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The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale ( March 14, 1980 )

UFJUD

Pag* 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 14, I960

JCC Music Month
Comedy March 23; Concert March 30
Mark Your Calendar:
The Big Event, Sunday, April 20
Direct from Broadway comes
Chayele Aah headlining the
Yiddish Musical Comedy Theatre
to be presented at 2 p.m.,
Sunday, March 23, in the Fort
Lauderdale High School
Auditorium, 1600 NE 4th Ave.
Chayele Ash, a character
actress and singer, is returning to
Fort Lauderdale for the fourth
year in the Jewish Community
Center presentation. Featured
with her will be Ari Fuhrman,
character actor; and Renee
Solomon, concert pianist.
Reserved seats for the
sophisticated, professional New
York troupe are on sale at JCC.
19 MUSIC WINNERS
PERFORM MARCH 30
Nineteen musically talented
members of the Jewish com-
munity were chosen by a panel of
judges to take part in the Jewish
Music Celebration at 2 p.m.,
Sunday, March 30, at the Jewish
Community Center, Perlman
Campus, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Two of the judges, Cantor
Jerome Klement of Temple
Emanu-El and Dorothy Rubin,
newspaper editor, have volun-
teered to coordinate the variety
program to be presented. The
third judge who joined the other
two in the evaluation of the talent
during the competition was
Music Critic Shirley Green.
Shulamith Saltzman, chairman
of the Jewish Music Celebration,
expressed her gratitude to the
judges and to Irene Unterman,
pianist, who accompanied all the
gerformers during the auditions,
he said: "She played, tran-
sposed, and generally enhanced
the performances of all the
contesants. We are most grateful
to have her talents for the
program."
The March 30 event will be in
the Soref Hall at JCC.
And here are the winning
contestants: Moe Berg, Elsie
Faecher, Celia Friedman, Jack
Friedman, Mrs. Gillian
Greenstein, Rene Greenstein, Sol
Gruber, Evelyn Kalmowitz, Ida
Kaplan.
Also Michelle Kaplan, Dr.
Andrew Katz, Pearl Kline, Hans
Lesser, Manuel Leibowitz,
Nelson Robbin, Masha Sharon,
Steve Sharon, Sol Sher, George
ShwUler.

BERMUDA CLUB PLAYERS (seated) Sam Farbstein, Sunny
Landsman, Murray Zwerdling; (standing) Whitey Cohen, Ceil
Blanckensee, Jean Kozim, and Jack Huber presented the
"Jewish Radio Hour" to an enthusiastic audience at JCC as
part of Jewish Music Month.
The two pictures show just a small segment of the doings at
Israel's Independence Day celebration a year ago in Fort
Lauderdale's Holiday Park. Bigger and better than ever plans
are being made to celebrate the 32nd anniversary of Israel's
Indpendence as a state among the nations of the world. And
this year, most of the 16 acres of the Perlman Campus of the
Jewish Community Center of Greater Fort Lauderdale will be
dotted with booths, with games, with wheels of fortune, with
entertainment, with refreshments of all kinds, and with Israeli
artifacts on sale, too. All this will take place Sunday, April 20,
so mark your calendars, because this will be a most joyous day
in the history of the Jewish community in Broward County for
Jews of all ages.
WECARE Needs
Volunteers
The true meaning of
WECARE, was spelled out in a
letter received from a muscular
dystrophy victim, Joanne
Wexler, which reads in part as
follows:
"I have muscular dystrophy
and have had it most of my life.
Now at age 42 most of my time is
spent in a wheelchair. I spend
most of my time at home because
it is difficult for me to get in and
out of a car and back into my
wheelchair. That means I am
home a great part of that time
my father is home a great part of
that time but he leaves me for
periods. To fill time TV occupies
a major portion of the day and
night. I read, but holding a book
and turning pages is hard for me.
"But when all is said and done
it is people with whom I can
speak and converse which I find
most fulfilling. Occasionally,
friends of the family come over
but this is infrequent: when they
do, I am happy.
"The WECARE (of the Jewish
Community Center) program,
helps to fill my loneliness in some
way. Through the past few years
volunteers in the WECARE
program have come to my home
to spend an hour with me, and
this I find the happiest times of
all. When they come, which is
about once a week, I look forward
to their visits. But they drop off
after a while. Only one woman
remained with me week after
week, until family problems
interfered. I miss her very much.
Matinee in Boca
The Adult Activities Com-
mittee of the JCC has planned a
matinee day for JCC members at
the Royal Palm Dinner Theatre
in Boca Raton on Wednesday,
March 26.
Jerome Kern's musical
"Showboat" is the theatre's
presentation: also included is a
luncheon buffet. Time has been
apportioned to allow for a
leisurely stroll through the Royal
Palm Mall.
The air-conditioned bus leaves
the JCC at 10:15 a.m.. returns at
5 p.m. Reservation may be made
by check to the JCC office.
Right now Nan Namiot (Reach-
, Out Chairman) of WECARE is
the only one who comes to be
with me, when she is able to get
away from her many duties. She
always spends two hours each
time she comes. That is always a
high spot for me."
She adds: "This says it all.
What I need most is human
companionship, someone with
whom I can yak. I'd love to meet
some other people."
How can you refuse? Why not
call the WECARE office, 792-
,6980, and offer to do a little
something for those who are
unable to do for themselves.
Volunteer to help on the Reach-
Out Program and help chairman
Nan Namiot carry on and in-
terpret the true meaning of
WECARE for the Joanne
Wexlers of Broward.
Webster's dictionary says a
volunteer "is a person who of his
own free will offers himself for a
service or duty."
Because they care about the
human race and its image,
volunteers make the lot of those
less fortunate, livable and
meaningful. They give their time
and energy to help the shut-in,
the disadvantaged, the blind, and
the indigent live a more fulfilled
life, if possible.
The Volunteers of WECARE
visit nursing homes and hospitals
bringing gifts, songs, and
cheerful conversation to brighten
otherwise dull days.
The lonely and shut-in
desperately needs companionship
and a helping hand for many
small tasks we take for granted
and do automatically.
Instead of wondering where
the hours of your day went, why
not volunteer to spend a few
hours of the day or days you
choose, making someone else's
lot easier and more meaningful.
You too will benefit not only by
the satisfaction of having given
of yourself but the pleasure of
knowing someone else is happier
because you shared in their day
you were there.
Mora JCC News Page 14
Fortunately,
some things never change.
The ancient traditions remain generation alter year once again. Manischewitz malzo. gefille
generation. And today, we observe Passover as our
lore lathers did thousands of years ago.
tor almost a century, the old-lashioned goodness
ol Manischewitz has ushered in festive holiday
dinners in lewish homes all over America. This
fish, soup and other delcclablcs wilfgrace tradi-
tional tables.
Treat your family and Iriends lo a taste ol tradi-
tion, loo.
And have a Kosher and happy Passover!
For traditional goodness you can counl on.
Manischewitz
QUALITY JEWISH FOODS SINCE 5649
Produced under strict Rabbinical supervision)
For Kashruth Certificate write:
Boardof Rabbis. P.O. Box 214. |ersev City. N| 07303
'


Friday, March 14,1960
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page
13
_Young Leadership Gets Sights and Sound of Federation

Leslie S. Gottlieb (left), executive director of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale; Sherwin Rosenstein,
executive director of the Jewish Family Service of Broward County;
Fran Merenstein. director of the Hebrew Day School, and William
Goldstein, executive director of the Jewish Community Center, were
the principal speakers at the sixth meeting of the Federation's Young
^Leadership Division headed by Glenn Meyers (pictured far right with
Mitch Pasin and Ron Schagrin).
Visible in the picture top right are some of those who heard the
Federation story and saw a slide presentation of Federation activities
supported by United Jewish Appeal contributions to the annual
Federation campaign.
Pictured (from left): Larry and Shelly Shapiro, Jayne Rotman,
Mark and Carol Steingard, Carey and Ellen Fischer, Jane Schagrin,
Nina Nemerofsky, Carolyn Russell, Susan Weinberg, Steve Fayne,
Johl Rotman, Steve Nemerofsky, Art Langer, Alan Margolies,
Federation's Young Leadership director.
The camera'8 eyes failed to spot these other members of the
Young Leadership at the meeting: Carol Hauser, Jason Israel, Joyce
'The Genesis Project9 Next
On 'Leam-In' Agenda
The Young Leadership
Development group of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, in cooperation with
the Federation's Committee on
'Jewish Education, is sponsoring
the second "Learn-In' of the
year.
Six Thursday evening ses-
sions, from April 10 through May
15, have been scheduled to be
held at the Jewish Community
Center of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale. 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
This "Learn-In," titled "The
*" genesis Project," will give
participants a unique and in-
novative sight and sound of the
classic Biblical stories of
Creation, Adam and Eve, Cain
and Abel, Noah and Abraham.
Filmed on location in Israel by
Hollywood production people,
The Genesis Project consists of
an international fellowship of
archaeologists, historians, Bib-
lical scholars, educators, tech-
nicians and creative artists who
are translating the written
language of the entire Holy
Scriptures to the language of
motion pictures, image by image.
Federation's Young
Leadership Director Alan
Margolies said: "The Genesis
Project will be a challenging,
penetrating analysis of the First
Book of Moses. We will explore
how the values found in Genesis
can be applicable to our life in
modern society. We are especially
trying to enroll our young adults
from Coral Springs, Plantation,
the Northeast, Lauderhill, and
other communities in North and
West Broward County in 'The
Learn-In.' Enrollment is open
without charge."
New Leadership Journey
The State of Israel Bonds
Organization has announced its
1980 New Leadership Delegation
to Israel, with an optional exten-
sion to Egypt, departing May 4.
The Israel portion of the trip will
be for 11 days with a three-day
airo extension.
The New Leadership is com-
prised of young professional
members of the community who
have demonstrated support and
interest for the Israel Bond
Program, which supports the
economic development of the
Jewish State, according to Joel
lie in stein, an active Bonds
worker in Broward County.
This will not be just another
tour of Israel but something
special that young people will
identify with, appreciate and
remember the rest of their lives,
Reinstein said. Going to Israel
with a Bond delegation assures
one of meeting top Israeli leaders
and seeing sights which are
normally not available to the
'ordinary tourist, Reinstein ex-
plained.
The May 4 delegation will cost
$1,500 per person, including
stays at the Tel Aviv-Hilton,
Plaza Tiberias and the Jeru-
salem-Hilton.
"We are fortunate that this
community has two delegations
to Isarel. the Israel Bonds trip
in May and the Jewish Fed-
eration trip in July, and we know
that young people in this area
will take advantage of this op-
portunity to visit our beloved
Israel," Reinstein said.
All interested parties may
contact the Israel Bond office in
Fort Lauderdale for further
information.
HELP URGENTLY WANTED
Volunteers needed for telephone solicitation during March
and April. Do yourself AND ISRAEL a favor. UJA needs
YOU Now! Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale 2999
NW 33rd Ave.. one block south of Oakland Park Blvd. CALL
484-8200.
MOKE TllAX EVER!
and Mel Jarolem, Linda and Barry Mandelkorn, Donna Meyers, Jon
Russell. Audrey and Richard Schwartz, Adrian and Bruce Syrop. Bob
and Fran Vernick, Michael Weinberg, Sidna and Ross Wexler, Carol
and Ira Wish, Judy and Ross Zimmerman, Sharon Langer.
One of the major goals of the Leadership Development Program
is to instill a sense of "community" to its members. Many of the
participants in this year's group are taking active roles in the
Federation's campaign, serving on the boards of various Jewish
organizations in the community, and markedly increasing their
personal commitments.
Young Leadership Chairman Meyers spoke of his satisfaction with
the progress made by the group. He outlined programs for the balance
of this campaign which will include sessions on "Soviet Jewry," "The
American Jewish Political Scene," and the Young Leadership Mission
to Israel, July 1-11,1980.
They Had the Time of Their Lives
AND they and others can
enjoy 10 days unlike "Any in
your life," says Alan Margolies,
Federation Young Leadership
Mission to Israel director.
Pictured in front of King David
Hotel in Jerusalem is the Fort
Lauderdale group that went on a
Mission to Israel last year. From
left: Johl and Jayne Rotman,
Harry and Leona Levey, Kenneth
Bierman of the Federation staff,
Mel and Joyce Jarolem, Steve
and Nina Nemerofsky, Nedra and
Gil Friedman, Greta Sussman,
Jane and Ron Schagrin, and a
couple from New England.
Kneeling: Susan Dowd of Con-
necticut, Israeli Guide Yossi
Dagan, and Chuck Sussman.
This-year's Mission, including
an available optional four-day
trip to Egypt for those who want
to extend their Middle East
experience, will take off Tuesday,
July 1, flying directly from
Miami International Airport to
Tel Aviv, and returning to Miami
on Friday, July 11.
In between those two dates,
those on the Mission will enjoy a
maximum educational and
emotional experience. They'll
visit Jerusalem, the Western
Wall, Masada, Mount Scopus,
Tel Aviv, Haifa, select Sinai
settlements, the Golan Heights,
West Bank, Yad Vashem,
Knesset, Yamit Region, the Gaza
Strip, the Dead Sea, and much
more. They'll be participating in
a unique and exciting in-depth
A Year Ago
exposure to the people and
historic places of Israel.
Space is limited to 50 par-
ticipants. Early reservations are
requested. Alan Margolies at the
Federation office, 484-8200, has
complete* details on the cost,
$1,499 per person, double oc-
cupancy, $216 single supplement,
with the price subject to change.
The all-inclusive rate provides
round-trip air transportation be-
tween Miami and Tel Aviv, all
meals, except for two evenings,
all tours, first class accom-
modations, departure taxes,
porterage, entrance fees, tips,
transfers.
Want more information?
Detach the coupon below and
mail to the Federation.
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
2999 N.W. 33rd Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311
Tell me more about the Mission to Israel:
My name is.
My address is.
City.
Zip.
Phone.


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
March 14, 1980

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00157

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
March 14, 1980

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00157

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward

Full Text
fcJewish Floridiam
r>lume9 Number 6
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, March 14,1980
I frt ShocKti
Price 36 Cents
IRC Presents
Middle East Update by Sen- Stone March 23
[One of the nation's most know-
dgeable senators on the Middle
st will present "Middle East
late 1980" at 10 a.m., Sun-
March 23, under sponsor-
lip of the Community Relations
Immittee (CRC) of the Jewish
deration of Greater Fort
jderdaJe.
The senator is Florida's own
chard (Dick) Stone, who is
irman of the Near Eastern
South Asian Affairs sub-
nmittee of the U.S. Senate
reign Relations Committee. He
be the speaker at the March
ent at 10 a.m. in the Samuel
I Soref Hall of the Jewish Corn-
Sen. Richard Stone
munity Center, 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd.
CRC Chairman Edmund
Entin, noting that the committee
has titled the open meeting as
"Leadership Development," said
that invitations have been sent to
representatives of various
organizations and communities
to hear Sen. Stone. Entin said
that Sen. Stone has been a strong
advocate of a firm U.S. foreign
policy to resist Soviet expan-
sionism and a strong national
defense.
Sen. Stone has some cogent
ideas concerning the U.S. posture
in regard to the continuing prob-
lem of the 50 hostages held by
Iranian militants in the U.S. Em-
bassy in Teheran and the Russian
invasion of Afghanistan.
He will also discuss the U.S.
vote in the UN, later repudiated,
presumably by President Carter,
calling for the dismantling of
Jewish settlements in Arab ter-
rorities occupied since the 1967
Six Day War.
Sen. Stone has served in the
U.S. Senate since January 1975.
A Floridian since he was six
months old, Sen. Stone has had a
distinguished career as a lawyer,
a state senator, and Florida's
Secretary of State before his
election to the Senate.
inter Joins Israel Regretting UN Vote on Settlements
tews sources reported that
days after the U.S. voted
ig with the other 14 members
| the United Nations Security
incil calling for the dis-
itling of Jewish settlements
Irab terrorities occupied since
1967 War, President Jimmy
it issued a statement saying
the U.S. "made a mistake"
|ing for the resolution.
Israel, a Foreign Ministry
Ikesman rejected the
}lution as having "no jus-
ation." Michael Shiloh added
that Jewish settlements in oc-
cupied lands. including
Jerusalem, are justified under
international law since they are
an integral part of Israel's
defense policy.
Shiloh also voiced unhappiness
with the U.S. decision, which was
delayed a day while U.S. Ambas-
sador to the UN, Donald
McHenry, conferred with the
State Department on the wording
of the resolution.
Prior to the UN vote, Egypt
dorsement of his stand, said:
"We unequivocally reject this
resolution. We will not agree to it
under any condition, not to any
part of it or any sentence or
clause."
Here are Begins own com-
ments on autonomy. He gave this
answer in response to a question
by the American Jewish press at
a conference last month in
Jerusalem.
Begin, winning Knesset en- "The West Bank-it. proper
sources had indicated that
President Carter, Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat and
Israeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin would have a "summit
meeting" in April unless the
Palestinian autonomy nego-
tiations make progress this
month. It is expected that if the
summit takes place, it would give
a new push to the peace process
and encourage other Arab parties
to join it.
Trying to Reach UJA Goal by Pesach
thf big push to complete the
UJA campaign of the
rish Federation of Greater
f Lauderdale is underway.
rget date for the major "clean-
[' is Monday, March 31 Erev
pach the night of the first
ier of Passover.
' J A General Chairman Milton
tiner and the campaign's vice
airman, Victor Gruman, are
ading up a corps of volunteers
so are calling the hundreds of
evious contributors, and new-
lers to North Broward, for
commitments to meet the
humanitarian needs of Jews in
Israel, elsewhere in the world,
and in North Broward County,
for such programs as the Kosher
Nutrition for the elderly, the
Jewish Community Center,
Jewish Family Service, con-
tinuing education, community
relations, leadership develop-
ment, and other objectives..
While the telephone callers are
busy each evening attempting to
maintain the pace of increased
giving over previous years, which
is necessary to meet the 1980
goal, other groups are still com-
pleting plans for fund-raising
meetings, among them:
Members of the Men's Club at
Palm Springs 2, Margate, headed
by President Allen Caplan, are
sponsoring a breakfast at 9:30
a.m. Sunday, March 30. Sol
Dolleck is chairman of the UJA
Campaign. William Katzberg,
noted columnist, will be the
'speaker.
Sunday morning, April 20, the
day of the 32nd Israel Indepen-
dence Day celebration, at 10 a.m.
at Margate Jewish Center, Rabbi
Dr. Solomon Geld will be honored
by the UJA Committee headed
by Alfred Cohen, and at the same
time at Congregation Beth Hillel
in Margate, Sol E. Silver and
Charles Perlman will be co-
honorees at the breakfast
arranged by UJA Chairman
Dave Borman and his committee.
Speaker will be Alfred Golden
And Sunday morning, March
23, at Cypress Tree, Lauderhill, a
committee headed by Victor
Feldman is completing plans for
a breakfast for residents of the
condominium complex.
name is Judea and Samaria is
the whole territory between the
Jordan River and the Mediter-
ranean Sea, what the ancient
Romans used to call Trans Jordan.
We suggested the idea of
autonomy because we want to
solve the problem of the Pales-
tinian Arabs living in Judea,
Samaria and the other districts
. The Palestinian Arabs will
enjoy full autonomy. They will
elect their administration council.
This council will conduct the
daily affairs, as it was presented
by our proposed model in Cairo
just two days ago, which will
preserve security. Because other-
wise the PLO would take over.
And this is an implacable enemy
bent on the destruction of
Israel."
Begin led a group of
dignitaries, including President
Yitzhak Navon and former Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin to Kib-
butz Ginnosar on the western
shore of the Sea of Galilee for the
funeral of Yigal Alton. AUon, 61,
died of a heart attack. He was a
one-star general and a former
foreign minister in the gover-
nment.
Fellowship Church Presenting
For Israel With Love' March 16
i
Croft
"For Israel With Love," featuring Israeli-style
Susie, special singers, folk dancing, and a slide
resell tat ion on Israel, is sponsored by the Good
lews Fellowship Church of Fort Lauderdale at 7:30
lm., Sunday, March 16, at the Fort Lauderdale
ligh School Auditorium. 1600 NE 4th Ave.
The production, the second annual event honoring
Israel, is open to the public, free admission, ac-
cording to Pastor Jim Croft, who recently presented
the church's $1,400 commitment to Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale for the 1980
United Jewish Appeal.
This was the second year that Good News
Fellowship has made a commitment for the Israel
programs supported by UJA through the Jewish
Agency in Israel.
Pastor Croft will speak at the March 16 event, as
will Derek Prince, an elder of the church who is
building a home in Israel and whose daughter,
Jesika Prince, is currently completing a year's study
at Kibbutz in Israel. The Kibbutz and other Israeli
programs receive support from the Good News
Fellowship group.
The March 16 program will include music by the
Good News Orchestra, singers from the church in
Fort Lauderdale and from South Broward, as well as
Israeli folk dancing-
Rabbi Albert Schwartz, director of the Jewish
Federation's Chaplaincy Commission; Joel Telles,
Federation campaign associate, and Max Levine,
Federation's public relations consultant, will be the
official representatives of the Federation at the
Sundav evening program and express the thanks of
the Jewish community for the Good News
Fellowship support of the State of Israel.
Jewish Agency in Israel
Received $226 Million
From UJA in 1979
Nationally, from the funds contributed by
Federations throughout the United States,
United Jewish Appeal (UJA) allocated
$226,279,264 to the United Israel Appeal (UIA)
for programs administered by the Jewish Agency
in Israel in the calendar year 1979.
This was reported by the UIA Chairman Jerold
C. (Chuck) Hoffberger past president of Council
of Jewish Federation. In the annual report of the
' UIA, he noted, $4.5 million was allocated to the
Israel Education Fund, and $3.25 million for
Project Renewal programs.
The annual report which was presented to the
officers and directors of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale and to Federations
throughout the U.S., noted that the funds
received were for absorption of new immigrants,
the establishment of rural settlements, and for
programs aiding youth, the aged, and the needy.
The Jewish Agency budget for 1979-80 is $405
million; UIA will provide $272.5 million (67
percent) of that sum for this fiscal year. Karen
Hayesod, the world-wide equivalent of the United
Jewish Appeal, will help make up the difference.
Karen Hayesod conducts fund-raising campaigns
for Israel in scores of country around the world.


Ill .
Pge2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March u

Federation's Foundation
Provides for Future Needs
The Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale is designed to enable
the Federation to keep pace with
growing community needs, meet
crises when they arise, build
reserves for emergency and
economic recession and provide
resources for studies, creative,
innovative programs and
projects. The Foundation con-
ducts a separate endowment
program, segregated from the
annual UJA campaign, whose
funds are for the special purposes
described.
The Foundation operates in a
variety of areas providing life
income programs, receiving
bequests from individuals, gifts,
which may be used during the
donor's lifetime, a life insurance
program and charitable
remainder or unity trusts. It is
also equipped to make in-
vestments for funds put into its
care and to establish special
designated foundations for in-
dividuals and families.
Arthur Faber, chairman of the
Foundation, announced the
board of trustees includes
Richard Romanoff, co-chairman;
Leo Goodman, president ex
Faber
Romanoff
officio; Milton Reiner, campaign
chairmen ex officio; Joel Levitt,
treasurer ex officio, and Jacob
Brodzki, Leonard Farber,
Seymour Gerson, Alfred Golden,
Samuel Goldfarb, Sen. Samuel
Greenberg, Alvin Gross, Evelyn
Gross, Victor Gruman, Erwin
Harvith, Hyman Indowsky,
Samuel Leber, Hildreth K. Levin,
David Miller, Commissioner Jack
Moss, Carl Schuster, Sam Soref,
Sidney Spewak, Florie Strauss,
John Streng.
Additions to the board, he
said, will be made from time to
time.
The Foundation operates
under the guidance of a Legal and
Tax Committee. The committee
keeps abreast of the charitable
tax implications of the various
areas covered in the Foundation
Program and the singular tax
and estate advantages accruing
to individuals who take part in
the program.
Members of the Legal and Tax
Committee are as follows:
Attorneys Carl Schuster,
chairman; Gerald Boyer,
Elliot P. Borkson, Alvin Capp,
Alfred P. Denowitz, Jesse
Faerber, Michael Feinman,
Jeffrey M. Fenster, Libo B.
Fineberg, Howard Greitzer,
Martin I. Lipnack, Joel Rein-
stein, Barrett M. Rothenberg.
Accountants > Hyman
Indowsky, chairman; Norman
Becker, Martin Cass, Judnh
Ever, Robert Hersh, Martin J.
Kurtz, Sheldon Polish, Sol
Sokolow, Irwin A. Weiser.
Nathan Rosenberg, director of
the Foundation, has called at-
tention to the advantage of
taking part in the Foundation
Program from the point of view
of taxes and sound estate
planning and has indicated he is
prepared to discuss this without
obligation with anyone who may
seek information. He can be
reached at the Foundation Office,
484-8200.
CRC Concerned about Falashas
Community Relations Com-
mittee of Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, noting
the plight of the remaining
Ethiopian Jews (Falashas) who
are trying to leave Ethiopia,
adopted the following statement
of concern at its meeting this
month:
"We are deeply concerned'
about the imperiled Ethiopian
Jewish community, and deeply
committeed to the support of
rescue efforts aimed at bringing
them to Israel, as they desire.
"We are encouraged by the
newly energized activities which
have been undertaken by the
government of Israel aimed at
the rescue of the remnant Beta
Yisraei (House of Israel) com-
munity.
"We are similarly encouraged
by the parallel actions un-
dertaken by the representative
bodies of the American Jewish
Community to bring to this
critical matter the priority at-
tention and action which it
deserves.
"We urge those bodies,
together with other appropriate
national, international and
diplomatic instrumentalities, to
continue and to expand their
energetic action to rescue the
remnants of Ethiopian Jewry."
JDC, Hungary Agree To Aid for Jews
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Donald M. Robinson, president
of the Joint Distribution
Committee, announced here that
the JDC had recently concluded
an agreement with the
Hungarian government and the
Jewish community of Hungary to
provide welfare services for
Hungarian Jews.
JDC executive vice president,
Ralph I. Goldman, who recently
returned from Hungary after
I concluding an agreement with
* the Secretary of State of the
Office of Religious Affairs, Imre
Miklos. and representatives of
the Central Board of Hungarian
Jews, described Hungarian
Jewry as "a vital, vibrant Jewish
community."
NOTING THAT there are an
estimated 80,000 to 100,000 Jews
in Hungary today, he said that
"JDC is contributing to the
establishment of a new Kosher
kitchen in Budapest which will
provide 350,000 kosher hot meals
a year. JDC," he added, "will
also be active in the provision of
geriatric support services for the
elderly members of the
population as well as a full range
of social welfare concerns."
Eighty percent of Hungarian
Jewry lives in Budapest, the
capital. TheJewish population of
Hungary in the late 1940s was
estimated at 800,000. The Central
Board of Hungarian Jews
supports the only Rabbinical
Seminary in Eastern Europe. In
making the announcement
Robinson said, "we welcome the
opportunity to be of help to the
Jewish people of Hungary with
the cooperation of the govern-
ment."
Baptist
Minister
Honored
SUNRISE MAYOR JOHN LOMELO (center), a member of
I the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, proclaiming
UJA Week in the community, "calling upon all men and women
of good will, representing every faith," to make a commitment
during UJA Week when more than a dozen events were
scheduled, presented the proclamation to Hy Sirota (left)
chairman of the Sunrise Lakes Phase I Committee, and Nat
Pearlman, chairman of the Sunrise Jewish Center Committee
NEW YORK Pledging his
personal commitment to the
survival of the nation of Israel,
Dr. Jerry Falwell of Lynchburg,
Va., nationally renowned Baptist
minister, addressed a cross-
section of leaders at a luncheon in
his honor last week at JNF
House here.
The Jewish National Fund
luncheon was held in tribute to
Dr. Falwell for his establishment
of the Rev. Jerry Falwell Forest
on the Hill of the Teacher (Givat
Hamoreh) between Nazareth in
Israel's Galilee and Mt. Tabor
(Mount of the Transfiguration),
as part of the continuing JNF
program to a/forest the barren
land in this historic area.
Photos Show
Soviet Tanks
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
intelligence services distributed
two aerial reconnaissance
photographs showing Soviet-
made T-34 tanks in the hands of
Palestinian terrorists in south
Lebanon. An army spokesman
said the tanks, of World War II
vintage, are positioned near Tyre,
a terrorist stronghold on the
Lebanese cast
Families expect more
from
Riverside.
More service.
Riverside now has seven chapels to serve the
Jewish communities of Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties. But, more convenience is only one of the reasons
why since 1935, Riverside has been the standard by which
people compare funeral service.
At Riverside, families are served by the largest
Jewish staff of any funeral director in Florida. They are
people with a genuine understanding of families' needs,
regardless of financial circumstances.
At Riverside, families find total dedication
to Jewish tradition. And economical help in arranging
service between Florida and New York, or anywhere else
in the world.
Families expect more from Riverside.
We're trying to live up tr> that trust.
FT.LAUDERDALE (SUNRISE): 11?1 North West 61st Avenue
(Sunset Strip)
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Other chapels in North Broward, Hollywood.North Miami Beach
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Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area
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Friday, March 14, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laiiderdale
Page 3
Seminar Set for Nursing Home Volunteers Coral Springs Breakfast
Last month's seminar for
hospital volunteers proved so
successful that Rabbi Albert B.
Schwartz, director of the Jewish
Federation's Chaplaincy
Commission, has coordinated the
efforts of WECARE and other
interested groups for a seminar
for nursing home volunteers.
The Center for Living at 2000
E. Commercial Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale, is making its
facilities available for the session
to be held from 10 a.m. to noon
Thursday, March 20.
The participants, according to
Rabbi Schwartz, will include:
Sherwin Rosenstein, director,
Jewish Family Service; Dr. Alvin
Colin, chairman, Federation's
Chaplaincy Commission; Monroe
Mitchel, administrator, Center
for Living; Father John B.
Handrahan, chaplain, Holy Cross
Hospital; Ann Briganti, director
of activities. Center for Living.
Also WECARE'S Anne
Fleischman, coordinator; Sally
Radin, general chairperson; and
Eda Solon, chairperson of
nursing home volunteers.
Others expected are Dolly
Malitz, chairperson, Chaplaincy
Commission of the Cleveland,
Ohio Jewish Federation; Leo
Goodman, president, and Leslie
S. Gottlieb, executive director,
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
Sunrise Lakes I Honors Three Women
Residents of Phase I, Sunrise
Lakes honored Dora Frucht,
Betty Schulberg and Edythe
Zuckerman, pictured front left to
right, at the annual UJA Night
for Israel. Also pictured past
president Ralph Frucht, Hy
Sirota, Past president and
Master of Ceremonies, Larry
Spring, president, and past
president Nat Goldman UJA
planning committee.
Sirota, chairman of the Sunrise
Lakes Phase I UJA Committee,
lauded the work of the committee
in planning and carrying out the
program, which included en-
tertainment by the Sunrise
Singers who received a standing
ovation.
Sirota also announced
solicitation efforts will continue
because the needs are now
greater than ever. His committee
includes Ralph Frucht, Nat
Goldman, Lou Gruber, Ida
Kostoff, Harry Levene, Sam
Loev, Jack Milman,' Thelma
Rosenfeld, Mr. and Mrs. Larry
Spring, Barney Straus, Estelle
Strow.
Also Bernie Bennett, Harry
Besner, Dave Brockman, Dave
Charmer, Isadore Frankel, Dave
Friedman, Harry Glass, Oscar
Gold, Nat Goldman, Emma
Hyman, Jerry Kreiss, Marty
Kurke, Rose Lipsky, Dave
Lubell, Harold Michaelson, Jack
Milman, Ruth Mittleman
Murray Neus, Rube Oren, Jack
Peller, Jack Rosenberg, Harry
Rothfarb, Hyman Salmonson,
Maxwell Schaefer, Max
Schneider, Harry Schreibman,
Dave Schultz, George Siegel,
Charles Suslak, Herman
Trufelman, Evelyn Weinapple,
Max Worchel.
Irish Smooth Ruffled Israeli Feathers
r
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
DUBLIN (JTA) -
The Irish Republic has
given a conciliatory reply to
last week's stiff Israeli pro-
test over pro-Palestine Lib-
eration Organization state-
ments by the Irish Foreign
Minister. However, accord-
ing to Istraelh officials, the
fact remains that there has
been a significant shift in
Irish policy in favor of a
Palestinian state and the
role of the PLO.
In Memoriam Maxine Hess
The Jewish community of
Fort Lauderdale was
shocked and saddened by
news of the death of Maxine
S. Hess, a dedicated leader in
the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
Mrs. Hess, 61, wife of M.
Henry Hess of Point of
Americas, was killed in-
stantly in Naples, Fla., along
with her sister, Melva
LeBeau, in a head-on col-
lision with a car driven by a
75-year-old man who was
also killed. Stella Keiner,
also of Point of Americas, a
passenger in Mrs. Hess's car,
was severely injured in the
crash Tuesday, March 4.
Women's Division
President Mitchie Libros and
Campaign Chairman Gladys
Daren, along with the leader-
ship of the Federation,
mourned the loss of a friend
whose many faceted contri-
butions to the community
here and her hometown of St.
Louis will be long remem-
bered.
Funeral services were held
in St. Louis for Mrs. Hess,
who was a member of the
board of directors of the
Martha Manning Co.,
women's clothing makers,
headed by her husband.
Their two sons, Julian and
Michael, are vice presidents
of the firm.
In St. Louis, she was
active in the Women's
Maxine Hess
Society of the Symphony,
the Elliot Society of
Washington University, the
Jewish Federation, the
Jewish Theological
Seminary, and Hadassah.
She had similar interests in
Fort Lauderdale, receiving a
community award from the
Seminary, heading the Point
of Americas UJA campaign,
the leadership development,
and instrumental in the suc-
cessful UJA Phone-a-Thon
Day on Feb. 17.
Exchanges between the two
countries were sparked off when
Foreign Minister Brian Lenihan,
on a visit to Bahrein, signed a
joint statement backing an inde-
pendent Palestinian state, and
acknowledging the PLO's claim
to represent the Palestinian
people. It also spoke of the need
for total Israeli withdrawal from
the occupied territories, including
Jerusalem.
ISRAEL WAS especially
incensed by Lenihan's descrip-
tion of PLO Chief Yasir Arafat as
"a most sensible element." His
further remarks amounted to a
virtual invitation to Arafat to
visit Dublin, which would thus be
the first country of the European
Economic Community to offer
him hospitality.
The controversy marks the
worst point in Irish-Israeli
relations since diplomatic ties
were set up about five years ago.
To Israel's disappointment,
Ireland refused to exchange
embassies with her, and contacts
are maintained through non-
resident ambassadors by
Israel's Ambassador in Britain
and Ireland's envoy in Switzer-
land.
When it lodged its stiff protest
to Ireland last week, Israel broke
with precedent and gave it to the
Irish Embassy in London, rather
than sending it directly to the
Foreign Ministry in Dublin.
ALTHOUGH Israeli diplo-
mats say that it did so to ensure
speed of delivery, it could also
have been interpreted as a sign of
Israel's anger. Not having a
resident ambassador in Dublin,
Israel could not have made the
usual gesture of displeasure by
recalling him for consultations.
Since then, the Israelis have
followed up their diplomatic
message by sending their London
press counsellor, Yehuda Millo,
to Dublin to put the Israeli case
to politicians and the press. He
pointed out tartly that the lack of
an Israeli embassy here contrasts
with the opening of one in Cairo.
The Children's Choir of Temple Beth Orr entertained at the
UJA Breakfast, co-sponsored by the Coral Springs UJA Com-
mittee. Among the speakers were Bruce Syrop, B'nai B'rith
president; Andy Press, reporting on the Teen Federation in the
community; Judy Averbuch discussing the growth of the
Jewish community in three years; and Ron Luzim who
delivered the invocation.
Le Browse Shop Needs Sales Help
Volunteer salespeople,on a regular basis (fourhours one day
a week or more) are needed to serve in the clean and neat
surroundings of Le Browse, the newest and most exciting
bargain shop selling new and gently used clothing, housewares,
brie a brae, appliances, furniture and TV sets that work.
Volunteers also needed to sort, size and tag merchandise
contributed.
Contributions of salable merchandise will be accepted only
on Mondays and Tuesdays at Jewish Community Center, 6501
W. Sunrise Blvd., Plantation. PLEASE clean salable items
only NO SHOES.
Spring cleaning time is almost here why not start now
and contribute your "no longer being used" items to WECARE.
For more information, call 792-6980.
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' MjM1
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 14.1980

Jewish Floridian ^rab Activists at U. of Miami
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Business Office 12t> S Federal Hwy.. Suite 306. Danla. Fla. S3004
Telephone 020-9018
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Of The Mm hand!: Advertised In Its Columns
Second Class Postage Paid at Danla, Fla. H9M20
Published Bl-Woeiuy
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weeki,
uJenHrr-l,,he cJewiIh Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
vvor dwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association ol
English- Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBsr OPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year-$7.
- 9eoue Friday, March 14, 1980
Volume9
26ADAR5740
Number 6
Carter Strikes Again
There is absolutely no excuse for President
Carter's latest muff. How can it be conceivable that
he did not know the precise wording of the Security
Council Resolution that he ordered United Nations
Ambassador Donald McHenry to vote in favor of?
The result was a disastrous boost to the
propagandists purposes and political machinations
of the Third World bloc against Israel that not even
the President's Monday night act of erasure can
mitigate.
Nor can his "I'm sorry, we didn't mean to vote
that way, and we did because we didn't understand
fully" do any good to the livid Israelis who, by the
U.S. vote were right in claiming that they had been
two-timed and double-crossed by Mr. Carter.
All it can do is to give added muscle to the
bigots of the world who see all Jews, Zionism and
Israel as a secret intrigue of immense global propor-
tion with the power to sway the American
presidency, if not the very universe.
It i^now crystal clear that the President simply
doesn't have his act together.
Trial for Activist
May Signal New
Soviet Crackdown
On Emigration
NEW YORK (JTA) Igor Gubenman, a 44-year-
old Soviet Jewish activist, will be brought to trial on Mar.
11 after being held in prison incommunicado since his
arrest last Aug. 13, the National Conference on Soviet
Jewry reported.
Guberman, a writer and author of popular science
books, has been active in the Jewish cultural movement in
Russia and was a contributor to the samizdat (unofficial)
publication, Jews in the USSR."
ACCORDING TO the NCSJ, Guberman was
harassed by the Soviet secret police since 1978 when he
first applied for emigration for himself and his wife and
two children. He was arrested, the NCSJ reported, after
he refused to cooperate with the KGB which was seeking
information on the Jewish cultural movement in the
USSR.
He has been charged with trafficking in stolen icons.
Since his arrest, Guberman, who lived in a town near
Moscow, was permitted to see no one except his lawyer.
THE NCSJ REPORTED that Jewish sources in
Moscow are concerned that Guberman's trial will signal a
new crackdown on emigration activists and dissidents.
Although other activists have been tried in the past on
false charges, none has been brought to trial recently.
SOMETIMES, my impulse is
to take the Jewish community by
the scruff of the neck and shake it
until it begs, "I give up." There
are such gross insensitivities that
pervade our ranks that too often
we are either unaware of a broad
constellation of profound dangers
to us, or else we just plain don't
care.
One such danger is at the
University of Miami at this very
moment. Simultaneously, our
best blood is either spending
American dollars in Paris, the
seat of Jewry's one and only true
and sincere ally, or else in Las
Vegas laughing it up with the
latest comic front for the mob.
MYSELF, I don't really give
much of a hang about the
University of Miami, which is
merely situated in the com-
munity. It is not of the com-
munity and so has not, in turn,
given much of a hang about us
either.
Still, the danger that exists
there today grows like a cancer
with national and international
roots, and the Jews of South
Florida, who stand to be its ulti-
mate victims, seem to be as indif-
ferent to it as the insouciant
voyagers in the fleshpots of Paris
and the gambling casinos of
Nevada's petit bourgeois
Camelot.
I have in mind the forward
phalanx of a group of Arab
"students" who are in attendance
at the Center for Advanced
International Studies at the
university. The Center offers
Master's and Doctoral degrees,
but I am reliably informed that
some of the Arabs at the Center,
if they do not already have these
degrees, are so close to getting
them at other, far more aca-
demically known institutions that
the question is why they have left
those institutions to come to the
University of Miami at all.
The question is especially per-
sistent because of the bitter
academic criticisms they have of
the Center. The answer to the
question is of course simple, at
least in some cases. They aren't
really students; or, put another
way, they are as much
"students" as are the frenzied
terrorists who hold 50 Americans
hostage at the U.S. Embassy in
Teheran. They haven't come to
study but to commit mayhem.
THEY ARE political activists,
infiltrators, whose purpose it is to
assume ideological control of the
U of M Center, as they have been
endeavoring to do with varying
degrees of success at the foreign
affairs schools of Georgetown,
Harvard and Stanford
Universities.
Arab "students" on the
University of Miami campus
number in the hundreds. Jewish
students make up a cadre in
excess of 3,000, or about one-
sixth of the total UM student
population of 18,000. This may
not be a substantial proportion
judged from the point of view of
the totality, but reckoned in
terms of the Arab sector, Jewish
students represent a lion's share.
And what are they doing about
the Arab challenge? Just about
as much as their parents are
doing about it in Paris and Las
Vegas. Or, if they know about it
at all, perhaps they prefer the
beaches surrounding the
university in any case, or their
Corvettes and Porsches.
A LETTER to the editor of the
Miami Hurricane of Feb. 22, the
U of Ms student publication,
reflects the Arab ."student"
modus operand) on icampus. In
essence, these "students" oppose
the presence of Dr. George Wise
as director of the university's
Center for Advanced Inter-
national Studies.
Their method is sheer anti-
Semitism and anti-Zionism.
"Granted," write five Arab
"students' registered at the
Center, "Professor Wise is ac-
credited for the building and
financing the establishment and
growth of the University of Tel
Aviv, but this in no way a cer-
tificate of Qualification (sic) to
become the Director of the Center
for Advanced International
Studies ..."
In a coy reference to Dr. Wise's
magnanimous gesture of
returning his annual salary as
director of the Center to the
University of Miami in the form
of a gift a reference equating
Jews with money as a classic
anti-Semitic ploy the
"students" note:
. .THE RAISING and
contributing money (sicI to the
University of Tel Aviv or in this
case to the University of Miami
does not necessarily mean that
Continued on Page 2 2
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Friday, March 14.1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
PageS
U JA Cash Flow Up Sharply
B> DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
After a period in the doldrums
last year, the flow of cash dollars
from the United Jewish Appeal,
through the United Israel Appeal
to Israel has picked up sharply in
recent months. Figures for the
first two months of 1980 show an
increase of 14,5 million compared
to the same period last year.
; The turnabout has coincided
with the appointment to the post
of National Cash Chairman of
Edward Cadden, 53, of Chicago.
Because of the success-story told
by the figures, Cadden, who grew
to UJA prominence as chairman
of the Chicago campaign, has
been hailed in national UJA
circles as something of a "whiz-
kid," and observers predict a
central role for him in national
UJA affairs in the future.
Cadden himself modest and
businesslike, attributes the
upswing in cash-flow figures to
hard work by himself and his
cash committee in cooperation
with regional committees across
the country. An auto spare parts
agent with solid business success
behind him, Cadden recalls how
he was telephoned in London "at
1 a.m. one night" by' UJA
national chairman IrWin Field
and asked to take on the cash job.
WHEN HE took over in
September, 1978, cash flow was
$13 million down from the
previous year. The turnabout in
five months has been in the order
of $18 million. In practical terms
this means that a looming Jewish
Agency deficit of some $44
million could be substantially
cut.
Cadden speaks earnestly of the
"partnership" between the UJA
and Keren Hayesod and the
Jewish Agency. He believes in it,
and believes it is working. Being
a big giver, or being involved in
national UJA work gives him,
and others, no right whatever to
interfere in Israeli government
policy ma king, Cadden says
firmly. "I don't buy a place in the
Israeli Cabinet ." Thus he
steers clear of commenting, in his
UJA capacity, on Israeli
government policy regarding
settlements or other con-
troversial issues.
But regarding the Jewish
Agency, Cadden is equally firm
in favoring close and constant
involvement between the UJA
and the Agency. He has attended
in Jerusalem this week the
Agency Board of Governors
meetings and the budgetary
committee sessions that preceded
them, and is satisfied that the
diaspora side of the "part-
nership" is sufficiently informed
and involved in setting priorities
and shaping the broad policies.
He notes that the Jerusalem
meetings themselves followed
preliminary consultations be-
tween the diaspora and Israeli
sides.
It is to underscore this
"partnership" reality that
Cadden has initiated a visit to the
U.S. shortly for a two-week
across-the-nation tour of Jewish
Agency Treasurer Akiva
Levinsky. Cadden, like other top
UJA lay leaders, finds former
Bank Hapoalim director
Levinsky immensely impressive,
efficient and straightforward.
HE SAYS that direct meetings
between the man in charge of
Agency expenditure and the
major UJA centers will serve
better than any other means to
convince contributors and
Federations of the importance of
transferring pledges into cash
and of shifting the cash speedily
to the UJA and on to Israel.
Cadden denies rumors rampant
in Israel that a trend is
developing among American
Federations whereby a greater
proportion of UJA funds is being
allocated to local needs and lesser
sums for Israel. "There may be
isolated instances which I do not
know of," he said, "but there is
no such trend."
Similarly, Cadden scotches
another Israeli rumor that past
givers have canceled pledges or
ceased giving because they
disapprove of Israeli settlement
policy. The cases where he comes
across such arguments are "very
rare," says Cadden. "And
usually this is an excuse for not
giving ... I know there is worry
about this in Israel and among
some UJA circles. But I myself
don't feel political views affect
giving."
Cadden also reports heartening
news that campaign pledges are
up this year by 18 percent over
last year, comparing the sums
the same contributors pledges
this year and last. Unfulfilled
pledges remain constant at the
UJA's longtime low level of 4-5
percent.
Coordinator for Jacaranda
Brandeis Honoring Jack Moss March 30
Prominent members of the
'Gurnard County community met
recently to prepare a Brandeis
University dinner honoring Jack
L. Moss, senior Broward County
commissioner.
Leonard Farber (second from
left), a Brandeis Fellow and
honorary dinner chairperson,
hosted the meeting at his Fort
Lauderdale home.
Among principals attending
were (from left) Herbert Sadkin,
dinner vice chairperson; Farber;
Moss; Mrs. Anita Perlman,
honorary chairperson and
Brandeis Fellow; and Gerald
Mager, dinner chairperson. J.
Edward Houston is dinner vice
chairperson.
Brandeis will present Moss
with its Distinguished Com-
munity Service Award March 30
at Pier 66 in Fort Lauderdale.
Proceeds from the dinner will
establish the Carol and Jack L.
Moss Scholarship and Fellowship
Fund in Public Administration
and Public Policy at the
Waltham, Mass., University.
Lawrence K. Freilich is a man
of action. And that's the reason
Martin Kurtz, general chairman
of the Plantation United Jewish
Appeal of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
announced the appointment of
Larry Freilich as coordinator of
the Jacaranda area of the
Plantation campaign.
Kurtz noted that Freilich, who
is the officer and manager of the
Plantation branch of the
American Savings and Loan
Assn., has the responsibility for
all aspects of the operation of the
office. Assets and deposits at the
branch were almost tripled in the
one year period following his
appointment in 1976.
Freilich is a graduate of City
College of New York, where he
majored in economic and political
science, and took post-graduate
courses at Kent Sate University,
Ohio; New York Institute of
Finance, and the H. Hentz & Co.
Training Institute where he was
the recipient of the highest award
for public speaking and
salesmanship.
He was recently appointed to
the Plantation Mayor's Com-
mittee on the 1980 Census and is
affiliated with the Plantation
Deborah Hospital Fund,
French Recognize Palestinian Rights
PARIS France Sunday
officially recognized "the right of
the Palestinian people to self-
determination," thus implicitly
accepting the creation of a
Palestinian state.
President Valery Giscard
d'Estaing, on an official 10-day
tour of the Gulf states and Saudi
Arabia, said in a joint com-
munique with Kuwait, "The
French President and the Emir of
Kuwait express their conviction
that the Palestinian problem is
not one of refugees but that of a
people which must enjoy, within
the framework of a just and
lasting peace, the right to self-
determination."
This is the first time that
France has come out in favor of
Palestinian self-determination
and thus implicitly recognized an
independent Palestinian state.
Up until now, French official
spokesmen have mentioned only
"a Palestinian homeland" and
have generally supported some
sort of autonomy regime.
BONN Nazi criminal Ernst
Heinrichsohn, the former mayor
of the Bavarian small town of
Buergatadt, has been released
from jail pending his appeal Ten
inhabitants of the town, who still
IfWipathize with the former SS
official in occupied France, raised
the 200,000 Marks needed for the
bail.
Valery Giscard d'Estaing
The Cologne court which
released Heinrichsohn ordered
him to show up at the police
station once a week, and to hand
over his passport. It rejected a
related plea to set free Martin
Hagen and Kurt Liahka, who
received 12 and 10 years
respectively for complicity to
murder.
PARIS Egyptian' Prime
Minister Mustafa Khalil has
welcomed French President
Valery Giscard d'Estaing's all
for the recognition of the Pales-
tinian people's right to self-deter-
mination.
He said that this principle is
Egypt's guideline in the
autonomy negotiations with
Israel now taking place. Khalil
said "Egypt welcomes any
resolution that can lead to self-
determination for the Pales-
tinians."
Khalil, who met here with
French Premier Raymond Barre,
said that in Egypt's view the five
year transition period provided
by the Camp David agreements
"would inevitably lead to
Palestinian self-determination."
WASHINGTON Sen.
Edward Kennedy (D., Mass.) has
denounced the Carter adminis-
tration for the U.S. vote in the
United Nations Security Council
Saturday supporting a resolution
that condemned Israel's settle-
ment policies in the occupied
Arab territories, including East
Jerusalem.
In a statement issued Sunday,
Kennedy condemned the U.S.
vote "as a shameful moment in
the diplomatic history of our
natk n' and a reversal of past
policy.
Laurence Freilich
Plantation Chamber of Com-
merce, and Miami's B'nai B'rith
Finance Lodge.
Kurtz said: "We're delighted
that Larry has accepted the
challenge of working with
Jacaranda residents to meet the
humanitarian needs of Jews in
Israel, elsewhere in the world,
and right here in our own North
Broward community."
J
Light tt\e candle
and remember?
Menorah Chapels, to preserve
the traditions of our faith,
wishes to offer a gift of re-
membrance. A Yahrzeit
Calendar in the name of the
departed and a Yearly Re-
minder of the Yahrzeit
observance date. A part of
our religious life, now and
through the ages.
CALL OR WRITE FOR YOUR
YAHRZEIT CALENDAR AT:
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313
742-6000
In Dade, call 861-7301
In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME, DATE AND TIME OF
DEATH OF THE DEPARTED
RNMNSWaUM wos
W* Vort
5I*NIy. JCNIOOMKG.SOl
MCMOMAl CMAMlS
mto"
MM* Mf WMIU CMMH s
Pmm
And serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
Chapels also in Deerf ield Beach and Margatt
The oldest Jewish-owned chapels in Broward County.


rageo
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 14.1980
U.S. Sources and Flow of Funds
to the
Jewish Agency for Israel
Contributor
Community Federations
u J A Local
Campaigns
Rabbi William BerkowiU, president of the Jewish National Fund, speaks with Jamea nazi
pursuer, Beate Klarsfeld, concerning the worldwide rise of neo-Nazism and anti-Semitism.
The duo are shown exchanging confidences in New York prior to Mrs. Klarsfeld's appearance
before 2,000 persons in Dialogue, the public forum series.
National
UJA
Campaign
JOB
1
ORT

Debt I Financing
h
NYANA
HIAS
HU S Government I
Programs
United Israel Appeal
JeeHsh Agent lor Israel
ir
Aural Immigration Youth Higher Education Social
Settlement Absorption Hewing SernCes Education Well a re
Definition ol abbreviations:
JDC Joint Oslrtbu'ioo Commmw
HIAS H"L"-a I umigfdini AiO Society
NYANA Ne Ywii Association loi New Amenr an*
ORT Organization lof Ren.*.rjilit-,ti(
$25 Contribution Required
To Receive 'The Floridian9
The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale has raised the
minimum contribution to the 1980 United Jewish Appeal for those
who wish to receive The Jewish Floridian the newspaper
published every two weeks with national, international, and local
news of Interest to residents in the Jewish community of North
Broward County. The new minimum is $25.
In the seven years that the Jewish Federation has been involved
in the publication of the Greater Fort Lauderdale edition, the costs
for postage, typesetting, printing, newsprint, and maintaining ac-
curate mailing addresses have all risen dramatically. The Jewish
Federation can no longer absorb these costs and your under-
standing of the necessity for this action Is sincerely appreciated.
Even with this Increase with a goodly portion of that minimum
commitment going to aid Jews around the world The Jewish
Floridian is available for one of the lowest subscription rates among
English-language Jewish newspapers.
Greater Fort Lauderdale I
Edition of !
"".Jewish Floridian
la provided a* a public service to the Jewish communities In North Broward County by the
Jewish Federation of
2999 N.W. 33rd Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale 33311
Leo Goodman
President
Greater Fort Lauderdale
Phone
305/484-8200

i
Leslie S. Gottlieb
Executive Director
Milton Keliter
Executive Vice President
Victor Gruman
Vice President
Joel Relnsteln
Vice President
John Streng
Vice President
Richard Romanoff
Secretary
Joel Levitt
Treasurer
Mrs. Bernard Llbros
Women's Division President
Paoe four dilontl column! ol THE JErV'SH FLORIDIAN e.press me opinion ol IK* Publish*
snd neither Ihost columns not Ih* mdfrlismg rmprtsr.nl indorstmini by the Jewish Ftdtialibn
ol Qrtiltr Fort Lauderdale
I tor the Oree.Hr Pert Laudardali Edition of The Jewiih Floridian should be sent to
the Jewleh Federation office, 2tfM NW llrd Ae., Fort l.uderdele 3M11.
CERTIFIED KOSHER
FOR PASSOVER
Highest in
polyunsaturates.
No cholesterol.
No preservatives.
--*-
RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Who picked up the telephone
before Alexander Graham Bell did?
A: Johann Philipp Reis.
Reis is listed in THE BOOK OF FIRSTS as
number one to publicly demonstrate the
telephone. He did this in front of a group of
scientists in 1861fifteen years before Bell got
a patent. Because of illness and a lack of funds.
Reis was unable to capitalize on his invention.
Bell knew of his work as did Edison who even
toyed with Reis' ideas. On March 22, 1876,
twelve days after Bell's first intelligible speech
transmission, the NEW YORK TIMES ran an
editorial entitled The Telephone'. The editorial
was all about Philipp Reis. Not one word about
Bell. Even the U.S. Government brought suit
against Bell for: "claiming the invention of
something already widely known to exist in the
form of the Reis 'telephone' and also with
somehow concealing the latter from the Patent
Office's expert examiner in that field" Bell, of
course, survived the lawsuits and the challenges
but physicists built a monument to Reis as the
inventor of the telephone. (Better he should
have won the lawsuits.)
ANOTHER RARE FACT...
A big part of Jewish warmth and affection
is to quickly become completely open and
informal with people and things they par-
ticularly like. Samuel is called "Sammy!'
a snack is a "nosh" and the famed Chicken
Soup has become known as "Jewish
Penicillin'.' And right in keeping with this
inherent warmth, J&B Rare Scotch has
come to be regarded as a favorite part of
the 'mishpocha'. Because along with
its elegance at formal affairs-J&B
is also the kind of 'relative1 one can take
his shoes off with, loosen the tie and
relax with friends at home.

J'B
RARE
SCOTCH
.
.


Friday, March 14, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
Next Year
World Gathering of Holocaust Survivors in Israel
"Chai'* (Life), which is also the
word for 18, takes on a new
meaning to Jewish Holocaust
survivors.
Next year 36 years (Double
Chai) after liberation there will
be a World Gathering of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors from June
15 to 18,1981, in Israel.
Ernest W. Michel, executive
vice president and campaign
director of the New York City
UJ A-Federation, has been named
chairman of the World Gathering
committee.
He said the Gathering is en-
visioned as an event of major his-
torical consequence in contem-
porary Jewish life the first of
its kind ever to take place and
possibly the only one. It is
estimated, he said, that there are
several thousand survivors
throughout the world, and it is
possible some 15 to 20,000, to-
gether with their families (second
and third generation members
included), will participate/
The Gathering is not spon-
sored by any organization but is
being planned and organized,
totally, by the survivors them-
selves. It will be under the
patronage of Prime Minister
Menachem Begin. Honorary
chairmanship has been assumed
by the distinguished survivors
author L*lie Wiesel, chairman of
the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Delta Announces Discount Fares
Delta Air Lines has introduced
a new discount fare between New
York. Philadelphia or Baltimore
and the Florida cities of Miami.
Fort Lauderdale, Tampa, Or-
lando. West Palm Beach, or
Jacksonville (not available for
Baltimre).
The fare is subject to gover-
nment approval, and its effective
dates are March 1 through June
30. 1980.
"The Delta Buy N Fly' dis-
count fare," remarked J. A.
Cooper, the airline's senior vice
president-marketing, "is
designed to save the traveler
money while eliminating red
tape. The one-way cost os $99 in
coach and $119 in first class, and
this includes tax. The traveler
can buy one flight at a time as
needed, and thus avoid a big cash
outlay and the bother of coupon
booklets."
The new Delta fare is good on
any day and flight, and no ad-
vance purchase requirement
applies. Fare does not apply on
service via Atlanta. Delta
operates dozens of flights each
day between these cities, and
reservations are now available
from the airline or by contacting
a travel agent.
Council, and Simone Veil,
president of the European Parlia-
ment, France.
PURPOSE
The World Gathering of Jew-
ish Holocaust Survivors will:
(1) Emphasize the significance
of the Holocaust and com-
memorate the 36th anniversary
of liberation from the Nazi con-
centration camps;
(2) Serve notice to the entire
world that the Holocaust must
never be forgotten, never be
repeated;
(3) Affirm the continuity and
survival of the Jewish people as a
whole and the State of Israel as
their focal point;
(4) On a worldwide scale, bear
personal witness to the
Holocaust experience;
(5) Transmit testaments from
all the survivors to the next
generation and future
generations.
(6) Above all, this gathering
will be an opportunity for the
survivors from all over the world
once in their lifetime to be
with each other, see each other,
touch each other and in doing
so rejoice in their survival and
that of the Jewish people.
While it is noted that of
paramount importance is the
advancing age of many of the
survivors and the awareness that
this may be the only opportunity
for such an international convo-
cation, at the same time par-
ticipants will be invited to bring
their sons and daughters their
spouses, children, even grand-
children. Thus the continuity of
our heritage and history would be
reinforced.
The planning and management
aspects are being handled by the
survivors themselves. To take
charge of planning and adminis-
tration, Samuel R. Mozes of New
York has been appointed execu-
tive director of the World
Gathering. The office is located
at the headquarters of the World
Jewish Congress, One Park Ave.,
Suite 418. New York 10016.
Some seed money has been
made available to the World
Gathering. Additionally, the
World Jewish Congress,
American Section, is con-
tributing supplementary office
services. Other organizations will
be asked to help finance planning
and administration. The program
will be primarily financed by the
individual survivors.
f The GLATT KOSHER
Hold & Bearh Club ^C*
OPEN ALL VfcAH
UtOEN
MQMT.
GLATT A KOSHER
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II Vbu Hai Not Completed Tour Plans
for PASSOVER MEALS... ACT HOW!
Phone: 1 538 6631
On The Ocean al 7lu SI Miami Beacn.
EARLY BIRD
PASSOVER SPECIAL
Reservation* Made by Man h I
10 Days 9 Nighu COOK *" ""*""
Mar 31 to Apr. 9 90U0 *>' -
2&4 Week Packages Including
Passover Available
Services Conducted by Cantor
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SPECIAL LOW MARCH RATES
VastPrlv Beach Olympic Pool
TV In All Rooms Movies Dane Ing &
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Resident Mashglach & Synagogue
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LIGHTS: Tl rug. "W. 0.8 mg. nicotine. LIGHT 100'$: Tl mg. V. 0.9 mg.nicotine. iv. pet cigitette. FTC Report DEC. 79


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 14, lj

Israelis Limited to
$500 In Currency
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The amount of foreign currency
Israelis are permitted to hold in
cash has been reduced sharply
from $3,000 a year to only $500.
The rest can be held only in
traveler's checks or a bank check.
This move against black
capital was a surprise by Finance
Minister Yigal Hurwitz as he
presented next year's 63.5 billion
Shekel (IL 653 billion) budget to
the Knesset. He also announced
the ban on the transfer from one
foreign currency account to
another.
IN PRESENTING the budget,
Hurwitz said he would have liked
to cut the budget even more, but
the defense and housing needs
had to be considered. The budget
was believed to forecast a very
difficult year for Israelis with
major cuts in services.
Sharp price increases were
therefore expected in public
transport, basic commodities,
municipal services, health and
national insurance fees and fuel
prices.
For instance, during 1980, fuel
prices are expected to double. In
dollar terms imports will cost 65
percent more. The budget in real
terms forecasts a freeze in the
standard of living, a cut in
manpower, in the public services
and a rise in unemployment from
38,000 to an average of 55,000
which is 4.2 percent of the labor
force.
ALL THESE measures are
geared toward one goal a
reduction of inflation. Prof. Ezra
Sadan, director of the Treasury's
Economic Planning Authority,
said inflation should be curbed bv
next December. Local defense
expenditure will go up 9 percent,
but civilian public spending
should not increase at all.
"We expect a reduction in
private consumption,'' said
Sadan, "and we expect a total
reduction in investments, par-
ticulariy in public investments, in
inventories, not so much in the
business sector and not at all in
the sector which is exports
oriented."
Although the Treasury had no
forecast regarding the price rises
for next year, in order to keep
public expectations low, Sadan
expressed his confidence that the
budget would not be increased in
real terms, when it is updated in
six months' time.
SADAN DECLARED that the
Treasury intended to maintain
real wages without deterioration.
1 "We do not intend to let wages
decline because of inflation."
Labor Knesseter Adi Amorai
took the podium following
Hurwitz' statement, and at-
tacked the government for still
printing too much money. He
said the Finance Minister had
only managed to frighten
everybody, but had not done
anything constructive. He
charged that the present budget
was based on a fallacy. "The
government drew a rosy picture
based on very optimistic
assumptions, which are entirely
unrealistic."
He further argued that the
government's intentions to move
workers from the services to the
industry was but wishful
thinking. "The first unemployed
will come from the industry," he
said.
Ml
X
TIC
h, ?J.Td ttle ^^ aae each **> and **rate The Exodus
tnrough traditions passed down to us over thousands of years These
traditions have become so much a part of our heritage they are inscribed
jr. The Hagodah for all the world to see: me matzoh. the MaMshtanah
the Aphikoman. the recitation of the plagues, the chant of 'Dayenu' and
on and on through the night, dosing with Chad Gadya
At each Seder, however, there are other kinds of traditions tradi-
tions which are just as strong, just as chenshed. They are our personal
family traditions. Unwritten and unsung, they are as much a part of our
Seders as the hard boiled eggs and bitter herbs. And among these one of
the most popular traditions is the wine that is used throughout the
Seder evening. That b Manischewitz. of course. In millions of homes it
just wouldn't be Passover without a bottle of Manischewitz Kosher Wine
it b a wine that spans the generations and, somehow, symbolizes the
continurty of the fam.!y Seder. Faces may change, we grow older some-
times there is a new youngster to
ask the MaNishtanah:. .but always
there is the Manischewitz.
It holds a traditional and honored
place at our Seder table.
Produced and bottled under
strict Rabbinical supervision by
Rabbi Or. Joseph I. Snger A
Rabbi Solomon B. Shapiro
Mantachewttz Wine Co.. NY. NY 11232
Kashrutfi Certificate available upon request
Progressives Request
Rabbis as Marriage

m *
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The World Union for Progressive
Judaism, representing Reform
Jewry in the United States and
around the world, has asked
Religious Affairs Minister
Aharon Abu-Hatzeira for
recognition of its rabbis, under
law. as registrars of marriages.
Abu-Hatzeira. a member of the
National Religious Party, is
expected to reject the request, in
which case the Progressive
movement said it would appeal to
the Israeli Supreme Court.
MARRIAGES and all other
Jewish religious functions
relating to family life in Israel are
the exclusive domain of the
Orthodox rabbinate. The
Progressives announced their
request to the Ministry of
Religions and their intention to
go to the high court at the
opening here last week of the 21 st
Conference of the World Union
for Progressive Judaism.
In its request to Abu-Hatzeira,
the Reform movement noted that
several bodies other than the
Chief Rabbinate of Israel are
recognized by law as registrars of
marriages. These are. apart from
the Christian. Moslem and Druze
denominations.' the Rabbinical
Council of the Agudat Israel
which does not recognize the
Chief Rabbinate and the court
of the Eda Haredit in Jerusalem
which does not recognize the
legitimacy of the State of Israel
in many respects.
Another registrar, not within
the Chief Rabbinate framework,
is Rabbi Menahem Hacohen, a
Labor Party MK and rabbi of the
moshav movement. The Reform
movement has asked that two
Reform rabbis be similarly
recognized according to
regulations that the Minister of
Religions is empowered to issue.
"WE WILL never agree to a
situation in which the Jewish
State, for coalition con-
siderations, gives exclusivity to
one stream in Judaism," declared
Rabbi Richard Hirsch, secretary
general of the World Union.
Hirsch, who has lived in Israel for
several years, represents the
world Reform movement on the
World Zionist Organization
Executive.
He and other Reform rabbis
cited the recent marriage of
Karen Dickenstein and Howard
Levine, both of Kibbutz Yahel,
which was solemnized by a
Reform rabbi, Ade Assavi and
then duly registered by the Chief
Rabbi of Eilat, Moshe Hadaya.
They said that later, hadaya was
pressured into announcing that
he would not register such
marriages in the future.
For this reason, the Reform
leaders explained, they felt they
could no longer rely on the good
will of the Orthodox registrars
and must demand the right for'j
Reform rabbis to become
"register authorities." Hirsch
and the World Union's legal aide
said they would not .perform
marriages that are not recognized
by Israeli law, such as between a
Jew and a person of illegitimate
birth or between a Jew and a non-
Jew.
BUT THEY gave no com-'
mitment regarding jnarriagea
that Orthodox rabbis refuse to
perform, such as between a
Cohen and a divorced person, but
which, if performed, abroad, are
recognized ex post facto by the
Israeli courts.
Hirsch said that thg Issue of
which marriages would be
performed could be included in
the "dialogue" which he hoped
would develop between the
Religious Affairs Minister and
the Reform movement in con-
nection with its request for
recognition.
FflPORItf BBSS
0V6R RtflPK
WW) JVUKVW Anxw erf ****** food symbolize Jewish festival
mSmSZ'"'"*' mdmim***"*P*l balabuto, here are mouth-
*******
TRADITION, CUSTOM, FAMILY AND FOOD For thousands
of years, food has been an integral part of the
Passover celebration. And for thousands of years
dried figs have been an important source of food '
for the Jewish people. That is why California's fig
growers want to give you these fine recipes for
both traditional and modern Passover dishes
When you buy dried figs, be sure to pick up your
own free copy of these carefully written and tested
recipes. And, as you enjoy them, remember that
today, this ancient and nutritious sweet is ripened
and dried in the California sun.
good yomtov
from
The California Dried Fig Advisory
BoardFresno, California
i
<&
***=**
hlfikPra onH I.


Friday, March 14,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page

Jewish Activist Now on Trial in USSR
Community Relations Com-
mittee of Jewish Federation
received word from the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry
(NCSJ) that Igor Guberman, 44,
Jewish activist refusenik living in
Moscow, a writer and author of
popular science books and ar-
ticles for youth, is on trial.
major step in a
Jewish activists.
crackdown on
Guberman applied to emigrate
to Israel in December 1978. He
was arrested last Aug. 13 after he
refused to collaborate with the
Soviet secret police, KGB.
Jewish activists in the Soviet
Union have expressed to NCSJ
their fear that the trial of
Guberman may become the first
They urge that letters be sent
to Soviet officials demanding
Guberman be released im-
mediately and permitted to
emigrate to Israel with his
family.
Here are addresses:
B. V. Kravtsov, The Chief
Procurator of RSFSR
Kuznetskii most 13
Moscow, RSFSR, USSR
Anatoly Dobrynin
Ambassador
Embassy of the USSR
1125 16th Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
i '
Egyptian Sees Summit
With President Carter
CAIRO Gen. Kamal Hassah
Ali, Egypt's Minister of Defense,
in an interview here Sunday said
that a summit meeting may be
held next month involving
President Carter, Egypt's
President Sadat, and Israel's
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin.
"It is expected a summit
grouping the three leaders will be
held in April, unless the
Palestinian autonomy
negotiations make progress in
March," Gen. Kamal Hassan Ali
declared in the interview
published in the Egyptian
newspaper, Al Siyassi.
THE FOREIGN Minister
made his remarks after the last
round of autonomy negotiations
in the Hague last week failed to
achieve more than formal
progress.
Negotiations are focusing on
setting up an elected self-rule
council to run the affairs of the
1.1 million Arabs on the West
Hank and in Gaza.
The next round of autonomy
negotiations is due at the end of
March in Cairo, and will be
spurred by the May 26 deadline
for both parties to come up with a
solution to the thorny question.
The Egyptian's comments are
in essence a blunt warning that
no progess has been made so far
as President Sadat is concerned,
who has been upping the level of
concessions he is demanding
from Israel on the autonomy
question beyond those as defined
by the Camp David accords.
THIS IS the view of Israeli
officials, who now interpret the
call for a summit meeting with
President Carter as the ultimate
threat in the exacting of further
Israeli concessions.
Particularly as this is an
election year, Israeli officials
note, President Carter will be
especially inclined to pressure
Israel toward the kind of
autonomy plan that may
ultimately lead to a separate
Palestinian state on the West
Bank and in Gaza, although he
has repeatedly declared he is
opposed to the establishment of
such a state.
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 14, 1980
A
Hebrew Day School
350 Hear How to Cope With Cults
More than 350 teenagers and
their parents crowded the
auditorium of the JCC Feb. 26 for
a program on "Coping with the
Cults," organized by the Judaica
High School of the CAJE of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
Rabbi Rubin Dobin, leading
community figure who seeks to
raise public awareness of the
nature of the various cult
movements on the local and
national scene opened the
program following words of
welcome on behalf of the Jewish
Federation by Phyllis Chudnow,
chairperson of its Committee on
Jewish education.
The second half of the program
included two concurrent sessions,
with the one for teenagers led by
Sally Fox who presented a one-
woman encounter dramatic
theatre experience in which the
teenagers reacted to the various
individuals who are involved in
cult activities.
At the same time, Sandy
Andron, youth programming
director of the CAJE, addressed
the parents with a detailed
description of the nature of cult
activities, their goals and ap-
proaches and dealt with the issue
of what action should be taken by
parents, teenagers and com-
munity leaders in relationship to
the cults.
Students from tenth through
twelfth grades who are interested
in learning more about the Cults
may join the class of the Judaica
High School now being con-
ducted each Tuesday evening
from 8 to 9 p.m. at the JCC.
Sean Leder, Gregg Polsky, Erin Fineberg,
Philip Rackin, Sandi Kurtz, Jennifer Arm-
stead, Natasha Mann and Jennifer Faerber
were among the Purim performers of the
Hebrew Day School following the schooFs
traditional Friday Kabbalat Shabbat in the
Soref Hall of JCC. The service and the Purim
program were performed for the frail elderly of
the JCCs Gathering Place and the Nutrition
Program as well as parents of Day School
children.
Early Childhood Education Programs Discussed
Directors of the Early
Childhood Education Programs
of the North Broward
synagogues and the Hebrew Day
School met last week at the
Jewish Federation with
Federation's Education Director
Abraham J. Gittelson to discuss
issues of mutual interest, in-
cluding the new Florida
regulations regarding entrance
date for first grade students for
the coming year.
Other matters of concern were
teacher professional growth
programs, a unified school
calendar, fulfillment of
requirements of Broward Board
of Health, curriculum of Early
Childhood programs and parent-
school relationships.
Joining in the discussion were
Marilyn Beyer of Temple Beth
Israel, Sunrise; Florence
Reinstein of Temple Kol Ami,
Martha Moses and Carol
Wasserman of Temple Beth Orr,
Kay Fleischer of Temple Emanu-
El, and Sheila Grenitz of Hebrew
Day School.
Annual Passover Sale
Hebrew Day School Annual Passover Sale
Carmel Israeli Kosher for Passover Wines
Benefit for the Hebrew Day school March 19 & 20
10 a.m.-6 p.m. at Grapevine wine & Cheese Shoppe
256 S.universitv Drive, Plantation
DURING THE SEDER DINNER
EVERYONE WILL THINK YOU DID
WHEN YOU DIDN'T
The Prune Juke
Self-Improvement
Plan.

Everybody knows how busy the balabusta is preparing
for the Seder. The hustle and bustle of cleaning, cook-
ing, setting the table and making sure everything is
just right. So when you serve delicious Maxim*the
100% freeze dried coffee, with your delicious dessert,
everyone will marvel that you took the time and
trouble to make fresh perked coffeewhen you
didn't. And it won't be so terrible if you don't tell them!
Maximfthe 100% freeze-dried coffee with the rich
ground aroma and fresh perked taste is Kosher for
Passover in@-P marked jars.

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It's a natural. Eat wefl-balanced
foods. Exercise. Enjoy Sunsweet,
the 100% pure natural fruit juice. It
contains iron and potassium and
vitamin B2. And it
the better you.SUNSWEET*
TbyourheaWt"
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:;


Friday, March 14,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
Passover Theme at Day School Scholarships for Teens
Throughout the Hebrew Day
School, the theme of freedom will
ring during the month of March.
This theme is being utilized in
every grade level from pre-
kindergarten through fifth in
preparation and- celebration of
Passover.
Studying the holiday and
having a Seder are not sufficient
for a thorough understanding of
the meaning of the holiday, so the
children will be involved in all
facets of freedom.
In pre-kindergarten, the
children will discuss the concept
of freedom on a limited level,
drawing from their own life
experiences to enhance the idea of
being able to do what they want.
This group has its own Seder for
which they do the preparation
from Seder plate to the service.
The kindergarten group
follows the same format as the
pre-k, but they also write and do
Hie Hebrew Day School
OF rOKT LftBSERXKLE
to Study in Israel
crafts around the holiday. Both
the pre-k and kindergarten have
used the Mario Thomas record of
"Free to be You and Me" as a
pivotal point for their
discussions.
One of the major projects of
the upper levels is a newspaper
which will contain sections of
polling different individuals in
the community as to their views
of freedom. Creative writing will
constitute a majority of the paper
where the children can express
their views of what freedom and
Passover mean. Inherent in this
paper will be an emphasis on
tracing the children's roots via
their 'Grapevine9 Giving Wine
Profits to School
Passover heralds many events.
At the Hebrew Day School,
Passover affords an opportunity
for the fundraising vice president
to once again promote the annual
Passover Wine Sale.
On March 19 and 20, Wed-
nesday and Thursday, the school
will once again sponsor the sale of
Israeli Kosher wine for Passover
by Carmel at the Grapevine, 256
S. University Dr., Plantation,
* between 10 and 6.
Profits of the wine sale go to
the Hebrew Day School, and all
those who desire may purchase
wine at that time.
Rhonnie Leder, vice president,
has said, "What an easy was to
show your support for the
Hebrew Day School in our
community. Remind your friends'
to buy their wine on those days
and show that the community is
r* ij behind the school."
In addition to the Passover
Wine Sale, the Hebrew Day
School has announced its plans
for a yacht party. On April 19 at
8 p.m. the 50 couples who have
purchased tickets at $40 a couple
will sail for three hours from
Miami. A night of games aboard
ship is planned as well as dinner.
Enrollment
Opening
at School
Hebrew Day School has set its
re-enrollment period until March
28 for its current parent body.
After that date the enrollment
will be open for the general public
as well. Several classes may close
early as class size is limited. The
school offers both Judaic and
secular education for children
four years old to children in the
fifth grade.
Since the school deadline has
been changed in Florida, the
Hebrew Day School will adhere
to the deadline in the following
manner. To enter kindergarten,
the child must be five on or before
Dec. 1, 1980, as stated in the new
law. If the child will be five on or
before Dec. 31, 1980, the child
may be tested for early ad-
mittance to the Hebrew Day
School.
Parents interested in enrolling
for the 1980-81 school year are
encouraged to call the school
office located on Perlman
Campus of Jewish Community
Center, for more information.
The Hebrew Day School will be
hosting open hooaes for parents
or prospective students an
Wednesday, March 26, at 10 a.m.
and on Thursday, March 27, at 10
a.m. To RSVP, call the school
office or Mrs. Norma Polsky,
enrollment chairman.
Anyone interested in obtaining
tickets should contact Rhonnie or
the school office.
America.
One of the aspects of freedom
that the children will explore is
the realm of constitutional right
of the American citizen. The
children will study the Con-
stitution and then follow up their
study by having a laywer speak
to the groups and then going to
the courthouse for a visit.
The first grade and kin-
dergarten will emphasize a unit
on citizenship and the flag in lieu
of the Constitution unit.
Integrating the Judaic aspects
of freedom with the secular were
evident when the pre-k began its
study of freedom with learning
about Abe Lincoln. From Lincoln
to Moses may seem far-fetched,
but for the children the principles
that guided these individuals
make an undeniable link.
Passover has and always will
be a significant Jewish holiday.
For all the children of the Hebrew
Day School, Passover will take
on an added dimension of
meaning after this month's
study, say school officials.
The conviction that a study
tour to Israel is one of the most
effective educational programs
for creating Jewish loyalty and
commitment among Jewish
teenagers has motivated the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale to establish the
Israel Scholarship Awards
program, Stanley Cohen, Israel
Scholarship Committee Chair-
man announced. Applications are
now being accepted.
"The Israel Scholarship
Awards are designed to stimulate
participation of North Broward
teenagers in worthy study
programs in Israel so that
hopefully they will continue in
Jewish studies and involvement
in the Jewish community during
the high school, college and adult
years," Cohen said.
Requirements for the grants
include participation in an on-
going program of Jewish studies,
a commitment to attend an
orientation program prior to
departure and involvement in a
study program upon return; at
least a' "C" average in both
public school and Jewish studies;
and membership of the family in
either one of the area synagogues
or the Jewish Federation.
Phyllis Chudnow, chairperson
of the Committee on Education of
the Jewish Federation noted that
"both financial need and in-
centive grant scholarships will be
awarded, with the possibility of
one major scholarship that would
cover most of the cost of summer
program in Israel, as well as
smaller individual grants."
Students applying for grants will
be interviewed by the scholarship
Committee.
In addition to the tours of the
national Jewish youth
organizations and the Miami
High School in Israel, the
program of the Judaica High
School of the CAJE originating
in the Hollywood community is
highly recomended.
The tour will include four
weeks in Israel with visits to the
major sites of interest and an
ongoing study program, with a
cost of about $1,600. It is hoped
that in the coming year a full
complement of Broward County
teenagers will make up an annual
tour.
Teenagers who meet the
requirements listed above and
who wish to apply for the grants
should call Abraham J. Gittelson
at 484-8200.
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^


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 14,1980
JCC Music Month
Comedy March 23; Concert March 30
Mark Your Calendar:
The Big Event, Sunday, April 20
- -at
Direct from Broadway comes
Chayele Ash headlining the
Yiddish Musical Comedy Theatre
to be presented at 2 p.m.,
Sunday, March 23, in the Fort
Lauderdale High School
Auditorium, 1600 NE 4th Ave.
Chayele Ash, a character
actress and singer, is returning to
Fort Lauderdale for the fourth
year in the Jewish Community
Center presentation. Featured
with her will be Ari Fuhrman,
character actor; and Renee
Solomon, concert pianist.
Reserved seats for the
sophisticated, professional New
York troupe are on sale at JCC.
19 MUSIC WINNERS
PERFORM MARCH 30
Nineteen musically talented
members of the Jewish com-
munity were chosen by a panel of
judges to take part in the Jewish
Music Celebration at 2 p.m.,
Sunday, March 30, at the Jewish
Community Center, Perlman
Campus, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Two of the judges, Cantor
Jerome Klement of Temple
Emanu-El and Dorothy Rubin,
newspaper editor, have volun-
teered to coordinate the variety
program to be presented. The
third judge who joined the other
two in the evaluation of the talent
during the competition was
Music Critic Shirley Green.
Shulamith Saltzman, chairman
of the Jewish Music Celebration,
expressed her gratitude to the
judges and to Irene Unterman,
pianist, who accompanied all the
performers during the auditions.
She said: "She played, tran-
sposed, and generally enhanced
the performances of all the
contesants. We are most grateful
to have her talents for the
program."
The March 30 event will be in
theSorefHallatJCC.
And here are the winning
contestants: Moe Berg, Elsie
Faecher, Celia Friedman, Jack
Friedman, Mrs. Gillian
Greenstein, Rene Greenstein, Sol
Gruber, Evelyn Kalmowitz, Ida
Kaplan.
Also Michelle Kaplan, Dr.
Andrew Katz, Pearl Kline, Hans
Lesser, Manuel Leibowitz,
Nelson Robbin, Masha Sharon,
Sieve Sharon, Sol Sher, George
Shwiller.

BERMUDA CLUB PLAYERS (seated) Sam Farbstein, Sunny
Landsman, Murray Zwerdling; (standing) Whitey Cohen, Ceil
Blanchensee, Jean Kozim, and Jack Huber presented the
"Jewish Radio Hour" to an enthusiastic audience at JCC as
part of Jewish Music Month.
The two pictures show just a small segment of the doings at
Israel's Independence Day celebration a year ago in Fort
Lauderdale's Holiday Park. Bigger and better than ever plans
are being made to celebrate the 32nd anniversary of Israel's
Indpendence as a state among the nations of the world. And
this year, most of the 16 acres of the Perlman Campus of the
Jewish Community Center of Greater Fort Lauderdale will be
dotted with booths, with games, with wheels of fortune, with
entertainment, with refreshments of all kinds, and with Israeli
artifacts on sale, too. All this will take place Sunday, April 20,
so mark your calendars, because this will be a most joyous day
in the history of the Jewish community in Broward County for
Jews of all ages.
WECARE Needs
Volunteers
The true meaning of
WECARE, was spelled out in a
letter received from a muscular
dystrophy victim, Joanne
Wexler, which reads in part as
follows:
"I have muscular dystrophy
and have had it most of my life.
Now at age 42 most of my time is
spent in a wheelchair. I spend
most of my time at home because
it is difficult for me to get in and
out of a car and back into my
wheelchair. That means I am
home a great part of that time
my father is home a great part of
that time but he leaves me for
periods. To fill time TV occupies
a major portion of the day and
night. I read, but holding a book
and turning pages is hard for me.
"But when all is said and done
it is people with whom I can
speak and converse which I find
most fulfilling. Occasionally,
friends of the family come over
but this is infrequent; when they
do, I am happy.
"The WECARE (of the Jewish
Community Center) program,
helps to fill my loneliness in some
way. Through the past few years
volunteers in the WECARE
program have come to my home
to spend an hour with me, and
this I find the happiest times of
all. When they come, which is
about once a week, I look forward
to their visits. But they drop off
after a while. Only one woman
remained with me week after
week, until family problems
interfered. I miss her very much.
Matinee in Boca
The Adult Activities Com-
mittee of the JCC has planned a
matinee day for JCC members at
the Royal Palm Dinner Theatre
in Boca Raton on Wednesday,
March 26.
Jerome Kern's musical
"Showboat" is the theatre's
presentation; also included is a
luncheon buffet. Time has been
apportioned to allow for a
leisurely stroll through the Royal
Palm Mall.
The air-conditioned bus leaves
the JCC at 10:15 a.m., returns at
5 p.m. Reservation may be made
by check to the JCC office.
Right now Nan Namiot (Reach-
, Out Chairman) of WECARE is
the only one who comes to be
with me, when she is able to get
away from her many duties. She
always spends two hours each
time she comes. That is always a
high spot for me."
She adds: "This says it all.
What I need most is human
companionship, someone with
whom I can yak. I'd love to meet
some other people."
How can you refuse? Why not
call the WECARE office, 792-
,6980, and offer to do a little
something for those who are
unable to do for themselves.
Volunteer to help on the Reach-
Out Program and help chairman
Nan Namiot carry on and in-
terpret the true meaning of
WECARE for the Joanne
Wexlers of Broward.
Webster's dictionary says a
volunteer "is a person who of his
own free will offers himself for a
service or duty."
Because they care about the
human race and its image,
volunteers make the lot of those
less fortunate, livable and
meaningful. They give their time
and energy to help the shut-in,
the disadvantaged, the blind, and
the indigent live a more fulfilled
life, if possible.
The Volunteers of WECARE
visit nursing homes and hospitals
bringing gifts, songs, and
cheerful conversation to brighten
otherwise dull days.
The lonely and shut-in
desperately needs companionship
and a helping hand for many
small tasks we take for granted
and do automatically.
Instead of wondering where
the hours of your day went, why
not volunteer to spend a few
hours of the day or days you
choose, making someone else's
lot easier and more meaningful.
You too will benefit not only by
the satisfaction of having given
of yourself but the pleasure of
knowing someone else is happier
because you shared in their day
you were there.
More JCC News Page 14
Fortunately,
some things never change.
The ancient traditions remain generation alter year once again Manischewilz matzo aelllle
genera ion. And today, we observe Passover as our lish, soup and other delectables will'grace Iradi
lore lathers did thousands of years ago. tional tables.
Kor almost a century, the old fashioned goodness Treat your'family and Iriends to a taste ol Iradi
ol Manischewilz has ushered in festive holiday lion. loo.
dinners in fewish homes all over America. This And have a Kosher and happy Passover!
For 11.iiliiiiiii.il goodness you can count on.

Manischewilz
QUALITY JEWISH FOODS SINCE 5649
Produced under strict Rabbinical supervisions
For Kashruth Certificate write:
Board of Rabhis. P.O. Box 214. Jersey City. NJ 07303
4


Friday, March 14, I960
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
^Young Leadership Gets Sights and Sound of Federation
Leslie S. Gottlieb (left), executive director of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale; Sherwin Rosenstein
executive director of the Jewish Family Service of Broward County'
Iran Merenstein, director of the Hebrew Day School, and William
Goldstein, executive director of the Jewish Community Center, were
the principal speakers at the sixth meeting of the Federation's Young
Leadership Division headed by Glenn Meyers (pictured far right with
~\1 itch 1'asinand RonSchagrin).

Visible in the picture top right are some of those who heard the
Federation story and saw a slide presentation of Federation activities
supported by United Jewish Appeal contributions to the annual
Federation campaign.
Pictured (from left): Larry and Shelly Shapiro, Jayne Rotman,
Mark and Carol Steingard, Carey and Ellen Fischer, Jane Schagrin,
Nina Nemerofsky, Carolyn Russell, Susan Weinberg, Steve Fayne,
Johl Rotman, Steve Nemerofsky, Art Langer, Alan Margolies,
Federation's Young Leadership director.
The camera's eyes failed to spot these other members of the
Young Leadership at the meeting: Carol Hauser, Jason Israel, Joyce
The Genesis Project9 Next
On 'Learn-In9Agenda
The Young Leadership
Development group of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, in cooperation with
the Federation's Committee on
'Jewish Education, is sponsoring
the second "Learn-In" of the
year.
Six Thursday evening ses-
sions, from April 10 through May
15, have been scheduled to be
held at the Jewish Community
Center of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale. 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
This "Learn-In," titled "The
*" 'jenesis Project," will give
participants a unique and in-
novative sight and sound of the
classic Biblical stories of
Creation, Adam and Eve, Cain
and Abel, Noah and Abraham.
Filmed on location in Israel by
Hollywood production people,
The Genesis Project consists of
an international fellowship of
archaeologists, historians, Bib-
lical scholars, educators, tech-
nicians and creative artists who
are translating the written
language of the entire Holy
Scriptures to the language of
motion pictures, image by image.
Federation's Young
Leadership Director Alan
Margolies said: "The Genesis
Project will be a challenging,
penetrating analysis of the First
Book of Moses. We will explore
how the values found in Genesis
can be applicable to our life in
modern society. We are especially
trying to enroll our young adults
from Coral Springs, Plantation,
the Northeast. Lauderhill, and
other communities in North and
West Broward County in The
Learn-In.' Enrollment is open
without charge."
New Leadership Journey
The State of Israel Bonds
Organization has announced its
1980 New Leadership Delegation
to Israel, with an optional exten-
sion to Egypt, departing May 4.
The Israel portion of the trip will
be for 11 days with a three-day
.Cairo extension.
The New Leadership is com-
prised of young professional
members of the community who
have demonstrated support and
interest for the Israel Bond
Program, which supports the
economic development of the
Jewish State, according to Joel
. Reinstein, an active Bonds
worker in Broward County.
This will not be just another
tour of Israel but something
special that young people will
identify with, appreciate and
remember the rest of their lives,
Reinstein said. Going to Israel
with a Bond delegation assures
one of meeting top Israeli leaders
and seeing sights which are
normally not available to the
'ordinary tourist, Reinstein ex-
plained.
The May 4 delegation will cost
$1,500 per person, including
stays at the Tel Aviv-Hilton,
Plaza Tiberias and the Jeru-
salem-Hilton.
"We are fortunate that this
community has two delegations
to Isarel. the Israel Bonds trip
in May and the Jewish Fed-
eration trip in July, and we know
that young people in this area
will take advantage of this op-
portunity to visit our beloved
Israel," Reinstein said.
All interested parties may
contact the Israel Bond office in
Fort Lauderdale for further
information.
HELP URGENTLY WANTED
Volunteers needed for telephone solicitation during March
and April. Do yourself AND ISRAEL a favor. UJA needs
YOU Now! Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale 2999'
NW 33rd Ave., one block south of Oakland Park Blvd. CALL
484-8200.
MORE IILW EVER!
and Mel Jarolem, Linda and Barry Mandelkorn. Donna Meyers, Jon
Russell. Audrey and Richard Schwartz, Adrian and Bruce Syrop, Bob
and Fran Vernick, Michael Weinberg, Sidna and Ross Wexler, Carol
and Ira Wish, Judy and Ross Zimmerman, Sharon Langer.
One of the major goals of the Leadership Development Program
is to instill a sense of "community" to its members. Many of the
participants in this year's group are taking active roles in the
Federation's campaign, serving on the boards of various Jewish
organizations in the community, and markedly increasing their
personal commitments.
Young Leadership Chairman Meyers spoke of his satisfaction with
the progress made by the group. He outlined programs for the balance
of this campaign which will include sessions on "Soviet Jewry," "The
American Jewish Political Scene," and the Young Leadership Mission
to Israel, July 1-11.1980.
h&
fcrt
r i^
They Had the Time of Their Lives

AND they and others can
enjoy 10 days unlike "Any in
your life," says Alan Margolies,
Federation Young Leadership
Mission to Israel director.
Pictured in front of King David
Hotel in Jerusalem is the Fort
Lauderdale group that went on a
Mission to Israel last year. From
left: Johl and Jayne Rotman,
Harry and Leon a Levey, Kenneth
Bierman of the Federation staff,
Mel and Joyce Jarolem, Steve
and Nina Nemerofsky, Nedra and
Gil Friedman, Greta Sussman,
Jane and Ron Schagrin, and a
couple from New England-
Kneeling: Susan Dowd of Con-
necticut, Israeli Guide Yossi
Dagan, and Chuck Sussman.
This year's Mission, including
an available optional four-day
trip to Egypt for those who want
to extend their Middle East
experience, will take off Tuesday,
July 1, flying directly from
Miami International Airport to
Tel Aviv, and returning to Miami
on Friday, July 11.
In between those two dates,
those on the Mission will enjoy a
maximum educational and
emotional experience. They'll
visit Jerusalem, the Western
Wall, Masada, Mount Scopus,
Tel Aviv, Haifa, select Sinai
settlements, the Golan Heights,
West Bank, Yad Vashem,
Knesset, Yamit Region, the Gaza
Strip, the Dead Sea, and much
more. They'll be participating in
a unique and exciting in-depth
A Year Ago
exposure to the people and
historic places of Israel.
Space is limited to 50 par-
ticipants. Early reservations are
requested. Alan Margolies at the
Federation office, 484-8200, has
complete, details on the cost,
$1,499 per person, double oc-
cupancy, $216 single supplement,
with the price subject to change.
The all-inclusive rate provides
round-trip air transportation be-
tween Miami and Tel Aviv, all
meals, except for two evenings,
all tours, first class accom-
modations, departure taxes,
porterage, entrance fees, tips,
transfers.
Want more information?
Detach the coupon below and
mail to the Federation.
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
2999 N.W. 33rd Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311
Tell me more about the Mission to Israel:
My name is.
My address is.
City-----------
Zip.
Phone.



Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 14, 1960
Issues Without Answers
Each Wednesday at 10 a.m. at
the Jewish Community Center,
Lou Silverman, retired
elementary school principal,
leads a discussion which he calls
"Issues Without Answers." In
Silverman's words, it's a
"workshop in values
fication."
He takes a controversial topic,
issues in the areas of philosophy,
psychology, religion, current
events, etc., and encourages his
group to articulate their attitudes
and feelings about the topic
under discussion.
With his effervescence and
humanistic approach to each
"problem," Silverman creates an
atmosphere that encourages
communication among the
participants. He believes that
many of the senior adults have
dormant feelings that have never
been articulated, and he en-
courages them to do so. .
He also has a class on Monday
called "Self-Discovery Through
the Humanities." Here he uses a
text prepared by the National
Council on Aging in Washington,
D C. The class is using Book 3 A
Family Album The American
Family in Literature and
History. In it are excerpts from
literature.
In Silverman's own en-
thusiastic words, "There are
some beautiful gems in this text
that truly encourage thinking.
It's a wonderful experience to be
with these people and help them
and watch them grow as they
express their thoughts and
clari- ideas."
"It's a wonderful experience to
be with Lou Silverman as he
obviously enjoys what he is doing
and does it well," comments
Esther Dobkin, class participant.
Silverman stresses the fact
that their opinions must be
recognized, but at the same time
they are encouraged to recognize
that others may differ in opinion
and to respect these differences.
he
Some of the questions
challenges his class with are:
1. Should the personal life of a
candidate for president of the
USA be an issue in the cam-
paign?
2. How should a widow behave
on her first date with a widower?
3. Is it true that a man who
does the dishes, washes floors,
etc. is not a man but a shmata?
Do you remember enjoying
"Puss in Boots?" Well, he's
coming to town. The Jewish
Community Center's Children's
Theatre is in rehearsal with the
production of "Puss in Boots."
Director Ivy Levine has an-
nounced that the following have
been cast in the play scheduled
for Sunday, April 6, per-
formance: Joe Alzina, Allison
Levey, Susan Grubbs, Susan
Nathanson, Arlene Horrow,
'Puss in Boots'
Marjorie Wichinsky.
Adults, tween and teens,
should call the center and ask for
Ruth if interested in being in th?
chorus.
Magic Show Set
A 45-minute Magic Show,
starring Michael Winters, will be
presented at 3 p.m. Sunday,
March 16, in Soref Hall of JCC.
Joni at JCC office, has more
information.
- /
Andv Horrow. Mark Horrow,
"Never too Late'
"Never Too Late," a comedy
by Arthur Long, will be the next
Jewish Community Center
theatrical production.
Joel Telles, director, has
completed the casting for the
major roles. Allen Cohen, Gert
Goodman, Max Lesser, Alan
Margolies, Audrey Schwartz and
Violet Zausner have accepted
roles in "Never Too Late." There
are still a few minor male roles to
be cast. Anyone interested
should call Ruth Pine at the
center.
At JCC
Entertainment for Kids
The Children's Department of
the Jewish Community Center is
presenting a special program.
"That's Entertainment For
Kids!" consisting of a series of
three events geared to the
elementary school child.
The first event will take place
Sunday, March 16, 5 p.m., at the
JCC. The Crescent City Strings
will perform in the large
auditorium. Price of the ticket
also includes dinner.
On Sunday, April 6, the
Children's Corner of Le Petit
Theatre presents "Robin Hood
TOO" at 5 p.m.
On Sunday, May 18, at 5 p.m.
the Delta Festival Ballet will be
featured, and dinner will be
included in the price of the ticket.
Tickets are available for the
entire series or for individual
performances as well as at special
family rates.
More information about the
series is available by contacting
Mark Zimmerman at the Jewish
Community Center.
ft
ft
ft
*
*



*




4
4
4
ft
$
J
:


ft
ft


*
4
4
4
4
ft
ft
ft
ft
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
PRESCHOOL CLASSES BEGIN
Monday, March 10
Tuesday, March 11
Thursday, March 6
Teen Karate
Women'8 Self-Defense
Karate for Kids
Tumbling & Gym
Tumbling & Gym
Creative Movement
Creative Movement
Creative Movement
Ages 4-6
Ages 4-6
Ages 2 Vj-4
Ages 4l/>-6
Ages 2'/-4
3:30-4:15
4:30-5:15
1-1:30
1:30-2
4:30-6
JCC SELF-DEFENSE CLASSES
Thursday, March 13 7:15-8:15
Thursday, March 13 8:30-9:30
Sunday, March 9 2-3
FAMILY SPORTS FUNDAY
SUNDAY.......MARCH 23
1-4:30 p.m.
Peanut and Colt Basketball Games
Aerobic Dance Demonstration, Cartoons,
Art and Photography Exhibits, Food and Fun,
Pool Open Tennis Courts Open
NO CHARGE FOR VISITORS OR FRIENDS!
JCC SWIM TEAM
Practice starts Monday, March 10
Practice Monday through Thursday, 4:30 6 p.m.
Open for Center Members Grades 2 through 10
Registration Fee $35 Includes swimsuit and team membership
through May 31
DOUBLES TENNIS TOURNAMENT
S9
$9
$15
$15
$15
$15
$15
$10
*
*
*
*
*
*

4
4

4
4
:
8 Weeks 4
8 Weeks
8 Weeks
8 Weeks
8 Weeks
8 Weeks
8 Weeks
8 Weeks
Sunday.......MARCH 23 4
MEN'S OPEN DOUBLES AND WOMEN'S OPEN DOUBLES J
Games start at 9 a.m. till noon (approx.) ft
Registration Fee: $2 (JCC MEMBERS ONLY)
Individual entries can be matched with a teammate J
Balls furnished PRO-SETS Deadline, Friday, March 14
7 DELICIOUS WAYS
TO BRING SPARKLE TO THE SEDER.
Mott's has a way
fresh taste of the
a new zest on
of capturing all the natural goodness
sun-ripened fruit...a bright, lively taste
your Seder table. Mott's uses only
and sparkling
that helps put
the finest fruit.
unique. And that's what makes its
And that's what makes its taste
name great. So, ^ft look for E^: all of the Mott's delicious products
specially labeled ^ Kosher W UPesach with A*> at your favorite
store. And W bring a new kind of sparkling B flavor to your beautiful
dinners. PS. The apple sauces are fantastic *m& with latkes!
3
MOTT'S
. noab-itos
ist Certified KosherPafve lor Passover by RaDbi J H Raibag
t .
.
...


fcday, March 14,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 15
CDU Solon Affirms Party's Support of Israel
| By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
VASHINGTON (JTA) -
foreign affairs spokesman for
tst Germany's Christian
locratic Union (CDU)
Iffirmed his party's support for
ui'l and its people but in-
nii'd that it would not ad-
Kate direct German military
bport should Israel require it.
The Jewish Telegraphic
i'licy asked Dr. Alois Mertes if
agreed with the position of
ipean "Parliament President
iione Veil, of France, who said
several weeks ago that
'umans Honored
Ttor and Min Gruman
Victor and Min Gruman
beived the National Award for
Immunity Service presented by
I Jewish Theological Seminary,
w York, at the 21st annual
invocation Dinner last week at
Diplomat Hotel, Hollywood.
In the presence of 450 people,
|bbi Kassel E. Abelson of the
fumans' former "home-"
nagogue, Beth El in Min-
apolis, Minn., lauded them for
?ir deep involvement in Jewish
and their commitment to
|daism.
Since moving to Florida in
ft~, both Min and Victor have
i-ome leaders of the Jewish
ieration of Greater Fort
kuderdale.
(Presentation of the Award was
ade by Dr. Gerson D. Cohen,
fancellor of the Seminary, which
the academic, spiritual and
kllural center of the Con-
Jrvative Movement in American
lidaism. It is the training
found for the rabbis, cantors.
huhers and communal workers
\ho serve the 828 Conservative
ingregationa in the United
Itates and Canada.
[KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
M Great!
Prfcl for evtry
dith; gives frih
meal-oppent r p
Uflovri.' fool
Muthroum Gimvy,
no fuss
i-
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Diatr. by: Hi-Grade Food Co., Inc.
/ The Gl ATT KOSHER
King David
W
;k djilv per prrtontJUi*on
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NOT INCLUDING PASSOVM
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PASSOVER HOLIDAYS
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jcyuicd by ihr BEBF.OWITZ Family}
Western Europe should use
"military force" if Israel's
existence as a state was
threatened. He replied that
Germany's constitution
prevented such action by the
nation but indicated that in-
dividual Germans could help.
Mertes was in Washington to
explain the views of the West
German opposition party to
American officials and members
of Congress with respect to the
defense of the West against the
Soviet Union.
HE WAS asked by the JTA if
he considered Israel to be a
strategic asset in West European
defense and about the reported
Anglo-French agreement to press
for changes in Security Counci'
Resolution 242 that would opei.
the door to Palestinian Arab
participation in Israel's
negotiations with neighboring
states. He did not respond
directly to those questions.
Mertes, who presumably would
become West Germany's Foreign
Minister if his party took power
in the next elections, spoke of the
need for a "conistent" policy by
the West toward the Soviet
Union because "the Soviet Union
wants a political victory and
peace" and "control of Western
Europe." He met here with
diplomatic correspondents at a
breakfast sponsored by Foreign
Policy Magazine.
Responding to questions about
Israel, Mertes spoke of two
principles held by the CDU
"since 1948." One, he said, is that
Germany is in "a position of
responsibility towards Israel"
because Israel's people are made
'up of "victims or the sons and
daughters of victims of Nazi
persecution."
HE SAID this "does not mean
we are in accord with every step"
taken by Israel. The other
principle, he said, is the
"renunciation of force" in the
Middle East. "The Palestine
Liberation Organization and the
Arabs must have a position of
non-terror," he stressed. "This is
a universal principle. As long as
the PLO uses terror and
questions the existence of Israel,
that threatens its very existence,
Israel must be defended," he
said.
He added, "To be quite sincere,
the relations of power has
changed." He noted that "the
West is threatened by blackmail
possibilities of the Arabs" and
quicKiy empnasized that "We
are interested in the peace
process now taking place."
He observed that it would be
"satisfactory" if Israel helped
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
"to assure chances" of success
for the Camp David accords. "We
would be happy if Israel would be
more flexible on the issue of
settlements" on the West Bank.
"But that is a matter for Israel
and Sadat," he added.
LATER, Mertes was asked by
the JTA if Germany would
contribute military force in
Israel's defense. He replied that
the German Constitution
provides that Germany use its
military only within the context
of NATO and that Israel is not
geographically part of that area.
Asked if the German govern-
nment would permit the for-
mation of a "brigade of volun-
teers, say in Hamburg," to aid
Israel, he thought that also
would be in conflict with the
Constitution. But "individuals
certainly" were free to assist. He
said that "in the Yom Kippur
War" the CDU critlzed elements
in Germany that had criticized
the use by the U.S. of German
harbors and airports to transport
supplies to Israel.
Get your morning off
to a great-tasting start.
Get your day off to a great start
with Minute Maid. Frozen Concen-
trated Orange Juice and Lender's
Frozen Bagels.
Minute Maid Orange Juice is 100%
pure orange juice and always tastes
fresh and delicious because it's
specially blended from the juices
of different kinds of oranges.
And Lender's Bagels are frozen
fresh from the oven for tastiness
and convenience. They're pre-sliced,
preservative-free and come in so
many varieties they'll please bagel
mavens every where. Toast never
tasted this good.
So try a delicious breakfast with
Minute Maid Orange Juice and
Lender's Bagels. And get your
morning off to a great-tasting start.
SSSv*
1980 is the 50th Anniversary of the Frozen Food Industry.
)W/N The Coca-Coil Ci.nip.in> Minim- Mjid in j PtfjkMICd trademark of The Coo -CnLi ('mnp.ni)


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale

Friday. Mareh 14,1980
Organization News
"Redeem the Endangered9
Is Panel Topic in Pompano
Mrs. Sam Rose, president of
the Pompano Golda Meir
Chapter of Hadassah, invites
members and friends to attend a
panel presentation, "Redeem the
Endangered," on Sunday March
23, at 8 p.m. at Temple Sholom, >
132 SE 11th Ave., Pompano
Beach. ;
This program is the outgrowth
of a study group held during the
year. Participating are the
following members: Mrs. Milton
Alpert whose topic is the "Jews
of the Soviet Union"; Mrs.
Joseph Nadler, "The Falasha
Jews of Ethiopia" and Mrs.
Charles Prombain, "The Jews of
Iran." A question and answer
period will follow the presen-
tation.
Refreshments will be served.
The education committee, Mrs.
Alpert, Mrs. Richard Herman,
Mrs. Joseph Nadler, Mrs. Morris
Remler, Mrs. Eugene Rich and
Mrs. Prombain, chairman, thank
Charles Ruben for his generous
cooperation.
Women's League for Israel
National President to Visit
Violet Wiles, national
president of Women's League for
Israel, will be visiting chapters in
South Florida during the week of
March 17.
Her busy schedule begins at
the Shalom Chapter, Monday,
March 17, at Aventura Club,
followed by Lincoln-Miami Beach
and Florida chapters holding
their donor event Tuesday,
March 18, at the Eden Roc Hotel,
and that evening at Palm Beach
Spa in Palm Beach for the slide
presentation of "Faces of the
Future," to which the public is
invited.
Bonaventure chapter holds its
donor Wednesday, March 19, at
Cricket Club in North Miami,
followed by the meeting on
Thursday afternoon, March 20,
at the home of Celia Engelmeyer
in Margate of Broward and Palm
Beach counties' chapter chairmen
with Mrs. Wiles.
She'll meet the next day with
all Dade chapter chairmen at her
suite in the Eden Roc Hotel,
Miami Beach.
Mrs. Wiles will report on the
Women'8 League for Israel
activities, including maintenance
of homes for young immigrants
in Haifa, Jerusalem, Tel Aviv
and Natanya. workshops in
Natanya, dormitories, a chair in
sociology and a book endowment
fund at the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem. Ruth Sperber, of 5975
W. Sunrise Blvd., is Florida
representative, for those seeking
additional information.
Sylvia Blumenthal and
Marilyn Erasmous are chair-
persons of the group's Donor Day
in North Miami. For credits
earned, either through work or
cash contributions, or ads in the
Donor Journal, chaired by
Florence Bromberg and Addie
Morse, members are invited to a
"special" luncheon.
Kuei Designs Inc. will present
a Fantasy inFabrics and Fashion
Show, complete with narrator
and models.
Bonaventure Country Club in
, Fort Lauderdale will be the
setting for the Bonaventure
Chapter of Women's League for
Israel Seder, to be held Monday
evening, March 31, at 6 p.m.
Services will be conducted by
members and their families, and a
traditional dinner will be served.
Bebe Gould, Bebee Pullman,
Gabriel Silitsky and Milton
Sperber are the committee.
r-
i
BRANDEIS WOMEN
The Fort Lauderdale Pom-
pano Beach Chapter of the
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee is having
its annual sale of used books at
the Lauderdale Lakes Mall,
Oakland Park Boulevard and
441, on Friday, Saturday and
Sunday, March 21, 22 and 23.
hours Friday and Saturday are 10
a.m. to 10 p.m., Sunday, 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
Thousands of used books will
go on sale everything from the
latest bestsellers to en-
cyclopedias, reference books,
cookbooks. All proceeds benefit
the Brandeis University Library.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
William Bretchman Post 730,
Jewish War Veterans, elected the
following officers for the year:
Al Danheiser, commander; Irv.
Corn, Senior vice commander;
Virginia Friedman, junior vice
commander; Isadora J. Gold-
stein, quartermaster; and
Charles Crespi, adjutant.
Meetings are held the fourth
Monday in the month. New
Members and transferrees are
invited to attend.
HADASSAH
Hadassah Aviva Oakland
Estates Chapter will hold a
Viennese Dessert Party for the
benefit of Youth Aliyah and
HIAS at Lauderdale Lakes City
Hall. The date is March 19.
The Inverrary Gilah Hadassah
Chapter wfll meet on Thursday,
March 20, at the Inverrary
Country Club, Inverrary Blvd.,
Lauderhill, at 12:30 p.m. The
boutique will open at 11 am. A
mini-lunch will be served at 11:30
a.m. Telephone reservations to:
Robbe Gordon or Adele Lewis.
Hadassah Israel Education
Services will be highlighted.
Mrs. Hester Kapelow will
present a review on The Story of
My Life and Living With the
Bible, by Moshe Dyan.
Dorothy Pittman of Tamarac
was elected Ima, "Mother-in-
Israel" to a child for one year by
the Ray us Group of West
Broward Hadassah Chapter. This
boy or girl will be sustained,
educated, given medical and
other care through $720 spon-
sorship.
A luncheon in Mrs. Pittman's
honor will be held Wednesday,
April 16, at the Tamarac Jewish
Center. Helen Reingold, Ima
chairman, and Yetta Baratz,
Youth Aliyah chairman, will give
a report on the luncheon at the
Tuesday noon, March 25,
meeting of the chapter.
Dorothy Batler, nominating
committee chairman, will present
the 1980-81 slate of officers. The
fifth drawing of "Inner Circle,"
chaired by Pauline Levine, will
take place.
The Rayus-Lime Bay Minyan
Club will present a Passover
celebration, "I Remember Papa,"
produced and directed by Esteue
Rosen thai.
Blyma Margate Chapter of
Hadassah will present the Ima,
(mother-in-Israel) award to
President Eva Leibowitz at a
luncheon in her honor on March
18 at 12:30 p.m. in Congregation
Beth HUlel, 7608 Margate Blvd.
in Margate.
Reservations may be made by
calling Rae Radow, Youth
Aliyah, chairperson.
Regular meeting on March 20,
at 12:30 p.m. in Congregation
Beth Hillel will feature the
presentation of the new slate of
officers for the year 1980)81.
Refreshments will be served until
lp.m.
Guest speaker Dr. Martin
Lerner of Nova University will
tell about "Facts and Fiction
about the Body Beautiful."
A GIFT FOR
SHAARE ZEDEK
On behalf of the American
Committee for Shaare Zedek
Hospital in Jerusalem, a cer-
tificate of appreciation and
recognition was presented to the
Sisterhood of Ohel B'nai Raphael
Synagogue of Fort Lauderdale.
Pictured accepting the cer-
tificate from director, Henry
Tuchman, is Mrs. Ben Gellman,
president. The Sisterhood
purchased two oxygen tanks for
the medical center in Jerusalem.
Members of the Sisterhood
board are Mindy Berstein, Jennie
Werfel, Bella Tetnik, Lillian
Zimmer, Jean Levenson, Syd
Levine, Regina Freed man, Sadie
Mitteldorf, Lillian Brickman,
Sarah Ecker, Sylvia Holland,
Kitty Dressner, Irene Amster,
Lottie Carpet and Cele Levine.
It was noted that Kitty
Dressner purchased a wheelchair
for the hospital in memory of her.
sister.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women, Ocean
Chapter, will hold an installation
and fashion show by Phyllis's
Fashions on April 9 at 12:15 p.m.
at Gait Ocean Mile Hotel, 3200
Gait Ocean Drive, Fort
Lauderdale.
A hot luncheon is planned.
Reservations should be made
before April by phoning Selma
Friedman, Mae Schreiber, or
Marilyn Waldman.
Problems facing Florida's ever-
increasing Jewish population will
be detailed by Abraham J.
Gittelson, director of education of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, at the meeting
of American Jewish Congress of
Deerfield Beach, at 1 p.m.,
Wednesday, March 26, at Temple
Beth Israel, 200 Hillsboro Blvd.,
Deerfield Beach.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The North Broward Region of
Women's American ORT
(organization for rehabilitation
through training,) in recognition
of 100 Years of ORT's service to
people of the United States and
throughout the Free World is
having a Centennial Birthday
Party.
The event will be Thursday,
March 20, from 10 a.m.to 2 p.m.
at the American Legion Hall,
8551 W. McNab Road, Tamarac,
(west of University Drive).
Speaker will be Commissioner
Jack Moss.
Gift wrapped toys will be,
donated, by all members present
to a children'8 ward in a hospital
in Broward County.
Helaine Lewis is centennial
chairman.
Women's American ORT,
Lauderdale-Ridge Chapter, will
host a show on March 23 at 8:30
p.m. to be put on by the Twin
Lakes Theater Group of
Hawaiian Gardens. It is a
"Revuesical" titled, "The Best of
Broadway Number 2." It will be
held in the clubhouse at
Hawaiian Gardens, Oakland
Park Blvd. Proceeds go to the
above chapter.
.Why
is this oil
different
from all
other oils?
It's the only leading oil that's
Kosher and Pareve, every day of
the year, including Passover.
Planters' Oil is 100% pure peanut
oil with nothing artificial added.
It's perfect for all your wonderful
Passover dishes.
Passover Walnut Torte
1 cup matzo meal
Vt cup potato starch
'/i teaspoon salt
6 eggs, separated
1V* cups firmly packed
light brown sugar
'/< cup Planters'Oil
1 teaspoon grated orange ri nd
Vi cup apple juice
2 cups ground Planters*
Southern Belle Walnuts
Combine matzo meal, potato
starch, and salt; set aside. Place
egg yolks, brown sugar, Planters
Oil, and orange rind in a large
bowl. Beat at medium speed
until thickened. Alternately add
dry ingredients and apple juice,
mixing well after each addition
Mix in Planters Southern Belle
Walnuts.
Beat egg whites until stiff
peaks form; fold into batter.
Fbur into two 9-inch cake pans
which have been greased and
sprinkled with matzo meal.
Bake at 350 F for 30 minutes.
Cool cake H) minutes in pans.
Remove from pans and cool
on wire racks. Cut each layer
in half and frost as desired.
Passover dishes
deserve pure
Planters'Oil.
*i"rt &tanda*i&umdi
hmV^ru on< *
IOOvUICNJ 111 tllt3 UMmi.iitij;


Friday, March 14, 1980
Tha Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page
17
CARAMEL PUFF PANCAKE
28
Caramels
I 4 cup water
4 cups peeled apple slices
1 7-ounce jar marshmallow ere me
1 8-oz. pkg. Philadelphia Brand Cream Cheese
+ + +
'/i cup milk
2 eggs
II cup flour
' 4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon margarine
Melt caramels with water in saucepan over low heat. Stir
occasionally until sauce is smooth. Add apples to sauce; heat.
Gradually add marshmallow creme to softened cream
cheese, mixing until well blended.
Combine milk, eggs, flour and salt; beat until smooth and
well blended. Heat 9-inch skillet in oven until very hot. Add
murgarine to coat skillet; pour in batter immediately. Bake on
lowest rack d% 460 degrees, 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 350
degrees, continue baking 10 minutes until golden brown. Fill
with fruit. Serve immediately with cream cheese mixture. 6 to 8
servings.
Variations: Substitute 29-oz. can peach slices, drained or a
id oz. inn apricot halves, drained for apples.
RASPBERRY GRAHAM JAMBOREE
30 Double Sunshine Honey Graham Crackers
'cup Raspberry Jam
1 Package Instant Vanilla Pudding Mix
2 cups Prepared Whipped Topping, Thawed
Prepare pudding mix as directed on package, set aside.
Spread four double crackers with < cup of the jam, top with four
double crackers. Arrange filled crackers in a single row on a
platter. Spread 1 / 3 of the pudding mixture on top of jam filled
crackers. Repeat steps 2 and 3 two times, ending with four plain
whole crackers. Spread loaf with Whipped Topping. Chill 2 hrs.
Before serving, crush remaining 2 whole crackers and sprinkle
over loaf. Cut into slices. Serves 8.
MM11EL
IMPORTED WINES 8 SPIRITS
UitERNifr
SAirviONOW
5 Bring ISRAEL to
your Passover table
^CARMEt WINE CO. INC. NEW YORK, NY.
MOTTS ADDS SPARKLE
Now's the time to think about
serving Mott's Mott's natural
juices are delicious with chicken,
kx and bagels or any Purim
meal. If you're having children,
friends and relatives in
serve refreshing Mott's Apple
Juice with Hamentashen and
cookies. Especially during this
holiday when it's obligatory to
eat, drink and be merry, you'll be
glad you stocked up on Kosher
Mott's juices.
DEMITASSE FOR HOLIDAYS
1 cup Maxwell House A.D.C.
Coffee
1 quart water
Prepare coffee in automatic
drip coffee maker, using amounts
given above. Pour into demitasse
cups. Serve with cream and
sugar. Makes 10 to 12 servings.
Glatt Kosher Seders
109B per person*
Menu
Home-made Cef ilte Fish
w/Beet Horseradish
or
Chopped Chicken Liver Garni
Hearty Matzoh Ball Soup w/ Fresh Dill
Glazed Boneless Breast of capon
with Savory walnut Dressing
Traditional Passover potato Kugel
Carrot & Fruit Tzimmes
Assorted Passover cakes & Macaroons
, Traditional Seder Plate
minimum 10 people
Naturally Kosher Brand
Prepared Foods
576-6060
(From Broward & Palm Beach call collect) /-si
Under supervision of tfaatUJI

RED CHEEK.
THE BEST-TASTING
APPLE JUICE IS
CERTIFIED KOSHER
FOR PASSOVER.
CERTIFIED KOSHER FOR PASSOVER.
Everybody knows that 100% natural Red Cheek Apple Juice tastes
the very best That's because Red Cheek is made from a blend of the best
fresh whole juicy apples. 100% natural, nothing added, nothing taken
out. Certified Kosher for Passover by Rabbi Dr. Joseph Renov. Be sure to
stock up for the family now. Available in quarts and % gallons


Page 18
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
Friday, March 14, 1980
'

Carolyn Fetter of Sands Point,
whose talents have benefited
many organizations, including
Federation's UJA Committee,
newsletter editor on Israel Public
Affairs for Women's League for
Israel, Sunrise City Library
Board, has been named a member
of Broward County Democratic
Executive Committee Cantor
Jack Merchant of Sunrise Jewish
Center, and his wife, Betty,
received the Bonds of Israel
Solidarity Award at the Center-
Sunrise Lakes II brunch ... Dr.
Bernard Millman. after 31 years
of general practice throughout
Broward County from his base in
Pompano Beach, is retiring. He's
hoping to have more time to play
his violin It's far-sighted
planning and the date is
registered in the Federation's
community calendar: Monday,
Oct. 27, 1980. Anita Perlman,
president of the Jewish Com-
munity Center, will be honored
by the Inverrary Lodge of B'nai
B'rith and the B'nai B'rith Foun-
dation of the U.S. at a dinner-
dance at Inverrary Country Club.
American Zionist Federation is
serving as national coordinator
for Yom Yerushalayim. Jeru-
salem Day. activities, May 14,
Q
Browsta' thru
roward
rr
%
\
with mr. "maggie" levine
)
J
1980. AZF, 515 Park Ave., N.Y.
10022, has posters and other
material marking the 13th an-
niversary of the reunification of
Jerusalem Alan J. Levy, a
founder of Southern Cucumber
Co. in Wauchula, Fla., and a
cattle rancher in that city, as well
as being a member of Fort
Lauderdale's Temple Emanu-El,
was elected to the board of
directors of Landmark First
National Bank Kosher
nutrition diners at the Jewish
Federation's center. 2999 NW
33rd Ave., at 11 a.m.. Friday,
March 14, will be entertained by
Hadassah's Somerset Shoshana
LANTZMEN!
POKER PLAYERS
MIR DARFEN TZ WEI YIDDLA CH
TO JOIN US IN A SOCIABLE
GAME ONCE OR TWICE WEEKLY.
PHONE 772-8437
Passover Special
For Our South Florida Friends
10 DAYS -9 NIGHTS
March 31 to April 9
$875
FOR TWO PERSONS
PLUS TAX
Includes
Luxurious Room at
Adjoining Atlantic
Towers Hotel
Famed Waldman
Glatt Kosher Cuisine
2 Seders
Daily Religious Services
Waldman Hotel
On the Ocean at 43 St., Miami Beach
Phone: 538-5731
CARIBBEAN
CRUISE!
Now for the first time
Universal Kosher Tours
presents The Luxury
Cruise ship M.S. World
Renaissance for a unique
Carribean Cruise. The entire
ship is kosher for Passover.
Under the strict rabbinical
supervision of (5) Rabbi Bernard
Levy.
11 Days from Miami
(March 31 April 11) from
$995* $1580*
(* Add Kosher Supplement
$195 per person)
Traditional Seders 6 ports of
call lop name entertain-
ment The Passover experi-
ence of a lifetime.
DIPLOMAT
HOTEL
Hollywood, Florida
The originators of innovative Pas
sover travel programs invite you to
join them for a truly distinctive Pas-
sover at one of the world finest
resorts.
Complete Holiday Program
March 31 April 8,
(per person double occupancy!'
F,om $625 to $775 *
Seders Conducted by
Jo Amar
exclusive separate kitchen and
dining room under strict orthodox
supervision of Rabbi Tibor Stern.
* IS V, lawt and9uifte (Of (fcmngloom
M nd c nttmbrTmaadt
?
UNIVERSAL KOSHER TOURS INC.
1775 BROADWAY. NEW YORK. N.Y. 10019
212-757-6302 l >l I I Kl I 800-223-0560
chapter Sunrise chapter of
American Red Mogen David
honors its administrator, Betty
Schulberg, at a luncheon 11:30
a.m., March 20 at the Reef
Restaurant, 2700 S. Andrews
Ave., Fort Lauderdaie .
Stanley Cohen, educational
director of Temple Beth Israel.
Sunrise, was honored by being
elected to serve on the executive
board of the Jewish Educators
Assembly of the Conservative
Movement. He attended the
national convention last week at
the Concord Hotel in the Cat-
skills .
General Dynamics will start
air-ferrying its sophisticated
multi-role fighter plane, the F-16,
in August to Israel ... At least
15 Israel fashion makers will
show their wares at an Israel
Fashion Week next month in
Cairo Millicent Caplan, wife
of Max Caplan of 6308 Wax-
myrtle Circle, Tamarac, is
$40,000 richer because she used
Muenster cheese instead of cream
in making a zucchini crescent pie.
Her recipe was the best of 8,000
entries in the Pillsbury final
bake-off held last month at the
Fontainebleau-Hilton in Miami
Beach Wfllard Zweig of
Tamarac has been named
national deputy press officer of
the Jewish War Veterans Joe
Baratz and Winifred Axler get
high praise from Rayus Group of
Hadassah's West Broward
chapter. Joe collects old news-
papers, delivers them to Pantry
Pride in exchange for "Food for
the Needy," the project headed
by Winnie, who then delivers the
packages to JCC Broward's
United Way raised $3.5 million in
1979. a 14 percent increase over
1978.
The 1980 edition of American
finish Year Book, published
jointly by American Jewish
Committee and Jewish Pub-
lication Society (both among
beneficiaries of UJA allocations),
confirms increasing migration of
Jews into the sunbelt, primarily
from the Northeast. Estimates of
population for 1979: Fort Lau-
Iderdale. 60.000: Hollywood,
55,000; Miami, 225,000. U.S.
'Jewish population, 5,860,900,
about 2.7 percent of total U.S.
population Tickets will be
available soon at Sunrise Parks
and Recreation Department for
scheduled appearance of U.S.
Army Band in a free concert
April 13 at Sunrise Musical
Theater Because Soviets
vetoed the UN plan to have 4,500
United Nations peacekeeper force
supervise the Israel withdrawal
from the Sinai, a force of 150
Americans will be based there
until Israel finally leaves the
peninsula in May of 1982 .
Proceeds of "Hest of Broadway
II" show on March 22 by Twin
Lakes Theatre Group of Hawai-
ian Gardens Phase 3 is being
presented to liana Hadassah .
Students of religious schools at
Temple Beth Israel and Tamarac
Jewish Center fulfilled the mitz-
vah of deeds of loving kindness"
by putting on shows at nursing
homes Plans for Passover
observances at hospitals and dis-
tribution of Passover packages at
nursing homes are being com-
pleted by Federation's Rabbi
Albert Schwartz and WECARE.
PASSOVER
Having a
Bridge
Party?
Great tasting
Maxwell
House*
Coffee is
the perfect
partner.
A bridge party is never the same with- brewed to be remembered cup after cup,
out a cup of piping hot Maxwell House year after year. Smart Jewish hostesses
Coffee. Its rich, satisfying taste is have been serving it for hStf a century.

Good
to the
La* Drop"*
Maxwell
..<.. i. .I-*,?
Naxweu
V HOUSf
K
Certified
Kosher
ABvingtraoitioninlBwiAhoinwforinorethanhaJfar^rury.
U*.
l
hrrlnro artrt *r\ urtnta *il
iraiurai m lire anitn i iiiij..__ui_


Friday, March 14,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 19
Entin Chairs Woodlands Bonds Dinner
Edmund Entin will preside at
the State of Israel Bonds Dinner
honoring Charles and Dorothy
Locke, Sunday evening, March
23, at the Woodlands Country
Club in Tamarac.
Long active in Jewish com-
munal affairs, Entin is currently
chairman of special bank pur-
chases for the Broward County
Israel Bonds Organization.
He is a member of the board of
directors of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Fort Lauderdale and
served as president of the Beth
Israel Hospital in Passaic, N.J.
At the Woodlands, he has chaired
the Initial Gifts Division of the
UJA and Israel Bonds Cam-
paigns.
The special guest speaker at
the Israel Dinner of State will be
Robert Mayer Evans, former cor-
respondent and bureau chief for
CBS News in Moscow.
Evans served as special
He filed eye-witness reports of
the Yom Kippur War in Israel
and has produced a series of TV
news films on Israel, under the
auspices of the Israeli Foreign
Ministry.
Evans has covered major world
events, including the Soviet
invasion of Czechoslovakia.
Passover Seder at Temple Shalom
1
The annual Passover Seder will
be held at Temple Sholom,
Pompano Beach, on Monday
evening, March 31. Services will
be conducted by Rabbi Morris A.
Skoo. assisted by Cantor Jacob
J. Renzer.
A limited number of reser-
vations are available to non-
members. Reservations can be
made by calling the temple office.
Robert Evans
assistant to Edward R. Murrow
at the U.S. Information Agency.
Oriole Gardens II Night in Israel
Residents of Oriole Gardens II
will celebrate a Night in Israel at
8 p.m., Wednesday, March 19, at
the Oriole Gardens Phase II
recreation hall.
The Oriole Gardens Men's
Club and the Women's Club will
be presented the Israel Solidarity
Award in deep appreciation of
exceptional devotion and service,
advancing Israel's progress and
welfare through the economic
development program made
possible with the aid of Israel
Bonds.
Eddie Schaffer, the American-
Jewish humorist, will be the
special guest entertainer.
Ben Bregman is chairman. Co-
chairmen are Dottie Berke and
David Brown; honorary chair-
person is Lillian Wadler.
Now.
More Than Ever.
We Are One.
Passover Seders
Monday, March 31 and Tuesday, April 1
$43
per day, per person, dbl. occ.
MAP (includes breakfast &. dinner)
3 night minimum
Unlimited Free Golf &. Tennis 12 Courts (5 lighted) Pool, Lake.
Sailing. Water Skiing- Dinner Dancing &. Entertainment Private
Championship 18 Hole Golf Course 60 minutes to Disney Worid
A
HARDER HALL
COlf ft. TENNIS RESORT / Sebr*^. Fta 33870
CALL HOTEL COLLECT: (813) 385-0151
It just wouldn't seem like Passover without
Sun-Maid* Raisins in the tzimmis. And Blue Ribbon or
Old Orchard Figs in the compote. For over half
a century our wholesome kosher fruits have been a
Jewish holiday tradition.
We dry them the traditional way, too. Naturally,
in the sun. So the natural sweetness you enjoyed as a child
still tastes the same today. And isn't that what
tradition is all about?
KOSHER AND PARVE FOR PASSOVER
nOB^ 11333
Certified by Rabbi Dr J. H. Ralbag
CSwvMdGi>iirfCiMnni.m*

en nobody has a
%"-%*
'Be fussy.We are!
Another fin. product of
WHITNEY-FIDALGO SEAFOODS, INC.
c 1H0
For over 125
tasty suggestions,
send for our new code-
book," Beyond Chicken Soup".
In it, you'll find everything from
traditional favorites to delicious new food
ideas. There's even a special section on major
Jewish holidays, with appropriate menu sug-
gestions for their celebration.
To get your copy, send 76# plus the label from a
32 oz. jar of Hellmann's or Best Foods'"
Mayonnaise (or $1.00 without the label), along
with your name and address to: "Beyond
Chicken Soup", Dept. BCS-M,Box 807,Coventry,
CT 06238, or use this convenient coupon. -


Page:*)
The Jewish Fhridian of Greater Fort Lauderdak
SUNDAY, MARCH 10
Margate Jewish Center State of
Israel Bond*-7:30 p.m.
Jaw I an Community Center -
Lecture/Breakfast a.m.
Jewish Federation Lauderdal*
West Fundraising p.m.
Temple Emanu-EI Jewish,
National Fund Honoring Helen*
Soref-6p.m.
Assn. of Parents of American
Israeli*, Parents of Children In
Israel Invited, Jewish Federation
Building. 2999 NW 33rd Ave., 1:30
p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH 17
Pioneer Women Natanya Club
Board meeting
Hadassah Armon Castle Oar-
dans Chapter Board meeting at the
Castle Gardens Rec. Hall a.m.
mat B'rlth Sunrise Lodge No.
2953 Regular meeting p.m.
Temple Shomom Games
Temple Emanu-EI Games 7:15
p.m.
Hadassah Tamar Fort Lauderdale
Chapter Hadassah Israel
Education Services Luncheon
Hadassah Avlva Oakland Estates -
Meeting at Lauderdale Lakes City
Hall presenting The Oakland
Estates "Choraleers" noon
B'nai B'rlth Women No. 345 -
Annual Donor Luncheon at the
Holiday Inn, 1711 N. University Dr.,
Plantation noon
ORT Margate Chapter Speaker,
Sherman Winick. Mini lunch, Beth
Hillel Congregation, 7640 Margate
Blvd. noon.
TUESDAY, MARCH 18
Hadassah Plantation L'Chaylm
Chapter Regular meeting,
speaker, Rabbi Albert Troy of
Sunrise JC, "Israel Revisited."
Deiche Aud 12:30 p.m.
Womens League for Israel Board
meeting
B'nai B'rlth Fort Lauderdale
Chapter No. 345 Regular meeting
Ft. Lauderdale 1438 Speaker,
Steven D. Goldstein, "You and
Your Money," Lauderdale Lakes
Public Safety Bldg. 8 p.m.
Temple Sholom Sisterhood of
Pompano General meeting 1
p.m.
Deborah Heart and Lung Center
Sunrise Chapter, Paid-up mem-
bership luncheon. The Sunrise
Minstrelaires, directed by Arthur
Mayer. Whiting Hall, 11 a.m.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19
Sunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood
Regular meeting
Hadassah Inverrary Qilah Chapter
General meeting Israel
Education Services Luncheon
B'nai B'rlth Margate Chapter
Board meeting
National Council Jewish Women -
N. Broward Chapter Regular
meeting
Hadassah Orlol Scopus Chapter
- General meeting at Catherine
Young Library Community Room,
Margate noon
Hadassah Kavanah of Plantation
Board meeting
B'nai B'rlth Sunrise Chapter No.
1527 Board meeting
Temple Beth ORR Games -
Riverside Dr. & Royal Palm Blvd.,
7:45p.m.
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael
Sisterhood Purim program noon
National Council of Jewish Women
- General meeting at the Wilton
Manors Women's Club House, 600
NE 21st St., Wilton Manors. The
movie "Rendezvous for Freedom"
will be shown. Refreshments.
12:30 p.m.
ORT Woodlands Chapter
Section No. 7, Mulberry Dr., Lunch
- Esther Wachs Dance Group in
celebration of ORT's 100th bir-
thday, noon
Deborah Hospital Lakes Chapter,
Sportwear Sale, Lauderdale Lakes
City Hall, noon.
ORT Lauderdale West, Deicke
Aud., noon.
THURSDAY, MARCH 20
Hadassah Bat Yam Chapter -
Regular meeting at Jarvls Hall,
Lauderdale-By-The-Sea
ORT N. Broward Chapter -
We do business
the right way.
O
11SSW.
General meeting
Hadassah Blyma Chapter of
Margate Regular meeting at Beth
Hillel Temple
Hadassah Holiday Springs Orty
Chapter General meet ing
Hadassah % Bat Yam Chapter
Games at Jarvls Hall, Lauderdale-
By-The-Sea-p.m.
Hadassah Sabra Chapter
Regular meeting 8 p.m.
Jewish War Veterans Women's
Auxiliary of Pompano Beach Post
196 Pompano Beach Rec.
Building- Meeting
B'nai B'rlth Tamarac Chapter No.
1479 Regular meeting at Tamarac
Jewish Center, 9101 NW 57th St.
Oscar Goldstein, lecturer and
humorist. New members are
welcome. 12:15 p.m.
FRIDAY, MARCH 21
ORT Ocean Mile Chapter ORT
Day Spring' Centennial Mem-
bership Luncheon at Embassy
Tower II. For reservations call Mrs.
Pollock or Mrs. Anker. 12:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, MARCH 22
Hadassah Kavanah of Plantation -
Major Fund Raising
SUNDAY, MARCH 23
Jewish Community Center Jewish
Radio Hour- Live Yiddish Program
of Music at Jewish Community
Center- p.m.
Jewish Community Center -
Yiddish Musical Theatre at Fort
Lauderdale High School. Classic
Yiddish Musical Theatre starring
Cheyella Ashe. 2 p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH 24
Pioneer Women Natanya Chapter
- Regular meeting
ORT Ocean Mile Chapter Board
meeting at Regency S. Red. Room,
3750 Gait Ocean Dr., 10a.m.
ORT Palm-Airs Chapter Board
meeting
Temple Sholom Games
Temple Emanu-EI Games, 7:15
p.m.
Hadassah Plantation L'Chaylm
Chapter, Eye Bank Luncheon and
Card Party. Deicke Aud. noon.
Hadassah Tamar/Fort Lauderdale
Chapters Board meeting
B'nai B'rlth Chapter No. 345 -
Annual Installation of Officers
Luncheon at the Reef Restaurant,
Andrews Ave. Buses available at 11
a.m. at the Ballpark, Sunrise -
noon TUESDAY, MARCH 25
Women's League for Israel -
Margate Chapter
Regular meeting
B'nai B'rlth Lauderhill Chapter
No. 1463 Regular meeting
Education Day. Purlm and
Passover, at the Rec. Hall noon
Hadasssh Rsyus Group of W.
Broward General meeting at the
Tamarac Jewish Center, 9101 NW
57th St., Tamarac. Passover
celebration "I Remember Mama."
Refreshments, noon.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26
ORT Royal Plantation Chapter -
Board meeting
ORT N. Broward Region Board &
General meetings
ORT Inverrary Chapter Regular
meeting
ORT Coral Springs Cahpter -
Board meeting p.m.
ORT of Lauderdale West Meeting
at Deicke Hall noon 3 p.m.
Hadassah Ramaz Chapter -
Meeting at Coral Springs Rec.
__________Friday, March 14, 1980
Center, Mulllns Park 29th St. 8:30
p.m.
Hadaassh Boca Raton Avlva
Chapter Book Review. Boca
Teeca Clubhouse 12:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Orr Games -
Riverside Dr. & Royal Palm Blvd.
7:45 p.m.
Jewish Federation Young
Leadership 7:45 p.m.
THURSDAY, MARCH 27
Temple Emanu-ef Executive
Committee meeting 7:30 p.m. and
board meeting 7:45 p.m.
B'nai B'rlth Bermuda Club -
Regular meeting
Hadassah Haverlm Fort
Lauderdale Chapter Board
meeting-8 p.m.
Hadassah Pompano Beach Chal
Chapter Regular meeting
Women's League for Israel Jewish
Music and Humor Woodlands 8 -
10 p.m.
Hadassah Shoshana (Sands Point
Condo.) Meeting at the Tamarac
Jewish Center noon
B'nai B'rlth Hope Chapter No.
1617 Regular meeting and
election of officers at Deicke Aud.,
5701 Cypress Road, Plantation.
Lime Bay Choral Group. Refresh-
ments, noon
ORT Lauderdale Ridge Chapter,
Book Review by Ruth Pine:
"Masada Plan" by Leonard Harris.
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall, 12:30
p.m.
FRIDAY, MARCH 28
Workmen's Circle No. 1046 -
General meeting, Sam Strichman
speaks on "World Affairs,"
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall. 7:30
p.m.


It's the time of year
for happiness, hospitality and
Reynolds Wm
3
CCJt/'
(9)
v
When family and friends come to your
house for Passover, let Reynolds Wrap give
you a hand. It works in the oven for easier
cooking and baking. It's the best wrap
around for freezing. For lining pans. And
for protecting all your food. Reynolds Wrap
aluminum foil... a big help for holiday en-
tertaining. And, as always, Reynolds Wrap
is Kosher for Passover and Pareve.
Along with our best wishes for
Passover is a new recipe from the
Reynolds Wrap Kitchens. We hope you
enjoy it.
Orange/Honey
Glazed lit ns in Foil
\
2 teaspoons orange rind
grated
' 2 cup ffesh orange |uice
'} cup honey
' teaspoon ground ginger
4 Rock Cornish hens (1 lb
each) thawed
2 tablespoons kosher-for-
Passover pareve
margarine, melted
' i teaspoon salt
Rinse and pat dry hens. Place each in center of sheet ot
Heavy Duty Reynolds Wrap large enough to permit ade-
quate wrapping. Brush with melted margarine: sprinkle
with salt Combine remaining ingredients. Spoon half of
glaze over hens Bring two foil sides up over hens; fold
down loosely in a series of locked folds. Fold short ends
up and over; crimp to seal. Cook in 350F oven 30
minutes. Remove from oven; spoon remaining glaze on
hens. Return open packages to oven; continue to cook
25 to 30 minutes until hens are done. Makes: 4 servings
The
Best Wrap
Around i
ReynoldsWrap
JJ.Mmin um Foil
ReynoldsWrap
^

9
Aluminum
9QFT
san
'(mamtti/mj.
Reynolds Wrap heavy %*
Aluminum Fo>l PUiY Jf^-jfiw
rnaarforaaaitionai recipes, write: Reynolds Wrap Koaher Recipes, P.O. Box 26606, Richmond, VA 28261


Friday, March 14,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 21
Now Floridians Can Count on Weinstein
Hershey Weinstein has been helping Jewish
unities in their times of need for more than a
generation. Chicagoans have known for over 50
pears that they could count on Weinstein.
Now Floridians"are discovering that they too
ban rely on the president of Chicago's original
Veinstein and Sons, Inc., funeral home. He has
oined in an association with Riverside funeral
phapels.
After the last three winters, which were very
Cold in the Midwest, Weinstein said more
rhicagoans than ever moved to Florida. For a
arge number, the move was permanent.
"Many of these were older Jewish people, my
people, my life-lpng friends. When some of them
bassed away, it was tough for their friends and
amilies to arrange their funerals in Chicago,"
aid Weinstein.
"So last year, we did something about it. We
>ined in an association with Riverside,"
/einstein added.
"I moved to Florida for the winters because I
jve it here, just like everyone else," said
Veinstein. He and Adeline, his wife of over 40
have been coming here since 1940. "I
ranged the association with Riverside to better

1
pi March 22 and 23, Las Olas Boulevard will
the site of an Spen air art gallery. Beaux
irts and the Friends of the Museum of Art,
Hershey Weinstein is shown with his wife Adeline
serve Chicago's Jewish people. You see, many of
Chicago's Jewish people are now Florida's Jewish
people."
Riverside chapels in Florida are located in
Miami, Miami Beach, North Miami Beach,
Hollywood, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm
Beach.
Take a Meaningful Trip
Travel with the
National Council of Jewish Women
For the new 1980 Brochure call
Felicia B. Sussman 733-0662 or Lilly Lester
434-3492
Inc., Fort Lauderdale will present the Eleventh
Annual Las Olas Art Festival. The festival will
be open to the public from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.
on Saturday and Sunday.
A
QUICHE TO
K VELL OVER
from Swiss Knight, of course
Recipe
One 9" prepared pie crust,
unbaked
One 6 oz. pkg. Swiss Knight
Gruyere Cheese, cut into
small pieces
1 cup milk
Preheat oven to 425F.
In small saucepan,
combine Swiss
Knight Gruyere
Cheese and milk;
cook over moderate
heat until cheese
melts and mixture
is smooth; remove
Irom heat and set aside
In small bowl, combine
eggs, onion, salt, pepper and
3 eggs
Vi cup minced onion
1 measuring teaspoon salt
'/ measuring teaspoon white
pepper
'A measuring teaspoon nutmeg
nutmeg; beat slightly.
Slowly add cheese-
milk mixture
to eggs, stirring
constantly Pour
into prepared pie
shell Place on
cookie sheet Bake
at 425F for 15
minutes. Then bake
at350Ftor 15-20
minutes Makes 6 servings.
1S&*
Imported from Switzerland, Swiss Process Gruyere Cheese is mellow,
distinctive and delicious. In foil-wrapped wedges, plain or assorted
flavors, Swiss Knight is a treat because of its quality.
IMPORTED BY THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC. CHEESE DIVISION
100 Bloomingdale Road, White Plains, NY. 10605
Now.
lore Than Ever.
We Are One.
SOME SERIOUS NOTES
ON MOVING.
By Victor Borgc
" When you move, make sure your
mail arrives at your new address right
after you do.
The key is this: Notify everyone
| who regularly sends you mail one lull
[ month before you move.
Your Post Office or Postman can
I supply you with free Ghange-of-
Address Kits to make noticing even
easier. One last serious note ^
[Use your new ZIP Code. ;. ,'^k ,
Don't make V"J-
your mail come looking for you.
Notify everyone
a month before you move.
Going North?
Heading South?
Let The Jewish FlAidian^
follow you. Notify
Jewish Federation of
your change of address:
2999 NW 33rd A>fc.
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The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 14, 1980




E
Iveo Mind liti
Arab Activists at U. of Miami
Continued from Page 4
such a person should be auto-
matically be appointed (sic) to an
academic position at the
university. We believe that
money is a mean (sic), but not an
end by itself. The contribution of
Dr. Wise's salary to the operation
of the Center should not only be
looked at from a positive point of
view, but also from negative
point of view (sic). Each story
has negative and positive
aspects."
Such chutzpah, for Arabs
whose rapacious propensity for
amassing money in the last
decade through international
cartelism and the manipulation of
multicorporate enterprise has
never before been matched in
history, to lecture the community
about the morality of how funds
should and should not be used.
And for such well-heeled Arabs,
who have by now just about
brought western civilization to
its knees through the
manipulation of money, to trade
on ancient anti-Semitic canards
having to do with Jews and
money Jews and their paltry
pennies meant for Parisian
baubles and a night on the town
at Caesar's Palace with Johnny
Carson or Buddy Hackett or
some other such mas mid.
But the most potent attack in
the Feb. 22 letter is not upon Dr.
Wise, a distinguished
academician and industrialist of
international stature in the
Jewish community. At least not
directly.
THE CLEVER Arab prop
agandists argue that the U of M
Center for Advanced Inter-
national Studies is merely an
' 'ink on paper' Center. Say
they: "The Center has only one
'sound' area of studies and that is
the Latin American area The
Center lacks, to name a few,
academically specialized faculty
members, periodicals and a
review (emphasis mine) of its
current curriculum," the latter
meaning to make it a staging
area for the PLO.
Be reminded that the Arabs are
technically at war with Israel and
any connection between their
citizens and Israelis might, if not
will, jeopardize their future."
WHAT SPECIAL tune are the
"students" piping? Clearly, that
an Israeli specialist is incapable
of teaching a course on the
Middle East and Islam, not only
for what they consider to be
reasons of obvious prejudice, but
because they are at war with
Israel in the Middle East.
Who cares? If their studies in
Miami put them in jeopardy, why
don't they leave? If they are at
war in the Middle East, why
don't they go back to the Middle
East and fight it there? The
answer is that they mean to con-
tinue waging that war here, in
Miami and in Washington and in
Cambridge, Mass., and in any
other place where there is a
university campus to be besieged
and enslaved.
The most vicious charge in the
letter is the. Arab "student" dec-
laration that ". Dr. Wise,
through his fund, orchestrated a
forum of the Middle East in
which one school of thought (sic).
This is done (sic) without prior
consultation and to the dismay
and rejection of the students at
the Center and of the Arab
students at the university at
large."
MEANT HERE in this
miasma of illiteracy, characteris-
tic of these kinds of "students"
for advanced degrees in inter-
national affairs, is that Dr. Wise,
in their view, rigged a Feb. 12-14
conference sponsored by the
Center on the theme, "The
Middle East and the West:
Toward the End of the Twentieth
Century," without the presence
of Arab specialists to present an
Arab and Islamic point of view.
This is a damnable lie. The
conference featured many Arab
academicians and political
statesmen, including Prof. Saad
Ebbin Ibrahim, of the University
of Cairo; Mohammed Yeganeh, a
former Foreign Minister of Iran;
Dr. Nuri Erin, Ambassador of
Turkey (Ret.); and Rouhollah K.
Ramazani, University of" Vir-
ginia, among others.
In any case, who are these
"students" to assess what
forums ought to feature? Or how
weak or strong particular depart-
ments of the Center ought to be?
Who are they to insist that the
Middle East studies division
should be "strengthened" in their
own image as a better stage for
Arab propaganda here?
I SUPPOSE, in the end, the
fate of Dr. Wise and, indeed of
the U of M Center itself, can't
matter much in the scheme of
things. The distant and detached
nature of the University of Miami
itself, which is more of an ex-
'Lady' of Israel's
Stage Dead at 90
To prove their point that the
Center's admitted weaknesses
are all the fault of its Jewish
(read Zionist, imperialist,
colonialist, racist) director, a
fault they of course could easily
correct given the power to take
over, the "students" declare:
"Dr. Wise, through his salary
fund, brought a visiting
professor, Dr. G. Warburg, from
the University of Tel Aviv in
order to teach Middle East and
Islam. Just let us imagine an
Israeli Isic) professor supervising
the Arab students at the Center.
By LYNNETTE SHIFM AN
Channa Rovina died on Feb. 2,
and the Yom HaShloshim (the
30th day of mourning) fell on
Mar. 2.
With her passing at the age of
90, the curtain descends upon the
greatest single figure of the
Hebrew stage, an actress whose
impact on theatregoers all over
the world was so strong that
words seem inadequate to
describe it.
She was born on Yom Kippur
and died on Tu B'Shevat, the
New Year for trees. Like the
saplings planted then, the
memory of her genius will grow
and branch out wherever the
Hebrew theatre flourishes.
"To dream the impossible
dream, to fight the unbeatable
foe, and to reach the]
unreachable star." This was her
quest to create a Hebrew theatre
employing the language of
Hebrew, first in Communist

Russia and later in Eretz Yisrael
and in the State of Israel.
CHANNA ROVINA, the first
lady of the Hebrew theatre,
fulfilled her dream. She con-
tributed to the modern
renaissance of the Hebrew
language through creating
Habima, the first Hebrew
national theatre, performed in
Hebrew to an audience that used
the language in everyday life in a
Jewish homeland, and brought
joy and pleasure to millions who
watched her.
The name of Channa Rovina
and Habima will forever be
linked. Under the late Nahuni
Zemach, Rovina and 11 other
actors struggled against the
harsh conditions of 1917 Russia
to produce short one act plays
entitled Twilight of Creation.
They received much support and
led to Habima's official
recognition as one of the
dramatic studios of the Moscow
Art Theatre.
At the age of 33, Channa
Rovina made her mark in the
. history of drama as Leah in
Habima's production of Solomon
Anski's The Dybbuk. She was
not the first choice for the role of
Leah, but because of her
knowledge of Hebrew, was called
in from the sanatorium where she
was suffering from tuberculosis.
SHE RECEIVED much ac-
claim and compliments for her
acting in The Dybbuk. The
Russian writer, Maxim Gorki,
called her "a stage phenomenon"
and a "powerful dramatic actress
with feeling." After her im-
pressive performance, Hebrew-
speaking Habima was awarded
the status of an official state
theatre in Russia. As for the play,
with Rovina in the lead, it was to
become an international sen-
sation.
"I am really surprised that I
ended up an actress. I was not
very nice looking. I was very
thin, with long legs, red hair, and
freckles all over my face," Rovina
always said about herself.
elusive social club for the elite
philanthropists who participate
in its socialite functions than a
center of education for the com-
munity, encourages such an
indifferent point of view.
Still, here is a potent Miami
Jewish community sitting back
on its sleek, suntanned haunches
utterly inured to a war waged by
Arab henchmen in their own
backyard. That war is a far
different thing from the usual
backstage socialite nonsense
occurring on the University of
Miami campus for its privileged
minions, and the Jewish com-
munity, the subject of such a
vicious attack from a flea-sized
Arab segment, just doesn't give a
damn.
Is it that it prefers to rub
shoulders with its judenrein
Coral Gables / Riviera Country
Chib confreres there, and so
would rather not be bothered?
Would rather not rock the boat of
its very illusory comfortable
community solidarity?
IN MY BOOK, the Jewish
community ought to join forces
with responsible academic
leadership at the Center and
inform these "students" that
they must promptly become
students and nothing more.
No longer ought their thinly-dis-
guised political activism be
tolerated. The campus is not the
U.S. Embassy in Teheran to be
overwhelmed by bully-boys.
They must accept their place
as guests at the university and
in this country and they must
give up trying to usurp the role of
host. If they have legitimate ,
complaints about the Center's
programs, then let them be aired
academically, not polemically.
Their8 is not the privilege to
serve as Yasir Arafat's advanced
legions here, and forthwith they
must be made to understand that
the teaching of foreign affairs at
the university, even Middle
Eastern foreign affairs, can not
be turned over to them as the
minions of militant Islam.
IP THEY don't like the-
message, then there ought to be r.
other fields for them to toil in
not ours.
With Jews sitting on the
University of Miami Citizens
Board, with Jewish names
decorating the endowed facades
of numerous facilities on the U of
M campus, with a potent
population of Jewish students '
attending classes there, the com-,
munity ought to rise up and tell *
the Arab "stu .is" to take their
war back where they came from if
these conditions don't suit them.
Does the Jewish community
have the courage for this? So far,
it is too busy, playing socialite
and that sort of thing. Besides,
pretty soon now, the ACLU will
surely take up the much-
maligned Arab cause as an
exercise in freedom of expression.
And how will the Jewish com-
munity be able to disagree? Even
enemies deserve the right to
organize your butchery.
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iday. March 14, I960
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 23
l I
ow
ooooooooeoooeoooooo
Commissioner Tobin Named to Board
Special Program Set March 14
At Reconstructionist Synagogue
Rabbi Lavy Becker of Mon-
treal will conduct the 8:15 Friday
;ht service, March 14, of the
constructionist Synagogue,
7473 NW 4th St., Plantation.
Following the service, Rabbi
leer will present a special
[lecture program, "Jewish Com-
[munities: How They Live; How
[They Die."
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
The next meeting of the
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise,
Sisterhood will be held on
londay, March 17, at 12:30 p.m.
pre-Passover skit will be
uesented by Sisterhood
nembers.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
The Temple Emanu-El Men's
'lull regular bimonthly breakfast
be held Sunday, March 16, at
llO a.m. at the temple, 3245 W.
[Oakland Park Blvd., will feature
[an unusual speaker.
He is Max Saligman, a 78-year-
[old retiree. His topic will be "Is
rrhere Life after Mah-Jong tuid
|Bingo?" He is .co-founder and
[associate director of Nova
[University's Institute for Retired
tpfessionals.
Saligman believes that human
jeings, by helping others, enrich
[themselves, and the one who does
[the helping gets the most out of
lit.
Breakfast will be served.
I Members and non-members
welcome. Reservations suggested
| by calling the temple.'
PLANTATION JEWISH
CONGREGATION
Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr will
conduct Shabbat services on
Friday, March 14, at 8:15. Guest
speaker will be Rabbi Lewis
Bogage, director of the Southeast
Religious
Directory
LAUDERDALELAKES
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE.
4351 West Oakland Park Boulevard.
Modern Orthodox Congregation
Murray Bnckman, president
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 3245 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Reform Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome
Klement.
SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative
Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz Cantor
Maurice Neu.
| SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER, INC. 8049
Aiest Oakland Park Blvd. Con
servative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy.
Cantor Jack Marchant, Irving
Steinhaus. president.
LAUDERHILL
| HEBREW CONGREGATION OF
LAUDERHILL. 2048 NW 48th Ave..
Lauderhili. Conservative. Rabbi
David W. Gordon, President; Sol
Cohen.
TAMARAC
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9101
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman. Cantor Henry
11 Beiasco.
HOLLYWOOD
.K)NG ISRAEL OP- HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUOEROAt-E 4171 Stirling
Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bomzer.
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE
GATION. 8200 Peters Rd. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr.
[RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE
7473 NW 4th St. Hank Pitt, president.
POMPANO BEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Jacob Renzer.
MARGATE
(BETH HILLELCONGREGATION.7640
Margate Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Joseph Berglas.
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 6101
NW 9th St. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Solomon Geld.
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive, Reform. Rabbi Leonard Zoll.
DEERFIELDBEACH
kJEMPLE BETH ISRAEL at Century
village East Conservative Rabbi
David Berent Cantor Joseph Pollack
BOCA RATON
TEMPLE BETH EL. 333 SW 4th
Avenue Boca Raton Rsbbi Merle S
Rabbi Becker, chairperson of
the World Jewish Congress Com-
mittee on Small Jewish Com-
munities, will discuss the factors
which affect the vitality of
Jewish communities.
Visitors are invited to attend
and participate in the service and
the program.
Region of the UAHC (Union of
American Hebrew Con-
gregations).
B'nai
Mitzvah
Jodi Kurtz, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Martin J. Kurtz, will be
called to the Torah as a Bat Mitz-
vah, Saturday, March 22, at
Temple Sholom, 132 SE 11th
Ave., Pompano Beach.
At Tamarac Jewish Center,
Temple Beth Torah, B'nai Mitz-
vah services will be held Satur-
day, March 22, for Robert
Kuztin, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Kuztin; Friday evening,
March 28, for Dana Zussman,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Amir
Zussman; Saturday, March 29,
Stuart Katz, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Larry Katz, and Glenn Herman,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Her-
man.
At Temple Emanu-El: Stacy
Ostrau becomes a Bat Mitzvah at
11 a.m., March 22; and at 11
a.m., Saturday, March 29,
Jonathan Laye becomes a Bar
Mitzvah.
At Temple Beth Orr: at 10:30
a.m., Saturday, March 15, Elyse
Familant becomes a Bat Mitz-
vah, and at 10:30 a.m., Saturday,
March 29, two Bat Mitzvah
services for Jennifer Press and
Erica Pollack.
At Plantation Jewish Congre-
gation-Temple Kol Ami: Mr. and
Mrs. Philip Fagelson sponsor the
Oneg Shabbat Friday evening,
March 14, in honor of their
daughter, Felicia, who becomes a
Bat Mitzvah on Saturday, March
15, at 10:30 a.m.; the following
week Mr. and Mrs. Abraham
Rosenberg are the Oneg Shabbat
sponsors Friday night, March 21,
in honor of their son, David, who
becomes a Bar Mitzvah at 10:30
a.m., Saturday, March 22. On
Friday evening, 8:15, March 28,
Sherry Raskin, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Stephen Raskin,
becomes a Bat Mitzvah. Her
parents sponsor the Oneg
Shabbat following services.
At Temple Beth Israel: Debra
Wilde, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Jay Wilde, will chant the Haf-
torah Vayikra on Friday evening,
March 21. Debra will also par-
ticipate in the service as a Bat
Mitzvah.
Louis Caraess, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Daniel Carness, will chant
the Haftorah Vayikra on Satur-
day morning, March 22.
Nancy Salame, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Salame, was
Bat Mitzvah on Friday, March 7,
as she chanted the Haftorah
Shabbat Parah.
Broward County Com-
missioner Jack Moss recently
announced the appointment of
Margate City Commissioner Jack
Tobin to the Broward County
Mobile Home Advisory Board.
"Commissioner Tobin has
shown unique leadership in the
City of Margate. I feel he will be
an important addition to the
Mobile Home Advisory Board,"
Moss said.
Commissioner Tobin was
elected in 1979 to the Margate
Margate Bond Reception
The Margate Jewish Center
will hold its annual Israel Bond
Reception, Sunday, March 16, at
7:30 p.m., at the Center, 6101
NW9thSt., Margate.
Emanuel Schwartz and Samuel
Singer will receive Israel's David
Ben-Gurion Award, recognizing
their efforts and dedication to the
Israel Bonds Program.
According to chairman of the
event. Moses Levenson, both
Schwartz and Singer have
demonstrated exemplary
leadership on behalf of the Jewish
community and the State of
"Israel.
Schwartz is president of the
Margate Jewish Center and a
member of the Independent
Order of Odd Fellows. He has
been active in synagogue work
for many years and organized the
Sofrim Society, consisting of
Jewish members of the Comp-
troller's office and Finance
City Commission. Prior to that
he served as president of Kim-
berly Estates and Forest
Homeowners Associations. He is
a past vice president of the
Federation of Northwest
Broward Civic Associations and a
board member of the Margate
Kiwanis Club.
Any mobile home park
residents who would like
Commissioner Tobin to speak to
their board can contact him at
Margate City Hall.
Department of the City of New
York.
Singer served as president of
the Margate Jewish Center in
1974 and currently is the
synagogue administrator. He is a
charter member and former board
member of B'nai B'rith Blue Star
Lodge in Tamarac and has served
as chairman for numerous Israel
Bond Campaigns. He has been
active in countless Jewish
philanthropic and sen Ice
organizations.
Levenson is serving as third
vice president of the Margate
Jewish Center and has been
active in B'nai B'rith and the
Zionist Organization of America,
as well as Israel Bonds and the
UJA.
Eddie Schaffer, American-
Jewish humorist, will be the
special guest entertainer. Co-
chairmen are Flora Weller and
Sara Simonowitz. Honorary
chairman is Louis Feen.
Margate Bond Drive Set March 16
On Sunday, March 16, at 7:30
p.m. the annual Israel Bond
Drive will take place at the
Margate Jewish Center.
Honoree8 will be Executive
Director Samuel Singer and
President Emeritus Emanuel
Schwartz.
The comedian and raconteur
Eddie Schaffer will entertain.
Chairman of the function will be
Moses Levenson. Refreshments
will be served.
All those not receiving formal
invitations are invited. Rabbi Dr.
Solomon Geld will be among
those attending.
Begin Sees 'Wide Deviation'
With Egypt on Autonomy
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Menachem Begin termed
Egypt's position in the autonomy
talks a "wide deviation from the
Camp David agreements." In a
radio interview on the occasion of
the exchange of Ambassadors
between Egypt and Israel, Begin
denied that the autonomy talks
were in "deadlock."
He maintained that the three
parties, Israel, Egypt and the
U.S., could still reach agreements
by the May target date "if we all
remain faithful to Camp David."
BEGIN OBSERVED that the
Camp David agreements,
painstakingly negotiated, ad-
visedly defined the projected
autonomous body as "an ad-
ministrative council." For the
Egyptian side, therefore, to
propose a body with legislative
and constitutional powers was "a
decided deviation from Camp
David," he said.
It was a proposal "which Israel
cannot accept ... We hope to
persuade the Egyptians that they
are raising difficulties for the
negotiations by deviating from
Camp David." Begin added that
"agreements have got to be
observed just as we have both
observed the peace treaty be-
tween us."
Begin said the government was
"thinking about" the problems of
the legal status of Jewish set-
tlements on the West Bank and
would soon publish its decisions.
He said they would not con-
tradict the Camp David
agreements.
THE PREMIER was
moderate and circumspect on the
question of American arms
supplies to Egypt. "This is a
problem of quantities and
quality. It must be clarified in
contacts between governments,
not in public declarations," he
said. Replying to an army radio
interviewer who tried to press
him on this issue, Begin said, "I
have said it is a problem. That is
enough."
BENEFIT BONANZA for United Way: Del Olson (right),
director of corporate communications of Cenvill Communities,
Inc., presents two checks totaling over $19,000 to Byron
Campbell (center) and Douglas Endsley, representing United
Way of Broward County. The funds, combined receipts of a
series of Red Buttons benefit performances held earlier this
month, will be used to kick off the 1980-81 United Way of
Broward fund-raising campaign. Campbell, president of Gore
Newspapers, Inc., has been named this year's general cam-
paign chairman of the United Way. Endsley is executive
director of the United Way, which allocates funds to 49 local
health and human service agencies. Cenvill, major adult con-
dominium developer in Broward and Palm Beach counties,
sponsored eight performances at Wynmoor Village, Coconut
Creek, and Deerfield Beach's Century Village.


*e
24
The Jtwish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 14, i960
But Firings Upheld
Charge 'Shortcomings' in RFE Trifa Broadcast
WASHINGTON (JTA> -
A special investigation into
Radio Free Europe's two broad-
cast* of its interview last spring
with alleged Nazi war criminal
Archbishop Valerian Trifa
concludes that the "adminis-
trative shortcomings" of the
director of RFE's Rumanian
service who arranged them,
presents "a serious problem" to
the radio's management, while
"the conduct" of two employes
who had denounced him "is com-
plete justification for their
discharge."
According to the report of the
investigators, the employes,
Jacob Popper and Edgar Rafael,
had "acted in bad faith in talcing
the position that they were
shocked and alarmed at the Trifa
broadcasts and they genuinely
believed that Iron Guardism and
anti-Semitism were infiltrating
the Rumanian service (of RFE).
No one in the service has such a
suspicion."
RATHER, according to the
investigators Roy Q. Minton,
an Austin, Texas lawyer, and
Edward Alexander of the U.S.
International Communications
Agency Popper and Rafael
were motivated by bitter per-
sonal animosities toward Noel
Bernard, the director, and their
superior in the RFE's Rumanian
service.
In extensive oral testimony,
supplementing the report before
the House Subcommittee on
International Operations, Minton
said he and Alexander agreed
that if they were to criticize
RFE's management it would be
"why didn't you fire them
(Popper and Rafael) a long time
ago."
Minton and Alexander ,
reported that termination of
Rafael and Popper was "based on
the content of two letters, one
written by Popper on Aug. 10,
1979, and distributed to members
of Congress by Rafael, and the
other written by Popper and
Rafael on Oct. 12, 1979, and sent
to Alan Schwartz, of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith." The report said the
letters contained "the same kind
of venom."
THE SUBCOMMITTEE, of
which Rep. Dante Fascell (D.,
Fla.) is chairman, is looking into
the matter at the request of Rep.
Elizabeth Holtzman (D., N.Y.),
who both praised and challenged
aspects of the report and com-
plimented the investigators for
their efforts. Members of the
subcommittee also complimented
Minton and the report, but made
no immediate recommendations
on the issues.
Fascell adjourned the hearing
"subject to the call of the chairT'
Popper and Rafael were noti-
fied of their dismissal Dec. 27
before Minton and Alexander
began their 15-day investigation
in Washington, New York and
Munich. The investigation was
ordered by former Postmaster
General John Gronouski, chair-
man of the U.S. Board for Inter-
national Broadcasting which
overseas the operations of RFE
and Radio Liberty, both of which
broadcast from Munich to Com-
munist countries.
GRONOUSKI and RFE's top
officials deplored the interview
when it came to light in
Washington through reports by
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
Trifa, of Grass Lakes, Mich., and
head of the Rumanian Orthodox
Church in the U.S., is accused by
the U.S. Department of Justice of
having failed to disclose his
membership in the fascist Ru-
manian Iron Guard during World
War II. He is charged with being
a leader of a pogrom against Jews
in 1941 in Bucharest in which
4,000 Jews were killed. The RFE
interview was baaed on the 50th
anniversary of the U.S. church.
Glenn Ferguson. RFE's
president, told the subcommittee
that the dismissals of Popper and
Rafael were made despite
Gro nous la's request that no
action be taken against Popper
and Rafael until the investigation
was concluded because under
German law an employe has six
months notice that can be given
only in December or June. If dis-
missals were delayed until
January the effect would have
been to have given them a year's
notice at full pay.
WHILE noting "Bernard is
outstanding as a broadcast
journalist," and "fully aware of
who Bishop Trifa was," the
report said "it did not occur to
him that he could be arranging a
program that would lend some
dignity to a war criminal about to
go on trial in the United States."
The investigators reported
that "it is the conviction of the
radio (RFE) from top manage
ment clear down and through the
drive "a wedge" between the
church Trifa heads and another
Rumanian church in the U.S.
which reportedly adheres to the
Budapest Patriarch. Ferguson
testified that Bernard exceeded
his responsibility in attempting
the wedge.
Responding to questions from
subcommittee members why no
reprimand was placed in Ber-
nard's file, Ferguson replied,
"Because we don't have such a
mechanism" in the Munich
operation, and Bernard has not
been replaced because the
Rumanian service "has no one to
take his job."
FORMER Ambassador John
Hayes, who is chairman of the
RFE and RL boards, testified,
"It is difficult to put statements
in his file; he is the director of the
service," which was described
both in the report and by
Ferguson and Hayes as per-
forming excellently.
Holtzman pointed out to the
Rumanian staff that in initiating subcommittee that "in addition
willingness of foreign govern-
ments to provide judicial assis-
tance to the U.S. in other cases
involving Nazi war criminals."
Testifying "to our govern-
ment's 35-year history of indif-
ference and inaction to inves-
tigating alleged war criminals in
the U.S.," Holtzman said, "The
broadcast could only be viewed
as further evidence of our
government's ambivalence on
this issue."
The Minton-Alexander report
said that after the 31-minute
Trifa interview was broadcast on
Apr. 30 and May 1, "it was by no
means considered a matter of
great importance" at RFE in
Munich. "No one blew the
whistle, certainly, not Popper
and Rafael," the report said.
Popper made "his first outer,
on May 25 "when he wrote a
letter to Dr. Charles Kramer of
the Nazi War Criminal Com-
mittee with a copy to Congress-
woman Holtzman." Gronouski
and Holtzman both said they
learned of the matter from the
JTA.
Syria Warned To Sit Tight
broadcast Bernard
incredibly bad
the Trifa
exercised
judgment."
Minton testified that Ber-
nard's motive was to attempt to
to being outraged that RFE
would provide a suspected mass
murderer with a public forum, I
was disturbed about the potential
effect of the broadcast on the
pending Trifa litigation and the
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Deputy Premier Yigael Yadin
joined Pemier Menachem Begin
in warning Syria not to take any
offensive measures in the north.
Speaking before the 21st
International Conference of the
World Union for Progressive
Judaism here, Yadin said
thousands of Syrian tanks were
stationed on the northeastern
front. They were moving from
place to place, thus creating a
focus of tension, he said.
Similar warnings were issued
earlier this month by Begin.
However, after having twice
warned Syria in toughry worded
statements, Begin made a point
of saying that Israel had no
interest in heating up the nor
them border.
This statement was interpreted
here as a response to American
requests to keep a low profile on
the northern border. Yadin s
Syrian statement was the first in
several weeks. Yadin did not
specify what time period he was
referring to.