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The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale ( February 13, 1981 )

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S3 IE BK
a guide
thoughtful.
giving
... for the benefit of future generations
Arthur A. Faber, chairman of
thr> Foundation of Jewish Philan-
trophies of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, an-
nounced publication of A Guide
tor Thoughtful Giving For
the Benefit of Future Genera-
tions, newly revised by the
Foundation.
At the same time, he an-
nounced the new members of the
Foundation's board of trustees:
Samuel Goldfarb, Sen. Samuel
Greenberg, Erwin Harvith,
David Jackowitz, Samuel Leber,
Joel Levitt, Sydney Liben, David
Miller, Richard Romanoff, Carl
Schuster, Ronald Schagrin, Sid-
ney Spewak, John Strong, Saul
Weinberger.
Continuing as trustees are
Jacob Brodzki, Leonard Farber,
Seymour Gerson, Leo Goodman,
Alvin Gross, Victor Gruman,
Hyman Indowsky, Milton
Keiner.
Farber said that Schuster and
Indowsky will continue as chair
Attractive college
graduate professional
Jewish lady in Southeast,
Fla. seeks decent Jewish
physician, dentist or,
lawyer early 30s, object
matrimony. Box ACG, The
Jewish Floridian, P.O.
Box 01-2973, Miami 33101
A
QUICHE TO
K VELL OVER
from Swiss Knight, of course
Recipe
One 9' prepared pie crust,
unbaked
One 6 oz. pkg. Swiss Knight
Gruyere Cheese, cut into
small pieces
1 cup milk
Preheat oven to 425"F.
in small saucepan,
combine Swiss
Knight Gruyere
Cheese and milk;
cook over moderate
heat until cheese
melts and mixture
is smooth; remove
from heat and set aside
In small bowl, combine
eggs, onion, salt, pepper and
3 eggs
Vi cup minced onion
1 measuring teaspoon salt
'/< measuring teaspoon white
pepper
'/ measuring teaspoon nutmeg
nutmeg; beat slightly.
Slowly add cheese-
milk mixture
to eggs, stirring
constantly. Pour
into prepared pie
shell. Place on
cookie sheet. Bake
at 425F lor 15
minutes. Then bake
at 350F for 15-20
minutes. Makes 6 servings.
Imported from Switzerland, Swiss Process Gruyere Cheese is mellow,
distinctive and delicious. In foil-wrapped wedges, plain or assorted
flavors, Swiss Knight la a treat because of Its quality.
IMPORTED BY THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC. CHEESE DIVISION
100 BtoorrWngdale Road, White Plains, NY. 10806
Presidents Provide New Insight On
Mar. 29 Jewish Family Conference
men of the Foundation's Legal
and Tax Committee. Serving
with them are the following
attorneys: Gerald Beyer, Elliot
P. Borkson, Alvin Capp, Alfred
P. Denowitz, Jesse Faerber, Jef-
frey M. Fenster, Howard
Greitzer, Martin I. Lipnack, Joel
Reinstein, Barrett M. Rothen-
berg.
Also serving on the Legal and
Tax Committee are the following
accountants: Martin Cass, Judah
H. Ever, Robert Hersh, Martin J.
Kurtz, Sheldon Polish, Sol Soko-
low, Irwin A. Weiser.
Faber said that the Foun-
dation's Guide briefly outlines
the most popular methods of
participation, noting that a gift
to the Foundation can be a source
of enormous satisfaction, as a liv-
ing tribute, and as an enduring
memorial because the generosity
is perpetuated and becomes a
blessing for many generations.
Welcoming community par-
ticipation, Faber said gifts may
be in the form of cash or prop
erty, real estate or securities or
life insurance. Such gifts may be
made during the lifetime of the
donor or under terms of a will,
and may be outright or in trust.
Usually they afford current or
estate tax benefits. Information
is available at the Federation
office, 484-8200, where Joel
Telles, assistant executive
director, is associated with the
Foundation.
The Conference of Presidents
of Jewish Organizations provided
new insight and input into the
planning of the community-wide
"Conference on the Jewish
Family" scheduled for Sunday,
March 29, at the Jewish Com-
munity Center, 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd.. Plantation.
The presidents met this week
with Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz,
director of the Chaplaincy
Commission of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale: Sherwin Rosenstein,
executive director of the Jewish
Family Service of Broward
County; Lorrie T. Blank,
assistant area director of the
American Jewish Congress, and
Abraham J. Gittelson, director of
education of the Federation.
They, along with the Jewish
Community Center and others,
are sponsoring what is expected
to be an annual conference ad-
dressing itself to "The Endan-
gered Specie: The Jewish
Family."
Encouragement was voiced for
the conference because of the
varying pressures that are being
exerted on the traditional Jewish
family. These include inter-
marriage, divorce, zero
population growth, indifference
to Jewish identity, the stresses
on child rearing in single parent
families, as well as in families
where there are children of two
marriages. Also among the
problems to be addressed, with
input to come from teen-agers
who are expected to attend the
conference, are factors that
threaten the survival of the
Jewish family and of Jewish
values.
To help the Conference develop
effective strategies to deal with
the various problems, the Family
Life Conference Committee has
secured the services of Dr. Carl
A. Sheingold, program specialist
in American Jewish Committee's
Jewish Communal Affairs, to be
the keynote speaker. Following
his talk, the participants will be
encouraged to attend one or two
workshops of their choosing
during the afternoon session.
ADL Golf Tourney at Palm Aire
The Palm Aire Golf Tourney
Committee of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith chaired by Michael Davis,
Jay Haddock and Irving Meyers
announced that William Hyn-
dman. III, one of the highest
ranked senior amateur golfers in
the world, will be honored at a
tournament to be held on March
23, at the Palm Aire Country
Club.
Hyndman represented the
United States on ten golf teams,
the Walker Cup five times, the
World Team, the Eisenhower
Trophy Team, and the Captain
America's Cup Team three times.
He played with Jack Nicklaus on
the World Team, played in the
Master's ten times and won the
North and South Amateurs in
1961, the Trans-Mississippi
Amateurs in 1968, the U.S.
Seniors in 1973 and the North-
eastern Amateur Championship
in 1974.
For 68 years, the ADL has been
actively engaged in the defense of
civil rights of all groups regard-
less of creed and ethnic
background. Its preoccupation
with the underlying concepts of
democracy have led the League
to be one of the largest agencies
of its kind in the world, with 27
regional offices in the United
States and offices and cor-
respondents in Israel, the
Vatican, Paris and South
America.
Maxwell House' Coffee
Is Hospitality.
Lox 'n bagels 'n cream cheese is al-
most as much a pan of a traditional
Jewish household as the Mczuzah on
the door. And the most natural ac-
companiment to this American
gastronomical innovation is Maxwell
House Coffee.
The-full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House
K Certified Kosher
has been delighting lovers of good
food for half a century. And why not ?
Who would ever think of serving
first-rate food without great coffee!
So, no matter what your preference
instant or goundwhen you pour
Maxwell House you pour flavor. At
its most satisfyingconsistently cup
after cup after cup.
Maxwell
V HOUSf
/"IS-*
CmmlhoJi
Corpormuom
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century


Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
Dedication of Kopelowitz Playground Draws 400 Families
Jt was the dedication of a spec-
tacular children's playground
(above), free JCC Frisbies,
w bunches of balloons, special
^^prizes, popcorn, lemonade, and
the cooperation of glorious
weather that made Sunday, Jan.
25 a very special day for the JCC
Perlman Campus, 6501 W. Sun-
rise Blvd. Plantation.
Over 400 families gathered to
join in the dedication of the
Kopelowitz Playground, and
later to enjoy a Children's
Theatre Production of "Little
Red Riding Hood."
Anita Perlman, JCC President,
thanked the Kopelowitz Family
for their very generous gift to
Center children.
Many thanks went also to Jean
and Irv Griff, the official "Pop-
corn poppers" and "Lemonade
pourers," and to the JCC Mem-
bership Committee members who
lanned the "Special Day": Jo hi
man, Chairman and JCC vice
The Kopelowitz Family, donors of the facility: June Wolf,
Betty Kopelowitz, Hartley Wolf, Joseph Kopelowitz, Lynn and
Harvey Kopelowitz and their children, Jill and Brian
Kopelowitz.
Jo hi Rot man at the microphone, noting hostage Americans free
at last, called for a moment of silent meditation, before intro-
ducing Mrs. Perlman and the Kopelowitz Family.
w>lar
Jlot
president; Louise Feller, Louise
and David Kingsley, David
Gross, and Ivy and Larry Levine.
'Fantasy Finger Factory'
JCCAD Celebrates First Anniversary
*

The First Anniversary celebration of the Jewish Community
Center Association the Deaf was held Jan. 17. The founders,
coordinators and officers for 1979-1980 were recognized for their
achievements at the award Ceremony.
Pictured left to right, Lore Honigstein, Outstanding Volun-
er; Walter Pease, Jr., treasurer; Roberta Stein, chairperson
the evening; Elli Levy, program associate for the Deaf;
eyer Rindner, incoming president; Julius Fershleiser, retiring
president; Estelle Reiferson, secretary.
... And Still More at JCC
For additional information on the following programs, and
other activities, call the Jewish Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, 792-6700.
day, Feb. 18, at 8 p.m.
Stop Smoking Clinic
"Stop Smoking Clinic," co-
sponsored by JCC and the
American Cancer Society, meets
for six remaining sessions, every
Monday, 7 to 10 p.m., Feb. 16
through March 23.
flB, Defensive Driving Course
JCC and the American Associ-
ation of Retired Persons are co-
sponsoring a Defensive Driving
Course, Tuesday, Feb. 17 and
Friday, Feb. 20, 12:30 to 4:30
p.m. at the Center. The cost for
the two, four-hour sessions is S3
for members of AARP, and $5 for
non-members of AARP.
Portrait Painting
Portrait Painting will be of-
fered at the Center, Tuesdays
^from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. The
^fctight week session will not be
fcmited to Portrait Painting, but
rather all expressions of art.
Book Review Series
"Great Jewish Book Review
Series" will review "Joys of
Yiddish" by Leo Rosten, with
Sylvia Patt, reviewer. Wednes-
Mr. & Mrs. Group
Married and interested in
meeting other married couples?
Want to expand your circle of
friends, or just have a pleasant
evening with pleasant people?
The Mr. & Mrs. Club of JCC is
starting a new monthly social
group for marrieds, 40 to 60 years
old, on Feb. 15, 8 to 10 p.m. This
first "planning" and "coffee and
cake social" is open to members
and non-members. Sara Berger
and Ethel Morris, Cc-chair-
"Fantasy Finger Factory"!
They're a factory and their
product is entertainment:
juggling, puppetry, mime, and
clowning, currently on tour
persons, have planned an ex-
citing evening. All are welcome to
be part of this exciting new
group!
Cultural Art Series
JCC will present Israeli
operatic and concert singers,
Tibor Herdan and Stella Rich-
mond on Saturday, Feb. 28, at 8
p.m. at the Center.
Tickets priced at $5 and $7 are
available at the JCC office. For
group discounts, call 792-6700.
Evolution of Art
The Cultural Arts Department
will sponsor Evolution of Art,
Cubism, Wednesday, Feb. 25, at
8 p.m.
Theatre Guild
Presentation
The JCC Theatre Guild pro-
duction of "You Know I Can't
Hear You When the Water's
Running" will be presented
Saturday, Feb. 21, and Sunday,
Feb. 22, at 8 p.m. in Soref Hall.
Tickets are $2.50 for Center
members, and $3 for non-
members.
Senior Day Camp
The "Senior Day Camp" of the
Jewish Community Center is
accepting registrations for its
new and exciting "Senior Day
Camp" experience. Beginning
Wednesday, Feb. 18, and con-
tinuing for the first and third
Wednesday of each month,
campers will enjoy music, sing-
ing, physical fitness, picnics,
swimming, fishing, vegetable
picking and more. The fee is $6
for six sessions. Campers must
bring their own lunch and a
beverage will be served. This pro-
gram is for Center members only.
Transportation is available on a
first come first serve basis.
Poetry Encounter
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter's Cultural Arts Department,
will sponsor a Poetry Encounter,
Wednesday, Feb. 18 at 7 p.m.
Area poets read their own poetry
for prizes. Kirt Dressier, Editor
"Arts Gazette," .is master of
ceremonies.
throughout the United States.
The versatile duo, Mimi Schultz
and Ed Allen, have been filmed
for educational television, and
have also appeared in Time
Magazine.
Come and visit with the two
zany managers as they make
plans to build a factory like you
have never seen before a
factory filled with puppets and
clowns. Join with their whole
family as they dance and sing
their way through a delightful
1 blend of juggling, mime, and
acrobatics slightly nostalgic
and enormously touching.
"Fantasy Finger Factory" will
appear at the JCC on Sunday,
Feb. 15, at 2 p.m. in Samuel M.
Soref Hall. Tickets are $2 for
members and $3.50 for
members.
non-
Theatre Guild
Presents
Comedy Hit
The Jewish Community Center
announces the Theatre Guild
Production of three of the four
plays in "You Know I Can't Hear
You When the Water is Run-
ning" by Robert Anderson on
Saturday, Feb. 21 at 8 p.m., and
Sunday, Feb. 22 at 2 p.m. and 8
p.m. Tickets are available at the
JCC. Prices are: members $2.50
and non-members $3.
Simm Gottesman, director, has
an MA in Theatre Arts from the
University of Michigan, as well
as a television engineering
degree. Gottesman has created a
family spirit amongst the Guild
players. Each one has agreed to
work on production as well as
performance.
Sally and Sam Belfer co-star in
"I'm Herbert." Mel Ashley,
Arlene Horrow, Syvil Marro and
Alzira Schall are in "Footsteps,"
and Eileen Fruchtman, Sam
Gutterman, Scott Snyder and
Robert Stevens are in "Shock of
Recognition.'' Be rn ice A shley
and Don Harris axe co-producers.
Willis Shulman has designed the
tet.
Spirit of JCC
It's too early to peek, but Soref
Hall is being refurbished for its
Dedication Day March 1. Evelyn
Gross and her committee have
plans to make it a memorable
day.
"Unity in the Jewish Com-
munity" was the theme that
Anita Perlman, JCC President,
stressed at the Intra-Faith
Luncheon held at Temple
Emanu-El. The audience was
most enthusiastic and receptive.
The interchange of ideas that
came from the workshops con-
firmed Mrs. Perlman "s message.
Wanderlust is the name, and
going places is the game. JCC
has planned a series of trips of
different types. Reservations are
coming in. Have you made
yours?
Music, Music, Music JCC
las organized a four part choir
that will specialize in Hebrew and
Yiddish music under the direc-
tion of talented Mirian Breitman.
If you love to sing, don't miss the
opportunity to be a part of what
is expected to become a force in
Jewish music in the community.
If you hear Perlman Campus
rocking with all the popular tunes
be advised that the energetic
ladies of the Jazzercize classes
are having fun and getting into
shape.
"Tzinderella" is coming to
town. Jack Fishman, director,
had auditions. It won't be easy to
choose his actors. There's a lot of
talent in our town.
Mai and Bernice Ashley and
Sam and Sally Belfer have roles
in "You Know I Can't Hear You
When The Water's Is Running."
The couples met at the old JCC.
They've remained friends and
continued their interest in the
theatre. Don't forget -- Feb. 21
and 22!!!
"The Osmosis of Creativity"
Interesting concept. Poetess
Judy Rosenberg will give a
course of study of developing the
creativity that is in YOU. Watch
for an announcement of starting
"You are There A Trip
Through Israel." Harry
Dobkin asks: "Where are you?"
It's a fantastic course headed
each week by an Israeli who takes
the class to a different part of
Israel, with an insight that only
an Israeli can give.


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
February 13, 1981

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00181

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
February 13, 1981

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00181

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward

Full Text
>e
Jems,
WTani&in
OF GREATER FORT LAUDEtfDALE
folume 10 Number 4
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday. February 13, 1981
I Fnd Sfiochtt
Price 35 Cents
g Nations Call for Holy War Against Israel
Israel Urges U.S. and Others to Stop Selling Arms to Saudis
From JTA Sources
.JERUSALEM After the 37 of the 41 Islamic nations
Jummit attendance at Taif, Saudi Arabia, issued a call
lr jihad (Holy War) against Israel, Israel stepped up its
kmpaign to get Western nations to halt sale of advanced
eaponry to the Saudis.
Israel's Foreign Ministry spokesman, Naftali Lavie,
lid; "The Saudis are armed to the teeth, if you take into
Lnsideration the size of their population and the area they
in r to defend. It's not legitimate to arm a country
kving the sword of aggression and war."
|Israel recently protested to West Germany about
ports that it was planning to sell several hundred
lopurd tanks to Saudi Arabia.
saudi Arabia has been pressing Washington to have
knl) racks and additional fuel tanks installed on the U.S.
1'. warplunes which the Saudis are planning to buy.
k( i additions would extend the range and offensive
June 30 for Elections?
Depending upon two votes to be taken by the 120-mem-
ber Knesset, the elections that will lead probably to a new
Prime Minister in Israel is tentatively set for June 30. A
17-member Knesset committee, with eight opposition
party members abstaining, voted for the Tuesday, June
30, date four months ahead of the scheduled end of
Prime Minister Begin's four-year term.
capability of the most advanced fighter-interceptor plane
in the world.
Israeli newspapers have reported that Israel has also
complained to the U.S. that Saudi Arabia and Jordan
have been violating an arms sales agreement by supplying
Iraq with U. S. -made artillery to fight its war with Iran.
Meanwhile in Beirut, there was a report that the Iraqis
are trying to renew diplomatic relations, broken off in the
wake of the 1967 Six-Day Arab-Israeli war, with the U.S.
The Iraqi News Agency said Iraq wants the U.S. to take a
"positive, acceptable stand toward the conflict between
Arab states and Israel."
And in France, additional Mirage fighter bomber planes
are being readied for shipment to Iraq to supplement the
60 already sent to that country.
And from Saudi Arabia comes a report from outgoing
U.S. Ambassador John C. West that the Reagan
Administration will have a "real problem unless it ad-
dresses two key issues, Jerusalem and the Palestinian
problem." He said a solution to the Palestinian problem
"ultimately involves letting Palestinians determine what
their future will be." He urged a "special relationship" be-
tween the U.S. and the Saudis because Saudi Arabia is
America's major supplier of foreign oil, and provides
America with crude at "reasonable prices," in addition to
investing heavily in U.S. government securities.
Interfaith Forum Open to All Feb. 22
a ^ 1
1 w

ml i mmm
Von
. Carl Hermann Voss. inter-
anally renowned Protestant
fman. and Dr. Steven T.
chairman of the Dept. of
:ion. Dartmouth College.
Dr. Katt
Hanover, N.H.. will talk "all
about the issues we are (usually)
afraid to talk about to each
other" on problems confronting
the Christian and Jewish com-
munities.
They are the keynote speakers
of the Interfaith Forum
scheduled for 3 p.m., Sunday,
Feb. 22, at Fort Lauderdale High
School, 1600 NE 4th Ave. The
school is easily reached from N.
Andrews Ave., to 16th St., then
east four blocks, and left to the
rear of the school where there is
ample parking space.
Indicative of the response to
this first such county-wide effort
originated by the Community
Relations Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale with the aid of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, Florida Region
office, are the additional spon-
sors: Broward County Clergy
Council (BC 3) which includes the
presiding clergy of ministerial,
rabbinic and diocesan groups;
the Church Women United of
Broward County, and the
Broward County Human
Relations Division.
Additional interest has come
from television and radio stations
in making the public aware of the
Interfaith Forum. Selkirk Com-
munications Cable 25 had aired
two discussions about the
Interfaith Forum; WEXY 1520
will broadcast an interview
Saturday morning, Feb. 14, at
10:30 a.m., conducted by Claire
Mitchel; and WCKT-TV Channel
7 will televise a panel discussion
about the Forum with par-
ticipants Rev. Donald Bautz,
coordinator for BC 3; Martha
Thrasher of Church Women
United, and Edmund Entin, CRC
chairman, at 9:30 a.m., Sunday,
Feb. 22. WFTL Radio 1400 will
have a one-hour call-in about the
Forum from 11 a.m. to noon,
Sunday, Feb. 15.
Entin will be the moderator for
the Forum which will have the
speakers answering questions
speakers answering guestions
posed in writing by people at-
tending the 3 p.m., Sunday. Feb.
22, program in Fort Lauderdale
High School. Admission is free.
The entire community is invited
to hear Dr. Voss and Dr. Katz.
Dr. Voss is chairman of the
Humanities Division, Edward
Waters College, Jacksonville. He
has lectured at various colleges
around the country and in
various countries. He has con-
ducted tours of Arab nations and
Israel annually since 1949.
Recipient of many awards from
Christian and Jewish
organizations, he is also a prolific
writer of articles and books,
including "Living Religions of
the World: Our Search for
Meaning.
Dr. Katz, in addition to
serving as Chairman of Religion
at Dartmouth, also teaches
religion and is in demand as a
Continued on Page 5
Super Sunday Nationally Raised $14 Million for UJA
lewisfa Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
volunteers (like those pictured here and in the
. 30 issue of The Jewish Floridian) among the
)w than 17,500 in more than 70 communities in
U.S. who raised more than $14.5 million on
or Sunday, Jan. 18, for the 1981 United
mil Appeal Campaign.
ike the report from national UJA offices in
York that among the 128,000 gifts were
ly from non-givers," so, too, did the Jewish
e ration's volunteers record more than 900
contributors" among the 1,200 who pledged
than $75,000 foi the North Broward cam-
i for UJA and the Israel Emergency Fund.
I As Super Sunday National Chairman
rme J. Dick called the national effort: "The
successful mass appeal in peacetime in our
iwish Women: Topic for
omen's Group Board Members
/omen" is the major topic for Education Day dis-
ion at 10 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 25, when the
>bers of the boards of Jewish women's organiza-
meet under the sponsorship of the Presidents'
icil of Organizations of the Jewish Federation of
bter Fort Lauderdale. The meeting, to be held in
.auderdale Lakes Public Safety Building, behind
Hall at 4300 NW 36th St.. will have as its panel:
{ley Miller, a past president of the Women's
sion of the Federation, recently returned from
el, and now director of the Fort Lauderdale office
^he Jewish National Life, whose topic will be
iman-Jewish"; Claire Mitchel of the Broward
inty Human Relations Division, who conducts a
"tly radio program on WEXY, speaking about
Toman- Female," and Florence Straus, a vice presi-
|t of the Women's Division, whose subject will be
foman- Human Relations."
loz Entin, chairman of the Women's Presidents'
Continued on Page 9
history. This incredible celebration ot sharing is
eloquent testimony to the unity and commitment
of the American Jewish community. Super
Sunday helped bring American Jews closer to-
gether and demonstrated clearly our deep concern
for our people in Israel, in our communities and
throughout the world."
UJA National Chairman Herschel Blumberg
praised volunteer workers for the "exciting,
inspiring and highly infectious spirit they demon-
strated on Super Sunday. The results are enor-
mously gratifying and reflect the growing
determination of our American community to
fulfill its responsibility to all Jews in need,
everywhere."
It was reported that at least 25 other com-
munities in the U.S. will hold similar events in
coming weeks.
Polish Jew Who Converted
Named Archbishop of Paris
PARIS A Polish Jew who converted to Roman
Catholicism in Paris in 1940, and whose mother died
in Auschwitz in 1943, has been named archbishop of
the largest archdiocese in France.
Monsignor Jean-Marie Lustiger, 54, succeeds
Cardinal Francois Marty as the 139th archbishop of
Paris. Lustiger is the bishop of Orleans.
Lustiger's parents came to live in Paris early this
century. Lustiger was born in Paris and attended
schools there. Later the family moved to Orleans
where Lustiger was converted to Catholicism. His
parents, along with thousands of other Jews living in
France, were transported by the Nazis during World
War II to concentration camps. Lustiger's parents
were sent to the Auschwitz death camp. A spokesman
for the archbishop's office said he believed the father
escaped and was living in Paris. Lustiger is reported
to have said that his parents were "agnostics."
Circumcision Seminar Scheduled
At Mt. Sinai Medical Center
Because North Broward County, for one, has no
officially certified or halachicaUy qualified mohel
(circumciser), the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale is joining in sponsorship of an all-day
seminar on "Medical and Religious Aspects of Cir-
cumcision" at Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater
Miami Beach, 4300 Alton Rd.
Mount Sinai is a co-sponsor of the event which will
have the morning session for professionals devoted to
surgical, medical and Jewish law problems concerning
circumcision.
The afternoon session will be opened to the general
public with a .talk on new challenges to ritual circum-
cision and conclude with a question and answer
session.
Other sponsors include Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration, Jewish Federation of South Broward, the
Rabbinical Council of Greater Miami, and the Brith
Milah Board of America.


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Federation-UJA Events Listed

PALM SPRINGS
Among the activities sched-
uled in conjunction with various
communities is that for the resi-
dents of Palm Springs Phase II
whose committee is pictured
above. The committee includes
Sol Dolleck, chairman: Hannah
Unger, co-chairman; Morris
Kdelman, Murray Edoff, Joseph
Goldstein. Marcus Lebster,
Rosalind Margolin, Murray
Saidman, Laura Savid. Seymour
Sheinman, Etta Sklar, Harriette
Sweig, Israel Sweig, Nathan
Unger, Abe Wiener, Irving
Wiener.
So supportive has been the
Palm Springs community that
when the breakfast meeting is
held at 10 a.m., Sunday, Feb. 22,
in the Phase II clubhouse, a
plaque will be presented honoring
all residents "who shared because
they cared."
Morris and Mildred Kushner
(pictured) will be the honored
guests when residents of Oriole
Golf and Tennis 1 have their UJA
Breakfast meeting at 10 a.m.,
Sunday, Feb. 22, at Temple Beth
Am in Margate. The speaker will
be Herman Fineberg who has
served International B'nai B'rith
and who is a resident of the com-
munity. David E. Brill is UJA
committee chairman with
Clarence Hourvitz and Micky
Danberg as his co-chairmen.
BERMUDA CLUB
Bernard Simms is chairman of
Um Bermuda Club UJA Com-
mittee which is holding an even-
ing meeting, at 8 p.m., Wed-
nesday, March 4, in the
Recreation Hall. Herman Solnit
will be honored at the meeting
with Abraham J. Gittelson,
director of education at Jewish
Federation and authority on
Middle East, speaking.
OAKLAND HILLS
William Katzberg is scheduled
to speak with the residents of
Oakland Hills
William Katzberg is scheduled
to speak when the residents of
Oakland Hills gather for dinner
at 6:30 p.m., Sunday, March l.at
Temple Beth Am in Margate.
Alfred I. Cohen will be honored
for his commitment to Judaism,
according to Gus Spinder, chair-
man of Oakland Hills UJA com-
mittee, who has Al Cohen serving
as his co-chairman.
POMPANO BEACH SO.
Abe Gittelson is being called
on again to be a speaker. This
time for the 10:30 a.m., Sunday,
March 8, brunch scheduled for
the residents of Pompano Beach
South who will be meeting at
Temple Sholom, 132 SE 11th
Ave., Pompano Beach. Dr. Adolf
Lowe is chairman of the com-
munity's UJA committee.
OTHER EVENTS
Temple Beth Am congregants
will have a breakfast meeting at
10 a.m., Sunday, March 30:
Congregation Beth Hillel of Mar-
gate will have its breakfast meet-
ing for UJA on Sunday, March
22; and residents of Wynmoor
Village will meet at 10 a.m., Sun-
day, April 5, at Holiday Ion,
Plantation, for a brunch with Joel
Telles, assistant executive direc-
tor of the Federation, and
GOOD
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speaker on Middle East affairs,
as the speaker.
Judge Leo Brown, who served
on the bench in New York City
after service with the Marine and
Aviation Commission, will be the
honored guest, according to
Wynmoor Village's UJA
Chairman, Louis Schneider.
BIG INCREASE NOTED
Residents of Paradise Gardens
1 and 2, Continental Village.
Koyal Park Gardens, Wingate,
and Lakewood on the Green
joined forces Sunday morning,
Jan. 25 at Temple Beth Am in
Margate for a 100 percent in-
crease in attendance and 50 per-
cent increase in commitments to
the 1981 UJA Campaign.
CASTLE GARDENS
To round out this year's UJA
Campaign, Castle Gardens resi-
dents held a Campaign Brunch
on Feb. 8 in their main clubhouse.
Max Kronish, Castles' Chair-
man, reported that the area's
UJA Committee was bringing in
1981 pledges at a record pace.
This year's committee in-
cludes: Lou Simon, Ralph
Kagan. Sunny Friedman, Sylvia
Gottlieb, Michael Weiner, Harry
Freeman, Irving Elishewitz.
Jesse Isaacs, Molly Meltzer, Nat
Meltzer, Henry Trossman, Joe
Waxman, Sam Mandelberg,
Harry Cohen. Barney Ross, Max
Kronish. Leonard Levitt, Milton
Meltzer, Phil Levine, Lou Gold,
Sam Scheinhorn, Philip Erstling,
and Ben Dantzker.
PINE ISLAND RIDGE
Pine Island Ridge residents
have made final preparations for
their second annual UJA Break-
fast set for Feb. 15 in their Ridge
Room of their main Clubhouse.
Terri Marder, UJA Chairper-
son; Co-chairmen Charles Block.
Mort Casper, and Bert Roths-
child, and many of their com-
mittee, had started off their cam-
paign with a meeting doubling
last year's early commitments to
the campaign.
Abe Gittelson, noted educator
and public speaker, will address
this year's Breakfast audience.
ARAGON
Manny Hagler, chairman of
the Jewish Federation-United
Jewish Appeal Committee in the
Aragon community of Sunrise,
announced plans completed for
the 10 a.m., Sunday, Feb. 22
breakfast to be held in the
Aragon clubhouse.
Serving with him on the com-
mittee which is seeking a capa-
city turnout for the meeting are
his wife, Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Cohen, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Feld-
man, Mr. and Mrs. Irving Green-
fader, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Israel
and Mi. and Mrs. Jacob
Rosenzweig.
Hawaiian Gardens 8
Hawaiian
Gardens Phase
VIII will conduct
a, breakfast for
United Jewish
Appeal on Sun-
day, Feb. 22, at
10 a.m., at the
Phase VIII
Clubhouse.
Everyone is wel-
come to attend.
At the breakfast,
the residents of
Phase VIII will
honor Samuel
Delfin, for his
outstanding con-
tributions to
Jewish causes.
The Phase
VIII UJA Com-
mittee consists of
chairman Jack
Alper, Ike
Assael, Frank
Stein, David
Levine, and Bea Samuel Delfin
Richelson.
r
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One reason why
more Jewish families
select Riverside.
More Jewish personnel
At Riverside, we have the largest staff of
Jewish personnel in Florida. It's been that way since 1935,
and it's one of the major reasons why more Jewish families
select Riverside than any other funeral director.
At Riverside, families find total dedication to
Jewish tradition. A genuine feeling of understanding.
Economical assistance in arranging funeral services
between Florida and New York or anywhere else in the
world. And real concern for each family's needs and
wishes, regardless of financial circumstance.
Today, if Riverside service is becoming the
standard by which people are comparing all the others,
there is a reason. Riverside people. They know Jewish
tradition. And they honor it.______________
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Inverrary Community
Dines And Dances for UJA
Joseph Kaplan LeeDreiling Israel Amitui
<$L A ;'j*Jm
Israel Amitai. noted Israeli
television producer/ director,
author and journalist, who has
provided audiences with thought-
provoking commentary as he dis-
cusses an up-date on the Middle
East, will be the keynote speaker
at the United Jewish Appeal
dinner dance for the entire In-
verrary community.
Joseph Kaplan and Lee Dreil-
ing, chairmen, with the men and
women combining forces to make
the 19M1 UJA effort the greatest
ever, are anticipating a record
turnout for the Wednesday, Feb.
18, event in the Inverrary
Country Club.
Both Kaplan and Mrs. Dreiling
said that those attending will
hear one of Israel's most dis-
tinguished commentators. A
sabra, Amitai, who served in the
llaganah, has written exten-
sively about the Egypt-Israel
peace agreement ever since he
covered first-hand the meetings
at Camp David which led to the
accords.
AJ Congress Calls for Probe Of
Arab Boycott Expansion
The American Jewish
Congress called for a federal in-
vestigation of Arab plans to
expand the economic boycott of
Israel.
According to reports from Taif,
Saudia Arabia, where leaders of
37 of the 41 Moslem nations and
the Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation concluded a four-day sum-
mit meeting, a formal declaration
approved an expansion of the
boycott to all Moslem states.
In a letter to Treasury Secre-
tary Donald Regan, Howard M.
Squadron, president of the
American Jewish Congress,
pointed out that the Treasury
Department is required by the
Internal Revenue Code to main-
tain a list of nations that partici-
pate in the boycott.
The American Jewish Con-
gress leader urged that any
countries that join the boycott as
u result of the Tail declaration be
added to the U.S. list. He said the
Treasury should take "appro-
priate action to insure that U.S.
firms and businessmen comply
with the anti-boycott law."
The most recent quarterly
Treasury Department report on
the boycott lists 14 Aral; coun-
tries that participate in the boy-
colt. The reported terms of the
action taken in Tail could more
than double the size of the boy-
colt, which seeks to punish firms
that do business in Israel. Under
the declaration, such non-Arab
nations as Turkey. Pakistan and
Indonesia would be expected to
join ihe boycott.
The American Jewish Con-
gress, which receives support
from the Federation, has been
active in efforts to lessen the im-
pact of the boycott through legis-
lation to protect Americans from
boycott demands.
Bonaventure Honors Kays
The Kuys
Phil Cohen, Chairman of the
1981 UJA Campaign for Bona-
venture, has announced plans for
the Feb. 24 Dinner .o be held at
the Bonaventure Country Club.
Annette and Sheldon Kay will
be honored at this gala affair for
their dedication and contri-
butions to countless community
organizations. "The Kays," said
Cohen, "have greatly added to
the quality of life for all those
who have been fortunate enough
to know them. We, at Bonaven-
ture. are grateful to have the op-
portunity to pay tribute to
Annette and Sheldon."
Annette Kay is an active
member in Hadassah, B'nai
B'rith Women and ORT. For the
past four years, she has been
Chairman of the Women's
League for Israel at Bonaven-
ture; has been active in PTA and
has taken part in entertaining the
Senior Citizens at the Jewish
Community Center during
Hanuka the past two years.
Sheldon Kay has played a
major role in the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale's
efforts at Bonaventure. He is a
member of B'nai B'rith at Bona-
venture, the Miami Beach Junior
Chamber of Commerce, the
Miami Beach Hotel Owners'
Association and the Home Build-
ers Association of South Florida.
The committee working with
Phil Cohen for the Feb. 24 Bona-
venture UJA Dinner includes:
Mickey Cohen, Mr. and Mrs.
Saul Padek, Mr. and Mrs. Alvin
Stein. Mr. and Mrs. Phil Saks,
and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert
Sadkin.
Leo Goodman Testimonial
Story and pictures of the heart-warming community tribute to Leo
Goodman, immediate past president of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, by more than 300 friends, including a large
group from Bergen County, N.J., Thursday night, Feb. 5, at Wood-
lands Country Club will be featured in the next issue (Feb. 27) of The
Jewish Floridian.
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Friday. February 13. 1961
Volume 10
9-1 ADAR 5741
Number 4
A Provocative Document
That Needs Careful Study
The 119-page study by the World Jewish Con-
gress which was made public at the recent assembly
of the WJC in Jerusalem deserves careful attention
by those who are concerned with Israel-diaspora re-
lations. The tendency by some to hasty attacks
should be avoided.
There is no question that the report, two years
in the making, is controversial. The report was not
formally presented to the WJC gathering nor was it
endorsed in a resolution. WJC President Edgar
Bronfman stressed that the WJC "is neither respon-
sible for nor committed to accept or support any of
them."
This is a correct position. Some of the 'con-
cerns*' expressed, such as over the control of the
Orthodox rabbinate, Israel's settlement policies in
the West Bank and Gaza, and its electoral system
will find people on both sides of the argument in the
diaspora as in Israel.
Bronfman's collective statement "We do
believe, however, that this thoughtful, sensitive and
significant report warrants the serious consideration
of concerned Jews everywhere" should be listened
to. The 33 member International Commission .
chaired by Guy de Rothschild of Paris which pre-
pared this report is made up of some of the most
prominent, thoughtful and concerned Jews in the
diaspora and in Israel.
Their warning that criticism of Israel's policies
by Jews in the United States and elsewhere should
not be "swept under the rug," but must be openly
expressed to relieve "increasing strains" in Israeli-
diaspora relations, must be heeded.
In recent years, there has been much more effort
both in Israel and the diaspora to improve relations
in order to create a real partnership between the
Jewish people and the Jewish State. The WJC study,
while certainly open to criticism, could provide a
catalyst for needed thought and discussion.
Our Former Hostages
After all the divisiveness and polarization that
seemed to emerge during the recent national election
campaigns, in part fueled by the unfortunate com-
bustion of fundamentalist religion and politics, the
American response to the hostage tragedy discloses
that our national solidarity as a people is greater
than the tendency toward fragmentation.
Americans supported the hostages as fellow
citizens who command our support and respect, and
no one made distinctions as to whether they were
Christians or Jews, black or white, men or women.
They were Americans all.
That unity and solidarity must be preserved in
the coming months as we seek new beginnings with
the Reagan Administration to face the hard chal-
lenges ahead of us all in the 1980s.
Urge Criminals Be Prosecuted
WASHINGTON
Representatives William Lehman
ID.. Fla.l and Hamilton Fish Jr.
(R. N.Y.I have circulated to their
colleagues in the House of Repre-
sentatives a letter to President
Reagan requesting his commit-
ment to assure that Nazi war
criminals living in the United
States are finally brought to
justice.
In a letter to President Rea-
gan. Lehman and Fish call for full
funding for the Justice Depart-
ment's Office of Special Investi-
gations, which is responsible for
the investigation and prosecution
of Nazi war criminals in the
I nited States who fraudulently
obtained United States citizen-
ship. At present, the Justice De-
- xtrtrrteBl's Office of Special.
Investigations has IT ca ea in the
courts and 260 others under
investigation.
APPROXIMATELY $3 mil-
lion, or one-tenth of the percent of
the Justice Department Budget,
is required to continue the Office
of Special Investigations, which
was established in the Criminal
Division of the Department of
Justice in 1979. "This amount
has been consistently and un-
animously authorized and ap-
propriated by the Congress in the
past." the letter states.
The actions of the Attorney
General and Justice Department
are of immeasurable importance
in demonstrating to the courts,
foreign government!' and others
the priority our government now
attaches to ridding our country of
those war criminals who faund
sanciuar.. here." the letter states.
IT WOULD be an exag-
geration. I admit, to say that
CBS Television is carrying on a
war against the Jews. On the
other hand, a good case can be
made in support of the thesis.
On the heels of the tempest in
the Vanessa Redgrave teapot
comes the most recent CBS
assault in the form of the pro-
duction the other night called
Bunker." a dramatization of the
final weeks of the life of Adolf
11 itler and his Third Reich.
NOT EVEN so distinguished
an actor as Anthony Hopkins,
whose rnle as Pierre Bezhuchov
in Leo Tolstoys "War and
Peace is one of the immortal
achievements of television
theater production, could have
pulled this putrescent soap opera
Irom the gas chamber of its own
despair.
In examine the production in
all critical seriousness is to give
Hunker" the historic and artis-
Im justice it does not deserve
and that in turn it gives neither
to accuracy nor to the Jews
themselves.
Hut it is important to under-
stand that Bunker" invests in
Hitler. Bormann. Goebbels.
Goering. Speer and Co. the kind
of historical credibility that they
did not have in life, that in retro-
spect they do not deserve and
i Ml. Imm the days of Nuremberg
onward, we hoped internationally
to deny 1 hem.
THE CBS production shows
Hitler and his pals to be tragic
rWMAH* RCTURJ4

| types who lived before their time
and who have therefore been ill-
used by history. The production.
would you believe the gall?, com-
menting like a Greek chorus on
the misfortunes of these grand
Wagnerian heroes, holds out the
promise someday for a new judg-
ment and vindication of their
decade and a half of international
terrorism.
Anthony Hopkins as Hitler
says this over and over again as
the end. the imperative of his
suicide, becomes ever more clear.
He has nearly achieved, says
Hopkins Hitler, a "solution" to
the Jewish problem a solution
whose effectiveness the world has
yet to recognize. Too bad for the
world now. he rants obsessively;
at some future date in history, it
will see the error of its failure to
have learned his lesson well.
The shattering lesson is clear:
at some future dale in history,
i Ik- world will take up where
Hitler left off in his solution to
the Jewish problem and bring the
solution to its proper conclusion,
which one is meant clearly to
understand is the universal
annihilation of the Jews.
NOWHERE in the CBS
l""'-niiii is there an effort except
by dramatic implication to
suggest that Hitler was wrong or
that his lesson is bestial and one
mankind lietler mot learn.
In lacl. the Hitler Guide to
Jewish Genocide is given corn-
lulling credence with Hop
kins II it lei engaging in cease-
It ss paranoid (anting alxiut plots
and I let ruv wtH (and the woridl, and the rein-
n. mis di ins Thousand-Year
li. icli lie at his leet in his final
Berlin retreat because his arrm
lias deserted him to make deals
will, tin enemy: because his
iiIIhti cn|i- has It-It him in tin
lurch: In cause even his trusted
-nil kick doering. holed up in
lieu liu -sgmk'ii iwhich nolxiiiv in
iiu casi .'.ii mice even comes
tin-, in pionouncing correctly I.
; i- mvii lit to abandon the
sinking N.i/i ship l stale alonn
with what Hitler conceives til as
the to-ai In H'us abandonment b>
I n i Ins. ihe Hunker paranoiu
11.ut in. |isi-\\nrlii War I (iii
< "iilinued on Page 17
How Racism Paralyzes Life in Boston
A year has gone by since
Hoston. hk-eding from racist stab
wounds, looked deep into its sick
civic psyche ana applied to those
wounds a tourniquet known as
A Covenant for Kacial Peace."
Thousands of decent citizens
signed the covenant and affixed
to their garments a symbolic pin
showing an olive branch with
leaves in colors of the various
races
In the next 12 months, friction
bewean blacks and whites inten-
sified, incidents of interracial vio-
lence were frequent, and the olive
branch began to wither. A badly -
divided School Committee s
reactionary majority fired the
Superintendent. Dr. Robert
Wood, who had taken on that
thankless job after a brilliant
career at MIT and as president of
the University of Massachusetts.
Boston's racial woes spilled over
on to front pages of newspapers
in cities with better records for
racial harmony.
RECENTLY, the disease came
to fever pitch at Harvard across
the river in Cambridge when
Lydia P. Jackson, president of
the Black Students Association,
after receiving a series of obscene
phone calls threatening rape, got
a "Ten days to kill" message
from a source boasting "KKK
Unite."
As manifestations of virulent
racism continued. Mayor Kevin
While finally acknowledged
publicly that the Hub is a racist
SAW::*:*:**
x
Robert
:W:WS:::W::
City In an effort to try to end the
killings, shootings, lire bomb-
ings, rock throw ings. attacks on
school buses, and other acts Hi
racial violence, the mayor ap-
pointed Frank Junes. |5, execu-
tive head of a spanking new
Boston Committee.
Jones, who is black and a
former vice dean <>t the Universi-
ty of Pennsylvania Law School,
had served as director of legal
affair* lor the U.S. Community
Service Administration and had
been dispatched to Miami by
Washington to try to stem
Florida's own severe outburst of
noting.
ALONG WITH Jones, the top
deck of the Boston Committee
seeking racial peace ia occupied
by Humberto Cardinal Mediros;
Davis Taylor, chairman of the
board of Affiliated Publications
which owns The Huston Ubtn \
and Richard Hill, chairman oi iht
First National Bank. This is an
awesome team.
Somewhere along the way. this
observer noted that Jones was to
operate nil a kitty ol $200,000,
hall contributed by private
charitable and business sources
and hall lie thecilv
All this was much on my mind
I he other night when I met a
lormer Boston Public School
teacher with whom I had worked
clnsek in the days when Boston s
intergroup tensions consisted
primarily ol Jewish-Catholic con-
flicts. The teacher is Catholic. 1
was ;i professional representative
oi the Jewish community.
Together, we approached the
gentleman then serving a
superintendent of the Boston
schools, asking tor financial help
to initiate an mtercultural
education program in those
schools.
Wi got the money a
munificent $500
THIS UNHAPPY excursion
hack to the 1950s is not recalled
lor laughs That 1600 budget was
typical ol lunds doled out bj
those occupying the Huston
power structure. 1 remember well
a meeting in crisis a few years
later when Boston > Roxbury
section was aflame with anger
and destruction. At that meeting.
Bostons captains of industry
were urged to raise funds for
summer jobs for blacks The
banks, business houses, and the
utilities came up with a paltry
S60.000: and the civi fires con-
tinued to roar.
,, Continued on Page 1 7 -
____,.


Jewish Chaplain Met Returned Hostages
, The hostages are finally free.
. When they arrived in Wies-
baden, the Jewish men among
them Barry Rosen, Jerry
Plotkin, and Malcolm Kalp
found U.S. Air Force Chaplain
Joel H. Schwartzman waiting to
talk with them, provide them
with any spiritual counseling
they needed, and give them gifts
from Jewish Welfare Board
(JWB), which receives support
from Fort Lauderdale Federa-
tion.
Chaplain Schwartzman, who is
stationed at Ramstein Air Force
Base in Germany, was sent on his
mission by Rabbi Joseph B.
Messing, Director of JWB's
Armed Forces and Veterans Ser-
vices and Jewish Chaplaincy
Commission.
In an overseas telephonic
report to Rabbi Messing, with
JWB Executive Vice-President
Arthur Rotman listening in,
^Chaplain Schwartzman told how
he had met the returnees and had
given the three Jewish men
among them JWB Prayer Books,
JWB Holy Scriptures, necklaces
with Jewish stars which JWB
had sent to Jewish chaplains as
part of their supplies for distribu-
tion to Jewish service personnel,
and the Chaplains' Tablet pins
with Jewish stars. Schwartzman
drew upon these supplies to make
gifts to the returned hostages.
Since they were freed on Tu
B'Shvat, he also gave them JNF
tree certificates.
"All three men are relating well
to Judaism," Chaplain Schwartz-
man told Rabbi Messing. "They
are wearing the JWB necklaces
and Barry Rosen is proudly
wearing the Chaplain's Tablet
with the Jewish star."
JWB Serves Worldwide
Beached in Chicago, JWB
President Robert L. Adler ex-
pressed profound satisfaction
that Chaplain Schwartzman had
gone to Wiesbaden and had
ministered to the freed hostages.
There are 55 Jewish chap-
lains, some of whom are stationed
at bases throughout the world
who can make themselves avail-
t able for such emergencies, in
addition to carrying on their
regular work," Adler said. "Just
within the last two months, we
have had Jewish chaplains
serving the earthquake victims in
southern Italy and the Cuban
refugees in Florida. I am ex-
tremely grateful that Chaplain
Schwartzman was able to go to
Wiesbaden and serve these
people who endured so much
these past 14 months."
Chaplain Schwartzman parti-
cipated in conducting an
ecumenical service for all the hos-
tages on Thursday night and
conducted Shabbat services for
the three returned hostages and
U.S. Jewish military personnel
stationed in Wiesbaden.
Prior to the freed hostages' de-
parture for America, Chaplain
Schwartzman conducted a prayer
service in which he talked about
Jewish values, the need for un-
derstanding, and the need to
establish the concept of true
values.
Rosen, a 36-year-old press
attache from Brooklyn, spent six
months in maximum security
prison and was accused of being a
"master spy and plotter." But
his Iranian captors did allow him
the packages of Passover food
sent from the U.S. which JWB
sent to all the Jewish hostages in
1980. He revealed to Chaplain
Schwartzman that prior to his
captivity, he had been involved in
helping Jews get out of Iran.
Plotkin, the 45-year-old luck-
less businessman from Sherman
Oaks, Calif., who was "seeking
business opportunities" in
Teheran and was visiting the
U.S. embassy when it was seizecr,
had a religious medal ripped off
his neck.
The 42-year-old Kalp, origi-
nally from Brooklyn, now from
Fairfax, Va., accused of being a
C.I. A. agent, spent 374 of the 444
days in solitary confinement and
was beaten.
The work of Jewish chaplains
and all other services of JWB are
made possible by the support of
Federations, UJ A-Federation
Campaign of Greater New York,
and Jewish Community Centers
andYM&YWHAs.
Dinner Chairman Named
for Woodlands Bonds
Israel Sending Two Teen-Agers Here
Two Israeli high school stu-
dents who are among the group
chosen by the State of Israel for
an exchange program that takes
them to various cities in the
United States will be guests in
the Greater Fort Lauderdale area
for three days in March.
"Adi Elkeles, 16, and Tzvia
Shperber, 17, are expected to
arrive Sunday, March 1, and for
the next three days will be very
busy visiting local high schools
and youth organizations. They
tell them what it's like to grow up.
in today's Israel and will lead
discussion groups.
It's part of a program arranged
by Israel's Ministry of Education
to give youngsters, who compete
for the honor, the opportunity to
meet their counterparts in
America and assist in the bridge-
building process between the
youth of both countries.
Leo Kaplan of Woodlands was
named dinner chairman for the
Bonds of Israel Dinner honoring
Roz and Ed Entin Sunday,
March 15, at the Woodlands
Country Club. Announcement of
Kaplan's appointment was made
jointly by Woodlands Bonds
Chairman Robert Adler and the
North Broward Israel Bond
Campaign Chairman Joel
Reinstein.
Prior to the move to the
Woodlands, Leo Kaplan was long
active in Community affairs, and
Jewish Communal affairs in
Rochester, N.Y. He directed
publicity for many UJA drives in
that city, and was active in the
Jewish Home of the Aged, B'nai
B'rith and was a sought after
entertainer and speaker for a host
of Jewish organizations.
He served on the Board of the
Public Broadcasting Channel 21,
Travelers Aid, Irondequoit
Country Club, and the Rochester
Society of Communicating Arts,
in Rochester.
He is presently a member of
the Board of Governors of the
Woodlands Country Club.
Prior to retirement, he was the
Executive Vice President and
Creative Director of Great Lakes
Press, one of the country's lead-
ing color lithographers. He is
nationally known as an Assem-
blage and Collage artist, is
represented by galleries in
Rochester, N.Y., Hartsdale, N.Y.
and Los Altos, California. He is
listed in Who's Who in American
Leo Kaplan
Art, and his work is represented
in a host of public and private
collections.
Interfaith
Continued from Page 1
lecturer at colleges. He earned his
Ph. D. at Cambridge University
in England, wl. ?re he had a two-
year Studentship in Philosophy
and Religion. He has been a
visiting professor at Hebrew
University in Jerusalem, and
authored many articles and
books, including the newly-
published Mysticism and
Religious Traditions.


I
UJA University
Essay Contest
NEW YORK The national
United Jewish Appeal, in co-
operation with the Morris J.
Kaplun Foundation, is sponsoring
an essay contest for American
university students on the
theme: "Toward Jewish Survival
in the 21st Century: New Visions
and Strategies."
The nationwide competition,
open to any undergraduate or
graduate student in an accredited
institution of higher learning,
was announced by Dr. Henry
Feinggold of the College of the
City of New York, chairman of
the UJA University Essay
Contest Committee.
An all-expense-paid trip to Is-
rael will be awarded to the
authors of the eight winning
essays. The 10-day trip in
August, 1961, will include visits
with Israeli leaders and tours of
border settlements, archaeolo-
gical excavations and other
events of historical, social, and
educational value. Prizes will be
provided through grants from the
Morris J. Kaplun Foundation.
Candidates may not be older
than 25 years of age by August,
1961. Entries must be between
1,500 and 2,500 words in length
and must be postmarked no later
than March 28, 1961. Contest
winners will be announced June
15,1961.
The focus of the contest is edu-
cational. Its objective is to sti-
mulate creative thinking on the
perennial problem of Jewish
spiritual and physical survival.
Applicants may interpret the
survival theme as broadly as they
wish, approaching it from the
point of view of the social
sciences, history, the arts,
theology, philanthropy, Jewish
communal and organizational life
or any combination of such
disciplines.
For contest rules and other
information, contestants may
write to UJA University Essay
Contest Committee, Creative and
Educational Programs, United
Jewish Appeal, 1290 Avenue of
the Americas, NYC 10104.
:::::::::::::::;:;:::;:^:;::^
Beth Israel Children Entertain
at St. John's Nursing Home
BBYO Holding Junior
Maccabiah Feb. 15
A track and field meet, on the
order of the international
Maccabiah that is held in Israel,
for the boys and girls of the
Aleph Zadek Aleph IAZa) and
B'nai B'rith Girls (BBO) in
Broward and Dade counties,
tabbed the Junior Maccabiah,
will be held Feb. 15, the Miami-
Dade Community College, South
Campus, 11011 SW" 104th St.,
Miami.
Opening ceremonies will begin
at 11 a.m., following registration
and warm-up for events, and the
entire series of events will be cli-
maxed by a gigantic cooik-out.
No more than three chapter
members may enter the field
events: high jump, long jump,
shot put, discus and the running
races of sprints and mile run,
except for the two relay races.
Also included in the day's activi-
ties will be singles and doubles
racquetball, and a seven-member-
team tug-of-war.
Awards will be presented at
the cook-out. Entries must be
sent to the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization (BBYO) at 14411 S.
Dixie Highway, Miami.
They came right from their Bet
class at Temple Beth Israel's
Abraham Haber Torah School in
Sunrise to tell guests at the St.
John's Nursing and Convalescent
Center in Lauderdale Lakes all
about Tu B'Shvat, the Jewish
New Year of Trees. The ten
youngsters were Gregg Robin-
son, Jason Singer, Donny Rock-
off, Todd Dombrosky, Abby
Milikowsky, Vivian Schneider,
Lisa Salkman, Heath Glassman,
David Toback. Michael Blum.
Following their recital of poetry
and prose, they sang Hebrew
songs, and then under the direc-
tion of their teacher, Miriam
Klein, and Beth Israel's Educa-
tional Director Stanley Cohen,
they presented each of those
present with a micro-mini living
palm tree that could be placed on
a table. The visit and program
was arranged by Ruth Horowitz,
in the background with Cohen, in
the picture of several of the nine
and ten-year-olds handing out the
trees.

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Planting Trees and Raising
Jewish Commitment
Larry and Shelly Jackier mount the dedication plaque for the
Young Leadership Cabinet Forest at the JNF Bicentennial
Park near Jerusalem. (UJA Photo by Marty Gallanter)
f*
By MARTY GALLANTER
I JERUSALEM On the
outskirts of this holy city, on
i.iikI maintained by the Jewish
National Fund. 700 tiny
evergreens struggle to grow
the beginning of the United
Jewish Appeal's Young leader-
ship Cabinet forest.
The contrast between the
vision ol a lush, healthy forest
and the reality ol an oiien field of
seedlings brings u smile to Larry
Jackier. the Cabinet's National
Chairman, who was present when
:18() young American Jews.
plainril the Irons with their own
hands as part ol the Young Lead-
ership Cabinets Hashiveynu
Mission.
Ol course it's not a forest
yet." says Lurry, "but it will be
one day. We're concerned about
preparing lor (he lulurcas well as
meeting immediate goals. This
lores! is just one example of that
column ini'iil
In I9t)l. a group ol young
people visited huropc ami Israel
in see lor themselves what UJA
dollars were accomplishing
overseas. This effort was later to
be called the first Young
Leadership Mission.
for many participants, the
Hashiveynu Mission wu.i their
lirsl visit to Israel. Involvement
ol Iirst timers' to broaden and
deepen American .lewish com-
mitment to the world Jewish
community is a primarj Cabinet
goal, and a philosophy reflected
bj the nameol the mission itself.
Hashiveynu" is a Hebrew
word, part ol the traditional
prayer that is spoken in the
synagogue when the Toroh is
returned to the Ark. It has come
to represe/il an entire movement
in li w ish life.
I'oeticalh translated, it means
renew our days as ol old
lew ish renewal the restoration
ol tradition, historj and culture
nas become a vv.iv ol life lor
I lie men ol the Cabinet. The
"Hashiveynu" mission itinerary
included, among other activities.
u Ceremonv ol Renewal" at the
\\ estern \\ all. a "Rededical ion to
Jewish ideals" on Masada. and
the inauguration of the Young
l.earship Cabinet "forest" at the
.JNF Bicentennial Park near
Jerusalem.
future Young Leadership
missions will continue to expand
the forest with each visit. Fort
l.auderdale Young Leadership
Mission is planned for this
Summer. Call Alan Margolies.
Federation 484-K200 for details.
Canadian Leader Against Cults
Returning to & Florida
Rabbi Dr. J. Immanuel
Schochet, professor of philosophy
and religion at Humber College.
Toronto, Can., who impressed
more than 250 people at a meet-
ing in Temple Beth Israel, W.
Oakland Park Blvd.. about the
threat of the "Jews for Jesus"
movement is returning to South
Florida next month.
Arrangements are being made
for him to speak to adults at
evening meetings and to students
at religious schools of
synagogues in the Greater Fort
l.auderdale area during the first
week of March.
We do business
the right way.
1700 W. Oakland Mr* *
M. Laudf ala. Fla 33311
**on 736-1330
OAKLAND TOYOTA
Conceived in the early 1960s to
train, involve and develop young
men 25 to 40 years of age for
service to the Jewish community,
the Cabinet was founded on the
premise that the UJA's ongoing
res|M)nsibility as the primary
American fundraising agency for
the Jewish people of Israel and
throughout the world required a
broadly based leadership pool.
Missions to Israel are only one
lacet ol the Cabinet's wide-
ranging programs. A fun-
damental commitment made by
every Cabinet member is to train
themselves to become a "Jewish
resource." Each month members
receive a newly published book
that deals with some important
aspect ol Jewish life. Recent
mailings have dealt with such
diverse topics as the Palestinian
question, the Holocaust. Jeru-
salem, and American Judaism.
This program of self-education
includes the "Judaica Series." a
In-monthly set of materials
designed to assist Cabinet
members in their celebration of
Shibbat and Jewish holidays,
and their observance ol Jewish
traditions in their own homes.
The Judaica series is prepared
cooperatively by the UJA Young
Leadership and Rabbinic
Cabinet.
Kducational programs also are
aimed at enhancing members'
participation in their own com-
munities. I'.ach year, do/ens of
Young Leadership members
conduct. 01 speak at hundreds of
UJA sponsored community
meetings around the country
Young Leadership program.* are
part ol every regional conference
and major UJA event, and
Cabinet members serve on local
sv nagogue, federation and
Jewish organization boards.
They are active in political and
religious education programs,
and are an important source ol
manpower lor direct solicitations
during annual UJA Federation
('ampaigns.
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He believes, based on his studies,
that it is impossible to identify
the personality, the teachings
and activities of Jesus with those
of the Biblical Messiah.
Chabad-Lubavitch is making
possible Dr. Schochet's return
visit. Arrangements for his local
appearances are being made by
Kabbi Casriel Hrusowankin.
director of Chabad House of
North Dade and South Broward,
and Yisroel Her Kaplan, program
coordinator, at Chabad House in
North Miami Beach. 932-7770.
During his clear-cut, in-
cisiveness manner of piling fact
u|M>n fact, Dr. Schochet held the
audience spellbound with his
knowledge of Torah and
Traditional Judaism as well as
the "New Testament" and
personality of Jesus. He has
become one of the leading inter-
national specialists in mission-
ary-cult confrontation and con-
sultation.
He suid: "Parents are
desperately concerned about
their children, but do not know
where to turn. Young couples are
Ix-ing wooed by the missionary
groups. All these messianic-
groups are front organizations for
Christian fundamentalist
movements seeking to lure Jews
into Christianity under the
illusion of completing' their
Jewishness."
He demonstrated with dignity
and with knowledge of scripture,
that the "New Testament" as
well as the words of Jesus are in-
consistent and irreconcilable with
the Jewish Bible anu tradition.
'ksady]
OCCUPANCY J
-"Q-$p-
A&
A rewarding way to get rid of old autos that \
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SB
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i ne jewisnrionaucnof uteaterrort l^auaeraaie
Friday, February 13,1981
Reality of Arab Mind Explored
Compressing into 60 minutes
what he called was the equivalent
of a "year*s course" in the study
of the Arab mind and the Arab-
Israel conflict, a Tel Aviv univer-
sity professor kept the North
Broward Adult Education
Committee of the Jewith
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale intrigued with his
"one mans opinion" of the reali-
ty of the Arab world.
Dr. Arnon Gutfeld. a native of
Tel Aviv who earned his docto-
rate and taught at University of
California, Los Angeles, spoke at
the committees meeting Feb. 3
at Temple Kmanu-El. He just
completed two years of teaching
American history at the
University in Gainesville.
Currently he is "scholar-in-resi-
dence" for South Florida com-
munities
Samuel M. Soref
Hall Dedication
Evelyn Gross, pictured here,
chairperson of the Soref Hall
Dedication scheduled for Sunday,
March 1, called her committee
meeting to order with the en-
thusiasm that matched her
words, "this is the most exciting
project that I've ever had the
pleasure to work on. Members
of her "blue-ribbon committee,"
as she calls it, agreed whole-
heartedly.
These women, committed to
JCC, came to plan for the special
occasion in honor of Samuel
Soref, benefactor of Samuel M.
Soref Hall which is being refur-
bished. It will be the show place
of the Perlman Campus when
completed.
A musical program has been
arranged by Irene Unterman.
Vicki La Cava, soprano, and
Richard Ryan, baritone, will sing
in concert.
His intense, sharp, staccato
remarks had his listeners strug-
gling to keep their pens and
pencils making notes at the same
pace in which he declared, among
other things, that though "sep-
aration of church and state" is
proclaimed in the U.S. Constitu-
tion, there is no such thing in Is-
lamic nations. The political state
and the religious state are one
and the same, and never the
twain shall be separated.
He said Khomeini is acting as
"an Arab lord." determined to
wipe out every vestige of the
Shah's 30 years of trying to
Westernize Iran, and return the
nation, and hopefully, all Islamic-
nations hundreds of years back to
the Sth Century Koran rule.
Dr. Gutfeld. injecting bits ot
Tax
Assistance
If you can use help with your
income tax returns if you have
questions that need answers -
come to the following Broward
County libraries: Coral Springs
Branch. 9571 W. Sample Rd. -
every Thursday and Saturday.
Feb. 5 through April 11;
Tamarac Branch, 8601 W.
McNab Rd., every Monday, Feb.
2 through April 13; Sunrise
Branch, 6600 Sunset Strip, call
library for information.
This tax help is available
through the Volunteer Income
Tax Assistance Program (VITA).
Find out everything you always
wanted to know about filing your
income tax returns but were
afraid to ask at vour local
' library. This service is available
free of charge for anyone who
needs help with tax questions.
Passover Seders
at Sunrise
Sunrise Jewish Center will
sponsor two Passover Seders to
be held at the Townhouse, 7786
NW 44 St., in Sunrise, on Satur-
day night, Apr. 18, and Sunday
night. Apr. 19. These seders will
be strictly kosher and full-course
dinners.
SPECIAL PASSOVER PACKAGE FOR
OUR SOUTH FLORIDA FRIENDS
11 DAYS-10 NIGHTS (April 17 to Apr.. 27.
FROM
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Towers Hotel meals at Waidman
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Daily Religious Services
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i Full Entertainment Program
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HOTEL
OCEAN AT 43 ST
MIAMI BEACH
sardonic wit in his fast-paced
talk, sees the U.S. as having a
complex role in the Middle East.
It is a costly relationship, econo-
mically, for Israel because 40
percent of its budget goes to
repay loans from the U.S.
Another 50 percent, he said, goes
to keep Israel militarily secure.
"and,' he added, "that's why
Israel has 133 percent inflation.
He is surprised at the number
ot American Jews who opt to
visit Kgypt. "particularly,
because of the stench of Cairn
where so many live, even in
graveyards." He says OPEC
blackmails nations with its price-
tactics, and says, scornfully, the
talk of Saudi Arabia's "moderate
pricing ol oil." means, to him. the
"Saudis are strangling you
moderately."
Big Heist Cleans Out
Tel Aviv Museum Valuables
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Jewelry and religious and
artistic objects with a nominal value of between $3 million
to $5 million, but with a historical value worth far more,
were stolen from the Haaretz Museum's Ethnography and
Folklore Pavillion. Police were rounding up known
receivers of stolen jewelry and keeping a close watch on
airports, but they fear that the objects may already have
been broken down for smuggling abroad.
The thieves apparently knew that the museum
building had security devices only at its front door. They
broke in through a rear window and cleared out the entire
building, stripping models of their jewelry. The items
stolen included silver phylacteries given to Theodor
Herzl's son on his Bar Mitzvah, and a Bible donated by
Tel Aviv's first mayor, Meir Dizengoff. Also stolen were
rare Bibles, spice boxes and kiddush cups.
Militant Settlers Return Home
JERUSALEM (JTA I
About 2(H) militant settlers who
seized a lull lop north ol Jerusa-
lem have returned to their homes
apparently satisfied that their
action bad spurred the govern-
ment to speed up its plans to
build a new town on the West
Hank site. Representatives of the
group and ol the settlers regional
council met with Premier
Menachem Begin.
He promised them that (wild
ing would commence in three
months. The plans lor the new-
town, known as (Jivon, have been
submitted to the Military
(Jowrnmenl's zoning committee.
I'inhat) Wallerotein, chairman ol
(lie regional council, said working
procedures have already been
agreed on with the government.
IT'S THE COFFEE THAT'LL
MAKE EVERYONE THINK YOU DID
WHEN YOU DIDN'T!
The rich ground aroma and fresh perked taste
makes Maxim*the coffee any busy baibusta
would be proud to serve. Especially with the
strudel. Or. the Honey cake. Or the lox n
bagels. Or whenever friends and 'mishpocheh'
suddenly drop in. Maxim* the 100% freeze
dried coffee that'll make everyone think you
took the time to nake fresh perked coffee
when you didn't!
Phone: 538-5731


inatan ofUreater For
lUL
Paged
$ Organizations In The News
\
B'NAI B'RITH
Billed as a night to be
remembered, the Margate's B'nai
B'rith Men's Lodge and the
Women's Chapter are presenting
a Musical Extravaganza, March
8, featuring stars from stage,
television and supper clubs, at
Coral Springs High School
Auditorium, 7201 Sample Rd.
I Three headliners are Paula
tjf Wayne, who has appeared with
^J^jammy Davis, Jr., Liza Minnelli,
T)avid Hartman, Burt Reynolds
and the Johnny Carson Show;
Frank Capri on the accordion,
who has played at leading supper
clubs in the United States and
Europe; and Rick Terry,
comedian and singer.
Paul Shelly and his orchestra
will accompany the performers.
Tickets for the event can be
j^ta^obtained by calling Chairman
^*I)avid Berger, Lou Rosenberg,
Rose Gorsky or Bea Miller.
Donations are $4 and $5.
BLUE STAR LODGE
Blue Star Lodge of B'nai B'rith
will elect officers and be en-
tertained by Tommy Cohen at
the 9:30 a.m., Sunday, Feb. 15
meeting at Tamarac Jewish
Center, 9101 NW 57th St.
Unopposed for office are the
following: Dr. Samuel Lazarus,
president; Zeke Feldman,
Charles Fox, Carl E. Alper,
Nuthan Shrenley, vice
presidents; Jack Brill, E. Ross
Zimmerman, Mark Weissman,
secretaries; Isidore Gross,
treasurer; Philip Weinberger,
chuplain: David Gornitsky,
warden.
The directors to be elected
include: Dave Abels, Benj.
HiTiislein, Milton Chi/.ner, Irving
M. Disraelly, John Goldmann,
Oscar Goldstein, Irving lleitner,
Milton Kirsch. Milton Kir-
shvnbcrg, Nat Roller. Charles S.
Kmnl/, David E. Krantz, Al
Niemy, Moe Kttbb, Robert Shurr,
Harry Singer, Joseph Sobel,
Joseph Stone.
MASADA MARGATE
Life members and associates
will be honored at the 7 p.m.,
refreshments, 7:30 p.m., meeting,
Tuesday, Feb. 24, of the Masada
Margate Chapter of Hadassah at
Temple Beth Am, Margate. The
Masada Players will present
"The Hadassah Game" with
song and dance routines.
BETH ISRAEL
MEN'S CLUB
"L'Image Ballet," modern jazz
ballet, plus Chuck Lyons, pianist
and singer, and Operetta Star
11 ami a Owens, are featured in the
concert presented by Temple
Beth Israel Men's Club at 8 p.m.,
Sunday. Feb. 15, at Bailey
Concert Hall, on the Central
Campus of Broward Community
College.
All seats are reserved with
tickets selling for $5.50. Proceeds
will benefit the Oakland Park
Blvd. synagogue's Abraham
Haber Torah School.
BETHHILLEL
STISTERHOOD
Sisterhood of Congregation
Beth Hillel of Margate meetsat
9:30 a.m., Sunday, Feb. 22. A
bus trip to Warm Mineral
Springs and Venice from Friday,
March 20 to Sunday, March 22, is
being planned. Luncheon and
card party is scheduled for
Tuesday, March 17, $3 ad-
mission. No meeting is planned
for April because of Passover
(first Seder Saturday night, April
18).
SOUTHFIELD. MICH.
Sisterhood Snowbirds of
Congregation Shaarey Zedek of
Smith field. Mich., will have its
second annual Patron luncheon
Wednesday. Feb. 18, at the home
ol Mrs. Erwin Harvith, 3050
Estate Dr., Pompano Beach.
Mrs. Hurvith and Rose Meskin
9 Jewish Women
C-ontinued from Page I
Council, and lui -o chairman, Gail Capp, have been
assisted by representatives of various Jewish
women's organisations. The committee includes-
Frcidu Alderman, Evelyn Aronson, Pearl Auerbach,
list her Cannon. Pcnnie Greenfield, Belle Grusky,
Hi inn Lcibowiu. Kuth Levin, Freda Levy, Estelle
Ituppupurl, Freda Rosen, Esther Rothschild, Beatrice
Xamosl.
The committees have been assisted by Gladys
Dann. president of Ihe Women's Division, and Ethel
Wuldinun, the Division's executive vice president and
general chairman of the Division's UJA campaign.

r
4fe
ih
MARGARET MORSE CULTURAL EXCHANGE TOURS
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JUNE 2-16.1981
JUNE 16-30.1981
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RT TRANSATLANTIC AIR FARE
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8 DAYS of Touring & SiQhtseema
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Miami to Miami Add on $198 00- per person
For detailed brochure and reservations
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Telephone: (305) 445-2696
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are taking reservations. Tickets
for the luncheon include
"Woman's World 1981,"
featuring former Congresswoman
Elizabeth Holtzman.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
Art Exhibition and Auction,
sponsored by the Bonaventure
Chapter of Women's League for
Israel will be held Sunday
evening, Feb. 22, at the
Bonaventure Country Club, 200
Bonaventure Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale. Preview is at 7:30
p.m. Auction al8 p.m. $2.50 peV
person is the charge. There will
be a door prize and refreshments.
Oils, graphics, watercolors and
sculpture of major artists will be
included in the collection. Sakal
Galleries Ltd. of New York and
Fort Lauderdale is coordinating
the event;
Delta to the
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$149 Day First Class. $129 Night First Class.
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when accompanied by an adult passenger pay-
ing a Buy 'N Fly Fare.
These fares are available to other Delta
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30,1981.
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To Indianapolis Flight-times leaving round
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All schedules and fares are subject to change
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Supreme Super Saver Fare seats are limited and
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Delta is ready when you are


- ^^
TT \J I fUl
wmm^^rr
Fn3ay^bruaryl3^981
B it LI
a gciide
tbocigbtpaL
giving
... for the benefit of future generations
Arthur A. Faber, chairman of
tho Foundation of Jewish Philan-
irophies of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, an-
nounced publication of A Guide
for Thoughtful Giving For
the Benefit of Future Genera-
tions, newly revised by the
Foundation.
At the same time, he an-
nounced the new members of the
Foundation's board of trustees:
Samuel Goldfarb, Sen. Samuel
Greenberg, Erwin Harvith,
David Jackowitz, Samuel Leber,
Joel Levitt, Sydney Liben, David
Miller, Richard Romanoff, Carl
Schuster, Ronald Schagrin, Sid-
ney Spewak, John Strong, Saul
Weinberger.
Continuing as trustees are
Jacob Brodzki, Leonard Farber,
Seymour Gerson, Leo Goodman,
Alvin Gross, Victor Gruman,
Hyman Indowsky. Milton
Keiner.
Farber said that Schuster and
Indowsky will continue as chair-
Attractive college
graduate professional
Jewish lady in Southeast,
Fla. seeks decent Jewish
physician, dentist or,
lawyer early 30s, object
matrimony. Box ACG, The
Jewish Floridian, P.O.
Box 01-2973, Miami 33101
A
QUICHE TO
K VELL OVER
from Swiss Knight, of course
Recipe
One 9" prepared pie crust,
unbaked
One 6 oz. pkg. Swiss Knight
Gruyere Cheese, cut into
small pieces
1 cup milk
Preheat oven to 425F.
In small saucepan,
combine Swiss
Knight Gruyere
Cheese and milk;
cook over moderate
heat until cheese
melts and mixture
is smooth; remove
from heat and set aside
In small bowl, combine
eggs, onion, salt, pepper and
3 eggs
Vt cup minced onion
1 measuring teaspoon salt
% measuring teaspoon white
pepper
% measuring teaspoon nutmeg
nutmeg; beat slightly.
Slowly add cheese-
milk mixture
to eggs, stirring
constantly. Pour
[ into prepared pie
shell. Place on
cookie sheet. Bake
at 425F for 15
minutes. Then bake
at 350F for 15-20
minutes. Makes 6 servings.
Imported from Switzerland, Swiss Process Gruyere Cheese Is mellow,
distinctive and delicious. In foil-wrapped wedges, plain or assorted
flavors, Swiss Knight is a treat because of Its quality.
IMPORTED BY THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC. CHEESE DIVISION
100 BtooffWngdals Road, White Plains, NY. 10806
. i .. _.
Presidents Provide New Insight On
Mar. 29 Jewish Family Conference
men of the Foundation's Legal
and Tax Committee. Serving
with them are the following
attorneys: Gerald Beyer, Elliot
P. Borkson, Alvin Capp, Alfred
P. Denowitz, Jesse Faerber, Jef-
frey M. Fenster, Howard
Greitzer, Martin I. Lipnack, Joel
Reinstein, Barrett M. Rothen-
berg.
Also serving on the Legal and
Tax Committee are the following
accountants: Martin Cass, Judah
H. Ever, Robert Hersh, Martin J.
Kurtz, Sheldon Polish, Sol Soko-
low, Irwin A. Weiser.
Faber said that the Foun-
dation's Guide briefly outlines
the most popular methods of
participation, noting that a gift
to the Foundation can be a source
of enormous satisfaction, as a liv-
ing tribute, and as an enduring
memorial because the generosity
is perpetuated and becomes a
blessing for many generations.
Welcoming community par-
ticipation, Faber said gifts may
be in the torm or cash or prop-
erty, real estate or securities or
life insurance. Such gifts may be
made during the lifetime of the
donor or under terms of a will,
and may be outright or in trust.
Usually they afford current or
estate tax benefits. Information
is available at the Federation
office, 484-8200, where Joel
Telles, assistant executive
director, is associated with the
Foundation.
The Conference of Presidents
of Jewish Organizations provided
new insight and input into the
planning of the community-wide
"Conference on the Jewish
Family" scheduled for Sunday,
March 29, at the Jewish Com-
munity Center, 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd., Plantation.
The presidents met this week
with Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz,
director of the Chaplaincy
Commission of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale; Sherwin Rosenstein,
executive director of the Jewish
Family Service of Broward
County; Lorrie T. Blank,
assistant area director of the
American Jewish Congress, and
Abraham J. Gittelson, director of
education of the Federation.
They, along with the Jewish
Community Center and others,
are sponsoring what is expected
to be an annual conference ad-
dressing itself to "The Endan-
gered Specie: The Jewish
Family."
Encouragement was voiced for
the conference because of the
varying pressures that are being
exe*ted on the traditional Jewish
family. These include inter-
marriage, divorce, zero
population growth, indifference
to Jewish identity, the stresses
on child rearing in single parent
families, as well as in families
where there are children of two
marriages. Also among the
problems to be addressed, with
input to come from teen-agers
who are expected to attend the
conference, are factors that
threaten the survival of the
Jewish family and of Jewish
values.
To help the Conference develop
effective strategies to deal with
the various problems, the Family
Life Conference Committee has
secured the services of Dr. Carl
A. Sheingold, program specialist
in American Jewish Committee's
Jewish Communal Affairs, to be
the keynote speaker. Following
his talk, the participants will be
encouraged to attend one or two
workshops of their choosing
during the afternoon session.
ADL Golf Tourney at Palm Aire
The Palm Aire Golf Tourney
Committee of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith chaired by Michael Davis,
Jay Raddock and Irving Meyers
announced that William Hyn-
dman. III, one of the highest
ranked senior amateur golfers in
the world, will be honored at a
tournament to be held on March
23, at the Palm Aire Country
Club.
Hyndman represented the
United States on ten golf teams,
the Walker Cup five times, the
World Team, the Eisenhower
Trophy Team, and the Captain
America's Cup Team three times.
He played with Jack Nicklaus on
the World Team, played in the
Master's ten times and won the
North and South Amateurs in
1961, the Trans-Mississippi
Amateurs in 1968, the U.S.
Seniors in 1973 and the North-
eastern Amateur Championship
in 1974.
For 68 years, the ADL has been
actively engaged in the defense of
civil rights of all groups regard-
less of creed and ethnic
background. Its preoccupation
with the underlying concepts of
democracy have led the League
to be one of the largest agencies
of its kind in the world, with 27
regional offices in the United
States and offices and cor-
respondents in Israel, the
Vatican, Paris and South
America.
Maxwell House] Coffee
Is Hospitality.
Lox 'n bagels 'n cream cheese is al-
most as much a pan of a traditional
Jewish household as the Mcz'uzah on
the door. And the most natural ac-
companiment to this American
gastronomical innovation is Maxwell
House Coffee.
The-full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House
has been delighting lovers of good
food for half a century. And why not ?
Who would ever think of serving
first-rate food without great coffee!
So, no matter what your preference
instant or goundwhen you pour
Maxwell House you pour flavor. At
its most satisfyingconsistently cup
after cup after cup.
K Certified Kosher
Corpownm
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century


'nday, reoruary
^i^ewisf^lor^^i^GTeate^or^MMderdaXe
Page 11
Dedication of Kopelowitz Playground Draws 400 Families
I
}t was the dedication of a spec-
tacular children's playground
(above), free JCC Frisbies,
.bunches of balloons, special
.-(^prizes, popcorn, lemonade, and
the cooperation of glorious
weather that made Sunday, Jan.
25 a very special day for the JCC
Perlman Campus, 6501 W. Sun-
rise Blvd. Plantation.
Over 400 families gathered to
join in the dedication of the
Kopelowitz Playground, and
later to enjoy a Children's
Theatre Production of "Little
Red Riding Hood."
Anita Perlman, JCC President,
thanked the Kopelowitz Family
for their very generous gift to
Center children.
Many thanks went also to Jean
and Irv Griff, the official "Pop-
corn poppers" and "Lemonade
pourers," and to the JCC Mem-
bership Committee members who
lanned the "Special Day": Johl
tman, Chairman and JCC vice
The Kopelowitz Family, donors of the facility: June Wolf,
Betty Kopelowitz, Hartley Wolf, Joseph Kopelowitz, Lynn and
Harvey Kopelowitz and their children, Jill and Brian
Kopelowitz.
Johl Rot man at the microphone, noting hostage Americans free
at last, called for a moment of silent meditation, before intro-
ducing Mrs. Perlman and the Kopelowitz Family.

president; Louise Feller, Louise
and David Kingsley, David
Gross, and Ivy and Larry Levine.
'Fantasy Finger Factory'
JCCAD Celebrates First Anniversary
%'H
The First Anniversary celebration of the Jewish Community
Center Association the Deaf was held Jan. 17. The founders,
coordinators and officers for 1979-1980 were recognized for their
achievements at the award Ceremony.
Pictured left to right. Lore Honigstein, Outstanding Volun-
r; Walter Pease, Jr., treasurer; Roberta Stein, chairperson
the evening; Elli Levy, program associate for the Deaf;
eyer Rindner, incoming president; Julius Fershleiser, retiring
president; Estelle Reiferson, secretary.
... And Still More at JCC
For additional information on the following programs, and
other activities, call the Jewish Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, 792-6700.
^*TAe
Wfl. Defensive Driving Course
JCC and the American Associ-
ation of Retired Persons are co-
sponsoring a Defensive Driving
Course, Tuesday, Feb. 17 and
Friday, Feb. 20, 12:30 to 4:30
p.m. at the Center. The cost for
the two, four-hour sessions is $3
for members of AARP, and $5 for
non-members of AARP.
Portrait Painting
Portrait Painting will be of-
fered at the Center, Tuesdays
^from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. The
^fcnght week session will not be
^fcmited to Portrait Painting, but
rather all expressions of art.
Book Review Series
"Great Jewish Book Review
Series" will review "Joys of
Yiddish" by Leo Rosten, with
Sylvia Patt, reviewer,
Wednes-
day, Feb. 18, at 8 p.m.
Stop Smoking Clinic
"Stop Smoking Clinic," co-
sponsored by JCC and the
American Cancer Society, meets
for six remaining sessions, every
Monday, 7 to 10 p.m., Feb. 16
through March 23.
Mr. & Mrs. Group
Married and interested in
meeting other" married couples?
Want to expand your circle of
friends, or just have a pleasant
evening with pleasant people?
The Mr. & Mrs. Club of JCC is
starting a new monthly social
group for marrieds, 40 to 60 years
old, on Feb. 15, 8 to 10 p.m. This
first "planning" and "coffee and
cake social" is open to members
and non-members. Sara Berger
and Ethel Morris, Co-chair-
"Fantasy Finger Factory"!
They're a factory and their
product is entertainment:
juggling, puppetry, mime, and
clowning, currently on tour
persons, have planned an ex-
citing evening. All are welcome to
be part of this exciting new
group!
Cultural Art Series
JCC will present Israeli
operatic and concert singers,
Tibor Herdan and Stella Rich-
mond on Saturday, Feb. 28, at 8
p.m. at the Center.
Tickets priced at $5 and $7 are
available at the JCC office. For
group discounts, call 792-6700.
Evolution of Art
The Cultural Arts Department
will sponsor Evolution of Art,
Cubism, Wednesday, Feb. 25, at
8 p.m.
Theatre Guild
Presentation
The JCC Theatre Guild pro-
duction of "You Know I Can't
Hear You When the Water's
Running" will be presented
Saturday, Feb. 21, and Sunday,
Feb. 22, at 8 p.m. in Soref Hall.
Tickets are $2.50 for Center
members, and $3 for non-
members.
Senior Day Camp
The "Senior Day Camp" of the
Jewish Community Center is
accepting registrations for its
new and exciting "Senior Day
Camp" experience. Beginning
Wednesday, Feb. 18, and con-
tinuing for the first and third
Wednesday of each month,
campers will enjoy music, sing-
ing, physical fitness, picnics,
swimming, fishing, vegetable
picking and more. The fee is $6
for six sessions. Campers must
bring their own lunch and a
beverage will be served. This pro-
gram is for Center members only.
Transportation is available on a
first come first serve basis.
Poetry Encounter
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter's Cultural Arts Department,
will sponsor a Poetry Encounter,
Wednesday, Feb. 18 at 7 p.m.
Area poets read their own poetry
for prizes. Kirt Dressier, Editor
"Arts Gazette," is master of
ceremonies.
throughout the United States.
The versatile duo, Mimi Schultz
and Ed Allen, have been filmed
for educational television, and
have also appeared in Time
Magazine.
Come and visit with the two
zany managers as they make
plans to build a factory like you
have never seen before a
factory filled with puppets and
clowns. Join with their whole
family as they dance and sing
their way through a delightful
blend of juggling, mime, and
acrobatics slightly nostalgic
and enormously touching.
"Fantasy Finger Factory" will
appear at the JCC on Sunday,
Feb. 15, at 2 p.m. in Samuel M.
Soref Hall. Tickets are $2 for
members and $3.50 for non-
members.
Theatre Guild
Presents
Comedy Hit
The Jewish Community Center
announces the Theatre Guild
Production of three of the four
plays in "You Know I Can't Hear
You When the Water is Run-
ning" by Robert Anderson on
Saturday, Feb. 21 at 8 p.m., and
Sunday. Feb. 22 at 2 p.m. and 8
p.m. Tickets are available at the
JCC. Prices are: members $2.50
and non-members $3.
Simm Gottesman, director, has
an MA in Theatre Arts from the
University of Michigan, as well
as a television engineering
degree. Gottesman has created a
family spirit amongst the Guild
players. Each one has agreed to
work on production as well as
performance.
Sally and Sam Belfer co-star in
"I'm Herbert." Mel Ashley,
Arlene Horrow, Syvil Marro and
Alzira Schall are in "Footsteps,"
and Eileen Fruchtman, Sam
Gutterman, Scott Snyder and
Robert Stevens are in "Shock of
Recognition." Bernice Ashley
and Don Harris are co-producers.
Willis Shulman has designed the
Kt.
Spirit of JCC
It's too early to peek, but Soref
Hall is being refurbished for its
Dedication Day March 1. Evelyn
Gross and her committee have
plans to make it a memorable
day.
"Unity in the Jewish Com-
munity" was the theme that
Anita Perlman, JCC President,
stressed at the Intra-Faith
Luncheon held at Temple
Emanu-El. The audience was
most enthusiastic and receptive.
The interchange of ideas that
came from the workshops con-
firmed Mrs. Perlman's message.
Wanderlust is the name, and
going places is the game. JCC
has planned a series of trips of
different types. Reservations are
coming in. Have you made
yours?
Music, Music, Music JCC
las organized a four part choir
that will specialize in Hebrew and
Yiddish music under the direc-
tion of talented Mirian Breitman.
If you love to sing, don't miss the
Dpportunity to be a part of what
is expected to become a force in
Jewish music in the community.
If you hear Perlman Campus
rocking with all the popular tunes
be advised that the energetic
ladies of the Jazzercize classes
are having fun and getting into
shape.
"Tzinderella" is coming to
town. Jack Fishman, director,
had auditions. It won't be easy to
choose his actors. There's a lot of
talent in our town.
Mai and Bernice Ashley and
Sam and Sally Belfer have roles
in "You Know 1 Can't Hear You
When The Water's Is Running."
The couples met at the old JCC.
They've remained friends and
continued their interest in the
theatre. Don't forget Feb. 21
and 22!!!
"The Osmosis of Creativity"
Interesting concept. Poetess
Judy Rosenberg will give a
course of study of developing the
creativity that is in YOU. Watch
for an announcement of starting
date.
"You are There A Trip
Through Israel." Harry
Dobkin asks: "Where are you?"
It's a fantastic course headed
each week by an Israeli who takes
the class to a different part of
Israel, with an insight that only
an Israeli can give.


leuiei luuiJUUUlJUUl!
Community
Calendar
MONDAY , Temple Emanu-EI Games 7:15
p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Alione Group -
General meeting at Temple 7:30
p.m.
Hebrew Congregation of Lauderhill
Sisterhood General meeting -
Noon
Hadassah Kadima Chapter ot
Oentury Village Deerfield
General meeting at Temple Beth
Israel, Deerfield
Hadassah Bat Ami Tamarac
Chapter Board meeting 9:30
a.m.
B'nai B'rith Inverrary Chapter -
Board meeting -10 a.m.
Temple Kol Ami Sisterhood Plan
lation Board meeting at Temple -
8 p.m.
B'nai B'rith General meeting at
Roufke Recreation Center Leon
Fcldinan: "ADL" 1 p.m.
Hadassah Aviva Oakland Estates
Chapter Ann Fleischman: "Fun
with Yiddish', Lauderdale Lakes
City Hall Noon
Brandeis Inverrary Woodlands
Chapter General meeting 11:30
a.m.
New York City Retired Teachers in
Florida Broward County Meeting
at Pompano Beach Recreation
Center -1-3 p.m.
Temple Emanu-EI Cultural Series
- Parker Playhouse
Women's League for Israel Mini
Luncheon, Broward Mall Com-
munity Room Noon
Deborah Lung & Heart Center,
Lauderhill Luncheon and Card
Party, Castle Recreation Center
TUESDAY, Feb. 17
Temple Sholom Sisterhood
Pompano General meeting -12:30
p.m.
Women's League for Israel Mar-
gate Board meeting at Boca Bank,
Margate 10:30-12:30 p.m.
ORT Ocean Mile Chapter Bazaar
at Jarvis Hall -10-6 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Fort Lauderdale
Chapter Aflred Golden: "Jews in
Trouble'' Lauderdale Lakes Public
Safety Bldg., next to City Hall.
4300 NW 36 St.-8 p.m.
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood -
Interfaith meeting -11 a.m.
Hadassah L'Chayim Plantation
Chapter General meeting at
Deicke Auditorium 1 p.m. Bou-
tique 11 a.m. Robert Lockwood,
Court Clerk: Court systems in
U.S., Israel and Egypt.
Fort Lauderdale Zionist District 31
- Open meeting at Tamarac Jewish
Center Gerald Barlin and Nancy
Abrams, Bache Halsey Stuart
Shiels, Inc. -7:30p.m.
B'nai B'rith Lauderhill Chapter -
General meeting at Castle Recre-
ation Center Barbara Goldberg of
ADL: "Current Local Jewish
Issues"
B'nai B'rith Women Margate
Chapter Book review: "Joseph the
Provider,' by Thomas Mann,
Temple Beth Am Noon
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18
Temple Beth Israel Games 7:30
p.m.
Yiddish Culture Club Meeting at
Satellite Clubhouse 15, Sunrise
Lakes Phase I -10 a.m.
Hadassah Inverrary Gilah Chapter
- General meeting at Inverrary
Country Club- p.m.
Hadassah Pompano Golda Meir
Chapter Michael Stolkowsky:
"Tourism" Palm Aire Social Hall
National Council of Jewish Women
- No. Broward Section General
meeting Lauderdale Lakes City
Hall, 4300 NW 36 St. -12:30 p.m.
Sunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood -
General meeting at Temple 11:30
a.m.
Mizrachi Women Masada Chapter
- Board meeting at Temple Beth
Israel- 10 a.m.
Women's League for Israel Bona-
venture Chapter New Member
Coffee, home of Toots Sacks 10
a.m.
Hadassah Ahavah Deerfield.
Chatter General meeting, Temple
Betn jfcael, Deerfield -12:30 p.m.
TempfVOhel B'nai Raphael Sister-
hood General meeting. Temple,
4351 Oakland Park Blvd. W. -
Representative from WPIP:
Musical and game program Noon
Pioneer Women Natanya Chapter
- Lounge, Boca Raton Federal,
1334 N. State R. 7, Margate -12:30
p.m.
THURSDAY, Feb. 19
Temple Beth Israel Games -12:30
p.m. i ,
Women's League for Israel Wood-
lands Chapter World Affairs 8-10
p.m.
Jewish Family Service Executive
meeting, Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale 6 p.m.;
Board meeting 7:30 p.m.
Temple Sholom Men's Club Pom-
pano Board meeting 8 p.m.
American Red Mogen David for
Israel Col. David Marcus Chapter
of Fort Lauderdale Sunrise Chap-
ter Meeting, Whiting Hall Mini-
Lunch -11:30 a.m.
B'nai B'rith Holiday Springs
Lodge General meeting, Club-
house. 3131 Holiday Springs Blvd.
- 8 p.m.
ORT No. Broward Region Board
meeting, Lauderdale Lakes City
Hall-10 a.m.
Jewish War Veterans and Women's
Auxiliary Meeting, Temple Beth
Israel, Deerfield 7:30 p.m.
Temple Kol Ami Brotherhood -
Plantation Meeting. Temple 8
p.m.
B'nai B'rith Inverrary Lodge -
General meeting, Temple Beth
Israel -8 p.m.
Hadassah liana Hawaiian Gar-
dens Chapter General meeting
Free Sons of Israel Fort Lauder-
dale Lodge Board meeting 7:30
p.m.
B'nai B'rith Tamarac Chapter -
General meeting, Tamarac Jewish
Center Bea Feldman: Film on
BBYO.
Hadassah Blyma Margate Chapter
- General meeting, Congregation
Beth Hiliel, Margate. Robert Lock-
wood, Clerk of County Courts
Deborah Lung & Heart Center -
Lauderhill Donor Luncheon,
Inverrary Country Club
SATURDAY. Feb. 21
Ramat Shalom, Reconstructionist
Synagogue Art Auction, Temple-
8 p.m.
Jewish Federation General
Campaign $500 Minimum Func-
tion, Plantation, home of Shelly
Polish SUNDAY, Feb. 22
Jewish Federation Community Re-
lations Committee Interfaith
meeting at Fort Lauderdale High
School, 1600 NE 4 Ave -3p.m.
Temple Emanu-EI Youth Group -
meeting
Temple Beth Torah Tamarac -
Games 7 p.m.
Temple Sholom Men's Club Pom-
pano International Theatre &
Music Festival Series "Winged
Victory Singers" 8 p.m.
Jewish Federation Ramblewood
East 10a.m.
Temple Beth Hiliel Games Early,
Bird 7 p.m. Regular 7:30 p.m.
MONDAY, Feb. 23
Temple Emanu-EI Games 7:15
p.m.
ORT Ocean Mile Chapter Board
meeting 10a.m.
Hadassah Tamar Chapter Lau-
derdale Lakes Board meeting,
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall 10
a.m.
National Council of Jewish Women
- Plantation Section General
meeting, Deicke Auditorium 9:30
a.m.
Hadassah No. Lauderdale Chai
Chapter and all Tamarac Chapters -
Program, "The Source" will be the
theme for the day. Sol Robinson
will be the keynote speaker, Nob
Hill Rec. Center, Sunrise -10 a.m.
TUESDAY, Feb. 24
Hadassah Bermuda Club Herzl -
Executive Board meeting, Bermuda
Club Recreation Hall -10 a.m.
Hadassah Pine Island Ridge
Chapter Board meeting, Club-
house- 1 p.m.
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale Board meeting 7
p.m.
Hadassah Somerset Shoshana
Chapter General meeting, Somer-
set Recreation Hall Phase I Noon
B'nai B'rith Women No. Broward
Council meeting at David Park
Pavilion 1 p.m.
Jewish Federation -Bonaventure -
Cocktail Party
Pioneer Women Debra Chapter -
Skit: "Mamalushen," Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall- 12:30 p.m.
Hadassah Rayus Tamarac
Chapter General meeting,
Tamarac Jewish Center. Book
review by Josephine Newman,
V.P., Florida Mid-Coast Region of
Hadassah, "Old Neighborhood" by
Avery Korman Relreshments -
Noon
American Jewish Congress Shad
Polier No. Broward Chapter -
General meeting. Holiday Inn, 441
and Commercial B\d. Dr. Martin
E. Danzig, professorof Sociology,
City University of New York:
"Current Political Scene in Israel" -
1 p.m.
Hadassah No. Lauderdale Chai
Chapter Film on Israel, new City
Hall, 7015 SW 71st Ave. (Rock
Island Rd.)-12:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25
Temple Beth Israel Games 7:30
p.m.
ORT Ramblewood East Chapter -
Board meeting at Ramblewood
East Condo- 12:30p.m.
Hadassah Boca Raton Aviva
Chapter General meeting
Women's Division Jewish
Federation Lauderdale Lakes City
Hall, Public Safety Building, Presi-
dents'Day 10 a.m.
Sunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood -
Testimonial Luncheon for Betty
Marchant, Holiday Inn, 1711
University Dr., Plantation Noon
Hadassah Boca Raton Aviva
Chapter General meeting, B'nai
Torah Congregation Pearl Fried-
man: "Spotlight on the Middle
East''
Women's League for Israel Bona-
venture Chapter Mildred Epstein: J
A few funny things happened on
the way through the Bible" Bona-
venture Country Club Noon
THURSDAY. Feb. 26
Temple Beth Israel Games -12:30
p.m.
B'nai B'rith Hope Chapter, Plan
tation Florence Morton: "Dolls for
Democracy" Deicke Auditorium
Noon
B'nai B'rith Deerfield Beach
General meeting, Temple Beth
Israel -8 p.m.
ORT Tamarac Chapter Genera
meeting. Guest: Sally Sherman
Colony Club Rec. Hall I Noon
Hadassah liana Hawaiian Gar
dens Chapter Study Group
Free Sons of Israel Fort Lauder
dale LOdge Col. Keith
Comestock, Broward County Com
munications Whiting Hall
Sunrise 7:30 p.m.
Temple Emanu-EI Board o
Trustees meeting 7:45 p.m.
as
All the issues we are afraid to talk about
to each other..."
INTER-FAITH FORUM
3 p.m., Sunday, February 22, 1981
at Fort Lauderdale High School,
1600 N.E. 4th Avenue
Free Admission Refreshments
jointly sponsored by
Broward County Clergy Council (BC/3)
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, Florida Region
Church Women United
Broward County Human Relations Division
in cooperation with
Community Relations Committee
of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
2999 N.W. 33rd Avenue, Fort Lauderdale 484-8200
NATIONALLY RENOWNED
SPEAKERS
Dr. Carl Hermann Voss
Protestant clergyman,
author, educator
Dr. Steven T. Katz
Chairman, Religion Department,
Dartmouth College
Summer Teenage Travel
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s


mans Approve
Studies Program in Anti-Semitism
"often told me that there always
comes a day when we are con-
fronted with our identity
Jews."
as
[ByLISABILLIG
[E (JTA) Four
lementary hours a
of voluntary lessons
history of anti-Semi-
iwith particular refer-
to World War II have
approved by a student
ibly in a Rome high
bl as a direct reply to
inti- Semitic incident
[took place on school
ids several days
Caviglia, a 14-year-old
high school girl, had been
down a flight of stairs by
ip ol neo-Fascist students
imi' from behind her mut-
Ire Community
Calendar
l.m
FRIDAY. Feb. 27
Emanu-EI, "Creative
ood Sabbath." Dinner
service 8:15 p.m.
at
SATURDAY. Feb. 28
Community Center Cu!
>enes Richmond & Herdan
iic Emanu-EI Men's Club.
Ihood and Couple's Club -
iii,I uiiLtiun p.m.
Jewish Center Sisterhood -
[ijl All Theatre Comedy in 2
' The Golden Years" at Piper
IGUiool Tickets, $4.50 p.m.
SUNDAY. March 1
Hi Community Center Dedi-
ii ul Samuel Soref Hall 2-5
^le Beth Torah Tamarac -
' p.m.
sh Federation Omega -
kliio! a.m.
B'lith Fort Lauderdale
Mer 40th Birthday, Holiday
1711 University Dr.. Plantation
Bo p.m.
pie Beth Hillel Games Early
7 p.m. Regular-7:30 p.m.
EE INFORMATION available on
inety of private camps. We
{resent the finest camps in
i location and price range.
' experience and expertise in
I camping field can help you
ase the appropriate camp for
child whether the camp be
ral, portt oriented, munc,
, theatre, science, wilderness,
M reduction or teen tour*.
IS. GRACE STEIN
WISORY SERVICE
AMPS A PRIVATE SCHOOLS
ox 667, Hallandale. Fla 33009
(305) 944-5022 Dade
(3C5) 457-7899 Broward
IEEHOUSE
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Ldult Community
|1 Treehouse lLane
Tamarac
[and 2 Bedrooms
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$385-$650
J>ools and Recreation
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Walk to Shopping
Telephone:
739-3585
M5-5922 (Miami)
tering, "Get out of the way, dirty
Jews." But the student body at
the Virgilio school just across the
Tiber from the Rome Jewish ele-
mentary, middle and high
schools, were united in strong
emotional and intellectual
support of Paola.
"I AM proud of the Virgilio ly-
ceum," she said, addressing an
assembly hall packed with over
1,000 students and parents, in-
cluding groups from neighboring
schools both Catholic and
Jewish plus representatives
from Rome's Jewish community.
1'aola thanked the assembly
for "The solidaritv vou have
shown." She said she was unable
to identify the assailants because
she transferred to the school from
the Jewish school system only a
few months earlier. "Whoever
they are, they will have realized
that they have no hope here
because you are all on my side,"
Paola said.
A measure of Italian public
opinion's sensitivity toward the
resurgence of anti-Semitism is
the publicity the media gave the
incident. Front page headlines
referred to this "offence" to a
Jewish girl. A poignant comment
made by Paola immediately after
the incident was extensively
quoted: "My mother," she said,
NOW THE schools student
body, of its own free will, plans to
start filling the information gap
which they consider a partial
cause of this incident. Lessons in
history, ranging from anti-Semi-
tism. Nazism, Fascism and in-
evitably leading up to more con-
troversial issues regarding the
foundation of Israel and the
present-day situation in the
Middle East, will soon be initi-
ated, subject to the final approval
of the school authorities and
parent-teacher group repre-
sentatives.
Paola is a budding actress. She
and her brother, Giacomo,
founded a semi-professional
Jewish theater group that
debuted in 1977 with "The Diary
of Anne Frank" under the
direction of the well-known
Jewish actor-director, Cesare
Polacco. It is currently present-
ing Massani's "The Garden of the
Finzi-Contini's."
Council of Jewish women
m available for Brochure call
LIIV Lester, 484-5492
or
lb New York and
Washington, DtC
Were big on business
.
Miami, Ft. Lauderdale /Hollywood
to New York
Leaves
Arrives
MIA 7:30am nonstop
MIA 9: OOamt nonstop
MIA 9:05am__one stop
FLL 10:00am_ nonstop
MIA 11:40amnonstop
FLL 12:25pm_nonstop
MIA 1:10pm nonstop
MIA 2:00pmt_nonstop
MIA 3:00pm_ nonstop
MIA 4:15pm _one stop
FLL 4:30pmt_nonstop
MIA 5:30pml_nonstop
MIA 5:45pmL_nonstop
FLL 6:10pmnonstop
MIA 7:55pm*'nonstop
FLL 9:20pm_one stop
MIA 9:45pm?nonstop
MIA 10:15pmnonstop
_10:03am (LGA)
_11:28am (JFK)
_12:32pm (EWR)
_ 12:32pm (EWR)
___2:15pm (LGA)
___2:53pm (JFK)
___3:43pm (EWR)
___4:28pm (JFK)
___5:35pm (LGA)
___7:50pm (EWR)
___6:56pm (JFK)
___8:03pm (JFK)
___8:2 lpm (EWR)
___8:42pm (EWR)
10:30pm (LGA)
12:43am (EWR)
12:11am (JFK)
12:43am (EWR)
Except Thursday
Except Saturday
?Wldebody
Miami, Ft. Lauderdale/Hollywood
to Washington, IXC.________
Leaves
Arrives
MIA 8:OOam_ nonstop.
FLL 11:55am _one stop.
MIA 12:50pm_nonstop-
FLL 5:30pm one stop.
MIA 6:45pm__nonstop.
JFK (Kennedy)
LGA (LaGuardla)
EWR (Newark)
DCA (National)
MIA Miami
FLL Ft. Lauderdale
Schedule subject to
change without
notice.
.10:13am (DCA)
_2:53pm(DCA)
_2:59pm (DCA)
_9:00pm(DCA)
_9:03pm(DCA)
Not only do we have the first nonstop to New York, every day. But we also fly to all
three New York area airports.
And Pan Am flies you nonstop to Washington, DC. every day.
Remember, we've got very competitive fares. Get busy and call your Travel Agent,
Corporate Travel Department, or Pan Am. In Miami, call 874-5000. In Ft. Lauderdale/
Holrywood. call 462-6600.


News in Brief

Opposition Mounting in Bonn Against Tank Sale
V
BONN Opposition seems to
be mounting to plans by West
Germany to equip Saudi Arabia
with the new German-made Leo-
pard II tanks and other military
materiel. While the Saudis con-
tend that the arms shipments
had been promised by Chancellor
Helmut Schmidt, the veteran
Social Democratic leader, Her-
bert Wehner, said that no major-
ity for the deal is expected in the
Bundestag faction of the ruling
Social Democratic Party (SDP).
In an interview with German
television last Friday, Wehner,
chairman of the SDP's parlia-
mentary faction, and one of the
most influential members of the
SDP, observed that during the
summit meeting of the Islamic
nations in Taif, Saudi Arabia last
week, Saudi Arabia played a
major role in urging a jihad (holy
war) against Israel. "We do not
want to be pulled into that,"
Wehner said.
TEL AVIV The Labor
Party, confident of victory in the
elections this spring, has
promised to honor all inter-
national agreements and obli-
gations entered into by the
present Likud-led regime but
would not be bound by Likud
actions or promises with respect
to settlements on the West Bank
and economic policy.
Labor Party Chairman Shimon
Peres made this clear at a special
supplementary session of the
party's convention which was
held last December. The session
was devoted to discussions of the
economic and social programs
contained in Labor's election
platform.
NEW YORK Barry Rosen,
one of the former hostages who
participated with 21 of his com-
rades in a joyful welcome home
reception here last Friday, made
a stop at Temple Emanu-El to-
gether with his wife, Barbara.
The couple had telephoned in
advance to make sure their visit
would be all right, Rosen said.
The Rosens were greeted by
.abbi David Posner, associate
bbi of the world's largest
torm congregation, and assis-
lt Kabbi Richard Chapin.
I sen asked if he could hold one
i the synagogue's Torahs for a
t( .\ minutes. Then he and Mrs.
Kosen and the two rabbis joined
in praver before the ark. The
Male Nurse Aide
ooking lor home care Good
'eterences, car, no live ins.
Albert J l-wuinault. 5420 SW 44 Tfl
Fort Uudrrd.lt M3I4 Phnw 792 273H
Chancellor Schmidt
Rosens visited Temple Emanu-El
after attending services at St.
Patrick's Cathedral where Mrs.
Rosen, a Roman Catholic, took
part in the services.
WASHINGTON The Jus-
tice Department, in a complaint
filed in Federal District Court in
Los Angeles, acted last Thursday
to strip the American citizenship
of Dalivaldis Karklins, 66. for
concealing his wartime member-
ship in the Nadona police force in
Nadona, Latvia, and his position
as a concentration camp com-
mandant during the Nazi oc-
cupation.
The complaint also declared
that Karklins, now a resident of
Monterey Park, Calif, had
"materially assisted in the per-
secution and murder of unarmed
Jewish civilians in Latvia''
during World War II.
Andrea Ordin, U.S. District
Attorney in Los Angeles, and
Allan Ryan, director of the Jus-
tice Department's Office of
Special Investigation here, said
that during Karklins' tenure as
head of the Nadona camp, "un-
armed inmates of the camp were
starved, beaten, tortured and
murdered.''___________________
JERUSALEM The Israeli
exhibit at the international book
fair in Cairo has been moved to a
different location in the exhi-
bition hall and was reported to be
operating smoothly today after a
series of embarrassing and pro-
vocative incidents before and
after the fair opened.
The situation of the Israeli dis-
play adjacent to the Palestinian
-(and made trouble inevitable
from the start. When the Israeli
Ambassador to Egypt, Fliahu
Ben-Elissar, visited his country's
booth, a raucous exchange de-
\ Hoped between Israelis and
Palestinians. The organizers of
the fair responded by ordering
the Israeli flag removed, a
demand that triggered bitter in-
dignation among the Israelis.
The Israel Publishers Associ-
ation, which is sponsoring the ex-
hibit, seriously considered with-
drawing from the fair. Hut the
Egyptians, aware of the serious
repercussions this could have on
the peace process, proposed that
the Israeli stand be moved to the
main exhibition hall where the
Western countries' pavilions are
located. Previously, the
Egyptians had claimed there was
no room in that section.
Israel now stands at the head
of the six-team table of European
national champions. A win
against Real Madrid in Spain this
week will ensure the Israeli
champions a place in the Euro-
pean Basketball finals in March.
WASHINGTON Lane
Kirkland. president of the AFL-
ClO, told Japanese labor leaders
in Tokyo last week that an im-
pending visit to Japan by Pales-
tine Liberation Organization
leader Yasir Arafat at the in-
vitation of some Japanese parlia-
mentarians was one they should
shun. He expressed his personal
revulsion against the PLO.
Kirkland's reiteration of his
sentiments about the PLO
sentiments frequently expressed
in both domestic and foreign
speeches were made known to
DOM El and SOHYO labor of-
ficials, counterparts in Japan of
theAFL-CK).
Kirkland expressed dismay
that Arafat was scheduled to
meet with the Japanese Premier
and stressed to his labor hosts
that the expected visit could be
interpreted as violating the spirit
of the tamp David accords as
well as giving respectability to
terrorism.
vl
World Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors
June 10-23,1981 in Israel
Direct Flights from Miami
In Cooperation with
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
14 day package tour includes airfare, hotel accom-
modations, transfers, sightseeing, entrance fees, por-
terage, transfers to and from all "Gathering events
from $1494.
Participation in the World Gathering requires a
registration fee of $100 per person.
FOR RESERVATIONS OR FURTHER INFORMATION, CALL
2500 E. Hallandala Baach Blvd.
Hallandala, Florida 33008
Brwd.: J305) 486-3000 Dade: (305) 944-7119
tion in prices of color television
sets, refrigerators and small cars.
His move was hailed by
government supporters as a step
towards reducing inflation by
cutting government expenditure
for subsidies and taking in more
money from larger sales of
durable items.
But it was immediately cas-
tigated by labor leaders and
Histadrut Secretary General
Yeruham Meshel who said that
Aridor was helping the rich while
harming the poor.
Israel Stays Cool As
U.S. Reviews Mideast
TEL AVIV New Finance
Minister Yoram Aridor's first
public appearance since taking
over the post last week was to
announce increases in the price of
dairy products, meat, electricity,
fuel and other items, and a reduc-
JERUSALEM IJTAI
Israel ottered II mild official
.eucl ion i" the Heagan
Vdtmnist rat sin's announcement
i IhiI h in \ "Wing US. polity in
nr MmIiII. East, its character-
i/iilionol ww Israeli Settlements
ill ||i< U'-l Hank as unhelpful"
and 'In- 'ml ol ambiguity in its
apprais-l <>l the Palestine
I.iIm Hi,- n Organi/.alion.
\ Ii.'ign Ministry spokesman
.aid in.ii it wasonl) natural that
llie new Administration would
take si.uk id us commitment*
around till' world. He said the
rv.iiHiks by Stale Department
sp'ik'sinan \\ illi.nn I )\ ess on the
si nil infills., t lu TI.O and other
niiiiii-i- Mi'iiHtl to be a run-
urination ..i I'.S. MiilrnM |w>luy.
Km iIh spokesman diHercd with
ih. \iew "i ilie 1*1X1 as an
umbrella organization"' which
implies n contain* moderate"
mid irrniriKl dements.
THAT cliaraclcri/.alion was
.tllnbttli'd by Dyesh to Secretary
.1 Man- \le\ander Haig during
in. iiniliiinulMHi hearings by the
N'lmll foreign Uelatiniis t'onv
mitlee. The Foreign Ministry
spokesman stressed that in
Israel's view, the 1'LO is an
extremist terrorist organization
and- the existence of any
moderate elements within it
remains to be proven. Even if
such elements exist, the question
to what extent do they in-
IS
lluence I'LO
spokesman said.
policy. the
He pointed out thai the I'LO is
t'oiumilUil by its Covenant and
is mis nature lo I he annihilation
.I Isiiul. by any method in-
I'ludmg tinoiisiu. Israel believes
iIihi i be I s si amis hy President
l(r.i,',an s description ol the I'LO
as ;i terrorist organisation, the
pukesmmi said.
Noting the Suite Department's
ivlcrcmrs In the Islamic summit
iiM-t'lmg ii' Saudi \rahia. the
poki-sinai' 'hiu conference.
vv.i- loiiiiiiii i.''. i" war against
I-i.i.l. ami Saudi \raina called
i,n [lath *arl In recover
.I. < i. .iU ii. The s|Mikesman said
Israel wa di-.pl> disappointed
by i in-pi. ..lie.-and part icipat ion
oi l \ S rn-ian General Kurt
\\ .liiili.un in tin Islamic summit.
_J2^ayde wore
~ kilts!
Although Jews have .i tradition of maintaining their culmral heritage,
they also have the reputation of becoming an integral part of the community they
live in. And Scotland is no exception.
Glasgow prides itself on having the only Jewish pipe-hand in
the world. And one of the city's largest kilt-makers is Jewish.
Scotland's most famous product is fine Scotch whisky. And
America's favorite scotch is JckB. We carefully select the finest scotches |
and blend them for smoothness and subtlety. The result is why we say
that J&B whispers.
No matter where your friends or guests come from, serve them
J&B to make them feel at home.
86 Prool Biendec Scotch Whisky C1981 The Paddingion Cotp NV
]&B. It whispers.


dzki, Mueller to Receive Bonds Honors
i Fort Lauderdale residents
an singled out to receive
nors from the government
ael and the Israel Bonds
nation at a tribute dinner
field on March 1 in Miami
State of Israel Bonds Or
ktion will hold its New Life
,' honoring survivors of the
sust whonave been reborn
new life in the United
and have distinguished
elves in service to the
riity.
Swik Brodzki has been
to receive the New Life
A, recognizing his outstand-
srticipation in Jewish com-
J affairs and his concern and
lion for the welfare of the
i and secular community.
:la Mueller has been named
eive Israel's Righteous
tian Award, recognizing her
Bm in Nazi Germany for
cting and aiding members of
Jewish community.
__dzki, a native of Poland,
|ed in Florida nearly 30 years
jind is a.founder of Zenolls
iiture Co. He is founding
dent of the Jewish Federa-
[of Greater Fort Lauderdale
i recipient of Israel's Shalom
Ird from the Israel Bonds
ani/.ation.
served as president of
[pie Emanu-El and as chair-
of the Federation's Educa-
Committee. He has been
pred by the Jewish National
and currently serves as a
nber of the Executive Board
de World Gathering of Jewish
Dcaust Survivors in Israel.
Irs. Mueller is an in tern a-
lally acclaimed photographer
|.spent much of the Nazi era in
nany helping her Jewish
Ids survive with gifts of food
khased with her meager war
bns. She has been recognized
(the government of Israel for
heroism and will be presented
Righteous Christian Award
Israels Consul General to the
Itheaslern United States.
Irs. Mueller has received
nerous awards and citations
pgnizing her ability. She is
ed in Who's Who of American
wii'ii. Two Thousand Women
Achievement, and has visited
lei numerous times. She is an
nor and travel lecturer and
interviewed and photo-
phed many of the world's
ables.
I Hollywood Stars Headline
Israel Bonds Anniversary
Internationally famous enter
piers Rito Moreno and Abe
koda will be special guests at
Israel Bonds 30th Anniver-
ly (iala. to be held Feb. 17 at
ll.i Vizcaya. Miami, according
kiary and Niety Gerson, chair-
in of the Patron Host Com-
ttee. Gerson is also General
ynpaign Chairman of the South
ula Israel Konds Organiza-
fhe Israel Bonds 30th Anni-
Ludwik Brodzki
versary Gala will be a national
event, at which time Jewish com-
munal leaders from- the United
States and Canada will gather to
honor three decades of support
for Israel through the Israel
Bonds Program. The gala will
also prolvide an opportunity for
guests to enroll in the Israel
Bonds Prime Minister's Club and
the Ambassador's Society of
Trustees.
Rita Moreno is the only female
performer to have won all four of
the most prestigious awards, the
Oscar, the Tony, the Grammy
and Emmy. She has become in-
volved in numerous projects on
public television, most notably as
a member of the Children's Tele-
vision Workshop show "The
Electric Company."
The Israel Bonds Organization
will present Miss Moreno with
Israel's Cultural Award, noting
her devotion to Israel and nu-
merous humanitarian causes.
Vigoda received the 1979
Cultural Award from Israel.
The Colemant
Holiday Springs
Residents of Holiday Springs
will celebrate a "Night in Israel"
on Sunday. Feb. 22 at 7:30 p.m.
At that time Nate and Doris
Coleman will receive Israel's
Scroll of Honor for their many
years of dedicated and devoted
service to the people of Israel and
to the Jewish community. The
Colemans have been active in
B'nai B'rith, Israel Bonds,
Hadassah, ORT and the UJA.
Special guest will be Joey
Russell, comedian and raconteur.
Chairman is Jerry Kalinsky and
co chairpersons are Gertrude
Panem, Aaron Letiman and Jules
Lustig.
TONIGHT...
LET THE CHEF COOK!
KREPLACH ITALIAN)
Chef Bey-ar-dee" Cheese Ravioli in sauce
Italian deliciousness' 'to go
Tender Ravioli (kreplach) stuffed
with cheese and smothered in The
Chef's own tempting tomato sauce
it s like ordering up" direct
from Italy Just heat it. serve it-
Ihen sit back and take credit for it
You can serve Kreplach Italiano
as a quick nourishing lunch or as a
hearty dinner
So. relax tonight Get Cheese Ravioli
from The Chef Chef Boy-ar dee'
of course Bravo1
Carola Mueller
Margate Jewish Center
Temple Beth Am/The
Margate Jewish Center will
honor its Rabbi, Dr. Solomon
Geld, at an Israel Bond Recep-
tion to be held Sunday, Feb. 22 at
7:30 p.m.
According to Chairman, Ben
Dinkes, Rabbi Geld will receive
Israel's David Ben-Gurion
Award in recognition of his long
career in the rabbinate and for his
outpouring of concern for the
economic survival of Israel and
for the welfare of the Jewish
community.
Special guest will be Israel
Amitai, a noted authority on the
Middle East and popular Israeli
television producer and journal-
ist. Amitai will discuss the latest
situation in the Middle East re-
garding Israel and her Arab
neighbors.
Honorary chairmen are Mayor
Rick Schwartz, Vice-Mayor Jack
Tobin. Co-chairpersons are Israel
Resnikoff and Nettie Rothstein.
Congregation president is Harry
Hirsch.
Cypress Chase "A"
Michael and Caroline Hecht
received Israel's Solidarity
Award at the Cypress Chase "A"
Night in Israel held in coopera-
tion with the State of Israel
Bonds Organization. The Hechts
were honored for their many
years of service to the Jewish
community.
Temple Beth Israel
Temple Beth Israel in Sunrise
held its annual Israel Dinner of
State in cooperation with the
State of Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion. Bernard and Dorothy
Oshinsky received Israel's David
Ben-Gurion Award for their
many years of leadership on be-
half of the people of Israel. The
award was presented by Hy and
Pauline Segal, chairpersons.
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Browsin' thru
roward
with "maggie" levine
Consul General Joel Arnon, Is-
rael's top consular officer for1
seven Southeastern States, was
scheduled to be in Broward
County this month. But he had to
change his plans because all of
the consul generals in the U.S.
have been called to Washington
for Feb. 12 meeting Joel
OUandcr, assistant executive
director of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council (NJCRAC), who played
an important part jn the Plenary
Session in San Diego last month,
will be meeting Feb. 19 with
Community Relations Committee
in Federation's 2999 NW 33rd
Ave. office on Thursday, Feb. 19,
at noon, and later that evening
with Federation's Young Leader-
ship group. Leonard Seidman,
who has directed Hebrew Im-
migrant Aid Society (HI AS)
operations in Europe and North
Africa for 13 years, has succeeded
Gaynor I. Jacobson as executive
vice president of H1AS.
Rev. Don Bauts, program co-
ordinator for Broward County
Clergy Council; Martha Thrasher
of Church Women United; Alan
Katcben, associate director of
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, Florida Region, and
Edmund Entin, chairman of Fed-
eration's Community Relations
Committee, were video-taped
talking about the Interfaith
Forum scheduled for Feb. 22 at
Fort Lauderdale High School in
Miami's TV Ch. 7 studio for
airing at 9:30 a.m., Jan. 25.
Instead of going on at that time,
the program was aired at 8:30
a.m. So Warren Griffiths, public
affairs coordinator for TV 7, an-
nounced the program will be re-
run at 9:30 a.m. on Feb. 22. That
gives CRC a double-tv-shot for
its Interfaith Forum which
begins at 3 p.m. that afternoon
and is open to the public without
charge.
B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization is providing bus
transportation for North
Broward BBYO-ers participating
and going to the Sunday, Feb. 15,
Maccabiah. Pick-up points at
8:30 that morning are at Coral
Springs Mall, in front of J.
Byrons, University Dr. and
Sample Road: and in front of
Gray Drugs at the Plantation
Mall. 6975 W. Broward Mall. The
bus's will return to those same
lo>-y)ns at about 7 p.m. follow-
irfgiill the events and pick nicking
... On March 8, wrestling try-
outs will be held in Broward
County for Israel's July 6-16
Maccabiah Games. Contact Ben
Siegel, 6950 NW 16th St.. Mar-
gate, for details Maurice
Cohen, Brandeis University
trustee, talked "Money Sense foi
Women" this week to West
Broward Brandeis Women's
Committee.
Jean Womser talked aboift the
plight of Falasha Jews it the
Jan. 27 coffee hour at Fed-
eration's Gait office, 3366 NE
34th St. Southpoint area
residents will be meeting at the
Gait office with Federation's
UJA General Chairman Victor
Gruman as the speaker .
Sidney Karlton of Polynesian
Gardens who was one of the
Super Sunday phone-a-thon
volunteers, wrote to the
Federation to say: "It was a
wonderful experience. Glad we
were part of it" Moshe
Decter, a senior research fellow at
Columbia University's Center foi
Policy Research, is the new editor
of Near East Report, published
by American Public Affairs Com-
mittee (A1PAC). Temple Beth
Israel has a Young Singles (25-
45| Club. It met for the first time
last month with Dr. William
Penzer discussing "Sexuality,
Sensuality and Sensibility" .. j
And on Feb. 1 another club'
"Jewish Mr. and Mrs. 40-60" met
at the Nob Hill Recreation Center
in Sunrise to hear Marcy K, psy-
cic and numerolgist. .
Haverim Chapter of Hadassah,
meeting in Tamarac this week,
heard Rabbi Joseph Berglas of
Congregation Beth Hillel in Mar-
gate discuss Kabala and Jewish
mysticism Jill M. Elk in has
been named manager of Century
Bank's North Lauderdale branch
. Pioneer Women organized
Phases II, III and IV of Sunrise
Lakes as a new chapter this
month United Way still
reporting lees than $100,000
short of its $4 million goal for
Broward County, but a half-
million gain over last year's total,
will hold its annual meeting at
noon, Friday, Feb. 20, in the
Venetian Ballroom at Pier 66 .
Linda E. Kessler was promoted
to asst. vp in the commercial loan
dept. of Landmark Bank's Corel
Springs branch Gary K.
Rosenberg was named innkeeper
of Holiday Inn's Fort Lauderdale
Airport Inn.
Gifts to UJA were made in
. honor of Sophie and Morris Wolfe
of 68th Ave., Plantation, in lieu
of personal gifts to the couple
celebrating 50 years of marriage.
Their daughter, Jessica Sher of
Fort Lauderdale, arranged the
'celebration at the Inverrary Rac-
quet Club Mr. and Mrs.
Michael Cohen were honored on
the occasion of their 52nd wed-
ding anniversary Jan. 28 at the
breakfast of Margate's Beth
Hillel Minyanaires Tiki
Silverman has left her position as
religious and music teacher at'
Temple Beth Israel's Abraham
Haber Torah School to make
Aliyah to Israel Ronnie
Neeman, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Shaul Neeman of SW 50th Place,
Fort Lauderdale, returned to
Cooper City High School after
eight weeks attendance at the
High School in Israel .
Florida's former U.S. Sen
Richard Stone, who lost last yeai
in his bid for a second term, has
decided against a Reagan Ad-
ministration position and plans
to join a New York law firm.
Learn
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fFrjdaylFebruary 13-19^1
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 17
1 co Mindlin
Waldheim Defends
9"!!!!* Mtler testKctamfa w Stamp Honoring
Continued from Page 4
man experience perfectly and,
indeed, the justification for the
rise "I Nazism in the first place.
History, which Hitler foresees
will ultimately vindicate him, at
lIn- moment merely betrays him
with the help of what Goebbels in
this CMS abomination identifies
s "the Jewish Communists.''
FOR HIS part, Goebbels de-
Ivers long speeches about the
Jews as "vermin," a kind of
nalional prime time presentation
iii 1981 America which Jews
hardly need. In between times,
his poachy-looking Nordic Haus-
fnm played by Miami Beach's
own Piper Laurie prepares for
death and lor the deaths of an
endless brood of peachy-looking
pK'lihols children, also of impec-
cable Nordic feature, with the
heroic stoicism if not girth of a
|V\ac"erian Hrunnhilde.
The CHS production is meant
(i be mildly satiric, but you'd
lever know it. The Nazi
(ungsters are meant to be seen as
Nililkul lunatics, but you'd never
Ik now that either. Hecause when
ihcy are nut offering vicious anti-
Semitic broadsides or self-starter
muses in Nazi ideology, they are
>hown as wonderful husbands.
sensitive patriots, a tragically
iniNiiiiiliTslood arum uardv
ainst the cynicism and ter-
rorism ol an advancing horde of
Muscm Hi'rapists.
I mm Hitler, liinwll. reads
fairy tales to the bunkum
"Hunker children at bedtime.
niches with soullul eves as
hers dance (those Hopkins eyes
ml served his characterization
I'lerrc ltc/.liuchu\ so well, but
i.il here are an historic abom-
iilmill, anil prepares with true
roisin lor the end ol hi.s
Imisand-Year dream anil of
IS III, .
I III: QUESTION is whether
ii ii n> ol nullioiis ol Americans
\ it-will Hunker" anil its un-
Uakable ilistoriions even came
to knowing that it was
fi.mi in In satiric, that the Nazi
ters were in reality deadly
jiriopiilli.s. that Hitler reading
I'll>i.ils to bedbound children
.is lone hopes) intended lo be
In consuiiiiiiate portrait of bis
|clii/.oplireniu.
I be net result is that
Hunker" enters the dangerous
oiieol recreated history that has
mii piKulv done and that there-
in e ill-serves its purpose, Fur
iinin oflering moral imperatives
a I be honor ol the Hitler era.
|iiiisiis|iccting viewers are enticed
into accepting Hunker" at luce
lvalue.
or instance. Hitler, they can
sue. tliil have a viable solution
I be Jewish problem why the
%\ s are forever a problem, no
li-SeniiU' will ever say. Anil
In the solution has been
|l i>i(l by the Jews, themselves,
ii are ol course "vermin" anil
iiiiiiminists."
IN A WORLD of renewed anli-
liiiiilisin today, the CHS pro-
luciion was therefore a time-
PHilb. Whether it intended to or
Vi. ii gives Hitler and his bench-
Jen a new respectability that
liev did not have in the first
pure and that the world hardly
lewis lor them to have today.
W bile increasingly, the horren-
fous genocidal master plan of the
'u/.i era is being iliscounted
lho.se day s us mere Zionist propa-
ganda, while the horror of the
Holocaust is being denied as
never having taken place al-
logether, production! like
Hunker" do not give sustenance
l he victims.
On the contrary, productions
like "Hunker" feed the roaches <>i
I reproach, the spawn of Hitler in-
carnate. They give them the
l.a/.arus treatment: they are
resurrected to resume their
purpose. Perhaps in this, the
Anthony Hopkins as Adolf
Hitler in CBS-TVs pro-
duction.
Ilillerian prediction of ultimate
justification was absolutely on
target.
I SAID at the outset that CHS
has been carrying on a war
against the Jews. To "Hunker"
must lx' added the recent Play-
ing lor Time." with CHS stone-
walling incensed national Jewish
opinion against its decision to
star the I'l.O apologist. Vanessa
Uedgrave. in the role of Kama
I'eiielon. who managed lo survive
the agony of Auschwitz.
Can you imagine CHS insult-
ing, a\. Uoiiiun Catholic opinion
in the same way? This is why it
appeals ibal CHS seenis in Ih-
cartyiiig on a war against the
.lews. In "Playing for Time," at
least the insensitive ideologues
.urmunding that production,
including playwright Arthur
Milter himself, could oiler the
trendy argument in its defense
Mi.it art and politics are un-
lt-lnlctl. Hut it is mere crass.
greedy opportunism that pro-
duced' Hunker." a dangerous
.....i-staleinent at a dangerous
I HIS'.
\ Until thought might suggest
that Jews themselves are partly
to blame lor the dilemma. We
must rethink the Nazi period. We
niusi rethink the Holocaust. 1
mean this in the sense that we
must git it oil the market of a
workl opinion wearied by its
preaibiuent. We have pushed it
loo hard on a Christian civiliza-
tion that wrestles with its anti
Semitic impulses every day. Let a
knock oil the pussy looting and
11, hank about it: Anti-Semitism
is an imperative <>l Christianity.
In deny this is lo demonstrate
ignorance ol Christian theology.
WE MUST cool the at-
mosphere. Constantly to keep it
b.ai.il is to exacerbate anti-
Semitism, to encourage the
Christian imperative ol its pro-
lilcnition. There is no doubt that
I he Jewish defense organizations,
whose business it is lo do just the
opposite, will call this the shah-
shah treatment of a pre-Hitler
world in which Jews operated on
the principle that to be quiet
meant to discourage anti-Semites
Irom being aware of our existence
and therefore of endangering it.
1 mean nothing of the kind. Of
course, we must teach the Nazi
period. We must teach the Holo-
caust. We must teach them to
ourselves and to our children
until the end of the generations in
much the same way that we teach
our children and ourselves the
meaning of the Passover.
Hut it is fruitless to teach
others in the same way.
Hunker" is a perfect example of
the Confused results of our best
intentions when we forget this. In
one night. "Hunker" destroys
them by encouraging just the
opposite. It can contribute to
destroying us, as well.
How Racism
Continues
To Paralyze
Continued from Page 4-
..ickel and-diming it for a long
lime, and perhaps a new sense of
reality has hit the 350-year-old
city famous lor universities, mu-
scums, symphony orchestras,
and numerous other cultural
blessings, but derelict in the cry-
ing matter of binding up civic
wounds.
The challenge is terrifying.
Huston is a city of neighborhoods
rooted in ethnic pride, hostile to
invaders of turl Staked out long
Ugo. The racial madness is more
than a long series of incidents. It
has mounted to calamity, more
tragic than any modern
American city can long endure.
The need is tor a profound change
ol atlitude. a siirring for the good
m the hearts and minds of the
citizenry, plus job openings, job
upgrading, more and better
bousing, and an ever-expanding.
sound educational program.
'Palestinian People'
By YITZHAK RAIM
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Secretary General
Kurt Waldheim has de-
fended the issuance by the
United Nations Postal Ad-
ministration of three
stamps bearing the inscrip-
tion, "Inalienable Rights of
the Palestinian People," in
English, French and Ger-
man. The stamps, author-
ized by a General Assembly
resolution in 1979, drew
sharp protests from various
groups and individuals.
Waldheim, in a statement read
by a UN spokesman, responded
to charges that the stamps may
legitimize terrorism. "There was
no intention, by implication or
otherwise, to legitimate terrorism
to which the UN remains
strongly opposed, nor to jeopar-
dize the legitimate rights of any
of its member states," the state-
ment said. The spokesman noted
that the stamps were being
issued with the objective "of
publicizing the inalienable rights
of the Palestinian people."
He added. "The importance of
assuring the rights of the Pales-
tinian people in the process of
establishing a permanent peace
in the Middle East has been
accepted by the vast majority of
the world community, including
all the parties directly concerned
with the'question of Palestine.
The spokesman noed that
profits from the sale of the
stamps "as in the case of all UN
stamps, will be placed in the UN
General Fund which is redis-
tributed to its members."
The stain are valid only
when post* d rom UN premises.
The 15-cen I ..-nomination stamp,
which bear, its inscription in
English, is lor mailing from UN
headquarters here. The UN has
two post offices, one in the public
area open to visitors and oper-
ated by the UN Postal Adminis-
tration and the other in the Sec-
retariat building which is
managed by the U.S. Postal
Service.
The two other stamps are for
use at UN headquarters in
Geneva. The one inscribed in
French has a denomination of
F.s. 0,80 and the one with the
German inscription a denom-
ination of S4. The English and
French-inscribed stamps were
printed in quantities of 1.9
million each and the German in-
scribed stamp 2.1 million. All are
printed in four colors and were
designed by an American, David
Dewhurst. Many stamp dealers
said they would not distribute
the stamps.
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Vorspan 'Pinch-Hits'
Mar. 2 for Dr. Fein

One of the most provocative
talks of the current lecture series
open to the entire community will
take place at 8 p.m., Monday,
March 2, at Temple Kol Ami,
8200 Peters Rd.. Plantation
The speaker is Albert Vorspan,
executive vice president of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations. He is the "pinch-
hitler" for the scheduled speaker,
Dr. I.t-onard Fein, editor of
Moment Magazine, who can-
celled his commitment because of
some problems concerning the
magu/ini'.
In baseball circles, a "pinch
hitler" is considered better than
ihe athlete scheduled to come to
!>ul. And that's true in this case,
Ixrause Vorspan is certain to
keep his listeners enthralled by
ni>, lalk on "The Move to the
Uight ami the Jewish Com-
munity." And all this and more
lor only S>2 on March 2.
The lecture is the third in the
series cooperatively sponsored by
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, the synagogues
of North Hroward County and
i he Jewish Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdale. Tickets
lor members of the sponsoring
organizations are $2 for the
individual lectures and $3 for
non-meml)ers. Tickets are avail-
able at those organizations and
institutions, as well as the Kol
Ami door Monday, March 2, and
also at the Federation office, 2999
NW 33rd Ave.. Fort Lauderdale.
The series of four lectures
which opened Jan. 25 when Dr.
Earl A. (in ill man spoke on
"Family Crises." and continued
Religious
Directory
LAUDERDALE LAKES
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE.
4351 West Oakland Park Boulevard.
Modern Orthodox Congregation. Saul
Herman. Rabbi Emeritus.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 3245 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome
Klement.
SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu.
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER. INC. 8049
West Oakland Park Blvd. Con-
servative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy.
Cantor Jack Marchant.
LAUDERHILL
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAU
DERHILL. 2048 NW 49th Ave.,
Lauderhill. Conservative. President,
Maxwell Gilbert.
TAMARAC
TEMPLE BETH TORAH TAMARAC
JEWISH CENTER. 9101 NW 57th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Israel Zimmer-
man. Cantor Henry Belasco.
PLANTATION
TEMPLE KOL AMI. Plantation. 8200
Peters Rd. Liberal Reform. Rabbi
Sheldon J Harr
RAMAT SHALOM. Reconstructionist
Synagogue. 7473 NW 4th St. Rabbi
Rebecca Alpert.
POM PA NO BEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Jacob Remer.
MARGATE
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION 7640
Margate Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Joseph Berglas.
TEMPLE BETH AMMARGATE
JEWISH CENTER. 7205 Royal
Palm Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi Or.
Solomon Geld. Cantor Mario
Bofoshansky.
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive Reform. Rabbi Donald S.
Gerber. Cantor Harold Dworkln.
KETERTIKVAH SYNAGOGUE.8p.m.
Friday, 1030 a.m. Saturday in
Auditorium, Bank of Coral Springs.
3300 University Dr. Rabbi Leonard
Zoll. 1
__ _, DEERFIRLD BEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL at Century
Village East Conservative. Rabbi
David Berent Cantor Joseph Pollack.
YOUNG ISRAEL of Deerfield Beach.
1661W. Hillsboro Blvd. Orthodox.
BOCA RATON
TEMPLE BETH EL. 333 SW 4th
Avenue, Boca Raton. Rabbi Merle S.
Singer.
B'NAI TORAH. 1401 NW 4th Ave., Boca
Raton. Conservative. Rabbi Nathan
Zeliier, Cantor Henry Perl.
HOLLYWOOD
YOttftG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
LAUDERDALE. 4171 Stirling
Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bomzer.
on Feb. 8 when Dr. Thelma Alt-
shuler spoke on "Judaism and
Humanism" will conclude
Sunday, March 22. at Temple
Beth Israel. 7100 W. Oakland
Park Blvd.. when Rabbi Robert
(iordis, professor of Bible at
Jewish Theological Seminary,
and chairman of the Jewish
Welfare Board's Jewish Book
Council, will be the speaker.
Vorspan is the foremost mover
of Jewish social action programs
in the United States and has
written, among scholarly works,
a most amusing book. My Rabbi
Doesn't Main- House Calls. He
peppers his talks with bits of
witticism that drive home points
that he expounds concerning
Jewish values and social crises.
Another of his lx>oks is The Kids
An- Heroltinu. Us just $2 for
memliers of sponsoring insti-
tutions and S3 lor others to hear
one ol Americas gifted speakers.
Concert at
Temple Sholom
Feb. 22
The Men's Club of Tempi'
Sholom is presenting th.
"Winged Victory Singers" at *
p.m.. Sundav. Feb 22. in the
Temple's Social Hall. 132 SE 11
Ave.. Pompano Beach, as the
third in the current series of
conceits.
Hy Mintz. Men's Club presi-
dent, said the eight talented
performers, directed by Joe Baris
and featuring Norman Brody.
will entertain with Broadway and
Hebrew melodies. Donation is S5
|)er person.
The Sisterhood of Temple
Sholom, Pompano Beach, has
scheduled its annual dinner dance
for Saturday night. Feb. 21. with
proceeds to aid the Temple's
enlarged Sunday School, the
teachers staff, and the Youth
Group, in addition to the recently
enhanced Temple Library.
The dinner in the Temple's
Social Hall, is scheduled for 7:30
p.m. preceded by a buffet table,
and cash bar, at 6:30 p.m.
Bea Weidenfeld. Sisterhood,
president, with honor guests
Rabbi and Mrs. Morris A. Skop,
and Cantor and Mrs. Jacob
Kenzer. will greet the guests.
Mistress of Ceremonies is
Betty Selis. The dinner will be
prepared by the Temple cuisine
trio, Ray Farber, Florence Marks
and Hilda Robbins.
Dance music will be provided
during and after dinner by the
one-man band, Bill Flannigan,
popular guitarist and vocalist.
Tickets and further in-
formation are available from Mrs.
Selis. Early reservations are sug-
gested since only 180 reserva-
tions will be accepted.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
On Feb. 17, at 11 a.m. the
Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-EI
will host its annual Interfaith
meeting in conjunction with
Church Women United. The
theme will be "Down Liturgy
Lane" with Rabbi Jeffrey
L.Ballon officiating, and Cantor
Jerome Klement assisting with
the musical portion.
Luncheon will be served
following the program. There will
A totally new and different breast
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dipping, durable, wear regular era or
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For color brochure call MlamT
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be a $2 charge to defray the cost
of the luncheon.
Sunday, March 1, at 9:30 a.m.,
the major Jewish American poet-
critic, Laurence Lieberman, in a
special guest appearance in the
All-Purpose Room of Temple
Kmanu-El. 3245 W. Oakland
Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, will
discuss selections from his latest
work, "God's Measurements."
Sunday, March 8, at 9:30 a.m.,
the International musician and
lecturer from Mexico City, David
Prensky, will play excerpts on
the recorder and speak on the
"Joy of Music."
Tickets for each session are
available at the Temple office at
$4 for members of the Temple, .
and $5 for non-members. A
Continental Breakfast will be
served. Additional information
can be obtained by calling the
Temple office.
RAMAT SHALOM
itabbi Lavy Becker of
Montreal, who has recently
returned from a visit to Israel,
will conduct the Feb. 13-14 week-
end service and study period at
Kunuil Shalom, the Reconstruc-
tionist Synagogue, 7473 NW 4th
St.. Plantation. Rabbi Becker has
main Canadian friends who
winter in the area and Is looking
forward to welcoming them at t he
8:15 Friday service.
tin Thursday. Feb. 19 at 8:30
p.m. Kahlii Becker will talk on
Jewish Continuity in Isolated
Communities." This will be the
sixth of a series ol eight talks
given at Kamal Shalom in
conjunction with the North
Broward Midrasha. The follow-
ing Thursday. Feb. 2ri. Habbi
Harold Kichler, Director.
Chaplaincy Service of Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
will speak on Redesigning The
Second Half Ol Your Life."
Information on these and other
Synagogue events can be had by
calling the Synagogue 583-7770
Month)) through Friday from 9
to noon.
BETH AM CLUB
A Young Couples Club has
become the newest arm of Temple
Belli Am. Although the group
was lormed to provide a means of
social interaction, many of the
activities and programs planned
will help strengthen Temple
Jewish interests and the Hebrew
School. Any couples interested in
joining this group should contact
(iloria Gross or Sue Feiner.
On Feb. 14 the Club will turn
ihe clock back to the 50s. All
members, prospective members,
and friends are invited to attend.
Cost per couple is S20. For
reservations, call Doreen Klein.
B'NAI /B'NOT MITZVAH
KOL AMI
Stephen Effren, son of Marlene
Effren, and Linda Cohen,
daughter of Stanley and Diane
Cohen, will receive Torah honors
on the occasion of their B'nai
Milzvah Saturday morning. Feb.
14, at Temple Kol Ami. Plan-
tation Jewish Center.
Amy Ardman, daughter of
Martin and Linda Ardman will
become a Bat Mitzvah at the
Saturday morning, Feb. 21
service at the Temple, and on
Saturday, Feb. 28, Marcy Hart,
daughter of Walter and Diane
Hart, will become a Bat Mitzvah.
B'nai Mitzvah of David
Kamins, son of Alan and Han-
nalore Kamins, and Alan
Rechter, son of Marvin and Linda
Rechter, took place at the
Temple's Feb. 7 service.
BETH HILLEL
At the Feb. 7 Shabbat service
at Congregation Beth Hillel,
Margate, the Bar Mitzvah of
John Joseph Eisenstadt. son of
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Watson,
was celebrated. His grand-
parents are Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Gilbert, and Mrs. Irene Watson.
BETH ISRAEL
Karen Jackson, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Jackson,
will become a Bat Mitzvah at the
Friday evening, Feb. 13, service
at Temple Beth Israel, 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.
Shabbat services the following
week at Temple Beth Israel will
include participation by Beth
Heller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Leon Heller, at Friday, Feb. 20
service, on the occasion of her
Bat Mitzvah, and the following
morning the Bar Mitzvah of
Daniel Bodenstein, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Bennett Bodenstein,
and grandson of Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Gottlieb, who are also
members of the congregation.
EMANU-EL
Joseph Paris, son of Corben
and Susan Paris, will become a
Bar Mitzvah. Feb. 14 at Emanu-
EI.
Jeff Simmer, son of Lawrence
and Sharron Simmer, will cele-
brate his Bar Mitzvah, at Satur-
day, 11 a.m., Feb. 21, service at
Temple Emanu-EI, 3245 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd.
At the Jan 31 service. Sean
Kesson, son of Jack and Joan
Kesson. became a Bar Milzvah at,
Emanu-EI service.
BETH ORR
Stephen Bernstein and Doug
Kalz will each be called to the
Torah Saturday morning. Feb.
14, at Temple Beth Orr. Coral
Springs, on the occasion of their
B'nai Mit/.vah. The following
week, another double celebration
ul B'nai Mitzvah takes place
when Stephen David Kraft and
Pelei Wilkins are honored. And
on Saturday. Feb. 28. Hilly
I'erstman will become a Bat
Mitzvah and Greg Korum will
Ix'comea Bar Mit/.vah.
Jeffrey Berkowitz was the Bar
Mit/.vah celebrant at Beth Orr's
Feb. 7 service.
RAMAT SHALOM
Dean Roman, son of My ma
and Larry Roman, eighth grader
at University School, will become
a Bar Mitzvah at the 10 a.m.*
Saturday, Feb. 14 service at
Ramat Shalom, The Reconstruc-
tionist Synagogue with Rabbi
Lavy Becker officiating. In
attendance will be Dean's
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Abe
Kudd of Sunrise, and Mr. and
Mrs. Carl Gepner of Delray.
Rabbi Rebecca Alpert will be
back for the 10 a.m., Saturday,
Feb. 21 Ramat Shalom service
when Jody Feldman, who began
Torah School at age 3, becomes a
Bar Mitzvah.
BETH TORAH
Liza Markowitz, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. William Marko-
witz, will become a Bat Mitzvah
at Friday, Feb. 13, service of
Temple Beth Torah, Tamarac
Jewish Center. At Saturday
morning. Feb. 14, service Troy
Kranitz, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Steve Kranitz. and Michael
l'elker. son of Mr. and Mrs. Mel
I'Ylker. will lie the B'nai Mitzvah
celebrants.
Friday. Feb. 20, Judy Itosen-
ihal. daughter ol Mr. and Mrs.
Joel Kosenthal, will become a Bat
Milzvah. The following morning
Richard Cohen, son of Mr. and
Mrs. George Cohen, will become
a Bar Mitzvah.
Friday. Feb. 27. Charlene
feigenbaum. daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Feigenbaum.
will be a Bat Mitzvah.
Also at the Beth Torah. the
Shabbat services. Feb. b" and 7.
B'not Milzvah honors were ac-
corded Laurie Vermut. daughter
of Mr. and Mrs Daniel Vermut.
and Brett Kenwood, son of Mr.
and Mrs. William Kenwood.
Levitt -} h
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LOEHMANN'S
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NOW AT WHITE
SALE PRICES.
MU ANOALE il ACM IlVD
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DESIGNER SHEETS
50 by YVES ST. LAURENT
* Grace Kelly
* Gear at
Reg. SALE Reg. SALE
TWIN............12.00........5.99 QUEEN.......19.00........9.50
DOUBLE.....15.00........7.49 KING............23.00......11.50
SEE OUR 1981 COLLECTION
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