The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00163

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 9 Number 12
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday. June 6, 1980
FridShochtt
Price 35 Cents
ederation Elects Keiner President; Honors 400
Milton Keiner became the
kinth president in the 12-year
kistory of the Jewish Federation
if Greater Fort Lauderdale at the
nnual membership meeting held
lav 29 in the Samuel M. Soref
]aQ of the Jewish Community
tenter Perlman Campus.
He succeeds Leo Goodman
^ho M'rved as president for two
ears In addition to the elections
officers and board members.
hr meeting was highlighted by
ke president's report of pro-
fams instituted locally by its
vn committees and beneficiary
fancies, and the presentation of
lards to some 400 volunteer
kders (See Awards Story,
\ee 31 in the 1980 United
vish Appeal.
The line of presidents of the
deration began in*1968 with
Jdwik Brodzki serving at the
V the Federation received its
kte charter. He was followed by
krtin Fridovich. Alvin Gross,
Lard Miller, Albert Garnitz,
|an E. Haer. Jacob Brodzki and
i (i(Kxlman.
Elected with Keiner to lead the
deration during the 1980-81
Leo Goodman
year are Victor Gruman, who
succeeds Keiner as executive vice
president and as general chair-
man of the United Jewish
Appeal; Richard Romanoff, Saul
Weinberger, Joel Reinstein, vice
presidents; Joel Levitt, sec-
retary; John Streng, treasurer.
The membership also elected
the following to serve on the
board of directors for two years:
Irving Friedman. Morris Fur-
man. Seymour Gerson, Alven S.
Ghertner. Alfred Golden, David
Jackowitz, Joseph Kaplan,
Milton Keiner
William Katzberg, Martin Kurtz,
David Miller. Samuel K. Miller.
Joseph Novick, Jack Nudelman,
Anita Perlman, Israel Resnikoff,
Albert Segal, Florence K. Straus.
And for a one year term: Leonard
Gluck and Alan Levy.
PRESIDENTS REPORT
President Leo Goodman's
report of a year of "tremendous
progress and growth" lauded the
efforts of the hundreds of volun-
teers in making it possible, and
singled out Keiner and Gruman
for the great increase of the
Victor Gruman
United Jewish Appeal for 1980
now at the $3,040,000 total
compared to the under $2,400,000
total of 1979.
Listing the Federation pro-
grams and the local beneficiaries
supported by UJA contributions,
the President's Report called
attention to the following:
Chaplaincy Committee,
chaired by Dr. Alvin Colin with
Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz as di-
rector. Rabbi Schwartz, joining
the Federation staff in December,
gave the committee a full-time
chaplain who serves the religious
needs of persons confined to 22
nursing homes, patients in 15
hospitals, involuntary Jewish
"guests" in three prisons, and
scores of individuals in need of
religious counseling.
Russian Resettlement, co-
chaired by Leon Messing and
Israel Resnikoff, which has re-
settled, in cooperation with the
Jewish Family Service of Brow-
ard County, 31 Russian Jews and
six Vietnamese refugees to date.
Community Relations Com-
mittee, headed by Edmund Entin
with Max Levine of the Fed-
eration staff as consultant, was
re-constituted last September
and is being further expanded in
meeting the community concern
in North Broward, and the
concerns of the community for
Israel and world Jewry.
Young Leadership Develop-
ment program chaired by Glenn
Meyers with Alan Margolies as
staff director has had more than
40 persons meeting monthly
covering various aspects of
Continued on Page 2
Israel
Teizman Resigns; Begin Rebuffs UN, Invites Saudi Prince to Knesset
ERUSALEM (JTAI Supreme Court Justice Moshe
kky ordered the Israel government to answer an appeal
fcnsi the deportation of three West Bank political
lers in the aftermath of the Mav 2 terrorist killings of
[yeshiva students in Hebron Including 20-year-old
cov Zimmerman, the grandson of Alex and Miriam
kmerman of Lauderdale Lakes.
[he appeal was fded on behalf of the mayors of Hebron,
Ihoul and a Moslem judge in Hebron.
^though the PLO and its mis-labeled "moderate"
der, Yassir Arafat, have boasted the responsibility foi
murder in cold blood of the six Jewish religious
dents and have praised the killers as heroes, neither
shington nor other Western governments have moved
[punish the PLO by condemning it in the United
lions. Instead, Israel is pictured as the guilty party
der international law" for having deported the three
Dron area Arab leaders involved in inciting the Arab
leanwhile, last week, following the resignation of
fense Minister Ezer Weizman from his Cabinet, Israeli
ne Minister Menachem Begin invited Saudi Arabian
iwn Prince Fahd to Jerusalem to address the Knesset
|ut his willingness to bring the Palestinians and other
bs into a peace agreement.
U the same time, Begin rebuffed the UN Security
kncil call for the return of the three Arabs to the West
kk. He said, in a message to UN Secretary General Kurt
Idheim, that Israel's Supreme Court will decide.
lupreme Court Justice Baisky has referred the appeal
to a panel of three high court justices. The government's
case will be presented by a representative of the Attorney
General.
Begin protested to Waldheim that the atrocities that
led to the expulsion were not mentioned in the Security
Councils resolutions. Waldheim published Begins
response to his appeal in a report to the 15-nation Security
Council.
The Security Council twice in less than two weeks voted,
12-0, with the United States abstaining, to approve
resolutions calling upon Israel to rescind the orders
against the three Palestinians. Israel spurned the earlier
request.
Israeli military authorities expelled Mayor Faud
Kawasme of Hebron, Mayor Mohammad Milhem of
Halhul and Sheik Rajab al-Tamini because of a Palestinian
guerrilla ambush in Hebron May 2 that killed six Jewish
worshipers and wounded 16 others.
Begin told Waldheim that a petition to allow the three
men was before the Supreme Court and will be handled "in
the course of the next six weeks.
'Then the Supreme Court, sitting as the High Court of
Justice, will render its judgment, which will of course be
carried out by the government," he said.
Begin said the three expelled men "openly incited"
West Bank Arabs "to violence."
"Neither the first resolution of the Security Council nor
the last makes even a mention of the horrendous
atrocity perpetrated by the emissaries of the PLO
whose command in Beirut officially declared responsibility
for carrying our their murderous ambush of worshipers,"
Begin said.
Begin later met with Katharine Graham, chairman of
the Washington Post Co., publishers of The Washington
Post and Newsweek when he extended the invitation to
Prince Fahd to come to Israel.
Begin said that under no circumstances will Israel with-
draw from the occupied territories it captured in 1967 a
condition laid down by Prince Fahd for Arab cooperation
in the Middle East peace process but he invited the
Saudi leader to the Israeli capital to present his case.
"I have to say that his demands, under any conditions,
are rejected and are totally unacceptable. But he's invited.
Perhaps he wUl convince me. Perhaps I will convince
him," the prime minister told Graham, in an interview.
In a meeting with Graham in Riyadh, Prince Fahd, who
continues to oppose the Camp David accords and the
proposed Palestinian autonomy scheme, pledged Saudi
involvement in the peace process providing Israel leaves
all the occupied areas.
It is unlikely that the crown prince would accept Begin's
offer to visit Jerusalem, which the Saudis insist must be
returned to Arab control. In the interview, he said
Palestinian self-determination must be the key to any
settlement.
Responding to Prince Fahd's proposal, opposition
Labor Party leader Shimon Peres said, "I take it seriously.
Not that I agree to his conditions, but it is a departure
from the traditional Saudi positions."
lornerstone Placed at Beth Am
pore than 750 persons were in
tndance on Sunday morning,
|.v IK. inside the cavernous un-
shed House of The People, the
home of the newly-named
'ip/c Beth Am Margate Jew-
Center on Royal Palm Blvd.
pock Island Road for the sym-
[f cornerstone laying
fmony,
1 Wai held indoors for the
tefit uf the audience which
r" nor have heard the
fakers or seen the corner where
stone is to be placed since
fdreds of cars were parked on
teuly-paved roadway in front
'he temple and on sandy
rtches surrounding the
tple.
The following is a report filed
fpavid Klempner, the temple's
flicity director, of the in-
""iff 90-minute service:
t
If--***.
Model of Temple Beth Am.
Cornerstone Ceremony so
special? Was it the stuffing of the
metal-lined concrete block with
documents by past presidents to
become part of the bodyof the
this purpose was secondary.
More important was the im-
mensity and grandeur of the
edifice on a land area of 7' 2 acres.
Free Burial for Indigents
The Chaplaincy Commission of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale has un-
dertaken the responsibility of providing free burial
and memorial service for the poor and needy North
Broward County residents.
The Free Burial program, suggested by Com-
mission member Alfred Golden of the Riverside
Chapel who helped institute a similar program in
Dade County, was approved at the Commission
meeting presided over by Chairman Dr. Alvin Colin,
and followed through by the Chaplaincy Com-
mission Director Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz.
Rabbi Schwartz said that approval of the
Federation's free burial program has been received
from all of the rabbis serving congregations in
North Broward, and from Al Golden for Riverside
Chapel, Mark Weissman for Menorah Chapel, and
Gary H. Arnold for Sinai Memorial, and also from
Jon C. Thomas of Star of David Cemetery, and
i Rabbi Milton Schlinsky of Sharon Garden.
The Chaplaincy Commission will be meeting at
noon Thursday. June 12, at the Jewish Federation
office to discuss proposed videotaped Sabbath
service to be made available to patients in hospitals
having closed circuit television ______


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 6, l98y
:
E
h
c
y
Ci
b.
C
al
m
m
90
m
P<
ac
se
CO
Tl
T
R.
in
of
rel
gn
tl
Mi
Ed
syi
ini
1
Ho
ser
Fri
auri
Federation Elects Keiner
President; Honors 400
Continued from Page 1
Jewish life and activities. Nearly
all participants have become
involved in the U JA campaign or
with Jewish agencies in the
community.
Hebrew Day School, whose
president is Paul Frieser and
whose director is Fran Meren-
stein, is completing five years of
outstanding secular and religious
education in classes from kinder-
garten through fifth grade. Pro-
jected enrollment for 1980-81 is
100 pupils.
Jewish Community Center,
whose president is Anita Perlman
and whose executive director is
William Goldstein, is the Fed-
eration's largest local beneficiary
providing a wide variety of pro-
gramming for all age groups with
cultural, social, athletic and edu-
cational activities. JCC has
enjoyed enormous growth since
moving to the 16-acre Permian
Campus with its 11 buildings,
now numbering more than 1,100
family members. JCC's Summer
Day Camp, in its second season
this summer, boasts an enroll-
ment of more than 400 children.
Jewish Family Service, whose
president is Fred Greene and
whose executive director is Sher-
win Rosenstein, has a staff of
highly qualified professional
counselors offering guidance and
assistance to Jewish families, the
elderly, young people, and in-
dividuals in need of help and
counseling. During the year, JFS
received 820 applications from
families and individuals in the
over-65 age and 1,140 ap-
plications from persons under 65
years of age.
Public Relations Committee,
chaired by Bernard Libros with
Max Levine as consultant, util-
ized a billboard on State Road 7,
and announcements on TV and
radio stations, and in articles in
local newspapers to publicize
UJA, and the Federation. Public
Relations is also responsible for
the news content and makeup of
the Fort Lauderdale edition of
The Jewish Floridian which is
published every two weeks and
mailed to more than 13,000
families in North Broward
County.
Jewish Education, headed by
Phyllis Chudnow with Abraham
J- Gittelson as director, has been
responsible for a variety of
programs, including the founding
of the Judaica High School which
included 65 students from four
congregations, observances of
holidays, and seminars for
teachers of religious schools in
cooperation with the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
Hillel is chaired by Al Golden
and is intimately involved with
Hillel Foundations of Florida
concerned with an on-going pro-
gram for the 24,000 Jewish
students on the campuses of
colleges in Florida, including the
Hillel presence at the following:
University of Florida, Gaines-
ville; Florida State in Tal-
lahassee; South Atlantic Univer-
sity, Tampa; University of South
Florida, Tampa, and Broward
Community College in Fort
Lauderdale.
WECARE, headed by Sally
Radin with Anne Fleischman as
the staff member, has more than
500 volunteers providing a
variety of services to the Jewish
community, including its on-
going programs of Services to the
Blind, Blood Bank, Eyes for the
Needy, Hospital and Nursing
Home visitations, and Jewish
holiday programs.
Kosher Nutrition, with Helen
Nathan administering the
program for the Federation which
provides more than 1,000 hot
Kosher meals each week at the
Federation's building and at the
Jewish Community Center,
through Federation support
given to the federally-funded pro-
gram administered by the state
through the Broward County
Agency for the Aging.
Cornerstone Placed at Beth Am
Continued from Page 1
with a sanctuary that will seat
1,000, and several hundred more,
if needed; a daily' chapel, class-
rooms, an auditorium and stage,
two kosher kitchens, garden
patios, administration offices,
rabbi's study, Judaica library,
cantor's office, bride's room,
boutique and gift shops, ample
illuminated parking area, apart-
ment for caretaker.
The many guests of honor were
spotlighted by the bright sun-
light streaming in from either
side of the Bimah. As Morris
Broad, president of American
Savings and Loan Association,
told the audience: "When there is
no dream, there is no will. It is
not just brick and mortar, but a
JFS Re-elects Greene
OFFICERS OF JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE
OF BROWARD COUNTY, left to right, Brian Sherr, first vice
president; Lynda Levin, second vice president; Sheldon
Fohsh, treasurer; Fred P. Greene, president, and Dr. Robert
Heller, secretary.
The 18th annual meeting of the
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County was held on
May 7, at the Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Community Center.
Fred Greene, re-elected
president of the board, stressed
ti the ever-increasing demand for
. 'he professional counseling
j services of this agency, and the
concurrent strides made by the
gency to meet the needs of the
community.
The 1979 Annual Report
relating to the development and
expansion of systems which have
been initiated during recent years
I *s presented by the Executive
t Director. Sherwin H. Rosenstein.
Ms. Ellen Held of the Russian.
Resettlement Program
jn-
attendance. Certificates of
Awards were presented to those
volunteers who help make this a
very viable program.
The Esther Lowenthal
Community Service Award was
presented to Dr. Alfred Martin
for his outstanding work and
community dedication.
Presentation was made by
Abraham Halpern, first recipient
of the award.
Other officers are: First vice
President, Brian Sherr; Second
Vice President; Lynda Levin;
Treasurer, Sheldon Polish; and
Secretary, Dr. Robert Heller.
Greene thanked the past
board of directors and staff for
the help in making the agency
meaningful House of Worship.
Marquesee, looking down from
Heaven, could not in his wildest
dream imagine what has taken
place in Margate."
As Rabbi Phillip Labowitz put
it: "This day God has made a
breathtaking edifice, stemming
from humble beginnings. The
accomplished fact hides the
efforts of kinship, comradeship,
common purpose and love,
dedication to Judaic principles.
These are the realities that augur
well for the future of a House of
God built on love."
Many other thoughts were
expressed by eloquent speakers
such as Rabbis Emanuel Schenk
and Joseph Berglas, and Abra-
ham J. Gittelson, education
director of Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
President Harry Hirsch thanked
all benefactors for their
generosity, but looked ahead for
ever greater sacrifice. Quoting Sir
Winston Churchill's words,
"Give us the tools and we will
finish the job," he emphasized
the necessity of continued efforts
and contributions so that "this
beautiful picture can be turned
into a masterpiece, not a
mirage."
The newly engaged Cantor
Mario Botoshansky enhanced the
meaning of the temple through
Torah and its teachings through
the scholarship of Rabbi Dr.
Solomon Geld by transforming
one of the daily blessings, which
he entitled Melamed Torah into
sweet strains to which the many
hundreds of listeners con-
tributed.
Dr. Geld concluded the pro-
gram with his invocation in
which he stressed the happiness
that "the mind's eye could see,"
but cautioned his listeners to
cyntinue their efforts if they
wished to see continued progress.
"May this first function at
Temple Beth Am," he said
serve as a guideline and omen
for the many more to come. If it
commands the same leadership of
officers and mass participation of
its members, the future of
Temple Beth Am is permanently
assured by such a performance
Families expect more
from
Riverside.
Moreservice.
4
Riverside now has seven chapels to serve the
Jewish communities of Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties. But, more convenience is only one of the reasons
why since 1935, Riverside has been the standard by which
people compare funeral service.
At Riverside, families are served by the largest
Jewish staff of any funeral director in Florida. They are
people with a genuine understanding of families' needs,
regardless of financial circumstances.
At Riverside, families find total dedication
to Jewish tradition. And economical help in arranging
service between Florida and New York, or anywhere else
in the world.
Families expect more from Riverside.
We're trying to live up to that trust.
FT.LAUDERDALE(SUNRISE):1171 North West61st Avenue
(Sunset Strip)
nu_ Call:584-6060
Other chapels In North Broward.Hollywood.North Miami Beach
Miami and West Palm Beach.
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
RIVERSIDE
I Memorial Chapel, Inc./ Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Sponsoring the Guardian Plan Pre-arranged Funeral.
Outrditn
SB
Plan
Carl Grossberg/ Alfred Golden/ Leo Hack/ Kenneth M.Kay/
Arthur Grossberg/Joseph Rubin/Carmen Serrano/
______ Andrew Fier/Charles S.Salomon
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
776-6272
HOWARD
|aper a
ackaging
1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT LAUDERDALE
*
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES.

TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE.
*i


W^X I Subsidiary oraa
Leu mi
Securities

Bank Ltumi X ltral B M
18 East 48th Street
New York N Y 1001:
(212)759-1310


Friday, June 6, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
400 Honored for Leadership During 1980 United Jewish Appeal

Manny Zamore, Irving Baker,
Myer Baker, Nathan Baum,
Milton Berman, Carl Bernstein,
Raymond Eulau, Joseph Fink,
Harold Gelber, Morris Ginsburg,
Nathan Gold, Isadore Goldberg,
Abel Greenberg.
Abram Hersh, Harold Hirsch,
Herbert Kahan, Irving Kaplan,
r. Harold Katz, Joseph
^tranberg, Lee Krinsky, Joseph
Lederfine, Dr. Samuel Levy.
Among those who helped in developing
committees in communities, condominium
complexes, and neighborhoods to solicit
thousands of Jews and in some cases. non-
Jews for commitment to the 1980 United
Jewish Appeal of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale are those listed on this
page. But to the hundreds of "unlisted" others
who worked on the committees that helped
produce commitments totalling more than
83,040,000 to date also go the thanks of the entire
campaign organization which was headed by
Milton Keiner and Victor Gruman and the
heartfelt thanks of the officers and directors of
the Federation.
Saul Padek, Herbert Sadkin,
Phil Sacks, Sheldon Kay, Charles
Greene, George Burgh, Jerry
Kaye, Phil Halle, Irving Seid,
Sidney R. Goldstein, Phil
Goldman, Sidney Bernstein,
I jBruce Lyons.
Sidney Bernstein, James I.
Cohn, Jeffrey M. Fenster,
Howard Greitzer, Steven L.
Josias, Michael Until, Barry
Mandelkorn. Steven Fayne.
Johl Rotman, Michael
Weinberg, Mark Steingard,
Bruce W. Syrop, Edward Kaplan,
Michael Jacobs, Mitchell Pasin,
Philip Averbuch, Robert
Feigenbaum, Richard Dubin,
David Gross, Arthur Langer.
Glenn Meyers, Joel Reinstein,
Dr. Robert Segaul, Mel Jarolem,
Dr. Stephen Nemerofsky, Jeffrey
Klein, Sheldon Polish, David
Jackowitz, Dr. Robert Grenitz,
Alan Levy, Larry Freilich.
Irving Libowsky, Meyer
Morris, Joseph Nadler, Jack
Osterweil, Edward Pollack,
Melvin Rose, Adrian Rouss, Sam
Rowitt, Charles Ruben, Jack
Sandals, Irving Schultz, Dr.
Daniel Schwartz, Philip Sch-
wartz, Sam Schwartz.
Julius Sharlet, Morris Singer,
Morris Spar, Abraham Speiser
Burt Steinberg, Jack Storti, Max
Teitelman, Milton Trupin, Jack
Wasser, David Wilson, Sidney
Wolf, Sam Young.
Cong. Beth Hillel of Margate.
Margate Jewish Center, Tamarac
Jewish Center, The David Kohns,
Harry Forman, Joseph Rich,
Elsie Miller, Harry Rosenkrantz,
MAYOR E. CLAY SHAW of
Fort Lauderdale, candidate for
U.S. Congress, met with leaders
of the Brandeis University
National Women's Committee at
their matting last month in
Inverrary. Pictured with him are
Elaine Lisberg, Brandeis
Women's national president,
Hermine Hoffman and Gloria
Boris. "Brandeis has produced
some of the finest minds of our
generation and the generation
which preceded us," Shaw told
the 300 women present. "And it
would not have been able to
accomplish its important work,
were it not for the dedicated self
sacrifice of thousands of alumni
and friends of Brandeis who have
provided the means the tools
to accomplish its work," he
said. Shaw is the third term
mayor of Fort Lauderdale, former
special U.S. ambassador to
Papua New Guinea and is
currently a candidate for the 12th
district seat in the U.S. Congress.
Sidney Goldfarb, Jerome
Davidson, Hyman Goldman.
David Schlom, Jack Alper,
Harriet Weiner.
Ike Assael, David Levine,
Ruth Weinrieb, Dr. Alvin Colin,
Arthur Faber, The Jon Russells.
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Smith,
Jacob Brodzki, Ludwig Brodzki,
Alfred De Beer.
Thedore S. Daren, Ben Eppy,
Saul Goldmark, Samuel Leber,
David Miller, Al Sharenow, Sam
Sorrell. Robert Adler, Sen.
Samuel Greenberg, Bernard
Libros, Charles Locke, Ben
Roisman.
Sidney Dorfman, Max
Eisenstein, Jules Bressler, Leo
Kaplan, Dr. Justin May, Samuel
Mothner, Jack Nudelman,
Martin Weiner. Sol Furman,
Dr. Erwin Michaelson.
Hyman Wasserman, Harold
Katzen, Samuel Oppenheimer,
Louis Lipman, Murray
Schneider, Stanley Ruskin, Joel
Levitt, J. Milton Edelstein,
Harriet D. Zalon. Jack Levine,
Abraham Marcus.
Joseph Segal, Herbert L.
Wilens, Jay B. Homer, Albert
Schaeffer, Lewis Eckstein,
Murray Miller, The Morris
Schwartzes, Charles Gordon,
Estelle Gedan, Connie Nielsch.
Fred Tenbrink, Louis Gold-
berg, George Friedland, Samuel
White, Samuel Miller, Lee
Milazzo, David Katzman, Ezra
Leboff, Viola Katz, Sydell
Oppenheimer, Ruth Freedland,
Irving Spector, Isadore Glad-
stone.
Joseph Curewitz, Pincus
Deren, Harold Kahn, Roz
Weisman. Goldie Stonehill, Mae
Goldstein, Julius Mines, Dr. Ben
Kite, Joseph Vogel, Samuel
Soskin, Lawrence Feigenbaum.
Charles Ostrow, David Brown.
Hyman Kart, Charles Charlip,
Louis Rosenberg. Harry Lowe,
Irving Tannenbaum, Louis
Davidson, Moe Levenson,
Clarence Hourvitz, Morris
Kushner, David E. Brill, Lou
Gatkin, Leon Kanter, Sam Lezel),
Jules Lustig, Sol Dolleck.
Bernard Simms, Isidore
Landsman, Sidney Grossman,
Morris Leibson. Dr. Adolf Lowe,
Leonard Gluck, Sidney Liben.
<
Local BB
Youth Had
^fo-Sleep-a-thon'
The May issue of Shofar, the
newspaper of the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization (BBYO), has
this report of "Happenings" in
North Hroward County:
Mike Feinstein of Davarun
AZA (Aleph Zadik Aleph) of
Sunrise reports that chapter
members 'are still tired, but we
made a lot of money and had a
fantastic time' doing a 50-hour
'No Sleep-a-thon' at which each
insomniac was sponsored by a
member of the B'nai B'rith Men's
Genesis Lodge of Plantation, as
well as other donors. Highlights
included a football game against
sister chapter Ahavah BBG
(B'nai B'rith Girls), several how-
to-programs, and a 3 a.m.
,business meeting. After all
"whey is collected, we will have
made well over $600.' Credit for
Gold Coast Council's youngest
chapter's five-fold fund raising
weekend goes to Mike, Larry
Casper. Craig Blafer and Michael
BOND IS BACK
the new
Rcmx
BOND
G0HERU5
Dr^PlamBondRferQp^tptoaBKlfkrr
Whan you **copy FAST copy WG copy RELIABLY M"y
hv lo copy on lh run and can I afford to mew around win cnmcar* or
g* ,nio I PP* (-" your copiv snook) btlhtRoyla. Bond Cop^r 115
The Roylar Bond Cop*r 115 ttHH COpws m choc* Of 6 MM up to
B rd fhem And you OW ratable p*rtormnof from st>ghi and talc
pap* path non* safer. wn* al but etmmam paper i*ms
Call
AMERICAN PHOTOCOPY
IQUIPMINT CO.
(Wv Author Bad Daafat Hi Dad* County
0tfr.B1SN1 ^TBBmRB IIP**: 832-4744
_ ^ _________
Sam Weidenfeld, Judge Leo
Brown, Maurice Berman, Jack
Magzen.
Meyer Zola, The Ben Carps,
The Morris Posners, Harry
Hirsch, Harry Glugover, William
Katzberg, David Klempner,
Israel Resnikoff, Sarah
Simonowitz, Flora Weller.
Nat Pearlman, Ben Goldstein,
Sidney Permission, David Rosof,
Louis Cohen, Lou Hurwitz,
Milton Meltzer, Max Kronish,
Lou Simon, Sunny Friedman,
Sylvia Gottlieb, Michael Weiner,
Harry Freeman, Jesse Isaacs.
Molly Meltzer, Henry
Trossman, Joe Waxman. Sam
Mandelberg, Harry Cohen,
Barney Ross, Lewis Gold, Sam
Scheinhorn, Philip Erstling,
Albert Neber, Sol Cohen, Irving
Elishewitz, Ben Dantzker.
David Krantz, Molly Backer,
George Baer, Mrs. A.E.
Bochenek, Nat Kotler, George
Morantz, Nat Schrenley. David
Abels, Irv Steinlauf. Charles
Waxman, Bud O'Connor, Teri
Marder, Bert Rothschild, The
Sam Friedmans, The Ralph
Savitts.
Phil Solomon, Paul Zim-
merman, Irving Vistrofsky, Matt
Dinah. Celia Wcnig, Estelle
Wagner, The Larry Mines'. The
Harry Feldmans, Victor Feld-
man, George Seeman, Irving
Bassen, Harry Kirschner, Rose
Goldman.
Arnold Denker, Abe L. Okun.
Jack Silverman, Samuel Gelber,
Alven S. Ghertner, Myron
Goldman, Herman Norman,
Harry Ostroff, Myron Sherman,
Robert Siegal, Theodore C.
Spatz, Samuel S. Venitt, Stanley
Waldman.
Max Faibisoff, Harry D.
Cooper. Artie Hvman. Fanny
Swartz. Hyman B. Estroff, Philip
Granoff. Bernard H. Packman.
Leo A. Rauch. E. Louis Freeman,
Nathan Halpern, David Katz,
Harold G. Refowich.
Marty Klein, Joe Rudolph,
James Darling, Henry Hirsch,
Dr. Joseph Fisher, Lou White,
Rabbi Mordecai Brill, Florence
Kass, Jeanette Nurenberg, The
Hyman Seidmans, The Myer
Steins, The Karl Kaplans.
Louis Silvers, Jack Weiner,
Augusta Zimmerman. Moe Raab.
Irving Salit, Joe Tucker, Sam
Gross, Jules Flaschner, Sylvia
Temkin, Henry Dallman. Ber
Sklaw. George Singer.
Myron H. Klein, Bernard
Orlan, Abner Lichtenstein, Jack
Levine. Sidney Bobick, Jerry
Sherman. Harry S. Brodv.
Milton Frankle, Israel Cohen.
Philip Brostoff, Norman Soiowe,
Sol Becker, Ben Sadoff, Samuel
Soref. The Hyman Dicks.
Morris Cohen, Nat Ginsberg,
Ruth Goldman. The Milton
Kaplans. Mildred Klein. The Nat
Goldmans, Ida Kostoff, Thelma
Rosenfeld, Harry Levene. Morris
Lustig. Rose Port, Harry
Gallant, Alex Lieberman.
Sylvia Tyler, Carl Blum. Paul
Katzenstein, Jack Kantor,
Emanuel Bly, Cantor Nat
Corburn. Al Blumenthal, Manny
Raffer, Maury Levine, Robert
Green, Ben Strassner, Sol
Soroka. Eugene Mink. Max
Kurland, Irving Feinberg, The
Mel Wolperts.
Samuel Davidson. Sam
Rudner. lister Levick. Sam
Pearlman, Charles Hill, Sam
Kirshman, Harry Sunness,
Irving Raskin, Michael
Salamone. Hy Hoffman.
Selig Marko, Harold Slater,
Michael Bloom, Joseph Kaplan,
Milton Lowenstein, Sol
Mehlman. Mickey Harris,
Bernhardt Oolie, Nat Rosenstein,
Morris Borell, Louis Kogan,
Benjamin Wiener, Mrs. Herman
Sirtta and her husband, the late
"Hy" Sirota.
Take a Meaningful Trip
Travel with the
National Council of Jewish Women
For the new 1980 Brochure call
Felicia B. Sussman 733-0662 or Lilly Lester 434-3462
>
<4S>
*
v
J^Cr*
Brager & Co.
2301 Collins Avenue. Suite M-30
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Miami Phone: 673-8393
Our of local area call collect
Howard B. Goldman, M.D.
Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology
is pleased to announce the opening of his office
FOR SURGERY OF THE EYE
EYE EXAMINATION
GLASSES AND CONTACT LENS FITTING
GLAUCOMA CONSULTATION AND SURGERY
2200 Glades Road
Suite 910
Boca Raton
By Appointment
(305)368-5606


Page4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort bauderdale
Friday, June 6,1980
"Jewish Floridian
OF GREATERFOKTLAUOEROALC
Bualneaa Office American Saving* 3800 Bulldlna
2500 E Hallandjde Beach Boulevard, RoomTOTO
Hallandale. Florida S3000Telephone: 4M-0496
IkiiMWirhrMlaiDNiNMI
Of Tka Itarekutftoe A4w_
Secoml Cteaa Peaaage Peodtag at Hailudale. FU.
PuhUabed Bl Weekly
FORM )S7* returns to THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
-- ?'.O. Box 01297], Miami. FU). J3101
WorldwW. Mew, SarWca. Z2^?2i,XW- *!**!* Sv" Enallih- J twith Newipaperi and tha Fl
Out of Town Upon Rtqueif.
Friday. June 6, 1980
Volume 9
Yaar-fl.M
22 SIVAN 5740
Number 12
The Weizman Departure
Israel's new Defense Minister, Yitzhak Shamir,
argues by his appointment that an even harder line
is to be expected if and when the autonomy talks
resume.
The May 26 deadline was over Monday. But no
one really expected that the deadline was anything
more than symbolic not Prime Minister Begin,
not-Egypt's President Sadat.
Sadat's reasons for interrupting the talks are
his own: one may speculate upon them ceaselessly.
It is doubtful that his stated reason, Israel's vote to
affirm the status of Jerusalem as one city indivisible
and as the capital of Israel, was Sadat's real reason.
His purposes apart, we find it hard to believe
that the autonomy talks will not resume. But there
will be a change once they do. The resignation of
Defense Minister Ezer Weizman is perhaps a good
thing. We do not take the position that Weizman
was a dove and therefore a credit in the ledger of the
Israeli autonomy talks setup.
Rather, we prefer to observe that Weizman has
long had Likud aspirations of his own and that his
status as a negotiator weakened Israel. First, he
failed to represent the government's viewpoint on
the territories, speaking instead for himself.
Second, and more important, he used autonomy
as a platform to advance his personal political
ambitions.
Time Will Tell
There will be those who disagree with these
conclusions. They will largely be represented among
observers who fear the appointment of Shamir on
the basis that he is a hardliner, that he will reflect
the Begin government's views on autonomy more
closely than Weizman ever did, and who believe tnat
the open-end concessions are the only way for Israel
to achieve peace in the Middle East.
Time will tell. But the talks will resume we
do not need time to certify that. And when th. dks
resume, the atmosphere will be somewhat lesc jvial
a la Weizman to the endless expense of Israel. Here,
too, time will be needed to determine whether within
this new diplomatic frame of reference Israel can
hope to begin to score some points.
A Clerical Error
The American Jewish community is saddened
by the forced decision of Rep. Robert Drinan (D.,
Mass.) not to seek another term in Congress!
During his 10 years in the House of Represen-
tatives, he has been an effective supporter of Israel
and a leading spokesman for the cause of Soviet
Jewry. First elected because of his strong opposition
to the Vietnam War, he is the author of a book that
takes liberals to task for their failure to support
Israel.
But Drinan, a Jesuit priest, had to bow before a
new edict by Pope John Paul II that priests can no
longer take part in politics.
Yet, one would have less quarrel with the
Pope's decision if there were no cause to wonder
why the Vatican has not cracked down on Arch-
bishop Hillarion Capucci, the onetime gun-runner
for the Palestine Liberation Organization who now
pops up in Teheran frequently to aid the terrorists
holding 53 American hostages there.
Alter serving 39 months of a 12-year jail
sentence in Israel for smuggling arms to Palestinian
terrorists on the West Bank, Capucci was banished
to Latin America. But he returned to Europe and
the Mideast.
If Pope John Paul II wants priests out of '
politics, he should have started with Capucci, a
clergyman who supports terrorism, not Drinan, who
has a constructive record in public affairs.
Property is the Key to Racial Peace
THERE IS no doubt that
riots, like the neutron bomb, are
based on a sound American
belief: property is worth more
than humanity. As a sacred prin-
ciple, it is central to our most
exalted national document, the
Declaration of Independence.
When blacks rioted in Miami
the other weekend, they were
operating according to that
belief. If whites will not actively
listen to them and redress their
grievances, the reaction may be
slow in coming, but it is
terrifying in its result and un-
mistakable in its meaning: the
destruction to property will hurt
those who own it (whites) more
than it does those who merely
live or work in it (blacks).
THE HURT to whites is
profound beyond the loss of
property itself. The hurt is to a
sacred American trust, a
profound belief in the im-
Mind li n

BwPlliillwWBPIIPlPB^^Ww'
mortality of what you own and
pass on to heirs.
In this sense, it is a surrogate
for immortality itself. The
property-owner participates in
the immortality of property
through his last will and
testament, and it is a truer kind
of immortality than heirs them-
selves because heirs ultimately
die. too.
For the most part, blacks still
have little property. Blacks have
no such surrogate for their own
WAjnNq WHOrViuRfl
to
%^
OTA
immortality, and in destroying
white property they are seizing
upon the best means they know
to encourage the chance of be-
coming a part of this unique
relationship between the
collection of things we own and
life eternal. They are saying: if
you do.not let us into your club
where you enjoy this benefit,
then we're going to hit you where
it hurts the hardest.
ONLY NOW, are whites
beginning to understand the psy-
chology of the modern American
race riot as an attack upon them-
selves. As late as the 1960s,
white Americans still wondered
in bewilderment at the "illogic"
of black warfare upon the homes
in which they lived and the busi-
nesses in which they worked.
And they advanced all kinds of
theories about black self-hatred
and its limits. The liberals among
them even assumed an exotic
array of guilts about the white
role in the development of this
self-hatred.
As late as the 1960s, white
Americans still failed to make
this simple connection: that
blacks, say, living in their apart
ments were not living in their
apartments at all. but in apart-
ments owned by absentee white
landlords. The black's attack on
his community only seemed like
an attack upon himself to the
white man who still failed to
make this simple connection.
The profound black Martinique
psychiatrist and social
philosopher. Frantz Fanon. had
long since defined the black man
not only as a guerrilla fighting
the while bourgeois oppressor
and his property who was all too
frequently invisible.
FANON SAW the guerrilla
war itself, the race riot, as in
emotional purgative for the blai k
man. The more violence in which
he engaged, (he more effectivi -
would the purgation ol black
become; i leansed of hi.-- fe<
of white-inspired humiliation and
inferiority, the more pn
would the black man finally be to
negotiate with the white m
Continued on Page l.'i
I
7
;
Two Groups Press Arab Cause in U.S.
Two groups pressing the Arab
cause in the United States have
set as a Spring and Summer,
1980, goal a cut of $150 million in
U.S. assistance to Israel.
One of the units is NAAA (the
National Association of Arab
Americans). The second calls it-
self PHRC (the Palestine Human
Rights Campaign). It seems
reasonable to expect these two
groups to make common cause
with the new MEPAC (Middle
East Peace Action Coalition).
Don't let this proliferation of
pressure on behalf of some Arab
nations mystify and confuse you.
Nor need you be surprised to
learn that the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference and
Operation PUSH, two American
black organizations, are now
marching under the banner of the
Middle East Peace Action
Coalition along with the All
African People's Revolutionary
Party and several other outfits.
WHEN YOU recall that the
Southern Christian Leadership
Conference and Operation PUSH
made the headlines not long ago
by embracing the ubiquitous
Yasir Arafat, head of the
collection of Arab terrorists
known as the Palestine
Liberation Organization, you can
understand why those bodies are
now following Arab leaders.
Currently, one of their chief
propaganda efforts is to un-
dermine the effectiveness of the
Camp David agreements.
These significant develop-
Robert
Segal
ments are reviewed carefully in
the April 9 issue of the Near East
Report, a valuable guide to Mid-
dle East happenings. This com-
prehensive resume indicates that
one of the pro-Arab bodies
mentioned the Palestine
Human Rights Campaign is
reportedly under investigation on
suspicion of failing to register as
a foreign agent for the PLO.
-Along the way of the Near
East Report's expose of these
activities, inimical to the
economy, security, and survival
of the State of Israel, one learns
that the American Friends
Service Committee is yet another
party agitating for the Arab-
desired cut of SI 50 million in U.S.
assistance to Israel.
THIS SEEMS strange, for the
Quaker group has long contended
that it aims to rescue, feed, and
succor people in need. Here one
feels free to cite a July 18, 1979,
letter-to-the-editor by the
Executive Secretary of the New
England Region of the American
Fnends Service Committee: that
earnest person contends in her
letter that the AFSC's goals in
the Middle East are not political,
but humanitarian. No doubt, a
great deal of the Service Com-
mittee's efforts are humanitarian.
But what is an APSC lobbying
effort agianst U.S. aid to Israel if
it is not political?
Those who want' this flow of
funds from Washington to lsraer-_
diminished argue that Israel
intends to use the money to build
new settlements in 1981.
Actually, Israel uses such
funding to buy American goods.
It does not spend monetary
assistance of this kind in areas
brought under its administraion
since 1967.
Why do Quakers let their good '
name and fine intentions ger
sullied with anti-Israel activities?
Why has the American Friends
Service Committee, from 1951 on,
advocated support for and
recognition of tile terrorist unit.
PLO? Why does this otherwise
idealistic American association
insist that the PLO must be
included in negotiations aimed at
undergirding long-prayed for
peace in the Middle East?
In 1977. the American Friends
Service Committee made clear it
intention, in calling a conference
on "The New Imperative For
Israeli-Palestinian Peace," that it
expected Israel to negotiate with
the PLO.
GO TO THE terrorists who
murder Israeli athletes t|
Olympic games and murder
Israeli babies in head-hunting
raids and continue to vow to
crush the existence of the Jewisn
state, begging for peace.
Continued on Page 12-


Friday, June 6,1980
The Jewish FloHdian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
PB*5
Stack Greets
AIPAC Group
.
.11 the picture at left, Joel Reinstein, vice
president of the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, is standing to the right of
Congressman Edward J. Stack (LVFort
Lauderdale). With Joel are other participants who
attended the 21st Annual Policy Conference of
American Israel Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC) held last month in Washington, D.C.
Between sessions he and the others, Mrs. Fred
Ehrenstein seated alongside the Congressman,
and Sally Katz and her father. Herb Katz,
standing behind Stack, met with various
congressmen and senators to get their views on
matters of interest to the Jewish community.
At the meeting Stack expressed his firm
support for continued U.S. military and economic
assistance to Israel. He said: "Soviet ad-
venturism and radicalism in the Middle East
demonstrate that the strategic interests of the
United States are best served by giving
assistance to Israel, the ONLY politically stable,
democratic, reliable ally in the region."
The group thanked Stack for his tireless efforts
on behalf of Ida Nudel, Soviet prisoner of con-
science.
ik

r
I
)
h
I
MR. & MRS. R. JAY KRAEER
PROUDLY ANNOUNCE THE FORMATION OF
KRAEER FUNERAL HOME, INC.
FOUNDED 1952
SERVING THE JEWISH FAITH
FOR OVER A QUARTER CENTURY
After 28 years Mr and Mrs R Jay Kraeer of the R Jay Kraeer Funeral Home, in-
dividually owned and operated as a sole proprietorship, announce the formation of the
Kraeer Funeral Home. Inc. The officers of the Company are all Florida Licensed
Funeral Directors with a minimum of 15 years experience with R Jay Kraeer ^
Officers of the Corporation are:
Chairman of the Board R. Ja> Kraeer
President and General Manager Robert D. Russell.......16 jrrs.
Vice President Ronald L Deppen......................JOyrs.
Vice President Edwin C. Richardson...................]'**
Vice President James A. Judge........................}**
Secretary Leonardo. Walker.......................... *"
Treasurer Steven P. Nowatka........................."J^
1. There are no outside investors.
2. The same high caliber of service will continue as in thejpast.
3. The Pre Need Trust Plan will continue and mil be honored. ___
4. Mr. and Mrs. R. Jay Kraeer will continue their residence at the Kraeer Funeral Home in Pom-
pano Beach.
,N AN EFFORT TO BETTER SERVE iWffiaffJl JKbSRrS
OPENING OUR 7TH FUNERAL HOME TO BE LOCATED AT 1C55 UNIVERSITY DRIVE IN CUML w*
INGS. _______________^___
Hashiveynu:
Mission of Renewal
"Our voices will resound in tne
streets of Jerusalem 500
strong we will form .
Hashiveynu ... a mission of
renewal."
That was the ringing
declaration of the hundreds of
Young Leaders of Jewish
Federations around the country
at the Special Washington
Conference of the Young
Leadership Cabinet of United
Jewish Appeal.
Hashiveynu begins the
traditional prayer. "Cause us to
return, oh Lord renew our
days as of old."
Hashiveynu is the fulfillment
of "our prayer, our journey of
return and renewal."
It is a bold and demanding
journey that will bring par-
ticipants face-to-face with the
spirit, the strength and solidarity
of the Jewish people.
Five hundred Young Leaders.
Jewish men and women from
every corner of the United States,
will set out on an airborne
mission that captures the joy, the
drama and the passion of being
Jewish.
Five hundred Young Leaders,
traveling in three groups will:
pause to discover Jewish roots
and deep ties to the Jews of
Eastern Europe home of "our
grandparents, sacred resting
place for our Holocaust martyrs
Touch down in Cairo for days
of exploration and dialogue with
the Jewish community and the
Egyptian people witness,
firsthand, the rescue and relief
work of HI AS and J DC along the
lifeline of hope as Jews journey to
freedom. .
"Come home" to Jerusalem.
500 strong, stand with Israeli
brothers and sisters in an historic
celebration of Jewish unity.
Answer the challenge of the
new decade join Hashiveynu
... a mission of renewal.
The Young Leadership Mission
from Oct. 30 to Nov. 9 will offer
several options for pre-Israel
programming, including one or
more stops before all mission
groups converge in Jerusalem.
The options will include a stop in
Eastern Europe, a stop in Egypt,
or a stop along the rescue lifeline
of HIAS (Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society) and JDC (Joint
Distribution Committee), both
beneficiaries of contributions to
the United Jewish Appeal of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
For further information, call
Alan Margolies, Young
Leadership director, at the
Federation office, 484-8200.
HEADACHES ^^'
NECK PAINS, BACK PAINS. LEG PAINS, SCIATICA, "SLIPPED DISC"
Try Gentle Force Chiropractic
Dr. William E. Givone, Chiropractic Physician
Medicare Office Visit $2 it qualified Maintenance off ice visit $7.50
Regular Office Visit $10
2190 Wilton Drive. Fort Lauderdale
564-9968
.Levitt WWeinstein
memorial chapels
HOLLYWOOD" '9?' PemDfOUe f>od 921 7200
NORTH MIAMI 13385 W Dine Hv 9496315
west palm BEACH mm Okewooe. Bi.d 6898700
Light tt\e candle
and remember?
Menorah Chapels, to preserve
the traditions of our faith,
wishes to offer a gift of re-
membrance. A Yahrzeit
Calendar in the name of the
departed and a Yearly Re-
minder of the Yahrzeit
observance date. A part of
our religious life, now and
through the ages.
CALL OR WRITE FOR YOUR ^
YAHRZEIT CALENDAR AT:
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313
7426000
In Dade. call 861-7301
In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME, DATE AND TIME OF
DEATH OF THE DEPARTED
>IKM(NAUM tROS INC SIANI11KV SCMlOSUI*G> SOLOMON MSf HIMOKIAL CHAMlS
*..k MtMOHIAL CMAMlS ,>,_,
iMeajM
And serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
Chapels also in Oeerf ield Beach and Margate
The oldest Jewish-owned chapels in Browerd County.

j


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June6,1980
MONDAY. June 9
Temple Emanu-EI Games 7:15
p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood -
Board meeting
TUESDAY. June 10
B'nai B'rith Bermuda Club Board
meeting
w B toward Brandels National
Women's Committee meeting -
12:30 p.m.
Temple Sholom Board meeting
Hadassah Rayus Group of W.
Broward Board meeting
Hebrew Day School Board
meeting
WEDNESDAY, June 11
Women's Environ Club (Inverrary) -
Board meeting p.m.
Hadassah Oriole Scopus Board
meeting -9:30 a.m.
I
SSSSBHSS^SSSS^^
iiiiti-iniii
&viirMi:CC%
Community
Calendar
ORT Royal Plantation General
meeting
Sunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood
- Board meeting
ORT Palm-Aire Chapter General
meeting
Brandels Plantation W. Broward
Chapter Deicke Auditorium -
noon to 3 p.m.
ORT Coral Springs Chapter -
Community
Bresslers Honored by ADL
Mr. and Mrs. Bressler
The Anti- Defamation League
Foundation has dedicated the
editorial offices of ADL's
national publication, the ADL
Bulletin, in honor of Florence and
Jules J. Bressler of Tamarac for
their many years of devotion and
generous support and leadership
of the League.
Mr. and Mrs. Bressler
were
ON JUNE 9TH
OPENING
IN CENTURY
PLAZA
JOIN US FOR
THE FESTIVITIES
IS
1st Bank
0* BOOwVABD
CENTURY VILLAGE OFFICE
Deerdeid Beach
Phone 426-4200
Mr-fc- f Ok
General meeting
Center- 8 p.m.
Temple Beth Orr Games 7:45
p.m. Riverside & Royal Palm
Blvd.
THURSDAY. June 12
Temple Emanu-EI Executive
Committee 7:30 p.m.
Hadassah Havarlm Fort Lauder-
dale Chapter general meeting 8
p.m.
Temple Sholom Men's Club -
i meeting
Hadassah Somerset Shoshana
Chapter Board meeting Rec.
hall 10 to noon
B'nai B'rith Hope Chapter #1617 -
Board meeting
Council of Jewish Education -
Luncheon mee'ing noon to 2:30
p.m.
MONDAY. June 16
Pioneer Women Natanya Club -
Board meeting
B'nai B'rith Sunrise Lodge #2953
- Regular meeting p.m.
Temple Emanu-EI games 7:15
p.m.
TUESDAY.June 17
Temple Sholom Sisterhood
formerly longtime residents of Genera' mee,ing 1 p m
Englewood. N.J. A silver plaque WEDNESDAY. June 18
with their names was placed at Temple Beth Orr Games 7:45
the ADL Bulletin office during a P Riverside & Royal Palm
special ceremony recently in the Blvd.
League's new international B'nai B'rith Margate Board
headquarters in New York, meeting
Benjamin R. Epstein, executive Hadassah Oriole Scopus -
vice president of the ADL General meeting noon at
Foundation, praised the couple Ca,nenne Y"ng Library Com-
for their 'untiring efforts and m"n',y RKoomf" Ma,9a,e, ,
exemplary generosity to the .^^^^ 'P'^'on
cause of human rights. .; .;. e
B nai B nth Sunrise
Attending the ceremony with #1527 Board meeting
the Bresslers were their daughter Sunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood
and son-in-law. Mr. and Mrs. Regular meeting 11.30 a.m. at
temple A representative of
Southern Bell Telephone Co. will
THURSDAY. June 19
N. Broward Chapter
ORT
General meeting
B'nai B'rith Tamarac Chapter -
General meeting
Jewish War Veterans & Women's
Auxiliary of Pompano Beach Post
196 Pompano Beach Rec. Center
- meeting
National Council of Jewish
Women Gold Coast Section. 11
a.m. Board meets, Coconut Creek
Community Center.
B'nai B'rith Holiday Springs. 8
p.m. H.S. Playhouse. Holiday
Springs Blvd.. Margate. Speaker
Mike Satz, Broward County State
Attorney.
*
Constant Ribbimc)
Supervision Michgiach
FINEST KOSHER CUISINE
RESERVE NOW FOR
HIGH HOLY DAYS
from Sept. 9 In 21
On (he Ocean
al 67th Street
Miami Beach Fl 33141
IF IT IS STIRLING YOU KNOW IT S THE FINEST
INTRODUCING A KOSHER HOTEL FOR MATURE
ADULTS ON MIAMI BEACH r ,^
The An Condit-o'ted a Mc.ited KOSnf ; XSi
WJilTJ10USCH01'ir-.
Her* is a hotel where you won't bo neglected, In lact you are
really wanted. Everything Is designed to gJv* you the greatest
time of your life, whether you stay a week, month or year
Wo cater to you in every way. W* serve 3 not 2 KOSHER
meals dally. We are the only hotel that has a Color TV with a
giant 7 toot screen to make your viewing easier end (he only
Chapter
lotel on the ocean adjacent
Olympic Pool
Beauty Salon on Promises
TV ft Air Conditioning
Daily Maid Service
Oceantront Dining Room
ngt
beautiful Lummue Park'.
24 Hour Phone Service
Resident Mashgiach
Movies Crafts Trips
Daily Synagogue Services
Entertainment
For Reservations Phone
Paul Epstein of Demarest. N.J.
and three grandchildren.
Bressler. a retired electronics be gueSl speaker Refreshments
executive, last year was elected
honorary life member of ADL's
national commission. He is a
former president of Knglewood
lyodge of B'nai B'rith. and Mrs.
Bressler was president of
Knglewood B'nai B'rith Women.
He is a charter member and
national vice chairman of the
ADL Society of Fellows, a
national leadership organization,
and currently chairs its Broward
County chapter. In 1978, he was
chairman of The Woodlands-
Tamarac Israel Bonds drive.
1-531-6483
ON THE OCEAN AT 15th ST MIAMI BEACH FLA 33139
Owner Mqmt Baumnnd Ehrenreirh
$25 Contribution Required
To Receive 'The Floridian'
The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale has raised the
minimum contribution to the 1980 United Jewish Appeal for those
who wish to receive The Jewish Floridian the newspaper
published every two weeks with national, international, and local
news of interest to residents in the Jewish community of North
Broward County. The new minimum is $25.
Greater Fort Lauderdale
Edition of
"Jewish Floridian
is provided is a public service lo ine Jewish communities Ml Norm Broward County by me
Jewish Federation of
2999 N.W. 33rd Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale 33311
Greater Fort Lauderdale
Phone
305/484-8200
Milton Keiner ~^^^^ Leslie S. Gottlieb
President \ Executive Director
Victor Gruman
Executive Vice President
Richard Romanoff | Joel Levitt
Secretary
John Strong
Treasurer
Gladys Daren
Women's Division President
Vice President
Joel Reinsteln
Vice President
Soul Weinberger
Vice President
P,g, Foui tiloiHl column, ol THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN ,.pn in, op,,0n ol in, PuDhshe,
,nan,,in,tinos,c^umnt nor lh,,Ov*rl,sing i,pi,s,m tnOoisement a, Ih, j,wlsh federation
^SSJ^TS^LaT !?f,,r Fort *** Etlon of The Jewish
Floridian should bo sent to the Jewish Federation of fie,
Mrd Are.. Fort Lauderdale 33311.
Federation office, 2M9 NW
RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Who named the "Turkey"?
A: Luis de Torres who called it TUKKI
The Hebrew word for peacock!
The first of Columbus' crew to set foot in the
"New World" was Luis de Torres, a Jewish
crewman, a master of languages and one of
Columbus trusted friends. Thinking that any
natives they might meet may be descendants of
the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel. Columbus sent
de Torres ashore first, to find out if the natives
were friendly and whether they spoke Hebrew
or some other known language of the day.
The beauty and richness of the land captivated
de Torres' imagination and he prevailed upon
Columbus to let him settle there In writing
to his friends back home' de Torres used the
Hebrew word for peacock-TUKKI-to describe
a new bird he encountered And through
usage, the American bird came to be called a
Turkey (probably because there is no known
Hebrew word for Gobble Gobble).
A NOT-SO-RARE FACT...
A big part of Jewish warmth and affection
is to "open the house" when mishpocha.
guests or friends drop in. Out comes the
fine food and, invariably, J&B Rare
Scotch. And why not?J&B is a clean,
light scotch with the superb taste that fits
right in with the tradition of serving the
best. And because of its great taste,
J&B commands a high level of elegance...
at home or at your most important
simchas.
And that's a fact!
n
RARE
SCOTCH
(*


Friday, June 6. 1980

The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
r.K*

"
Guests Take
Nursing home personnel
throughout North Broward
County are loud in their praise of
the work of volunteers who have
been performing a myriad of
services for many months, and
particularly during the past few
months with the direction
provided by Rabbi Albert B.
Schwartz, director of the
Chaplaincy Commission of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
Typical of the service provided"
by the rabbi and the volunteers of
the WECARE (With Energy,
Compassion and Responsible
Effort) of the Jewish Community
Center -of Greater Fort
Lauderdale and the Federation is
the monthly symbolic Shabbat
service at Sheffield Convalarium,
2675 N. Andrews Ave., Wilton
Manors.
Page 7
At last month's Friday
morning service about 20 of the
Jewish guests gathered in the
activities room for the service.
The honor of benching licht was
given to octogenarian Anna
Budd, mother of WECARE
Volunteer Mitzi Forman who was
leaving a few days later for a visit
to Israel. David Zirin led the
sanctification of the wine, and all
joined in the motzi. Rabbi
Schwartz led the group in singing
Le Hododi, welcoming the
Sabbath Queen.
The importance of the Sab-
bath, brief remarks in English
and Hebrew with responses bv
Organizations
In the News
PIONEER WOMEN
Installation of officers of
Pioneer Women, Negev Chapter,
will be held on Wednesday, June
11, 12:30 p.m., at the Beth Israel
Temple, Century Village, Deer-
field Beach. Shirley Berger,
Oscar Rappoport and Sam Itkin
will entertain.
Reservations for the following
events are open: Rosh Hashonah
holiday Sept. 10-14 including
religious services: a cruise on the
SS Dolphin Oct. 31 Nov. 3;
Thanksgiving weekend at the
Beau Rivage, Bal Harbour, Nov.
27-30. For information and reser-
vations, call Betty Waga or Rona
Schimel.
B'NAI B'RITH
Plantation B'nai R'rith Lodge
meets at 8 p.m. Thursday, June
5, in the Deicke Auditorium, 5701
Cypress Road. A feature of the
evening will be a presentation of
a prizewinning Israeli docu-
mentary film.
REMINDER
Representatives of
organizations and in-
stitutions are reminded to
send their information
concerning board and
general meetings for the
1980-81 activities year by
June 13 to Min Gruman, who
will be in charge of the
Community Calendar which
appears in every issue of The
Jewish Floridian. The in-
formation should be sent to
Mrs. Gruman, Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, 2999 NW 33rd
Ave., Fort Lauderdale 33311.
And on June 25, the
representatives are to meet
at the Federation office with
notice of their major events
to resolve any conflicts of
same date for affairs apart to
similar ai
Part in 'Shabbat Service' at Nursing Home
A
Gathered around Anna Budd at the kindling of Sabbath
candles are WECARE volunteers from left: Nina Dinah, Ruth
Horowitz who has been named chairman of the volunteers for
nursing homes, Hilde Goldmann who is chairman of Shef-
}\
'Vtf
Mitzi
field's WECARE volunteers, Anna Budd's daughter,
Forman, and Lillian Ochstein. In the picture at right. Rabbi
Schwartz encourages David Zirin and Harvey Levin in reciting
a blessing. Photos by Jay Stevens.
the guests were encouraged, and
then each was called on to give
his or her name to be written on a
piece of paper which Mrs. For-
man promised to take to Israel
and place in the crevice between
blocks of the Western Wall.
Fat Traviss. Sheffield's ac-
tivities director, expressed great
delight the way guests were
participating actively in the
service, giving credit to the
rabbi's empathy, including his
calling by name various in-
dividuals to lead in the recital of
the Shema, other prayers,
blessings, and songs.
Kosher Ice Cream Sherbet]
Bulk Novelties Weddings Bar Mitzvahs
kosher All Occasions
pareve Special Service to Institutions
wandembergh, inc.

Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.

'
J


PgaA
3*5=
^Jf^uKFiqeidum pf.tevtvfPT* &*&&!*
Friday. June 6, 1900
Elderly Have 'Fun Day*
The Jungle Queen is a local sightseeing attraction that travels each
day through the Intracoaatal waters of Broward County on three-hour
excursions.
This colorful boat was the magic carpet one day last month by
which 21 very frail elderly from "The Gathering Place" of the Jewish
Community Center escaped to the sea.
Slow but determined they boarded the bueee and then the boat. It
was an arduous process because of the several wheelchairs, walkers,
and canes.
Throughout the day the comments from the travelers were con-
sistently happy exclamations about the weather, the beautiful homes,
and the beautiful day.
This delightful group of elderly sponsored their own trip by way of
of their own handmade crafts.
Show Producer
Supervisors were Marian Hunlev of the Gathering Place, Beth
Straahua, Rose Papier and Helen Nathan.
Special thanks to Broward County Transportation, Community
Services Department, were extended for supplying the vans and the
drivers for this trip.
Profile of Julian Feingold
This past year members of the
Jewish Community Center have
had the benefit of Julian
Feingold's knowledge as an artist
and as a teacher. Julian has never
forgotten the American Jewish
agencies like HI AS and J DC that
brought him out of Europe to the
U.S.A. He has shown his ap-
preciation in many ways. He
gave his talent to the JCC Israel
Independence Day Program as a
caricaturist. It was one of the
highlights of the day. Recently
members visited his home and
studio. "It was truly a beautiful
day," said Lillian Schoen as she
commented on Feingold's work.
As a young boy, he studied at
the Posen Art Institute in Posen,
Poland, the city of his birth.
Here, he became proficient in
graphics. He also studied at the
Lemberg Art Institute of Fine
Arts. He is a most prolific artist,
and the walls of his home are
completely filled with his
paintings. He works in many
media. It is obvious that he is an ,
observer of the social and
political scene. Although he is an
excellent portraitist, he also does
many water color landscapes.
Each of his paintings tell a story.
Artist George Grosz, who is
known for his satirical 9odal
commentary, was a great in-
fluence on Feingold. However,
Julian has chosen to develop his
paintings with more humor and
affection than satire. He does this
by exaggerating certain salient
qualities that he finds out-
standing in his subjects.
He has most recently
developed a series of slides that
he calls "Condominium Fever"
that has brought many a chuckle
to those who have seen them.
He and his wife, Ada, who is
his favorite model and supporter,
are "snowbirds" in Fort
Lauderdale. JCC executive
director Bill Goldstein says: "We
are most fortunate to have these
two special people in our midst,
even for just part of the year."
Linda Cohen, who was the
producer for JCCs "Come
Blow Your Horn" earlier in
the season, earned additional
plaudits for her work as
producer of last month's
Theatre Guild's "Never Too
Late."
'Le Browse' Needs More Space
The "Le Browse" Shop, selling new and gently used merchandise,
sponsored by the Jewish Community Center, has outgrown ha
present quarters. We are in desperate need of at least 5.000 square
feet of space. If you, or anyone you know, can direct us towards
getting such space, please call Maxine Adler at 792-6700.
55 Plus Singles Schedule
Wine and Cheese Meeting
The 55 Plus Singles group of
the Jewish Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdale is
having an open house member-
ship meeting on June 8 at 7 p.m.
at the Center's site at 6501 W.
Sunrise Blvd.
The public is invited for wine
and cheese and to meet the newly
elected officers of the group.
Future plans and programs will
be presented.
For more information, call the
Jewish Community Center.
Sign up for a Committee
Summer Day Camp
Parent Orientation Meetings
Monday June 9 7:30 p.m.
PreSchool
Thursday June 12 7:30 p.m.
Tween / Travel
Learn Photography
Photography classes at the
I Jewish Community Center will
begin Monday, June 16 for eight
weeks. Fee $15. Instructor is
Michael J. Weinberg.
Lunch Time Learning
On Tuesday, June 10, at 11:30
a.m., the Jewish Community
Center will present "Random
Aspects of Jewish Thought" by
Jewish philosopher Ben-Zion
Eisenberg. "Bring your lunch
(dairy please) and we'll supply
the beverage," the committee
suggests.
Softball Tournament
The Jewish Community Center
of Greater Fort Lauderdale will
hold a "C" Division Softball
Tournament on Sunday, June 22
and June 29.
Softball Games
The Jewish Community Center
of Greater Fort Lauderdale is
looking to schedule softball
games on Sunday mornings for
June. July and August. "B" and
"C" division teams should
contact Ed Basan at the JCC if
interested.
Together with the start of the
Center's new program year,
many of the committees are being
reorganized, and Center members
are being recruited to serve on
these committees.
Committees help in the
operation ofthe Center, and
recommend policy to the board.
Members of the Center should
deem it a privilege, as well as an
obligation, to participate on the
committee of their choice to help
P.
X
I
the Center in its service to the
community. Parents of children
who participate in many facets of
the program should be especially
interested in joining committees
related to their activities.
Please fill out the form below
and return it to Harold Cohen at
the Center. Indicate the com-
mittees on which you would like
to serve, numbering them in
preferential order, e.g. 1,2,3, etc.
. Adult activities
By-Laws
Budget & Finance
Children's Activities
Cultural Arts
. Day Camp
Deaf Programming
Grants

IsaaiaeBBianwi
-Health & Physical education
.House
Membership
.Personnel
_ Publicity
. Senior Adult Activities
. Special events
Tween and Teen
W.E.C.A.R.E.
I
i
l
j
i

Hypnosis
Explained
On Wednesday, June 25, at 7
p.m., the Jewish Community
Center will have Pat Reiger,
hypnotist, as its guest lecturer.
Reiger, past president of the
Association to Advance Hyp-
nosis, Florida Chapter 8, is a
member of the Florida
Association for Professional
Hypnotists.
All JCC members are invited
to be guests at this lecture when
Keujer will demonstrate his
technique and expertise in
hypnosis. Question and answer
period will follow.
=^/tw>1
IN
TakE
r
a te%texmsti&&itm&
ft* jg>ggf 9/
rn a- 0" fff fwraysffiffw
fRODUCED ** DIRECTED fry
IRENE UNTER./AAN
CHOREOGRAPHY B/
MURRAY UCHTENSTEIN,
fe
It"
Ut&f* 8jr
Summer Volunteers Needed
There's a long, hot summer ahead and everyone will be setting their
sights for comfort at the beach or pool or in air-conditioned spots
where they can think "COOL."
But what about residents of nursing homes and patients in
hospitals who can do nothing to change their lot? Forgotten because
it's summer? We hope not!
To make their days pleasant and more meaningful, they depend on
visitors. Some have no familv or relatives nearby, and that is where
WECARE hope.i to fill the gap. Desperately needed are volunteers to
fill the role of surrogate "family." WECARE savs "Wc mustn't ignore
the needs of these shut-ins because weather beckons us elsewhere!
"Let'snot close for the summer." Volunteers are needed 365 days a
year for as little as two hours a day, one day a week, or as much time
as a person can spare for this humanitarian effort. The biggest mit-
zvahof all: helping others.
Call the WECARE office, 792-6980 in the Jewish Community
Center building.
Aerobic Dance Is Fun
"I never thought such
strenuous exercise could be so
much fun," said Lois Polish, one
of the Aerobic Dance students at
the JCC. This sums up the
feelings of the 25 students who
attend classes twice a week at the
Center's Soref Hall.
Jackie Sorenson, founder of
Aerobic Dancing, says "Aerobic
Dancing combines the health and
figure benefits of jogging with
the fun and vigor of dancing. It's
a series of easy to learn dances for
non-dancers, a carefully choreo-
graphed blend of jogging, lunges,
arm swings and leg kicks, set to
music from disco to country and
western."
Each session contains new
dances, new music and a new
theme. It is a non-competitive
program which allows par-
ticipants to work at their own
level of fitness.
The p.ogram is run simul-
taneously throughout the
country, she said, "so you par-
ticipate in a class wherever you're
vacationing."
Watch for starting dates on the
new 'Summer session." For
additional information call Ed
Basan, JCC health and physical
education director.
Travel With The JCC to Sarasota
The Jewish Community
Center's Senior Adult Club in-
vites all members to join a three-
day-tour to Sarasota and Long
Boat Key. This trip is scheduled
for Tuesday, June 17 through
June 19.
The trip includes the Ringling
Brothers museums guided tour, a
performance of "Man and
Superman" at the Asolo Theatre,
a cruise of Long Boat Key, two
complete breakfasts and two
dinners.
The price for this tour is $135
double occupancy; 1172 single
occupancy, and $122 for triple
occupancy. Call the JCC office for
additional details.
Introduction to Israeli Folk Dance
The Jewish Community Center
has secured the services of Yossi
Yanich, prominent Israeli folk
dance instructor. He has taught
folk dance at numerous South
Florida colleges.
Age and sex are not deterrents
for this program. He has more
than 300 Israeli folk dances in his
repertoire.
Let the whole family come and
enjoy Israeli folk dancing. It's a
great way to participate in
Jewish heritage and culture, and.
as the saying goes "Come and
enjoy."
The introduction to Israeli folk
dancing was held Sunday, June 1
at Soref Hall. Call the JCC office
for details.
*


Fifiky.-Ju*'*. 1SW*
Same Old Thing
TheJewM /^r#jan;#dfr<^
P*t
W 'I"'
I
AJComm. Says Passion
Play Still Viewed
As Hostile to Jews
1~v
NEW YORK (JTA)
- The 1980 Oberammer-
gau Passion Play began in
that Bavarian, West
German village May 18 as
the American Jewish Com-
'- mittee warned potential
visitors that the play still
can be viewed as hostile to
Jews. A half million people
are expected to see the
play this summer which
villagers have performed at
the beginning of every
decade since 1680.
In a 20-page booklet the
AJCommittee has prepared for
potential visitors to Oberammer-
gau, they were warned that
despite "a serious effort to
cleanse the play of anti-Jewish
polemic and prejudice," the
pageant remains "rooted in a
tradition of hostility and con-
tempt toward Jews and Judaism
which prevailed for centuries and
shaped the attitudes of
generations of Christians."
THE BOOKLET, entitled
What Viewers Should Know
About the Oberammergau, and
prepared by Judith Herscopf
Banki, the AJCommittee's assis-
tant national director of inter-
religious affairs, was published
under a grant from the Nathan
Appleman Institute for the Ad-
vancement of Christian-Jewish
Understanding.
The Oberammergau Passion
Play is a work of fiction, incor-
porating some episodes from the
Gospels, ignoring others and
freely inventing scenes and
characters with no basis in
Christian Scripture, Mrs. Banki
said. She said the play was
written with a deliberate effort
"to make the Jewish people and
their leaders appear as villainous
and evil as possible."
At the time the play was
written, Jews were charged with
collective guilt for the death of
Jesus and regarded as rejected by
God for refusing to accept Jesus,
Mrs. Banki pointed out.
SHE SAID this anti-Jewish
theology has been "repudiated by
major Christian churches and
replaced by policies of respect
and understanding." But she
said this has not been reflected in
the 1980 Oberammergau script.
"The text has only been cut,
not rethought," Mrs. Banki said.
"The traditional anti-Jewish
polemic which shaped the earlier
text has not been questioned, nor
have the insights of modern bib-
lical and extrabiblical scholarship
been incorporated into the
dynamics of the play."
9
I*
//TO* OfMPJxoAllM
Tjoqe*ce/tailo*i
thoughtful
f giving
... for the benefit of future generations
GIFTS in the form of cash or property, real estate or
securities to the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies may
provide
Life Income
Let us show you how you can, by your gift:
t Seal in profits and reduce capital gains;
Reduce federal estate taxes;
Save on probate costs;
9 Help keep your windfall profits;
Provide you with a better cash flow;
Enable you to receive a tax deduction while getting a Hie
income.
Call Joel Telles for information no obligation 484-8200.
All inquiries will be kept strictly confidential.
FOUNDATION OF JEWISH PHILANTHROPIES
JEWISH FEDERATION OF
GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
2999 NW 33rd Ave.,
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311.
Please, Florida,
dorittellHewYorR
t

were giving away
NEW
Pizza Bagels
sat*
HO ISfV*TlVfS
;
m
The crust is a Lender's chewy-crisp bagel. It's never
dry or soggya "hole" new kind of pizza crust.
The Lender-men (Sam, Murray & Marvin), those su-
per bagel makers, got a super pizza maker to make
delicious toppings.
Just bake them for about 12 minutes and you've got a
kid's lunch, or a grown-up's snack. Six individual piz-
zas mean you can have pizza anytime you want it.
Save on the First Box
20? 2(K off
on any variety of frozen
Lender's Pizza Bagels.
To the Dm torFor each coupon you accept as our authorized agent on the purchase by iconiumcr
of the specified product, we will pay you face value plusS cents handling charges, provided you and
your customer have complied with the terms of this consumer offer Any other application consti-
tutes fraud Coupon may not be assigned or transferred by you Void when presented by outside
agency broker or institutional user or where prohibited, taxed or otherwise restricted Your cus-
tomer must pay any sates tax Invoices showing your purchase of sufficient stock to cover coupons
presented for redemption must be shown on request Cash redemption value 1/20 of l cent Good
only in the US A Send to Lender s Bagel Bakery. Inc ,PO Box R-7003. El Paso. Texas 79975
Coupon Expires November 19, 1980 JFG 05260
The
Second
Box is
I couldn't believe how delicious your frozen pizza bagels tasted Please send
me a coupon so I can get another box for Free. I'm enclosing my name and ad-
dress and the end nutritional panel, from a Lender's Pizza Bagel Box
Name
Address:
City:.


K
State
.Zip
Mall to: Lender's Bakery. Inc.
P.O. Box 77-05
Orange, Connecticut 06477
Duplicates or copies of this form will not be honored. Limit one coupon per
family This form must be postmarked on or before June 16 1980


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 6,1980


Muskie Fears Europe's Trend
Egypt, Israel Must Face Central Issues
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Secretary of
State Edmund Muskie said
here that Egypt and Israel
"have no choice but to
deal" with the six "hard
central issues that stand in
the way of
agreement on
for the West
a genuine
autonomy"
Bank and
Normalization
Israel Finds Egypt Accords
Bring No Real Clue to Peace
By ELISSA ALLERHANL)
"The nature of normalization is
such that Israelis seize upon
every tiny demonstration of
normalization as an indication
that the Egyptians' intentions
are genuine and that the
territories were not relinquished
in vain, while even those
Egyptians who favor the peace
process are in no great hurry to
normalize relations, augmenting
the Egyptian rift with the Arab
world." say three Arab experts of
Tel Aviv University's Shiloah
Center for Middle Eastern and
African Studies who have just
returned from an eight-day trip
to Egypt.
The three, Profs. Haim Shaked
and Itamar Kabinovich, and Mr.
Elie Itekhess. met with senior
Egyptian government officials,
university intellectuals and
prominent authors and jour-
nalists, exchanging views and
discussing approaches to current
Egyptian-Israeli relations. They
were welcomed with warmth and
enthusiasm throughout their
stay, particularly on the popular
level.
DESPITE THE centralized
controlling role of the govern-
ment, there is a wide spectrum of
opinion which does not coincide
with the declared government
position, although Sadat has
thus far been able to use the
diversity towards his own ends,"
says Prof. Shaked, dean of the
Faculty of Humanities at Tel
Aviv University and head of the
Shiloah Center for Middle
Eastern and African Studies.
Explains Prof. Rabinovich,
head of Tel Aviv University's
Department of Middle Eastern
and African History, some of the
Egyptian elite who support the
idea of peace feel that Sadat has
compromised too much and that
normalization is not a good idea.
On a personal, professional level,
they are concerned about
jeopardizing their contacts with
the Arab world.
They are afraid that El Al
planes landing in Egypt will
result in Arab airlines refusing to
deal with Egypt, cutting them off
from the Arab world. Egyptian
writers, playwrights and film-
makers naturally want their
works to reach the entire Arab
world. Egyptian university
people often spend several
lucrative years in Libya and i
Persian Gulf universities, and
many stand to lose by the
repercussions of overt nor-
malization.
AT THE other end of the
spectrum are leftists, radical
Muslims, and Nasserites who,
negate the entire peace process. |
The three Tel Aviv University
experts visited the office of the Jl
El-Doawa magazine, published \
by the Muslim Brothers, one ol
the most outspoken Muslim
Groups opposing the peace
process, to try and gain insight
into their approach.
Joined by a fourth Tel Aviv)
University professor, expert in
Arab literature and well-known
and highly regarded in Arab
literary circles, Prof. Sasson'
Somekh, the Tel Aviv University
group came to the editorial office
offering to discuss the Middle!
East situation. The reply by
Mustafa Mashur, "We are
against peace in its present
format while there is still op-
pression. It is all clear. It is all
written."
The magazine recently
described normalization as "a
dangerous cancer which will kill
all the living cells of our body."
BUT THE El-Uuawa editors
are not on the lunatic fringes of
Egyptian society, explains Prof.
Kanibovich. "They are an op-
position which, at times, blends
into the total Egyptian or-
chestration, serving Sadat's
ends, and representing an Islamic
trend which is in fashion now
throughout the Arab world, and
is of massive scope in Egypt as
well." To what extent they can be
indefinitely controlled remains in
IS!
Gaza and that "obviously
they are not going to be
settled by May 26," the
target date set by the
Camp David accords.
The former Senator from
Maine also said at his first press
conference at the State Depart-
ment since assuming its helm
that the Western European
countries should not "dilute" the
Camp David peace process
because there is "no better pros-
pect" for a peace agreement.
THE WESTERN European
countries, notably Great Britain,
France and West Germany, have
indicated that they would seek
to set aside the Camp David
formulas and take the lead at the
\ United Nations by amending
Security Council Resolution 242
which underpins the Camp
David accords, if May 26 passes
with no agreement on autonomy.
"It would be a disservice to
the stability in that area, to the
prospect of the further rallying
of support for the results of this
process if we were to back off or
if initiatives are taken by other
countries which would undercut
this process," Muskie said.
Resolving these issues, he said,
"is going to require time, per-
sistence, encouragement and
prodding."
The Secretary of State added.
"I understand, of course, that
those who have not been in-
volved in the Camp David
process, including our European
friends and the moderate and
more radical Arab countries, are
dissatisfied with the process.
But nothing that has been pro-
posed, as far as I can see, holds
out a better prospect for coming
to grips with the six funda-
mental questions on the issue of
autonomy anymore effectively
than these talks."
MUSKIE SAID "land,''
"settlements" and "security"
are among the six "tough
issues" but did not list the
others. However, a senior State
Department official said later
that they included Jerusalem,
Israel's borders, land and water
rights and the scope of authority
for the people of the area.
Muskie said that "a lot of
other issues involving proposed
authorities of the self-governing
authority" have been "cleared
away" in the negotiations thus
far.
"It is clear most government
functions affecting people would
be under the self-governing
authority" and that "basically
agreement is within reach" on
them.
MUSKIE SPOKE in response
to questions as to whether he
--------------------(Vji, ---------"-------
had "formulated plans to break
the stalemate" in the Egyptian-
Israeli-U.S. negotiations which
President Anwar Sadat broke off
two weeks ago, when Sadat
would rejoin the talks and if he
would "dissuade" the European
allies from recognizing the
Palestine Liberation
Organization.
Muskie did not refer to the
PLO in his replies but dwelt
entirely on the autonomy
negotiations.
ON JUNE 9TH
19
OPENING
IN CENTURY
PLAZA
JOIN US FOR
THE FESTIVITIES
1st Bank
OF BROWARD
CENTURY VILLAGE OfFICE
DeerfieW Beach
Phone 426 4200
Mfrnbtf fOil
The
tun
KOSHER
King David
Miami Beach s GlTT KOSHER
HOTEL 1 IEACH ClUI
OPEN ALL YEAR
JULY 4th WEEKEND CELEBRATION
4 DAYS & 3 NIGHTS ^S 5 DAYS & 4 NIGHTS
July 3 to July 6 yW July 2 to July 6
SCC per parson EX} | SOC
03 double occ LJU OO
per person
double occ
hotel
On The Ocean
il 20ih Si
Miami Beach
piut a np
INCLUDING GLATT KOSHER CUISINE
TV In All Rooms Dancing & Entertainment
Card Room Movies Free Parking
GALA JUUT 4th WEEKEND
4 Days ft 3 Nights O 5 Days ft 4 Nights
July 4 to July 6 XL July 3 to July 6
$49cXocc ,11 $65SoX<
(an, H.Mr,.i,, i. HIGH HOLY DAYS SUCCOTH shhhh i
Services Will Be Conducted by a Prominent Cantor
j_____________SUCCA on premises_________________
GLATT KOSHER-VAAD HAKASHHUT UNDER ORTHODOX
SUPERVISION OF RABBI SHELDON EVER
For Reservations Phone: 1-538-7811
plus tax 4 tips
INCLUDING GLATT KOSHER MEALS
Private Beach Free Beach Chair* Movies
Entertainment Dancing Color TV e Theatre
Make Tour Early Reservations For The
HIGH HOLT DATS ho. $175 v p* tMtk occ
Services on Freilaes by prominent Cantor
For Reservations Phone: 1-672-0333
_//**? Old AT HOME \
DINNERS DELIVERED TO
YOUR HOME FOR
LESS THAN COOKING
let Master Hosl Florida s largest and tmest dinner
iperb fresh lull course dinners to
. r home daily, for less than oolong yourself Try il
one day O' as often as vou like tor one per son or
a housefull USDA cnoice meals garden fresh
vegel hi ind only the finest ingredients
v used Delivered in spar Ming clean
/*\ disposable heal m LOntamers
. Menu changes daily and
weekly Ca I before 10 am
-^av aj ss> ""' h.i dinn-r at your
^^^ door belore 6 PM
y&%g
r-fT*
%
KOSHER
SALT FREE *
LOW FAT
DINNERS
AVAILABLE
IN DADE: 633-8066 IN SOUTH BROWARD: 927-3266
LATIN PHONE 635-5201
N. BROWARD 462-8466
master
host
dinner
service
4001 N.W. 31st Avenue.
Miami, Florida 33142
Wi ASS CJUI BSJSJIMBJJ S MM MstSm, SMLMMB'MML.
CALL FOR FREE MENU
liaia-luana p. 4
Why
The Big
Tzimmes
Over
Tetley's
Tiny
Little Tea
Leaves?
TINY IS TASTIER. THAT'S WHY!
Gourmets have always known that! That's why
they buy tiny peas. Tiny baby lamb chops. And
the same goes tor tea leaves. The most flavorful
are the tiny young leaves. The kind of leaves
Tetley packs into every tea bag. That's why hot
or iced, Tetley Tea gives you rich, refreshing
flavor. Tetleythe favorite tea in Jewish homes
since 1875.
K Certified Kosher
A CENTURY OLD TRADITION
-------Tp-
-!T-
-*-
-rrr


Friday, June 6, 1980
a
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
BonniV Ann Sharlene Herman,
daughter of Nettie and Martin
Herman of Somerset, was
graduated last month from the
University of Pennsylvania
Dental School. She'll be prac-
ticing at Lutheran Hospital in
Brooklyn Jack Moss, elected
recently to the Broward County
State Republican Committee,
was appointed to the executive
board of the State Republican
State Committee Jules
Strober, a founding member of
LauderhiU's B'nai B'rith Lodge,
was re-elected vice president of
the Broward Council of B'nai
B'rith Hebrew Day School of
Greater Fort Lauderdale's Fifth
(irade Clasa will be graduated at
2:30 p.m., Monday, June 9, in the
school's first official graduation
ceremony in its five years.
Graduation will be at JCC's Soref
Hall on Perlman Campus. 6501
W. Sunrise Blvd., where the
school is located.
.luli Basaichis of Nova High
School won the girls' State Class
lA 50-yard free-style swimming
championship, and finished
second in the 100-yard butterfly
event Josh Halpern is
helping his hometown police.
Tamarac, organize a citizen band
K'BI radio network for relaying
emergency messages .
/r
Browsin9 thru
roward
F^.

V.
with mr. "maggie" levine
J
Broward County public transit
bus drivers will be asking senior
citizens to show a pass to get
reduced fare. Bus passes for
people 65 and over are available
by showing proof of age at Senior
Citizen Agency Desk in County
Courthouse, 201 SE 6th St., Fort
Lauderdale. Desk is open week-
days from 8:30 to 1 and 2 to 4:30.
Jules Miller was elected
president of the Plantation
Democratic Club Feder-
ation's Chaplaincy Commission
Director. Rabbi Albert B. Sch-
wartz was one of the
"Brotherhood'' speakers partici-
pating last month in the Broward
County Multi-Ethnic Multi-
Culture Program.
Red Magen David for Israel
Broward Youth Vote Encouraged
A drive to engourage the
Youth Vote" in 1980 is under-
way in Broward County high
schools.
Under the direction of
Supervisor of Elections Jane
Carroll, the purpose of the drive
is to encourage high school
students who will be 18 years old
on or before Nov. 4 to vote in this
>ear selections.
"The unique thing about this
drive," explained Mrs. Carroll.
is that student ieaders are
deputized for one day in order to
register other students in their
own schools. It is part of an on-
going program from my office to
1 encourage all adults in Broward
whatever their ages lo par-
ucipate in government.''
The drive to register high
school voters began with a
county-wide student workshop
last March. Each high school in
the county was asked to send
representatives, or student
leaders as they are called, who
would be able to encourage voter
Flo. House
Salutes Israel
TALLAHASSEE The
House pi Representatives, in
Resolutfcn 1617, has put itself on
record as joining "with the free
people of the world in con-
gratulating the State of Israel on
the occasion of its 32nd an-
niversary."
The resolution was introduced
into the House by Represen-
tatives Fred Lippman, of Or-
lando, and Dick Batchelor. of
Hollywood.
The resolution observes that
"the United States of America
and the State of Israel (was) each
born in the fire of revolution" and
that both "still struggle con-
stantly for man's basic freedoms
of speech, petition, religion and
representation."
IT ALSO observes that "both
nations share a common heritage
as a refuge for fugitives from dis-
tress and still maintain that
oppressed humanity will have an
asylum on this globe."
In addition, Resolution 1617
notes that "both nations con-
tinue to demonstrate to the world
that thriving democracies can
exist in the midst of turmoil and
dictatorship both nations
have resisted the call to the oil
[blackmail and are again seeking
| to establish a lasting peace in an
area so devastated by war "
The resolution ia signed by J.
lyatt Brown, Speaker of the
Florida House of Rep-
registration in their home
schools.
All students turning 18 on or
before the upcoming election are
encouraged to register. Students
can pre-register six months prior
to the election if they will be 18
on or before election day. The
voter's registration application is
held, not proecessed. until the
actual birth date.
celebrates its 50th anniversary
with a national convention
during the latter part of this
month. Members of the U.S.
group are planning to attend and
then to tour Israel and Egypt, .
Vic Diamond was runner-up in
men's singles in Broward County
Closed Tennis Championships.
Sunrise Jewish Center joining
the early announcers of Sep-
tember's High Holy Days ser-
vices. In addition to Rosh
Hashonah and Yom Kippur
services in its own sanctuary at
8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd., the
synagogue will have additional
services in the main Recreation
Hall of Phase II. Sunrise Lakes,
8120 Sunrise Lakes Blvd .
Gene Greenzweig and Rabbi
Shimon Azulay represented
Central Agency for Jewish
Education last week at the
Annual Conference of Jewish
Communal service in Denver
Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale
will have an exhibition during
July of "Fashionworks"
illustrations by Stephen
Stipelman of New York's
"retailers bible." Women's Wear
Daily.
Julius Schatz has been ap-
pointed by President Carter to
the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council, chaired by Elie Wleael.
Th following recommendations made
by the President's Commission
on the Holocaust, which was also
chaired by Wiesel. The new
Council, among other things, is
charged with establishing an
appropriate memorial museum
and a foundation to com-
memorate the Holocaust. Schatz
is director of AJCongress
Commission on Jewish Life and
Culture ... Hy Solof, past
president of Sunrise Jewish
Center will be honored by the
congregation at 8 p.m., Wed-
nesday, June 11, at the CenteH
i. New Orthodox synagogue in
the .formative stages,
Congregation Migdal David is
meeting Saturday mornings at 9
in the home of the Leon Ker-'
steins. 9505 NW 81st ManorJ
Westwood Section 23, Tamarac.
Adam Glasser. 6 years old. of
Coral Springs, and Heather
Goldstein, 10, of Sunrise were
among winners of $50 savings
bonds in Mothers' Day coloring
contest sponsored by a group of
real estate offices The movie.
"Lies My Father Told Me," will
be among the features al the
Fathers' Day full breakfast
special, 10 a.m.. June 15, served
by the master chefs ofdhe Temple
Sholom Men's Club. A two-dollar
donation covers the full tab for
the breakfast and movie at the
Temple. 132 SE 11th Ave.,
Pompano Beach Hadassah's
Shoshana Chapter of Sandspoint
will install its officers, with
Priscilla Lippa. presiding, at
noon (lunch will be served!
Thursday, June 12. at Tamarac
Jewish Center, 9101 NW 57th St.
HOUSES COMMERCIAL APTS.
MAID SERVICE
LAWN SERVICE
JANITORIAL SERVICE
APPLE SHINE
CLEANING
COLLEEN WERNER
LEON MASON
"SPECIALIZING IN APPLE SHINING
791-3443
Mon -Fn 8 00-4 30
587-7916
Eves & Weekends
MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE
WANTS TO SEND YOU TO ISRAEL!
ENTER THE MAXWELL HOUSE* COFFEE
qASTE OF IRAMTIGN SWEEPIAISgS
IET PAN AM TO LONDON OR ROME_________
WITH CONNECTING JET TO ISRAEL
You're always a winner with Maxwell
House* Coffee. The full aroma and
great-tasting flavor gives you all the
good things you want in coffee...
consistently cup after cup after cup.
That's why today as it has been for
over fifty yearsMaxwell House^
Coffee is good to the last drop.
ISRAEL! The land of the very old
and the brand new. Where twentieth
century technology lives side by side
with first century tradition. A trip for
two. For 14 excitement packed days
and 13 nights you'll see the sights.
The cities. You'll eat the foods and
meet the people. Anybody can win.
Just fill in the entry blank and send it
in. And if you're the "chosen one"
Maxwell House* Coffee will be de-
lighted to send you.
HOD
<-F
lf*MMM H t 1
MMiu ooo
1 tacn entry must oe accompanied oy mnerseal from
j iar oi instant Maxwell House' Coltee 2" square cul
Horn the plastic lid ol a can oi Ground Maxwell House'
Cotlee or the word Maxwell House' Cottee printed in
dioc letters on a 3' x 5 card and man to
Taste 01 too**! Sweepstakes
General Foods Corporation
PO Boi 3680. Grand Centra Sutien
New York NY 10017
Z No purchase required
3 entries must be postmarked no later man June 30 '980
and received By July 7 1980
4 Winner will Be selected By random blindfold drawing
under me supervision ol an independent organization
whose decision is tin* in the event any winner declines
the prize or it lor any other reason the pnze cannot Be
awarded after the initial drawing a supplemental draw
aor drawings will Be held to award the prize ftawing
Oe held on July M 1980 Winner wHl M noulied By
mail ThewirrasrtamecanBeorjtaf^lWsrnga
separate stamped sell addressed envelope to
OFFICIAL BULES-NO PURCHASES NECESSARY
Winners List
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
MaiwtH Mouse" Collee s igilfed iraasmafh ol Giwii Fooo*
1900 Ge"t'i< Food* Co'po'alio"
PO Boi 3990 Grind Central Station
New York NY 10017
5. Prize will Be awarded as soon as compliance ol win
ing entry with these rules is verified in order to Be
awarded the prize winning participant musl Be avail-
able ai the address shown on the entry Blank or must
turnrsh a proper forwarding address lo sweepstakes
officials prior to the date of drawing
6. Prize consists of round trip economy airfate lor two via
Pan Am to London or Rome and connecting iet to Te
Aviv Israel plus hotel accommodations for 14 days
and 13 nights in Jerusalem or Tel Avrv
7 No substitution tor prize Prize is rwvtranslerabie and
mi redeemable lor cash The trip must be takenm 1980
on an available Pan Am scheduled departure date
I. The sweepstakes is open to ail U S residents ecepi
residents ol Utah and employees (and liter families i o'
General Foods Corporation its advertising agencies
ntaetann or aMiaws or Joseph Jacobs Oqaniza-
ton inc Federal state and local regulators I any
apply Void m any locality where taxed restricted 3'
prohibited by law
9 All taxes are the sole responsibility ol the winne-
10 Each entry has an equal chance of winning There is no
pre-determined winner Your chances o' winning are
dependent on and vary according lo the actua: "unioe'
ot entries received
OFFICIAL ENTRY BLANK
MAIL TO. Taste Of Tradition Sweepstakes
General Foods Corporation
PO 90x3660
Grand Central Station
New York NY 10017
Name
Address .
"City
Stile
Zip
r-^^&^A tftt'r|U
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
i

-I


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
fricftiy.June6.I980
Kahane's View of His Arrest
By MEIR KAHANE
They came at night. A knock
at the door. And then another.
There are four of them. One
flashed his card. Good evening.
Rabbi Kahane. we are from the
police. I regret to have to ask you
to come with us for a small
clarification. What is it about?
He smiles: I prefer to speak
about it at the station.
It is not new to me. Just the
previous week others had come
at midnight. I sat in prison for
a week and was suddenly
released. No charge. I assume
this is one more petty
harassment on the part of the
government. I take my prayer
shawl and phylacteries on the
reasonable charge that I will be
held overnight and tell my wife: I
will see you soon don't worry.
She will, but not too much she
has seen this many times before.
WE DRIVE in silence. The
streets of Jerusalem even
Jaffa Road, the main one are
not crowded, despite the fact that
'his is Yom Yerushalayim
Jerusalem Day. It is supposed to
be a joyous holiday marking
the 13th anniversary of the
liberation East Jerusalem during
the 1967 Six-Day War. It is not
very joyous because, despite all
the nonsensical orating on the
part of Mayor Teddy Kollek and
Begin. Jerusalem is not a unified
city, but rather another Belfast,
divided into a Jewish city and an
Arab one, with the latter seething
with hate.
Last month. Kollek brought
over a number of mayors of U.S.
cities for a conference. The public
relations gimmick was that these

mayors presided over cities with
differing national and ethnic
groups and that Jerusalem was
similar to them. It followed, ergo,
that as Pittsburgh and Cin-
cinnati were one city in which
various groups co-existed, thus
would Aiab and Jew dwell side-
by-side in Jerusalem.
Of course, the absurdity is self-
evident. In Pittsburgh, various
ethnic groups may struggle over
a greater share of the pie, but
they all agree that they are part
of the same pie. They all agree
that they are Americans, citizens
of the same state.
NOT SO IN Jerusalem, despite
all our foolish illusions and wish-
ful thinking. The Arab in East
Jerusalem is not an Israeli, does
not want to be an Israeli, hates
Israel, and looks forward to the
day of his "liberation," when all
Israel will become "Palestine."
It is for saying such self-
evident truths that I am being
arrested, and I muse ruefully
about the fact that even the
weather has turned bitterly cold
on this unsmiling holiday. A
sudden shift in the weather has
brought uncommon rain for the
middle of May, and the cold wind
seems to mirror the feeling in
Israel and the country drift*, as a
ship without a hand at the
rudder.
always, I will greet the police
whom I know and smilingly
say: "I have nothing to say
concerning any questions." I will
be either released or held for 48
hours and brought before a
judge. This is the usual
procedure.
BUT NOT this time. Israel has
progressed. The officer returns.
In his hand he has some papers.
He gets in and turns to me. I
regret that I must do this in the
automobile, but I must read to
you the following. He proceeds to
read: "Under my authority as
Minister of Defense and under
the administrative detention
powers, I hereby order that Meir
ben Yechezkel Kahane be held in
Jerusalem and the Shata Prison
for a period of six months."
(signed) Ezer Weizman.
That is it. No trial, no judge,
no attorney, no charge, no op-
portunity to defend. It is the
Britain that Begin fought in the
name of Herut, freedom, returned
in the form of Begin. I think:
This is what the "one democracy
in the Middle East" has come to.
I remember the little blue and
white Jewish National Fund
pushka (charity box) I would put
a penny into each day as a child.
The dream was to build a Jewish
We arrive at the Russian
Compound, the main police
station. The officer in charge
jumps out. I wait patiently, Berlin 1936; Moscow 1980' is the title 'o'f the Student
knowing the procedure. He will Struggle for Soviet Jewry's new poster on the upcoming
return soon, and I will be taken Olympics of Oppression' in the USSR. Many Jewish activists
ins.de for questioning As are expected to be arrested for the duration of the Games to
^^^^^ bar them from Western contacts in Moscow.
State someday. I remember
the years I gave as a .youth to
Begin's Zionist youth movement,
Betar, and the final words of
martyred Jewish underground
soldiers going to the gallows
under "emergency" laws. I think
of how many speeches I have
made pleading for Jews to come
home home to Israel.
I REGRET NOTHING. The
dream remains and will be, long
after the neo- Hellenists and
gentilized Hebrews of today are
gone. Weizman is not Israel. He
represents all that is foreign and
un-Jewish in the land. He will
pass, but the dream will remain
and be fulfilled.
Two Groups Press
Arab Cause in U.&
Continued from Page 4
ASFC urged, in effect.
At the time, Theodore Bickel
commented that the Quakers
would never have asked the
National Association For the
Advancement of Colored People
to bargain with the Ku Klux
Klan. a terrorist group anathema
to practically all Americans. Why
then call upon Israelis to dicker
with a band of brigands which
the United States itself has
pledged not to deal with until it
adheres to UN Security Council
Resolution 242 and 338?
In the early days of Quaker
action in America, the Friends
established a golden reputation
by working to abolish slavery in
this country. Is it too much to
recommend to the American
Friends Service Commitee to
follow that lead now? Saudi
Arabia alone has 250.000 slaves
within its borders? Why can"t the
AFSC take a respite from its pro-
PLO and anti-Israeli activity and
get involved in the fight to end
Arab slavery?
Breyers yogurt is
not just all natural,
its all kosher, too.
. o **** + : v. x *



-*-T WT. S O?
all no
tar^
Yogurt ,
M
In fact, Ipeyers yogurt
M so kosher &e Untos of
Orthodox Jewish Congrega-
tions puts its 0 seal oi approval
on every cup ^
And just wait until you taste what's m
every cup. Because Breyers is the creamy smooth,
full of fruit yogurt. There s luscious strawberry,
raspberry, black cherry, peach and lots of other
favorite flavors And don't forget, it's made with
10M IIP8*6 yogurt cultures.
You can pick up ail the Breyers
yogurt Savors in the popular 8 oz.
size, and our plain yogurt is now
available in 16 oz. and 32 oz. containers
isach one is 100% natural with absolutely '
nothmg artificial and absolutely no gelatin,
?k. ^w^yu're shopping far yogurt, look for
the name with a tradition since 1866. Look for
Breyers. In a word, it's Geshmak'
&Je.


Friday, June 6,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
Iaso Mindlim
Property is the Key to Racial Peace
Continued from Page 4
equivalent terms about an equal
future.
Fanon saw the race riot as a
prescription for black emotional
health, and if whites did not see it
too. it is that they did not wish
to.
Now that the Miami riots are
over for the moment, those who
understood the true meaning of
race riots even before they began
anew regard with a sense of
anxiety the escalation of the riot
process. If blacks really want to
get well from the sickness of
^ .while indifference, who knows
what the limits of black violence
may be?
ALREADY, those who bur-
ned, killed and looted in Miami
are being called '"guerrillas" in
the press, a term of warfare
giving sanction to what in fact
occurred, while still failing to
come to terms with what oc-
curred and what must be done
jointly with the black'community
if the war is to come to an end.
The word, "guerrilla," at its
worst gives sanction to terrorism
as a substitute for curing the
need for terrorism. It is almost as
if. suddenly understanding the
riot process, we can continue to
drag our heels to correct the
conditions giving rise to it.
I.vents, and our understanding
nl them, may have finally caught
up with the shapers of the events.
fanon, though he is dead since
1962, is finally alive among us.
For the white-propertied, this
should strike no note of fear if
they are at last prepared to share
the opportunity to acquire
property with the black com-
munity A propertied black man
as disinclined to destroy
Vi rial hi' owns as anyone else.
My own concern is that we
ma) have gone beyond this
obvious ameliorative as an af-
fective antidote to race riots and
social unrest generally. Perhaps
u might have worked in the
1960s.
PERHAPS, if white men
moved to create genuine oppor-
tunity of equivalence in the
I960 s, there would have been no
black riot in Miami in 1980.
Hut the 1980 Miami riot, it
seems to me, is breeding another
sort of harvest. It is a harvest not
just of American proportions of
'guerrilla activity, but of inter-
national proportions of terror and
revolution.
Into Miami the other week
strolled the Rev. Jesse Jackson
and Andrew Young, among other
black leaders, to still the fires of
rage. But Jackson and Young are
part of a much larger movement
than the "mere" Mack American
^movement for equivalence.
Jackson and Young are both
deeply involved in international
revolutionary activities. This was
made eminently clear only last
year by their intimate par-
ticipation in the affairs of the
Palestinians, which goes far
beyond Israel to Jews them-
selves, Israeli and of other
nationalities. It includes the Irish
Republican Army, Italy's Red
Brigade, the terrifying heirs to
Japan's Zengakuren.
JESSE JACKSON is clear
about Jews. He is tired, he says,
of hearing about the Holocaust.
And Andrew Young's flirtation
with the PLO and Yasir Arafat
have already been sufficiently
well-documented to need no more
ON JUNE 9TH
JOIN US FOR
THE FESTIVITIES
1st Bank
OF BROWARD
CENTURY VILLAGE OFFICE
Deerfield Beach
Phone 426-4200
Mem Of I ID".
comment here.
One is therefore forced to
shudder that it is men such as
these who visited the black com-
munity the other week to help
still the fire of rage. Did they
speak to the black community as
black Americans or as inter-
national guerrillas?
An Associated Press report of
May 17 quotes Yasir Arafat in
Beirut on the Cuban influx into
Miami. There, in Beirut, Arafat
proclaimed unity with Fidel
Castro, vowing that his PLO
guerrillas would pledge them-
selves to fight alongside Castro
Cubans against the United
States.
"THE JOINT command of the
Lebanese-Palestinian forces is
! fully prepared to fight in defense
of Cuba and its people," said
Arafat. What, he declared, the
PLO is fighting, "is the struggle
against American imperialism
everywhere." It is a struggle, he
said, "which is indivisible."
White America, white western
Europe, still do not see Arafat for
what he truly is the deceptive
Marxist Castro of the Middle
East.
They are quite prepared to
dismiss his challenge as "simply"
against Judaism and Zionism
and to betray both as they have
done throughout history.
Why should black America see
through the deception anymore
clearly, including Jackson and
Young? That there are some
blacks, such as Roger Wilkins,
who has declared, "If Jesse
Jackson said he is tired of
hearing about the Holocaust,
then Jesse is an ass," does not
mitigate the fact that Jackson
and Young and the other black
leaders of their ilk are an ass.
That they are the vanguard of the
disaffected black community
today.
WHAT WE are left with is
ignorance on both sides of the
conflict, white and black, and
that is what I find so horrifying.
In 1980, American race riots are
infinitely more complex than
they were in the 1960's.
If the causes that enflame
them are not laid to rest soon, it
is not equivalence that dis-
affected blacks will be seeking,
but something else. Something
revolutionary that the Jacksons
and the Youngs are preaching
among them today.
INTRODUCING
NEW PRITIKIN
STONE GROUND
WHOLE WHEAT BREAD.
THEBREAD
FORALLREASONS.
WERE
OPENING
IN CENTURY
PLAZA
PRITIKIN STONE
GROUND WHOl. I
WHEAT BREAD truly is the
bread for all reasons
Because you know what
you want and what you
don't want in your daily diet
Developed for use at the
Santa Monica Longevity
NO SUGAR
NO SHORTENING
NO ANIMAL FATS
NO MILK OR MILK PRODUCTS
NO CHOLESTEROL
NO ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS
NO ARTIFICIAL COLORS
NO ARTIFICIAL PRESERVATIVES
LOW IN SALT
ALL NATURAL FIBERS
ALL NATURAL CARBOHYDRATES
ALL CEREAL PROTEIN
Center. PRITIKIN STONE
('HOUND WHOLE-:
WHEAT BREAD is made
from a special formula using
only the most wholesome
ingredients PRITIKIN
STONE GROUND WHOLE
WHEAT BREAD truly the
bread for all reasons.

Ifi-k


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. June 6,1980
After May 26, What Now?
PeaceBut No Normalization as Yet

By RABBI ARTHUR
HERTZBERG
London Chronicle Syndicate
Do ihe Egyptians want peace?
Is peace really possible?
Afum a few days, recently, of
intensive discussions in Cairo, I
have come away with answers
(there is no one answer) that are
surprisingly clear. Sadat wants
peace;, the intelligentsia does not
want 'normalization; and the
masses' do not want war. Each of
these .pinions is solidly rooted
in thejeelf-interest of those who
hold dfcm.
SaoVft is at once the best-
know*' and most enigmatic of
these ftree forces. It is possible,
even probable, that
events in motion by
war in 1973 and by
[himself to Jerusalem in
t-hout a clear conception
the ultimate result on
4' in the Middle East
The one thing that is
I is that both in war
i he was, and is, first
smost, playing to an
gallery.
'DIRECTION of Sadat's
best understood by
it with the much more
jfined positions and self-
of the masses and the
itsia The Egyptian
have one very clear
>n: they do not want to
igain One hundred
casualties in the (
wars with Israel are
Conclusion is shared by
everyone in Egypt, in-
pven those who are for
The widening of the
al is now going for-
the cities on its banks
rebuilt. A nation plan-
would not thus block
route.
es not mean that war is
(impossible. Some new
| may arise that knew
jlp David. He may have
that will overfly the
the whole of the Sinai
f .? in Egypt. Neverthe
the short run, for the
e. which is an eternity
liddle East, there is no
i of an Israeli-Egyptian
PEACE between Israel
it does not, hosever,
it normalization now
near future. The intel-
id professional classes,
form and express
are in their over-
majority opposed to
. ition and, from the
perspective of their own self-
interest
A diplomat unfurls the flag at the newly-established Israeli
Embassy in Cairo. Will the embassy become less isolated as
the days go by ?
opim
whel
norr
. for very good reason.
Professional wages are low in
Egypt and the way an academic
makes ends meet is by lecturing
in Kuwait or elsewhere in the oil
sheikhdoms for very large fees.
Technicians of all kinds need
their consultancies in the Arab
world and their frequent tem-
porary employment in order to
maintain their lifestyles back
home.
The largest single source of
foreign currency for Egypt as a
whole are the remittances of
some two thousand million
dollars a year, which come back
to their families from the quarter
of a million Egyptians employed
in the Arab world.
This "diaspora" is as large, or
larger, than the Palestinian
group of technicians with which
it competes for place all over the
Middle East. An interruption of
these relations, even a temporary
tremor within them, would be
disastrous not only to those
individuals whose lifestyles
depend on these relationships,
but to the Egyptian State.
A FEW academic encounters
between Israel and Egypt have
taken place, "under the table."
But any Egyptian academic who
is publicly a part of such en-
deavors has dynamited his
bridges to the rest of the Arab
world. In mid-April, a chair of
Israel-Egyptian studies was
dedicated at Tel Aviv University
and an international colloquium
was convoked there in honor of
the occasion.
There was no trouble, of
course, in constructing a dis-
tinguished delegation of Jewish
scholars, from Israel, Britain and
the United States. Of fifteen
Egyptians invited, two came.
One was the cultural attache of
the Egyptian Embassy in Israel
and the other was a dis-
tinguished gentleman of eighty,
with a great academic past,
whose primary residence is in
Paris.
On my recent visit to Egypt, 1
was invited to give two lectures.
One group consisted of middle-
range diplomats, and the other
was academic and research
oriented. In both rooms I was
treated with courtesy, but no one
made any secret of the fact that
normalization between Israel and
Egypt was not in the hands of
the two Governments involved.
It depended on the Palestinians,
who were cast for the role of cor-
porate "rabbi" whose stamp of
approval was required before full
and open relations between
Arabs and Israelis could be
regarded as "kosher."
IN THE relationship between
the Egyptian intelligentsia and
the rest of the Arab world, there
is also an intangible, but even
more fundamental, component of
pride and self-image. Cairo
regards itself as the intellectual
and acadmic center of the Arab
world. In order to maintain at
least some claim to that leader-
ship, the Cairene intellectuals
must and do display some over
opposition to Sadat. They do opt
for the dominant orthodoxy in
anti-Sadat circles all over the
Arab world, that the Camp
David accord be junked and that
pressure towards the creation of
an independent Palestinian State '
be the immediate central en-
deavor for the entire Arab world.
The Cairene intelligentsia
seems to be waiting with some
impatience for one of two things
to happen either for Sadat to
succeed in the negotiations, and
thus unexpectedly bring this
desired result, or that he will
totally fail with the Israelis and
thus free them, and him, to
pursue a new and harder policy.
There are, of course, circles in
Cairo which are waiting and
hoping that Sadat will fall, and
it is possible to meet a few such
figures even at respectable dip-
lomatic parties. My own im-
pression is that not a blade of
grass falls among the bureau-
crats and intellectuals in Cairo,
not even those seemingly dis-
affected, unless its very falling
has some place in the mind of
Sadat.
PERHAPS the leeway that
Sadat is now giving to his
various critics and opponents is
more than a safety valve for dis-
content. He may be or-
chestrating this very unhappi-
ness as part of the pressure he is
mounting on Israel, and
especially on the Americans.
What lends credence to these
reflections is the line presently
being followed almost verbatim
by his diplomatic emissaries in
Washington, Cairo and Tel Aviv.
In recent weeks one hears every-
where the same plea from high-
ranking Egyptians: if Israel does
not concede more, then Sadat
will be further weakened; he will
be in imminent danger of falling,
thus removing from the Egyp-
tian scene and the Middle East
the one force for peace.
What would follow would be
inimical to Israel, for the Egyp-
tian intelligentsia and the
technocrats are so largely op-
posed to Camp David.
The trouble with this
argument is, of course, that if it
is true; that the Egyptian-Israeli
peace depends on Sadat's sur-
vival, then the Israeli hardliners
are absolutely right in treating
the whole process with extreme
suspicion.
THIS ARGUMENT, fortu-
nately, is not true. Peace that
is, non-war between Egypt and
Israel does not depend on
Sadat's survival, for the basic
transaction between Egypt and
Israel to end the fighting has
been made. What is not secure
and, indeed, has not even begun,
is normalization, which Sadat
alone cannot deliver, and which
the Israeli Government in its
present posture cannot possibly
expect.
At Camp David, both Sadat
and Begin knew that normal-
ization between them had at
least something to do with the
Palestinian question. Obviously,
the differences in the inter-
pretations of that accord which
have now appeared showed that
it meant very different things to
each of them. Were they fooling
each other? I think not, but it is
clear that they misconceived
each other quite fundamentally.
Begin is far more open than
Sadat, and it is therefore easier to
be relatively certain as to what he
thinks. What follows is how
Cairo, today, reads his thinking
(in my view correctly). He seems
to have gone to Camp David as a
great-hearted gentleman. The
Sinai, including the settlements,
the oil fields and the road to
Sharm el Sheikh, were hard to
give up, but ideologically, Jabo-
tineky and his disciples never laid
claim to them as part of the Land
of Israel.
WHAT COULD be more
noble and gallant than to
give up the Sinai in one grand
gesture, thus accommodating
Sadat's needs, on the assumption
that Sadat would be equally the
great gentleman and allow Begin
to retain territorial sovereignty
over the West Bank? Could
Sadat fail to recognize, in return,
that the "undivided land of
Israel" is indispensable both to
the ideological purity and the
domestic political needs of his
new friend, Begin?
The trouble with this bargain
is that it does not matter whether
Sadat thought, even briefly, that
such a deal was possible. It is
clear that it is not within his
power to end the Palestinian
question for Israel in terms
acceptable to the Likud, in return
for its generosity on the Siani.
The most that he could ever offer
was precisely what the world
knew he was offering at Camp
David: concerted action among
Israel, Egypt and the United
States to create in a demilitarized
West Bank a Palestinian entity
in association with Jordan. The
Israelis at that marathon nego-
tiation may have believed that
this was rhetoric, a smokescreen
behind which Sadat hid his in-
tention to conclude a separate
peace. Sadat evidently gave them
reason to believe this by em-,
phasizing, then and since, the
binding nature of the bilateral
pledges never to go to war again
but there is a difference, at
least for someone who rules from
Cairo, between peace and nor-
malization. Sadat can sell peace
for the Sinai, as he did, but no
more.
SADAT'S situation can, of
course, be radically changed from
without. The solution that he
hopes for is that the Americans
will put enormous pressure on
Israel. There is a fair likelihood
that he is right and that such is
coming, at least after the presi-
dential election in November. It
is also possible that the oil-rich
Arab States, which have broken
political relations with Egypt but
have not cut economic ties, might'
start making difficulties. Sadat
would then be in real danger of
falling.
The second scenario is for the
moment unlikely, especially in
view of Sadat's new role as
America's chosen instrument in
the region (it was from an Egyp-
tian airfield that the C-130s flew
in the abortive rescue attempt in
Iran), but it would simply make
the oil kingdoms more
vulnerable.
Time is therefore on Sadat's
side. The Americans are com-
mitted to supporting him, and
Egypt has already very nearly
overtaken Israel as the prime
recipient of aid of all kinds. Many
of Sadat's enemies in the Arab
world find the prospect of his
successors much more frighten-
ing, and internally, for the
moment, there is something of an
economic upswing in Egypt.
Sadat can live fairly comfortably
for the next three years while the
rest of the Sinai is returned to
him with the present state of
peace without normalization.
Indeed, he is likelier to grow
stronger than weaker.
HAVING MARRIED Sadat
at Camp David, produced a
handsome dowry of the Sinai,
and looked forward to an even
warmer relationship, Israel is
now disappointed to find itself
mated with a correct partner,
who is gracefully but persistently
demanding further payment to
his relatives.
How should Israel be
responding to this state of peace
without normalization? The un-
published contacts are in-
creasing, though not very
rapidly, and it is therefore
possible to imagine that, bit by
bit, the wall will be breached. One
response is therefore to do what
Israel is doing and to presume
that its embassy in Cairo will be
less isolated as the days go by
that that there will eventually be
as much traffic from Egypt to
Israel as there is from Israel to
Egypt. It is more probable that
increasing angers on the West
Bank will check this process and
that normalization will, indeed,
depend as the Egyptians keep
saying on the developments
with regard to the question of the
Palestinians.
At Camp David, Sadat made
Israel the only offer on which he
could then have delivered: to
undertake to lead much and
eventually most of the Arab
world to reconciliation with
Israel, if Israel would join with
him, the United States and
Jordan, to create some form of
Arab sovereignty in the West
Bank and Gaza, under the joint
auspices and effective military
control of the powers involved.
THIS PRICE the present
Israeli Government has been un-
willing and even unable to pay.
Had such a solution happened,
quickly, Sadat dreamed that he
would have become, by ac-
clamation, "King of the Arabs."
He would, greatheartedly, have
found a large role for Israel
and even world Jewry in de-
veloping his "realm."
The May 26 deadline on the
- autonomy talks will pass,
especially in the light of the out-
rage at Hebron, without
progress. During his visit to
Washington, Sadat suggested a
device for passing this trans-
itional date without major con-
frontation: a new "declaration of
principles" by the Governments
involved. No doubt some such
rhetoric will be devised, but the
basic problem will, of course,
remain.
In the starkest terms, Begin
and Sadat cannot possibly give
each other what each wants on
the West Bank, and so the prob-
lem is inevitably getting worse.
No successor to Sadat could
possibly be more giving. The
question which remains open is
whether, under the government
to follow after Begin, Israel will
be able to negotiate with Egypt
within the parameters of the
possible.
Congress Candidate
Alan S. Becker of Plantation,
who served in the Florida State
legislature for six years and who
made an unsuccessful bid for
State Attorney General two
years ago, has announced his
candidacy for Congress from
Broward s 12th District.
HEBREW TUTOR
Summer tutoring by experienced
and licensed teacher. All levels
and Bar Bat Mltzvah. Please call
963-7874


Friday. June 6, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 15
re 3
K SbcJXzd yJUW4l&)gMG *A/<&WA> -^K j
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
At the recent convention of the
I Cantors Assembly of America
[held at Grossinger's Hotel in
4ew York, Cantor Maurice A.
leu of Temple Beth Israel, Fort
[Lauderdale. was honored with
'receiving the
commission of
hazzan minister
and was also
elected to the
executive com-
mittee of the As-
sembly for a
eriod of three
ears. He is cur-
rently chairman
of the Southeast
Region of the
Assembly. Can tor Neu
Cantor Neu has been with
Temple Beth Israel for the past
12 years, serving in the capacity
of cantor, Bar/Bat Mitzvah
teacher, and musical director.
KETERTIKVAH
SYNAGOGUE
The Keter Tikvah Synagogue
announces the formation of the
Academy of Judaic Studies with
the offering of its first Seminar on
Prophecy: Spiritual Resources
for Modern Living, led by Marvin
Cohn, Bible teacher. This will be
the first of a large program of
intellectual and spiritual ad-
f ventures in Judaism and
Jewishness. The seminar is
limited to 15 participants and will
meet for 10 sessions on Tuesdays
to Aug. 5.
Registration for the seminar
and for the Torah Club Religious
School for grades K-12 may be
completed by writing to Keter
Tikvah Synagogue, POB 8125,
Coral Springs 33065. Services,
conducted by Rabbi Leonard
Religious
Directory
LAUDERDALE LAKES
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE.
43S1 West Oakland Park Boulevard.
Modern Orthodox Congregation. Saul
Herman, Rabbi Emeritus.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 3245 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor /erome
Kiement.
< i, SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu.
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER, INC.
8049 West Oakland Park Blvd. Con
servative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy.
Cantor Jack Marchant,
THANKS, AVIVA!
It is good to know that in
Lauderdale Lakes we are
concerned with our neigh-
bors, and try to help one
another when help is needed.
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael
on Oakland Park Boulevard
is having alteration work
done to enlarge the temple so
they can accommodate those
who wish to attend services.
They were at a loss as to
where they can congregate
for the next few months to
hold services. Gary Lampert,
administrator of the Aviva
Manor Nursing Home, of-
fered the chapel in the home
to the temple for Friday and
Saturday prayers.
That is being neighborly.
Jean Levinson
Zoll, are held every Friday at 8
p.m. in the auditorium of the
Bank of Coral Springs, 3300
University Drive at Sample
Road.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
A newly elected slate of officers
will be installed by the Sister-
hood of Temple Beth Orr, Coral
Springs, as part of its Friday
evening service on June 6 at 8
p.m.
A special ceremony has been
prepared by Installing Officer
Doris Kliegman and her associate
Leslie Johnson. Rabbi David
Goldstein will conduct the
regular Sabbath Service with
Rabbi Lewis Bogage as invited
guest.
The following officers will be
installed for the coming year
1980-1981: President, Toby Kan-
trowitz; Vice Presidents, Marilyn
Preissman, Shirley Berman, Fran
Askenas, Judy Galician;
Treasurer, Rose Domnitch; Re-
cording Secretary, Maxine
Berlow: Financial Secretary,
'**}
LAUDERHILL
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAU
DERHILL. 2048 NW 48th Ave.,
Uiuderhill. Conservative. Rabbi
David W Gordon; President, Sol
Cohen.
TAMARAC
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9101
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman Cantor Henry
Belasco.
PLANTATION
EMPLE KOL AMI Plantation 8200
"eters Rd. Liberal Reform. Rabbi
Sheldon J Harr.
EMPLE RAMAT SHALOM. Recon
tiruttionist Synagogue. 7473 NW 4th
tl
POMPANO BEACH
IMPLE SHOLOM. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A Skop.
fantor Jacob Renzer.
MARGATE
|TH HILLEL CONGREGATION.
1640 Margate Blvd Conservative
labbi Joseph Berglas
IMPLE BETH AM. 6101 NW 9th St.
lonservative. Rabbi Dr. Solomon
feld.
CORAL SPRINGS
1PLE BETH ORR 2151 Riverside
Irive. Reform
ITER TIKVAH SYNAGOGUE,
?eets 8 p.m. Friday, Auditorium,
lank ol Coral Springs, 3300 Uni
ersity Dr Rabbi Leonard Zoll.
DEERFIELD BEACH
UPLE BETH ISRAEL at Century
11 age East. Conservative Rabbi
svid Berent. Cantor Joseph
piiack
BOCA RATON
^PLE BETH EL. 333 SW 4th
enue. Boca Raton. Raboi Merle S
oer.
HOLLYWOOD
Broward County
Library Notes
Here is a sampling of "no
charge" events, sponsored by the
Broward County Library System
at its various branches:
For those learning or wanting
to improve their bridge tech-
niques, Lester Rosenthal offers
workshops for intermediate
bridgers from 10 a.m. to noon
Friday, June 6. at Coral Springs,
9571 W. Sample Rd.; for begin-
ners: 7 to 9 p.m.. Thursday, June
19. Tamarac Library. 8601 W.
Mi-Nub Rd.: 10 a.m. to noon.
Friday, June 20, at Coral Springs
Library; 2 to 4 p.m., Thursday.
June 26. at Lauderhill. 1174 NW
42nd Way.
Thursday from 3 to 4 p.m. is
film dav at Lauderdale Lakes.
3521 NW 43rd Ave.: June 12.
Picasso; June 19. First Impact;
June 26, Charlie Chaplin in
Floorwalker, added musical
soundtrack.
Diane Berman; Corresponding
Secretary. Dorothy Sands.
Two qualified youngsters,
Michele Gordon and Cindy
Wilkins, participated in a first
Confirmation Service at Temple
Beth Orr, Erev Shavuot,
Tuesday, v May 20, in Coral
Springs.
Confirmation is a sacred
ceremony whereby young Jews
become confirmed in Judaism
and confirm their attachment to
their faith. It comes at the end of
a course of study in Religious
School which goes three years
beyond Bar or Bat Mitzvah.
It is customary to incorporate
the Confirmation Service as part
of the Shavuot holiday. This day
in Judaism is marked by a fes-
tival service which com-
memorates the anniversary of the
giving of the Ten Command-
ments on Mt. Sinai.
A revised curriculum for the
new semester starting in Septem-
ber has been announced for the
Temple Beth Orr Religious
School.
Barbara Fellner, director of
education, has reorganized the
Sunday School and the Hebrew
School in concert with her staff of
10 teachers.
Registration of grades K
through 3 Sunday classes and
grades 4 through 9 is currently in
progress. In addition to the
regular courses in Hebrew, Jew-
ish History. Israel. The Holo-
caust, Morals and Ethics,
Holidays and Current Events, a
Youth Activities Program
headed by a youth director is
being organized.
Enrollment applications are
available at the temple office
from 9 to 3 weekdays.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Dr. M. Issacson was elected
president of Temple Sholom,
Pom pa no Beach; Hyman Mintz
was elected president of the
Temple's Men's Club, and
Beatrice Weidenfeld was elected
president of the Temple's
Sisterhood.
Other officers of the
congregation serving with Dr.
Issacson are: Reuben Sperber,
Sam Buxbaum, Julian Sharlet.
vice presidents; Treasurer,
Joseph Shore; Financial
secretary, Alyce Arrick;
Recording secretary, Theodore
Cohen; Education, Arlene
Blumenthal.
Other officers of the Men's
Club are vice president, Frank
Welsh, Treasurer, Bruno
Loehner, Recording secretary.
Jack Sherrod.
Other officers of the Sisterhood
are Vice Presidents: Sylvia
Freed, Betty Selis. Ann Gilbert,
Bryna Freed; Treasurer. Mollie
Gresser; Financial secretary,
Helen Haas; Recording
secretary. Mildred Schwartz;
Corresponding secretary, Selma
Zager: Membership secretary.
Giselle Frankel.
Beach: David Schultz. son of Dr.
and Mrs. Gerald T. Schultz, will
be called to the Torah honoring
his Bar Mitzvah, Saturday June
7.
Jamie Tribble, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. K. Tribble, will be
honored on her Bat Mitzvah on
Friday night and Saturday
morning, June 13 and 14.
Jerry Salvage, son of Mrs.
Rosalyn Salvage and grandson of
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin
Figelman, will be called to the
Torah in honor of his Bar Mit-
zvah on Saturday, June 28.
Temple Beth Orr. Coral
Springs, has two B'nai Mitzoth,
10:30 a.m. Saturday. June 14.
Randee Horowitz and Barbie
Graduation of Temple Sholom
Religious School's students will
take place Friday, June 6.
following Shabbat services.
Film night at Fort Lauderdale,
1300 E. Sunrise Blvd., is Tues-
days at 7:30 p.m.. for people of all
ages- June 10. Scandinavians in
Lot! Vikings; June. 17 E/ Sal- TO IMi + Wit
vador and The Soviet Uruon. A |) flal lVlllZVOl
New Look. This branch also
offers discussions at the same
time on those Tuesday nights on
William Shakespeare's work.
Mrs. Alyce Douglas leads the
discussions.
Sunrise branch. 6600 Sunset
Strip, youngsters from 4 to 8
vears ot age are invited to a story
time from 3:30 to 4:15 p.m.. and
- suecial program that will in-
Frankel will be called to the
Torah.
'enniter Hirsh, daughter of
Frances and Richard Hirsh, will
celebrate her Bat Mitzvah on
Friday, June 6. at 8:15 p.m. at
Temple Kol Ami. Rabbi Sheldon
J. Harr will officiate. In honor of
this occasion. Mr. and Mrs. Hirsh
will sponsor the Oneg Shabbat
following services.
Saturday, June 7, at 10:15 a.m.
will mark the Bat Mitzvah of
Sheri Knight, daughter of Carol
and Jay Knight, at Temple Kol
Ami, Plantation. In their
daughter's honor. Mr. and Mrs.
Knight will co-sponsor the Oneg
Shabbat following Sabbath
Sen-ices on Friday, June 6.
Reconstruction^ Renamed
'Ramat Shalom'Synagogue
Adopting the name, Ramat
Shalom (Standard of Harmony),
the Reconstructionist Synagogue
in Plantation is looking forward
to a new year of continued
growth with a new ad-
ministration. Dr. Richard
Goldman, director of the Center
for Advancement of Education at
Gregory Feiss will become a
Bar Mitzvah at Havdallah
services 6:30 p.m. Saturday.
June 7. at Temple Emanu-El.
On Saturday, June 14. at 11
a.m., at Temple Emanu-El. 3245
W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Hope
Levy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Allan Levy, will be called to the
Torah to celebrate her Bat
Mitzvah.
Nova University, was elected
president of the congregation to
succeed Hank Pitt.
Serving with Dr. Goldman will
be M arlene Kunin, re-elected vice
president; Manny Steuerman,
secretary; Martin Goldman,
treasurer, and Rhea Studley, re-
elected financial secretary.
or
ed
se
th
v,
et
e,
>r
>r
is
tr
if
g
it
n
e
r
e
!
It
i l
th* good mm Is thai
- for YOU! It th* tny v
i men have stormed the Iranian Embassy the bed
m Beeld
Russia to Israel
With Love
Although she taught school for over
thirty years in Southern Russia, Asnat
Usupori never felt that her native Bukhara
was her home. "Now in Israel, I am
home," says this 63-year-old newcomer to
Israel. "No one can ever tell me to leave."
Asnat speaks Turkish, Bukharan, and
Russian, but the fluent Hebrew that her
children and grandchildren have acquired
is still her biggest challenge. "Luckily my
husband and I were able to find jobs at
Hameshakem where knowledge of
Hebrew wasn't so important," she says.
Largely funded by the Jewish Agency,
Hameshakem employs 7,000 of Israel's
elderly and handicapped throughout the
country. World Jewry, through the United
Israel Appeal Keren Hayesod, helps
w..Tr"^wi'l? ?hoca f,,n^S.idie_____*ip L.oae___


^2Lil
Tk* Jewish Flondian of Grtttr Fort Laudert&e
Friday, June 6.

He Carried a Torch
Sharp Increase
Soviet Anti-Semite's Career Anti-Semitism in Uruguay
Ends in Wife's Fiery Ashes
By GLENN RICHTER
The high flying career of
Dr. Valery Emelyanov. the
USSR's most notorious of-
ficial anti-Semite, has
crashlanded. In the twisted
remains he the burned
body of his murdered wife,
the pages of his Pales-
tinian-printed Nazi-like
book, and the protection
previously afforded him by
the highest reaches of the
Kremlin's hierarchy.
According to the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry and
Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews, Emelyanov had been
Nikita Khruschchev s Arabic
translator a generation ago. He
rose to bead the Arabic Depart-
ment of the Institute of Foreign
Languages, meanwhile becoming
a top lecturer in the Znanie
Society. Russia's militantly
atheist organization.
HIS CAREER waned tem-
porarily when one of his
virulently anti-Jewish speeches
reached the U.S. Congress and
was protested, but bounced back
as a political science instructor in
the same Institute.
The most extensive documen-
tation of Emelyanov's ravings, a
detailed memorandum to the
Presidium of the Supreme Soviet,
reached the West in early 1977.
In it, he asserted that Jews in
Russia constitute "fifth
column" to "undermine us from
within" and that "Zionist
penetration of the USSR is so
complete that snowflake
decorations in Soviet shop
windows have a Star of David
outline, as do loudspeaker grilles
in the Moscow subway and news-
paper crossword puzzles."
President Carter, French Com-
munist leader Georges Marchais
and even the official, token
Soviet Jew Aaron Vergalis are
Zionist agents or stooges. "It's
well known that the Zionists plan
to seize world power by the year
2000," he ranted to a Moscow
audience.
WITH THE help of Pales-
tinian friends, Emelyanov smug-
gled to Paris the manuscript of a
new book, De-Zionuation, in
which he asserts that Jews derive
from the "crossbreeding of
ancient dynasties of the pro-
fessional criminal world of the
black, yellow and white races."
The tome was printed there by
the Palestine Free Press. Emel-
yanov proudly sent copies to
Chairman Brezhnev, Defense
Minister Ustinov and other high
Soviet officials.
In late March, the SSSJ and
UCSJ said, Emelyanov was

interior Design
School
Willsey institute
(305)947-4590
Free Brochure
i
We do business
the right way.
1700W OaMw* Parti
Fl LimifH,fto.11
PhMW: m-UBt
1 A
O ,
lOAKl TOYOTAl
'omrry-l part oi iwu en-
Backed from the communist
Party not for his writing, but
for breaching Party discipline by
sending an unauthorized
manuscript abroad. His wife
began to nag him. A week later.
Emeryanov's anger exploded. He
murdered his wife, burned her
body and left it in a garbage
dump on the edge of Moscow.
After three davs. he was arrested
and placed in an institution for
the criminally insane.
Although Emelyanov has ap-
parently reached his end. the
stench of official anti-Semitism
ft ill pervades Russia. The Krem-
lin continues to elevate its many
proponents, rather than consign
them to the lunatic asylums in
which they properly belong.
Spurred by "Protocols'
Who *4d boycott?
Ths; A/gos
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Jewish community in Uruguay,
an estimated 45.000 among a
population of three million, is
concerned over a sharp increase
in anti-Semitism, the American
Jewish Committee reported here.
Attacks on synagogues.
Jewish organizations and Jewish
students have been growing in
number according to reports
reaching the AJCommittee, and
distribution of anti-Semitic
literature has become more
widespread.
BOOKS LIKE the notorious
Czar is t anti-Semitic forgery, The
Protocols of the Elders of Zion,
are available in editions coming
irom Spain and Mexico and
Argentina, too, though such
volumes are now forbidden in the
latter country* because of their
racist character.
In Montevideo. Uruguay's
capital, there is even a bookstand
that specializes in anti-Semitic
material.
The Jewish Central Committee
in Uruguay has gone to top-level
authorities to denounce this state
of affairs. There was a promise
from the Ministers of Justice and
of Foreign Affairs that a law
would be passed under which
propaganda inciting racial
discrimination would be severly
punished.
More than a year has elapsed
since that promise was made, but
no such law has yet been passed.
the AJCommittee reported.
SOME URUGUAYAN'
newspapers reported that the
government was not acting
because officials felt adoption of
such a law would implicit.-.
acknowledge the existence of
racial discrimination. This
brought a denial by Justin-
Minister Bayardo Bengoa, but nn
action on the law was forth-
coming.
The independent Uruguayan
press generally baa been sup-
portive of the Jewish community
position, according to the
AJCommittee.
4fe


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ERXHINTBG_SHHUTY INGEST_TIME 2013-06-28T22:04:01Z PACKAGE AA00014312_00163
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Friday. June 6, I960
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
l^o Mind I ill
Property is the Key lo Racial Peace
Continued from Page 4
equivalent terms about an equal
future.
Fanon saw the race riot as a
prescription for black emotional
health, and if whites did not see it
too, it is that they did not wish
to.
Now that the Miami riots are
over for the moment, those who
understood the true meaning of
race riots even before they began
anew regard with a sense of
anxiety the escalation of the riot
process. If blacks really want to
get well from the sickness of
.white indifference, who knows
what the limits of black violence
may be?
ALREADY, those who bur-
ned, killed and looted in Miami
are being called "guerrillas" in
the press, a term of warfare
giving sanction to what in fact
occurred, while still failing to
come to terms with what oc-
curred and what must be done
jointly with the black'community
if the war is to come to an end.
The word, "guerrilla," at its
worst gives sanction to terrorism
as a substitute for curing the
need for terrorism. It is almost as
if. suddenly understanding the
riot process, we can continue to
drag our heels to correct the
conditions giving rise to it.
Events, and our understanding
oi i hem. may have finally caught
up with the shapers of the events.
Fanon, though he is dead since
1962, is finally alive among us.
For the white-propertied, this
should strike no note of fear if
they are at last prepared to share
the opportunity to acquire
property with the black com-
munity A propertied black man
ii as disinclined to destroy
w h;ii he owns as anyone else.
My own concern is thai we
maj have gone beyond ihis
obvious ameliorative as an ef-
fective antidote to race riots and
social unrest generally. Perhaps
u might have worked in the
1960s.
PKRHAPS. if white men
moved to create genuine oppor-
tunity of equivalence in the
I960'a, there would have been no
black riot in Miami in 1980.
Hut the 1980 Miami riot, it
seems to me, is breeding another
sort of harvest. It is a harvest not
just of American proportions of
guerrilla activity, but of inter-
national proportions of terror and
revolution.
Into Miami the other week
strolled the Rev. Jesse Jackson
and Andrew Young, among other
black leaders, to still the Tires of
rage. But Jackson and Young are
| part of a much larger movement
than the "mere" Mack American
{movement for equivalence.
Jackson and Young are both
ieeply involved in international
revolutionary activities. This was
made eminently clear only last
year by their intimate par-
ticipation in the affairs of the
Palestinians, which goes far
beyond Israel to Jews them-
selves, Israeli and of other
nationalities. It includes the Irish
Republican Army, Italy's Red
Brigade, the terrifying heirs to
Japan's Zengakuren.
JESSE JACKSON is clear
about Jews. He is tired, he says,
of hearing about the Holocaust.
And Andrew Young's flirtation
with the PLO and Yasir Arafat
have already been sufficiently
well-documented to need no more
ON JUNE 9TH
JOIN US FOR
THE FESTIVITIES
1st Bank
OF BHOWAUD
CENTURY VILLAGE OFFICE
Deerfiekj Beach
Phone 426-4200
comment here.
One is therefore forced to
shudder that it is men such as
these who visited the black com-
munity the other week to help
still the fire of rage. Did they
speak to the black community as
black Americans or as inter-
national guerrillas?
An Associated Press report of
May 17 quotes Yasir Arafat in
Beirut on the Cuban influx into
Miami. There, in Beirut, Arafat
proclaimed unity with Fidel
Castro, vowing that his PLO
guerrillas would pledge them-
selves to fight alongside Castro
Cubans against the United
States.
"THE JOINT command of the
Lebanese-Palestinian forces is
! fully prepared to fight in defense
of Cuba and its people," said
Arafat. What, he declared, the
PLO is fighting, "is the struggle
against American imperialism
everywhere." It is a struggle, he
said, "which is indivisible."
White America, white western
Europe, still do not see Arafat for
what he truly is the deceptive
Marxist Castro of the Middle
East.
They are quite prepared to
dismiss his challenge as "simply"
against Judaism and Zionism
and to betray both as they have
done throughout history.
Why should black America see
through the deception anymore
clearly, including Jackson and
Young? That there are some
blacks, such as Roger Wilkins.
who has declared, "If Jesse
Jackson said he is tired of
hearing about the Holocaust,
then Jesse is an ass," does not
mitigate the fact that Jackson
and Young and the other black
leaders of their ilk are an ass.
That they are the vanguard of the
disaffected black community
today.
WHAT WE are left with is
ignorance on both sides of the
conflict, white and black, and
that is what I find so horrifying.
In 1980, American race riots are
infinitely more complex than
they were in the 1960's.
If the causes that enflame
them are not laid to rest soon, it
is not equivalence that dis-
affected blacks will be seeking,
but something else. Something
revolutionary that the Jacksons
and the Youngs are preaching
among them today.
INTRODUCING
NEWPRITIKIN
STONE GROUND
WHOLEWHEATBREAD.
THE BREAD
F0RALLREAS0NS.
OPENING
IN CENTURY
PLAZA
MmOr fO".
PRlTIKIN STONI
GROUND WHOLE
WHEAT BREAD truly is tin-
bread lor all reasons
Because you know what
you want and what you
don't want in your daily diet
Developed for use at the
Santa Monica Longevity
NO SUGAR
NO SHORTENING
NO ANIMAL FATS
NO MILK OR MILK PRODUCTS
NO CHOLESTEROL
NO ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS
NO ARTIFICIAL COLORS
NO ARTIFICIAL PRESERVATIVES
LOW IN SALT
ALL NATURAL FIBERS
ALL NATURAL CARBOHYDRATES
ALL CEREAL PROTEIN
Center. PRlTIKIN STONE
GROUND WHOLE
WHEAT BREAD is made
from a special formula using
onlv the most wholesome
ingredients PRlTIKIN
STONE GROUND WHOLE
WHEAT BREAD-truly the
bread for all reasons
Now in the freezer case.
fV
J


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 6| I9&J

Kahane's View of His Arrest
By MEIR KAHANE
They came at night. A knock
at the door. And then another.
There are four of them. One
flashed his card. Good evening,
Rabbi Kahane, we are from the
police. I regret to have to ask you
to come with us for a small
clarification. What is it about?
He smiles: I prefer to speak
about it at the station.
It is not new to me. Just the
previous week others had come
at midnight. I sat in prison for
a week and was suddenly
released. No charge. I assume
this is one more petty
harassment on the part of the
government. I take my prayer
shawl and phylacteries on the
reasonable charge that I will be
held overnight and tell my wife: I
will see you soon don't worry.
She will, but not too much she
has seen this many times before.
WE DRIVE in silence. The
streets of Jerusalem even
Jaffa Road, the main one are
not crowded, despite the fact that
?his is Yom Yerushalayim
Jerusalem Day. It is supposed to
be a joyous holiday marking
the 13th anniversary of the
liberation East Jerusalem during
the 1967 Six-Day War. It is not
very joyous because, despite all
the nonsensical orating on the
part of Mayor Teddy Kollek and
Begin, Jerusalem is nor a unified
city, but rather another Belfast,
divided into a Jewish city and an
Arab one, with the latter seething
with hate.
Last month, Kollek brought
over a number of mayors of U.S.
cities for a conference. The public
relations gimmick was that these

mayors presided over cities with
differing national and ethnic
groups and that Jerusalem was
similar to them. It followed, ergo,
that as Pittsburgh and Cin-
cinnati were one city in which
various groups co-existed, thus
would Arab and Jew dwell side-
by-side in Jerusalem.
Of course, the absurdity is self-
evident. In Pittsburgh, various
ethnic groups may struggle over
a greater share of the pie, but
they all agree that they are part
of the same pie. They all agree
that they are Americans, citizens
of the same state.
NOT SO IN Jerusalem, despite
all our foolish illusions and wish-
ful thinking. The Arab in East
Jerusalem is not an Israeli, does
not want to be an Israeli, hates
Israel, and looks forward to the
day of his "liberation," when all
Israel will become "Palestine."
It is for saying such self-
evident truths that I am being
arrested, and I muse ruefully
about the fact that even the
weather has turned bitterly cold
on this unsmiling holiday. A
sudden shift in the weather has
brought uncommon rain for the
middle of May, and the cold wind
seems to mirror the feeling in
Israel and the country drifts, as a
ship without a hand at the
rudder.
We arrive at the Russian
Compound, the main police
station. The officer in charge
jumps out. I wait patiently,
knowing the procedure. He will
return soon, and I will be taken
inside for questioning. As
always, I will greet the police
whom I know and smilingly
say: "I have nothing to say
concerning any questions." I will
be either released or held for 48
hours and brought before a
judge. This is the usual
procedure.
BUT NOT this time. Israel has
progressed. The officer returns.
In his hand he has some papers.
He gets in and turns to me. I
regret that I must do this in the
automobile, but I must read to
you the following. He proceeds to
read: "Under my authority as
Minister of Defense and under
the administrative detention
powers, I hereby order that Meir
ben Yechezkel Kahane be held in
Jerusalem and the Shata Prison
for a period of six months."
(signed) Ezer Weizman.
That is it. No trial, no judge,
no attorney, no charge, no op-
portunity to defend. It is the
Britain that Begin fought in the
name of Herut, freedom, returned
in the form of Begin. I think:
This is what the "one democracy
in the Middle East" has come to.
I remember the little blue and
white Jewish National Fund
pushka (charity box) I would put
a penny into each day as a child.
The dream was to build a Jewish
Berlin 1936; Moscow 198ff is the title of the Student
struggle for Soviet Jewry's new poster on the upcoming
Olympics of Oppression in the USSR. Many Jewish activists
are expected to be arrested for the duration of the Games to
bar them from Western contacts in Moscow.
State someday. I remember
the years I gave as a youth to
Begins Zionist youth movement,
Betar, and the final words of
martyred Jewish underground
soldiers going to the gallows
under "emergency" laws. I think
of how many speeches I have
made pleading for Jews to come
home home to Israel.
I REGRET NOTHING. The
dream remains and will be, long
after the neo-Hellenists and
gentilized Hebrews of today are
gone. Weizman is not Israel. He
represents all that is foreign and
un-Jewish in the land. He will
pass, but the dream will remain
and be fulfilled.
Two Groups Press
Arab Cause in U.S.
Continued from Page 4
ASFC urged, in effect.
At the time, Theodore Bickel
commented that the Quakers
would never have asked the
National Association For the
Advancement of Colored People
to bargain with the Ku Klux
Klan. a terrorist group anathema
to practically all Americans. Why
then call upon Israelis to dicker
with a band of brigands which
the United States itself has
pledged not to deal with until it
adheres to UN Security Council
Resolution 242 and 338?
In the early days of Quaker
action in America, the Friends
established a golden reputation
by working to abolish slavery in
this country. Is it too much to
recommend to the American
Friends Service Commitee to
follow that lead now? Saudi
Arabia alone has 250,000 slaves
within its borders? Why can't the
AFSC take a respite from its pro-
PLO and anti-Israeli activity and
get involved in the fight to end
Arab slavery?
Breyers yogurt is
not just all natural,
its all kosher, too.
**-<**** *

-

--T WT. 8 O?
all natur^
Yogurt
In fact, Breyers yogurt
h so kch# the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congrega-
tions puts its seal of approval
on every cup
And just waituntj you taste what's in
every cup. Because Breyers is the creamy smooth
full of fruit yogurt There's luscious strawberry,
raspberry, black cherry, peach and lots of other
favorite flavors And don't forget, it's made with
tiveyxjgartcu&uwjs.
Vbu can pick up all tile Breyers
yogurt flavors in the popular 8 oz.
size, and our plain yogurt is now
available in 16 oz. and 32 oz. containers,
fcach one is 100% natural with absolutely
nothing artifidal and absolutely no gelatin.
?k when you're shopping for yogurt, took for
toe name with a tradition since 1866. Look for
Breyers. In a word, it's Geshmak"
___
.W> Kraft, Inc