The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00152

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
fit's 1980: Now More than Ever UJA Needs You
Volume 9 Number 1
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, January 4,1980
GFndShochtt
Price 36 Cents
Volunteers Continue Pace of UJA 1980 Campaign
;>
Now it's a million and a half!
Now, more than ever, the fast
pace of the 1980 United Jewish
Appeal / Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign is continuing.
Two weeks ago The Jewish
Floridian headlined the fact that
the initial thrust of the UJA
Campaign for the 32nd year of
Israel's Independence had gone
over the million dollar mark.
The pace picked up since then.
The hundreds of volunteers
giving freely of their time and
commitments have been en-
couraged to maintain the pace in
the weeks ahead.
Scores of meetings have been
arranged to reach every com-
munity and every condo complex
in North Broward to gain the
utmost support for the 1980 UJA
Campaign of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. Reports of fund-
raising meetings to be held in the
two weeks, reported on various
pages of this issue, indicate that
committees are striving to reach
every Jew in the area for a
commitment for the unmet
humanitarian needs of Jews here
and around the world.
Complimenting the men and
women for their dedication,
concern and interest in serving on
the fund-raising committees,
Milton Keiner, Federation's
general Campaign chairman,
wishing all a happy 1980,
declared:
"With one gift, each individual
does a world of good. Each
commitment works wonders. We
take with us into this year 1980
the challenge of a campaign
which asks more of us than
another peace-year campaign in
our experience. Our support for
Israel must go on undiminished.
The future of Israel lies in its
people. We must support those
people and assure their peace.
Peace can be held off by forces
other than enemy attacks. Peace
can be threatened by deprivation,
by lack of opportunity, and by
thwarted dreams. Peace will be
won when we wage a campaign
for funds with the same vigor we
did in time of war."
Solar Energy Plant Is Opened
f>
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel opened its first year-round
solar energy plant on the Dead
Sea in December. But advocates
of nuclear power urged that the
country move in that direction as
well because of the soaring price
of oil.
Moshe Arena, chairman of the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee, warned at a
meeting at the Haifa Technion
that time was running out for
Israel to prepare the infra-
structure and assemble the
resources to build a nuclear
power plant. Israel has the scien-
tific know-how to build such a
plant, he said. He noted that by
next year Israel will probably be
paying Egypt $40 per barrel for
Sinai oil, almost double the
present price and still will not be
able to fill all of its energy needs.
Prof. Shimon I ft ah, president
of the Israel Nuclear Science
Society, observed that it was
paradoxical that oil-rich coun-
tries such as Libya and Iraq have
built nuclear power plants while
Israel has put a freeze on such
projects.
But solar energy was the
immediate focus of attention. The
150 kilowatt plant at Kin Bokek
on the Dead Sea was opened
officially at ceremonies attended
by Energy Minister Yitzhak
Modai. It is a pilot plant with a
limited output. But if the new
technique on which it is based
proves successful, a five mega-
watt power station will be built
on the same site by late 1981 or
early 1982 to be followed by a 20
megawatt plant.
Energy Ministry officials
expressed confidence that the
Dead Sea, where the sun shines
almost continuously, can be
made into a giant solar pond pro-
ducing 2,000 megawatts of elec-
tricity by the end of the century.
This would amount to about 80
percent of Israel's present pro-
duction.
The technology employed was
developed in Israel. According to
experts, it can be applied any-
where in the world where water,
sun and salt are available and
would generate power at a price
competitive with fossil fuel or
nuclear energy. The company
operating the new plant is
studying the possibility of con-
structing a similar solar pond
electric station in California.
Modai said he hoped solar
energy would solve Israel's
energy problems. But time is of
the essence, he said. He predicted
that Israel will have to pay $2
billion for oil in 1980.
Oceanside Communities United for UJA
Two Events at buxmay Jan 13
4 I
V
I
The Oceanside communities of
VGalt Ocean Mile, Hillsboro,
Lighthouse Point, Pompano
Beach, Points of America and
East Fort Lauderdale have joined
forces to sponsor a united Special
Gifts fund-raising dinner
Tuesday night, Jan. 15, at the
Gait Hilton Hotel, Fort
Lauderdale.
More than 250 persons are
expected to attend, according to
John Strong, dinner coordinator,
and Alven S. Ghertner, dinner
chairman.
The guest speaker for the $500-
minimum commitment to the
United Jewish Appeal dinner will
be Israel Amitai, native Israeli
playwright and director who has
won wide acclaim for his incisive
information on Israel's social and
economic development.
The UJA /Israel Emergency
Fund 1960 Campaign for the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale is progressing
with dramatic increases reported
by the volunteers who have been
covering the buildings along the
ocean.
Among the table hosts and
committee personnel assisting at
the dinner will be Jacob Brodzki,
Arthur Faber, Alan Baer, Dr.
Alvin Colin, Ludwig Brodzki,
Fran Smith, Ronald Schagrin,
representing East Fort
Lauderdale; Sam Weidenfeld,
Sidney Liben, Leonard Gluck,
Sidney Grossman, Pompano
Beach; Abe Marcus, Jack
Levine, Milton Edelstein, Joel
Levitt, Barnet Zalon, Victor
Scher, Sol Goldenthal, Joel
Segal, Jordan Snyder, Points of
America.
Also, Jerry Sherman, Milton
Frankle, Harry Brody, Hy
Estroff, Myron Sherman, Victor
Glazer, Sam Soref, Morice
Dr. Joseph Fisher and Rabbi
Mordecai Brill are busy com-
pleting plans for the residents of
Manors of Inverrary to have
breakfast at 10 a.m., Sunday,
Jan. 13, on behalf of the United
Jewish Appeal, at the Tennis
Center of the Manor.
And at the Recreation Hall of
Greens Phase II of Inverrary,
Henry E. Hirsch and his captains
of Buildings 5 and 6 will be at-
tending a cocktail party from 4 to
6 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 13.
Ghertner
Haymes, Celia Seelig, Bernie
Packman, Myron Klein, Hilda
Edelman, Saul Hochman, Earle
Reingold, John Streng, Gait
Ocean Mile.
Couples and singles are
welcome and some dinner
reservations are still available. A
call to the Federation office will
reserve a place.
>
U.N. Wants to Inspect Israeli Nukes
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The General Assembly has
adopted a resolution calling on
^Israel to "submit all its nuclear
facilities to inspection by the
International Atomic Energy
Agency" and urging all states
"to take all necessary measures
to prevent the transfer of
fissionable material and nuclear
technology to Israel which could
be used for nuclear weapons."
The resolution, sponsored by
Iraq, was adopted by a vote of 97-
10 with 38 abstentions. Israel and
the United States were among
the countries that opposed it.
Israel Ambassador to the U.N.
Yehuda Blum denounced the
resolution as nothing more than
w "a vethicle for the continuation
^of the anti- Israel political warfare
conducted by the Arab states and
their supporters in the U.N." He
emphasized that Israel "remains
faithful to its commitment to
It*
prohibit and prevent the spread
of nuclear weapons."
The resolution, titled "Israel's
Nuclear Armament," appealed to
all states "to put an end to any
cooperation with Israel which
may assist it in acquiring and
developing nuclear weapons."
Another provision strongly
condemned "any attempt by
Israel to manufacture, acquire,
store, test or introduce nuclear
weapons into the Middle East."
Blum, who spoke before the
vote was taken, charged that the
Iraqi draft resolution was based
on hearsay. As far as Israel is
concerned, he said, direct
negotiations with the par-
ticipation of all states in the
Middle East "could contribute
significantly to the im-
plementation of a process leading
to the establishment of a Nuclear
Weapons Free Zone in the Middle
East."
Blum charged that "by
avoiding mention of conventional
weapons and by accusing Israel
of trying either to acquire or of
possessing a nuclear capability,
Iraq has shifted into a safer area
of slander where hearsay, rumor
and speculation can be offered as
'irrefutableevidence.' '
Palm-Aire
Special Gifts
Erwin and Sylvia Harvith of
Estates Drive, Palm-Aire, are
hosting the Special Gifts fund-
raising cocktail party launching
the 1980 UJA Campaign at Palm-
Aire. Speaker will be Zvi Kolitz,
according to Palm-Aire co-
chairmen Milton Berman, Harry
Sacks and Morris Singer. The
Palm-Aire group is meeting
Thursday, Jan. 10.
JCC Perlman
Campus Dedication
With the raising of the American flag by the
Jewish War Veterans at 2 p.m.. Sunday, Jan. 6,
ceremonies officially dedicating the Jewish Com-
munity Center's 16-acre Perlman Campus, 6601 W.
Sunrise Blvd., will begin.
Everybody is welcome to attend the outdoor
festivities marking the completion of Phase I of the
renovation, reconstruction, refurbishing of the
former Florida Air Academy facilities last June. A
transformation of the 11 buildings on the grounds
has been accomplished. More is on the way.
And Leonard Farber, chairman of JCC Dedi-
cation Day, will be calling upon people involved from
the earliest days of JCC, first organized in 1975, to
participate in the event, including Anita Perlman.
JCC president; Leo Goodman, president of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale;
Robert Adler, Ted Perlman and others.
Music will be provided by the Nova High
School Band. Rabbi Phillip Labowitz of Fort
Lauderdale's Temple Beth Israel will offer the in-
vocation; Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon of Temple Emanu-El
the benediction.
The synagogues in North Broward on Friday,
Jan. 4, will observe JCC Shabbat in honor of the
dedication. A special service is scheduled this night
at Temple Beth Israel, 7100 Oakland Park Blvd.,
where the family of Anita and the late Louis
Perlman, in whose honor the campus has been
named because of their untiring efforts to secure the
property, will be in attendance. The speaker will be
Robert Adler of Woodlands, president of the
National Jewish Welfare Board, national organisa-
tion of community centers.
The JCC "family," honoring those who worked
so diligently in making the property purchase
possible, has been invited to a reception Saturday
night, Jan. 5, for the formal dedication of the Samuel
M. Soref Hall on the campus.
Other JCC news on Pagea 8,9 and 10.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian Friday, January 4,1980
Greater Margate UJA
Schedules Six Events
Sherr Again Leads Attorneys' Division
The efforts of the Greater
Margate UJA Committee,
chaired by William Katzberg and
Harry Glugover, are coming to
fruition in support of the 1980
Campaign of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
Six events have been scheduled
during January:
JAN. 13
On Sunday, Jan. 13 at 10 a.m.
there will be two events. One will
be conducted by Paradise
Gardens Sections 1 and 2 with
participating condos, Royal
Palm, Apple Green, Oriole Villas
and Margate Village. The break-
fast will he held at Margate
Jewish Center and will be chaired
by Lou Rosenberg. Guest
speaker will be Rabbi Dr.
Solomon Geld of the Margate
Jewish Center. Dr. Mannis
Neumann will make the
presentations to the honorees,
Gertrude and Nat Bodner and
Shirley and Morris Kirschbaum.
On the same day and hour
Oriole Gardens II will hold their
breakfast in their Recreation
Hall. It will be chaired by David
Brown. Speaker will be Henry
Levy, well known for his
humanitarian work. Honorees
will be Lou and Evelyn
Zuckerman.
JAN. 20
Four functions will take place
on Sunday, Jan. 20. Oriole
Gardens Phase I will have a
breakfast in their Recreation
Hall. It will be chaired by Charles
Ostrow. Guest speaker will be
Henry Levy. Honorees will be
Thelma and Jack Scheiner.
Paradise Gardens IV will have
its breakfast at Margate Jewish
Center at 10 a.m. Moe Levenson
will be chairman. Speaker will be
Danny Tadmore. a lieutenant
commander in the Yom Kippur
War and an accomplished
musician and entertainer.
Honorees will be Anne and David
Klempner.
Paradise Gardens III will have
a cocktail party at 5 p.m. and
supper at 6 p.m. at the
Reenikoffs' home. Chairman is
Irving Tannenbaum. Speaker will
be Victor Gruman, vice president
of the Federation and general
vice chairman of the 1980 UJA
campaign. Honorees will be Fay
and Chester Barker.
Oakland Hills will have
cocktails at 4 p.m. and steak
dinner at 4:30 p.m. at the home of
Lee and Max Rose. Chairman is
Alfred Cohen. Guest entertainers
will be Cantor Norman Brody
and Sunny Landsman, well
known raconteur.
JAN. 27
On Sunday, Jan. 27 at 10:30
a.m. Wynmoor will hold a brunch
at the Crystal Lago Country
Club. Since a large gathering is
anticipated, reservations should
be made before Jan. 20 by calling
Lou Schneider 973-3372 or
Mildred Yaphe 973-1899. This
event will be chaired by Judge
Leo Brown. Speaker will be the
noted Henry Levy.
On Sunday evening, Jan. 13,
the Attorneys' Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale will hold its
third annual fund-raising dinner
on behalf of the 1980 UJA
Campaign. The meeting will be
held at the Hilton Inn at
Inverrary and will begin at 7 p.m.
Brian J. Sherr of Rudin,
Barnett, McClosky, Shuster &
Russell, is chairman of the
Federation's Attorneys'
Division, as he has been the
previous two campaigns. Sherr
announced that the dinner will
honor Judge Hugh Glickstein of
Plantation, who was appointed in
October by Gov. Graham to the
4th District Court of Appeals.
Bruce Lyons is this year's
dinner chairman and will work
closely with Sherr toward their
Brian Sherr
I
goal of having 150 people attend
the dinner. Lyons cited
(Hickstein's contributions to the
cities of Plantation and
Hallandale, as well as his in-
volvement with his synagogue;
also the Fine Arts in North
Broward and many other civic
organizations.
Brian Sherr is a member of the
board of directors of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. He is also currently
vice president of the Jewish
Family Service and vice
president of Fort Lauderdale's
Youth Symphony Association.
For further information
regarding the Jan. 13 dinner at
the Hilton Inn at Inverrary,
contact Alan Margolies at the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
Bernstein to be Honored at Ramblewood
Phil Goldman, chairman for
the 1980 Jewish
Federation / UJA Campaign at
Ramblewood East, has an-
nounced that Sidney Bernstein
will be honored at the Second
Annual Ramblewood East
Breakfast. The breakfast will
take place on Sunday, Jan. 13, at
10 a.m. at the Coral Springs High
School.
Goldman remarked, "Sid was
instrumental in last year's
successful UJA event and has
served with great effectiveness as
president of our Men's club. We
are looking forward to an ex-
cellent breakfast, and I en-
courage all the residents of
Ramblewood East to attend as
we honor Sid and show our
support for Israel and our fellow
Jews throughout the world."
Sidney Bernstein is chairman
of the Rules Committee of
Ramblewood East. He serves on
Women's Division Event at Burdines
Zvi Kolitz and Israeli fashions
highlight the Wednesday, Jan. 9,
Champagne Buffet Supper Spec-
tacular of the Patrons Women of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale at Burdines
Dt'partment Store in downtown
Fort Lauderdale. Minimum
commitment for the 4:15 p.m.
event is $500 plus $5 for the
champagne and supper. For
those needing transportation free
bus service will be available from
the Woodlands Country Club
parking lot at 3:45 p.m.
the executive board of the Coral
Springs Democratic Club and
served as chairman for. the 1979
UJA drive.
Phil Goldman, formerly of
Brooklyn, N.Y., was vice
president of the Kingway Jewish
Center, and has been active with
UJA and the Israel Bonds
organization for all of his adult
life. In 1961, Phil was honored by
the Jewish Federation.
The guest speaker at the
breakfast will be Danny Tad-
more, an Israeli entertainer, who
speaks on behalf of the United
Jewish Appeal all across
America.
Ramblewood East is in Coral
Springs and is part of the Jewish
Federation Campaign in that
community, chaired by Johl
Rotman, Mark Steingard and
Michael Weinberg.
UJA Events Here Prove 'We Are One'
On this and other pages of this issue The
Jewish Floridian, news of fund-raising events for
the 1980 United Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale range all over North
Broward county from Fort Lauderdale right on
up to the Palm Beach County line with more
to come in the weeks ahead.
It's proof that the Jewish community,
regardless of boundary lines of cities, villages and
condo complexes, is becoming united as one.
NOW, MORE THAN EVER, WE ARE ONE
. And the oneness will be demonstrated
Monday, Jan. 14, when presidents, officers and
board members of the Jewish women's
organizations gather at the Jewish Community
Center at 10 a.m. for YOM KEHILLAH -
Community Day.
And again the oneness will be demonstrated
when UJA FEDERATION DAY fo> all of the
Jewish Community, young and old, will be
celebrated from 10 a.m. to about 6 p.m., Sunday,
Feb. 17, also at the Jewish Community Center.
Organizations are being invited to designate
telephone callers for the battery of telephones to
be installed that day, games and entertainment,
and a variety of activities is being planned.
Watch for details.
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Friday, January 4,1980
The Jewish Floridign of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
At Woodlands Community Dinner:
American Jewry's 'No. lVoice' Urges Full Support for Israel
I
Theodore Mann (second from left) chats with the principals of
the 1980 United Jewish Appeal: Milton Keiner (left), general
chairman of the UJA Campaign for the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale; Leo Goodman, Federation president;
and Victor Gruman, general vice chairman of the 1980 UJA.
An emotion-packed highlight of the Woodlands UJA evening was the "Yad Vashem" (Shrine
to the Six Million Martyrs) responsive reading by B'nai B'rith Youth Organization members
and Milton Keiner. Pictured left are Hillary Jackowitz, Craig Rappel, Ten Maybruck, and in
the picture right are Donna Guttman, Lawrence H. Casper, Ellen Perlman.
!
Telling the 176 men in at-
tendance at the first-ever United
Jewish Appeal dinner meeting in
the new Woodlands Country
Club that "your gift is your
commitment to the future of
Israel," Theodore R. Mann
reflected on the past, the present
and the future in the con-
versational style in which he
talks with President Carter at the
White House and with Prime
Minister Menachem Begin in
Jerusalem.
Ted Mann, as he is known to a
vast number of the Jewry of the
world, is chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations,
and he is being honored next
week in his hometown,
Philadelphia, at the plenary of
the National Jewish Community
^Relations Advisory Council when
he completes his two years as
-chairman of that organization.
A dramatic highlight of the
evening came when the lights
were dimmed and Milton Keiner,
general chairman of the Jewish
Federation's 1980 United Jewish
Appeal, joined six teenagers of
the Gold Coast B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization for
responsive reading about Yad
Vashem, the shrine to the six
million martyrs, in Jerusalem.
The reading included the recital
of the names of infamy, con-
centration camps, and as each of
the BBYO-ers finished reading
special thank you went to
Sam Leber, Woodlands
Country Club president, and
board of governors for having
the Community Night held at
the club.
I Care"
brightened the coat lapels of
the 176 men in attendance at
V:he Woodlands evening. Leo
Kaplan, incorporating the
graphic A of the Woodlands
logo, created the theme and
button he shows here.
I
Leon Messing
invocation.
Sidney Spewak (left),general chairman of the Woodlands Com-
munity UJA Campaign Committee, with his top aides: Al
Sharenow, Dinner Committee chairman, Robert Adler, dinner
co-chairman; and Bernard Libros, Woodlands co-chairman.
their lines, Keiner responded:
"My heart is my witness. I have
taken an oath never to forget."
They concluded in unison to a
standing ovation.
Earlier in the evening, tribute
was accorded to Sidney Spewak,
Woodlands Community's general
chairman, who received an
engraved plaque presented by
Keiner.
Spewak thanked Al Sharenow,
the dinner committee chairman
who served as master of
ceremonies; his own co-chairman,
Bernard Libros; Al's dinner co-
chairman Robert Adler, and the
Woodlands UJA Cabinet: Alan
Bernstein, Jules Bressler, Ted
Daren, Sidney Dorfman, Max
Eisenstein, Marvin Elfenbein,
Edmund Entin, Ben Eppy, Jack
Farber, Ed Frankel, Saul
Goldmark, Leo Goodman, Sen.
Sam Greenberg, Leo Kaplan,
Robert Lacey, Manny Lax,
Norman Lazar, Sam Leber,
Charles Locke, Dr. Justin May,
Leon Messing, David Miller, Sam
Mothner, Jack Nudelman,
Clarence Obletz, Ben Roiaman,
Sam Sorrell, Martin Weiner and
to all those who responded to the
opening phase of the Woodlands
Community Cares / Woodlands
Community Shares campaign.
Al Sharenow, during his
remarks, extolled the efforts of
Leslie S. Gottlieb, Federation's
executive director, and Kenneth
B. Bierman, Federation's
campaign director.
Leo Goodman, Federation
president, introducing Mann,
termed him the leader of
American Jewry, noting that he
can be considered a "neighbor in
North Broward County," because
his parents, Rev. and Mrs. Mann,
who were guests at the dinner,
live in Century Village East in
Deerfield Beach.
Mann reviewed events of the
past that led to the creation of
Israel, the wars and terroristic
actions that followed, and the
horror now being inflicted on the
U.S. with more than 50
Americans being held hostage in
the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. He
urged full support of the Israel
government which is making
every effort to stem the tide of
inflation now at 100 percent in
Israel, and entering the new
decade of the 1980s,
paraphrasing Rabbi Hillel on
continuing that support, "if not
now, when? if it's not you, who?"
Sidney Spewak accepts the testimonial plaque presented to him
by Milton Keiner.
Light tt\e candle
and remember?
As our fathers before us, light the
candle and remember those who
have left us. Hold this day for
reflection and thoughtfulness; in
solemnity, strength of purpose
and hope.
Menorah Chapels, to preserve the
traditions of our faith, wishes to
offer a gift of remembrance. A
Yahrzeit Calendar in the name of
the departed. A part of our
religious life, now and through
the ages.
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742-6000
In Dade, call 861-7301
In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME DATE
AND TIME OF DEATH OF THE DEPARTED.
Chapels also in Deerfield Beach and Margate

m


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, January 4,1980
The Chances of Peace
The passing of the Abortion Law amendment,
which gives Prime Minister Begin's coalition a
breather in terms of its slender thread of survival,
casts some unhappy light on the Israel-Egypt peace
accord.
In itself, this may not be so. Except for
essentially minor differences between the Prime
Minister and his most potent opponent, Labor leader
Shimon Peres, a change in the Jerusalem govern-
ment would constitute no major threat to the accord.
But taken together with President Sadat's own
status m Cairo, there ought to be some careful
thinking done about the future.
It is no secret that President Sadat is in trouble.
Egypt's economic condition is going from bad to
worse. Israel's own economic woes are nothing to
sneeze at, but they are of a different order from
Egypt's, where the extremist Moslem Brotherhood
has been exploiting the country's problems with an
eye toward unseating Sadat and scrapping Egypt's
history from November, 1977 onward, the date of
Sadat's flight to Jerusalem.
With both men knocked out of power, what
would that portend? The answer lies in just how
personal a document the accord hammered out at
Camp David is. Is it a continuing thing beyond the
individual leaders who signed it a national com-
mitment by the two countries involved to a peaceful
future? Or is it durable only so long as both men are
in office to see it through to a time in the future when
that will be so?
Had Prime Minister Begin tripped over the
challenge of the Abortion Law to the survival of his
coalition, the test might already have been upon the
Middle East peace, and possibly to its detriment.
There Ought to be a Law
Recently, U.S. Rep. Stephen Solarz (D., N.Y.)
introduced legislation which would make the
desecration of a house of worship, or the religious
articles in it, a federal crime punishable by a $10,000
fine, five years in jail, or both.
Although several Supreme Court decisions have
ruled against persons accused of disrupting religious
services, these were made with regard to civil
statutes and have never been applied in federal
criminal prosecutions. As a result, the U.S. Justice
Department, believing that it has no legal juris-
diction, has sidestepped church and synagogue
burnings and desecrations unless it believer chat
other statutes, such as those regarding explosives,
have been violated.
A more recent survey by the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith points to the imperative need
for a federal law to punish those who desecrate in any
way, shape or form houses of worship and cemeteries.
The increased manifestations of anti-Semitism
correspond with the Justice Department's report of a
450 percent increase in racially-motivated vandalism
over a six-month period this year as measured
against all of 1978. The increased anti-Semitic in-
cidents also coincide with the resurgence of the Ku
Klux Klan, neo-Nazi and extreme right wing
organizations around the country.
Continuing economic and social tensions will
tend to exacerbate the anti-Semitic feelings of those
who are looking for a scapegoat. This is the lesson of
history. An effective counter-measure could be a law
such as the one introduced by Solarz. It is only a first
step. But it is a step that must be taken. There ought
to be a law.
Ben Gallob

Jewish Floridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Business Office 138 S. Federal Hwy.. Suite 306. Danla. Fla. 33004
Telephone 020-9018
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Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association. American Association of
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One YearS7.J0
Out -""own Upon Request.
Friday, January 4.1980 15TEVETH5740
Volume 9 Number 1
Lawsuit May Decide Patterns
Lawsuit in a\New'.York\court)to
block the sale of an abandoned
but still usable synagogue
building, described as the first
lawsuit of its kind, may stimulate
inquiries to determine the
validity of such transactions
extending far beyond New York
State, according to Howard
Zuckerman, president of the
National Jewish Commission on
Law and Public Affairs.
In response to that lawsuit,
filed in State Supreme Court in
Manhattan, Judge Martin
Stecher ordered a trial to
determine whether conditions of
the sale of the Kalvarier
Synagogue, on Manhattan's
Lower East Side, to the Eastern
Buddhist Association for
"180,000 had been made in ac-
,-ordance with the state's
Religious Corporation Law.
THE SALE was made by
three Jews Abraham
Gulker and Saul Goldstein, of
Brooklyn, and Seymour Shyman,
of Manhattan claiming to be
trustees of the congregation.
The 75-year-old synagogue
building had long been aban-
doned by its original congregants
but was being used for regular
weekend worship by some 25
Jews in the area who contributed
to the upkeep of the synagogue,
according to Zuckerman.
Under the Religious Cor-
poration Law. sale of religious
property in New York State
requires court approval. The
sellers indicated in the ap-
plication for such approval that
the proceeds would be used to
maintain the synagogue's
cemetery in Ozone Park in
Queens. The application was
routinely approved in Strecher's
court last January.
IN RESPONSE to the suit.
Stecher ruled on Nov. 14 that the
sellers did not comply with the
law because, in the absence of by-
laws providing otherwise,
congregants must approve a sale
of real property owned by the
congregation and the sellers did
not give required notice of the
proposed sale or call a meeting of
the congregants to express their
approval.
The worshippers who filed the
suit last September in Stecher's
court were joined as plaintiffs by
the United Jewish Council of the
East Side. Thev are renresented
by Sheldon Silver, a New York
State Assemblyman from
Manhattan and a COLPA
member, and by Daniel Chazin,
also a COLPA member, and
Dennis Rapps. COLPA executive
dine tor. with assistance from
Jeffrey Strashun, a recent
Cardozo Law School graduate.
In issuing his ruling, Stecher
ordered that the sale proceeds be
placed in escrow and notified the
Buddhist purchasers that they
would be making changes in the
building for their needs "at risk,''
since the expected trial could
result in nullification of the sale.
The purchasers have barred use
of the building to the Jewish
worshippers and it is currently
unused.
IN ADDITION to freez-
ing the transaction
Stecher ordered the
two sides to undertake
"discovery" proceedings by
Continued on Page 15
H olocaust Lessons Must be Learned
About a year ago I visited the
infamous Nazi jdeath camp at
Auschwitz. Words can never
express the revulsion and horror
I felt there. Even now, almost a
generation after the terror of the
Holocaust, the appalling reality
of what happened during those
dark days is still beyond com-
prehension.
The Holocaust was an enor-
mous tragedy, but it would be an
even greater tragedy if we failed
to learn the lessons it can teach
us. It would be blind optimism to
declare it could never happen
again.
WHATEVER the lessons of
that terrible period may be they
must be learned and relearned in
each generation if a second
holocaust or a third or fourth
is to be avoided.
That is one reason why the
'Holocaust' television series is an
important and valuable
production. Not only does it
dramatically recount those tragic
days but it forces us to ask,
"What responsibility do we have
today to make sure such a
monstrous evil does not happen
again?"
What are some of the lessons
we must learn from the
Holocaust of Hitler's Germany?
First, we must learn what
happens when we refuse to accept
responsibility for those who
suffer injustice and oppression,
whatever the reason may be.
LIKE THE men in Jesus'
The 'Holocaust' television series,
which has aroused tremendous
emotion everywhere, was again
shown recently by NBC
Television. This article, written
by the renowned evangelical
preacher, Billy Graham,
discusses the impact of
'Holocaust' on the world's con-
science.
Parable of the Good Samaritan
who passed by on the other side
and refused to aid the injured
man, so the world by and large
refused to come to the aid of the
Jewish people in Nazi Germany
until it was too late.
Yes, there are many examples
of courage on the part of in-
dividuals who rescued both Jews
and non-Jews who were marked
for death. But far too many gave
silent assent to Hitler's schemes,
although his planned ex-
termination of the Jewish race in
Germany was clear.
This was true not just for those
under Hitler's rule, but for
leaders and nations who refused
to take steps to help the Jews
until it was too late.
A SECOND LESSON we must
learn from the Holocaust is the
reality of evil in our world
Germany was one of the most
advanced and sophisticated
societies the world has ever
known.
Its people were educated, and
some of its leaders held advanced
university degrees. Yet, in spite
of all this, Hitler's twisted
philosophy persuaded some of his
nation's finest minds.
How could it happen? There is
no rational answer to explain the
hatred and barbarism which
characterized the Third Reich.
There was instead something
demonic about the evil which
permeated those days.
THAT PERIOD of history
should warn us against the very
real presence of evil which lurks
just beneath the surface of our
lives, and which must be
recognized and fought. The
Holocaust, ultimately, was a
spiritual issue, just as evil in
every generation is spiritual.
As a Christian, I believe evil
can only be fought with spiritual
strength strength that comes
from beyond man's own
resources, from God Himself.
A further lesson we must learn
is the frightening consequences
which come when God is ex-
cluded from life. From the Judeo-
Christian tradition have come the
moral and spiritual values which
have undergirded western
civilization for centuries. From
the Ten Commandments and the
Sermon on the Mount have come
convictions about right and
wrong which have influenced our
whole legal system.
IT IS no accident that Hitler
rigorously substituted a new code
of ethics for these having their
roots in the Judeo-Christian
Continued on Page 13


Fri
=380
I

, January 4,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
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Progress Reported on Palestinian Autonomy
Meeting in Cairo during
[Hanukah week, Egyptian, Israeli
land U.S. negotiators claimed
progress is being made on
'alestinian autonomy. The
status of Jerusalem and its Arab
jters is still subject to much
ebate.
At the end of the one-day
(dneeting, Egyptian Prime
Minister Mustafa Khalil said it
took 97 days of Rhodesia talks
|fore agreement was reached,
that the seven-month-old
tonomy talks had not had
srly as long to work out a
lution to the Palestinian
ablem.
^The negotiators held the
event h session of autonomy
lks at the hotel near the
, rani ids where they first sat
jwn to talk peace two years ago.
ISRAELI CHIEF
ELEGATE Yosef Burg told the
opening session, "It's a good
men that we are meeting where
the peace talks began in
pecember 1977. Nobody can say
t didn't work."
U.S. Ambassador James
[ Leonard said in opening remarks
| he too was moved by the "many
memories" of the 1977 talks,
which began after Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat's
historic trip to Jerusalem.
Burg told a news conference at
the end of the session that he
believed progress made by a
committee on procedures for an
election in the West Bank and
Mayor John Lomelo (seated)
lends a helping hand in the
initial city of Sunrise
residential fund-raising drive
for the United Way. Dr.
Richard L. Sherman (left),
Sunrise residential campaign
vice chairman, and George
Kurland, vice chairman of
condominium solicitations,
are directing the once-a-year
drive within Sunrise which
will benefit the 48 local health
and human services agencies
of the United Way. Said
Kurland: "This is the first
time we have asked the
residents of the con-
dominiums, on a one-to-one
basis, for their contributions.
The response of the people has
been extremely enthusiastic
and cooperative." Residents
who would like to assist in the
campaign are asked to call
Sherman or Kurland.
glatt kosher
lOR
Hotel
A Beach Club
NOW UNDER NEW
MANAGEMENT
Managtd A Supervised
flf BUbttf Glmpl Omi'infl
cmnniir REnMswD i KcnurEo
1 Priv. Beach Pool Movies
Bingo Dancing A Entertainment |
TV In Rooms Mashgiach t
Synagogue On Premises.
I OPEN ALL VEAR
RESERVE HOW FOR YOUR WINTER
VACATION a*e PASSOVER MUBAY
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MIAMI BEACH. HA. SSI SB
Gaza would attract Palestinian
support.
"WE HAVE MADE progress
in working on an election system,
election rights, how to vote and
be elected, and I personally hope
that the progress will show to the
Palestinian Arabs that there will
be a process of free elections and
that it is worthwhile to par-
ticipate."
In a statement issued at the
end of the talks the three parties
said "expert assistance" would
be sought by groups working on
the powers and responsibilities of
self-rule council for the
Palestinains.
Many observers doubt the
May 1980 deadline for agreement
on an autonomy plan can be met
on schedule because of the wide
differences between Egypt and
Israel over the concept of
autonomy.
ISRAELI LEADERS have
defined autonomy more narrowly
as control over people and not
land. Begin, fearing Palestinian
radicalism, has refused to con-
sider the idea of a Palestinian
state or the re-division of
Jerusalem.
The issue of whether Arabs in
the former Jordinian section of
Jerusalem would be allowed to
vote appeared to be a major
sticking point.
"It is one of the points where
we surely agree to disagree." said
Burg, restating Israel's rejection
of an Egyptian contention that
the Arab section of Jerusalem is
part of the West Bank.
CHOLESTEROL
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And because of our specially
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And today with
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We think that
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AVAILABLE AT:
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*aga6
....
The Jewish Flortdian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, January 4,1980
r
0i4MMti%Uii>n&
Mid-Coast Hadassah
Sets May Conference
The second annual conference
of the Florida Mid-Coast Region
of Hadassah will be held May 4-6
at the Sheraton Yankee Trader
Hotel. Fort Lauderdale.
Formal announcement of the
conference will be made at a
specially scheduled region board
meeting on Jan. 29, at the
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall.
Esther Cannon, region
president, has appointed Adeline
Moll as region conference
chairman for the second year.
Mrs. Moll will outline the
program of the three-day confer-
ence at the upcoming board
meeting and will announce the
various workshops that will be
chaired by region leaders.
The conference will open on
Sunday with an Honor Roll
luncheon, and among the many
other sessions will be a gourmet
breakfast meeting for Hadassah
Associates, an installation
banquet with entertainment, and
a closing luncheon at which the
chapter and group of the year will
be named and awards given.
West Broward Hadassah,
Anna Silman, president, will be
the host chapter. Ruth Ain has
Quote of the Week
"I think Jerusalem must
stay united. The religious
shrines have been main-
tained with almost loving
care They've never been
better cared for. I don't think
it can be improved." Sen.
George McGovern (D-S.D.),
after touring Jerusalem
escorted by Mayor Teddy
KoUek.
been appointed local conference
chairman. Gloria Hirsh will be in
charge of registrations and Bess
Mandel is treasurer. More than
60 members will serve on the host
committee.
Sylvia Beckman is region
conference arrangements
chairman.
"Assuredly, the 1980 con-
ference will spearhead a great
surge of Hadassah activity in the
Mid-Coast Region (Broward
County and South Palm Beach)
for the next decade," said region
president Mrs. Cannon.
SUNRISE ORT
Sunrise Village Women's
American Organization Rehabil-
itation through Training will
meet Thursday, Jan. 10, Nob Hill
recreation center, at 12:30 p.m.
Book review of "The Masada
Plan" by Leonard Harris.
UNION COUNT*' CLUB
The Union County Club of N. J.
will meet Sunday, Jan. 13, at 1
p.m. at the Boca Raton Bank of
Margate on State Rd. 7 (Grand
Union Shoping Center). Enter-
tainment and refreshments.
WOMEN'S PRESIDENT
Dora Frucht has been named
president of the newly formed
Council of Pioneer
Broward
Women.
RECEIVES AWARD
Following his performance of
singing at the Hanukah
celebration of the Inverrary Gilah
Hadassah, Mike Guthertz was
presented with Hadassah's
Golden Service Award in memory
of his late wife. Olga, who was a
life member of Hadassah.
$25 Contribution Required
To Receive 'The Floridian'
The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale has raised
the minimum contribution to the 1980 United Jewish Appeal for
those who wish to receive "The Jewish Floridian" the newspaper
published every two weeks with national, international, and local
news of interest to residents in the Jewish community of North
Broward County. The new minimum is $25.
In the seven years that the Jewish Federation has been in-
volved in the publication of the Greater Fort Lauderdale edition.
the costs for postage, typesetting, printing, newsprint, and
maintaining accurate mailing addresses have all risen dramatically.
The Jewish Federation can no longer absorb these costs and your
understanding of the necessity for this action is sincerely appre-
ciated. Even with this increase with a goodly portion of that
minimum commitment going to aid Jews around the world "The
Jewish Floridian" is available for one of the lowest subscription
rates among English-language Jewish newspapers.
"Jewish Floridian
Thia Grutif Fort Laudardale Edition I* provided a* a public aervtce lo Iha Jewith com
muniliaa in North Broward County by the
Jewish Federation of
2999 N.W. 33rd Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale 33311
Greater Fort Lauderdale
Phone
305/484-8200
Leo Goodman ~^aW^^~ Leslie S.pottlieb
President Executive Director
Milton Kainer
Executive Vice President
Victor Gruman
Vice President
Joel Ralnstsln
Vice President
John Streng
Vice President
Richard Romanoff
Secretary
Joel Levitt
Treasurer
Mrs. Barnard Libros
Women's Division President
Ptgw Four tditonal columns ol THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN eiprtss the opinion ol the PuDiisher
nd nuthtr most columns nor tin idvmsing reprf stnr enaorstment by m Jewish Ftdwrtnon
olGreile' Forl Imuaerdtle
Sunrise Jewish Center's UJA Committee
is continuing its efforts in the follow-up
to its successful initial breakfast meeting
when Rabbi Albert Troy was honored.
Pictured here are chairman Nat
Pearlman and his co-chairmen: Ben
Goldstein, Dave Rosof, Sidney Per-
misson. In the center is Lou Cohen,
major domo of the kitchen, who
supervised the breakfast, and third
picture shows a few of the 300 at the
Sunrise Center when the total com-
mitments added up to more than three
times the initial effort of a year ago.

Advance Gifts Division
Women's Group Meets Israeli
Major General Avraham Orly of Israel not only
charmed the Federation women during the pre-
luncheon time, but his revealing talk about
peace negotiations and his articulate response
to questions captivated his audience. He is
pictured at left with Gladys Daren, 1980
Continuing the increased-
giving pace set by The Lions, the
advance gifts group of the
Women's Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale had the greatest
number of women ever to attend
its Sl.OOO-minimum luncheon,
and also the greatest initial
commitment response.
This was attributed to the
"Now, More than Ever" theme
that Jews throughout the world
- and in North Broward
County-must help to provide
funds for the unmet
humanitarian needs supported by
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale through the
annual United Jewish Appeal
Highly effective were the
solicitation by Sue Segaul and
her committee, the hospitality of
Ethel Waldman who hosted the
lunch in her home for the 60-some
women in attendance, and the
presence of one of Israels
foremost military and diplomatic
men. Major General Avraham
Orly.
Serving with Mrs. Segaul and
Blanche Obletz, her co-chairman
were Terri Baer, Sylvia
Begelman, Sarah Blum. Sybil
Women's Division UJA chairman; hostess
Ethel Waldman, and Sue Segaul, advance gifts
chairman. On the right he's pictured with Fran
Sindell, first president of the Women's
Division, 1968-69; Mitchie Libros, currently
president who succeeded the immediate past
president, Rebecca Hodes, 1977-78.
Pola Brodzki, Dorothy
Maxine Hess, Lillian--------------------------------------------
Brody,
Gluck.
Hirsch.
Also Judy Huston. Helen
Kuriansky. Edith Levir.e. Eve
Levitt. Maya Nathan, Joan
Okun. Alma Seelig. Florence
Straus, Selnia Streng, Roily
Weinberg, Selnia Zalon.
PASSOVER
Rabbi Aaron Gelman and Universal
Kosher Tours present the
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Friday, January 4,1980.
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7


Margate's New Center
I Tries for August Date
974-Q650
SAVINGS fc
AMERICAN
erpaykcJ >fg ARCHITECT
'2-2500,,
Principals in the planning and construction of the new Margate
Jewish Center recently got together in front of the builder's mobile
unit on the site at Rock Island Rd. and Royal Palm Blvd. in Margate.
In the picture above are, from left, Gary Garrison, manager of
Margate branch of American Savings; Harry Hirsch, incoming
Temple president; Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld; Emanuel Schwartz, out-
going Temple president; Randy Fisher, president of Fisher-Payne
Construction Co., and Pat Yaquinto, general construction foreman.
Ronald Kail, architect, unable to be present for this picture, has
designed a house of worship with a seating capacity of 1,000 that can
be expanded by several hundred more seats, if needed.
The building, with an area of 23,000 square feet, will have a social
hall and stage, two kosher kitchens, classrooms for Hebrew school,
dairy service chapel, rabbi's study, and other facilities.
Expected to be completed by August in time for the 5741 Jewish
New Year services next September, a campaign is underway to
provide furnishings and decorations for the building situated on seven
and a half acres.
Irving Resnikoff is heading the campaign, assisted by Louis
v Feen, with Dr. Geld and Irving Spivack as advisors. Officers of the
P" Temple pledged $40,000 to the campaign, and area captains and com-
l. mittees are canvassing prospects for contributions.
Brandeis Women's
'University on Wheels'
Three professors of the theater
. arts and literature departments
of Brandeis University,
Waltham, Mass., will present
"Fact, Fiction, Footlights and
Film," at the University on
Wheels annual lecture program
from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.,
Wednesday, Jan. 16, at Bailey
Hall in Fort Lauderdale.
Offered under the sponsorship
of the Brandeis University
National Women's Committee,
five chapters are participating:
Fort Lauderdale-Pompano
Beach, West Broward, Inverrary-
Woodlands, Hollywood,
Hollywood Hills.
Focusing on the theatrical arts,
the professors will explore
. '-)% various aspects of the theater,
tfin with Prof. Martin Halpern
speaking on "From History to
State," Prof. Maureen Heneghan
discussing "A View Behind the
Scenes," and Prof. Richard
Onorato viewing "Other People
and Ourselves: The Experience of
Style."
i~.
Reservations for the program,
requiring a donation of $7.60 for
the lectures and coffee and cake,
may be made with Hannah
Spitalnik, Fort Lauderdale-Pom-
pano Beach; Dorothy Schwartz,
West Broward; Elaine Stone,
Brandeis University profes-
sors Martin Halpern, Richard
Onorato, Maureen Heneghan.
I nverrary-Woodlands; Natalie
Goldberg, Hollywood; or Anita
Rashbaum, Hollywood Hills.
Sands Point Breakfast
Co-Chairpersons Anne
Friedman and Mildred Savitt
have announced that the Sands
Point UJA Committee is con-
tinuing its planning for the UJA
Breakfast to be held Sunday,
Feb. 3, at the Tamarac Jewish
Center.
Taking to heart the theme that
"Now, More Than Ever We Are
One," the committee is planning
to use the breakfast meeting as
the foundation for continuing
,1mim i ii i'ti- -ii r......
efforts on behalf of the Jewish
Federation and the community.
Serving with the co-chair-
persons: Ann Bobkier, Emanuel
Cohen, Joel S. Cohen, Carolyn
Feffer, Sam Friedman, Herman
Goldman, Rose Kershlansky,
Ruth Litt, Ruth Portnoy, Samuel
Roskin, Gussie Roskin, Ralph
Savitt, and Willard Zweig.
Others interested in joining the
Sands Point Committee should
call Mark Silverman at the
Federation office.
Mrs. Goldstein To Talk
To Shalom Sisterhood
Mrs. Louise E. (Syd) Gold-
stein, known as the "first lady"
of Conservative Judaism, will be
the guest speaker on Tuesday,
Jan. 15, at the annual Temple
Sholom Sisterhood Torah-Fund -
Residence Halls luncheon to be
held in the Social Hall of Temple
Sholom, Pompano Beach, at
noon.
Chairman of the luncheon is
Gisela Frankl, Torah Fund vice
president. Fran Sindell is special
gifts chairman and has been
named the honoree for the Torah
Fund Residence Halls event.
Mrs. Irwin (Rochelle) Stenn and
Mrs. Charles (Helen) Ruben are
co-presidents of the Sisterhood.
An activist and leader on
behalf of the Seminary and the
Conservative movement for three
decades. Mrs. Goldstein is a past
national president of the
Women's League for Con-
servative Judaism and a former
national chairman of its Torah
Fund Residence Halls cam-
paign.
She also serves as a member of
the board of directors of the
Seminary and is currently
chairman of its National
Afrs. Goldstein
Women's Patrons Society.
Mrs. Goldstein has the
distinction of being the first
woman to be appointed a member j
of the Executive Committee of
the Seminary as well as the
.World Council of Synagogues
and the Synagogue CouncU of
America, which represents the
lay and professional bodies of all
| three branches of Judaism in the
, United States.
Tickets can be obtained from
the three vice-chairmen: Mrs.
Max (Ethyl) Goodman, Mrs. Lee
(Frieda) Eiseman, or Mildred
Goldstein.
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0M THE OMAN
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Having a
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Don't forget to invite
the great taste of
Maxwell House
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Maxwell House' Coffee has tli.it rich.
satisfying taste;, brewed to be
remembered. Serve it with
sable and whitetish salad
or whatever the Cousins'
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Smart Cousins' Club
hostesses have
bt*en serving it
tor over hall
a centurv.
K
Certified
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A living tradition in Jewish homes for more than half a century.'


P>e8
The Jewish Floridian OfOfeaterPort Lauderdak
Friday, January 4,1960
From a Two-Room Operation in 1975, JC6
Biblical Commandment Fulfilled at JCC Honored
Volunteers
s >
Participants in affixing mezuzot at JCC from left: Federation Executive Director Gottlieb, JCC
Executive Director Goldstein, Rotman, Rabbi Schwartz, Sackowitz, Mrs. Perlman, Gruman.
"And thou shalt inscribe them
upon the doorposts of thy house
and upon thy gates."
This verse from the Book of
Deuteronomy is one of the
Biblical passages written by a
pious scribe with a quill on
parchment scroll the mezuzah.
Fulfilling the Biblical com-
mand, the Jewish Community
Center last week began affixing a
mezuzah to each of the buildings
and each of many doorposts
leading to meeting and
classrooms in the 11 buildings on
the 16-acre Perlman Campus.
Among those taking part in
the traditional ceremony at the
JCC Administration Building
and led in prayer by Rabbi Albert
Schwartz were JCC President
Anita Perlman, Jewish
Federation Vice President Victor
Gruman, Johl Rotman, David
Sackowitz, JCC Executive
Director William Goldstein, and
Federation Executive Director
Leslie S. Gottlieb.
When the largest of the
mezuzot, a gift from Sondra and
David Sackowitz who secured it
in Jerusalem, was affixed to the
Administration Building, Rabbi
Schwartz told the group
assembled for the ceremony that
"the doorposts of our homes bear
the inscription of that which is to
govern all our thoughts and
actions Grant that the
members and all who enter
therein be privileged to work
together in harmony, to love and
revere Thee, cleaving to Thy
ways, to study Thy Torah and
fulfill its precepts."
It's a rare day that Jean and
Irv Griff aren't visiting or
working at the Jewish Com-
munity Center. This has been
going on for four years, ever since
they won a turkey, at the first
JCC Adult Club meeting they
attended.
Irv jokingly remarked, "That
turkey has made us feel an
Continued on Page 10-
First
* this spring, the Jewish
Community Center utilized two
rooms in the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale
building at 2999 NW 33rd Ave.
There wasn't too much activity
going on then.
But now that JCC has 11
buildings on the 16-acre Perlman
Campus building at 6601 W.
Sunrise Blvd. all kinds of activity
take place.
Such as the very first Hanukah
Family Party in the dining hall.
Since it was Saturday night
when scores of the JCC members,
young couples with little
children, high school teens,
college students home for the
holidays, singles, elderly couples,
gathered in the hall, the Hav-
dalah (bidding farewell to the
Sabbath) service preceded the
lighting of the Hanukah candles.
Pictured are the principals who
took part in the Havdalah and
then the Hanukah lighting: Ron
Schagrin, after the sanctification
of the wine as the evening's first
star was visible, holds the
microphone to enable Jayne
Rotman to shake the spice box
and offer the blessing, followed
by her husband, Johj Rotman.
After lighting the four-wick-
intertwined special Havdalah
candle, he offered the blessing
and, true to tradition, ex-
tinguished the flame by dipping
it into the cup of wine that
Schagrin had used in opening the
service.
Richard Schwartz, now that it
was aus shabbas, offered the
Hanukah blessings, lit the
'Here Is Israel' Thrills 1,000
Meet the
JCC Staff
First of a Series
Ed Basan, director of health
and physical education, came to
the Fort Lsudsr-
dale Jewish
Community Cen-
ter with a strong
background in
Jewish centers.
Ed grew up in
Birmingham,
Ala., and during
those growing
years was an ac-
tive participant
in many JCC
programs, and a
constant part-
time employee in
Ivy Levine (center) and Susan Nathanson (extreme right)
Cultural Series chairpersons, meet "Here Is Israel" cast. '
Basan
Continued on Page 10
Backstage at Bailey Concert
liall on Thursday, Dec. 13, the
JCC Cultural Series chair-
persons, Ivy Levine and Susan
Nathanson, were warmly
congratulating and embracing
the cast of "Here Is Israel."
Everyone was excited the
show was a success the
audience had responded with
enthusiasm. To add to their
pleasure, David Firstenberg
praised their committee's
organization. In his soft Israeli
accent, he informed them that he
was "very impressed with the
warm welcome the cast had
received." He added that "no
other community could compare
with the effort that they had put
forth in presenting the show."
"It was a proud moment,"
Susan Nathanson said as she
related Firstenberg's praise.
It had all started on Wed-
nesday, Dec. 12 when the JCC
Cultural Series Committee
hosted a luncheon arranged by
Continued on Page 10
shamus candle and lit the two
candles.
The audience, only a small
portion picked up in the pic-
turejoined in the singing of the
"Star Spangled Banner" and
"Hatikvah." Piano accompanist
was Jean Tannenbaum. Then
came the crowning delicious
delight of the eveningbefore
the fun and frolicking latke
fressing. Tray after tray of hot
latkes with applesauce and sour
cream were brought to the long
serving tables and at each end
were gallons of punch.
Richard Schwartz chaired the
special event with the aid of a
host of volunteers, including
"Uncle Joe" Hoffman who is
pictured bringing yet another
tray of latkes to the table.
Teens Invited to
Dance on Jan, 19
All Jewish youth in North
Broward are invited to come
together through Teen Council.
Toward that end, the JCC is
having a dance on Saturday, Jan.
19, for all Jewish Youth Groups
and all Center member teens. The
teens will dance to the live music
of "High Voltage." Refreshments
will be served, and the dress is
casual.
One of the other projects of the
forming Teen Council was to
have some of the youth groups
get together to help decorate the
Center for Hanukah.
J*?.*2&lfa ""Potion
with Workmen's Circle,
often
a Yiddish Culture Club
for boys and girls 7 to 9 years
who want to learn Yiddish
language, literature, history
and songs and dances.
Program starts Sunday
Jan. 27-9:30 a.m.
to noon, ending in May
Community En
lalafl
Under the leadership of Alan Baer
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lai
provide social services for the elderly am
devoted to that purpose In the Federation
soon proved inadequate. And thus began
munity, Ludwik and Jacob Brodzki, Mia
and Louis Perlman, Leo Goodman. IV
and dozens of others, to find suitable!
all ages for social, cultural, recreational"i
Following many months of searching <
Air Academy moved oat of the Fort Laud
made available at the right price. The areas
the 16-acre facility, with 11 buildings, a n
athletic field was purchased and in June!
Center of Greater Fort Lauderdale moved oi
established its headquarters at 6601 W. Sm
The pool, rooms and puyficida garJP|
August. A day camp for children waajM ,
more than 300 children had enjoyednlfi
JCCsataff. J
JCC and the Federation, mindful of ta
moving into North Broward County, con tin
and projects that raise the quality of Jewial
JCC ia projecting an additional 300 family n
Tinocdiio' Jan. 13
Aimed at children from kinder-
garten through eighth grade, a
Sunday afternoon live per-
formance of "Pinocchio," by the
Baltimore Actors Theater has
been scheduled for 2 p.m.,
Sunday, Jan. 13, in the Jewish
Community Center's Soref Hall.
Tickets are available at JCC.
Fundau 7\me Change
Parents are asked to take note
that because Sunday School
classes are ending at 1 p.m., the
Sunday Funday for children
programs have been changed to
1:30 to 2:30, and 2:30 to 3:30.
Parents who have a question
are asked to call Joni at JCC, 792-
6700.
WECARE Gi?(
On the left, Jean Levinson, WECARE G
Chairman Sally Rodin and Glw:; *J*>
Avwa Manor Nursing Home; Mrs. ffaiii
John Williamson at Broward GeneraTifbi
and Ida Chuster, Min Bodin, Mrs. Rodin,
Bank Chairman Lucille StangandNanM
are pictured during showing of some t
activities of the volunteer group, sponsor
the Jewish Community Center and the J
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, d
Hanukah festival Food baskets wereJrH
mm
::::::%:
PLEASE NOTE!
SOMETHING NEW
HAS BEEN ADDED
Card players, Mah Jong,
"nnunyQ players...
We have a room for yon to
gather, play and socialise.
We 11 provide the room and
tables, you supply the
playere and equipment. (If
you need players, call Selma
-we'll try to help.)
MON TUES WED
1 -4 pm.
Bldg.C
Starting Jan. 7
r V



Friday, January 4,1960
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
Wow Has 11 Buildings on 16-Acre Site
\\terprise
* and Jacob Brodzkl in 1975, the
atderdale initiated a program to
md the young. But the two rooms
on building at 2999 NW 33rd Ave.
in the dream of leaders in the corn-
like Fridovich, Alvin Gross, Anita
m Yejjner, Helen and Sam Soref,
^^g 1 meet the needs of Jews of
*99a ." ml programs.
ig and planning, the former Florida
uderdale area, and its property was
'm was now approaching reality as
iwimming pool, tennis courts and
if of 1979, the Jewish Community
i out of the Federation building and
mrhe Blvd.
f|iit to, immediate use in July and
I ad ced before the program ended,
ajarvkwd activity with the aid of
the ever-growing numbers of Jews
tme to plan and develop programs
rnhlife. With 700 family
ymembersinl980.
JCCs 'Shalom' Reception
Aerobic Dance
"Shalom, Jewish Community
Center" is the greeting when
callers dial 792-6700 the
telephone number for the Jewish
Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. And those
callers will be directed faster and
more efficiently to the right
person or department desired,
thanks to the installation of the
long awaited new communication
and phone system.
The telephone
is a vital part of
JCCs daily
operation. Call-
ers can receive
information re-
garding classes
or meetings, get
directions, obtain
help with the aid
of staff members. Newman
Cyvea Newman, receptionist,
explains: "The addition of the
extra lines and the master switch
board, enabling us to by-pass the
intercom for inter-office calls, will
expedite all calls to the Center."
The staff can now hold con-
ference calls in lieu of a meeting
without leaving their respective
offices. At the same time, they
can still receive messages of any
incoming calls.
The new system also includes
phones to "The Gathering
Place," the Day Care Center, the
library, and additional phones in
the administrative and executive
offices. As Cyvea put it, "This
will enable me to reach more
people at one time and connect
calls directly, eliminating return
Continued on Page 10
Jeanne Dawson puts a class through its aerobic paces. This one
includes from left Marsha Feldman, Leslie Tesser, Karen
Bussell, Ruth Golden, Sandi Goldenberg, Sandy Jackowitz.
lamikah at The Gathering PLace'
When one thinks of day care, it's a case of
Wents bringing a child or children to a day
xtte center. But at the Jewish Community
:mter's "The Gathering Place," a child brings
i parent. Much like children's day care centers.
The Gathering Place" provides a variety of
etivity for elderly from 9 cm. to 5 p.m. And
luring the Hanukah festival Mike Fields
fHtu.*d above left) and his accordionist ac-
vnpanist Teddy Sloan, and Annette Kay and
Bebe Gould (pictured with Sloan) entertained;
and then Meyer Diem of "The Gathering
Place" lit the Hanukah candles, and the women
of the Bonaventure Women's League for Israel,
with which Kay and Gould are associated, and
Fifi Segal, Charlotte Goldstein, Sylvia Beil and
Belle Brooks Kaufman distributed gifts to the
elderly. Ruth Sperber of the Women's League
for Israel was mistress of ceremonies.
Aerobic Dance is a dance class.
No, Aerobic Dance is a fitness
class. Actually, Aerobic Dance is
both, and it's loads of fun.
Unlike the old style exercise
class with the one, two and three,
four, up, down, bend and
back Aerobic Dance is the
modern, swinging way to fitness.
With the music playing, the
instructor sets up the exercise
routine, but in this case the
routine is a combination of
exercises and dance steps to cool,
rockin' beat. Yes, j it really
swings, it's really fun, it's really
exercise.
The Fort Lauderdale Jewish
Community Center offers
Aerobic Dance Classes on
Tuesday and Thursday, from 9 -
10 a.m. or 6:30 7:30 p.m. The
fall enrollment for the two classes
totaled 35.
Here is a list of the first
session's enrollment: Cheryl
Goldsmith, Susan Nathanson,
Ivy Levine, Phyllis Bassichis,
Madelyn Zelman, Pauline Thaler,
Shirley Lazarus, Sandi
Goldenberg, Louis Kingsley,
Cookie Berman, Lynn
Kopelowitz, Karen Bussell,
Susan Segaul, Leslie Tesser,
Sondra Jackowitz, Lynn
Lieberman, Carol Garlin, Jo
Ellen Kaiser, Lois Polish, Janet
Borkson, Susan Feiss, Marsha
Feldman, Myra Halle, Ruth
Goldin, Judy Tekel, Carol Selor,
Francine Gumora, Gayle Martin,
Sandy Bos man, Pearl Tan-
nenbaum, Sondra Nisenbaum,
Ethel Morris, Dorothy Rubin,
' Ida Small, Helen Sands and
i instructor Jeanne Dawson.
SY KLEINMAN
"IF IT'S SO FUNNY
WHY ARE YOU
CRYING"
SUNDAY, JAN. 27 8 pm
There are only
a few tickets left.
$3.50 general admission
$5 preferred seating
yes Gifts-and-Gets Blood
.
E General
mam with
fifospital,
din, Blood
mMamiot
ntored by
hi Jewish
It, during
tJrt'uered
to families, goodies of all kinds distributed at
Aviva Manor, Center for Living, Covenant,
Tamarac, Broward, Plantation Convalescent
Homes, Castle Hill Elementary School, Holy
Cross and Broward hospitals, "Women in
Distress," Hebrew Day School. And then
spending the day with Energy, Compassion
and Responsible Effort Blood Bank Day in that
same week, WECARE volunteers assisted in
getting blood from donors with the Blood Bank
mobile unit stationed at Temple Emanu-El.
Winter Physical Education Programs
Choose Your Art Course:
Oils, Watercolors, Cartoons
In football
parlance, a "trip-
le threat play-
er" is quite a
star. In the world
of art, a talented
artist with triple
capabilities in his
field is a rarity.
The Jewish Community Center
is getting such a person a
person who was displaced from
his native Poland by the Hitler
Nazi terrorists. Julian Feingold is
waver grateful to HIAS (He-
brew Immigration Aid Society)
for getting him aboard the second
ship to leave Germany in 1946
hound for the U.S. with displaced
persons.
Julian, who studied art in
institutes in two cities in Poland,
now living in Plantation, has
done oil portraits, some exhibited
in museums, watercolors, and
political cartooning which ap-
peared in Jewish newspapers in
New York City and other cities.
He will be the instructor for a
series of additional art courses
scheduled to start Tuesday, Jai.
22, 10 am. 1 p.m., in portrait
painting, watercolors and car-
tooning such as the self-carica-
ture reproduced here. Those
interested in any one or more of
Feingold's classes should call
Ruth Pine at JCC.
Yoga
Yoga
Aerobic
Dance
Shape-Up
Disco
Modern Dance
Men's Basketball
Weight Control
Ballet
Tennis (Intermed.)
Tennis (Beg.)
Tennis (Beg.)
Tennis (Beg.)
Golf Lessons
Peanut Basketball
Peanut Floor Hockey
Jazz-Tap Dance
Rhythmic Dance
Ballet
Tumbling
Basketball
Floor Hockey
Mon.
Mon.
Tues.&Thurs.
Tues.&Thurs.
Mon.&Wed.
Tuee.
Wed.
Wed.
Thurs.
Thurs.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Thurs.
Thurs.
ADULTS
10-11:30 am
7:30-9 pm
9-10 am
6:30-7:30 pm
6-6:45 pm
8-9 pm
7:30-8:15 pm
7-10 pm
10-11 am
8-9 pm
10-11 am
9-10 am
10-11 am
9-10 pm
8-9:30 pm
Jan. 21
Jan. 7
Jan. 15
Jan. 15
Jan. 7
Jan. 8
Jan. 9
Jan. 9
Jan. 10
Jan. 10
Jan. 13
Jan. 13
Jan. 7
Jan. 10
Jan. 10
8Wks $20
BWks 25
12Wka
12Wks
10Wks
8Wks
BWks
10Wks
10Wks
BWks
5Wks
5Wks
5Wks
5Wks
5Wks
55
56
15
22
17.50
10
30
22
20
20
20
20
18
GRADE SCHOOL CHILDREN
Mon. -
Tues.
Mon.
Tues.
Thurs.
Wed.
Sun.
Wed.
Tennis Frl.
Tennis Mon.
Disco Tues.
Vollyball Tues.
The Body Shop (Girls Only) Sun.
Ballet Thurs.
Basketball Thurs.
Tween Girls Basketball Sun.
Rhythmic Dance Mon.
Rhythmic Dance Tues.
Creative Movement Tues.
Creative Movement Thurs.
Creative Movement Tues.
Creative Movement Thurs.
Children's Game Time Wed.
4-5 pm
4-5 pm
3:30-4:30 pm
5:156:15 pm
4:15-5:15 pm
4:15-5:15 pm
3-4 pm
4-5 pm
TEEN/TWEEN
3-4 pm
4-5 pm
7-8 pm
6:35-8 pm
2:30-3:30 pm
7-8 pm
6:3f>8pm
, 1:30-2:30 pm
PRESCHOOL
4 J0-5 M pm
4:15-5:15 pm
1:15-1:45 pm
4-4:30 pm
2-2:30 pm
4:45-5:15 pm
4:15-5:15 pm
Jan. 7
Jan. 8
Jan. 7
Jan. 8
Jan. 10
Jan. 9
Jan.
Jan. 9
Jan. 11
Jan. 7
Jan. 8
Jan. 8
Jan. 13
Jan. 10
Jan.
Jan. 13
Jan. 7
Jan. 8
Jan. 8
Jan. 10
Jan. 8
Jan. 10
Jan. 9
10Wks
10Wks
10Wks
10Wks
10Wks
10Wks
10Wks
10Wks
5Wks
5Wks
BWks
BWks
6Wks
10Wks
10Wks
10Wks
8
8
15
15
20
20
10
8
20
20
22
1250
20
10
10 .
Gr. 1-2
Gr. 1-2
Gr.1-3
Gr. 2-5
Gr. 2-5
Gr. 2-5
Gr.3-5
Gr.3-6
Gr.9-12
Gr.S8
Gr.5-9
Gr.9-12
Gr.6-8
Gr.5-8
Gr.9-12
Gr.6-8
10Wks 15
10Wks 15
BWks
BWks
Bwks 15
BWks 15
BWks 10
15
15
Ages 4-7
Ages 4-7
Ages2Vk-4
Ages 2^-4
Ages 5-7
Ages 5-7
Ages 4-6
Programs Open to Center Members Only. CENTER MEMBERSHIP AVAILABLE TO ANYONE.
^


m
T
'he Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, January 4,1980
jCC
Kosher Nutrition Hanukah Program
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of Greater Ft. Lauderdale
PROGRAM FOR PARENTS
Ho* ^ Prepare yourself for
your child s sexuality, and how to
"" a sexually happy and
responsible child is a program for
parents only, presented through
the cooperation of the Jewish
Community Center and Jewish
family Services with Dr. Judy
Horowitz as lecturer Wednesday
Jan. 16. at 8 p.m. y
Sexual issues are becoming
more prevalent among young
people. This seminar is aimed
toward the parents of young
children and adolescents.
YIDDISH CLUB
Former Borsht Circuit tumler
Jack Fishman leads the Yiddish
Club through a fun-packed
session every other Wednesday
at the JCC. This program is for
Yiddish-speaking novices as well.
Next class takes place Wed-
nesday, Jan. 9, at 2 p.m.
Members only.
SUNDAY MORNING SERIES
Frances Korins, known locally
as a teacher and lecturer, is the
guest speaker at the JCC's
Sunday morning Issues and
Answers program. Her topic,
"Israel A Personal Account,"
will be presented Sunday, Jan.
20, at 10 a.m. Breakfast (bagel
with cream cheese) is included in
the admission.
THE PALESTINE ERA
Eighteen years in Palestine
and nine active years with the
Israeli military group
"Hagannah" are the basis of a
lecture by Henry Goralkin at the
JCC on Thursday, Jan. 17, at 1
p.m. All JCC members are in-
vited to this talk.
Here's Israel
Continued from Page 8
Jean and Irving Griff for the
prime purpose of bringing
together the entertainers and the
families who had volunteered
their hospitality for the two
nights the cast was staying.
Lorraine Heller, who had the
only couple in the group as her
guests said, "I never dreamed it
would be such a gratifying ex-
perience." Johl Rotman, a bit
sleepy the next day from sitting
up until the wee hours talking,
remarked how much he and
Jayne had enjoyed having Danny
Maseng, the star of the show, in
their home.
Ron and Jane Schagrin em-
braced their guests after the
show, and Ron quipped, "Oh, a
star is born." Dubby, the
drummer, kept Ivy and Larry
Levine quite a while after the
show as he packed his many
drums. JoAnne Folk was a
second time hostess to the cast,
and Anne Jean Kardem went on
an errand of mercy to visit the
ailing Sima, in her hospital bed.
Nancy Goldberg, who admitted
to being a little apprehensive at
first, "loved every minute of it."
There were over a thousand
people in attendance that night,
but none enjoyed the show as
much as this group. "It was the
personal involvement with the
cast that made us feel this way,"
remarked an exuberant Ivy
Levine.
Susan Nathanson says she and
her husband, Rick, have to get to
Israel. They have an invitation to
Dahlia's home in Ramat Gan.
"What an evening. We'll never
forget it. It was truly an ex-
change program for our com-
munity and our Israeli cousins,"
Ruth Pine, JCC Cultural Arts
director, exclaimed happily.
"Here is Israel" was the
second program of the four-part
Jewish Community Center
Cultural Series. On Sunday, Jan.
27, Sy Kleinman will headline at
the Jewish Community Center in
"If It's So Funny, Why Are You
Crying." Helene Gold win. a
committee member, mentioned
that the "Sy Kleinman program
is practically sold out." She
suggests that those interested
not delay in getting their tickets
as the seating is limited.
Honored Volunteers
Continued from Page 8
obligation to the Center, and
we've been paying with our work
ever since." Shortly after that
meeting, Jean made "latkes" for
the annual Hanukah party. That
"latke" effort was the first of
many services and jobs that the
Griffs have undertaken.
Undoubtedly, they have
played a vital part in the growth
of the Jewish Community Center.
Jean says that whenever anyone
remarks about all the time she
has given the JCC, she promptly
answers, "If I had to pay them to
work there, I would. I'm not a!
pool sitter, I like to be involved in
doing, and the Jewish Com-
munity Center affords me this!
opportunity."
Married for 47 years, the Griffs
have two sons Steven and
Norman. Steven is an assistant
administrator for the Passaic
(N.J.) Beth Israel Hospital. He is
married and has two daughters.
Norman left a well-paying job in
1967 to fight in Israel's Six Day
War in 1967. He is married, living
in Israel with his wife and their
baby son.
The Griffs have always worked
in business together and still
work together as volunteers.
They complement one another
beautifully. Irv is a member of
the board of directors and has
been working most enthusiastic-
ally on the JCC Dedication
Journal. He has a delightful
sense of humor and is proudly
supportive of Jean, a bubbly,
pretty, blonde, blue-eyed woman
who strives for perfection in
whatever she does. For their
most recent project, Jean and Irv
arranged for the luncheon-recep-
tion for the "Here is Israel" cast
and their hosts. It was the usual
Griff success, and the bill of fare
was delicious.
You can be sure that the Griffs
won't be resting on their laurels.
There's no doubt that they soon
will be involved in a new project
at the Center.
JCC Shaohn
Continued from Page 9
calls and reducing waiting timt
for the caller."
The new phone system is but
another step forward for the fast
growing, energetic Jewish
Communtity Center. It joins a
long list of major improvements,
such as the new parking lot, new
lighting, landscaping, new gym
floor, renovation of Samuel M.
Soref Hall, and new ad
ministrative offices.
"Our winter programming
starts in January," reminds
Cyvea. "Call me at 792-6700 for
information regarding any
classes. Remember, I'm waiting
for your call on our new phone
system. '
Jean Lane (extreme left) sang to the piano accompaniment of
Charles Buchman as she entertained the large group in at-
tendance at the Jewish Community Center's Kosher Nutrition
Program and site manager Fred India, Augusta and William
Heyman, Mary and Irwin Borhin and others arranged the fes-
tivities which included calling on various persons regularly
attending the program that provides a hot kosher meal every
weekday for more than 200 persons to light Hanukah candles.
At the Kosher Nutrition program in the dining hail at the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, Mike Fields and
Teddy Sloan were the Hanukah entertainers.
UJA Committees
Paradise Gardens, Section 1
v
Morrii
Paradise Gardens, Section 2
K^tchbaum01118 RSenberg' SA"^'^ Saltzman, Morris
Dave Rosenzweig, Nat Bodner, Gertrude Bodner, Chairman
Harry Lowe.
Paradise Gardens, Section 3
V
? Biene m"1?^' Chairman tng Tannenbaum, Fay
^amZl ^"M^lson; standing: Lou Auerbach, Jasper
itowfise Gardens, Section 4
JCC Staff-
Continued from Page 8
various physical education activ-
ities, including lifeguarding,
front office reception, basketball
attendant and gym instructor for
youth programs.
Ed graduated from the Uni-
versity of Alabama in 1970, and
in November of that year was
hired as a full-time gym in*'
st rue tor at the Dallas (Tex.)
Jewish Community Center. After
6'i years, he left Dallas as
assistant physical education
director, and traveled to Water-
bury, Conn., as director of health
and physical education in a two-
year-old Jewish Community
Center, which included such
modern facilities as indoor heatedv
pool, racquetball courts, health *
club, new gym, and many acres of
woods and trails. After two years
in Connecticut, Ed joined the
staff of the Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Community Center on
June 1,1979.
When questioned about what
he sees for JCC's future Ed
replied, "The Center here is a
new identity on the verge of great
things. We want to develop
exciting programs that people
want, such as basketball leagues,
a good swim team, top jogging
course, first-rate fitness classes
and much more. Our tennis
courts are being rebuilt now, and
in the future we are going to have
racquetball courts, a new
enlarged heated swimming pool,
a health club and more. We can't
miss being a success what we K*
need most is for people to come
out and see what we can do, and *"
get involved."
a J? .{" aJwavs had an open
door. If you want to come by the
Center and talk about what's
going on, or just talk sports, Ed's
the one to see.
ffi2^2!r*~* *-*-. Ctoir^n
Thelma and Jack Scheiner will
be honored ai the annual UJA
breakfast of Oriole Gardens
Phase I on Sunday morning,
Jan. 20, at the Recreation
Hall. They are being honored
for their activities on behalf of
UJA and at the Margate
Jewish Center and Margate
B'nai B'rith, continuing
leadership qualities they
exhibited in their former home
town ofMoshulu, N. Y.
One-Woman Art Snow
Sue Kleinman of Pompano
Beach is having a one-woman art
show of her work from Jan 8
through Jan. 31 at the Con-
textual Galleries, 813 E. Las Olas
Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Adocent
of the Fort Lauderdale Museum
of Art and chairman of the
Museum library, Sue Kleinman.
former chairman of UJA in
Queens, N.Y., and a past
president of the Brooklyn
Hebrew Home and Hospital for
the Aged, serves on the boards of
the Fort Lauderdale-Pompano
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee and Palm
Aires ORT.

%
#'"


' i'. ,*..V>"*.' .' ''''
PiPay. .lanuary 4,1980
.-- y.y "' Th*Jtk>khfloridia*jtfQ^ggftLQuderddle

P*P
rr
MONDAY, JAN. 7
iSe Shalom Chapter Board |
tUmw's Circle 1(M6 -
cutive meeting
kissah Armon Caatle Garden
pter General meeting, Hester
Mow reviews "Story of Moshe
yan" Castle Garden Rec. Hall,
ipte Sholom Games
,ple Emanu-EI Games -7:15
randeis National Woman's
ommittee VVoodlanda/lnverrary
.wapters Board meeting
Moman'l League lor Israel Gersh-
,n Eve-8-10 fl
TUESDAY. AN. 8
'nai B'rith Bermuda Club Board
leeting
Broward Brandeia National
Women's Committee Meeting -
j 30 p.m.
fadassah N. Lauderdale Chai
H,apler Board meeting
f nai B'rith Ocean Chapter # 1628
/Regular meeting, Rose Mlllander
feviews The Masada Plan." Jarvis
Hall. 12.30 p.m.
Temple Sholom Board meeting
r b nai B'rith Ft. Lauderdale
I Chapter 345 Board meeting
[ Pioneer Woman Hatlkvah Chapter
Regular meeting Whiting Hall -
'noon- 12:30 p.m.
Temple Sholom Board meeting 8
1 p.m.
Hadassah Rayut Group of W.
Broward Board meeting
American Mlzrachi Woman
Masada Chapter Regular meeting
Temple Beth Israel 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Speaker:
Robert E. Lockwood. Topic: "The
Court Systems of Israel and Egypt
and How They Compare to Ours."
noon
JAN. 8, 9,* 10
Hadassah Somerset Shoehana
iiapter Trip
WEDNESDAY. JAN. 9
i Jewish Federation of Greater Ft.
Lauderdale Women's Division -
Citywide$500- Burdines
Women's Environ Club (Inverrary) -1
Board meeting- p.m.
Hadassah Oriole Scopus Chapter
Board meeting 9:30 a.m.
ORT Royal Plantation General
meeting
Hadassah Pompano Beach Chai
Chapter Board meeting
' tunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood -
Bu.ird meeting
ORT Palm Aire Chapter General
" :mg
Btandeis Plantation W. Broward
Chapter Regular meeting Deicke
noon 3 p.m.
ORT Coral Springs Chapter -
meeting Community
Coral Springs-8 p.m.
Temple Beth Orr Games -
de Dr. & Royal Palm Blvd. -
m.
lya Pioneer Women Meeting
i Raton Federal Savings &
Bank. 1334 N. State Rd.,
Speaker. Arthur Aron
Jewish Federation/UJA Palm-Aire
Function
^^^^^^^^^^^^^y^^^^^^^^^V^^^V^VV^^^^
Community
Calendar
THURSDAY, JAN. 10
Temple Emanu-EI Executive
Committee meeting 7:30 p.m.
Sunrise Shalom Chapter Regular
meeting
Hadassah Haverim Ft. Lauderdale
Chapter General meeting 8 p.m.
Hadassah Blyma Chapter of
Margate Board meeting Beth
Hillel Chapter-a.m.
Temple Sholom Men's Club of
Pompano "American BalaikaCo."
-8 p.m.
Hadassah Holiday Springs Orly
Chapter in conjunction with Blyma
Margate Chapter & Masada
Margate Chapters 10 a.m. -3 p.m.
Hadassah Somerset Shoshana
Chapter Board meeting Rec.
Hall 10a.m. noon
B'nai B'rith Hope Chapter 1617 -
Board meeting
Hadassah Bat Yam Chapter -
Book Review Jarvis Hall,
Lauderdale-By-The Sea 12:30
p.m.
Jewish Federation Young
Leadership Meeting Israel
Hadassah Sunrise Shalom
Chapter Mrs. S. Millard, assistant
administrator ol Doctors Hospital,
guest speaker. Tamarac Jewish
Center Gary Lawrence will en-
tertain. Refreshments
FRIDAY, JAN. 11
ORT Inverrary Fashion
Show/Luncheon- 11:30 a.m.
SATURDAY,JAN. 12
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood Art
Show
ORT Coral Springs Chapter at
Palm-Aire
MONDAY, JAN. 14
Temple Sholom Games
Temple Emanu-EI Games 7:15
p.m.
Hadassah Tamar Ft. Lauderdale
Chapter Regular meeting
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood -
Board meeting
Jewish Community Center
Repertory Theatre Planning
Meeting
Hadassah Sunrise Shalom Chapter
Luncheon & Card Party at The
Towne House. Sunrise
Jewish Federation Women's
Division All Presidents Day at the
Jewish Community Center 10
am.- noon
Jewish Education Committee
Meeting at the Federation Building
- 8p.m.
TUESDAY, JAN 15
Hadassah Plantation L'Chayim
Chapter Regular meeting
B'nai B'rith Ft. Lauderdale
Chapter # 345 Regular meeting
Chapter #
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B'nai B'rith Sunrise
1527 Board meeting
Temple Sholom Sisterhood of
Pompano Torah Fund Luncheon
Temple Sholom Sisterhood of
Pompano General meeting 1
p.m.
State ol Israel Bonds Century
Village Dinner Temple Beth Israel
Jewish Federation Young
Leadership Learn-In "The
Source" at the Jewish Community
Center
ORT Ocean Mile Chapter -
General meeting Jarvis Hall, 4501
N. Ocean Blvd. -12:30 p.m.
Federation/UJA Ocean Function
Pioneer Women Hatlkvah Chapter
- regular meeting Whiting Hall,
6767 24th St., Sunrise noon
WEDNESDAY. JAN. 16
National Council ol Jewish Women
- N. Broward Section Meeting -
Elaine Bloom, past president of the
Greater Miami section of the
National Council of Jewish
Women, Wilton Manors-1 p.m.
Sunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood -
Installation of officers -11:30 a.m.
Hadassah Inverrary Qilah Chapter
- National Fund meeting Big Gifts
Luncheon
Women's Environ Club (Inverrary) -
Installation Luncheon
B'nai B'rith Margate Chapter -
Board meeting
National Council Jewish Women -
N. Broward Regular meeting
Hadassah Oriole Scopus -
General meeting at Catherine
Young Library Community Room,
Margate noon
Hadassah Kavanah ol Plantation -
Board meeting
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee
Woodlands/Inverrary/Ft.
Lauderdale/Pompano/Emerald
Hills & Hollywood University on
Wheels Bailey Hall Central
Campus ol Broward Community
College All Dav Seminar
Temple Beth Orr Games -
Riverside Dr. & Royal Palm Blvd. -
745p.m.
Hall,
THURSDAY, JAN. 17
Hadassah Bat Yam Chapter
Regular meeting at Jarvis
Lauderdale-By-The-Sea
ORT N. Broward Chapter -
General meeting
B'nai B'rith Tamarac Chapter #
1479 General meeting
Hadassah Blyma Chapter of
Margate Regular meeting at Beth
Hillel Chapter- p.m.
Hadassah Sabra Regular
meeting 8 p.m.
Jewish War Veterans Ladies
Auxiliary of Pompano Beach Post
196 Pompano Beach Rec. Center -
meeting
Jewish Federation Workshop on
Aging- Hollywood Federal -6 p.m.
FRIDAY, JAN. 18,19, 20
CJF Board Institute Konover
Hotel, Miami Beach
SATURDAY. JAN. 19
ORT Coral Springs Chapter Art
Auction at Palm-Aire p.m.
State of Israel Bonds Palm-Aire -
6:30 p.m.
Jewish Community Center Jewish
Youth Group Dance 9 p.m. -
midnight.
SUNDAY, JAN. 20
Temple Sholom of Pompano -
Men's Club Meeting
Jewish Community Center Israeli
Art Film. "Seige" 1 p.m. and 8
p.m.
Jewish Community Center Break-
fast/Lecture- 10a.m.
Jewish Federation Oriole Gardens
(Phase I): Aragon (Sunrise);
Paradise Gardens IV noon; Phase
III 5 p.m.; Margate 4 p.m.; Oakland
Hills
Pioneer Women Hatlkvah Chapter
- Dramatization with song & music
by Max Denner of the book, "The
Lady & The Law." Refreshments -
7:30 p.m.
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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of OreaterJFort Lauderdale
Friday, January 4,1980


Browsin' thru
roward
with mr. "maggie" levine
Camp Ramah Program
At Temple Beth Israel
It's 1980: Now, More Than'
Ever UJA needs You, You and
You ... A hearty mazel tov to
Dr. Bob Segaul's parents, Dr.
and Mrs. Herman Segaul of
Bermuda Club, celebrating their
50th wedding anniversary .
The Israeli Embassy in Tehran is
still occupied by the PLO and
forgotten and ignored by the
"Khomaniacs" are such facts as
the thousands of Iranians trained
in Israel's kibbutzim and
universities and Iranian patients
getting special treatment in
Israeli hospitals Meanwhile,
almost 60,000 Jews are still in
Iran.
Christian militiamen a few
days ago bombarded the
southern town of Nabatayeh to
prevent Iranian gunmen from
joining Palestinian guerrillas
there Hanukah "greetings"
for Israelis included the order
raising gasoline prices to $3.42
per gallon making the increase
63 per cent in 11 months .
Though the PLO reportedly
refused the offer of Iranian
militiamen to fight Israel, ABC
Network showed scenes of more
than 100 such militants entering
Southern Lebanon Six-year-
old Melissa Budney of Margate
charmed her classmates by
bringing a Hanukiah to class .
Betty Kimmel of Lauderdale
Lakes, participating in the
Kosher Nutrition program at the
Jewish Federation, was loudly
applauded by the other diners on
Dec. 24 when she read her "Plea
to God" in verse calling for the
release of the 50 hostages in
Tehran.
Jeffrey Klein, who left his law
practice in Cleveland to take over
the Plantation Jeep franchise, is
receiving congratulations on
having been admitted to the
Florida Bar. In addition to his
dual career in Plantation, he is co-
chairman of the Federation's
Church-State-Anti-Semitism sub-
committee of the Community Re-
lations Committee Alan L.
Linsky has been named manager
of the new American Savings
Century Village West Palm
Beach office Marc Leider
joined the staff of Summit Bank
at Tamarac as a loan officer.
A tree bearing the name of
Raoul Wallenberg was planted
last month on the "Avenue of
Righteous Gentiles" leading to
the Yad Vashem, Memorial to the
Six Million Martyrs. Wallenberg,
Swedish diplomat who helped
save 100,000 Budapest Jews from
the Nazis, has been missing since
1947. The Soviet Union, which
imprisoned him after *.he
Budapest liberation, claimed he
was a spy and that he died in
Moscow's Lubyanka prison ... .
If and when Prime Minister
Menachem Begin decides to
retire from politics, sources in
Israel say that Defense Minister
Ezer Weizman could be his
successor The Jewish Agency
in Israel, calling on contributors
to the United Jewish Appeal to
pay their pledges, reports the
need for housing for 38,000
newcomers to Israel.
The U.S. Justice Department
is seeking to revoke the
citizenship of Bohdan Koziy,
owner of the Flying Cloud Motel
in Fort Lauderdale. In a civil
suit, the charge is made that he
lied about his activities in Lysiec,
a Ukranian village that was
Polish during World War II,
occupied by the Nazis, then
liberated by the Russians who
hold it now. The charges against
Koziy allege he took part in
"cruel and inhumane acts against
unarmed civilians." Israel
today has the largest per capita
debt in the world. Its citizens are
already taxed at a rate of 66 per
cent of gross income. Israel's
debt service to the United States
payments for loans made
amounts to $750 million, about
the same amount of economic aid
presently provided by the U.S. to
Israel.
Temple Beth Israel, located at
7100 West Oakland Park Blvd.,
Sunrise, will host an "Evening of
Sharing" with Debra Hirshman
Green, the director of Camp
Ramah in New England, on
Monday, Jan. 7, at 8 p.m. in the
Temple.
At that time children who are
presently in grades 4 through 10
and their parents are invited to
hear about the new and con-
tinuing programs, progress and
plans for the coming summer at
Camp Ramah and to see a slide-
show presentation.
Camp Ramah in New England
is devoted to educating children
and teenagers of Jewish families
in a summer program of Jewish
values, ideals, Hebrew study and
observance in the recreational
setting of a summer camp.
Further information can In
obtained from Stanley Cohen.
Chairman of the Jan. 7 evening at
Beth Israel.
Planning A Trip?
Council's 1980 brochure des-
cribing sensational tours to Is-
rael, Europe, China Canadian
Rockies, West Coast and Alaska
now available.
National Council
of Jewish Women
Please Call
Felicia B.Sussman
733-0662 or
Lilly Lester
JM-a4fl2
Ramble wood Hadassah Is Forming
The Ramblewood East Chapter
of Hadassah is the latest
Hadassah unit to be added to the
Florida Mid-Coast Region, a
Blyma-Margate
Hadassah
Blyma-Margate Hadassah's
Jan. 17 meeting will feature two
guests.
Esther Cannon, President of
the Mid-Coast Region of
Hadassah, will be guest speaker.
She will make the presentation of
a charter to the new chapter.
David Krantz, guest narrator, I
will speak about "Jews from the
far corners of the world."
All are invited to the Jan. 17
meeting, 12:30 p.m. at
Congregation Beth Hillel, 7634
Margate Blvd.
Pioneer Women
Pioneer Women's Hatikvah
chapter will sponsor a
dramatization, with song and
music by Max Denner, of the
book, "The Lady and The Law,"
at 7:30 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 20, at
Whiting Hall, 6767 24th St.,
Sunrise.
Refreshments will be served.
Donation is $2.50. Dora Frucht is
handling the ticket sale.
Castie Gardens
UJA Volunteers
Max Kroniah, chairman of tht
Castle Gardens UJA Committee,
has reported that committee
volunteers will be visiting
residents of the complex as the
advance effort on behalf of the
1980 United Jewish
Appeal / Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign.
He said that the committee will
be making plans for a meeting of
residents as the rallying point for
solicitation of commitments to
aid Jews in need in Israel, Iran,
Iraq, elsewhere in the world, and
right here in North Broward
county.
region covering Broward""County
and South Palm Beach.
The organizational meeting
which 40 women attended was
held at the Ramblewood East
recreation room in Coral Springs
on Dec. 19.
Both Esther Cannon, region
president, and Priscilla Lippa,
region expansion chairman, were
on hand to assist in the
organization.
The first open meeting is
scheduled for Wednesday. Jan.
16, in the recreation room. All
Ramblewood East residents are
invited. A special program is
being planned and the charter for
the new chapter will be
presented.
A full slate of pro-tern officers
has already been chosen. Lee
Goldberg is president. Pauline
Krewson, Ruth Katz, Ann Soskin
and Lillian Spevack, vice-
presidents; Lillian Levine,
treasurer; Juliet Horowitz,
financial secretary; Ruth Kress,
recording secretary, and Ethel
Lefkowitz, corresponding
secretary.
PASSOVER
Rabbi Aaron Gelman and Universal Kosher Tours
present the Diplomat Hotel Hollywood, Florida
for this year's celebration.
The originators of innovative Passover travel programs
invite you to join them for a truly distinctive Passover
at one of the world's finest resorts _____
Complete Holiday Program
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5 day plan March 28-April 2 from $329 '
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under strict orthodox supervision of Rabbi Tibor Stern
Universal Kosher Tours, Inc.
254 West 31st Street New York, NY. 10001
212-757-6302
out of N Y call toU free 800-223-0560

Anti-Arson Funds For Broward
Congressman Edward J. Stack
(D-Fort Lauderdale) has an-
nounced tnat federal funds
amounting to $120,105 have been
approved to develop an anti-
arson program in the Broward
County Sheriff's Department.
funds for an anti-arson program
and only 35 were selected.
Broward County was indeed
fortunate."
The LEAA funds are to be
used to establish an anti-arson
task force. This should permit
Stack noted that, Last month county ,aw enforcement officials
I met personally with DEAA
counsel Tim West and LEAA
congressional liaison John
Lawton, to press for approval o
the funds and emphasize the nee<
for an anti-arson program ii
Broward County.
"Under this Law Enforcemen
Assistance Administratioi
program, 135 applicants fror
around the nation sought federal
to substantially improve arson
detection and investigation
procedures.
Broward County Sheriff
Robert Butterworth, who ex-
oressed his pleasure at the an-
nouncement, was credited by
Stack with submitting an ex-
cellent, well-drafted application
to the Law Enforcement As-
sistance Administration.
EZRA SHARON M.D.
Arihrithis & Rheumatism
Diplomat American Board Of Rheumatology
ANNOUNCES
THE OPENING OF HIS OFFICE AT...
4701 N. Federal Hwy.
Bldg.B,Suite3
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
By Appointment Phone: 491 -7434
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Phone 448-7886 Boris Pritcher. President
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Friday, January 4,1960
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Ige

>cal Man Is Author
cular and Jewish Education Is The Subject of New Book
Abrham J. Gittelson, director
0{ education of the Jewish
[Federation of Greater Fort
I Lauderdale, is author of a book
[called a "landmark project" to
integrate general and Judaic
studies on a scale not previously
tried in the field of day school
programming.
The Miami Central Agency for
Jewish Education and the
American Association for Jewish
Education announced publication
of the 144-page book, "Inter-
Holocaust Lessons
Continued from Page 4
I tradition. By redefining what was
right and wrong, he justified the
slaughter of millions.
I am convinced any nation
which denies the moral absolutes
God has given will inevitably pay
the price in social chaos and
(moral anarchy. The Bible
"glares, "Whatever a man
fweth, that shall he also reap."
1 believe our own nation is in
dire danger at this point, and
unless we reverse the sickening
[slide toward moral and spiritual
[bankruptcy in our personal and
I public lives we will be vulnerable
I to ideas which are as distorted
and perverse as anything Hitler
conceived.
WE ALSO have to ask if there
are new holocausts which
threaten our world today. Yes, I
believe there are. Whenever any
group suffers injustice and
oppression, the potential for a
new holocaust exists.
The tragedy of the boat people
the starvation of millions in
many parts of the world the
discrimination against racial or
religous groups the appalling
threat of a nuclear holocaust
these and many other problems
demand our attention.
Cleveland Jewish News
disciplinary Integration in the
Jewish School."
The book describes all phases
of the innovative venture con-
ducted from 1974 to 1977 in the
fifth and sixth grades of the
South Dade Hebrew Academy, in
Miami Beach, which is under
Orthodox auspices, and the Hillel
Community Day School, in North
Miami Beach, which is under
Jewish communal auspices.
THE EFFORT was developed
"out of the need to try to
overcome the artificial division
between the secular and Judaic
curricula in Jewish day schools,"
said Mrs. Fradle Freidenreich,
consultant on methods and
materials to the AAJE*s national
curriculum research institute,
and overall consultant on the
project.
Mrs. Freidenreich said such a
division "tends to com-
partmentalize study for the day
school student and frequently
results in a learning gap' bet-
ween the theme and concepts he
is asked to absorb in his general
and Judaic studies classes." She
said the gap widens "each time
an American history course
ignores the political, economic
and cultural life of U.S. Jewry; or
when study of the Bible is related
minimally, if at all, to con-
temporary thought and ex-
perience; or when Jewish history
is taught in virtual isolation from
continuous events in world
civilization."
Gittelson who is also associate
director of the Miami day school
and co-author with Mrs.
Freidenreich of the book, said the
project sought to close this gap
by using "an interdisciplinary
and mutually reinforcing
curricular approach designed to
synthesize general and Judaic-
subject matter."
HE SAID, as an example, that
one unit "interwove parallel
elements in the studv of the
development of both America as
a nation and Jewish nationhood
in Biblical times." Another unit,
on American history, "gave
special focus to Jewish im-
migration to the United States in
all its various dimensions."
He said that, through this
approach, "the project attempted
to place knowledge from both
general and Judaic sources in a
more clearly related perspective
for the Jewish child, helping him
to achieve a greater unity in the
formulation of his personality
and values."
The AAJE said the book,
intended to serve as a model for
integrated social studies
programs in Jewish day schools
generally, includes sections on
the training and orientation of
teachers, creation of special
'materials, their implementation
in the classroom, and a careful
and extensive evaluation of the
project.

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ESUCifs


Page M
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, January 4,1980
Life-Saving Courses
To Be Offered Here
American Heart Association
(Broward County Chapter)
certified instructors will be
teaching a series of life-saving
cardiopulmonary resuscitation
(CPR) courses at various
Broward County locations.
The technique can be learned
by most laymen in three hours. It
utilizes mouth-to-mouth
breathing and chest com-
pressions to revive an un-
conscious, breathless, and
pulseless victim.
The course is offered free of
charge. Reservations are required
for all classes. For registration
contact the following:
City of Ft. Lauderdale, Fire
Department, Jan. 11, 1-4 p.m.
and 7-10 p.m.; Deerfield Fire
Department, Deerfield Beach,
Jan. 3. 10, 17, 24, 31, 7-10 p.m.;
Florida Medical Center, 5000 W.
Oakland Park Blvd., Ft.
Lauderdale, Jan. 23, 7-10 p.m.
Also Margate General
Hospital. 5850 Margate Blvd.,
Margate, Jan. 8, 7-10 p.m.;
Northridge General Hospital,
5757 N. Dixie Highway, Ft.
Lauderdale, Jan. 23, 7-10 p.m.;
Plantation General Hospital,
40! NW 42nd Avenue. Plan-
tation, Jan. 9, 7-10 p.m.; Sunrise
Fire Department, Station No. 2,
8330 NW 27th Place, Sunrise,
Jan. 14,7-10p.m.
Bob and Sylvie Mandel (left) were hosts in their home for a
dinner-dance early in December when Woodlands North ORT
celebrated ORTs Centennial Second from right is Shirley
Blank, chairlady, and next to her is Ellie Fine, president of the
chapter.
Menorah Chapels Take Part
Marriage Is
PaneFs Subject
Plantation Jewish
Congregation, Temple Kol Ami,
will host an informal panel
discussion on marriage at the
Temple on Monday evening, Jan.
21 at 8 p.m.
The discussion is a joint
project of the Temple Sisterhood
and Brotherhood and will feature
a group of panelists to discuss
the issue, "Marriage: Survival or
Not in 1980?"
Speakers will include the Hon.
Steven Shutter, 17th Judicial
Circuit; J. Jay Simons, attorney;
and Dr. William Penzer,
psychologist and director of the
Center for Counseling Services.
Discussion will center around
the trends in marriage in the past
decade and in the 1980s. The
meeting is open to the public.
New Chapter
OfHadassah
A new chapter of Hadassah to
start July 1 is being formed, to
meet in Tamarac.
If interested, come to the firct
get-together at 10:30 a.m..
Monday, Jan. 7, at the Tamarac
Jewish Center, 9101 NW 57th St.
Hope School
The Lauderdale chapter of
Hope School for the Mentally
Retarded Children and Adults
will hold a Penny Sale on
Monday, Jan. 7, at noon at the
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall.
Everyone is invited to attend.
The donation is $1 and refresh-
ments will be free.
JWF Officer Advises Veterans
Willard Zweig of Tamarac,
director of media for the Florida
Jewish War Veterans and a
public relations consultant, was
the guest speaker recently on
WPBT-TV, Channel 2's
"Soapbox" program.
He discussed veterans affairs
and urged ex-GIs and veterans to
supply Veterans Administration
with pertinent information to
successfully resolve many of their
claims and streamline replies
from that agency.
Zweig is president of the
Tamarac chapter, National
Association of Retired Federal
Employees.
Pioneer WomenNegev Chapter
A review of the book, "Looking
Out For Number One," by
Robert Ringer will highlight the
Wednesday, Jan. 9, meeting of
the Negev chapter of Pioneer
Women.
Jeanette Berger, a member of
the group, will be the reviewer.
The 1 p.m. session will take
place in the social hall of Temple
Beth Israel, Century Village
East, Deerfield Beach.
Ruth Leshowitz, vice president
of programming, said refresh-
ments will be served at 12:30
p.m. prior to the meeting. Anne
Fischer is president of the
organization.
Pioneer Women, cooperating
with Na'amat, its sister
organization in Israel, provides
for more than half of the
vocational training, educational
and social services for women,
youth and children in the State of
Israel. The organization also aids
in the absorption of newcomers
and works toward raising the
status of women.
Still Time for 'Learn-In'
First of four sessions of the
'I^earn-In," based on James
Michener's The Source will be
held at 7:45 p.m., Tuesday, Jan.
15, at the Jewish Community
Center of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. The series, spon-
sored by the Young Leadership
division of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, will
be conducted by Gene Greenz-
weig, executive director of the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
Reservations are still being
accepted by Alan Margolies at
the Jewish Federation.
B'riai R'rith Su/uise Lodge
Sunrise Lodge 2953, B'ani
B'rith, will install officers Jan.
21, at Whiting Hall, NW 68th
Ave. and NW 24th St., Sunrise,
at 7:30 p.m.
Leonard Goldman, currently
vice president of the Men's Club,
Sunrise Lakes Condo
Association, will be installed as
president; Nat Goldman, former
president of Sunrise Lakes Condo
Association, will be installed as
administrative vice president.
The installing officer will be
Paul Backman, former President
of South Broward Council and a
member of the Florida State
Association.
In Planting Israeli Forest Taste ofYkm*
Menorah Chapels, located in
Sunrise, Deerfield Beach and
Margate, has become the first
South Florida funeral firm to
announce full participation in the
planting of a memorial forest in
Lahav, located near Beersheba in
Israel's Negev Desert.
The purpose of the evergreen
forest is twofold. From the
practical standpoint, it is part of
the Jewish National Fund's
(JNF) effort to reclaim desert
land. On a spiritual level, the
forest is a living memorial for the
Jewish people.
In participating in the
program, Menorah Chapels is
planting a tree in the forest for
each funeral service conducted at
one of its chapels.
PLANTING in the Jewish
National Funeral Directors of
America Memorial Forest at
Lahav began eight years ago.
Since then, more than 50
American Jewish funeral firms
and several firms in Canada have
helped create a lush forest with
more than $500,000 in plantings,
as part of JNF efforts for the
"greening of Israel," begun with
the organization's start in 1901.
Israeli land owned by the
Jewish National Fund is the
property of all Jewish people
worldwide. Jews from all nations
have traditionally planted trees
in Israel through the fund, to
commemorate births, weddings
and other happy occasions, as
well as to observe memorials.
To date the JNF has planted
more than 150 million trees and
reclaimed more than 160,000
acres of desert land. Since the
founding of the Israeli state in
1948, tree-planting programs
have helped boost the total
forested land sixfold.
The tradition of planting trees
to commemorate milestones in
one's life grew from Israel's
needs, but also from Biblical
tradition, according to Mark
Weissman, director for Menorah
Chapels.
"THERE ARE references
throughout the Old Testament
that link the life of man to the life
of the trees around him,"
Weissman said. "At the Jewish
Funeral Directors of America
Memorial Forest there is the Tree
of Life Memorial Wall, with
intertwined Chai's, the Hebrew
word for life.
"On the memorial it reads 'For
Man is like the tree of the field,' a
phrase from Deuteronomy 20:19.
Each tree in the forest honors the
memory of an individual Jewish
person. Just as the separate trees
join to form a single, lush forest,
the memory of the individual
Jewish person becomes part of
the legacy of all the Jewish
people."
Jewish tradition even has its
own Arbor Day, Tu B'Shevat,
which the sage Hillel regarded as
the date from which the age of a
tree should be reckoned for the
purpose of assessing fruit tithes.
The day marks the end of the
Israeli rainy season, when new
sap starts to rise in the trees. It is
celebrated by the planting of
trees by school children.
Surrounded by other forests,
the Jewish Funeral Directors of
America Memorial Forest is the
largest in the area, according to
Charles Stein^.. of San Francisco,
one of the executive directors of
the fund.
"THE TREE of Life has long
had cultural and religious
significance for the Jewish
people," Steiner said. "Seeing the
planting of trees as a fitting
memorial, the funeral directors
joined efforts to create a living
symbol of continuity."
Menorah Chapels supply the
family of each individual
memorialized with a special
Jewish National Fund certificate
bearing the drawing of the Tree
of Life Memorial in the forest.
The Tamarac Branch of the
Broward County Library System
offers lessons in Yiddish on a
weekly basis, Monday after-
noons, Jan. 7. 14, 21, and 28,
from 2 to 4 p.m.
Adults are invited to par-
ticipate in these classes, being
offered free of charge at the
library.
liEVITT -1 IE
EINSTEIN
memorial chapels
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Co-ed 8-week camping for
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Co-ed 4-week session for
ages 6-13. Special pro-
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iFriday, January
Tht Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdak
Page 16
-, '.
Jewish Education For Adults Soon
Temple Sholom, Pompano
J Beach, will begin its winter adult
liJducation program Wednesday,
[Jan. 9, titled "Encounters with
the Jewish People," and con-
| tinuing for eight weeks.
The program, with tuition fees
for the course and lectures, is
open to Temple members at $3
I per person and to non-members
at $5 per person.
During the first hour, 8 to 9
p.m., Rabbi Morris A. Skop will
have a course on Bible study;
Cantor Jacob Renzer will instruct
"Tropp," chanting of the Maftir;
and Harry Selis will provide an
understanding of the Siddur.
Lectures and book reviews will
be available for the second hour,
9 to 10 p.m., with Rabbi Sam
Silver on Jan. 9; Rabbi Morton
Brill, Jan. 16; Rabbi Jerome
Kestenbaum, Jan. 23; Harry
Selis, Jan. 30; Rabbi Solomon
Geld, Feb. 6; Esther Cannon,
Feb. 13; Mildred Weiss, Feb. 20;
Rabbi Skop, Feb. 27.
Co-chairing the program are
Herbert Kahan of the Religious
Committee and Mildred Weiss.
\mpk Emmu-El's Obican Art Show
The Obicans
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Temple Beth Israel. 7100 W.
: lakland Park Blvd.. Sunrise, will
present Lecture 3 in its adult
education series Tuesday
ierring, Jan. 8, at 8 p.m.
'. Brenda Shapiro will speak on
\ Jewish Women's Agenda in
the I980's." Ms. Shapiro Is
director of the American Jewish
Committee, Florida area.
Vlmission is free and open to the
community.
Religious
Directory
LAUDERDALELAKES
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE.
4351 west Oakland Park Boulevard
Modern Orthodox Congregation.
Murray Brickman, president.
TEMPLE EMANU EL. 3245 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome
. Klement.
^ SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu.
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER, INC. 8049
West Oakland Park Blvd. Con
servative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy.
Cantor Jack Merchant, and Hy Solof,
president.
LAUDERHILL
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF
LAUDERHILL. 2048 NW 48th Ave..
- Lauderhill. Conservative. Max
Kronish, president.
TAMARAC
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9101
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
^ Israel Zimmerman. Cantor Henry
Bel at co
HOLLYWOOD
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE 4171 Stirling
Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bomier
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE
GATION. 8200 Peters Rd. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr.
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNAGOGUE
7473 NW 4th St. Hank Pirt, president.
POMPANO BEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM. 132 SE llth Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Jacob Renzer.
MARGATE
BETH HILLELCONGREGATION. 7640
Margate Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Joseph Berglas.
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 6101
NW 9th St. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Solomon Geld. Cantor Max Gallub.
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive, Reform. Rabbi Leonard Zoll.
k DEERFIELDBEACH
"TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL at Century
Village East. Conservative Rabbi
David Berent. Cantor Joseph Pollack.
BOCA RATON
'EMPLE BETH EL 333 SW 4th
Avenue, Boefr R#MI 'RabPt *** 9.
Singer
Famed Yugoslavian artist
Lazar Obican wul present his new
collection at an art show at
Temple Emanu-El on Saturday
evening, Jan. 12, from 8 to 10
p.m. and Sunday, Jan. 13, from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Temple
Auditorium, 3245 West Oakland
Park Blvd.
Lazar Obican and his father,
Jovan Obican, have been ap-
plauded worldwide for their
colorful epic portrayals of
Eastern European folklore.
Their themes are basic and
primitive, combining humor,
charm and color, with passion
and magical fantasy.
Included in the show will be
temperas, serigraphs, enamels,
tapestries, and posters.
The Obicans' exhibits have
been seen in cities including New
York, Philadelphia, Frankfurt.
Belgrade, Washington, and
Chicago.
The show will also present the
most recent collection of pain-
tings, watercolors, prints,
serigraphs, sculpture and
ceramics from the area's most
distinguished artists, including
Lamont Anderson. Elinor
Jensen. William Lattimer, Lee
and Larry Lerfald, Kitty Logan.
Palm Aire
Women's ORT
The Women's ORT, Palm-A ire
chapter, will hold its monthly
meeting on Jan. 9 at Burdines,
Fashion Square, Pompano
Beach, at 10:15 a.m.
Following a brief business
meeting with continental break-
fast, there will be hair and make-
up demonstrations, and members
present will be picked as models.
Next, a fashion talk, with
examples: "How to Coordinate
Your Wardrobe."
Members and friends are in-
vited.
Beth Israel
Sisterhood
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Israel will sponsor the popular
Habimah Players in the first
showing of "Survival" in
, Broward County on Sunday
evening, Jan. 27, at 8 p.m.
Donation is $3. For further
information and tickets call Pearl
Greene or the temple office.
Tamar Hadassah
Tamar chapter of Hadassah
will hold its regular meeting at
12:30. Monday, Jan. 14, at
Laudordale Lakes City Hall.
Speaker will be Gerald Galya,
assistani director for hospital
serviced at Holy Cross Hospital
Refreshment a will be served.
Jeanette and Murray Siegel of the Margate Jewish Center were
celebrating their 40th wedding anniversary recently in Israel
when Murray was inspired to become a Bar Mitzvah, an event
he had missed as a boy. Attended by fellow visitors from the
American Jewish Congress, Murray, pictured above carrying
the Torah, became a Bar Mitzvah at a ceremony at the Western
Wall in Jerusalem.
Reconstruction^ Synagogue
Rabbi Lavy Becker of Mon-
treal, who has been as-
sociated with the Reconstruc-
tionist movement for over 50
years, a past president of
Federation in Canada, and a
member of the board of governors
of The Reconstructionist College
in Philadelphia, will officiate at
the Friday night service and
study period of The Reconstruct-
ionist Synagogue, 7473 NW 4th
St., Plantation, Friday, Jan. 11,
starting at 8:15 p.m.
On Saturday morning, Jan. 12,
the 10 a.m. service will see
Joseph Wasserman, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Norman Wasserman,
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah. Joseph is a Torah
School graduate and is con-
tinuing his studies at the Judaica
High School.
David Pactor. Craig Reheis.
Admission is free and the
proceeds from the sale will
benefit the Temple beautification
fund.
There will be a champagne
preview reception from 7 to 8
p.m. on Saturday evening for
pal ron>. The donation to attend
the preview reception is $5 per
person; the names of the patrons
will appear in the Art Program it
their check is received prior to
Jan. 5.
For further information, call
the Temple office.
Kol Ami Bar Mtzvahs
On Saturday. Jan. 5, at 10:30
a.m. Mitchell Liberman. son of
Mr. and Mrs. William Liberman
will celebrate his Bar Mitzvah. In
honor of this occasion, his
parents will sponsor the Oneg
Shabbat following Services on
Friday, Ian. 4.
Also on Jan. 5, David Mad-
nick, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Walsh, will be called to the Torah
as ,i Bar Mitzvah. Mr. and Mrs.
\\ alsh will co-sponsor the Oneg
Shabbat on Friday evening. Jan.
I
On Saturday. Jan. 12. at 10:30
a.m. Kenneth Brown, son of Mrs.
Michelle Brown, will celebrate his
Bai Mitzvah. In his honor. Mrs.
Brown will sponsor the Oneg
Shabbat following the Jan. 11
Shabbat Service.
Lawsuit May Set Patterns for Future
Continued from Page 4
which lawyers for each side may
seek evidence of the validity of
the relevant claims of the other
side. Rapps cited, as an example,
the legal right of the defendants
to requirte the plaintiffs to prove
they met the basic requirements
of a congregation regular
worship and contributions to the
upkeep of' the synagogue
building.
Rapps said that Stecher's
grant of voting status to rtegular
worshippers is in accord with a
statement by Rabbi Mosche
Feinstein, considered one of the
world's leading authorities on
Halacha. Rapps said the judge's
grant was also in accordance with
the position of the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations
of America, considered the
largest American Orthodox
synagogue group, as contained in
an affidavit signed by its
president, Julius Herman.
Rapps added that the
statements provide the Halachic
definition of a worshipper. One of
the issues to be decided at the
trial is whether the plaintiffs are
in fact regular worshippers at the
Pike Street Synagogue.
SIMILARLY Rapps said, the
plaintiffs have a legal right to
determine whether the sellers are
bona fide trustees of the
congregation and authorized to
make the sale, even if they have
been ruled by Stecher as having
failed to give notice of intention
to sell to the congregation and
arrange for congregants to ap-
prove or disapprove the sale.
Another factual issue on which
Stecher seeks information is
whether the three sellers have not
been worshippers at the syna-
gogue for many years, as charged
by the plaintiffs.
When these fact-finding
procedures are completed, at-
torneys for the two sides will
submit briefs to Stecher, who
decide whether to rule on the
basis of the documents or to
order a trial, Zucerkerman said,
adding it might take three or four
months for Stecher to act.
IN DISCUSSING the wider
aspects of the case, Zucerkerman
stressed that, had there been no
court challenge by the small
group of Jews worshipping at the
synagogue and contributing to
its maintenance, the transaction
would have taken place with no
question raised as to the legal
right of the sellers to make such a
sale.
Rapps said the situation
pointed to the lack of some
mechanism in the Religious
Corporation Law to enforce a
requirement of proof of authority
to make such transactions, such
as a requirement of proof of
authority to make such transac-
tions, such as a requirement that
would-be sellers provide notice to
the officer of the Attorney
General and or interested
Jewish community agencies for
public inspection by concerned
persons.
Zuckerman said the scenario of
abandonment of synagogues by
Jews fleeing from deteriorating
neighborhoods, and the un-
supervised sale of synagogue real
property had been a fact of
Jewish life in the United States
for at least a decade and that
there could well be a very sub-
stantial number of such tran-
sactions of doubtful validity. He
said COLPA had been informed
of such synagogue building
transactions in at least two
adjoining states since dispute
over the sale of the Pike Street
Synagogue become public
knowledge.
Now.
More Than Ever.
We Are One.


, i Pagall
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, January 4,1980
_ f
MM
11
9



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:S$SS:SiS:
sxk::::-k::
:-:-:-x->:-:v:-:%->:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-::v."':-T:\


NOW
A flood tide of emigration from areas of Jewish
distress, into Israel and our communities.
MORE
The human upheaval of working
toward peace in Israel
THAN
The service for the frail and elderly in North Broward
through Kosher Nutrition Program, WECARE,
and others.
EVER
Counseling for young and old by the Jewish Family
Service, education, recreation, other services by the
Jewish Community Center of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL needs you.
UJA needs your strength... your commitment for 1980.
NOW, MORE THAN EVER WE ARE ONE
We must stand together. ACT TOGETHER.
1980 UJA
Milton Reiner
General Chairman
Campaign
Victor <>rumaii
Vice Chairman
''*

.


'.'.'.
:::
11:
m
%8&
m
m
Commemorating Israel's 32 Years of Independence
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
2999 K.W. 33rd Ave., Port Lauderdale 33311 Call 484-8200
Leo Goodman Leslie S. Gottlieb
President Executive Director
WMg^mm


Full Text
Page"
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
'i r'1 'M-'H', :, ;
Friday, January 4,1980
Life-Saving Courses
To Be Offered Here
Mamageb JWFOfficer Advms Veterans
American Heart Association
(Broward County Chapter)
certified instructors will be
teaching a series of life-saving
cardio pulmonary resuscitation
(CPR) courses at various
Broward County locations.
The technique can be learned
by most laymen in three hours. It
utilizes mouth-to-mouth
breathing and chest com-
pressions to revive an un-
conscious, breathless, and
pulseless victim.
The course is offered free of
charge. Reservations are required
for all classes. For registration
contact the following:
City of Ft. Lauderdaie, Fire
Department, Jan. 11, 1-4 p.m.
and 7-10 p.m.; Deerfield Fire
Department, Deerfield Beach,
Jan. 3. 10. 17, 24, 31, 7-10 p.m.;
Florida Medical Center, 5000 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.. Ft.
Lauderdaie. Jan. 23. 7-10 p.m.
Also Margate General
Hospital. 5850 Margate Blvd..
Margate, Jan. 8, 7-10 p.m.;
Northridge General Hospital,
5757 N. Dixie Highway, Ft.
Lauderdaie, Jan. 23, 7-10 p.m.;
Plantation General Hospital,
401 NW 42nd Avenue, Flan
tation, Jan. 9, 7-10 p.m.; Sunrise
Fire Department. Station No. 2,
8330 NW 27th Place. Sunrise.
Jan. 14, 7-10 p.m.
PaneFs Subject
Plantation Jewish
Congregation, Temple Kol Ami,
will host an informal panel
discussion on marriage at the
Temple on Monday evening, Jan.
21 at 8 p.m.
The discussion is a joint
project of the Temple Sisterhood
and Brotherhood and will feature
a group of panelists to discuss
the issue, "Marriage: Survival or
Not in 1980?"
Speakers will include the Hon.
Steven Shutter, 17th Judicial
Circuit; J. Jay Simons, attorney;
and Dr. William Penzer,
psychologist and director of the
Center for Counseling Services.
Discussion will center around
the trends in marriage in the past
decade and in the 1980s. The
meeting is open to the public.
Willard Zweig of Tamarac,
director of media for the Florida
Jewish War Veterans and a
public relations consultant, was
the guest speaker recently on
WPBT-TV, Channel 2's
"Soapbox" program.
He discussed veterans affairs
and urged ex-GIs and veterans to
supply Veterans Administration
with pertinent information to
successfully resolve many of their
claims and streamline replies
from that agency.
Zweig is president of the
Tamarac chapter, National
Association of Retired Federal
Employees.
Pioneer WomenNegev Chapter
A review of the book, "Looking
Out For Number One," by
Robert Ringer will highlight the
Wednesday, Jan. 9, meeting of
the Negev chapter of Pioneer
Women.
Jeanette Berger, a member of
the group, will be the reviewer.
The 1 p.m. session will take
place in the social hall of Temple
Beth Israel, Century Village
East, Deerfield Beach.
Ruth Leshowitz, vice president
of programming, said refresh-
ments will be served at 12:30 x
p.m. prior to the meeting. Anne
Fischer is president of the
organization.
Pioneer Women, cooperating
with Na'amat, its sister
organization in Israel, provides
for more than half of the
vocational training, educational
and social services for women, ^
youth and children in the State of .
Israel. The organization also aids
in the absorption of newcomers
and works toward raising the
status of women.
New Chapter Still Time for 'Learn-In'
Bob and Sylvie Mandel (left) were hosts in their home for a
dinner-dance early in December when Woodlands North ORT
celebrated ORTs Centennial Second from right is Shirley
Blank, chairlady, and next to her is Ellie Fine, president of the
chapter.
Menorah Chapels Take Part
OfHadassah
A new chapter of Hadassah to
start July 1 is being formed, to
meet in Tamarac.
If interested, come to the firtt
get-together at 10:30 a.m.,
Monday, Jan. 7, at the Tamarac
Jewish Center, 9101 NW 57th St.
Hope School
The Lauderdaie chapter of
Hope School for the Mentally
Retarded Children and Adults
will hold a Penny Sale on
Monday, Jan. 7, at noon at the
Lauderdaie Lakes City Hall.
Everyone is invited to attend.
The donation is $1 and refresh-
ments will be free.
First of four sessions of the
"Learn-In," based on James
Michener's The Source will be
held at 7:45 p.m., Tuesday, Jan.
15, at the Jewish Community
Center of Greater Fort
Lauderdaie. The series, spon-
sored by the Young Leadership
division of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdaie, will
be conducted by Gene Greenz-
weig, executive director of the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
Reservations are still being
accepted by Alan Margolies at
the Jewish Federation.
B'nai B'rith Sunrise Lodge
Sunrise Lodge 2953, Bani
B'rith, will install officers Jan.
21, at Whiting Hall, NW 68th
Ave. and NW 24th St., Sunrise,
at 7:30 p.m.
Leonard Goldman, currently
vice president of the Men's Club,
Sunrise Lakes Condo
Association, will be installed as
president; Nat Goldman, former
president of Sunrise Lakes Condo
Association, will be installed as
administrative vice president.
The installing officer will be
Paul Backman, former President
of South Broward Council and a
member of the Florida State
Association.
In Planting Israeli Forest itete of Yum*
Menorah Chapels, located in
Sunrise, Deerfield Beach and
Margate, has become the first
South Florida funeral firm to
announce full participation in the
planting of a memorial forest in
Lahav, located near Beers heba in
Israel's Negev Desert.
The purpose of the evergreen
forest is twofold. From the
practical standpoint, it is part of
the Jewish National Fund's
(JNF) effort to reclaim desert
land. On a spiritual level, the
forest is a living memorial for the
Jewish people.
In participating in the
program, Menorah Chapels is
planting a tree in the forest for
each funeral service conducted at
one of its chapels.
PLANTING in the Jewish
National Funeral Directors of
America Memorial Forest at
Lahav began eight years ago.
Since then, more than 50
American Jewish funeral firms
and several firms in Canada have
helped create a lush forest with
more than $500,000 in plantings,
as part of JNF efforts for the
"greening of Israel," begun with
the organization's start in 1901.
Israeli land owned by the
Jewish National Fund is the
property of all Jewish people
worldwide. Jews from all nations
have traditionally planted trees
in Israel through the fund, to
commemorate births, weddings
and other happy occasions, as
well as to observe memorials.
To date the JNF has planted
more than 150 million trees and
reclaimed more than 160,000
acre* of desert land. Since the
founding of the Israeli state in
1948, tree-planting programs
have helped boost the total
forested land sixfold.
The tradition of planting trees
to commemorate milestones in
one's life grew from Israel's
needs, but also from Biblical
tradition, according to Mark
Weissman, director for Menorah
Chapels.
THERE ARE references
throughout the Old Testament
that link the life of man to the life
of the trees around him,"
Weissman said. "At the Jewish
Funeral Directors of America
Memorial Forest there is the Tree
of Life Memorial Wall, with
intertwined Chai's, the Hebrew
word for fife.
"On the memorial it reads 'For
Man is like the tree of the field,' a
phrase from Deuteronomy 20:19.
Each tree in the forest honors the
memory of an individual Jewish
person. Just as the separate trees
join to form a single, lush forest,
the memory of the individual
Jewish person becomes part of
the legacy of all the Jewish
people."
Jewish tradition even has its
own Arbor Day, Tu B'Shevat,
which the sage Hillel regarded as
the date from which the age of a
tree should be reckoned for the
purpose of assessing fruit tithes.
The day marks the end of the
Israeli rainy season, when new
sap starts to rise in the trees. It is
celebrated by the planting of
trees by school children.
Surrounded by other forests,
the Jewish Funeral Directors of
America Memorial Forest is the
largest in the area, according to
Charles Steinw of San Francisco,
one of the executive directors of
the fund
THE TREE of Life has long
had cultural and religious
significance for the Jewish
people," Sterner said. "Seeing the
planting of trees as a fitting
memorial, the funeral directors
joined efforts to create a living
symbol of continuity."
Menorah Chapels supply the
family of each individual
memorialized with a special
Jewish National Fund certificate
bearing the drawing of the Tree
of Life Memorial in the forest.
The Tamarac Branch of the
Broward County Library System
offers lessons in Yiddish on a
weekly basis, Monday after-
noons, Jan. 7, 14, 21, and 28,
from 2 to 4 p.m.
Adults are invited to par-
ticipate in these classes, being
offered free of charge at the
library.
H
EVITT -1 IE
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friday. January 4,1980
The Jewish Floridian of QreaterFart Lauderdale
Page 16
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I Jewish Education For Adults Soon
Temple Sholom, Pompano
teach, will begin its winter adult
.Jucation program Wednesday,
Jan. 9, titled "Encounters with
the Jewish People," and con-
tinuing for eight weeks.
The program, with tuition fees
^or the course and lectures, is
open to Temple members at $3
per person and to non-members
t $5 per person.
During the first hour, 8 to 9
p.m.. Rabbi Morris A. Skop will
have a course on Bible study;
Cantor Jacob Renzer will instruct
"Tropp," chanting of the Maftir;
and Harry Selis will provide an
understanding of the Siddur.
Lectures and book reviews will
be available for the second hour,
9 to 10 p.m., with Rabbi Sam
Silver on Jan. 9; Rabbi Morton
Brill, Jan. 16; Rabbi Jerome
Kestenbaum, Jan. 23; Harry
Selis, Jan. 30; Rabbi Solomon
Geld, Feb. 6; Esther Cannon,
Feb. 13; Mildred Weiss, Feb. 20;
Rabbi Skop, Feb. 27.
Co-chairing the program are
Herbert Kahan of the Religious
Committee and Mildred Weiss.
made Emanu-El's Obican Art Show

The Obicans
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Temple Beth Israel. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.. Sunrise, will
(resent Lecture 3 in its adult
lucation series Tuesday
ening.Jan. *. at 8 p.m.
'Mrenda Shapiro will speak on
\ Jewish Women's Agenda in
180 MS. Shapiro is
lirector of the American Jewish
ommittee, Florida area.
ivdmission is tree and open to I he
I'ommunity.
Religious
Directory
LAUDERDALE LAKES
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE.
4351 west Oakland Park Boulevard
Modern Orthodox Congregation.
Murray Brickman, president.
TEMPLE EMANU EL. 3245 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome
Klement.
SUNRISE
|BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu.
ISUNRISE JEWISH CENTER, INC.8049
West Oakland Park Blvd. Con
servative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy.
Cantor Jack Merchant, and Hy Solof.
president.
LAUDERHILL
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF
LAUDERHILL. 2048 NW 48th Ave.,
Lauderhill. Conservative. Max
Kronish, president.
TAMARAC
ITAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9101
NW S7th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman. Cantor Henry
Belasco.
HOLLYWOOD
rOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 4171 Stirling
Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bomzer.
'LANTATION JEWISH CONGRE
GATION. 8200 Peters Rd. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J.Harr.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE
7473 NW 4th St Hank Pitt, president.
POMPANO BEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Jacob Renzer.
MARGATE
|BETH HILLELCONGREGATION. 7640
Margate Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Joseph Berglas.
|MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 6101
NW 9th St Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Solomon Geld. Cantor Max Gallub.
CORAL SPRINGS
| TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform. Rabbi Leonard Zoll.
DEERFIELD BEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL at Century
Village East. Conservative Rabbi
David Berent. Cantor Joseph Pollack.
BOCA RATON
fCMPLE BETH EL 333 SW 4th
Avenue, Boc* Raw*--R;*W-Mart* *
Singer.
Famed Yugoslavian artist
Lazar Obican will present his new
collection at an art show at
Temple Emanu-El on Saturday
evening, Jan. 12, from 8 to 10
p.m. and Sunday, Jan. 13, from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Temple
Auditorium, 3245 West Oakland
Park Blvd.
Lazar Obican and his father,
Jovan Obican, have been ap-
plauded worldwide for their
colorful epic portrayals of
Eastern European folklore.
Their themes are basic and
primitive, combining humor,
charm and color, with passion
and magical fantasy.
Included in the show will be
temperas, serigraphs, enamels,
tapestries, and posters.
The Obicans' exhibits have
been seen in cities including New
York, Philadelphia, Frankfurt,
Belgrade, Washington, and
Chicago.
The show will also present the
most recent collection of pain-
tings, watercolors, prints.
aerigraphs, sculpture and
Ceramics from the area's most
distinguished artists, including
l.amont Anderson. Elinor
Jensen, William Lattimer, Lee
and Larry Lerfald, Kitty Logan.
Palm Aire
Women's ORT
The Women's ORT. Palm-A ire
chapter, will hold its monthly
meeting on Jan. 9 at Burdines,
Fashion Square, Pompano
Beach, at 10:15 a.m.
Following a brief business
meeting with continental break-
fast, there will be hair and make-
up demonstrations, and members
present will be picked as models.
Next, a fashion talk, with
examples: "How to Coordinate
Your Wardrobe."
Members and friends are in-
vited.
Beth Israel
Sisterhood
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Israel will sponsor the popular
Habimah Players in the first
showing of Survival" in
Broward County on Sunday
evening, Jan. 27, at 8 p.m.
Donation is $3. For further
information and tickets call Pearl
Greene or the temple office.
Tamar Hadassah
Tamar chapter of Hadassah
will hold its regular meeting at
12:30. Monday, Jan. 14, at
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall.
Speaker will be Gerald Galya.
assistant director for hospital
services a! Uo\y Cross Hospital
Refreshments will be served.
Jeanette and Murray Siegel of the Margate Jewish Center were
celebrating their 40th wedding anniversary recently in Israel
when Murray was inspired to become a Bar Mitzvah, an event
he had missed as a boy. Attended by fellow visitors from the
American Jewish Congress, Murray, pictured above carrying
the Torah, became a Bar Mitzvah at a ceremony at the Western
Wall in Jerusalem.
Reconstmctionbt Synagogue
Rabbi Lavy Becker of Mon-
treal, who has been as-
sociated with the Reconstruc-
tionist movement for over 50
years, a past president of
Federation in Canada, and a
member of the board of governors
of The Reconstructionist College
in Philadelphia, will officiate at
the Friday night service and
study period of The Reconstruct-
ionist Synagogue, 7473 NW 4th
St., Plantation, Friday, Jan. 11,
starting at 8:15 p.m.
On Saturday morning, Jan. 12,
the 10 a.m. service will see
Joseph Wasserman, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Norman Wasserman,
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah. Joseph is a Torah
School graduate and is con-
tinuing his studies at the Judaica
High School.
David Pactor. Craig Reheis.
Admission is free and the
proceeds from the sale will
benefit the Temple beautification
fund.
There will be a champagne
preview reception from 7 to 8
p.m. on Saturday evening for
patrons. The donation to at lend
the preview reception is $6 per
person; the names of the patrons
will appear in the Art Program it
then check is received prior to
Jan. 5.
For further information, call
the Temple office.
Kol Ami Bar MUzvahs
On Saturday, Jan. 6, at 10:30
a.m. Mitchell Liberman, son of
Mr. and Mrs. William Liberman
will celebrate his Mar Mitzvah. In
honor of this occasion, his
parents will sponsor the Oneg
Shabbat following Services on
Friday, Jan. 4.
Also on Jan. 5, David Mad-
nick, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Walsh, will be called to the Torah
as a Bar Mitzvah. Mr. and Mrs.
\\ alsh will co-sponsor the Oneg
Shabbat on Friday evening. Jan.
I
On Saturday. Jan. 12. at 10:30
a m. Kenneth Brown, son of Mrs.
\1 ichelle Brown, will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah. In his honor. Mrs
Brown will sponsor the Oneg
Shabbat following the Jan. 11
Shabbat service.
Lawsuit May Set Patterns for Future
Continued from Page 4
which lawyers for each side may
seek evidence of the validity of
the relevant claims of the other
side. Rapps cited, as an example,
the legal right of the defendants
to requirte the plaintiffs to prove
they met the basic requirements
of a congregation-regular
worship and contributions to the
upkeep of' the synagogue
building.
Rapps said that Stecher's
grant of voting status to rtegular
worshippers is in accord with a
statement by Rabbi Mosche
Keinstein, considered one of the
world's leading authorities on
Halacha. Rapps said the judge's
grant was also in accordance with
the position of the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations
of America, considered the
largest American Orthodox
synagogue group, as contained in
an affidavit signed by its
president, Julius Berman.
Rapps added that the
statements provide the Halachic
definition of a worshipper. One of
the issues to be decided at the
trial is whether the plaintiffs are
in fact regular worshippers at the
Pike Street Synagogue.
SIMILARLY Rapps said, the
plaintiffs have a legal right to
determine whether the sellers are
bona fide trustees of the
congregation and authorized to
make the sale, even if they have
been ruled by Stecher as having
failed to give notice of intention
to sell to the congregation and
"arrange for congregants to ap-
prove or disapprove the sale.
Another factual issue on which
Stecher seeks information is
whether the three sellers have not
been worshippers at the syna-
gogue for many years, as charged
by the plaintiffs.
When these fact-finding
procedures are completed, at-
torneys for the two sides will
submit briefs to Stecher, who
decide whether to rule on the
basis of the documents or to
order a trial, Zucerkerman said,
adding it might take three or four
months for Stecher to act.
IN DISCUSSING the wider
aspects of the case, Zucerkerman
stressed that, had there been no
court challenge by the small
group of Jews worshipping at the
synagogue and contributing to
its maintenance, the transaction
would have taken place with no
question raised as to the legal
right of the sellers to make such a
sale.
Rapps said the situation
pointed to the lack of some
mechanism in the Religious
Corporation Law to enforce a
requirement of proof of authority
to make such transactions, such
as a requirement of proof of
authority to make such transac-
tions, such as a requirement that
would-be sellers provide notice to
the officer of the Attorney
General and or interested
Jewish community agencies for
public inspection by concerned
persons.
Zuckerman said the scenario of
abandonment of synagogues by
Jews fleeing from deteriorating
neighborhoods, and the un-
supervised sale of synagogue real
property had been a fact of
Jewish life in the United States
for at least a decade and that
there could well be a very sub-
stantial number of such tran-
sactions of doubtful validity. He
said COLPA had been informed
of such synagogue building
transactions in at least two
adjoining states since dispute
over the sale of the Pike Street
Synagogue become public
knowledge.
Now.
More Than Ever.
We Are One.


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