intellectual and
emotional commitments in
building honest and fulfilling
Jewish lifestyles.
"At the heart of Reconstruct-
ionist Judaism is the conviction
that it is every generation's
responsibility and right to
"reconstruct" its beliefs and
practices in light of its particular
experience. From the beginning,
Reconstructionist Jews have
instituted changes in Jewish
practice originally considered
radical challenges to the Jewish
community. The relevance of
these innovations is evidenced by
their rapid acceptance into
American Jewish life Recon-
structionist Jews seek a process
of growth and creative synthesis
by confronting and grappling
with new issues as they arise."
The State of Israel and the
Israel Bonds Organization will
present the New Life Awards on
March 1, at the Konover Hotel on
Miami Beach. Fort Lauderdale
residents Ludwik Brodzki and
Carola Mueller will be honored at
the Tribute Dinner.
Brodzki, a leading member of
the Jewish community in North
Broward County, has been a
staunch supporter of the Israel
Bonds Organization and was
founding President of the
Greater Fort Lauderdale Jewish
Federation.
Mrs. Mueller will receive
Israel's Righteous Christian New
Life Award, honoring her bravery
and heroism during World War
II, as she protected her Jewish
friends from the Gestapo.
Reservations and information
about the New Life Dinner, can
be made by calling the Israel
Bond office in Fort Lauderdale.
Chairman of the event is George
Morantz. Co-chairmen are David
Krantz, Abe Meltzer.
Palm Air*
Sharon and Jay Raddock, resi-
dents of Palm-Aire, have been
slated to receive Israel's coveted
Peace Medal, at a State of Israel
Tribute Dinner, to be held in their
honor, Sunday evening, March
15, in Fort Lauderdale.
According to Bernard
Margolius, Chairman of the
event, the Raddocks will be
recognized for their outstanding
contributions to Jewish com-
munal service and for their active
participation in numerous phil-
anthropic and civic organi-
zations.
Raddock is Chairman of the
Board of the South Shore Federal
Opera Star at Shalom
Bianca, believed to be the
;est opera star, headlines
March 15 International
Itre and Music Festival of
pie Sholom Men's Club. The
ram will be presented at 8
Sunday, March 15, in
pie Sholoms Social Hall, 132
11 St., Pompano Beach.
ition is $5. The concert is
to the general public. For
nations call the Temple
-942-6410.
Jews at their best
Imple Sholom's Rabbi Morris
(Religious
Directory
LAUDERDALELAKES
|L B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE.
SI West Oakland Park Boulevard.
dern Orthodox Congregation. Saul
rman, Rabbi Emeritus.
JPLE EMANU-EL. 3245 W.
Ikland Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi
trey Ballon. Cantor Jerome
lement.
SUNRISE
TH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
kland Park Blvd. Conservative,
sbbi Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor
.aurice Neu
.JRISE JEWISH CENTER, INC. 8049
jjest Oakland Park Blvd. Con
ervative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy,
tantor Jack Marchant.
LAUDERHILL
IBREW CONGREGATION OF LAU
1ERHILL. 2048 NW 49th Ave.,
auderhill. Conservative. President,
Maxwell Gilbert.
TAMARAC
*PLE BETH TORAHTAMARAC
EWISH CENTER. 9101 NW 57th St '
Conservative. Rabbi Israel Zimmer
pan. Cantor Henry Belasco.
PLANTATION
APLE KOL AMI. Plantation. 8200
eters Rd. Liberal Reform. Rabbi
(leldon J. Harr.
AAT SHALOM. Reconstructionist
vnagogue. 7473 NW 4th St. Rabbi
|ebecca Alpert.
POMPANO BEACH
APLE SHOLOM. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Dnservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
[antor Jacob Renzer.
MARGATE
TH HILLELCONGREGATION.7640
[Margate Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
seph Berglas.
PLE BETH AMMARGATE
EWISH CENTER. 7205 Royal
im Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
alomon Geld, Cantor Mario
itoshansky.
CORAL SPRINGS
APLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
rive. Reform. Rabbi Donald S.
erber. Cantor Harold Dworkln.
ITER TIKVAH SYNAGOGUE. 8 p.m.
rriday; 10:30 a.m. Saturday in
Vuditorium, Bank of Coral Springs,
1300 University Dr. Rabbi Leonard
loll.
L_, DEERFIELDiEACM
IMPLE BETH ISRAEL at Century
piLage East Conservative.
Cantor Joseph Pollack.
JUNG ISRAEL of Deerfleld Beach.
1661 w. Hlllsboro Blvd. Orthodox.
BOCA RATON
EMPLE BETH EL. 333 SW 4th
[Avenue, Boca Raton. Rabbi Merle S.
[Singer.
>NAI TORAH. 1401 NW 4th Ave., Boca
Raton. Conservative. Rabbi Nathan
[ Zelizer, Cantor Henry Perl.
HOLLYWOOD
JUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDETRDALE. 4171 Stirling
Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bomzer.
a
Tamarac Jewish Center
David and Blossom Waldman
(pictured) will receive Israel's
coveted Scroll of Honor at a
"Salute to Israel" Brunch,
scheduled for Sunday, March 8,
at 10 a.m., at Temple Beth Torah,
Tamarac Jewish Center. Long
active in Jewish communal af-
fairs, Dave and Blossom have
been participants in numerous
Jewish philanthropic and service
organizations, including the
ZOA, UJA, and the Yeshiva
University.
Special guest will be Eddie
Schaffer, noted Jewish humorist.
Skop will be the moderator for
panel discussion at 10 a.m.,
Sunday, March 1, at Temple's
Social Hall about "Jews at Their
Best." Panelists will be Rabbi
David Metzner, formerly of
Germany, and Rabbi Mark Lieb-
haber, editor and publisher of the
Minneapolis Jewish Weekly.
Donation for the discussion and
full breakfast is $2.
Wanted
Associate Rabbi
tor Conservative temple in Deer-
field Beach, Fla. Call between 5-
7 p.m.
426-0392 or 421-7513
nnoi; ? ft 1 5
Hospital Certified
Surgical Mohel
Kndorard By All Phyaiaiu And Rabbis
Hoapiul Or Home
Rabbi Dr. Abraham Vaknin
(305)652-5712
GRATCH-MANDEL
HARTMAN-MILLEB
Our new insignia symbolically expresses
the kinship between PISER of Chicago and
MENORAH CHAPELS in Florida. You will
find the same trustworthy service and
respect for Jewish traditions here that
generations of Chicagoans have come to
rely upon. In Chicago or Florida, you can
call on us at any time with complete
confidence.
Executive Offices:
6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale
(Sunrise), Fla. 33313
305/7424000
5915 Park Drive at U.S. 441
Margate, Fla. 33063
305/427-4700
2305 W. Hillsboro Blvd.
Deerfield Beach, Fla. 33441
305/427-4700
Dade County
305/861-7301
Palm Beach County
305/833-0887
. .
Savings i and Loan Association
on Long Island and is a Trustee
of the Adelphia University.
Mrs. Raddock has been active
in the Hineni movement, working
with Jewish youth involved in
cult activities.
Special guest at the dinner will
be Senator Howard Metzenbaum
(D-Ohio). Senator Metzenbaum is
a part-time resident of Palm-Aire
and a staunch supporter of Israel.
He will discuss the latest
developments in the Middle East.
Co-chairman of the event is
Joseph Kranberg. Honorary
chairmen are Zelda Coren; John
P. Crisconi; Lillian Davis;
Michael Davis and Joe Fink.
Also Morris Kaufman, Louis
Miller, Charles Ruben; Howard
Scheer and Sam Schwartz.
HHaHMHMIHiUtMHtHIUUIIIIIIIIIIflllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlllllllllllllUlltMHIIIIIItllllltttHffltlltlfllllllflltlt
Larry Freilich, who has co-
haired the Jacaranda United
Jewish Appeal campaign for the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, is running for
election as Group 4 Plantation
City Councilman in the election
to be held Tuesday, March 10. A
member of B'nai B'rith Planta-
tion Lodge, Freilich, who has
been manager of the American
Savings and Loan Plantation
branch for five years, has been
active in Plantation's United
Way, several of Plantation
Mayor's committees, and other
community endeavors.
TT
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1


Full Text
&

Congressmen Urge Reagan
to Aid Nazi Hunt
Pope Meets With Chief Rabbi
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON A bi-
partisan bloc of 104 members of
the U.S. House of Representa-
tives has written President
Ronald Reagan asking him to set
aside S3 million in the new U.S.
budget for the continuing
prosecution of 18 cases against
alleged Nazi war criminals living
in the U.S. which are now before
the courts and 210 other cases
presently under investigation.
The investigations, the letter
pointed out, are under a special
unit the Office of Special In-
vestigations established in the
Criminal Division of the Justice
Department. The letter, initiated
by U.S. Reps. William Lehman
II).. Fla.) and Hamilton Fish, Jr.
(R., N.Y.I, said that the
proceedings are being directed
"by an extremely competent and
dedicated attorney. Allan Ryan."
The letter said that "because of
the ages of the suspects and
witnesses and the extremely
complex evidentiary and logistics
problems involved in these cases,
it is essential that prosecution be
brought expeditiously and
professionally.
The Congressmen noted that
the money involved "is a small
price to pay for reaffirming our
nation's commitment at
Nuremberg that none of those
who participated in Nazi
atrocities should escape being
called to account. It will also
serve as a warning that civilized
nations will never again tolerate
such base inhumanity."
Emphasizing that "our
government must not revert to
the intolerable situation of years
past when it seemed to be con-
doning by inaction the horrors of
the Holocaust," the letter
concluded, "We must, in the
limited time remaining, make
clear to the world that the U.S.
has not forgotten this un-
paralleled tragedy."
In a related development, four
Senators and five Represent-
atives, all members of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council,
have asked President Reagan to
conduct this year's observance of
the "Days of Remembrance" of
the Holocaust in the White
House. They also requested that
he address the gathering.
The co-signers of a letter to the
We do business
the right way.
O
1700 W. MflMtf ?* **
n ii itii *--.
Ptoarm-ltN
President making the requests
are co-sponsors of the legislation,
passed last year by both Houses
of Congress, which established
the Holocaust Memorial Council
as a permanent part of the federal
government.
This year's "Days of
Remembrance" will be held from
April 26 to May 2. The signers of
the letter are Sens. John Dan-
forth ((R., Mo.); Henry Jackson
(D., Wash); Claiborne Pell (D.,
R.I.); and Rudy Boshchwitz (R.,
Minn.). The others are U.S. Reps.
William Lehmen (D., Fla.);
James Blanchard (I)., Mich.);
William Green (R., N.Y.);
Stephen Solarz (D., N.Y..)^and
Sidney Yates (D., 111.).
The letter stated that "for
Millions of Americans of all
faiths, the Holocaust is an event
of deep emotional significance
and the effort to commemorate it
is a deeply spiritual one. It would
be uniquely appropriate for you,
as our President, to lead the
nation in expressing remem-
brance of the victims of tyran-
ny."
Meantime, in Cleveland, the
Justice Department produced
videotaped testimony from a
former German military officer
identifying John Demjanjuk as
"Ivan the Terrible" guard in the
Treblinka death camp. "Ivan"
lied about his Nazi connections to
gain U.S. citizenship. If found
guilty, he could be stripped of his
citizenship and face deportation.

TREEHOUSE
Apartments
Adult Community
4501 Treehouse I Lane
Tamarac
1 and 2 Bedrooms
with-Den
S50
Pools and Recreation
Facilities on Premises
Walk to Shopping
Telephone:
739-3585
945-5922 (Miami)
ROME (JTA) Pope
John Paul II and the Chief
Rabbi of Rome, Elio Toaff,
have met in what the
Jewish community offi-
cially termed "an event of
historical import" and
which most observers saw
as a calculated effort by the
Vatican to enhance its re-
lations with the Jewish
community which, gen-
erally, have been good.
The encounter took place in a
building adjacent to the Church
of San Carlo Ai Catinari on the
Piazza Cairoli, in the heart of the
Roman ghetto, the oldest in
Europe. The Pontiff was ac-
companied by Cardinal Ugo
Poletti and Msgr. Jorge Mejia,
Secretary of The Vatican
Secretariate for Religious
Relations with the Jews. Toaff
had with him Assistant Chief
Rabbi Alberto Piattelli and a
small delegation representing
Rome's Jewish community.
IT WAS the first time in the
2,000 years of variegated
relations between the Church of
Rome and the Jewish community
that a chief rabbi of the city has
accepted an invitation to meet
with a Pope. Although Rome's
Jews never suffered pogroms or
similar persecutions, they hav
been, in past centuries, subjected
to many levels of humiliation,
including forced attendance at
sermons aimed at their con-
version in the very church
compound that was the scene of
the meet inn.
Just two months ago, the
Pope's second Encyclical dealing
with distortions of justice in the
modern world, drew a sharp
reaction from Jewish circles
because of its reference to the
Biblical injunction, "An eye for
an eye, a tooth for a tooth," aa
"the form of distortion of justice"
at the time of Jesus.
The Pope's decision to meet
with the Chief Rabbi of Rome and
the simultaneous publication in
the Vatican newspaper
L'Osservatore Romano of an
editorial entitled "Dives In
Misericordia: An Encyclical for
Chiristians and Jews" indicated
in an oblique way a desire to
assuage the feelings of Jews who
fell offended by the earlier
Encyclical which by the very
nature of an Encyclical, cannot
1 be rewritten.
TOAFF told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency later that
"This was a first contact. To
evaluate its impact, we will have
to wait for future developments."
That cautious appraisal was
shared by others in the Jewish
community who had hoped the
Pople would make some specific
apologetic reference to past
relations between the Church and
the Jewish community.
The Pope, however, limited his
comments to generalities. He
said in effect that it was good for
inui lal relations to emphasize the
present mil above all the future,
lie presented Toaff with a silver
Vatican medal and the other
members with copper medals.
He spoke of the Holocaust,
ihe great sufferings of the Jews,
the common religious heritage
that unites Catholics and Jews
and on themes touched by the
rabbi in his speech which stressed
the issues on which Catholics and
Jews are united.
"THERE ARE manifold ele-
ments we hold in common in the
struggle we are forced to conduct
in the world surrounding us."
Toaff said, "a struggle for the
affirmation of the dignity of man,
intended as a mirror of the Divine
image, a struggle for the right to
life from its very first conception,
recognizing the right to give or
take it away only to God."
That reference by Toaff to the
common position taken by
Catholics and Jews, at least the
Orthodox, against abortion was
. evidently appreciated by the
Pope, especially as the right of
choice in this matter has become
a heated political issue in Italy.
Toaff also spoke of a common
"struggle for the affirmation of
the values of the family, its unity
and its morality, a struggle
against the plague of drugs which
kill the weak and rootless, and a
struggle for the realization of a
society that is more just, where
all can share those goods that
God has conceded to man .
And finally, the struggle for the
rights of man and his religious
liberty."
A STATEMENT issued after
the meeting by the Rome Jewish
Community declared: "In the
moment in which a Roman
Pontiff meets the Chief Rabbi of
Rome and representatives of the
Roman Jewish community near
the area which for over 2,000
years witnessed infinite pain and
both ancient and recent mour-
ning, the Jews of Rome recognize
this encounter as an event of
historical import and the real
point of departure

WORLD GATHERING COMMITTEE
Of North Broward County
Announces The Following
14 Day Package Tours to ISRAEL
From June 10-23,1981
For the World Gathering in Jerusalem of Jewish Holocaust Survivors.
WORLD GATHERING OF JEWISH HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS TRAVEL OPTIONS
Prices include: round trip airfare from Miami to Tel Aviv based on Super Apex fares, hotel accommodations,
service charges, daily Israeli breakfast, transfers from and to Ben Gurion Airport 4'/2 days of sightseeing with
licensed guides, tour entrance fee, baggage handling, transfers to and from World Gathering events.
PLAN
T" deluxe
"V" deluxe
1W" deluxe
"X" deluxe
4Y" 1st class "Z" 1st class
Hotel In
Tel Aviv
Tiberias
Jerusalem
Hilton
Plaza
Hilton
Dan
Plaza
King David
Diplomat
Plaza
Plaza
Diplomat
Plaza
Diplomat
Moriah
Kibbutz
Moriah
Marina
Kibbutz
Ariel
Price
$1,745
*V17
$1.658
11557.
$1,577
$1,494
Additional Cost
For Single
Accomodation
$407
$417
$340
$276
$222
$230
'subject to
Availablity

Participation in the World Gathering requires a registration fee of $100 per person ($50 for children of sur-
vivors). This fee is not included in the rate shown above. Departure will be on a specially arranged El AI Israel
Airlines 747 Jumbo Jet. For reservations or further information, you may contact your travel agent or one of the
following travel agents who are cooperating in this historic endeavor.
AIR & SEA TRAVEL SERVICE INC., 6229 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale 33308 491-1500
ALL-WAYS TRAVEL SERVICES INC44850 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Lauderdale Lakes 33313:^733-7270
TRIO TRAVEL, 5567 N. University Dr., Tamarac 33321 748-0067
WOODMONT TRAVEL, 6726 N. University Dr., Tamarac 33321 721-9590
TRAVEL TALK, 2542 N. 60th Ave., Hollywood 33021 987-9650
PORTS OF CALL TRAVEL, *120 W. Palmetto Park Rd., Boca Raton 33432 368-0124
North Broward World Gathering Committee
Ludwik Brodzki Chairman
Jewish Federation Of Greater Fort Lauderdale
2999 N.W. 33rd Ave., Fort Lauderdale 33311
Phone 484-8200 |


i
!%,. .....-


rngeo
PamS
Fte Jeunafc Floridian of Ortattr Fort Lauderdale
HP
Friday, February 27,1961
Organizations In The News
rU
Shepard Broad
SHEPARD BROAD
NAMED HONOREE
BY H A D ASS AH
The Florida Mid-Coast Region
of Hadassah, has named Shepard
Broad, American Zionist activist
during Israel's War of Indepen-
dence, to receive its annual
Myrtle Wreth Award. The cere
monies will take place at a brunch
on Tuesday, March 10, at 11 a.m.
at the Holiday Inn, University
Drive, Plantation.
Esther Cannon, president of
the Region, will make the
presentation to Broad, currently
chairman of the board of
directors of American Savings
and Loan Assn.
Special guests will be
Hadassah Associates and
lladassah's Life Members.
Membership chairman Adele
Lewis and Life membership
chairman Evelyn Wilpon are in
charge of all arrangements.
Hadassah's birthday this
Purim will also be celebrated at
the brunch. Anna Tulin. national
chairman of Oral History for
Hadassah, will present a nostal-
gic and emotional word picture of
Hadassah's years of splendid
achievements.
Shepard Broad will be remem-
bered as one of 17 influential
Jews in America who met pri-
vately with David Ben-Gurion at
the end of World War II to plan
for the re-establishment of Israel,
the Jewish Homeland. His life
from that time on reads as one of
the most exciting underground
dramas no fiction writer could
create.
Tickets for the brunch are
available from individual chap-
ters throughout Broward County
and South Palm Beach.
'
>tt;:tA
NORTH BROWARD ORT
Bea Forrest (pictured)
of
Evanston, 111., a member of the
Central Board of World ORT
Anna Tulin
(Organization for Rehabilitation
Through Training), was the
speaker at the North Broward
Region ORT "Mother-to-
Another" luncheon Feb. 9 at
Justin's. Georgia Adler was
chairman for the luncheon with
the contributions supporting
ORT's Social Assistance Project.
Her co-chairmen was Fredella
Harden. Fran Nowick entertained
with songs, including Mamaleh
(Mother) in honor of the occasion.
POMPANO JWV
INSTALLATION MAR. 1
. .The Jewish War Veterans
and Ladies Auxiliary Pompano
Beach Post will install officers at
a paid-up membership brunch at
10:30 a.m. Sunday, March 1, at
the Boca Raton Country Club,
7601 N. Country Club Rd., Boca
Raton. Guests will be charged
$7.25 per person.
Pat Fine will be installed as
commander. Other officers are
Jack Malin, senior vice com-
mander; Al Chardis, first junior
vice commander; Al Rosen,
second junior vice commander;
Louis Eager, quartermaster;
Max Krasner, adjutant; Lester
Cantor, judge advocate; David
Skop, editor; Irving Chook,
David Skop, Milton Weinberg,
trustees.
EDWARD GOLDBERG JWV
Alton Zucker, state com-
mander of the Florida Jewish
War Veterans Department, will
be installing officer at the in-
stallation of officers of the
Edward Goldberg JWV at 10:30
a.m., Sunday, March 8, at Coral
Springs Masonic Lodge, 11030
Wiles Rd. Speaker will be
Mitchell Ceasar, grants man and
lobbyist for Port Everglades
Authority and the cities of
Tamarac and Lauderhill. He'll
discuss Grants for the Commu-
nity and the Veteran. Willard
Zweig of Tamarac, taking office
as commander for the second
term, heads the list of officers.
NEW OFFICERS
SUNRISE JEWISH
CENTER SISTERHOOD
Rabbi Albert N. Troy, of
Sunrise Jewish Center, installed
the following new officers for the
Sunrise Jewish Center
Sisterhood: Shirley Rubin,
president; Molly Haber, Rene
Cohen, Pearl Altner, vice-
presidents; Fay Solof, treasurer;
Estelle Mitchell, Sarah Canter
Ann Druker, Secretaries.
RAISING FUNDS
fOR YOUR ORGANIZATION
COME IN AND SEE US. WE HAVE THE FASTEST SELLERS
AND BEST PRICES AROUND
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CYPRESS
CHASE A PLAYERS
Pictured from left are some of
the Cypress Chase A Players
who'll take part in the three
weekend performances of their
"Star Spangled Revue" begin-
ning Saturday night, Feb. 28 and
Sunday, March 1: George
Vinegar is the Cowardly Lion in
"the Wizard of Oz" segment,
Dave Corell, Tin Man, Fran
Rosen is Dorothy Gayle and Phil
Paul is Strawman. The Male
Chorus includes George Vinegar,
Moe Althoz, Dave Corell, Milton
Steinback, Phil Paul, Dave Tyler.
In the forefront is Jean Gordon,
director and producer of the
show. The musical director is
Ada Greene.
The six performances will be
presented on the Saturdays and
Sundays at 8:30 p.m. in the
Cypress Chase A Clubhouse,
2999 NW 48 Ave., Lauderdale
Lakes. A portion of the proceeds
from the $3 reserved seat ad-
mission will be contributed to the
Israel Emergency Fund. Tickets
are available at the Clubhouse,
Sundays 11 to 1 p.m.; Wed-
nesdays and Thursdays from
6:30 to8 p.m.
PROFESSIONAL
VARIETY IN MARGATE
Sam Bakal, presidentof B'nai
B'rith Men's lodge in Margate,
and the Margate B'nai B'rith
Women's chapter president,
Irene Berger, are combining the
memberships of their two
organizations to present their
Second Annual International
Musical Extravaganza at 8 p.m.,
Sunday, March 8, at Coral
Springs High School, 7201 W.
Sample Rd., for the benefit of
B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tions, the collegiate counterpart,
Hillel, Israel Children's Home,
and the Anti-Defamation League
(ADD of B'nai B'rith.
Paul Shelly and his Orchestra
will be providing the musical
background and accompaniment
for Rick Terry, multi-dialect
comedian who has appeared on
Broadway and Las Vegas;
Accordionist Frank Capri, also a
Las Vegas entertainer, and Paula
Wayne who co-starred with
Sammy Davis Jr. in Golden Boy.
Tickets are $4 and $5 from Chair-
man David Berger, Rose Gorky,
Lou Rosenberg, Bea Miller.
WYNMOOR ENTERTAINERS
The Wynmoor Entertainers are
presenting an original musical
variety show, written and
produced by Ceil Marlowe, and
directed by Gladys Taylor, four
evenings during the week of
March 31 in the Wynmoor
Village Grand Ballroom. Ceil
Marlowe, who studied under Otto
Cessano at Juilliard, has written
Commissioner Craft Buys First
Ticket For 'Celebration 33'
r
Lillian Silitsky, Florida Chair-
man for the Women's League for
Israel "Celebration 33" commit-
tee, sells the first ticket to the
Celebration 33 Theatre Party to
Howard Craft, Broward County
Commissioner. Ruth Sperber,
Florida Representative of the
Women's League, looks on.
Mrs. Sperber said that the
Women's League is participating
with 18 other organizations in
celebration of Israel's 33rd anni-
versary with the world premiere
of the motion picture, The
Chosen, based on Chaim Potok's
novel. The movie is expected to
be shown in 1,000 theatres on
May 11. About 500.000 people
worldwide, contributing $100
each, are expected to be in at-
tendance for what has been called
"The Biggest Theatre Party
Ever."
Commissioner Craft wished all
participating organizations
success in the theatre which will
also include a star-filled enter-
tainment on film.
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