The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00161

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text

^Jewish Florid lam
Volume 9 Number 10
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, May 9.1980____________
Frtd Sfiochel
Price 35 Cents
Milton Keiner, 1980 UJA/Federation General Chairman
Announces Record Achievement for Campaign
Milton Keiner
"It is my great privilege to share with
you the happy news that the 1980 United
Jewish Appeal / Jewish Federation Cam-
paign has exceeded its goal and now stands
at $3,005,630, an increase of approximately
33 percent!
"A small army of people from all over
North Broward County gave immense
amounts of their time and tireless effort [to
say nothing of their generous con-
tributions] to achieve this remarkable
result.
"Some 13,000 donors were recorded,
setting a new record in North Broward for
giving in 1980.
"I give my special and particular thanks
to Vic Gruman, my co-chairman; to
Mitchie Libros and Gladys Daren and their
Women's Division, and to Leslie S. Gott-
lieb and his fine staff of professionals, all of
whom were part of a dedicated and un-
beatable team.
"If I could, I would list here, and thank
publicly and affectionately, each and every
worker, and each and every donor to the
1980 Campaign. They have re-affirmed my
faith in their devotion and their generosity,
and have lent true meaning to the words,
'We Are One.'
One last word before I sign off as chair-
man of the 1980 Campaign: THE CAM-
PAIGN IS NOT YET CLOSED, and won't
be until every outstanding pledge card has
been solicited and finally accounted for.
"If you still have a pledge card for 1980
to sign as a contributor, or to solicit, as a
worker, PLEASE DO IT NOW."
Milton Keiner
Federation's Annual
Meeting May 29
Leo Goodman, president of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, has invited presidents of
Jewish organizations in North Broward to join with
members of the Federation at the annual meeting to
be held at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 29, at Samuel
M. Soref Hall, Jewish Community Center Perlman
Campus. 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
The program for the evening, he noted, will be
interesting and highly informative. Included on the
agenda will be election of officers and board of
directors (See Nominations on Page 5 ), annual
reports, and the presentation of community and
UJA Campaign Awards.
In his invitation to the presidents, Goodman
wrote: "You are a key community leader. 1 sincerely
hope that you will be" present so that we might have
the benefit of your thoughts on how the Federation
can be made stronger and increasingly responsive to
the needs of the community. Refreshments will be
served." ________________________
Sm
East
\ditors Note: Little media
ftention was paid to the visit of
himon Peres, chairman of
srcwl's Labor Party, to the
i'hite House for talks with
f resident Carter. The meeting
his on April 24. But on "Black
hiday," April 25, the media was
umost totally concerned with the
Uilure of the attempted mission
rescue the hostages trapped in
U.S. Embassy in Teheran.
sraeli Prime Minister Menachem
fegin joined leaders of the free
lorld in expressing their regrets
f the failed mission.
Joseph Polakoff, the Washing-
on correspondent of the Jewish
'vlegraphic Agency IJTA), filed
his detailed report of Peres's day
Washington:
Shimon Peres, chairman of
srael's Labor Party, turned
(own suggestions that Presi-
ent Carter leans toward the
lews of President Anwar
adat of Egypt in the
autonomy negotiations with
Israel and said here that the
Presidents "main interest is
to maintain the momentum of
peace in the Middle East" and
seeking "a middle road" on
"full autonomy" for the West
Bunk and Gaza.
Peres, the first leader of an
Israeli opposition party ever
invited to the White House, met
with Carter privately for a half-
hour and later for an additional
15 minutes in company with Vice
President Walter Mondale, then
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance
and Israels Ambassador
Ephraim Evron.
WHEN HE emerged from the
White House, with Mondale
bidding him farewell, Peres was
asked if he thought Carter takes
sides with Sadat and against
Israel in view of his statements
that Jewish settlements on the
West Bank are illegal and an
obstacle to peace and his em-
phasis on "full autonomy" for the
Shimon Peres
Palestinians within the meaning
of what one reporter called "dic-
tionary" terms.
"I think the President is
sincerely interested in peace in
the Middle East," Peres
responded. "I think this is his
major consideration rather than
any particular solution. His main
interest is to maintain the mo-
mentum of peace in the Middle
East an area that is today
loaded with pressing and
dangerous issues. I am referring
to the Russian thrust, the future
of the Persian Gulf, the very
extreme religious streaks that
have emerged recently in some of
the countries."
Carter's Four Basic Points
Asked about Carter's views on
settlements and "full auton-
omy," Peres said. "The Begin
government all of us agree
with the Camp David language
on full autonomy. Autonomy is
less than independence and more
than the present situation. But
where exactly is the middle? It is
about this point that we are now
negotiating."
PERES WAS asked if Carter
is closer to Sadat than to Prime
Minister Menachem Begin on
autonomy. He replied, "If I
understood correctly what he
(Carter) told me, he is looking for
a middle wav between the two
positions." Peres said Carter
stated four "basic points." He
said these were a united
Jerusalem; no Palestinian state;
no negotiations with the Pales-
line Liberation Organization;
and keeping the "spirit" of the
Camp David agreements.
Asked by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency if he had any
indication of the views of Carter
or others on sovereignty over all
of Jerusalem, he answered, "no."
Favors Participation
By Jordan
The Israeli Labor Party leader
explained that "the majority" of
his party has "some differences"
with the Begin government about
the West Bank, "namely, that we
would like to see the Jordanians
coming in and partaking in the
negotiations on the Palestinian
issue and the West Bank so to
I Continued on Page 16
Jewish patients in Plantation General
Hospital are being offered a menu of Kosher
hot and cold entrees, thanks to the work of
Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz, director of the
| Chaplaincy Commission of the Jewish
j Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale. and
the inspired cooperation of the dietary staff
and the administration.
It's now being considered as the pilot
project for the other 149 hospitals around
the country and in foreign lands, including
Egypt, which are affiliates of the Hospital
I Corp. of America, as is Plantation.
A leaflet, titled "The Kosher Plate,"
I given to Jewish patients, notes that
Plantation's dietary staff understands
Kosher dietary restrictions, and lists such
hot entrees as beef goulash with noodles,
peas and carrots; chicken breast with
fettucini and green beans; filet of flounder
with lemon sauce, white rice, peas and
I carrots, and others, plus eggs "prepared in
[any way" the patient likes them; and cold
entrees and sandwiches such as chef's salad
bowl, tuna salad plate, gefilte fish platter,
I salmon salad sandwich, and soups, in-
cluding matzo ball soup.
Arranged
The leaflet notes that "this menu has
been prepared with the assistance and
approval" of Rabbi Schwartz who has
checked out all the other details of meal
servings for Jewish patients.
He gives full credit to Darlene Moppert,
director of the dietary staff, a registered
dietitian graduate of Barry College in
Miami Shores; Judy Otto, clinical dietitian
who is also a graduate of Barry College,
with approval of Plantation's
Administrator Al Quartin and "kosher
input" from Natalie Schanker, Plantation's
patient (Care) representative, a registed
nurse who previously served at Mt. Sinai
Hospital.
The question most frequently asked is :
"How can the hospital, without a Kosher
kitchen, provide hot Kosher meals?"
The answer belongs to the marvel of the
electronic age: microwave oven.
Rabbi Schwartz, in simplified terminol-
ogy, explains that the sealed packets are
heated by the microwave rays heating only
the food and that no hands, no utensils
touch the food until the patient unwraps the
tray of food.
KOSHER platter comes out of microwave oven as Natalie
Schanker, Judy Otto, Darlene Moppert demonstrate for Rabbi
Schwartz.
,iuiiij; ii tiiu.^,
MUN
*
11 ]- i


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
iwtC

SHANJUT:
\ Jo*ectTittK
far UjJrwMtRwpfa,
VmT\ H'tafU*.
...! \ll .|uilt FVonlr.Evvf vwfrere.
Please make or pay your pledge... do it now in time
to have an added mitzvah on Shavuot: May 21 and 22.
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale 1980 UJA
2999 NW 33rd Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311.
Thank You9Breakfast
For Margate-Quad City Group
Margate-Quad City's United
Jewish Appeal Executive
Committee, headed by Harry
Glugover and William Katzberg,
sponsored a "thank you" break-
fast last month for the key people
who helped make the 1980 UJA
campaign an oustanding success.
How successful was indicated
by Kenneth B. Bierman, cam-
paign director of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, who told the group
that a year ago the area raised
$60,000 compared to the total as
of April 24, with additional
Dr. and Mrs. Geld Honored
Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld, who
was ordained many years ago in
Breslau, Germany, preferred
teaching to being a pulpit rabbi
. until about 19 months ago,
when he was enjoying retirement
at Palm-Aire where he had
settled four years ago. A friend
implored him "just this once" to
be the rabbi at High Holy Days
services for Margate Jewish
Center. He accepted. And the
"just this once" developed into a
day or two a week, then three or
four days a week, now he's still
there serving a growing con-
gregation soon to have a new,
bigger synagogue.
And the congregation, now
Temple Beth Am of Margate JC,
and the community, responding
to that dedication, honored Dr.
Geld and his wife, Marion, at the
Margate community's United
Jewish Appeal Breakfast last
month. The Gelds are shown
receiving the UJA plaque pre-
sented by Harry Hirsch (left),
president of the Margate Jewish
Center. With them is Louis Feen,
chairman of Margate's United
Jewish Appeal, who thanked the
volunteers for their splendid
efforts in recording contribution
increases over last year's com-
mitment to the UJA of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
n
; College for Human Services Opens
The College for Human Ser- Colleges and
vices, Broward County's newest award an
contributions expected, of
$102,000.
William Katzberg, master of
ceremonies for the event, called
also on Paul Levine, Federation's
campaign associate, who thanked
all for their help and asked that
they continue their outstanding
work for next year.
Special commendation was
acknowledged by the committee
"with gratitude for the warm
cooperation of the Margate
Jewish Center and Temple Beth
Hillel, their officers and boards,
as well as the special and noted
efforts of Rabbi Dr. Solomon
Geld of Margate JC, and Rabbi
Joseph Berglasof Beth Hillel."
Co-Chairmen Glugover and
Katzberg had on their Executive
Committee Irving Resnikoff,
advisor; David Klempner,
publicity, and coordinators:
Flora Weller, Sarah Simonowitz,
Charles Charlip, Sam Lezell and
Jules Lustig.
They covered an area that
encompassed Aztec Mobile
homes, Holiday Springs,
Margate Village, Oakland Hills,
three phases of Oriole Gardens,
two phases of Oriole Gold and
Tennis Club. Oriole Villas, Palm
Springs 2, four sections of
Paradise Gardens, Royal Park
Gardens and Wynmoor Village.
In addition to those men-
tioned, honored at the breakfast
were: Maurice Berman, Allan
Caplan, David E. Brill, Louis
Davidson, Sol Dolleck, Mollie
Gioiosa, Morris Kirschbaum.
Jack Kirschbaum, Jack Magzen.
Charles Ostrow, Florence Posner,
Morris Posner, Charles Perlman.
Also, Louis Rosenberg,
Murray Saidman, Louis
Schneider, Max Shapiro, Irving
Tannenbaum, Abe Weiner,
Irving Weiner, Gretchen Winn,
Mildred Yaphe, Leo Zimmerman,
Meyer Zola.
Breakfast arrangements at the
Margate JC were made by Nan
and Ben Carp and Berte
Resnikoff.
Universities to
------, ...... ^,lt,j 0 iicncai> Associate of
institution of higher education, Professional Studies of Human
has opened its doors to its first Service degree, the Bachelor of
group of students at 4141 N. Professional Studies in Human
Andrews Ave. in Fort Lauder- degree, and a combined
dale. Bachelor's / Master's of
,. ., Professional Studies in Human
I he college has been Service degree,
acknowledged as being the new
f vanguard of the professional
rmovement in higher education T>*vl% XIJll^.1'^ TTT A
jand social services, according to DClll 1111161 S UJA
Audrey C. Cohen, founder and
EStt?sy*s- Presents 2 Awards
the Florida branch.
Congregation Beth Hillel of
Applications for the next class Margate honored two of its
m the fall are now being accepted members at the annual breakfast
from individuals who are em- sponsored by the Congregation's
ployed in the human service field. United Jewish Appeal of the
All of the campuses of the Jewish Federation of Greater
college have received ac- r"ort Lauderdale. Sol Silver and
creditation from the New York Charles Perlman were presented
Israel, elsewhere in the world
and in North Broward County
where the Federation allocates
UJA funds for the kosher
nutrition program providing
i .ooo hot meals weekly at
nutrition sites in the Federation
.. u^...v,.. iii tuc new ion ~ .*...*... xiv picociikcu building nnH mt
I State Board of Regents are are "*h wl by Murray Hauser, CoZnfnitv rJtL. Jewfh
; authorized to grant the Bachelor president of the congregation. S^SHL-Sft-SfC!! fr
of Professional Studies degree in David Bornman was the H^bJ^sS^TS^R
chairman of the 1980 UJA
committee. Together their efforts
made possible the most suc-
cessful finale of congregational
campaigns on behalf of Jews in
Miman Service.
In addition, the Florida
campus is licensed by the Florida
State Board of Independent
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Today, if Riverside service is becoming the
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there is a reason. Riverside people. They know Jewish
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iritfian of Greater Fort
fal'e

AIPAC's Views on Middle East Mayr Shaw Talks of Israel
A clear, concise and detailed
explanation of American foreign
policy, concerning the Middle
East, primarily, was lucidly pre-
sented by the research director of
the American Israel Public
Affaire Committee (AIPAC) last
week to an audience of more than
120 persons.
The speaker was Aaron D.
Rosenbaum who is also a con-
tributing editor qf Near East
Report, the weekly newsletter
^published by AIPAC. Following
.fljs afternoon talk, Rosenbaum
iitet that evening with the Young
Leadership Development group
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale to give
them an insight into the develop-
ments in the White House
Administration and Congress in
Washington, D.C., where AIPAC
is headquartered.
As he explained it at both
sessions, AIPAC is the only
Jewish organization officially
registered as a lobbyist with the
U.S. State Department. Staff
members meet regularly with
senators and representatives as
legislative matters of concern to
American Jews vis-a-vis Israel
are presented in Congress.
For many in both audiences, it
was a new experience to learn of
AIPAC's work, and, particularly,
with the perception of the issues
confronting the U.S. in regard to
Israel, and the dangers posed to
the nation by the situations in
Iran and Afghanistan. Rosen-
baum gave his audience a global
view of the U.S. foreign policy
being challenged with the present
administration seemingly un-
willing to challenge its ad-
~ *. rs;irifs.
Among the points made by
Rosenbaum during his talk and
his deft fielding of dozens of
questions from the audience:
The Soviet Union is a primary
threat to the West Nobody is
reading the real meaning of its
intentions ... In the Middle
East, the U.S. policy thrust
} appears to be based on securing
oil for itself and its allies, to keep
I^1*.,! relations with the Arabs,
and trying to keep Israel at a
distance.
The U.S. is refusing to see the
military potential of Israel. Israel,
can be of strategic value to
strengthen NATO Israel is
no longer the primary client:
Saudi Arabia is, getting F-lf>
planes from the U.S. ... A
Neville Chamberlain mentality is
developing ... U.S. must say
"we'll defend the Egypt-Israel
peace agreement" The talk of
a "comprehensive peace" be-
tween Israel and its other Arab
neighbors is just about im-
possible the pressure on
Lsrael is such that U.S. is moving
M.ard a Geneva meeting that
<>uId include the Soviet Union.
Florida's U.S. Senator Richard
Dick) Stone is one of the best
lends Israel has in Congress .
jther senators who deserve
tention include Frank Church of
da ho and Birch Bayh of Indiana
. Israel's interests are oriented
the West. Israel is the U.S.
-fc, the friend and the only
[democratic state in the Middle
East supportive of the U.S.
If the U.S. were to sell oil to
Israel which gave up its oil field
and its settlements in the Sinai
for the sake of peace, less than 18
hours worth of oil from the U.S.
would meet Israel's need ... If
U.S. relationship with Israel is
denigrated, its adversaries will
increase the pressure on U.S. .
For Israel to survive and thrive
in America's best interest, you
(the audience and friends) make
the difference; you are the hope
of the future.
In the question and answer
sessions. Rosenbaum clarified
many more issues, such as this
question: If Israel is destroyed,
w&eldn't the same problems
exist? Answer: Yes. Iran had no
contact with Israel, except to
double the price of oil and it's
MIDDLE EAST BRIEFING: Leslie S. Gottlieb, executive
director, Jewish Federation o[ Greater Fort Lauderdale; Aaron
D. Rosenbaum, AIPAC research director; Edmund Entin,
chairman, Community Relations Committee of Federation;
Alan Margolies, Federation's leadership development director.
nonsense, ignorance or lies for
anybody to say the lines at gas
stations are caused by Israel.
And one on "Israel's negative
image" in the media: no easy
solution, but by and large the
media has been "reasonably
good" to Israel's positions. And
another one concerning the
settlements: Certain ones are
necessary for security and
military value; others are there
because Jews have a right to live
there and then he repeated
the point that Israel gave up
settlements in the Sinai for the
sake of the Camp David accord
with Egypt.
AIPAC's National Conclave
The 21st annual Policy Con-
ference of AIPAC (American
Israel Public Affairs Committee)
opens Monday, May 12, at the
Washington Hilton Hotel,
Washington, D.C., at a time
when the foreign aid process will
be in high gear as Congress
tackles this and other issues vital
to Israel's security and well-
being.
Aaron D. Rosenbaum, AI-
PAC's research director, who
spoke last week at the meeting
arranged by Community
Relations Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, will be one of
the speakers at the opening
session. He will talk about recent
developments in the Middle East.
Other speakers during the two
days of sessions include Ephraim
Evron, Israel's Ambassador to
the United States; the former
Ambassador, Simcha Dinitz;
Lawrence Weinberg, president of
AIPAC, and the lobby organiza-
tion's executive director, Morris
J. Amitay.
The nationwide representation
of Jewish leaders will also get a
briefing at the State Department,
attend receptions for members of
the House of Representatives and
members of the Senate on Capitol
Hill. Appointments for par-
ticipants to meet with Represen-
tatives and Senators have been
arranged by AIPAC.
Now.
More Than Ever.
We Are One.
The author of Holocaust
returns with a fabulous
Jewish family saga.
With this powerful story of a
remarkable Jewish family.
Gerald Green returns to the
Brooklyn scene he depicted
so vividly in The Last Angry
Man.
Spanning the years 1910 to
1960, The Chains chronicles
the rise of the Chain family
from its immigrant founding
father Jake Chain, a wagon
driver who uses his cast-iron
fists to protect striking gar-
ment workers, to Jake's Ivy
League grandson, Martin,
who endows a magnificent
medical center. Alongside
the Chains in their time of
trouble is Dr. Samuel Abel-
man, that lovable cur-
mudgeon from The Lasl
Angry Man.
Peopled with strong char-
acters you care deeply about
and brilliantly recreating the
turbulent decades since the
turn of the century, The
Chains will hold you
enthralled from the very first
P8^ ,.
"Bursting with vitality,
vivid characters...a passion-
ate, violent story, streetwise
and rich in authentic detail,
a lesson in social history,
delivered from the barrel of
a gunand it grips at every
point."Publishers Weekly.
A Literary Guild Alternate
Selection.
THE CHAINS
A novel by Gerald Green
$ii.9A wherever hooks are sold
SEAVIEW BOOKS
Distributed by Harper & Row
"1 believe Jerusalem will stay
united, and I'm definitely op-
posed to recognition of the
Palestine Liberation
Organization (PLO)," stated E.
Clay Shaw, mayor of Fort
Lauderdale, who recently
returned from a trip to Israel.
Shaw gave his impressions to
Leslie Gottlieb, executive
director of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, of his
first visit to Israel as one of the
12 mayors of American cities
attending the International
Conference of Mayors in
Jerusalem, sponsored by the
American Jewish Congress and
the U.S. Conference of Mayors.
Mayor Teddy Kollek served as
host for the conference, which
examined in seminars and field
trips, the challenges to municipal
administrations inherent in
major cities with populations of
different races, religions, culture,
ethnic origin and language.
"I spent hours with Mayor
Kollek," Shaw said. "In private
conversations, he told me of a
plan to put libraries in housing
developments and tutors in
libraries, due to the overcrowded
conditions in many apartments
1 where as many as 10 children live
in a two-room apartment and
have no place to do their
homework."
Concerning the PLO, he
stated, "It has no legitimacy; it
is a self-imposed government in
exile. The tensions in the country
are heightened always by the fear
of war, and if Israel loses one war,
they've had it!"
Shaw believes the stated goals
of the Camp David accords are
almost impossible to achieve
concerning the West Bank
because Jordan is not included,
"but. the dialogue must continue
with the hope that King Hussein
will join it."
What impressed the mayoral
group, which included Mayor
Jane M. Byrne of Chicago and
the mayors of Pittsburgh,
Birmingham, Cincinnati, and
Cleveland, among others, was the
view afforded them of Jerusalem,
Israeli society, and a courageous
people who had somehow
managed to evolve a tranquil life
in the center of a volcano. They
were "awed by the massive
reconstruction efforts in the Old
City; the multitude of religions
flourishing in the land, and the
obvious freedom they enjoyed."
Yad Vashem, the shrine to the
Six Million Martyrs, touched
them "to the depths of their
souls."
Mayor Shaw said that "oil is
both a curse and a blessing. If it
were not for oil, nobody would
talked with the PLO."
Noting his announcement a
few days before.that he would
seek the Republican nomination
for the 12th District
Congressional seat, he offered
some views on the U.S. posture in
the months ahead. He believes
the federal government will fight
inflation by cutting back, tighten
expenditures, except for defense,
and seek new approaches, ad-
ding; "we must do more with
solar energy. In Israel, I saw
nearly every house with a solar
heating unit on its roof. The U.S.
must become more energy ef-
ficient."
The mayor concluded his
remarks by stating that he is
"looking forward to a return trip
to Israel."
It 11 mm HI HI gn 1 t
Itp -W|
N JfT^ 1*
JERUSALEM'S Mayor Teddy Kollek, Mrs. Shaw, Prime
Minister Begin, Mayor Shaw.
Take a Meaningful Trip
Travel with the
National Council of Jewish Women
For the new 1980 Brochure call
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Page 4
ti r _.
The Jewish Floridian-ofGreater FortLauderdale
Friday, May 9, 1980
Jewish Florxdiaxi
Busbies
UEANNB 8HOCHBT
Executive Editor
OF OR EAT ER FORT LAUDER DALE
em Office 118 S Federal Hwy.. SisUe **. DaiUjl, FU. SMM
Telephone MO-tOll
FRKDK.SHOCHET w*-
Editor and Publlaher C Tmt S*ochH
Tfce Newtek Ftartaton Doe* Not Ooaraatoe The
Of The MerrkaadlM- AavrrttMd la Its
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PoMlehed Bl Weekly
M.i!!"-1 *|ori*,an'" **** KM'Jewish Unify and the J.wi.h Weekly.
wLTn!Ly c JHegraphic Aoency. Seven Arti Feature Syoalcate.
BilS,t^*^*n$,r,"e,i """' "Hartal RtUCMHK, American Association of
MrVil.? KVSf*'and *** NH Asieciatlon.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) On*Year-is..H
NEAR
EAST
REPORT
Washington Utter on
American Policy in
the Middle East
April 16. I960
Volume XXIV. No. 16
Out of Town Upon Request.
Friday. May 9. 1980
Volume 9
23IYAR5740
Number 10

Cyrus Vance Resigns
The tragic misfiring of the U.S. effort to free our
hostages in Teheran now results in the resignation of
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance. It is no secret that
this is a victory for hardliner Zbigniew Brzezinski,
who is President Carter's National Security Adviser.
Whatever effort the Jewish community may
have made in the past to cozy up to Brzezinski, the
fact is that he is not a cozying-up type. What we can
now expect is not only a tougher stand against the
Soviet Union, with all the risks attendant to someone
in power sporting a short fuse.
We can also expect a harder line on the ad-
ministration's demand for more and more con-
cessions from Israel on the settlements and the
Palestinian autonomy question.
100 Years for ORT
In Russia the year was 1880, and a small group
of Jewish men met with the Czar to petition him to
allow them to open a school to teach Jewish boys a
skill so they might find jobs.
Now we are celebrating the 100th anniversary of
this Organization these men founded named ORT. In
the United States, over 140,000 women work to
support 100,000 students in schools all over the
world. Working alongside Women's American ORT
there is a group of men organized throughout the
United States, including South Florida, who support
the worldwide ORT vocational and technical
education program.
The year 1980 marks one century of ORT's
service as the vocational and technical education
program of the Jewish people.
Because of ORT, more than two million Jews
were given the modern skills that helped them
attain livelihood and often life itself. Because of
ORT, two million Jews were able to lift themselves
up from squalor and hopelessness to productive Ves
in the societies in which they lived.
Because of ORT, the State of Israel gained a top-
level, dynamic, innovative vocational and technical
education system that became the major force in
turning out desperately needed skilled workers for
Israel's burgeoning economy. Because of ORT, the
Jewish world and indeed the world of all mankind
was made a somewhat better and more human
place to live.
BBYO Spring Convention
Hillary Jackowitz of Planta-
tion was elected B'nai B'rith
Girls (BBG) president, and
Geoffrey Greener of North Miami
Beach was elected as boys Aleph
Zadik Aleph (AZA) president at
the annual spring convention of
Gold Coast Council B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization.
The event was held April 11-13
at the Holiday Inn, Plantation.
Past presidents, Rick Fisher of
Plantation and Ellen Periman of
Sunrise delivered their state of
the organization speeches.
Other officers elected were
Susan Samberg, programming
vice president from Hollywood;
Mindy Zweiban. membership
vice president from Sunrise;
Valerie Ross, secretary from
Davie; Craig Rappel, vice presi-
dent, programming from Plan-
tation; Neil Frieser, vice
president of membership from
Plantation; and Mike Sard, sec-
retary from Plantation.
A highlight of this year's
convention, coordinated by
Hillary Jackowitz and Larry
Casper of Sunrise, was an ad-
dress by Sen. Richard Stone.
Stone, a member of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee,
discussed the Middle East
situation.
The youth also participated in
discussion groups, a disco dance
and religious services prepared
for the weekend.
BBYO is open to all Jewish
youth in grades nine through 12
interested in meeting other
youths with a desire to become
involved in community service
and cultural events.
Interested youngsters entering
the ninth grade in the fall may
also call for information.
There are now over 1,049
BBYO members in the Dade and
Broward area, served by volun-
teer advisors and professional
staff. Steven M. Klein is Florida
Region BBYO director.
Editorial
Aiding the Abettor
Last week an Iraqi-sponsored
terrorist faction of the Palestine
Liberation Organization attacked
a nursery at an Israeli kibbutz,
leaving a two-year-old child and
two adults dead. But the Carter
administration, in spite of
legislation designed to limit
severely the sale of U.S. military
equipment to countries that aid
and abet terrorists, is apparently
bent on a sale that will sub-
stantially upgrade Iraq's naval
capability.
The proposed $ 11 million sale
involves eight engines designed
to power four navy frigates Iraq
is buying from Italy. Despite its
strong army. Iraq currently has
no frigates and is not capable of
exerting much control in the
Persian Gulf. The frigates would
give it that control. (Ironically,
the administration has supported
its massive arms sales to Saudi
Arabia with the argument that
the Saudis are threatened by
Iraq).
On Jan. 23. the Commerce
Department approved the export
licenses required for the sale of
the U.S.-made engines. Rep.
Millicent Fenwick (R-N.J.)
immediately protested that
Commerce had violated an
amendment she had written to
the Export Administration Act
of 1979 requiring the ad-
ministration to notify Congress
before approving sales of major
equipment with potential
military use to countries that
support acts of international
terrorism.
State Department has
The
always been overly cautious
about labeling countries as aiders
of terrorism, violators of human
rights or perpetrators of other
crimes. It even denies that it
keeps "lists,'' as such, of
violators. But whenever members
of Congress have requested the
identification of countries that
aid and abet terrorism, State has
responded with what Congress
regards as a clear list of three or
four countries. The size of the list
indicates it is very difficult to
qualify.
After the protest from Fen-
wick, who was joined by Rep.
Jonathan Bingham (DN.Y.I. the
administration agreed to review
the decision to approve the Iraqi
sale. Government officials were
quoted last week as saying
Secretary of State Vance had
approved the export of the
engines just before Iraq's Arab
Liberation Army struck at
Kibbutz Misgav Am in Israel.
Another protest from Fenwick
and Bingham prompted the
White House to place the sale
under review once again.
The danger that concerns
many people is that the ad-
ministration will wait until the
outcry over the latest terrorist
attack has subsided and. once
again, approve the sale of engines
for Iraq's frigates. Because of
Iraq's feud with Iran, not to
mention its oil, the ad-
ministration may see short-term
benefits in doing a good turn for
Baghdad. But doing so would
require not only overlooking
Iraq's history of aid to terrorists
but also its deep antipathy for
the U.S. Iraq broke relations with
the United States in 1967 and has
never agreed to renew official
ties.
If the administration would
like to see Iraq attack Iran, the
Iraqis, with all their Soviet
weaponry, are already capable of
doing just that. But the United
States has no business or interest
in improving Iraq militarily. The
export licenses for Iraq's frigate
engines should be revoked.
A Footnote g
Few people have ever seriously
doubted that the Arabs' anti-
Israel boycott was also anti-
Jewish. Now, according to a
report in The Times of London,
Iraq has apparently decided to
drop even the pretense. The
limes' Helsinki correspondent
reported recently that the Iraqi
embassy there now queries
corporations doing business with
Iraq as to whether any of its
board of directors or subdivision
managers "is Zionist or a Jew."
The Anti-Defamation
League's Society of Fellows
honored Gov. Bob Graham
(right) with the Florida Thou-
sand Distinguished Public
Service Award at a dinner-
dance last month at the Diplo-
mat Hotel in Hollywood.
Chairman Allan B. Margolis.
left, made the presentation.
RARE JEWISH FAC1
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Who picked up the telephone
before Alexander Graham Bell did?
A: Johann Philipp Reis.
Reis is listed in THE BOOK OF FIRSTS as
number one to publicly demonstrate the
telephone. He did this in front of a group of
scientists in 1861fifteen years before Bell got
a patent. Because of illness and a lack of funds.
Reis was unable to capitalize on his invention.
Bell knew of his work as did Edison who even
toyed with Reis' ideas. On March 22. 1876.
twelve days after Bell's first intelligible speech
transmission, the NEW YORK TIMES ran an
editorial entitled The Telephone". The editorial
was all about Philipp Reis. Not one word about
Bell. Even the U.S. Government brought suit
against Bell for: "claiming the invention of
something already widely known to exist in the
form of the Reis telephone' and also with
somehow concealing the latter from the Patent
Office's expert examiner in that field'.' Bell, of
course, survived the lawsuits and the challenges
but physicists built a monument to Reis as the
inventor of the telephone. (Better he should
have won the lawsuits.)
A NOT-SO-RARE FACT...
A big part of Jewish warmth and affection
is to open the house' when mishpocha.
guests or friends drop in. Out comes the
fine food and. invariably, J&B Rare
Scotch. And why not?-J&B is a clean,
light scotch with the superb taste that fits
right in with the tradition of serving the
best. And because of its great taste,
J&B commands a high level of elegance
at home or at your most important
simchas.
And that's a fact!
RARE
SCOTCH


>-<>' '/
Friday, May 9,1980
,v.-(-
,. I*V
.
The Jewish Fioridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
Palm-Aire Women's Pledges Top Goal Myrtle Wreath Awarded
The pledges and contributions
that were made at Palm-Aire on
Monday, April 21, the actual
Yom Ha'atzmaut (Day of
Independence), marking Israel's
32nd anniversary of its
Declaration of Independence on
the fifth day of Iyar, pushed the
continuing 1980 United Jewish
Appeal campaign over the
$3,000,000 mark.
More than 300 women had
gathered for Palm Aire Women's
UJA meeting, lunch, fashion
show and cards at the Spa's
Convention Center. Clara Kissel
and Betty Katz, co-chaired the
hard-working committee that
produced the turnout.
Gladys Daren, newly-installed
president of the Women's
Division of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale. and
Ethel Waldman, newly-installed
executive vice president-
campaign chairman for the
AT PALM-AIRE: Gladys Daren, Clara Kissel, Betty Katz,
Ethel Waldman.
Division's 1981 campaign, ap-
plauded and commended the
enthusiasm of the committee and
those in attendance.
The speaker was Abraham J.
Gittelson, education director of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, who noted that
the day was "most meaningful
and significant" marking the 32
years of Israel's statehood.
Palm-Aire Aides:
Lorraine Fine. Margo Rein.
The first Myrtle Wreath award
by Hadassah in North Broward
was presented last week to Jim
Dwight Davis, religion editor of
The Fort Lauderdale News, for
his reporting of news of the
Jewish community.
The presentation at the Crystal
Lago in Pompano by Esther
Cannon, president of the Florida
Mid-Coast Region of Hadassah,
was attended by 613 life mem-
bers, some of whom were third
and fourth generations, and men
associates.
Tamar Eldar of Haifa, a staff
member of the Israeli Embassy in
Washington, gave the audience,
which filled the room to capacity,
an overview of life in Israel in the
first year of peace between the
nation and one of its Arab neigh-
bors, Egypt, and the outlook as
Israel celebrated its 32nd an-
niversary of independence last
month.
Adele Lewis, chairman of the
Myrtle Wreath luncheon, intro-
duced Martin Rosen for the
invocation, and Lillian Baker, co-
chairperson of Ufe members. Mrs.
Baker's talk resulted in enrolling
additional life members when two
of those present added their
grandchildren to the rolls.
T v
Edmund Muskie, 66-year-old senator from Maine, was
named by President Carter on Tuesday to succeed Cyrus
Vance as Secretary of State. In announcing the choice.
Carter cited Muskie's long Senate tenure and his "inter-
national reputation." Muskie has been in the Senate for 21
years, for one-third of that time on the Foreign Relations
Committee.
though, he added: It's sad to
comtemplate that support for
Israel, around the world, in-
cluding the U.S., is eroding .
Jews are becoming an en-
dangered species.''
He called for support for the
humanitarian needs funded by
UJA Federation in North
Broward County, including the
1,500 meals weekly in the kosher
nutrition program for elderly
men and women, many of whom
are "lonelv and isolated looking
for the human touch of Jewish
fellowship."
So moved was the audience by
his remarks, that Betty Katz,
presiding, said: "We should have
a moment of silence." Then came
the contributions and pledges in
record amounts, followed by the
motzi (blessing before meal)
delivered by Margo Rein, and the
fashion show, coordinated by
Lorraine Fine, and modeled by 30
Palm-Air eans.
=*,
*X
If all we enjoyed was a perfect Passover.
DAYLNU!
We express our heartfelt thanks to all of you who
made it so memorable.
From the far comers of the earth you came to celebrate
with us. From Europe and Australia. Canada, Mexico,
and South America, the Near and Far East indeed
from Jacksonville to Jerusalem, you made the Concord
your home for the holiday.
Adding richness, depth and warmth to our Festival.
To all who performed in our spiritual program: our
superb entertainers and speakers, the many stars of
the theater and cultural worlds, to all of you. our
deepest gratitude.
Not for just making this Passover such a glowing
experience, but for reminding us once again of the
diversity, strength, and unconquerable spirit of a great
people celebrating a glorious tradition.
CONCORD
HOTEL i
Kiamesha Lake New York 12751 OT^/
ttV
111
Nominees Slated for Election
At Federation's Annual Meeting
\ Milton Keiner. general chairman of the successful 1980
United Jewish Appeal of the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, and executive vice president of the
Federation, was nominated for the presidency to succeed
Leo Goodman.
The nominating committee, headed by Charles Locke,
proposed the slate of officers and board members to be
elected at the Federation's annual meeting at 7:30 p.m.,
May 29. in Soref Hall. Jewish Community Center. 6501 W.
Sunrise Blvd.
Pursuant to the by-laws of the Federation, the nominating
committee, which included Past President Jacob Brodzki.
Women's Division newly-elected president Gladys Daren,
I'.tlmunil Entin, Joel Reinstein and John Streng, will
present the slate of nominees of "at least one person for
each vacancy to be filled" to the general membership. In
accord with the by-laws, the following slate is being made
available to the membership of the Federation by ap-
propriate publicity (in this issue of The Jewish Floridian)
"at least 15 days prior to the annual meeting. Additional
nominations for any director may be made by the filing of
a petition containing the signatures of 25 members of the
Federation."
PRESIDENT: Milton Keiner.
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT: Victor Gruman.
VICE PRESIDENTS: Richard Romanoff. Saul Wein-
berger, Joel Reinstein.
SECRETARY: Joel Levitt
TREASURER: John Streng
Board of Directors, Two Year Terms:
Irving Friedman
Morris Furman
Seymour Gerson
Alven S. Ghertner
Alfred Golden
David Jackowitz
Joseph Kaplan
William Katzberg
Florence K. Straus
Martin Kurtz
David Miller
Samuel K. Miller
Joseph Novick
Jack Nudelman
Anita Perlman
Israel Resnikoff
Albert Segal
Board of Directors, One Year Term:
Leonard Gluck
Alan Levy
I
Light tlje candle
and remember?
Menorah Chapels, to preserve
the traditions of our faith,
wishes to offer a gift of re-
membrance. A Yahrzeit
Calendar in the name of the
departed and a Yearly Re-
minder of the Yahrzeit
observance date. A part of
our religious life, now and
through the ages.
CALL OR WRITE FOR YOUR
YAHRZEIT CALENDAR AT:
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33313
7426000
In Dade, call 861-7301
In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME, DATE AND TIME OF
DEATH OF THE DEPARTED
KlMCHINCAUMMOS INC
Htm *'-
SI NI ISK SCMlOJMI C SOI OMON
MIMOKKkl CHKl5
Bono"
" MK>ll CMHIS
And serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
Chapels also in Deerfield Beach and Margate
The oldest Jewish-owned chapels in Broward County.



Pge6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale

Friday, May 9, 1980
New Approach to Bible Study Teacher's Sessions
A seminar for the religious
school teachers of North Broward
focusing on the study of Bible,
utilizing the methodology and
materials of the Melton Research
Center was held last week at the
Reconstructionist Synagogue
under the auspices of Central
Agency for Jewish Education
(CAJE) of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Ruth Zielenziger, faculty
member of the Melton Research
Center and instructor at the
Teachers Institute of the Jewish
Theological Seminary focused on
the opening chapters of the book
of Genesis. With the teachers,
she engaged in searching analysis
of the text of the Bible,
specifically as religious document
concerned with the basic
uestkras oi man's relationship
to God, to the world and to his
fellow man.
The Melton Research Center,
endowed by the late philan-
thropist, Samuel Melton of
Columbus. Ohio, has pioneered
during the last two decades in
developing materials, first in the
area of Bible, and now in Hebrew,
Jewish history and the Jewish
holidays, that challenge the
students of the Jewish schools to
intellectually relate to the classic
texts of Jewish life so as to ex-
tract the moral values contained
therin and formulate for
themselves a committed Jewish
lifestyle.
Temple Beth Israel of Sunrise,
under the direction of its school
principal, Stanley Cohen, has
instituted the Melton Hebrew
program into its curriculum.
In attendance at the two-day
seminar were teachers from the
Reconstructionist Synagogue,
Temple Beth Israel, Temple
Emanu-El, and Hebrew Day
School of Fort Lauderdale; Hillel
Community Day School of North
Miami Beach, Temple Sinai of
Hollywood, B'nai Torah of Boca
Raton, and Beth David
Congregation of Miami. The
seminar was coordinated by
Abraham J. Gittelson, director of
education of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
On 5 Bible's Scrolls
Schools Seek Teacher's
Qualified individuals with
background in education and
Judaic studies are urged to
contact Abraham J. Gittelson,
director of education of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. in regard to
positions in early childhood.
Sunday School, Afternoon
Hebrew School, Judaica High
School and adult Jewish
education for the schools of the
North Broward area.
"The continuing growth of the
Jewish community of Greater
Fort Lauderdale has resulted in a
growing need for teenagers on all
levels of Jewish education,"
Gittelson said. "The Jewish
Broward Library Notes
The Broward County Library
System offers the following
programs to the public, free of
charge:
Golf Clinic: Conducted by
Aaron Guzy, 2 p.m., Tuesday,
May 13, at the Tamarac Branch
Library. 8601 W. McNab Rd.
Collectibles: Anne Gilbert,
nationally syndicated newspaper
columnist, author and TV per-
sonality, speaks on "the art of
collecting," 7:30 8:30 p.m..
Wednesday, May 14, at Coral
Springs Branch Library, 9571 W.
Sample Rd.
Al-Anon: Panel discussion by
Broward Al-Anon Groups on
alcoholism will be presented 7:30
- 8:30 p.m., at Fort Lauderdale
Branch Library, 1300 E. Sunrise
Blvd. Anyone 15 years or older
who needs help in coping with an
alcoholic family member will find
help here.
Small Business Conference:
Also at the Fort Lauderdale
Branch Library, an all-day
conference from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., conducted by Joseph
Trovato and sponsored by the
Library System. Miami office of
Small Business Administration
and SCORE (Senior Corps of
Retired Executives), covering
forms of organization, financial
records, taxes, breakeven point,
business insurance, credit,
collections, and other relevant
topics. Advance reservations
required. Call the Library.
Broward Harmonic Group:
Entertains at 7:30 p.m., Thurs-
day, May 15, at Tamarac
Branch Library, 8601 W. McNab
Rd. Eight harmonic players and a
singer, all retired musicians in
Tamarac or Margate, are directed
by Chuck Levenson.
$25 Contribution Required
To Receive 'The Floridian'
The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale has raised the
minimum contribution to the 1980 United Jewish Appeal for those
who wish to receive The Jewish Floridian the newspaper
published every two weeks with national, international, and local
news of interest to residents in the Jewish community of North
Broward County. The new minimum is $25.
In the seven years that the Jewish Federation has been involved
in the publication of the Greater Fort Lauderdale edition, the costs
for postage, typesetting, printing, newsprint, and maintaining ac-
curate mailing addresses have all risen dramatically. The Jewish
Federation can no longer absorb these costs and your under
standing of the necessity for this action is sincerely appreciated
Even with this increase with a goodly portion of that minimum
commitment going to aid Jews around the world The Jewish
Floridian is available for one of the lowest subscription rates among
English-language Jewish newspapers.
Greater Fort Lauderdale
Edition of
"Jewish Floridian
is providfl at a public Mfvic* to the Jewish communities in Norm Biowaid County by Iht
Jewish Federation of
2999 N.W. 33rd Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale 33311
Greater Fort Lauderdale
Phone
305/484 8200
Leo Goodman ~^m^^~ Leslie S. Gottlieb
President Exet-ui/.ti/ncu^i
Milton Keiner
Executive Vice President
Victor Gruman I Richard Romanoff
vice rmsiuent ISecretary
Joel Reinstein I Joel Levitt
Vice President I Treasurer
John Strong I Mrs Bernard Libros
Vice President | Women s Division President
P,g, four ),,oml columns ol tHE JEWISH FLOhiDi*H upreu le opm.on o> mr FWAftMM '
oS:;~^s^
teacher is the key element in the
transmission of the Jewish
heritage to the next generation,
and those who have had ex-
perience in teaching in Jewish
schools are urged to join in the
sacred task of Jewish education."
Phyllis Chudnow. chairperson
of the Committeeof Jewish
Education of the Federation,
stressed that "no longer is
Jewish education confined to the
childhood years up to Bar or Bat
Mitzvah. Today it is more
evident than ever before that
high school and adult Jewish
education are vital necessities for
a quality Jewish community, and
teachers for those age levels are
more important than ever."
In addition to those teachers
who hold certification in Jewish
studies, the Central Agency for
Jewish Education (CAJE)
provides courses, workshops and
seminars for teacher professional
growth, as well as a licensing
program for early childhood and
day and afternoon Hebrew
teachers that is part of the
National Board of License of the
American Association for Jewish
Education.
Accordingly, individuals who
have completed studies in
education but have limited
Judaic background, or those who
are widely knowledgeable in
Jewish subjects but have no
teaching experience, may contact
CAJE at the Jewish Federation
to determine how they may
enhance their own knowledge so
as to qualify to teach in the
schools of the area.
"CAJE has been able to
establish a Teacher Fringe
Benefit Program in the Greater
Miami area for the teachers of the
Jewish schools," said Gene
Greenzweig, CAJE executive
director. "It hopes to institute
the beginnings of such a program
in North Broward as well."
Persons interested in applying
are asked to call the CAJE office
at the Federation office, 2999 NW
33rd Ave., Fort Lauderdale.
A study of the books of the
Bible known as "The Five
Scrolls," is being conducted for
the teachers of the Jewish schools
of North Broward every Tuesday
afternoon during the month of
May by Rabbi David Lehrfield,
under the auspices of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
(CAJE) for the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
Rabbi Lehrfield, who is the
spiritual leader of Congregation
Knesset Israel of Miami Beach,
has served as an instructor in the
Institute of Jewish Studies of
CAJE for more than a decade,
and is also adjunct professor in
Judaic Studies at Florida
International University. Known
throughout the Greater Miami
area as a master teacher and a
Judaica scholar. Rabbi Lehrfield
provides a challenging in-depth
analysis of the Biblical text
through a vast knowledge of
traditional sources and modem
thought.
The course, which is held from
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at Temple
Beth Israel 7100 Oakland Park
Blvd., each Tuesday during May,
is part of the on-going
professional growth programs
arranged for the teachers in the
day and afternoon schools of the
North Broward area.
Phyllis Chudnow, chairperson
of the Committee on Education of
the Jewish Federation noted that
"the teacher is the core of the
educational process and
professional growth seminars,
courses and workshops are vital
to the enhancement of the
teacher's competencies and
abilities in the classroom. The in-
service programs of CAJE for our
teachers have been a major
benefit in affecting the quality of
education in our community."
The Five Scrolls, which from
the subject matter of the course,
are short books of the last section
of the Bible, the Holy Writings,
each of which is read in the
synagogue service on a separate
holiday of the Jewish year. Major
concentration of the first session
on May 6, was on Book of Ruth,
and that concentration continues
on May 13. The Book of Ruth is
recited on the holiday of Shavuot
which begins at sundown
Tuesday, May 20, and continues"
for two days.
An entire session will be
devoted to the Scroll of
Lamentations read on the fast
day of Tisha B'Av (July 22 this
year) which commemorates the
destruction of both of the
Temples in Jerusalem, in the
years 586 Before the Common
Era (BCE) and 70 Common Era
(CE). In addition, according to
Abraham J. Gittelson, education
director of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale. one
session will serve as an overview
of the contents of all of the five
Scrolls, including the most well
known of all, the Scroll of Esther
which is read on Purim.
Learn to Tutor
A Workshop to train volunteer
reading tutors will be held at
First Lutheran Church. 441 NE
3rd Ave., Fort Lauderdale. on
May 14-17. Participants will be
taught to teach adults to read
and write. Everyone is welcome
Write "Learn to Read Volunteers
of Miami." P.O. Box 69-0001..
Miami. FL 33169.
We'll Make The World Kosher
For You.
Gesher
32 Kosher
Tours
For information and brochures call any travel agent.



Friday. May 9, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
A > V
JCC
I JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of Greater Ft. Lauderdale
"Gathering Place"
The Jewish Community
Center's "Gathering Place" is a
program of care for the frail
elderly. Twenty seniors, aged 79
through 93, come together daily
for a full day of activities such as
music, therapy, mild exercise,
crafts, discussions and games.
The participants in this program
handcrafted many items for sale
recently and successfully raised
the necessary funds to subsidize
a "day out." Plans have been
finalized for an excursion on the
Jungle Queen on Wednesday,
May 14.
Philosopher May 13
JCC will present "Random
Aspects of Jewish Thought," by
Jewish philosopher Ben-Zion
Eisenberg, Tuesday, May 13, at
11:30 a.m. Guests are asked to
bring their own lunch (dairy
please) to this "learn while you
eat" session. JCC will supply the
beverage. Call the Center for
further information.
Maccabiah Prize Winners
The Israeli Independence Day
Maccabiah Olympic Games
attracted over 350 participants
from six area synagogues,
Temple Kol-Ami, Temple Beth
Israel, Temple Emanu-El, Recon-
structionist Synagogue, Temple
Beth Orr, Tamarac Jewish
Center; and also from the He-
brew Day School and JCC.
Awards were given for first,
second and third place in each
activity, and a team trophy went
to the team with the most total
points. This year's team
championship trophy was won by
Temple Kol-Ami.
Individual winners in the
various age categories were as
follows:
Five and Six Year Old
10 Yard Ihmh: 1st. Brian Kahn,
KmanuKI. L'nil. Michael <;<>oodman,
Ui'th on. :ini, Wendy Nemarofaky,
Kmi.iiiu Kl. Running Broad Jump: 1st.
[odd rlelmowltx, Kol-Ami, 2nd, Curtii
Ituaaell, Emanu-El, 3rd. Kllen
MiMi.-iklsky. Hebrew I>ay School.
Wheel Barrel: lit, John Wcstonof Beth
Israel and Matan Orellch of Kol-Ami;
2nd. Michael Coodman, Alan Dobkin.
both hi U-tli Orr. 3rd. Curtis Russell.
David Schneider, both of KmanuKI
Thm l.i-KRi-d Kare: 1st. Jon Weston of
I nth Israel and Matin Orellch of Kol
\iin. jiiii,w.'ii(iy\ of EmanU'
Kl. Ulld Kliz.i ilrowii of Kul Ami 3rd,
I.....mil Billy CoWlfarbof Knianu Kl
Seven Through Nine
: Yard l>ash: 1st. Andrew Feinberg.
Kol \iiii, 2nd. Slavey (Joodman. Beth
on. 3rd. Michael Yablonskl. Kol Ami
Running Broad Jump: 1st. Michael
VuMoiukl, Kul Ami. 2nd. Mike Shorr.
Il.lh Israel. 3rd.Andrew Feinberg. Kol-
Vini Wheel Barrel: 1st. Brian Perlman
Hi KmanuKI and Mike Shorr of Beth
l-i.i,l. 2nd. Jennifer Slatfeld and
Sherry Nemernfiy of KmanuKI. 3rd
Michael Yablonski and Harry l-angarof
Kul Ami Three lagged Race: 1st.
I'liidy and Bari Turhman of Heth Israel;
2nd. Nicole Feldman and Morlsa
siiiu-iman of Keconstructlonlst; 3rd.
II..i Klein ni Hebrew Day school and
lush WcllikoffofKol Ami
10 Through 12
40 Yard llash: 1st, Sta<-ey Meyerson.
Kul Ami. 2nd. David C.rad. JCC. 3rd.
1 tt .-ill lioldman. Keconstructlonlst.
Ilroad Jump: 1st. David Urad. JCC.
2nd, Scolt Marko. Kol Ami, 3rd. Robbie
Cohen, Keconstructlonlst. Three
lagged Race: 1st. Daniel Fellner and
Jeffrey lierman of Beth Orr; 2nd. Susan
Cluidiiow and Michelle Cohen of Recon-
slmcliunist; aid, Debbie /.elman and
Lisa Fishman of Reconstructionlsl.
Wheel Barrel: 1st. Jon Cross and Brent
lioldinan of Reconstruct nuust. 2nd,
Mai la Kirschbaum and Cralg Lane of
l!.i uiistruitionlst; 3rd, Robert Fellner
and Adam Uoodman of Beth Orr.
13 To 15
Si Yard Daah: 1st. Andy Cohen.
Id-constriK tionist. 2nd, Marc Porls.
Tamarac Jewish Center, 3rd. John
Cohen, Tamarac Jewish Center. Three
Legged Race: 1st. Andy Cohen and
Brian Kraus. Reconstructionlsl. 2nd.
Man I'oils and Jon Cohen of Tamarac
Jewish Center; 3rd. Amanda and Carrie
Bruner of Reconstructions. Broad
Jump: 1st. Andy Cohen, Reconstruc-
tionlsl. 2nd. Marisa Kansky. Tamarac
Jewish Center. 3rd. Marc Ports.
Tamarac Jewish Center. Wheel Barrel
Race: 1st. Marc Ports and Jon Cohen of
Tamarac Jewish Center; 2nd. Andy
Cohen and Brian Kraus of Reconstruc-
lionist. 3rd. Amanda and Carrie Bruner
uf Reconstructions!.
I Visit Artist's Studio
Julian Feingold, artist, and a
man committed to working with
and for the Jewish Community
Center, has invited Center
members to his studio on Thurs-
day, May 15, at 2:30 p.m. to view
his paintings and to learn more
about art. His wife, Ada, will
host the occasion with wine and
cheese. Call the Center for further
information.
Seder in Egypt
Sunday, May 18, at 10 a.m. at
Sunday breakfast discussion,
guest speaker will be Dr. Leon
Fellman, of Omaha, Neb. He will
recount his experience as a
delegate from the State of Israel
Bonds Office at the first Seder
held in Egypt. Tickets for the
breakfast of bagel, cream cheese
and coffee must be purchased in
advance at JCC.
Jewish Book Reviews
JCC announces a Great Jewish
Book Review Series with out-
standing members of the com-
munity reviewing the best of
Jewish literature. The month of
May will feature Rabbi Albert B.
Schwartz, director of Chaplaincy
Commission of the Jewish Fed-
eration, who will discuss the
"Book of Ruth" on Wednesday,
May 7, at 8 p.m.
On Wednesday, May 14, at 8
p.m., Helene Gold win will review
How We Lived, a documentary
history of immigrant Jews in
America 1880-1930, by Irving
Home and Kenneth Libo.
Abraham Gittelson, director of
education for Jewish Federation,
has chosen Selected Stories by
Isaac Bashevis Singer for
Wednesday, May 28, at 8 p.m.
Senior Adult Club
The Senior Adult Club will
meet on Thursday, May 15, at 2
p.m. Two special films will be
shown. "The Team" features the
medical and paramedical men
and women who serve in the
Mogen David Adorn services.
"Man On A Bus," starring
Broderick Crawford and J.
Carroll Naish, is a story of a
group of Israeli immigrants
stranded in the Negev desert
when their bus breaks down.
Following the meeting, Lil and
Sol Brenner will conduct their
regular social dance class.
"Best of Broadway 2"
The Twin Lakes Theatre
group, after a successful run, is
giving performances of the "Best
of Broadway 2," a musical ex-
travaganza, on Thursday, June 5,
and Saturday, June 7, at 8 p.m.
at the Perlman Campus. The
group, under the direction of
Irene Unterman, will donate the
proceeds of their efforts to the
Jewish Community Center.
Tickets are now on sale.
Nutrition Program
Entertained
Something special happened
on April 25, when the Wynmoor
Philharmonics and the Wynmoor
Dance Group performed for the
seniors in the Nutrition Program
at JCC. Lou Del in. former pro-
fessional with the Boris Min-
nevitch harmonica group, taught
his group to read music and play
harmonicas. Ruth Weinberg,
former Rockette, choreographed
and directed tap dance routines.
Hannah Schaeffer, pianist, was
accompanist.
Symphony Season
The Broward Symphony Or-
chestra, Jimmy Woodle, music
director, has just announced its
1980-81 season.
A sixth concert has been added
to the series, and pianists Byron
Janis, Horacio Gutierrez and
Jerome Lowenthal, and violinist
Eugene Fodor have been engaged
for next season.
The series also will include the
annual Concerto Competition, in
which young artists compete for
cash prizes, and the annual
"Pops" Concert, featuring a
special tribute to George Ger-
shwin.
All concerts will be presented
on Saturday evenings in the new
Bailey Concert Hall on the BCC
Central Campus beginning Oct. 4
and ending May 30.
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25th a COLLINS
MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 33139
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, May 9,1980
5,000 Salute Israel's 32ndBirthday atJCC
f Tumol wa "tnn.
A little of Israel was "tran-
splanted" for a day to North
Broward County.
There was the Western Wall of
Jerusalem there was Tel Aviv
with its bustling Dizengoff
Square outdoor cafes and
there were several thousand men,
women and children celebrating,
just like the Israelis were doing,
the 32nd Anniversary of the
Declaration of Independence
establishing Israel as a State in
the world of nations.
All of this took place on the
fifth day of the Jewish calendar
month of Iyar: Yom Ha'aUmaut
(Day of Independence) on the 16-
acre Perlman Campus of the
Jewish Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
The Wall was a huge (40
bedsheets high and wide)
symbolic reproduction hanging
from the roof of one of the 11
buildings on the campus. And
there on another part of the
campus was the "Cafe"
dispensing falafel. knish, kosher
hot dog, and Coke. Off on another
corner was the kosher Carvel ice
cream stand, and nearby was the
ever-crowded Masada Israeli gift
booth. Along the Sunrise Blvd.
side of the campus were several
fun game booths, a popular
diversion for kids.
Scattered all over the front
campus were booths for JCC
itself, the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale,
synagogues, and a number of
other organizations. And over on
the football field, groups of
youngsters from the religious
schools of the synagogues and
Hebrew Day School of Greater
Fort Lauderdale were competing
in a miniature Maccabiahthe
Israeli version of the Olympics.
In the Samuel M. Soref Hall,
and in the shady picnic area near
the JCC gymnasium, Israeli folk
dancing was performed, and an
instructor was on hand to teach
Israeli dances to young and old;
and in various rooms of other
buildings, including Soref Hall,
movies, lectures, and spirited
singing and sing-a-longs were
enjoyed.
And it went on and on and on
for a joyous, festive day, with
moments of solemnity as several
hundred of the several thousands
who enjoyed the day took time
out to write prayers on slips of
paper and pin them to the
"Wall." Each of those prayers is
being taken to Israel to be put
between the huge boulders of the
real Wall built by Herod more
than 2,000 years ago.
Before this great event in the
history of the Jewish community
of North Broward could come to
fruition there were seemingly
endless meetings of Ron
Schagrin s special events
committee of the JCC, their get-
together to make some 4,000
falafel balls, and again to cut up
lettuce and tomatoes in
preparation for the falafel sale.
And on the morning of the
celebration itself, under overcast
skies that had many people
worried that rain might mar the
day, it was "shlep, shlep, shlep,"
as volunteers scurried to get
everything in shape with con-
stant calls for Selma TeUea,
JCC's program director: "Where
is my booth located" .
"Where is a maintenance man"
... on and on until the tun
broke through the overcast to
brighten the joyous day ... to
bring out television crews from
Channels 4 and 7, from the
University of Miami TV station,
and from the newspapers in
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
During the Maccabiah, under
the direction of Steve Bekon and
JCC's Physical Education
Director Ed Basan, Plantation
Jewish Congregation-Temple Kol
Ami won the trophy to be
awarded annually at Indepen-
dence Day celebrations, with a
synagogue or school winning
three times gaining permanent
possession.
The Western Wall
Pinning Prayers
, :-k seas*
Dr. Steve Levine,
PA announcer all day.
'&
Torch Run opens Maccabiah running, jumping events, and trophy winners
* f
Perlman campus crowded.
Feingold does caricatu
res.
Sephardic Cantor enchants audience.
"Clowning" faces.
m

l
Nat Wolf son's Dancers.
Learning folk dancing.
Sing-a-long
Cafe's chefs: JohlRotman, Ron The Cafe- JCC. OJ Schagrin, the Day's general chairman. rZ^^aS^T^***QoU*n
'Future" foretold.


Friday, May 9,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale

Page 9
JCC Annual Meeting Set 'Never Too Late Opens Saturday
Anita M. Perlman has been
nominated for re-election as
president of the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. The election and
installation of officers and board
members will take place at the
annual membership meeting at
10 a.m., Sunday, June 1, in the
Samuel M. Soref Hall of the Perl-
man Campus, 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd.
All members of JCC are invited
to attend the meeting which will
include presentation of special
awards and a "State of the JCC"
message by Mrs. Perlman.
JCC's Nominating Committee,
chaired by Helene Soref, sub-
mitted the following slate of
nominees:
President, Anita M. Perlman;
'* -Vic* Presidents: Milton Edel-
stein, Harvey Kopelowitz, Johl
Kotman. Michael Weinberg;
Treasurer, Arnold Simon: Sec-
retary, Sally Radin.
New members of the Board,
two-year terms: Leonard Farber,
Henry Hyman, Samuel Leber,
Jack Moss, Jack Nudelman,
Richard Schwartz, Abe Tuch-
man.
Renominated for a second two-
year term: Jan Atlas, Dr. Wayne
Bizer, Sol Brenner, Rovi Faber,
David Gross, Hy Kaplan, Al
Lang, Hildreth Levin, Cheryl
Levine.
Also Martin Lipnack, Neddie
Lynn, Allen Morris, Irv Rosen-
baum, Ronald Schagrin, Abram
Silverman, Judith Soffer, Helene
Soref, Mel Zipris.
Board members whose terms
have not expired: Larry Behar,
Steve Belton, Marianne Falk,
Irving Griff, Victor Gruman,
David Jackowitz, Mel Katz,
Rabbi Phillip Labowitz, Sunny
Landsman, Ivy Levine, Edith
Levine.
Photography Class Offered
"Photography is a science as
well as an art. Once you know the
disciplines, you can express
yourself more freely because the
technical end conies more
naturally."
Jewish Community Center
Vice President Michael Wein-
! berg, photography instructor at
' the Pelman Campus, stated his
1 basic philosophy for his course of
study. Mike, who was recently
nominated to the Young
Leadership National Cabinet, is a
busy fellow who has taken the
.,. role of photographer very
seriously.
As he puts it, "When I get
interested in something, I go all
the way." His interest in
photography is an outgrowth of
his love of art. He had the eye to
appreciate art, but it is with
photography that he finds he can
express himself best.
ii | > He is comparatively new to the
field of photography; however,
9 *Lrue t0 his nature of commitment,
he has studied in depth at the
Nikon School of Photography
with Arturo Morales. He recently
was accepted as a member of the
Nikon Professional Service
Division which is an indication of
Weinberg*s professionalism. He's
proud of having won two out of
10 prizes in last season's South
Florida Photography Contest.
As a teacher, he aims to make
photography a pleasure. He
teaches his students how to use
the average camera with some
simple techniques that will
enhance their photographs.
Composition and proper lighting
are the two areas he stresses.
Mike Weinberg
Weinberg insists that one can be
creative without spending
thon""t nt Hnlinrs Although
he admits that his equipment is
quite complete and more complex
than necessary, Mike feels that
he can help class attendees take
good pictures.
In the first half of his teaching
he stresses the technical aspects
of how-to meter, focus, and film.
The second half is concerned with
the taking of pictures. Models are
used. Lecturers at his classes
included Wally Clark, a com-
mercial photographer, who
discusses composition, and
Walter Michot, sports
photographer for the Fort
Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel.
Starting at 8 p.m. Monday,
May 12 for eight weeks Mike
will begin a new session. All ages
are welcome. They have been
fathers and sons attending the
classes as well as couples who
consider it a fun night out.
If photography is your in-
terest, don't delay in registering
for Mike's photography class at
the Jewish Community Center.
xmmsm
Holocaust VI
I
2
I
Above is reproduction of what
Irving Drucker remembers the
Holocauat village looked like on
rv but with a difference his is
nde of 15,000 matchsticks.
Irving is a wheelchair-bound
victim of arterial sclerosis who,
after 11 months in the Veterans'
Hospital, doesn't beleive in being
idle either mentally or physically,
iany time. While hospitalized,
he inspired other patients to do
as much as they possibly could
manually to be creative. He made
more models than anyone ever
attempted in an effort to get
::
:
r patients activated in mind
and body.
His next project (in matches)
will be a reproduction of an
Israeli kibbutz.
Irving was regional vice
president of a well-known chain
of department stores before he
was stricken and keeps himself
mentally alert with his hobbies,
which are many. He is willing to
help anyone start the match
hobby just call WECARE
office. The call will be capably
answered by Sara Drucker,
Irving's wife and the WECARE
receptionist.


Cast of "Never Too Late" includes (from left) Allen Cohen, Irving Salit, Morton Pine, Gloria
Fisher, Gertrude Goodman, Dr. Stephen Levine, Audrey Schwartz and Alan Margolies.
"Never Too Late," first '
production of the Jewish
Community Center's Theatre
Guild, has its opening per-
formance at 8 p.m., Saturday,
May 10, in the Samuel M. Soref
Hall of JCC's Perlman Campus,
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd., Plan-
tation.
Directed by Joel Tehes, who is
also playing the lead role, a
campaign associate of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale who has a
professional theatrical
background, the comedy which
had two-year run in Broadway
and became a movie will be
presented also at 2 pm. and 8
p.m., Sunday, May 11, and at 8
p.m., Saturday, May 17, and 2
p.m., and 8 p.m., Sunday, May
18.
i
Audrey Schwartz playing the role of "wife" makes overtures to
"husband" Alan Margolies in "Never Too Late."
The talented cast pictured
above is supported by a group of
backstagers who have worked
each night and Sunday af-
ternoons that the cast has
rehearsed for the production
which Theatre Guild President
Glorida Fisher says "is like
having a baby."
Linda Cohen, producer of
"Never Too Late," said Sandi
Goldenberg, Millie Lane, Cheryl
Levine and Marcia Starrels have
prepared the props and costumes,
and Jerry Cappel, Helen Nathan
and Ruth Pine have roamed the
area to pick up furnishings for
the set designed by William
Shulman and built by Joe Sch-
wartz and Ben Scribner.
WECARE Recruiting Volunteers
Anita M. Perlman, JCC president, keynotes WECARE meeting.
Recruiting volunteers was the
purpose of a "Coffee And" get-
together last month at WECARE
headquarters, JCC, Perlman
Campus to which Jewish
organizations were invited.
Sally Radin, chairperson of
WECARE, presided. Anita
Perlman, JCC president, stressed
the fact that Jews in greater Fort
Lauderdale belong to the various
organizations of their choice, and
are dedicated to volunteer ac-
tivities for love of their fellow
man. WECARE has grown and
become outstanding in all its
endeavors but needs the constant
support of volunteers who are
responsible and committed, she
said.
A specialized program for the
deaf in which over 100 people
have been enrolled is now active
at JCC with happy results. They,
too, have been volunteering and
performing many needed services
for the Center.
A person's involvement affects
the whole community. It's easy
to be a volunteer; there are many
ways to help. Mrs. Perlman
advised all to become involved in
the activity of their choice to help
stay young. Involvement brings
together all age groups, she said
creating a continued and lasting
effect.
"Living in Fort Lauderdale
may be Utopia for some of us
but are we aware of the hunger of
...........inhi "".....................
the shut-in, the disabled and the
handicapped also living here?"
Said Anne Fleishman, WECARE
coordinator, "Passover packages
were distributed by volunteers
who couldn't believe the need was
so great until they saw for
themselves how our fellow Jews
look to us as JCC friends.
Chairperson of youth ac-
tivities, Bobbi Hassman, asked
the group not to lose sight of the
young volunteer and his ability
to help the young blind to
vocational and economical
usefulness. Co-chairperson of
youth activities, Helene Boland
asked for volunteers to copy
printed matter to large print
all materials to be furnished by
Blind Services. Good speaking
voices are needed to make tapes
for science and history. On
hospital visitation, Maurie
Meyer, a "one man committee,"
has spent many dedicated hours
visiting the lonely and mostly
"un-visited" patients whose days
are made happier by his "hello."
Marianne Falk, chairperson of
Le Browse, the store which sells
new and gently used merchandise
for WECARE, needs people to
help sort, price and sell.
Esther Solomon heads the
Blood Bank program. She needs
telephone squads for next
September's drive to take place
on Perlman Campus of JCC. She
asked that young adults get
involved, noting that for every
pint donated, that person's
family could receive 50 pints, if
needed, at no charge. All Jews
can avail themselves of needed
blood.
Fran Goldstein, publicity
chairperson, reminded the
gathering that they were all her
spokespeople out in the com-
munity, and that she would send
WECARE News for their
organization publications.
Edith Morgano of "Eyes for
the Needy" asked for old costume
jewelry which can be converted to
cash for new eyeglasses. Old
eyeglasses are sent to the
destitute in foreign lands. U.S.
laws forbid reuse of eyeglasses.
Frank Morgano, official
photographer for WECARE, was
on hand taking photos of those
present.
Nan Namiot Reach Out thrilled
those present with a description
of the social teas held at her home
for exceptional people, stroke
victims, handicapped and blind.
Her last tea for the blind was a
huge success in every way.
Josephine Steinberg, volunteer
for nursing homes, pointed out
that the residents of these
facilities have given up every
vestige of personal belongings
their homes and prized
possessions. A volunteer need
only give two hours time to
lighten someone's lonely hours.
A representative of Brandeis
! Women, Ruth Horowitz,
volunteered to chair the Nursing
Homes Committee.


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, May 9,1980


Two Synagogues Formed
In Coral Springs
In Coconut Creek
The newly-organized Coconut
Creek Temple, with Rabbi Aaron
B. (Bob) Ilson, formerly of
Pittsburgh, as its spiritual
leader, will hold Shavuot service
at 8 p.m., Wednesday, May 21, at
its temporary meeting place,
Calvary Presbyterian Church on
Coconut Creek Rd., opposite the
entrance to Wynmoor Village. A
pro-tern board with Arnold
Nestel as chairman includes Jack
Horn, Lillian Glanz, Alex
Lichtshein, Anne and Jack
Osher, Rae and Sam Snediker,
Sol Silverberg, Charles
Rubenstein, Nat Sack and Rabbi
Ilson.
A new synagogue, the project
of a newly-formed National
Foundation for Judaic Living,
will have as its spiritual leader,
Rabbi Leonard Zoll. The Keter
Tikvah (Crown of Hope)
synagogue will be holding its
Friday evening Sabbath Services
in the Coral Springs Bank
auditorium. Herbert Ray of Pom-
pano Beach is president of the
Foundation. His wife, Regi, is
vice president. Richard Forrest of
Lighthouse Point is secretary-
treasurer.
City Council Approves Plans
For New Reconstmctionist 'ShuT
The Plantation Town Council,
at its meeting of Wednesday,
April 23, approved the site plan,
landscaping and elevations for
the proposed new Recon-
structionist Synagogue building.
The two acre plot is located at the
Northwest corner of West
lire ward Boulevard and Hiatus
Road in Plantation. Synagogue
officials hope to start letting
contracts shortly. Ground-
breaking and construction will
take place in the very near future.
Synagogue officials feel, barring
unforeseen delays, the early part
of 1981 should mark the opening
of its new home.
The synagogue is also having
its annual retreat weekend over
the Memorial Day holiday, May
24, 25, and 26 at River Ranch
Dude Ranch in upstate Florida.
Phone the synagogue office for
more information (between 9 a.m.
and noon).
Temple Beth Am Groundbreaking
Temple Beth Am of Margate
Jewish Center will breakground
for its new synagogue at 10 a.m.,
May 18, a Chai (life) Day, at
Rock Island Rd. and Royal Palm
Blvd.
The Temple's Sisterhood,
which held a rummage sale
during the week of May 4, is
continuing the sale during the
week of May 11, excluding
Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. at 5460 N. State Rd. 7 near
Prospect Rd., underneath the
Loft's Restaurant. Household
articles, small appliances,
jewelry, home furnishings and
bric-a-brac will be on sale at
reduced prices.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Temple Sholom Religious
School, Pompano Beach, will
hold its confirmation exercises at
its Friday night services, May 16,
in the main sanctuary of the
temple.
Rabbi Morris A. Skop will
confirm Lloyd Comiter, Andrea
Stone, Sindee Gozansky and
Linda Zipper.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER
Tamarac Jewish Center is
holding a formal dedication of a
Torah presented by the Jewish
Community House of Laurelton,
N.Y. Rabbi Israel Zimmerman
and Cantor Henry Belasco will
officiate with Manny Lax as
guest speaker.
The dedication ceremony will
take place at the temple, 9101
NW 57th St., Tamarac, on
Sunday, May 25, at 12:30 p.m.
For information, call the center.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
The Brotherhood of Temple
Kol Ami will elect its officers for
the 1980 1981 year on Tuesday,
May 15, at 8 p.m. Refreshments
and games will follow. All
Brotherhood members and
prospective members are urged
to attend.
The Brotherhood will hold its
annual picnic on Sunday, May
18, at T.Y. Park at 10 a.m.
Charcoal and drinks will be
provided. Bring your lunch,
sports equipment and swim suits.
Pavilion No. 11 has been reserved
for Brotherhood members and
their families.
CONFIRMATION
On Friday, May 23, at 7:45
p.m., Temple Kol Ami will mark
the ceremony of confirmation of
10 young adults. Tied in with the
festival of Shavuot, at which time
according to tradition^ the 10
Commandments were given by
God to the Jewish people,
groups and will be followed by
the incoming president or
chairpersons, who will outline
their plans for the coming year.
There will be other reports
given, pertinent to the operation
of the congregation.
HEBREW CONGREGATION
OF LAUDERHILL
As a public service to the
community, the Hebrew
Congregation of Lauderhill, 49th
Avenue and 21st Street (next
door to Camelot Hall) has
arranged a special additional
Yukor Memorial service on
Thursday, May 22 at 12:30 p.m.
on the second day of the festival
of Shavuot, it was announced by
Sol Cohen, president.
Additional liturgical prayers
highlighting the Festival of
Weeks will be included by Rabbi
David Gordon. Worshippers will
be assured a seat, prayer shawl
and a prayer book.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Shavuot will be celebrated at
Temple Emanu-El, 3245 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd., on Tuesday
night, May 20, with confirmation
services, at which time 16 girls
and boys will be confirmed by
Sunrise Jewish Center's new synagogue (sketched above) will
be built at Pine Island Rd. and 41st Ave. following ground-
breaking ceremonies this summer.
Rabbi Jeffrey L. Ballon. The
event culminates 10 years of
religious training for the
following people:
Uelh Lisa Becker, Michelle Bernstein,
iienjumln Blank. Barbara Lynne
Kurgess, Marc Jeffrey Horowitz. Amy
11i.ilie Jacobs.
Also Stuart Howard Kantor. Debra
Michelle Katz, Julie Klmmel, Susan
Manilla. Robert Joel Nlsenbaum. David
Itudcn. Julia Kuden. Fran Schlelcher.
I .amen Singer. Adam Joseph Thanz
Yizkor Services will be con-
ducted on Wednesday, May 21,
at 11 a.m., by Rabbi Ballon and
Cantor Jerome Klement.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Temple Beth Israel's Abraham
Haber Torah School will hold its
graduation service at 8:45 a.m.,
Saturday, May 17, in the sanc-
tuary at 7100 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.
The following students will be
graduating Matthew Bloom. Daniel
llodetisU-ln, Lewis Carness. Sharlene
Chase. Marc Chaykln, David Cohen.
Annette Dahan. Scott Dernier. Ruth
Fischer. Jon Flshman.
Steven Frankowltz. Barry Frelser.
Stacy Uershow Itz. Lisa Goldln. Michael
Goldman. Andrew Gross. Andrew
Huffman. Dori Hoffman. Andrew
Harrow, Lisa Housman. Abigail Klein.
Cindy Kin-man. Jeffrey Kraua. Jeffrey
Krieger.
Jeffery Leach, Steven Marks. Ross
Mendell, Brian Mevora, Mark Milch
man. Allen Miller, Jeffrey Peck. Sharon
I'inkert. Ronald Posner. Steven RavlU.
Scan Relter. Jennifer Rosen, David
Sucks, Nancy Saiame. Carol Sherr,
Amy Schulti. Russell Shuster. Garrln
Slolnhk. Richard Weinsteln. Debra
Wilde. David Yarmuth
confirmation signifies the con-
clusion of formal religious school
educational studies for young
people, aged 15 and 16.
The confirmation ceremony
this year will be based around an
original service written by
Temple's Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr
and given by each confirmand,
expressing his reactions to the
theme of the service and to his
confirmation.
The confirmation class this
year is composed of the following
persons: Steven Brown, Neil
(irishman, Heather Pinkus,
Martha Raskin. David Schaeffer,
Jeffrey Seiden, Karen Starr,
Andrea Stone, Mara Tucker and
Lisa Weisman. The public is
invited to attend this Shab-
bat / confirmation ceremony. ,
"DREAM AUCTION"
On Saturday, May 17, Temple
Kol Ami will hold its first annual
"Dream Auction." The public is
invited to bid for a microwave
oven, a 10-pound Hershey bar, an
American miniature stud horse,
disco lessons, dog sitting,
paintings, seamstress work and
more. The action starts at 7:30
p.m. in the temple social hall at
8200 Peters Road, Plantation.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
The annual congregational
meeting of Temple Emanu-El will
be held in the temple auditorium
on Sunday, May 18, at 8 p.m.
This meeting will be preceded
by a dessert buffet, which will be
hosted by the officers and board
members of the congregation.
Martin Yohalem, outgoing
president, will present his annual
report, and the gavel will be
turned over to Frances Smith,
the incoming president of the
congregation.
President or chairpersons of
the auxiliary temple
organizations will review the
achievements of their respective
After
shopping.
relax with a
great cup of
coffee.
Maxwell
House
Coffee says
welcome
home.
What tastes better than a cup of Maxwell satisfying taste of Ma
IW Coffee after a shopping spree? .t is >^Z^1^J^^
gives the two of you a chance to relax be- year after vear Smart I-^ickk P'
foreputtingawayyourpurchasesTherich. LvebeenLr^
i a century.
Good
to the
Last Drop""
I
_A_Uving tradition in Jewish homes for
JiAXWEM
i HOUSf
rnffl'
more than half a century.
K
Certified
Kosher
i-


Friday, May 9, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
Looks like a free-for-all as
challengers to Sen. Dick Stone's
seat in the U.S. Senate keep
popping up. Senator Stone is
completing his first six-year-term
with a distinguished record.
Among Democratic primary
contenders for the nomination are
State Insurance Commissioner
Bill Gunter, former Speaker of
Florida House of Representatives
Dick Fettigrew, State Sen.
Kenneth MacKay ... On the
Republican side, Miami Atty
Ellis Rubin currently is the only
announced candidate. Reportedly
considering entering the
Republican race are Sen.
Minority Leader John Ware,
former Orlando congressman Lou
Frey, former Florida legislator
Ander Crenshaw Lori
Wilson, wife of the president of
the Gannett chain of newspapers,
has announced as an independent
candidate.
Eygpt's President Anwar
Sadat has commissioned Prof.
Alfred Manfeld of Israel's
Technion. who designed the
Israel Museum in Jerusalem, to
submit plans for an interfaith
monument to peace Egypt hopes
to build at the foot of Mount
Sinai. The project will include a
synagogue designed by Manfeld,
i' mosque by an Egyptian, and a
8rowsin' thru
roward

)
%

V
with mr. "maggie" levine

-J
church by a French ar-
chitect I.J. (armin Karp-
man, founder and chief editor of
an encyclopedia listing notable
Jews of the world, is now com-
piling biographies for the new
25th anniversary edition.
Questionaires for potential
nominees to be considered for
inclusion are being gathered by
Who's Who in World Jewry, One
Park Ave., New York
10016 Molly Picon, great
versatile performer for more than
75 years, who recently played in
South Florida, is receiving
plaudits for her newly re-
leased autobiography. titled
"Molly" Lillian Carter, the
President's mother, toured Israel
last week as a guest of Prime
Minister Menachem Begin.
ending with prayer at the
the Hebrew Day School
OF rOKT LrtaDERDrtLE
Hebrew Day School
Officially Dedicated
April 13 was the day of the
official dedication of the Hebrew
Day School building on the
J.C.C. Campus. This date was
even more significant in that it
was Yom Hashoah, the Day of
Remembrance.
Jesse Faerber, executive vice
president, served as chairman of
(he program which included
children reciting prayers both in
Hebrew and in English. Paul
Frieser, president of the board of
directors, and Fran Merenstein.
director, gave brief messages.
Class Activities
Hebrew Day School's classes
from pre-kindergarten through
the fifth grade will go May 16 and
17 to the Riding with Nature
Ranch where they have classes in
nature lore, crafts, wildlife, and
riding horses. Each child has the
opportunity to learn about
horsemanship. It's the second
year for this learning experience.
Pre K Classes
The Pre-K classes have added
another dimension to their
learning. They are now involved
in socio-drama.
In addition to learning classic
fairy and folk tales, these creative
four-year olds are acting them
out. They set up their own sets,
put on costumes, and assume
roles. A favorite one is Snow
White and the Seven Dwarfs.
Mrs. Debbie Kaufman, the Pre-
K Hebrew teacher, feels "role
playing is a marvelous tool for
understanding the important
personalities in Jewish history.
For example during Passover,
the children really had a first-
hand look at both Moses and
Pharoah."
Fifth Graders
Taking part in community
activities is important to the
children. For the last few months
the fifth grade children have been
studying approximately 3,000
words. The words were supplied
by Broward County in con-
junction with the Hollywood Sun
Tattler's Annual Spelling Bee
contest. After many run-offs. the
Hebrew Day school finally had
their winning representative.
Justin Fineberg. son of Libo and
Estelle Fineberg. represented his
class at South Broward High
School on April '^4
Keynote speaker was Al
Golden, president of Central
Agency for Jewish Education. He
highlighted the importance of the
school a beneficiary of Federation
funds to the Jewish community
in Fort Lauderdale. He also
emphasized the cooperation that
is necessary between the
Federation and the Hebrew Day
School. The location of the
Hebrew Day School on the J.C.C.
Campus is indicative of the
solidarity and potential har-
monious growth of the Jewish
community in Fort Lauderdale.
he said.
Rabbi Phillip Labowitz of
Temple Beth Israel and Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon of Temple Emanu-
El also oarticinaiP''
A most moving part of the day
was the installation of the
mezuzah in memory of Rabbi
Alexander Gross, the founder of
the Hebrew Academy of Greater
Miami. Rabbi Sagra Gross, his
son, installed the mezuzah and
recited the brocha (blessing). It
was a most gratifying moment
for Mrs. Gross as she recognizes"
how instrumental a role her
husband played in the Hebrew
Day School movement.
Fund
Raising
Fund raising is a vital aspect in
any Hebrew Day School's
program. Rhonnie Leder, vice
president of ways and means, has
been meeting this challenge most
adeptly.
One hundred friends and
families of the school went on a
special yacht party, last month.
It was a gala, fun evening-
resplendent with black-tie and
jeans attire. All aboard clamored
for another such evening.
Mrs- Leder said the campaign
for the Journal is underway.
Calling the school office, for
details. Concurrent with the
Journal is the cookbook project
headed by Margie Katz. Send
recipes to the school office. Mrs.
Leder noted that leaves on the
Tree pf Knowledge can be pur-
chased for 875 throiigjuhe office.
women's side of the Western
Wall.
The April issue of Shofar, the
nationally-distributed newspaper
of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization (BBYO). has a
picture of Anita Perlman,
"founding mother" of B'nai
B'rith Girls, and plaudits for the
president of Fort Lauderdale's
Jewish Community Center and
the dedication of the Perlman
campus ... Stanley I.
Margulies, Hollywood
radiologist, is one of the group
seeking a state charter to open
Cypress Savings and Loan in
Plantation Another S&L,
Commonwealth, listing among
its organizers. Alan J. Levy of
Plantation, and Edna M. Tar-
nove of Fort Lauderdale, is
scheduled to open within the year
in Margate Edgar Bronfman
has succeeded Philip Klutznick,
now Secretary of Commerce in
President Carter's Cabinet, as
acting president of World Jewish
Congress.
Norman A. Levin has been
named director of manufacturing
of the Power Products division of
Fort Lauderdale's Computer
Products Rejected by a
German publisher, Sol Stein's
new novel The Resort, has been
published by William Morrow.
The theme, expected to spark
new interest in the Holocaust, is
based on the premise a Jewish
Holocaust can happen
again Rabbi Ludwig
Nadelmann, who will be installed
May 29 as president of the
Jewish Reconstructionist
Foundation, will have the
honorary degree of doctor of
divinity conferred upon him May
14 by the Jewish Theological
Seminary in New York
City National Council of
Senior Citizens, composed of
3,900 organizations, and the U.S.
Student Association, with some
120,000 members in Florida
colleges and universities joined
the National League of Women's
Voters giving Congressman Ed
Stack 100 per cent rating on key
issues of interest to those
organizations.
Isaac Bashevis Singer, Nobel
Prize winner, who spoke at
Federation's meeting last year in
Fort Lauderdale, refused an
invitation to attend a writers'
conference in Poland this month.
Said he: "It would be a terrible
emotional strain to see Poland
without my people" .
President Carter named Alfred
Moses, Washington lawyer who
is chairman-designate of AJCom-
mittee as unpaid consultant to
succeed Edward Sanders who
resumed his law practice in Los
Angeles Shelly Solomon, 16,
Fort Lauderdale, sister of tennis
star Harold Solomon, is good at
tennis, too. She won State H.S.
singles title and Gulfstream
State championship for under-18
players.

<>
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Miami Phone: 673-8393
Out nf local area call collect
FOR POSITIONS
In Jewish Education for 1980-81:
Sunday School
Nursery-Kindergarten
Hebrew School
Judaica High School
Register Now!
Central Agency for Jewish Education of
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
2999 N.W. 33rd Ave., Fort Lauderdale 33311
Telephone 484-8200
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-
Page 12
;.^.v,'.
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*.,
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The Jewish Flqridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. May 9,1960
r
&i TAeJVe*)&
1
I

Sunrise Mayor Gets Award
At the meeting of the Col.
David Marcus Chapter of the
American Red Mogen David for
Israel at the head table pictured
above (from left) were Diane
Levine, Sara Blatt, William
Wolliver, Sunrise City Mayor
John Lomelo, Chapter President
Max Bezozo, Betty Schulberg
and Ida Schnitzer.
Bezozo presented a Mission of
Mercy award to Mayor Lomelo
for his humanitarian deeds. Mrs.
Schulberg called on the audience
to redouble its efforts on behalf of
the chapter. Candles were lighted
to commemorate the Holocaust
martyrs.
B'nai B'rith Lodge Elects Officers
B'nai B'rith Holiday Springs
Lodge 3086, Margate, installed
officers at the Holiday Springs
Playhouse. Left to right, Sam
Lezell, vice president; Irv Bitter-
man, chaplain: Abe Lipstadt,
recording secretary; Stan
Landau, corresponding sec-
retary; Al Gura, president;
J
Bernie Rush, president-elect; Leo
Schildkraut, treasurer; Mike
Grossman, financial secretary;
Aaron Leitman, vice president.
Installation and keynote ad-
dress was administered by Oscar
Goldstein. Al Gura was re-elected
for a second term as president.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The North Broward Region of
Women's American ORT,
(organization for rehabilitation
through training) will hold its
installation of officers luncheon
Tuesday, May 20. at 11:30 a.m.
at The Inverrary Country Club
Lauderhill.
Mrs. Edward Light, District
VI chairman of the executive
committee, will install the
following for the 1980 1981 year:
President, Mrs. Mel M. Shapiro;
Executive Committee Chairman,
Mrs. Jerry Ross; Vice
Presidents: Mrs. Louis Berg,
Mrs. Milton Nowick, Mrs. Ian
Rudnick, Mrs. Harry Stonehill,
Mrs. Milton Warner, Mrs. Sarah
Weissman; Treasurer, Mrs.
Barry Montag; Financial
Secretary; Mrs. Etta Weinstein:
Recording Secretary, Mrs.
William Lewis; Corresponding
Secretary, Mrs. Mary Lewis;
Parliamentarian: Mrs. William
Sutter.
For any further information
please contact Mary Lewis.
Royal Plantation ORT extends
a welcome mat for new members.
If you are new to the area, wish to
help children all over the world
get an education so they can
support themselves, as well as -
make new friends and participate
in many fun-filled activities, ORT
is for you.
Ccme to the next meeting to be
held at Deicke Auditorium. 400
NW 73 Ave., Plantation on May
14, at 8 p.m.
HADASSAH
Florence Krantz was elected
president of the Bat Ami-
Tamarac Chapter of Hadassah at
the April 14 meeting. Hannah
Boyera was the installing officer
when the chapter elected its
officers. Serving with Mrs.
Krantz are the following vice
presidents: Belle Weinberg,
education; Eleanora Jacolow,
fund raising; Dorothy Pittman,
membership; Ina Miller,
program; secretaries: Janet
Cantor, corresponding; Betty
Marcus, ; nancial: Hannah
Boyers, n- cording; Frances
Marcus, treasurer.
Formal disbanding of
Hadassah's West Broward
Chapter with each of its three
groups becoming a chapter will
take place at the annual Donor
Luncheon at noon, Tuesday, May
13, in the Venetian Room. Pier
66, 17th St. Causeway. Fort
Lauderdale.
Chapter President Anna S.
Silman said the three groups,
now to be known as chapters.
Ramaz of Coral Springs, with
Toby Cohen as president; Rayus.
Tamarac, President Pearl
Auerbach; Shoshana. Tamarac.
President Florence Kirchik.
Another chapter has been formed
in Tamarac, Bat Ami, with
Florence Krantz as president.
Donor chairmen for the lun-
cheon are Ethel Rosenthal, West
Broward' chapter; Rosalie
Goldberg, Ramaz Group; Rose
Laine, Rayus Group; Gena
Hauptman. Shoshana Group.
Gary Lawrence, pianist and
vocalist, will entertain.
The donor luncheon for the
A viva-Oakland Estates, Tamarac
Fort Lauderdale, Pine Island
Ridge and Polynesian Gardens
Chapters of Hadassah will take
place on Thursday. May 8, at the
Crystal La go Country Club,
Pompano Beach.
Over 300 members who earned
their donor will be present, and
the guest speaker of the day will
be Mrs. Fanny Katz, Zionist
Affairs chairperson of the Florida
Mid-Coast Region of Hadassah.
The chairperson of the day will
be Mrs. Belle Hirsch, and the
program chairperson, Mrs. Ann
Salkin.
Somerset Shoshana Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its in-
stallation of officers on May 20 in
Somerset recreation Hall. Ann
Salkin will install officers for
1980-81: President, Sydelle
Oppenheimer; Vice President of
education, Sara Wollock; Vice
President of membership, Ora
Barrocas; Vice President of fund
raising. Ann Friedman and co-
chairman Sylvia Meltzer; Vice
President of program. Rose
Sadowsky; Treasurer, Jeanette
Pernick; Hermie Leving, Elsie
Glassman, Celia Schatz.
respectively, recording,
corresponding and financial
secretary.
A catered lunch will be served.
All are invited to attend this
function. Please see your building
captain. Hermie Leving is
chairman of the day.
Boca Raton Aviva Chapter of
Hadassah will have installation
of officers on May 19 at a break-
fast at the Boca Del Mar
Clubhouse. For reservations,
phone Mrs. Fred Saxe or Mrs.
Arthur Abramson.
PIONEER WOMEN
Upcoming events will be
discussed at the meeting of the
Negev Chapter of Pioneer
Wednesday, May 14, 1
the auditorium of the
Beth Israel, Century
East. Deerfield Beach.
Refreshments will be served
beginning at 12 -30 p.m.
Events include a Key West trip
May 19-20 and installation of new
officers June 9 at the Boca Del
Mar Country Club.
The meeting is open to the
Women
p.m. in
Temple
Village
,Room
Constani Rabbinical
Supervision Machgiach
FINEST KOSHER CUISINE
RESERVE NOW FOR
HIGH HOLY DAYS
from Sept. 9 to 21
i Mart i 61ATT KOSHER
HOTtl IEACH CLUI
OPEN ALL YEAR
JULY4th WEEKEND CELEBRATION
4 DAYS & 3 NIGHTS &S 5 DAYS A 4 NIGHTS
July 4 to July 6 fljjff July 3 to July 6
$S par parson Etf. f $pe par parson
199 doublaocc HU DO douWaocc.
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TV In All Rooms Dancing a Entertainment
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Sarvtctl Will Be Conducted by a Prominent Cantor
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SUPERVWOM OF RAM) SHELDON EVtR
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public, and everyone is welcome
to bring friends.
HEBREW CONGREGATION
OF LAUDERHILL
Sisterhood of Hebrew
Congregation of Lauderhill will
hold a card party at Castle
Gardens Recreation Center.
Monday. May 19, at noon. A
luncheon will be served, and
many prizes will be distributed.
ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
OF AMERICA
Yehuda Hellman, executive
vice president of the Conference
of Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, will be the
speaker at installation of officers
of the newly organized Fort
Lauderdale Zionist Organization
of America District at 7-30 p.m..
Thursday, May 8, at Temple
Beth Israel. 7100 W. Oakland
Park Blvd. Abe Zutig is
president of the new district.
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER
Tickets for the Sorell Sisters
Show being presented by the
Men's Club of Sunrise Jewish
Center. 8049 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.. are still available. Call the
Sunrise JC for reservations.
AJ CONGRESS
Mayor E. Clay Shaw of Fort
Lauderdale will be the speaker at
the 1 p.m.. Wednesday. May'28,
meeting of the Louis Newman
Chapter of the American Jewish
Congress at Temple Beth Israel,
Century Village- East, Deerfield
Beach. The mayor recently
returned from a week-long
session of the International
Conference of Mayors held in
Jerusalem.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
As the active season for
Women's League for Israel comes
to a summer "slow-down," the
chapters honor their Woman of
the Year at various May func-
tions in Florida, and at the
Waldorf Astoria Closing Donor
Luncheon in New York.
Plaques will be awarded to the,
following ladies A venture.
Pauline Brander: Bonaventure.
Lillian Silitsky; Tamarac, Faye
Rosenstein: LaMer Shalom,
Bertha Mindich: Inverrary,
Arlene Roberts; Margate. Helen
Newman: Lincoln, Betty Got-
tesman; Orah. Sally Findling:
Sabra. Sylvia Charash.
Honored chapter chairmen are
Florida. Delia Slater: Hatikvah.
Ann Mindich: Coconut Creek,
Jan Zeitlin: Woodlands, Elaine
Yadwin.
Lillian Silitsky gets her award
at Bonaventure's third annual
dinner-dance. Saturday evening.
May 10. at the Bonaventure
Country Club.
The
sun
KOSHER
King David
GALAJUL* 4th WEEKEND
On The Ocean
al 20th St..
Miami Beach
4 Days & 3 Nights jQ 5 Days & 4 Nights
July 4 to July 6 XI July 3 to July 6
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INCLUDING GLATT KOSHER MEALS
Private Beach Free Beach Chairs Movies
Entertainment > Dancing Color TV Theatre
Make Your Early Reiervatiom For The
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HIGH HOLY DAYS 1,.. $175 at. p.. d-u. o
Services on Premises by prominent Cantor
For Reservations Phone: 16720333
Why
The Big
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Over
Tetley's
Tiny
Little Tea
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TINY IS TASTIER. THAT'S WHY!
Gourmets have always known that! That's whv
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ACENJURY OLD TRADITION


Friday. May 9,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laud'erdale
Page 13
UIA Announces $100 Million
Interim Allocations for 1980
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Jerold Hoffberger, chairman of
the United Israel Appeal, an-
nounced that the UIA board of
directors has made an interim
allocation of $100 million toward
its projects in Israel for the fiscal
year which began April 1.
B'nai Mitzvah
B'nai Mitzvah scheduled at
Fort Lauderdale's Temple Beth
Israel:
At 8 p.m., Friday, May 2, Lisa
(iolden became a Bat Mitzvah; at
8:45 a.m., Saturday, May 3,
services: Bar Mitzvah, Richard
Weinstein.
At 8 p.m. Friday. May 23, Bat
Mitzvah. Ruth Fisher; Saturday
morning. May 24: David Cohen
and Michael Goldman will be
called to theTorah.
At 8 p.m. Friday, May 30: Bat
Mitzvah. Garen Slot nick
Dawn Shari, daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. Michael A. Halle, a
student at Nova University
School, became a Bat Mitzvah on
March 28 as she was called to the
Torah at Temple Beth Israel.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
B'nai Mitzvah at Temple Beth
Orr, with interim Rabbi David
Goldstein conducting services,
included: Andrea Wechsler and
David Appelbaum on May 3; and
Kric Wise, Saturday morning,
May 10: and on Saturday. May
24 10:30 a.m., with guest Rabbi
Howard Shapiro of Springfield,
N.J., officiating, Pam Weissberg
and Michael Shatsky.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
At Temple Emanu-El, at the
llavdalah service at '7 p.m..
Saturday, May 17, Frank
Bergman will become a Bar
Mitzvah. The following week at
11 a.m.. Saturday, May 24. Greg
Rosenthal will become a Bar
Mitzvah.
SUNPISE JEWISH CENTER
Gregg Sigman, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Lawrence Sigman, will
become a Bar Mitzvah at Satur-
day morning services. May 17, at
Sunrise Jewish Center, 8049 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi Albert
N. Troy and Cantor Jack
Marchant will officiate.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Darlene Gayhor, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Gaynor, will
celebrate her Bat Mitzvah at the
Friday night services, May 23, at
Temple Sholom, Pompano.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
Temple Kol Ami will mark the
B'nai Mitzvah of Charles Chalik
and Michael Tisman on Satur-
"Juml
-
We do business
the right way.
ir00W.OWnd **<
Fl. Laudwdate, Ft*. 13311
Phona: 736-1330
OAKLAND TOYOTA
day. May 10. In their sons'
honor, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert
Chalik and Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Tisman will co-sponsor the Oneg
Shabbat following Sabbath Ser-
vices on Friday evening. May 9.
Susan Brown, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. I-eonard Brown, will
celebrate her Bat Mitzvah at
Temple Kol Ami on Friday. May
16. at 8:15 p.m. Following the
Bat Mitzvah services, Mr. and
Mrs. Brown will sponsor the
Oneg Shabbat in their daughter's
honor.
Jeffrey Schonberg and Adam
Lazar will celebrate their B'nai
Mitzvah at 10:30 a.m. on
Saturday, May 17, at Temple Kol
Ami. In their sons' honor, their
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ira
Schonberg and Mr. and Mrs.
Lawrence Lazar will co-sponsor
the Oneg Shabbat following
services on Fridav evening. May
16.
The action, taken at the board
meeting in mid-March, is the first
commitment of funds this year,
launching a broad program of aid
to Israel during the coming
decade.
The board of governors of the
Jewish Agency recently ap-
proved a budget of $385 million
with a recommendation that it be
raised to $445 million for fiscal
1981.
Hoffberger said that major
phases of this interim funding
which will be administered by the
Jewish Agency include: im-
migration and absorption,
$15,000,000; social welfare
services. S 10,000,000; education.
S10.000.000: institutions of
higher learning. $20,000,000;
youth care and training,
$15,000,000; absorption in
agricultural settlements,
$15,000,000; immigrant housing,
$8,000,000. Only seven percent
will go for general administration
IS2.000.000) and debt services
($5,000,000).
An additional $10,000,000 was
authorized by the board for
Project Renewal, whose funds are
made available from one overseas
community for use in a neigh-
borhood "twinned" to it, Hoff-
berger said. The overall Jewish
Agency budget for Project
Renewal in 1980-81 is $80 million,
including $30 million for housing
in Renewal neighborhoods.
The UIA board. Hoffberger
reported, formulated guidelines
for structuring and
strengthening the relationship
between neighborhoods in Israel
and communities in the U.S. An
Ad Hoc Committee, chaired by
Jane Sherman of Detroit, a
newly-elected member of UIA's
board, is developing criteria for
allocation and monitoring
procedures. A reporting system
outlining legal and accounting
practices will assure the con-
tributor that full controls are
being maintained.
Allocation for Project Renewal
Hoffberger also stated that the
UIA board authorized the
allocation of $3,204,081 for
Project Renewal. Forty-five
programs were approved in 16
neighborhoods. Cumulative
allocations to Project Renewal as
of Feb. 22 amount to $7,843,382.
he said. and additional
authorizations are being made at
a rapid pace.
UIA's Jerusalem office staff
members are intricately involved
in the development of Project
Renewal programs, in close
cooperation with the Jewish
Agency, and continue to be key
participants in field trips,
workshons. and United Jewish
Appeal mission-related activities,
Hoffberger said.
According to UIA's 1979
annual report recently released to
all Federations, UJA and
community leadership, UIA had
received $226,279,264 during
fiscal 1979 from UJA for the
absorption of new immigrants,
establishment of rural set-
tlements, and for programs
aiding the youth, the aged, and
the needy.
To maintain a steady flow of
funds to the Jewish Agency for
the assurance of continuity in
programs and services, UIA
borrowed $60 million in 1979
from l>4 banks, the largest debt
financing in UIA history.
UIA plays a unique role as the
recognized agency handling a
grant from the U.'S. government
for the resettlement of refugees
from the Soviet Union and other
Eastern Kuropean countries, in
Israel. Hoffberger pointed out.
He noted that since 1973. UIA
has received 8178.115,000 worth
of grants authorized by the U.S.
Congress. for programs
providing transportation to
Israel. education, vocational
training and retraining, care and
maintenance, employment and
financial assistance. In 1979,
UIA received $25 million for this
purpose. An additional $25
million for 1980 is being made
available by the U.S. Congress
under a "continuing resolution."
..drning The Surgeon General Has Determined
Thai Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health
UUIH J; II 'iiu \m


-
1 he Jewish t.londuin of (trevter Fort Lauderdule
Changes in Federation By-Laws
The By-Laws Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
l-auderdale has proposed certain
changes In the 1977 By-Laws governing
the Federation These will be presented
at the Annual Meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
Thursday, May 29, In the Samuel M.
Soref Hall of the Jewish Community
Center. The changes, listed below In
BOLD FACE type. Immediately follow
the article or section to be changed:
ARTICLE I NAME
The name or title by which this
Federation Is to be known In law Is:
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, Inc.
ARTICLE I. NAME
The name or title by which Federation
i$ to be known in law Is: Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
Inc. hereafter referred to a* The
Federation.
ARTICLE II PURPOSES
To solicit, collect and otherwise raise
money for philanthropic, social
cultural, educational and religious
purposes: to contribute, disburse and
distribute the same or the Income
thereof for such purposes, either
directly for the same or similar pur
poses and to whom a direct contribution
could be tax exempt under the then
existing Internal Revenue Laws and
regulations; to receive and hold by
purchase, gift bequest or otherwise,
real or personal property and to
distribute it as It may be deemed best
for the promotion of the purposes of the
corporation.
ARTICLE II. PURPOSES
To solicit, collect and otherwise raise
money lor philanthropic, social,
cultural, educational and religious
purposes; to contribute, disburse and
distribute the same or Hie Income
thereof for such purposes, either
directly for the same or similar pur-
poses and to whom a direct contribution
would be tax exempt under the then
existing Internal Revenue laws and
regulations, to receive and hold by
purchase, gift, bequest or otherwise,
real or personal property and to
distribute it as it may be deemed best
for the promotion of the purposes of the
Federation with special consideration
given to the annual United Jewish
Appeal Campaign.
E. To support the people of Israel,
their security, prosperity and growth.
Omit E. F. becomes E intact.
ARTICLE V. OFFICERS
A. The officers of the corporation
shall be the President, two (2) and not
more than four (4) Vice-Presidents,
Treasurer and Secretary, all of whom
shall be elected and take office im-
mediately following the annual general
membership meeting of the corporation
and who shall hold the office for a term
of one year and or until their suc-
cessors are duly elected and qualified.
ARTICLE V. OFFICERS
A. The officers of the Federation shall
be the President, Executive Vice
President, three (3) Vice Presidents,
Treasurer and Secretary, all of whom
shall be elected at the annual mem
bership meeting of the Federation and
shall take office immediately following
the membership meeting, and shall hold
office for a term of one year and or
until their successors are duly elected
and qualified.
ARTICLE VI DUTIES OF OFFICERS
C. The President shall appoint the
chairmen of all standing committees of
the corporation except the Executive
Committee.
ARTICLE VI. DUTIESOF OFFICERS
C. The President shall appoint the
chairmen of all standing committees of
the Federation except (1) the Executive
Committee, and (2) the Nominating
Committee. All appointments of
chairmen of standing committees shall
be subject to approval by a majority
vote of the Executive Committee.
ARTICLE VI. DUTIES OF OFFICERS
SECTION 2
A. The President shall name one of
the Viee-Presldents to serve In his
absence and he shall preside at any
meeting of the corporation, of the
Executive Committee and of the Board
of Directors.
B. At the next regular scheduled
Board meeting or at a special meeting
called for that purpose, the Board of
Directors shall name one of the Vlce-
PresldenU to serve In the event of
death, resignation or removal of the
President from office and while serving
In this capacity the said Vice-President
shall become the President and shall
serve the remainder of the Presidents
unexpired term.
ARTICLE VI. DUTIES OF OFFICERS
SECTION!
1. Vice President:
A. The Executive Vice President shall
be chairman of the Federation United
Jewish Appeal Drive for at least one
year and the three Vice Presidents shall
be vice chairmen of such Drive, and
consent by candidates for election as
such Vice Presidents shall signify their
consents to serve in such capacities In
the event any one or mere such officers
resign or are unable or unwilling to so
serve, his or her replacement as officer
and drive chairman or co-chairman
shall be designated by the President
with the approval of the Board of
Directors.
B. In the absence of the President, the
Executive Vice President shall preside
at any meeting of the Federation, the
Executive Committee and the Board of
Directors. In the absence of the
President and the Executive Vice
President, the President shall name one
of the Vice Presidents to serve as
chairman of such meetings.
C. In the event of the death,
resignation or removal of the President
from office, the Executive Vice
President shall become the President
and shall serve the remainder of the
President's unexpired term and if the
Executive Vice President shall be

unable to serve as President, the Board
of Directors at a special meeting called
for that purpose, shall name one of the
Vice-Presidents to become the
President who shall serve the
remainder of the President's unexpired
term.
D. The Vice-Presidents shall oversee
the operation of the standing com-
mittees of the Federation as assigned by
the President and shall perform such
other duties as required by the Board of
Directors.
SECTION VI. DUTIES OF OFFICERS
SECTION 3
The Vice-Presidents shall oversee the
operation of the standing committees of
the corporation as assigned by the
President and shall perform such other
duties as required by the Board of
Directors.
B. The Secretary shall see that due
and proper notice Is given of all
meetings of the corporation, of the
Executive Committee and of the Board
of Directors, and such other duties as he
may be required to perform by the
Board of Directors.
SECTION VI. DUTIES OF OFFICERS
SECTIONS
Omit Sections.
Section 4 becomes Section 3 as
follows:
A remains the same,
B. The Secretary shall see that due
and proper notice is given of all
meetings of the Federation, of the
Executive Committee and of the Board
of Directors, and shall perform such
other duties as he may be required to
perform by the Board of Directors.
ARTICLE VII. BOARD OF DIREC-
TORS SECTION 2
A. The Board of Directors shall be
comprised of: (1) members of the
Executive Committee. (2) thirty-six
136) directors elected by the general
membership, (3) and one 11) rabbinical
member to be appointed by the Rab-
binical Council of North Broward, (41
all past presidents shall serve as ex-
offlclo members of the Board of
Directors with the right to vote.
B. In the event of the death,
resignation, removal or withdrawal of
any of the thirty-six 136) elected
directors, the President shall appoint a
successor to fulfill the remainder of the
term.
C. If a member of the Board of
Directors misses three 13) consecutive
meetings of the Board of Directors
without a reasonable excuse the Board,
as its discretion, may drop such
member from the Board. In this event,
the President shall appoint a new
Director to fill the unexpired term.
ARTICLE VII. BOARD OF DIREC-
TORS SECTION 3
A. The Board of Directors shall be
comprised of: (1) thirty-six (34)
directors elected by the general
membership, (2) one (l) rabbinical
member appointed by the Board of
Directors, (3) all past presidents, who
shall serve as voting members for three
(3) years after completing their term,
and then shall become honorary Board
members without vote unless sub-
sequently selected or appointed in the
same manner as other Board members.
B. In the event ol the death,
resignation, removal or withdrawal of
any of the thirty-six (3e) elected
directors, the President shall appoint a
successor to fulfill the remainder of the
term with the approval of the Board ol
Directors.
C. II a member ol the Board ol
Directors misses three (3) consecutive
meetings of the Board ol Directors
without a reasonable excuse the Board,
at its discretion, may remove such
member Irom the Board alter notice ol
such intended action is mailed to such
delinquent member.
ARTICLE VII. BOARD OF DIREC-
TORS SECTION 3
B. Of the thlrty-slx (36) directors
elected to the Board of Directors pur-
suant to these by-laws, those thirteen
(13) directors presently serving for a
term of two (2) years shall continue
their term, and shall be elected for a
term of one (1) year, and five (5) new
directors shall be elected for a term of
one (1) year. Additionally, eighteen (18)
directors shall be elected for a term of
two (2) years, thereafter, as each term
expires, the successors shall be elected
for a term of two (2) years.
ARTICLE VII. BOARD OF DIREC-
TORS SECTION 3
B. No director shall serve more than
six (4) consecutive years, except lor ex
of licio members ol the Board.
SECTION 4
B. The Board of Directors shall retain
an Executive Director to aid It In the
operation of the corporation. The hiring
and termination of the Executive
Director must be approved by the Board
of Directors.
D. The hiring of any other
professional staff required for the
operaUon of the corporation shall be
recommended by the Executive
Director to the Budget Committee and
approved by the Board of Directors.
E. The Board of Directors shall be
responsible for the approval of the
budget of the corporation, and shall be
responsible for allocating funds to
beneficiaries of the corporation and
shall establish written policies and
perform each and every act necessary
for the operation of the corporation.
F. Extraordinary meetings of the
Board of Directors may be called by (a)
the President of the corporation at any
time or (b) by any five (S) directors
upon ten (10) days written notice to the
remaining members of the Board of
Directors, which notice shall specify the
day. time and place of the meeting.
SECTION 4
B. The Board ol Directors shall
employ an Executive Director to con-
duct the operation ol the Federation.
The hiring and termination of the
Executive Director must be approved in
advance by the Board of Directors.
D. The hiring ol any other
professional staff required for the
operation of the Federation shall be
recommended by the .Executive
Director and approved by the Budget
and Personnel Committees.
E. The Board of Directors shall be
responsible lor the approval ol the
budget ol the Federation and shall be
responsible for allocating funds to
beneficiaries of the Federation and
shall be responsible for the operation of
the Federation.
F. Special meetings of the Board of
Directors may be called by (a) the
President ol the Federation at any time
or (b) by any five (5) directors upon ten
(10) days written notice to the
remaining members ol the Board of
Directors, shich notice shall specify the
day, time and place of the meeting.
SECTION 5
B. All committees of the corporation
shall report to the Board of Directors
when requested to do so by the Board of
Directors.
SECTIONS
B. All committees shall report to the
Board ol Directors when requested to do
so by the Board ol Directors.
ARTICLE VIII. EXECUTIVE COM
MITTEE SECTION 1
The Executive Committee shall
consist of the officers of the corporation,
the general chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal campaign, the President
of the Women's Division and Chairman
of Women's Campaign, and two
members from the Board of Directors
chosen by the President.
ARTICLE VIII. EXECUTIVE COM-
MITTEE SECTION 1
The Executive Committee shall
consist of the officers of the Federation,
the immediate past president ol the
Federation, the President of the
Women's Division, and live members of
the Board of Directors chosen by the
President.
SECTION 2
The Executive Committee shall meet
from time to time as necessary and
shall be responsible for recommending
actions and policies to the Board of
Directors. Additionally, the Executive
Committee shall be empowered to take
all actions necessary for the operation
of the corporation, within the policies
set by the Board of Directors. Actions
taken by the Executive Committee shall
be reported to the Board of Directors at
the first meeting following said action.
The committee's action shall be binding
and deemed to be the action of the
Board of Directors.
SECTION 2
The Executive Committee shall meet
from time to time as necessary and
shall be responsible for recommending
actions and policies to the Board ol
Directors. Additionally, the Executive
Committee shall be empowered to take
all actions necessary for the operation
ol the Federation, within the policies set
by the Board ol Directors. Actions taken
by the Executive Committee shall be
reported to the Board ol Directors at the
lirst meeting lollowing said action.
BCCTION8
A quorum of the Executive Com-
mittee shall consist of five (5) mem-
bers.
SECTION 3
A quorum of the Executive Com-
mittee shall consist of nine () mem-
bers. No action by less than a majority
of those present, but not less than six (4)
of the Executive Committee shall be
necessary to approve or disapprove any
action ol the Executive Committee.
ARTICLE IX. STANDING COM-
MITTEES SECTION 1
The President of the corporation shall
serve as an ex-offlclo member of all
standing committees of the corporation.
ARTICLE IX. STANDING COM-
MITTEES SECTION 1
The chairman of each committee
shall be appointed by the President with
the approval ol the Executive Com-
mittee. Except lor the campaign
committee, each standing committee
shall consist ol a chairman and at least
three (3) but not more than seven (7)
additional members appointed by the
chairman with the approval ol the
Executive Committee. At least two (2)
members ol each committee shall be
members of the Federation who are not
members of the Board of Directors.
SECTION 2
The following standing committees of
the Federation are herby established
11 United Jewish Appeal committee 2)
Budget & Allocations Committee 3)
Nominating committee 4 I Community
Relations committee 51 Personnel
committee 6) Jewish Education com-
mittee 7) Young Leadership committee
11 Community Planning
SECTIONS
The following standing committees of
the Federation are hereby established:
I) Campaign 2) Budget A Allocations 3)
Nominating 4) Community Relations 5)
Personnel 4) Jewish Education 7)
Young Leadership () Community
Planning 9) House 10) Chaplaincy
SECTION 3
The United Jewish Appeal committee
shall have charge of conducting annual
or special campaigns and fund raising
projects approved by the Board of
Directors. Etc
SECTIONS
The Campaign Committee shall have
charge of conducting annual or special
campaigns and fund raising projects
approved by the Board of Directors.
Etc.
SECTIONS
A. The Nominating committee shall
consist of no less than five (S) and no
more than seven (7| members; to be
chosen by the President.
C. (second sentence) Additional
nominations for any director may be
made by the filing of a petition con-
taining the signatures of twenty-five
(2Si members of the corporation.
SECTIONS
A. The Nominating Committee shall
consist of no less than live (S) and no
more than seven (7) members; to be
chosen by the Executive Committee.
C. (second sentence) Additional
nominations lor any officer or director
may be made by the tiling ol a petition
containing the signatures of twenty-five
(25) members of the Federation.
SECTION 6
The purpose of the Community
Relations Committee shall be to
coordinate the direction and to conduct
a program of community relations
between the Jewish and non-Jewish
communities to enable each such
community better to understand and
appreciate the other.
SECTION 4
The Community Relations Committee
shall coordinate the direction and
conduct a program of community
relations between the Jewish and non-
Jewish communities to enable each
such community better to understand
and appreciate the other.
SECTION 7
A. The Personnel Committee shall
consist of no less than five (6) members
und no more than seven (7i members
appointed by the President.
B. The committee on an annual basis
shall review and evaluate personnel
policies, practices and salary ranges,
and recommend to the Board of
Directors appropriate adjustments
when necessary It shall also formulate
additional personnel policies and
practices as needed.
SECTION 7
The Personnel Committee on an
annual basis shall review and evaluate
personnel policies, practices and salary
ranges, and recommend to the Board of
Directors appropriate adjustments
when necessary. It shall also formulate
additional personnel policies and
practices as needed.
SECTIONS
The Young Leadership Committee
shall be responsible lor elfecting a
program of recruitment and training
aimed at developing future leadership
for the Federation.
SECTION 9
The Community Planning Committee
shall seek to recognize long range plans
for the successful operation ol the
Federation.
SECTION 10
The Jewish Education Committee
shall coordinate and conduct a program
of Jewish Education for the people of
North Broward County.
SECTION 11
The House Committee shall have the
responsibility to oversee the operation
ol the buildings owned or operated by
the Federation, and to recommend
repairs, refurbishing, replacements and
additions.
SECTION 12
The Chaplaincy Committee shall be
responsible lor supervision ol the
community chaplaincy service, the
development ol services lor Jewish
residents and the preparation and
submission of the annual budget lor the
service.
ARTICLE X WOMEN'S DIVISION
SECTION 1
This Amendment shall take effect
immediately upon approval by the
Hoard of Directors of the Corporation.
ARTICLE X. WOMEN'S DIVISION
SECTION!
OMIT Section 1.
ARTICLE XIV. AMENDMENT OF
BY-LAWS
These by-laws may be revised,
amended or repealed by a two-thirds
12 3rdst vote of the members of the
corporation at a meeting of which notice
of Intention to amend by laws has been
given at least ten (10) days prior to such
meeting.
XIV. INTERPRETATION AND
AMENDMENT SECTION I IN-
TERPRETATION
The Board of Directors shall have the
power to interpret any provision of
these By-Laws, and such interpretation
shall be binding and conclusive for all
purposes.
SECTION 2: AMENDMENT
The Board of Directors, by an af-
firmative vote of at least two-thirds
(2 Srds) of its total membership shall
have the power to amend these By
Laws.
ARTICLE XV. EFFECTIVE DATE
This amendment shall take elfect
immediately upon approval of two-
thirds (2 Srds) of the Board ol
Directors.
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
776-6272
OW.RD
it a
ACKAGINC
1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT LAUDERDALE
THE HEBREW
DAY SCHOOL OF
FT. LAUDERDALE
ENROLL NOW
Kindergarten- 5*^4* f-Bo-rie

Child-centered philosophy
Integrated secular-Judaic curriculum
Non-denommationai community Day School
Beneficiary agency of Jew.sh Federation ol Greater Ft Lauderdale
Financial aid available
Located on 16 acre JCC campus
The Mebrev* Da, Sckm> ,1..
9*ou'
-'- .
6501 West Sunrise Boulevard
Plantation. Florida 33313
583-b/00
*i
*
Director Fran Merenstem
0


Jay, May \
Indian ofUreaterFort Lauderdale
Saturday, May 10
kple Beth Orr Fund Raising
nmittee, Las Vegas Night 8
Monday, May 12
kple Emanu-EI Games 7:15
lassah Tamar Fort Laudardale
pter Regular meeting
kple Beth Israel Sisterhood -
Ird meeting
Tuesday, May 13
li B'rith Bermuda Club Board
(ting
Broward Brandeis National
nen's Committee Meeting -
Ip.m.
issah N. Lauderdale Chai
pier Board meeting
ki B'rith Ocean Chapter #1628 -
jlar meeting
kple Sholom Board meeting 8
i B'rith Fort Lauderdale
pter #345 Board meeting
issah Plantation L'Chayim
pier Donor Luncheon *
issah Rayus Board meeting
Religious
Directory
LAUDERDALELAKES
EL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE.
|si West Oakland Park Boulevard.
dern Orthodox Congregation
kirray Brickman, president.
APLE EMANU-EL. 3245 W.
akland Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi
kllrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome
|lement.
SUNRISE
TH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
I.iki.ind Park Blvd. Conservative.
LbOi Philip A. Labowitz. Cantor
(dunce Neu.
XRISE JEWISH CENTER. INC .8049
pest Oakland Park Blvd. Con
fervative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy.
lantor Jack Marchant. Irving
jlrinhdus. preside))!.
LAUDERHILL
iBREW CONGREGATION OF
lAUDERHILL. 2048 RW 48th Ave..
loudorhill Conservative. Kabbi
avid W Gordon, President. Sol
bhcn
TAMAR AC
IMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9101
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
/mrnvrman Cantor Henry
HOLLYWOOD
kUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 4171 Stirling
Rd Orthodox Rabbi Moshe Bomier
lANTATION JEWISH CONGRE
SADON. 8200 Peters Rd. Liberal
ftciorm. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr.
ECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE
fj/3NW4lhSt.Hank Pitt,president.
POMPANO BEACH
|MPLE SHOLOM. 132 SE 11th Ave.
KjliV Rjbbi Morris A. Skop.
Cdtiior Jacob Renter.
MARGATE
lillLLELCONGREGATION.7640
nudio Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Joseph Berglas.
ARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 6101
|NW 9th St Conservative Rabbi Dr.
|Sulomon Geld.
CORAL SPRINGS
:MPLE BETH ORB. 2151 Riverside
|Orive. Relorm.
DEERFIELDBEACH
EMPLE BETH ISRAEL at Century
[Village East. Conservative. Rabbi
[David Berent. Cantor Joseph Pollack.
BOCA RATON
iMPLE BETH EL. 333 SW 4th
I Avenue. Boca Raton. Rabbi Merle S.
Singer.

I
Community
Calendar
*
Day School Board
Hebrew
meeting
B'nai B'rith Ocean Chapter #1628
Paid-up Membership Tea and
Hobby Show at Jarvis Hall, 405 N.
Ocean Blvd. Refreshments.
Deborah Hospital Foun-
dation/Sunrise Chapter Meeting
at Whiting Hall. Luncheon. Book
review by Dorothy Laufer, The
Littlest Hippie.
Wednesday, May 14
Women's Environ Club (Inverrary) -
Board meeting p.m.
Hadassah Oriole Scopus Board
meeting -9:30 a.m.
ORT Royal Plantation General
meeting
Sunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood -
Board meeting. Representative of
Thompson McKinnon will be guest
speaker. Refreshments 11:30
a.m.
OAT Palm-Aire Chapter General
meeting
Brandeis Plantation W. Broward
Chapter Regular meeting at
Deicke Aud. noon to 3 p.m.
ORT Coral Springs Chapter -
General meeting at the Community
Center of Coral Springs-8 p.m.
Brandeis National Women's
Committee Fort Lauder-
dale/Pompano Chapters Instal-
lation Luncheon
Temple Beth Orr Games River-
side Dr. & Royal Palm Blvd. 7:45
p.m.
Jewish Federation ot Greater Fort
Lauderdale/ Young Leadership
Meeting 7:45 p.m.
Hadassah Bermuda Club Herzl
Chapter Meeting Entertainment -
12:30 p.m.
Pioneer Women Natanya Club of
Margate Installation and Lun-
cheon at Schneiders Restaurant,
4220 State Road 7 noon
Hadassah-Somerset Shoshana
Chapter Donor Luncheon at
Towne House
Thursday, May 15
ORT N. Broward Chapter -
General meeting
Hadassah Pompano Beach Chal
Chapter Regular meeting
Margate Art Show
The first annual Margate
Artists Spring Show is being
planned outdoors for May 9 and
10 near the Catherine Young
Library, according to Dr. Harry
T. Zankel, president, Margate
Arts and Cultural Association
For detail, call Leopold Kirsch-
baum chairman.
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May 18
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B'nai B'rith Tamarac Chapter
#1479 General meeting at the
Tamarac Jewish Center. Guest
speaker will be Dave Krantz 12:15
p.m.
Hadassah Blyma Chapter ot Mar-
gate Instal lalion of new officers at
Beth Hillel. Musical program -
Retreshments
Hadassah Sabra Regular
meeting-8 p.m.
Jewish War Veterans Women's
Auxiliary of Pompano Beach Poet
196 Meeting at the Pompano
Beach Recreation Center
American Red Mogen David for
Israel Meeting at Whiting Hail.
Lunch. Jeffrey Goldberg, guest
speaker.
B'nai B'rith Qolda Meir Chapter
#1644 Meeting at Nob Hill Center.
Entertainment by Tony Spumoni -
Mini-luncheon
Friday, May 16
Hadassah Sabra Installation of
officers- p.m.
Sunday, May 18
ORT Ocean Mile Chapter Din-
ner/Dance at Jarvis Hall 6:30 p.m.
Monday, May 19
Pioneer Women Natanya Club -
Board meeting
Hadassah Armon Castle Gardens
Chapter Board meeting at 'The
Castle Gardens Rec. Hall-a.m.
B'nai B'rith Sunrise Lodge #2953 -
Regular meeting p.m.
Temple Emanu-EI Games 7:15
p.m.
Hadassah Oakland Estates Aviva
Chapter Installation meeting at
the Lauderdale Lakes City Hall.
Original Hadassah skit, directed by
Lou Vigon-noon.
Hadassah Inverrary Gilah Chapter
Donor Luncheon at Gibbys
Restaurant, 2900 NE 12th Terrace -
Oakland Park-11:30 a.m.
Tuesday, May 20
Women's League for Israel Board
meeting
Hadassah Somerset Shoshana
Chapter Regular meeting at the
Rec. Hall
B'nai B'rith Fort Lauderdale
Chapter #345 Regular meeting
B'nai B'rith Fort Lauderdale #1438-
Emanuel J. Bly Night, Lauderdale
Lakes Public Safety Bldg. 8 p.m.
Temple Sholom Sisterhood &
Pompano General meeting 1
p.m.
Hadassah Plantation L'Chayim
Chapter Installation
Hadassah Armon Castle Chapter -
Donor Luncheon at Emerald Hills
Country Club. Entertainment by
the Habimah Players
Hadassah Plantation L'Chayim
Chapter Installation ot new of-
ficers at Deicke Aud, 5701 Cypress
Ave.. Plantation- noon
Wednesday and Thursday
May 21 and May 22
SHAVUOT
Friday. May 23
Workmen's Circle #1046 General
meeting at Lauderdale Lakes City
Hall. Social program Folk dan-
cing with Lillian and Sol Brenner -
7:30 p.m.
Levitt -1 Fe
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Peres Meets with Carter Federation Briefed on Foundation
Friday, May 9, 1980
nHatinnl
Continued from Page 1
build a Jordanian-Palestinian
framework in which the Pales-
tinian issue can find its fair
solution in the future."
ASKED ABOUT Carters
response to this, Peres said, "He
was very interested in it." He
added, laughing, "I don't think
he became a member of the Labor
Party or Likud I gathered from
him he is not taking part in
Israeli politics or vice versa."
The Bible and
The West Bank
Peres was questioned about
the view that "the Bible deeds
the occupied territories to the
Jews,'* an apparent reference by
the reporter to the views ex-
pressed to Begin here last week
by a group of Evangelical
Christian ministers supporting
Israel. Peres said. "The Bible is a
document that deals with wider
issues than just territories. I
believe that Judaism is basically
a moral commitment based on a
homeland and that the Bible calls
for peace, no just for territory."
"There is no doubt," he added,
"that we have the right on the
land. But we cannot deal just on
historical assumptions. We have
to look to the future and see how
to guarantee the Jewish charac-
ter of the State of Israel which is
not just a numerical commitment
but moral as well, and how to
make peace with our neighbors.
There is nothing in the Bible that
forbids it."
ASKED IF the settlements
issue is making the peace process
more difficult, Peres said, "I
don't think the settlements as
such are the issue. It is the future
of the West Bank from which the
settlement policy results. We
have to decide the basic frame-
work over the West Bank and
U.S Vetoes
Resolution on
Arab State
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. -
(JTA) The United States
vetoed a United Nations Security
Council resolution calling for the
establishment of an independent
Palestinian Arab state on April
30.
The resolution affirmed the
Palestinians' right to have their
own nation and to return to their
homes or demand compensation
for their abandoned properties.
The vote was 10-1, with the
four Western European dele-
gations Britain, France,
Norway and Portugal ab-
staining.
Delegates of the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization said they
would now request, with support
from the Arabs and the non-
aligned nations, a special session
of the UN General Assembly to
deal with the Palestinian issue.
Explaining the U.S. veto,
Ambassador Donald McHenry
said the resolution could "not
bring the achievement of peace
one day closer to practical
reality."
He told the council that crucial
negotiations were now in
progress on Palestinian auton-
omy under the Camp David
accords.
"Egypt and Israel," he said,
"have commitied themselves to
work towards a comprehensive
peace in the Middle East which
p must resolve the Palestinian
problem in all its aspects and
recognize the legitimate rights of
the Palestinian people."
then the settlement issue will
become a matter of secondary
nature."
An aide to Peres told the JTA
that when Peres addressed an
Israel Bonds rally in Baltimore
later that night, he warned that
should a territorial compromise
be reached with new borders be-
tween Israel and a "Jordanian-
Palestinian state," Jewish settle-
ments would be under foreign,
Jordanian sovereignty.
In addition to his meeting at
the White House, Peres met
separately with Vance at the
State Department. He was a
guest at a breakfast at the
Cosmos Club, arranged by Max
Kampelman, a Washington
lawyer who was a political
supporter of the late Sen. Hubert
Humphrey. Sens. Henry Jackson
(D, Wash.) and Richard Stone
ID., Fla.l were also at the break-
fast. Peres was scheduled to meet
with Senate Minority Leader
Howard Baker (R.. Term.), and
with former Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger.
Editor's Note: Four days after
Peres met with Vance, the latter
resigned as Secretary of State
because he didn't approve of the
attempted Iranian rescue. Vance
was succeeded by Maine's Sen.
Edmund Muskie.
Norman Lipoff, a member of
the Miami law firm of Greenberg,
Traurig, Hoffman, Lipoff,
Quentel & Wolff, spoke to the
officers and directors of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale about the work
of Foundations in Federations
throughout the country.
His talk followed a progress
report on the Federation's
Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies by Foundation
Chairman Arthur A. Faber, and
Nathan Rosenberg, Foundation
director.
The report showed that a board
of trustees had been organized, a
Legal and Tax Committee form-
ed: numerous personal contacts
made; and a Tax Seminar
planned for attorneys, ac-
countants and trust officers of
banks.
Foundation Co-Chairman
Richard Romanoff indicated that
several members of the
Federation board are taking part
in the Foundation program and
urged others to follow that
example so that the general
community can take their lead in
participating in the program.
Lipoff, considered to be an
outstanding tax attorney, said
that Foundation programs have
produced a bonanza of additional
to help finance
needs facing the
resources
tremendous
Federations.
He stated that the program
indues Letters of Intent, in
which individuals indicate that
they will be including the
Foundation of the Jewish
Federation in their wills;
philanthropic funds, which will
be the establishment of a
Foundation within the Jewish
Federation; lifetime income
plans; charitable remainder
annuity trusts; gifts of real
estate, securities or other
property, or life insurance. M
He stressed the tremendous
tax advantages which individuals
can benefit from by taking part in
these programs, among which
include: receiving a charitable
deduction, together with a life
income, reducing capital gains,
sealing in profits, saving ori
estate taxes, how to keep windfall
profits and several other ad-
vantages.
Further information without
obligation is available from
Faber, Romanoff, or Joel Telles
at the Federation.
Stack Announces Grant
Congressman Edward J. Stack
(D-Fort Lauderdale) announced
that a grant of $323,000 has been
awarded by the Community
Services Administration (CSA)
to the Community Partnership
Program, Inc. (CPP), Fort
Lauderdale.
The award of these funds will
enable CPP to focus their
community action effort in 42
selected neighborhoods
throughout Broward County
where public housing and low
income apartments predominate.
Stack said, "This program is
primarily designed to help neigh-
borhoods help themselves.
Neighborhood civic groups and
leaders will be asked to determine
vital community projects and will
be assisted with their develop-
ment."
In addition, these neigh-
borhoods are to be assisted with
their representation before any
dealing with public bodies such
as local human service depart-
ments.
"This program reflects the
most effective method of im-
proving neighborhoods," Stack
said, "that is, helping people to
help themselves."

i


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Friday, May 9, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
y v
JCC
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of Greater Ft. Lauderdale
"Gathering Place"
The Jewish Community
Center's "Gathering Place" is a
program of care for the frail
elderly. Twenty seniors, aged 79
through 93, come together daily
for a full day of activities such as
music, therapy, mild exercise,
crafts, discussions and games.
The participants in this program
handcrafted many items for sale
recently and successfully raised
the necessary funds to subsidize
a "day out." Plans have been
finalized for an excursion on the
Jungle Queen
May 14.
on Wednesday,
Philosopher May 13
JCC will present "Random
Aspects of Jewish Thought," by
Jewish philosopher Ben-Zion
Eisenberg, Tuesday, May 13, at
11:30 a.m. Guests are asked to
bring their own lunch (dairy
please) to this "learn while you
eat" session. JCC will supply the
beverage. Call the Center for
further information.
Maccabiah Prize Winners
The Israeli Independence Day
Maccabiah Olympic Games
attracted over 350 participants
from six area synagogues,
Temple Kol-Ami, Temple Beth
Israel, Temple Emanu-El, Recon-
structionist Synagogue, Temple
Beth Orr, Tamarac Jewish
Center; and also from the He-
brew Day School and JCC.
Awards were given for first,
second and third place in each
activity, and a team trophy went
to the team with the most total
points. This year's team
championship trophy was won by
Temple Kol-Ami.
Individual winners in the
various age categories were as
follows:
Five and Six Year Old
III Yard Hush. 1st. Brian Kahn,
Kmanu Kl. -'iicl. Michael Cooodman.
Beth Orr; 3rd, Wendy Nemerofaky,
Kmanu Kl; Running Brnud Jump: 1st.
Tmiii HelmowlU, Kol-Ami, 2nd, Curtli
Ituaaell, Kmanu Kl. 3rd. Ellen
tovuseletaky, Hebrew i>uy School.
Wheel Barrel: 1st, John Weston of Belh
Israel and Mat an Orellch of Kol-Ami;
2nd, Michael Coodman. Alan Dobkin.
iinih 01 Belli Orr. 3rd. Curtis Russell,
David Schneider, both of Kmanu KI
Thrci Legged Hare: 1st. Jon Weston of
Hi ih Israel and Kabul Orellch of Kol
Vllll, 2nd,Wend) Neinei nl.skyof Kmanu
Kl, and Kliza Brown of Kol Ami. 3rd.
Inn .mil Hilly Coldfarb of Kmanu Kl
Seven Through Nine
H Yard Hash: 1st. Andrew Felnberg.
Kul Ann. -'ml. Staccy Goodman. Beth
Orr, 3rd, Michael Vablonski, Kol-Ami
Running Broad Jump: 1st. Michael
Vablonski. Kol Ami. 2nd. Mike Shorr.
Belli Israel. ;ird.Andrew Felnberg. Kol-
\iiii Wheel Barrel: 1st. Brian Perlman
ol Kmanu Kl and Mike Shorr of Beth
Israel. 2nd. Jennifer Statfeld and
Sluny Ncmerofsy of Kmanu-El. 3rd
Michael Yablonski and Harry l^ngarof
Kol Ami. Three Legged Race: 1st
Cindy and Ban Turhman of Beth Israel.
2nd. Nicole Feldman and Mortsa
Slcucrniaii of Kct cinslnictionlst; 3rd,
Hal Klein ol Hebrew Day School and
lii.-h Welllkofl ol Kol Ami.
10 Through 12
l Yard Ihtnh: Isl, Stai ey Meyerson,
Kol Ami. 2nd. David C.iad. JCC. 3rd.
Ilivnl Uoliiman. Keconstructionlst.
Broad .lump: 1st. David Grad. JCC.
2nd. Scott Marko, Kol Ami. 3rd, Robbie
Cohen. Keconstructionlst. Three
Legged Kaee: 1st. Daniel Kellner and
Jeffrey Herman of Beth Orr; 2nd, Susan
Chudnuw and Michelle Cohen of Recon-
slmctiunisl. 3rd, Debbie Z.elman and
Lisa Flshman of Reconstructionlst.
Wheel Barrel: 1st. Jon Cross and Brent
Goldman of Reconstructionlst; 2nd,
Marls Kirschbaum and Cralg Lane of
Hccunslruclionlst; 3rd. Robert Fellner
and Adam Goodman of Beth Orr.
UTolS
SO Yard Dash: 1st. Andy Cohen.
Reconstructionlst. 2nd. Marc Porls.
Tamarac Jewish Center. 3rd. John
Cohen, Tamarac Jewish Center. Three
l-*Ked Race: 1st. Andy Cohen and
Brian Kraus. Reconstructionlst; 2nd,
M.ui I 'in is and Jon Cohen of Tamarac
Jewish Center. 3rd. Amanda and Carrie
Bruner of Reconstructionlst. Broad
Jump: 1st. Andy Cohen. Reconstruc-
liunist, 2nd. Marisa Kansky, Tamarac
Jewish Center, 3rd, Marc Ports,
Tamarac Jewish Center. Wheel Barrel
Race: 1st. Marc Ports and Jon Cohen of
Tamarac Jewish Center; 2nd. Andy
Cohen and Brian Kraus of Reconstruc-
tionist. 3rd. Amanda and Carrie Bruner
of Reconstructions!.
I Visit Artist's Studio
Julian Feingold, artist, and a
man committed to working with
and for the Jewish Community
Center, has invited Center
members to his studio on Thurs-
day, May 15, at 2:30 p.m. to view
his paintings and to learn more
about art. His wife, Ada, will
host the occasion with wine and
cheese. Call the Center for further
information.
Seder in Egypt
Sunday, May 18, at 10 a.m. at
Sunday breakfast discussion,
guest speaker will be Dr. Leon
Fellman, of Omaha. Neb. He will
recount his experience as a
delegate from the State of Israel
Bonds Office at the first Seder
held in Egypt. Tickets for the
breakfast of bagel, cream cheese
and coffee must be purchased in
advance at JCC.
Jewish Book Reviews
JCC announces a Great Jewish
Book Review Series with out-
standing members of the com-
munity reviewing the best of
Jewish literature. The month of
May will feature Rabbi Albert B.
Schwartz, director of Chaplaincy
Commission of the Jewish Fed-
eration, who will discuss the
"Book of Ruth" on Wednesday,
May 7, at 8 p.m.
On Wednesday, May 14, at 8
p.m., Helene Goldwin will review
How We Lived, a documentary
history of immigrant Jews in
America 1880-1930, by Irving
Home and Kenneth Libo.
Abraham Gittelson, director of
education for Jewish Federation,
has chosen Selected Stories by
Isaac Bashevis Singer for
Wednesday, May 28, at 8 p.m.
Senior Adult Club
The Senior Adult Club will
meet on Thursday, May 15, at 2
p.m. Two special films will be
shown. "The Team" features the
medical and paramedical men
and women who serve in the
Mogen David Adorn services.
"Man On A Bus," starring
Broderick Crawford and J-
Carroll Naish, is a story of a
group of Israeli immigrants
stranded in the Negev desert
when their bus breaks down.
Following the meeting, Lil and
Sol Brenner will conduct their
regular social dance class.
"Best of Broadway 2"
The Twin Lakes Theatre
group, after a successful run, is
giving performances of the "Best
of Broadway 2," a musical ex-
travaganza, on Thursday, June 5,
and Saturday, June 7, at 8 p.m.
at the Perlman Campus. The
group, under the direction of
Irene Unterman, will donate the
proceeds of their efforts to the
Jewish Community Center.
Tickets are now on sale.
Nutrition Program
Entertained
Something special happened
on April 25, when the Wynmoor
Philharmonics and the Wynmoor
Dance Group performed for the
seniors in the Nutrition Program
at JCC. Lou Delin, former pro-
fessional with the Boris Min-
nevitch harmonica group, taught
his group to read music and play
harmonicas. Ruth Weinberg,
former Rockette, choreographed
and directed tap dance routines.
Hannah Schaeffer. pianist, was
accompanist.
Symphony Season
The Broward Symphony Or-
chestra, Jimmy Woodle, music
director, has just announced its
1980-81 season.
A sixth concert has been added
to the series, and pianists Byron
Janis, Horacio Gutierrez and
Jerome Lowenthal, and violinist
Eugene Fodor have been engaged
for next season.
The series also will include the
annual Concerto Competition, in
which young artists compete for
cash prizes, and the annual
"Pops" Concert, featuring a
special tribute to George Ger-
shwin.
All concerts will be presented
on Saturday evenings in the new
Bailey Concert Hall on the BCC
Central Campus beginning Oct. 4
and ending May 30.
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'
Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. May 9,
I

New Approach to Bible Study Teacher's Sessions
On 5 Bible's Scrolls
A seminar for the religious
school teachers of North Broward
focusing on the study of Bible,
utilizing the methodology and
materials of the Melton Research
Center was held last week at the
Reconstructionist Synagogue
under the auspices of Central
Agency for Jewish Education
(CAJE) of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Ruth Zielenziger, faculty
member of the Melton Research
Center and instructor at the
Teachers Institute of the Jewish
Theological Seminary focused on
the opening chapters of the book
of Genesis. With the teachers,
she engaged in searching analysis
of the text of the Bible,
specifically as religious document
concerned with the basic
uestions ot man's relationship
to God, to the world and to his
fellow man.
The Melton Research Center,
endowed by the late philan-
thropist, Samuel Melton of
Columbus, Ohio, has pioneered
during the last two decades in
developing materials, first in the
area of Bible, and now in Hebrew,
Jewish history and the Jewish
holidays, that challenge the
students of the Jewish schools to
intellectually relate to the classic
texts of Jewish life so as to ex-
tract the moral values contained
therin and formulate for
themselves a committed Jewish
lifestyle.
Temple Beth Israel of Sunrise.
under the direction of its school
principal, Stanley Cohen, has
instituted the Melton Hebrew
program into its curriculum.
In attendance at the two-day
seminar were teachers from the
Reconstructionist Synagogue,
Temple Beth Israel, Temple
Emanu-El, and Hebrew Day
School of Fort Lauderdale; Hillel
Community Day School of North
Miami Beach, Temple Sinai of
Hollywood, B'nai Torah of Boca
Raton, and Beth David
Congregation of Miami. The
seminar was coordinated by
Abraham J. Gittelson, director of
education of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
Schools Seek Teacher's
Qualified individuals with
background in education and
Judaic studies are urged to
contact Abraham J. Gittelson.
director of education of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. in regard to
positions in early childhood.
Sunday School, Afternoon
Hebrew School. Judaica Hiirh
School and adult Jewish
education for the schools of the
North Broward area.
"The continuing growth of the
Jewish community of Greater
Fort Lauderdale has resulted in a
growing need for teenagers on all
levels of Jewish education."
Gittelson said. "The Jewish
Broward Library Notes
The Broward County Library
System offers the following
programs to the public, free of
charge:
Golf Clinic: Conducted by
Aaron Guzy. 2 p.m., Tuesday,
May 13, at the Tamarac Branch
Library. 8601 W. McNab Rd.
Collectibles: Anne Gilbert,
nationally syndicated newspaper
columnist, author and TV per-
sonality, speaks on "the art of
collecting," 7:30 8:30 p.m..
Wednesday. May 14, at Coral
Springs Branch Library, 9571 W.
Sample Rd.
AI Anon: Panel discussion by
Broward Al-Anon Groups on
alcoholism will be presented 7:30
- 8:30 p.m., at Fort Lauderdale
Branch Library, 1300 E. Sunrise
Blvd. Anyone 15 years or older
who needs help in coping with an
alcoholic family member will find
help here.
Small Business Conference:
Also at the Fort Lauderdale
Branch Library, an all-day
conference from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., conducted by Joseph
Trovato and sponsored by the
Library System, Miami office of
Small Business Administration
and SCORE (Senior Corps of
Retired Executives), covering
forms of organization, financial
records, taxes, breakeven point,
business insurance, credit,
collections, and other relevant
topics. Advance reservations
required. Call the Library.
Broward Harmonic Group:
Entertains at 7:30 p.m., Thurs-
day, May 15, at Tamarac
Branch Library, 8601 W. McNab
Rd. Eight harmonic players and a
singer, all retired musicians in
Tamarac or Margate, are directed
by Chuck Levenson.
$25 Contribution Required
To Receive 'The Floridian9
The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale has raised the
minimum contribution to the 1980 United Jewish Appeal tor those
who wish to receive The Jewish Floridian the newspaper
published every two weeks with national, international, and local
news of interest to residents in the Jewish community of North
Broward County. The new minimum is $25.
In the seven years that the Jewish Federation has been involved
in the publication of the Greater Fort Lauderdale edition, the costs
for postage, typesetting, printing, newsprint, and maintaining ac-
curate mailing addresses have all risen dramatically. The Jewish
Federation can no longer absorb these costs and your under
standing of the necessity for this action is sincerely appreciated
Even with this increase with a goodly portion of that minimum
commitment going to aid Jews around the world The Jewish
Floridian is available for one of the lowest subscription rates among
English-language Jewish newspapers.
Greater Fort Lauderdale
Edition of
"Jewish Floridian
is provided as a public service to trie Jewish communities in Noun Broward County by me
Jewish Federation of
2999 NW 33rd Ave
Ft. Lauderdale 33311
Greater Fort Lauderdale
Phone
305/484-8200
Leo Goodman ~^^^^~ Leslies Gottlieb
President Executive unc\.tvi
Milton Keintr
Executive Vice President
Victor Gruman I Richard Romanoff
vice rrtn>iottnt ISeci-efar-y
Joel Rein stein I Joel Levitt
Wee President I Treasurer
John Streng I Mrs. Bernard Libros
Vice President \ Women s Division President
Page Four eOilorial columns ol me JfvViSH PlOHIOUN e.o'ess me op.n.on 0' me Put
and neither those columns nor me advertising represent enao'sentent c. me jemisr fm ol Greater fort iLioeroaie
New* items lor the Qreeler Fort Lauderdiie Edition ol Th, Jewish floridian should M sent to
the Jewish Federation ottice MM NW J3rd Ae.. Fort Lauderdale 33311
teacher is the key element in the
transmission of the Jewish
heritage to the next generation,
and those who have had ex-
perience in teaching in Jewish
schools are urged to join in the
sacred task of Jewish education."
Phyllis Chudnow. chairperson
of the CommitteeofJewish
Education of the Federation,
stressed that "no longer is
Jewish education confined to the
childhood years up to Bar or Bat
Mitzvah. Today it is more
evident than ever before that
high school and adult Jewish
education are vital necessities for
a quality Jewish community, and
teachers for those age levels are
more important than ever."
In addition to those teachers
who hold certification in Jewish
studies, the Central Agency for
Jewish Education (CAJE)
provides courses, workshops and
seminars for teacher professional
growth, as well as a licensing
program for early childhood and
day and afternoon Hebrew
teachers that is part of the
National Board of License of the
American Association for Jewish
Education.
Accordingly, individuals who
have completed studies in
education but have limited
Judaic background, or those who
are widely knowledgeable in
Jewish subjects but have no
teaching experience, may contact
CAJE at the Jewish Federation
to determine how they may
enhance their own knowledge so
as to qualify to teach in the
schools of the area.
"CAJE has been able to
establish a Teacher Fringe
Benefit Program in the Greater
Miami area for the teachers of the
Jewish schools," said Gene
Greenzweig, CAJE executive
director. "It hopes to institute
the beginnings of such a program
in North Broward as well."
Persons interested in applying
are asked to call the CAJE office
at the Federation office, 2999 NW
33rd Ave., Fort Lauderdale.
A study of the books of the
Bible known as "The Five
Scrolls," is being conducted for
the teachers of the Jewish schools
of North Broward every Tuesday
afternoon during the month of
May by Rabbi David Lehrfield,
under the auspices of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
(CAJE) for the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
Rabbi Lehrfield. who is the
spiritual leader of Congregation
Knesset Israel of Miami Beach,
has served as an instructor in the
Institute of Jewish Studies of
CAJE for more than a decade,
and is also adjunct professor in
Judaic Studies at Florida
International University. Known
throughout the Greater Miami
area as a master teacher and a
Judaica scholar. Rabbi Lehrfield
provides a challenging in-depth
analysis of the Biblical text
through a vast knowledge of
traditional sources and modern
thought.
The course, which is held from
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at Temple
Beth Israel 7100 Oakland Park
Blvd., each Tuesday during May,
is part of the on-going
professional growth programs
arranged for the teachers in the
day and afternoon schools of the
North Broward area.
Phyllis Chudnow, chairperson
of the Committee on Education of
the Jewish Federation noted that
"the teacher is the core of the
educational process and
professional growth seminars,
courses and workshops are vital
to the enhancement of the
teacher's competencies and
abilities in the classroom. The in-
service programs of CAJE for our
teachers have been a major
benefit in affecting the quality of
education in our community."
The Five Scrolls, which from
the subject matter of the course.
are short books of the last section
of the Bible, the Holy Writings,
each of which is read in the
synagogue service on a separate
holiday of the Jewish year. Major
concentration of the first session
on May 6, was on Book of Ruth,
and that concentration continues
on May 13. The Book of Ruth is
recited on the holiday of Shavuot
which begins at sundown
Tuesday, May 20, and continues
for two days.
An entire session will be
devoted to the Scroll of
Lamentations read on the fast
day of Tisha B'Av (July 22 this
year) which commemorates the
destruction of both of the
Temples in Jerusalem, in the
years 586 Before the Common
Era (BCE) and 70 Common Era
(CE). In addition, according to
Abraham J. Gittelson, education
director of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale. one
session will serve as an overview
of the contents of all of the five
Scrolls, including the most we\
known of all, the Scroll of Esther
which is read on Purim.
Learn to Tutor
A Workshop to train volunteer
reading tutors will be held at
First Lutheran Church, 441 M
3rd Ave.. Fort Lauderdale, on
May 14-17. Participants will be
taught to teach adults to read
and write. Everyone is welcome
Write "I^earn to Read Volunteers
of Miami." P.O. Box 69-0001..
Miami. FL 33169.
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