The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00145

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
wJewish Floridiari
Volume 8 Number 20
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, September 28,1979
frtd Shochit
Price 35 Cents
Prime Minister's Mission
Israeli Preview of 1980 Needs Impress Gruman
Seeing first-hand the way UJA
contributions from the North
Broward Jewish communities are
being used to provide social
services in Israel, Victor Gruman
returned from the four-day Prime
Minister's Mission more
determined than ever to make the
Jewish Federation's 1980 Cam-
paign greater than ever.
"Now, more than ever," he
said, "increased giving is im-
perative because the cost of peace
is greater than the price of war."
t And since his return, Gruman,
vice chairman for the Campaign
for United Jewish Appeal, Israel
Emergency Fund and 55 other
local and national social agencies,
is putting action to speech by
calling tor commitments in
advance of the first big campaign
event to be held in November.
A vice president of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, serving in the cam-
paign with Milton Keiner who is
general chairman, Gruman said
he accepted Prime Minister
Menachem Begin's invitation to
attend the Mission because "I
can't ask someone to do some-
thing if I won't do it and if I
don't make my own commit-
ment."
AND THIS he did during the
early morning to lateat-night
hectic pace of the four days in
Israel culminating with the
dinner meeting in the Great Hail
of Knesset in Jerusalem where
the Prime Minister heard each of
.the 250 leaders from communities
-throughout the U.S. and Canada
pledge increased giving to UJA
for 1980.
The Mission participants, by
plane, by bus, and on foot,
covered a variety of aspects of
living in Israel from slum neigh-
borhoods in various cities under-
going renewal to the Sinai
Peninsula to see what Israel is
giving up to Egypt, to in-depth
briefings at meetings with Israel
'resident Yitzhak Navon,
Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan,
Defense Minister Ezer Weizman,
Jewish Agency executives and,
finally, the Prime Minister him-
self who assured Gruman and the
others that Israel is living up to
every paragraph of the Camp
David agreement.
Defense Minister Weizman
was most impressive in his
NOW it can be told. That number 32 is making news. Milton
Keiner, general chairman of the 1980 United Jewish Appeal
Campaign of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
and Vice Chairman Victor Gruman, are dedicating the 1980 j
campaign to Israel's 32 years of life.
And the initial phase of the 1980 Campaign begins Tuesday,
Nov. 13, and 32 days later when Jews light the first candle of I
Chanukah Friday night, Dec. 14, the other phases of the
campaign will coninue the momentum.
And the first 32 days of giving are being devoted to the 32 years |
of Israel living.
It is symbolic that the initial phase to solicit major commitment I
runs through the Feast of Lights which marks the first recorded
battle for religious liberty. NOW 32 days of giving in North
Broward County will mark the 32 years of living in Israel where
four major wars have been fought in those years and now
comes peace a costly peace requiring greater commitments on
the part of American Jews. NOW MORE THAN EVER: 1948- ]
1980 5708 -5740, a new era dawns.

Victor Gruman of Fort Lauderdale, and Howard Klein of Miami
exit from a Hercules C 130 Army plane in Jerusalem after
visiting an Israeli airbase.
presentation concerning the
security problems facing Israel.
Gruman said he was extremely
impressed with the forthright-
ness of the former air force
general who spoke to the group at
an air base in the Upper Galilee.
An important aspect of the
Mission's study was the report
by top officials of the Jewish
Agency which is responsible for
the disbursements of funds sent
to Israel from UJA. In addition
to hearing from Arye Dulzin,
with a detailed report on im-
migration, housing, education,
and social services supported by
the Jewish Agency. Gruman goi
a firsthand view from the 30-
year-old mayor of Gavna where
the slum neighborhood is being
renewed with the cooperation of
the people living tnere whose
standards of living will be
enhanced.
AT ANOTHER time, the Fort
Lauderdale delegate toured a
rural settlement in the Jordan
Rift, directly on the border with
Jordan. Prof. Ra'anan Weitz,
head of the Jewish Agency's
Rural Settlement Department,
informed him that rural settle-
ments are important not only for
the additional income they
generate for the country through
agricultural products produced
on the settlements but for
security reasons, since those
areas remain demilitarized.
Wearied from the hurly-burly
intensive Mission, but inspired
and exhilarated by the spirit he
saw among the Israelis, Gruman
returned more deeply committed
than ever to the Jewish Fed-
eration's Campaign and all the
activities it supports.
Rotman, Steingard and Weinberg
Head Coral Springs Campaign
A
New Years Greetings
From the Women's Division
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
As we approach the Day of Atonement, we extend to
every Jewish family in North Broward the fervent
wish that each shall be inscribed for the good life and
that each shall have a very happy and healthy New
Year. May your strength and energy continue
through the Jewish Year 5740 as we strive to fulfill
the ideals of Judaism through our support of Jews in
Israel, in the Greater Fort Lauderdale area and
elsewhere in the world. We pray that together our
efforts for this worthwhile, wonderful cause shall be
undiminished. r,, n
... Gladys Daren
Mitchie Libros _..
President Campaign Chairman
"With three outstanding
young leaders as chairmen for our
1980 Jewish Federation / United
Jewish Appeal Campaign in
Coral Springs, I believe we can
look forward to a great year in
which we will accomplish many of
our goals." So said Victor
Gruman, vice chairman of the
General Campaign for the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. in announcing that
Johl Rotman, Mark Steingard
and Michael Weinberg will share
the responsibilities of chairing
the campaign this year in Coral
Springs.
The backgrounds of these three
support Gruman's statement.
Job! Rotman is a graduate of
Oglethorpe University in
Georgia. He is a member of the
executive board of Fort Lauder-
dale's Jewish Community Center
and a member of the Federation's
board of directors. Last year Johl
served as co-chairman for the
Federation's first Leadership
Mission to Israel and was
chairman of the campaign drive
in Coral Springs.
Mark Steingard earned his
master's degree in psychology
from New York University.
Before moving to Fort Lauder-
dale, Mark was very active with
Rotman
Steingard
B'nai B'rith organizations and
synagogue activities in upstate
New York and Greenville, S.C.
He is presently president of the
Coral Springs Business and Pro-
fessional Association and par-
ticipating in the Jewish Fed-
eration's Young Leadership
Program.
Michael Weinberg attended
the University of Georgia and
received his degree, majoring in
insurance. He is a past director of
the Atlanta Jewish Community
Center, and a former trustee of
the Hebrew Academy of Atlanta.
Michael is currently vice
president of the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Greater Fort
Lauderdale and a member of the
Weinberg
Jewish Federation's board of
directors.
Weinberg spoke on behalf of
his fellow co-chairmen saying,
"All of us here in North Broward
realize the Jewish Federation is
providing our community with
invaluable services. Those of us
in Coral Springs can benefit from
the Jewish Community Center,
Hebrew Day School, Jewish
Education Programs, WECARE
Programs, Young Leadership,
just to name a few of the
programs which our Federation is
funding. We hope to reach many
new people this year through our
campaign efforts in Coral Springs
and to do the best we can tor our
fellow Jews in Israel and here at
home."
f<


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 28,1979
Seventh Russian Family Arrives a,
I
ITS HEAVEN FOR SEVEN: The welcoming party at the arrival of the seventh Russian
Jewish family of immigrants to be re-settled in the Greater Fort Lauderdale area this year
included Jewish Federation representatives, Leon Messing, Israel Resnihoff and his wife, at the
extreme left, and Louis Balitzer and Sy Vinokor. In between are the newly-wed Alvina Lud-
manov, her mother Raia Maslov and her "bubba" Jennie Spivak, flanking the Abram Spivak
family: son Solomon, Mr. and Mrs. Spivak and their daughter, Elona.
"MOMMA!" With that
shout, Abram Spivak had a
joyful meeting with his
mother, Jennie Spivak the
first such meeting since they
left Russia some months ago.
Number seven was heaven for
the Abram Spivak family who
had been delayed by illness in
Rome, Italy, from reaching the
land of freedom. Abram, a 42-
year-old Russian Jewish factory
worker; his wife, Luba, their 16-
year-old son Solomon and their
14-year-old daughter Elona, were
reunited with family already
living in Lauderhill.
The Spivaks are the seventh
family to arrive in the area
through the combined efforts of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale and the Jewish
Family Service in conjunction
with the national HI AS (Hebrew
Immigrant Aid Society)
program.
The Federation's Russian Re-
settlement Chairman Leon
Messing and his co-chairman,
Israel Resnikoff, and additional
volunteers Louis Balitzer and Sy
Vinokor, brought Abram
Spivak s mother, Jennie, his
sister, Raia Maslov, and his
niece, Alvina, who was married
Sept. 2 to Loyva Ludmanov, to
the airport to greet the new
Broward County emigres. And
then came the loading of all the
earthly possessions of the Abram
Spivaks, two suitcases and two
tightly-roped cartons, into cars
for the ride to the Lauderhill
apartment secured for them by
the Federation'8 committee.
Young Leaders to Trace Jewish Roots
Sydna and Ross Wexler will
host the next meeting of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale's Young
Leadership Program on Wednes-
day evening, Oct. 17. This will be
the group's second session, and
the topic to be covered is
"Tracing Our Jewish Roots."
Jayne Rotman serves on the
Young Leadership steering com-
mittee working on each month's
program. She announced that
Arthur Kurzweil, "one of the
world's leading Jewish genealo-
gists," will be the guest speaker.
Kurzweil is a graduate of
Hofstra University in New York
and has a master's degree from
Florida University. Genealogy
has always been a hobby which
grew out of his fascination with
family history. Even before Alex
Haley made "Roots" so popular,
Kurzweil was researching his
Pioneer Women
Leaders of more than 30
Pioneer Women chapters and
clubs in Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach counties will meet
Monday, Oct. 8, in the Diplomat
Hotel, Hollywood, for a South-
east Region conference or
"Images of Israel."
The all-day event, which will
include luncheon, is designed to
educate, train and inform of-
ficers, directors and- committee
chairmen of Pioneer Women, the
world's largest Jewish women's
organization.
The conference is open to all
Pioneer Women members. Reser-
vations may be made at in-
dividual Pioneer Women units or
at the office of the Pioneer
Women Council of South Florida,
Miami Beach.
Chairman of the day will be
Mildred Weiss of Deerfield
Beach, Southeast Region co-
ordinator and a member of the
national board of Pioneer
Women. Conference program
chairman and coordinator is
Harriet Green, president of the
Pioneer Women Council and
natinnal vice president of the
American Zionist Federation.
Reservation chairman for Dade
County is Margot Bergthal, and
Grace Herskowitz is Broward
reservation chairman. Lillian
Davis, social secretary of the
South Florida Council, is in-
vitations chairman.
Morning workshops will be led
by Bebee Pullman of Fort
Lauderdale, national chairman of
Friends of Pioneer Women;
Ulian Hoffman, chairman of the
speakers bureau for the regional;
and Gert Aaron of Hallandale,
area membership cochairman.
Luncheon program wui ieauue
a panel discussion of current
developments in the State of
Israel and the Middle East by
representatives of Israeli
organizations and the Govern-
ment of Israel as well as Florida
Zionist and Pioneer Women
leaders.
family's background in Eastern
Europe.
"The history of the Jewish
people is an incredible one,"
Kurzweil commented. "We can
gain a great insight into our
history as we discover how our
families evolved in the framework
of many turbulent and often un-
believable times."
Kurzweil's work has taken him
back to the year 1500 when
relatives on his mother's side of
the family lived in what is now
the eastern half of Czecho-
slovakia. This journey of 600
years soon will be published in a
book entitled, From Generation
to Generation, which Kurzweil
has written for the William Mor-
row Company.
In recent years, Kurzweil's
writings have appeared in The
New York Times Magazine, The
Washington Post, The Los
Angeles Times and Moment
Magazine.
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FRIENDSHIP OCEAN
Mildred Tell (left), president of Aleph Council of B'nai B'rith
Women, and Council officers Bernice Davis and Hilda Goldman
display the banner of their chapters adorning a car during the
motorcade that preceded WECARE Sale Day at Richards.
Many members of the Council took part in the motorcade and
the Sale Day activities.
Notice
Reserve these dates for an exciting experience!!! July 1-11,1960
Second Annual Young Leadership Mission to Israel
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Fort, Lauderdale, FL 33311 484-8200
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for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
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Our staff of Riverside people consists of
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Since 1935, these policies have been
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It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
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Ft. lauderdale (Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
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r-t-wi


'riday, September 28,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
Page 3
Women's Division Plans a Special Event
Dynamic communications con-
l.ant, Rosalie H. Smith, whose
name appears in several pres-
tigious Who's Who volumes, is
coming to town to orchestrate an
NtoMI two-day Education
Institute for the Women's
Division of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
The important dates for the
women invited to take part in the
Repertory premiere of the
Women's Division year of ac-
tivity in 32nd year of Israel's life
begins with the overture Monday
morning, Nov. 5, and resumes
Tuesday morning, Nov. 6, until
curtain call at 3 p.m., with coffee
breaks and lunches entre-acts.
But more important is the
knowledge that Rosalie Smith,
M.A. graduate of University of
Hartford, Conn., who has studied
at the University of Lausanne,
Switzerland and continued doc-
tryal studies at Southern Con-
necticut College and the Hartford
Theological Seminary, will be the
director of the two-day Repertory
1 l the Jewish Community Center,
Perlman Campus, 6501 W. Sun-
rise Blvd.
She provides training and con-
sulting services in speech and
inter-personal communications.
Rosalie Smith
She teaches in the Management
Development Program of the
Hartford Graduate Center and
the Counseling Center of Hart-
ford College for Women A
former assistant professor of
communications and theater at
the University of Hartford, and a
certified speech pathologist, she
was also director of the univer-
sity's Speech Clinic.
A year ago she, with her
husband, Dr. Jay D. Smith,
visited Israel under the auspices
of the Friendship Flight spon-
sored by President Jimmy Carter
to serve as a cultural and familial
exchange of Americans and
specified foreign countries. Dr.
Smith served as flight surgeon
for the group.
Her interests in Israel and the
Jewish community in the U.S.
parallel her extensive back-
ground in public speaking, oral
interpretation, group dynamics,
and interpersonal com-
munications. She chaired the
annual Women's Seminar of the
Women's Division of Hartford
Jewish Federation, was a
representative on the Young
Leadership UJA Mission to
Israel, received Israel's Woman
of Valor Award, coordinated the
Special Gifts division of the
Hartford Women's Division UJA
Campaign and served as
president of Hartford Jewish
Children's Service Organization.
And her methods of developing
awareness and improving skills
for increased efficiency and
greater productivity in inter-
personal communications and
presentations to small and large
groups will be vividly demon-
strated on Nov. 5 and 6 for the
Women's Division in their two-
day session to be held at the JCC
Perlman Campus.
Spewak to Lead Woodlands
Campaign for Second Time
Postal Receives CJF Smolar Award
NEW YORK A special
Smolar Award for Excellence in
North American Jewish Jour-
nalism was presented by the
Council of Jewish Federations
(CJF) to Bernard Postal, editor,
journalist and author.
Postal's many outstanding
contributions to Jewish journal-
ism over the course of a 50-year
career won him the special
citation, according to Smolar
Award Committee Chairman
Siul Viener of Richmond, Va.
Since 1970, he has been the
associate editor of The Jewish
Week in New York and author of
its weekly column, "Postal
rd." Founder and editor of the
Tnonthly magazine, The Jewish
Digest, Postal served as director
of public information for the
Jewish Welfare Board from 1946-
1970, as founder and editor of
The JWB Circle" and editor of
"This is JWB." Previously he
was B'nai B'rith's national in-
formation director.
Founder of both the American
Jewish Press Association and the
American Jewish Public
Relations Society, Postal has co-
authored The Jewish Tourist's
Guide to the U.S.; Landmarks of
a People, Encyclopedia of Jews in
Sports and Jewish Landmarks in
New York.
CJF confers its regular Smolar
Awards annually at the General
Assembly. Named for Boris
Smolar, editor emeritus of the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Traffic Flow at Temple Emanu-El
Martin Yohalem, president of
Temple Emanu-El, 3246 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd., Fort Lauder-
dale, recently met with the
director of the traffic engineering
division of the Broward County
Board of Commissioners, to
discuss how beat to facilitate
traffic flow in and out of the
temple.
Eastbound drivers on Oakland
Park Blvd., coming from West
Broward Countv. should turn left
Temple Beth Shalom of
Hollywood and Fort Lauder-
dale has appointed Rabbi Jay
Neufeld, most recently of San
Diego and Vancouver, as
assistant youth director. He
*?ill serve with Shirley M.
Cohen, youth coordinator, and
Mrs. Leslie Wasserman, head
advisor, in meeting the needs
of the 300 teenagers enrolled
in the temple's programs.
on NW 35th Avenue, go north
one short block, turn right on
NW 32nd Street and proceed to
the temple property, and turn left
for parking.
Those who live east of the
temple should exit the property
via the east driveway into West-
bound Oakland Park Boulevard
traffic, and make a U-turn at 33rd
Avenue where a left turn signal is
active and a U-turn is permitted.
Permission for signs, to be
provided and installed by the
congregation, is being sought by
the Traffic Engineering Division.
Meanwhile, directional signs
have been posted on the temple
property. All vehicular traffic
there has a one-way flow only.
Emanu-El
Sukkot
Festival
On Sunday, Oct. 7, at 4:30
p.m., Temple Emanu-El members
will gather at the temple, 3245 W.
Oakland Park Boulevard, Fort
Lauderdale, to celebrate the
festival of Sukkot at an outdoor
dinner and service, followed by
Israeli singing and dancing.
Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon and
Cantor Jerome Klement will
conduct the service from 5:30 to 6
p.m. Congregants will be led to
the Sukka which will be
decorated with fruits and leaves
in the traditional manner. Lisa
Fox will lead the musical
festivities.
(JTA), the awards encourage the
highest standards of integrity,
creativity and professionalism in
Jewish journalism of the United
States and Canada.
The Council of Jewish Fed-
erations is the association of
more than 190 Federations,
Welfare Funds and Community
Councils which serve nearly 800
communities and embrace over
95 percent of the Jewish
population of the United States
and Canada. Established in 1932,
the Council serves as a national
instrument to strengthen the
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leadership
in developing programs to meet
changing needs in the Jewish
community: through the ex- .
change of successful experiences
to assure the most effective com-
munity services; through estab-
lishing guidelines for fundraising
and operation: and through joint
national planning and action on
common purposes dealing with
local, regional, national and
international needs.
One good turn deserves
another particularly, if that
was so successful that it didn't
require a command performance
for Sidney Spewak to accept the
chairmanship for a second year
for the Jewish Federation's
Woodlands UJA Campaign for
1980.
His efforts, with the aid of a
dedicated group of volunteers,
produced more than a half-million
dollar campaign for the 1979
Campaign. Now, echoing the
theme of the new Campaign,
Spewak has assured Campaign
Chairman Milton Reiner, "1980
means we must do more than
ever, and I'm happy accepting
the challenge."
Spewak, recently elected to the
>oard of directors of Woodlands
Country Club, was previously
active in the Allied Jewish
Appeal of Southern New Jersey;
and the UJA Campaign in Wood-
crest Country Club in his former
home town. Now the retired
CPA, a graduate of Temple
University in Philadelphia, is
enjoying Florida living with his
wife, Maxine. They have two
sons, Stephen and Michael.
Co-chairman with Spewak in
the all-important campaign in the
Woodlands will be Bernard
Singles 'Break Fast'
The Young and Active Singles
of the Jewish Community Center
of Greater Fort Lauderdale will
have a "Break the Fast" party at
the close of Yom Kippur services
Monday, Oct. 1, at the home of
Joan Saperstein, 4421 N. 41st
Ct., Hollywood.
Sidney Spewak
Libros, chairman of the Jewish
Federation's publicity com-
mittee, and an ardent, committed
campaigner like Spewak in pre-
senting the needs of supporting
the Jews of Israel, the Jewish
way of life in North Broward
County and elsewhere in the
world. Now more than ever they
promise their 32 days of cam-
paigning will be dedicated whole-
heartedly to the 32 years of Israel
living._____________________
Planning A Trip?
council s 1979 Exciting Travel
'Program to Israel, Europe,
west Coast, Canadian Rockies
and Alaska is now available
National council
of Jewish women
Felicia B.Sussman
733-0662 or
Lily Lester
484-3492
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Light tf\e candle
and remember?
As our fathers before us, light the
candle and remember those who
have left us. Hold this day for
reflection and thoughtfulness; in
solemnity, strength of purpose
and hope.
Menorah Chapels, to preserve the
traditions of our faith, wishes to
offer a gift of remembrance. A
Yahrzeit Calendar in the name of
the departed. A part of our
religious life, now and through
the ages.
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P^.4
"Jewish Flor idian
Of OR EATER PORT LAUDBRDALI
Bualncaa Office IK S. r*4araJ Hwy., StSU KM. Daala. Via.
Tclaphona esoSOlS ___
FRJCDK SHOCHBT .-. SUXANNE 8HOCHET
Editor and PubUahar er*fjiiii\ Emeutft* Editor
The Jewish Fhridian ofGnaterFort Laudirdak
Friday, September 28.197J1
Psewwtlea OfHcera: PresieeMt Lee |*Kmmi E*aaitive Vfca Pi Iffc Milton
Kotoer; Vice PiaeHasU. Victor r*mM. Jest Ratostoto, Mm Serena; Secretory.
Richer* Reeaaeerl; Traaiurar, Jeel Levitt; Rieartive Director. LeeMe S. Oettllee-
elettoeef
TheJewtefc PtorMtae hee aeserseS toe Jewtok Uelty m* toe Jewtek Weekly.
"**"" Jewtok TetoRreeMc Aaency. saves Am Pesters tyeelceto.
WerMwMe Hm Service. rtottoeeTsMltoiielAeclettoe, a mark a* At
subscription RAfsi7(Lscal Area) OhYht-vn
Owt el Towfi u pa* Reejeect.
Friday. September 28,1979
Volume 8
7 TISHR1 5740
Number 20
The Young Affair
Here, in America, the Outgoing Year for the
Jewish community was inextricably entwined with
the rate of Israel's future. The growing cancer of
petrodiplomacy has shifted our own nation's balance
of interest toward Arab pressures with respect to
Israel. And, indeed, on the eve of Rosh Hashanah, it
seemed clear that the United States has embarked
upon an equally inextricable course of recognizing
the Palestinian cause, whether or not the PLO alters
its chartered policy of extermination for Israel.
The resignation of Andrew Young as US.
Ambassador to the United Nations was triggered by
this new American petropolky, which thus far is
schizophrenic in its course. On the one hand, Pales-
tinian recognition is in the offing; on the other.
Young was forced to resign because he covertly held
meetings with PLO representatives toward this end.
Or perhaps not so covertly.
Another offshoot of the Young affair was a well-
coordinated public relations campaign announcing
the Black American community's determination that
there must be a rift between itself and the American
Jewish community on the pretext that Young's
resignation was as a consequence of President
Carter's knuckling under to ''Zionist influences."
Strange 'Solutions'
It is hard to see the outgoing year in America
apart from the impact of Israel on us all. Only peace
between Israel and Egypt offered the quiet hope
that, in the end, Israel will be spared the agony of
further world alienation and further American
chastisement.
But, as American Jews, Rosh Hashanah fore-
shadows continuing struggle against the ominously
anti-Semitic notion in our midst that Israel is at the
root of all our troubles at home, and that the way to
solve them is to wash Israel right out of the nation's
hair.
This is a "solution" deemed fitting by an in-
creasing number of Americans who link U.S. energy
policy with a growing view of Israel as expendable
and of American Jews as allegedly irresponsible if
they remain steadfast in their Israeli loyalties.
It is a growing solution*' offered by those who
tout the Arab cause by linking the Arab cause to
Palestine Liberation Organization terioiiam without
bothering to justify the fact that no one has asked
either Israel's Arabs or any other Arabs whether in
fact they regard the PLO as their political
representative.
The eternal prayer on Rosh Hashanah, who shall
five who shall die?, means perhaps more in 5740
for Jewry than it has in a long time

Quick: Tell Me What to Think
THE OTHER day. I read a
headline that trumpeted the
appointment to some post or
other of one Black and one His-
panic. The names of the ap-
pointees seemed less important I
to the headline-writer than their '
racial and ethnic identities. Even
the jobs to which they were ap-
pointed took second billing.
I am reminded of the time
when the querulous civil liber-
tarians fought with the press
over descriptions of people
charged with crimes in stories
about hold-ups, rapes and other
assorted reports of violence and
mayhem.
Why, the civil libertarians
wanted to know, was it important
to let the reader know that the
"alleged" law-breaker was, say, a
Black or a Hispanic? How did
this kind of information really
add to the completeness of
journalistic detail?
WASNT IT in fact a form of
prejudgmental statement on the
guilt or innocence of the hapless
person being charged? Weren't
we actually saying that, of
course, it was a Black or a His-
panic who else would commit
such a terrible crime in the first
place?
Now we are in a new era when
to identify an appointee
ethnically and/or racially is to
do just the opposite: We are not
we king to influence social judg-
ments negatively by calling upon
stereotypes of their behavioral
norms.
On the contrary, we are
proving our own freedom from
prejudiced feelings by acknow-
ledging our awareness of the
various ethnic and/or racial
of the American
social and cultural spectrum, and
by making appointments
predicated upon proportional
representation of these com-
ponents.
IN FACT, the new era in which
Mindlin
we find ourselves requires a new
kind of mathematics in which the
proof that we don't have a single
bigoted bone in our body politic
lies in this dictum: overcompen-
sation is the ultimate egal-
itarianism.
To tell the truth, it is those
querulous civil libertarians
(again) who forced the dictum
upon us, but now that it is here,
there can be no denying its value.
How does it work? Well, to make
up for the time when we were so
crude as to call a suspect Black or
Hispanic, thus offering
gratuitous information that could
be construed as defamatory, now
we are required to make appoint-
ments on racial and/or ethnic
bases far out of proportion to the
mathematical representation of
these racial and/or ethnic bases
in the social-cultural spectrum.
To offer our men culpos for
calling people, say. Black or His-
panic in the past, we must call
them that today in increasing
frequency and numbers. We must
advertise them in hoartlinia
their names, the purpose of their
appointments, or even their
qualifications, which no fair-
minded person would care to
consider at all. absolutely beside
the point.
OF COURSE, I recognize one
bit of illogic here, and that is a
study of past and present
methods of identification _
in two different areas of human I
experience. To call a suspect in a
rape case Black or Hispanic is not
the same as to identify him at]
Black or Hispanic when he haa ,
been appointed, say, to a federal
judgestup.
One way we have managed to
get around this sticky wicket it |
simply to call a spade a spade
These days, apparently, it is d,
rigueur to describe a suspect ini
newspaper story by his race
and / or ethnic origin. To do so,
celebrates our democratic im-
pulses. We are calling attention
to our cultural pluralism tad
singing hosannahs to it. |
Whites included provided;
they are called Caucasians. In tail'
sense, all descriptions are merely
anthropological identifications.
All descriptions are
scientific and how can anybody /
object to something scientific? It
would be impossible to infer any-
thing prejudiced from science.
The word, "Black," the word,
"Hispanic" these have no
more emotional content than the
word, "Caucasian "
EXCEPT NOW I must ask
myself why I failed to capitaliu
"Caucasian"? Is it that I feel m
the word an innate superiority
requiring no capitalization as do
"Black" and "Hispanic" to
maintain equality?
This is a problem that needs
instant fis.rifiy.twm. particularly
to accommodate Caucasian His-
panic*. Or is it Caucasian Hia-
panics? As opposed, say, to
Black Hispanic*? Or should it be
black Hispanics a combination
the implication of which I've yet
to consider.
' It is to be hoped that some
querulous civil libertarian will
make a ruling on this, and as
quickly as possabls Hurry, I
have to know what to think.
Victor Bienstock
U.S. Policy Ignores Our Own History
1 wish Cpl. Herb Nicksey. late
of the Connecticut National
Guard, were around today to
remind Secretary of State Vance
and his self-righteous cohorts in
Foggy Bottom of an episode in
American history in this century
which they might study for the
precedent it establishes. Cpl.
Nicksey was the oldest son of our
next door neighbors, and I still
remember him in the campaign
hat and baggy uniform of the
doughboy, limping around on
sick leave from the Punitive
Expedition which President
Woodrow Wilson sent into
Mexico in 1916 to destroy the
bandit forces that were attacking
American lives and property.
Secretary of State Vance, a
shrewd, skilled lawyer and
master of the diplomatic
statement, might be able to find
some real difference between an
American President sanding
American troops into the
territory of a neighboring
country to prevent a loss of
American lives and property and
an Iaiasli Prime Mimater ssading
Israel troops into the territory of
a aaighhoriag country to prevent
the toes of Israeli lives and
property.
I DONT THINK he would
had more than a hairtins of
difference. Aad if a great moral
leader like President Wilson. with
his visions of an international
order sad bin Fourteen Points,
could find the use of force not
only justified, but required, then
it smacks of hypocrisy for his
suusaaisi to condemn another
nation for following the
Wdsonian example under almost
identical.
Punitive Expedition
scant mention in history
textbooks today. The nasae of
Pancho Villa, which once spelled
terror to residents of the border
zone, is only a vague memory to
most Americans. But in 1915-16,
Pancho Villa's forays across the
border, pillaging and looting,
rustling cattle and horses from
isolated Texas ranches, was news
all over America, almost over-
shadowing American interest
in the Great War raging in
Europe in which the United
States would soon be involved.
Mexico, in 1915, was in
complete political disarray as
Lebanon is today. A long
standing regime had been top-
pled, a general detested in
Washington had seized power,
his rule was being challenged by
a loose coalition of generals, and
conditions in the country verged
on the anarchic.
AMERICANS lived and
worked in Mexico in danger of
their lives; there were numerous
cases of Americans being at-
tacked and killed. Mexican
bandits swooped across the long
frontier with impunity because
American forces were under
orders not to cross over into
Mexican territory, even in hot
pursuit, and the bandits knew
there was no Mexican govern-
ment able to subdue than.
President Wilson, recognising
that there was no strong central
government in Mexico, appealed
directly to the Mexican people to
reestablish order, promising
America's moral support to any
elements seeking the reestabneh-
mem of conatitional government.
His appeal was coupled with the
warning that if they failed in this,
the United States "will be
constrained to decide what means
should be employed by the
United States in order to help
Mexico save herself and serve her
people."
WILSON'S appeal was
disregarded. U.S. border patrols
were strengthened, but the ban
on hot pursuit continued. Gen.
Huertas was toppled from the
presidency and Gen. Carranse
was recognized as head of the dt
facto government. Pancho Villa,
one of Carranza's allies against
Huertas. with ambitions of bis
own. turned on Carranza and on
the United States.
His forces began attacks on
Americans in Mexico and m
raids across the Rio Grande into
Texas. In January. 1916, VillisU
forces intercepted s party of 1
American mining engineers
returning to the Chichuahua j
state mines at the express in-
vitation of Gen. Carranza and
under his promise of protection, s
robbed them and killed the entire
party.
Two months later, about 500 of
Villa's cavalryman swept across
the border, attacked the weakly
garrisoned town of Columbus,
Tex., robbed, looted, raped and
pillaged and left 16 American
men, woman and children dead
THE United States could no
longer tolerate Villa's raids -
just as the Israelis could no
longer permit Palestine
Liberation Organisation
terrorists some 60 years latartj}
attack Israeli towns and kW
Israelis It became the first ot
ficial task of Newton D. Baker.
professed pacifist, on taking
office as Secretary of War. w ore
off instructions to Maj. W*
Frederick Funston. the arsa
commander, to send a P****"
expedition into Mexico todsstraj,
eaPaaalS


y, September 28,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
IRC Names Sub-Committees I 'Gut Yom ToV
t*t it
More holiday greetings:
From President Yitzhak
Navon, Jerusalem: "I send the
traditional blessing of ktiva
vahatima tova a good in-
scription and sealing. 6740 dawns
upon a troubled world ... for
what do we hope in 57407
m
community Relations Committee members at initial meeting: Seated {left to right) Rabbi
ioll, Vice-Choirman Friedman, Chairman Entin, Mrs. Tell, Messing. Standing Mr. and Mrs.
Vusbaum, Mrs. Zipris, Klein, Katzburg, Kaplan, Mrs. Moses, Tell, Mayer, Adler, Ivanhoe.
The essential purpose of
sh community relations
tivities is to foster and enhance
editions conducive to secure
I creative Jewish living.
With that premise foremost,
Edmund Entin, chairman of the
immunity Relations Committee
__ ____ Federation office. He will be
Century Village in Deerfield assisted by MUdred Tell, Gerry
Beach, will be co-chaired by Zipris, Rabbi Leonard Zoll and
Frances Nusbaum and Sam others to be appointed.
Miller, with Joe Kaplan and Bill ., T .____ -
with others.
Robert Adler heads up the
group concerned with anti- c
KL2/SLjTftiS!r22 emitUm and 8ervin with S World Jewry Issues division.
S^ith^thtr rnen?biVs o ^ > Scott Ivanhoe and Sn With them wuibe Henry Hvman.
?n!L:L^L-!l TeU- Harry Mayer, and Israel Res-
Church-State Relationships, nikoff, who is cochairman of the
with Jeffrey Klein as chairman, Russian Resettlement
will be meeting Oct. 12 at the mittee.
Committee to consider prior
ties and establish sub-
smmittees.
Indicating the need for a
^road, coordinated program of
tivity, CRC will seek to inter-
pret Israel's positions and needs
the Jewish communities in
forth Broward County, to the
eneral public and to government
Officials; to marshall public
Opinion in behalf of justice and
iom for Jews in oppressed
inds; to promote equality of
jportunity, without regard to
ce, religion, ancestry or sex;
edom of thought, opinion,
ipression and association;
reedom of religion and
eparation of church and state,
|nd amicable relationships
long all groups.
Toward these ends, Chairman
Entin announced the following
ib-divisions: Israel Task Force,
Lnti-Semitism, Church-State Re-
Itionsnips, World Jewry Issues,
tussian Resettlement. Chairmen
^ere appointed along with CRC
ersonnel to serve with them.
chairmen were also advised
expand their sub-committees,
needed, hold a meeting as soon
possible to determine specific
sjectives, and report to CRC's
Bxt scheduled meeting Thur-
y, Nov. 15.
The Israel Task Force, first
armed several months ago in
[ew Eyes for
the Needy
Discarded eyeglasses can
trove useful to those who need
isses but may have difficulty in
aying for them. Hence the on-
)ing program of WECARE's
lew Eyes for Needy program
eking eyeglasses.
Mildred Tell, chairman of the
am, extended her thanks to
e who donated eyeglasses
to the many volunteers at
rarious condominiums who
elped collect the 750 pairs of
eyeglasses which were
lipped recently by WECARE to
Jew Eyes for the Needy in Short
lills, N.J. She urged renewed
ffort with eyeglasses to be
3pped off at WECARE's new
Iquarters at the Jewish Com-
lunity Center, Perlman Campus,
)1 Sunrise Blvd.
ment, continuing in that
capacity, will also serve as co-
chairman with Martha Moses for
Com-
"For satisfactory development
of peace negotiations with Egypt
and extension of their approach
to other sectors of the Middle
East... for a greater measure of
success in closing the social gap
in Israel and effectively guiding
its economy ... for emphasis in
all communities on Jewish
education and on the ties that
bind us to each other and to our
people's center in Israel."
From Morton L. Mandel,
president. Council of Jewish Fed-
erations: "It is a time to count
our blessings, ever mindful of the
serious concerns and unmet
needs that exist throughout the
Jewish world. However, we have
accomplished a great deal .
Our Federations are increasingly
providing programs and services
through their constituents,
programs and services designed
to bring greater fulfillment .
new facilities and services are
available for young people .
senior citizens are being helped
toward the comforts and security
they so richly deserve ... in the
Middle East, we see progress
toward peace for Israel and its
neighbors. We have much to be
grateful for. The year 5740 will
see us achieve even more as we
strive to fulfill the ideals of
Judaism."
Irwin S. Field, national chair-
man. United Jewish Appeal:
"The peace treaty with Egypt is
real, but the process of peace has
barely begun. We in the
American Jewish community
have a responsibility beyond
praying for its success. We must
help meet the cost of human re-
settlement involved on the road
to peace.
"Year after year, with the
blowing of the shofar, we have
wished our loved ones and all our
people the joys of the year and
a lifetime of health, peace,
freedom and self-renewal. This
year, as never before, we have the
opportunity of making an in-
delible contribution toward
achieving that joyous future. It
calls for the best within us.
"Now, more than ever we
are one."
HOUSEKEEPER
Jewish stve cooking, smaH
apt. Drive car optional Fort
Lauderdale on the ocean. 6
days week. Sleep-In. Refer-
ences 56S-2M2
Miiiruiii
0 *. -W. 0.1 *. mcsHm m. p* dfMMt. FTMtesM MAY 71.


T-'
Page 6
The Jewish Flaridian of QrtaUr Fort Lauderdak
Friday, September 28, lfl


Registration Day at JCCDraws 2,000
They came, they saw; they!
were delighted! A play on words,
as you can see, but they truly
represent the spirit and the
excitement that pervaded the
Open House that was held
Sunday, Sept. 9, on the Jewish
Community Center's Perlman
Campus, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
The Dining Hall was set up for
membership enrollment, course
registration, and information,
each department flourishing with
success. Bill Goldstein, executive
director, estimated that over
2,000 people attended. The
capacity attendance was rep-
resentative of all age groups and
interests.
He spoke with pride as he com-
mended the staff and a host of
volunteers who registered the
applicants, served them hot dogs
and drinks, and answered
questions about the construction
plans scheduled for the near
future.
There was a congenial milling
about the campus. After regis-
tration, many picnicked under
the hanging Spanish moss as
they listened and danced to Andy
Bartha's Deep South Dixieland
Band. When told about the
successful day, Anita Perlman,
president of the JCC, replied,
"It's only the beginning, the JCC
will be the home for many more
community happenings."
Since Open House, the phones
haven't stopped ringing at the
JCC which is a beneficiary of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. The community
has responded. Membership is
growing each day as is regis-
tration for classes. "We are
delighted with the response and
the interest shown by the Jewish
community," said Selma Telles,
program coordinator. "Con-
tinuing education is an integral
part of our lifestyle and the JCC
has prepared a program to suit
every need and every age."
Classes are being formed now.
Call 792-6700 for further in-
formation. Cultural series draws adults. Al fresco dining in JCCs picnic grove.
:ff:::vff::::::ff:^
T^oToTTTbuildings Jewish Community Center has on Building. Right front is the building housing class
th,TPerlmanCamp usAt left rear is the Administration meeUngroomsan^^
JCC Cultural Series Set
Teens Can Learn to Communicate Better]
The Cultural Arts Committee
of the JCC, chaired by Ivy
Levine, met at her home to dis-
cuss the Jewish Community
Cultural Series. Everyone at-
tending agreed that the four
programs offered were diversified
in type and outstanding in caliber
of talent.
Sharing the responsibility of
promoting the series is Susan
Nathanson, who enthusiastically
supported Ivy Levine. "It is an
opportunity for the entire Jewish
community to share an enjoyable
cultural experience that is certain
to make them feel a pride in their
Jewishness."
On Nov. 4, Dr. Ruth Gruber,
foreign correspondent and author
of Racquela, and other books,
who has been involved in all of
Israel's crises, will give a Mideast
Update. "Here Is Israel" will
return with a new musical pro-
duction featuring some of Israels
most talented performers. Jan. 27
brings Sy Kleinman, raconteur
extraordinaire. It promises to be
a hilarious evening "If It's So
Funny, Why Are You Crying."
On Feb. 23 Susan Merson will
perform in a dramatic one-woman
show.
The Cap* Times
Jewish Family Service of
Breward County, a beneficiary of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale annual UJA
Campaign, and the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Hollywood
have planned a series of family
life programs for teens, parents,
and single parents to be held at
the Hollywood JCC beginning in
October.
A special program for teen-
agers begins Tuesday, Oct. 6,
from 7:30 to 9 p.m. It is designed
to help them communicate more
effectively with family, friends,
teachers and others. The six
Tuesday night sessions, known
as 'Teen Assertiveness," will
have Augusta Zimmerman,
MSW, member of the Jewish
Family Service staff, as
facilitator.
On those same six Tuesday
nights, there will be a Parents
Effectiveness Program with
Maria Gale, MSW, also of JFS
staff, as the facilitator.
And for single parents trying
to be "mom and pop" to children,
"Raising Children by Myself"
series will begin Tuesday, Nov.
13, for six Tuesdays with Mrs.
Zimmerman as the facilitator.
Members of the Hollywood
JCC can enroll in the teen series
and single parents for 110, the
parents for $17. Non-members
able to pay will be asked to pay
$15, and $25 respectively. Bob
Schwartz is handling the regis-
trations for these programs and a
new one to be known as "Couples
Communication" with Dr. Robert
Green. Ph.D.. psychologist, as
facilitator for a three-!
series, Oct. 10,17 and 24.
Senior Citizens Olympics Week
With the financial sponsorship
of Dade Federal Savings, Mayor
Howard Craft and the City
Council of Lauderdale Lakes
have inaugurated a new project
aimed at the athletic entertain-
ment of the Senior Citizens in the
city. Mayor Craft recently pro-
claimed Nov. 10 to 18 Senior
Citizens Olympics Week.
Residents 60 years of age or over
are eligible to compete with no
entry fee charged.
Entry blanks can be obtained
ntry bl
andomi
at condominiums or at the Dade
Federal Savings office at Oak-
land Plaza.
Al Belzer originated the idea
for the Senior Olympics. He will
coordinate the program with Lew
Frankel. Nate Blackman is
executive director and Leonard
Cohen, public relations director.
All are working closely with
Like to
Sing-along?
Jewish Community Center
of Greater Fort Lauderdale is
interested in developing a
Sing-A Long Choral Group.
Sy Sugar, instrumentalist,
conductor and arranger, will
lead the group. If you like to
sing, join the group. Call the
Mayor Craft and Ira Corliss i\
the sponsoring bank. The latterr
offering three prizes for ea
event. Included are swimmr
bike-a-thon and walkatbon
Somerset); tennis (doubles)
Boyd Anderson High Scfa
hole-in-one golf at Lauder
Lakes Recreation Field; poolJ
Hawaiian Gardens and shut
board at Cypress Chase.
Active leaders in promo
the Senior Olympics indu
Bernie Rothman, Ebas r
fisher, Herb Cohan, Mo
Schlein, Max Levinson, Bs
Dwoshen, Hy Kaplan, Char*]
Sweedkr and Albert Schneider
Sukka at JC(
Sunrise Boulevard is getting'
sukka.
Ron Schagrin, chainnan-
special events for the Je*'*
Community Center of GreOT
Fort Lauderdale. and his eaq
mittee, gather on the 16**I
Perlman Campus of JCC st 6^
Sunrise Blvd. on Thursday. u>l
4, to build and decorate t]
sukka.
Schagrin said: "It will
strategically placed on caop!
so that the symbol of what wn
holiday of Sukkot represent^*"!
be on view for the entire "
munity to see and to visit


The Jewish Fkjrjdjan of Greater Fort Lauderdale
rage
Hebrew Day School Begins Fifth Year
Kindergartners
The Hebrew Day School has
started its fifth year in ito new
home on the Perlman Campus of
the Jewish Community Center
6601 W. Sunrise Blvd. The
school, directed by Fran Meren-
stein, houses pre-kindergarten
through the fifth grades with the
upper levels from third through
fifth grades closed with a waiting
list established. Several openings
are available in the pre-kinder-
garten and kindergarten levels.
The curriculum of Judaic and
general studies includes music,
physical education, art and
drama taught by the staff, all of
Fourth and Fifth graders.
whom are certified. Mrs.
Merenstein pointed out the
principle of the school's
education program as deter-
mining each child's needs.
Shelia Grenitz is acting as the
early childhood consultant for the
pre-kindergarten program, where
children may be enrolled for a
five-day morning or afternoon
program or a five-day all-day
program. Arlene Solomon has
been added to the staff as a music
specialist and is planning a
spring concert for the children.
Holidays play an important
role and with the advent of the
Israel's President Navon Greets
American Jewish Community
By YITZHAK NAVON
President, State of Israel
As we enter the year 5740, I
send from Jerusalem to Jewish
communities everywhere the
traditional blessing of ktiva
vahatima tova a good inscrip-
tion and sealing.
5740 dawns upon a troubled
world, disturbed in its economic
and political functioning. Not
least stormy are the conditions in
and about our homeland, Israel,
and they require both our
vigilance and our activity.
YET, at the same time, within
the complex of Israel's present
situation there is a new hope for
the emergence of peace, and there
are the constant factors of the
determination and creativity of
our people in Israel and the
attachment and aid of those
outside.
For what do we hope in 5740?
For satisfactory development
of the peace negotiations with
Egypt and extension of their
approach to other sectors of the
Middle East.
For a greater measure of
success in closing the social gap
in Israel and effectively guiding
its economy.
FOR EMPHASIS in all com
munities on Jewish education
and on the ties that bind us to
each other and to our people's
center in Israel.
For a vigorous and idealistic
movement of olim to Israel from
all the corners of our dispersion.
For the strength and wisdom
to persevere in building a society
and a culture that will truly
revive the Jewish people, its
heritage, and the Land with
which it is forever bound.
New Year, Rabbi K. Bruswankin
addressed the children about
Rosh Hashanah, blew the sbofar,
let the children take turns, and
answered questions. The children
had a special Kabbalat Shabbat
on Friday, Sept. 21, with first
graders presenting a per-
formance, students reciting the
Torah portion for the week, and
all receiving the traditional
apples and honey treat with their
challah and wine.
Fifth Anniversary Plans
The Hebrew Day School's
Fifth Anniversary Celebration
committee has plans underway
for the event to be held at 8:30
p.m., Saturday, Nov. 3, at
Temple Beth Israel.
Pearl Reinstein, Lisa Shulman,
Sandy Jackowitz, Carol Frieser
and Madelyn Lyons are co-chair-
persons. They have slated a
Vacation Auction as the high-
light of the evening. Last year
the Auction was so successful
and warmly received that it has
been expanded to include a
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The Fifth Anniversary
Celebration will be an evening of
cocktails, hors d'oeuvres, cham-
pagne, and dessert and dancing
to Jerry Wayne's Orchestra. The
Journal is distributed. Both the
Journal and the Auction are
major sources of raising scholar-
ship funds for the Hebrew Day
School.
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The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday.
28,1979
Judaica High School Adds North Branch uf **" ActJ ****
Exciting diacussioos on the
dangers facing Israel in the
Middle East, mixed with Hebrew
conversations and analysis of the
activities of various cults in
South Florida, took place at the
opening session of the Judaica
High School of North Broward of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Laodar-
dale this past Tuesday evening at
the Jewish Community Center.
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.. Fort
Lauderdale
Students from Temple Beth
Israel Reconstructionist Syna-
gogue, Temple Emanu-El and the
general community began the
first of three trimturn in such
courses as the Five Scrolls.
Jewish Current Events, the
Jewish Catalogue. What Does
Judaism Say About .?, Mis-
sionary at the Door. Hebrew
Ulpan and the Jewish Life Cycle.
Highlighting the program was
a special course given for high
school students on the Jewish
Short Story which is awarded
college credit both in Florida and
throughout the United State*.
The newly formed North
Branch of the Judaica High
School had its first sessions on
Tuesday evening. Sept. 25, at
Temple Beth Orr. 2151 Riverside
Drive, Coral Springs. There too
the coarse "The Jewish Short
Story" will be offered for college
credit with additional courses to
be achednled if the response
Sales Aiding Terrorists
Bill Goldstein (center), executive director, outlines room
assignments at the Periman Campus for Judaica High School
of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale with
Federation's Education Director Abraham J. Gittelson (left)
and Rabbi Shimon Azulay who is serving as principal of the
high school
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON {IT A) -
A Senate-House Conference
Committee is to adjust dif-
ferences between two amend-
ments of the Export Adminis-
tration Act designed to toughen
U.S. sales of transports to
countries aiding terrorists.
Libya. Iraq. South Yemen and
probably Syria would be im-
mediately affected by the legis-
lation. Congresional sources told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
Algeria's situation is not clear,
the sources said.
The House on Sept. 11 adopted
an amendment offered by Rep.
Milicent Fenwick IR.. N.J.I
which would require an export
license for aircraft sales ex-
ceeding $7 million.
THIS WOULD ban the
transfer of equipment such ast
the Boeing 727. Her amendment
would also require the Adminis-
tration to notify the House
Foreign Affairs Committee and
iHp Sen*** Foreign Relations
Committee of proposed sales. The
Secretary of State would
determine which countries are
supporting terrorists and the
military potential of aircraft pro-
posed for sale. There was not
floor opposition to the measure.
The Senate had previously
adopted a similar statement
authored by Sen. Jacob Javits
IR., N.Y.) which would prohibit
sales of aircraft if the President
determines it is not in the
national interest. The legislation
stems from sales last year of 400
US-made heavy duty trucks to
Libya
'Starlight Musical'
Slated Friday
Gary Dubler and Herald
Square play popular music at the
eighth "Starlight Musical,"
Friday, Sept. 28. The biweekiy
concerts are performed from the
Parker Snowmobile from 8 to 10
p.m.
Concertgoers spread their
blankets and picnics, sit in lawn
chairs, or tie up their boats in the
lagoon of George English Park,
1101 Bayview Drive, in order to
spend a relaxing, free evening
listening to one of a variety of
styles of music sponsored by the
City of Fort Lauderdale and
Parker Theater, Inc. in
iation with PACE.
warrants it.
Phylla Chudnow
chairperson of the Committee on
Education of the Jewish Fed
M eration, with Abraham J. Gittel-
son as director of education.
UJSL Jews Need to Be More Pragmatic
About Intermarried Couples
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) An
American Jewish Committee
report on intermarriage released
here urged the American Jewish
community and institutions to
reach out to intermarried couples
in an effort to have them become
more involved in the community.
Yehuda Rosenman, director of
the AJCommittee's Department
of Jewish Communal Affaire, told
a press conference, that with
intermarriage increasing, the
Jewish community needs to
change its attitude "not by
accepting intermarriage as a
norm but accepting in the
community the intermarried
couples."
ROSENMAN AND Dr. Egon '
Mayer, an associate professor of ;
sociology at Brooklyn College.
Bat (Mitzvah
DEBBIE KAPLAN
On Saturday. Oct. 6 at 10:30
a.m.. Debbie Kaplan will be
called to the Torah as a Bat Mitz-
vah at Plantation Jewish Con-
gregation. In honor of this oc-
casion, Mr. and Mrs. Jerome
Kaplan, her parents, wul sponsor
the Oneg Shabbat following the
regular Shabbat service on
Friday. Oct. 5.
who was research director for the
study, also called for a more
positive attitude toward con-
verting the non-Jewish partner to
Judaism Mayer said that among
the younger couples than was
more of a tendency to convert to
Judaism.
The report, called 'Inter-
marriage and the Jewish
Future," is based on responses to
questions from 446 intermarried
couples, ranging in age from 20-
70, in Cleveland, Dallas. Long
Island. Los Angeles. New York.
About 21 percent of the non-
Jewish spouses had converted to
Judaism and 3.3 percent of the
Jews had converted to then-
spouse's religion. The majority of
the couples were in what the
report termed "mixed marriages''
where both partners maintained
their religion.
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ly, September 28,1979
The Jewish. FMuj&iqnpf Ottflter Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
FRIDAY, SEPT. 28
lens Circle #1046 General
Bting Lauderdale Lakes City
HI, 7:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 29
gallon Jewish Cong. /Temple
>l Ami Dinner/Dance $20 per
son for members, $25 non-
lbers, 7:30 p.m.
Il Scheck HUM Community
sy School Art Auction, 8:30
lm.
TUESDAY, OCT. 2
B'rlth Margate Chapter -
sgular meeting
SMh Plantation L'Chaylm
ter Board meeting
I B'rlth Ocean Chapter #1628 -
poard meeting
iple Shalom Sisterhood of
smpano Board meeting
ste Jewish Center Sisterhood
I Board meeting
|ndli National Woman's
>mm. Ft. Lauderdale/Pom-
no Chapters Study Group
legislation
Ocean Mile Chapter -
neral meeting Jarvls Hall,
II N. Ocean Blvd., 12:30 p.m.
rlcan Society for
Fechnlon/Women's Division
fleeting at David Park Pavilion,
Margate Social & Refresh-
ients, 1 p.m.'
Womon/HstMcvs Chapter -
/hiting Hall, Sunrise Playlet
iho Is A Jew", noon
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 3
dsssah tnvorrary Oilah Chapter
Board meeting
llonal Council Jewish Women -
Broward Board msstlng
issh Ksvsnah of Plantation
ieneral meeting
B'rlth Sunrise Lodge #2953-
Joard msstlng, p.m.
B'rlth Lauderhlll Chapter
11483 Board meeting Castle
Hardens Rec. Hall, 10a.m.
ip4e Shalom Adult Education
mdels Natlonsl Women's
lm. Ft. Lauderdale/Pom-
Bosrd msstlng
iple Beth Orr Games River-
side Dr. & Roysl Pslm Blvd., 7:45
r.m.
THURSDAY, OCT. 4
N. Broward Chapter -
Executive msstlng
mdels National Woman's
>mm. W. Broward Board
Mating
near Women Hatlkvah Chapter
I Meeting at Whiting Hall. 12 to
|:30p.m.
Ish Community Center-Put up
(ukkot & Sukkot Party
I B'rlth Sunrise Chapter #1627
I Regular masting
sssh Bat Yam Chapter -
Joard msstlng
isah Sabra Chapter Board
leetlng, 8 p.m.
Ish Community Center Adult
;iub Discussions, nominations
Ind travelogue by Delts Airlines
It Jewish Community Center,
iunrlss Blvd., 1:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, OCT. 8
itlon Jewish Cong. /Temple
Col Ami Family service for
Sukkot, 8:15p.m.
SUNDAY, OCT. 7
Ish Community Center Yid-
dish Film Featlvsl "Ths Qrsat
Kdviaor"4to'7p.m.
MONDAY. OCT. 8
rish Federation/Woman's
)ivislon Board masting, 9:30
i.m.
Hadassah Armon Cattle Garden
Chapter General meeting,
Castle Garden Rec. Hall, noon
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood -
Board meeting
Temple Shalom Games
Temple Emanu-EI Games, 7:15
p.m.
Hadessah Tamar Ft. Lauderdale
Chapter Regular meeting,
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall,
12:30 p.m.
Brandels National Womens Comm.
- Woodlands/Inverrary Chapter -
Monthly meeting, 11:30 a.m.
Plantation Jewish
Congreg./Temple Kol Ami -
Blood Donor Program For
further Info, call 472-1988, 4 to 8
p.m.
Women's League for Israel -
Tamarac Chapter Bosrd
msstlng
Womens League for Israel
Tamarac Chapter of Century Vil-
lage Meeting at home of Chap-
ter Chairman: Blossom Miller
TUESDAY. OCT. 9
B'nal B'rlth Bermuda Club Board
meeting
Brandeis National Women'a
Comm. W. Broward Meeting,
12:30 p.m.
Hadassah N. Lauderdale Chal
Chapter Board meeting
B'nal B'rlth Ocean Chapter #1628 -
Regular meeting Jarvis Hall,
12:30 p.m.
Temple Shalom Board meeting, 8
p.m.
Margate Jewish Center Sisterhood
-Regular meeting
B'nal B'rlth Ft. Lauderdale
Chapter #346 Board meeting
Hedaassh Rsyus Group of W.
Emanu-El Beautification Project
Temple Emanu-El, located at
3245 W. Oakland Park
Boulevard, Fort Lauderdale, will
undertake a beautification
project to refurbish the interior
and to add an entrance portico.
Preliminary plans are being
drawn up by the designers of
church and synagogue interiors,
Albert Wood and Five Sons of
Port Washington, N.Y. A fund-
raising drive will commence im-
Educator to Speak
Abraham Gittsbon, director of
education of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, will be the speaker at the
Gait Ocean Mile B'nai B'rith
Chapter meeting Wednesday,
Oct. 17, at Jarvia Hall, Fort
Lauderdale. Gittelson, a witty,
articulate activist in communal
life in South Florida for many
years, will point up the
Federation programs, high-
lighting the importance of
providing education for North
Broward County's Jewish teens
as the backbone of future
enhanced Jewish life in the area.
We do business
the right way.
WOO W.Oakland Park Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 11311
Phone: 735 MM
OAKLAND TOYOTA
mediately after Yom Kippur, in
which the entire congregation
will be invited to participate.
Completion of the interior
beautifcation is predicted by
Passover in early April.
Broward Board meeting
State of Israel Bonds at Somerset -
"Night in Israel"
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10
Women's Environ Club (Inverrary) -
Board meeting, p.m.
Hadassah Oriole Scopus Chapter
- Board meeting, 9:30 a.m.
ORT Royal Plantation General
meeting
Hadasssh Pompsno Beach Chal
Chapter Board meeting
Sunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood -
Board meeting
ORT Palm-AIre Chapter General
meeting
Brandels W. Broward Chapter -
Regular meeting, Deicke Aud.,
Plantation, noon to 3 p.m.
ORT Coral Springe Chapter -
General meeting, Community
Center, Coral Springs, 8 p.m.
Temple Shalom Adult Education
Hadassah L'Chaylm Chapter -
Book review by Anne Ackerman,
Deicke Aud., $2 donation, 12:30
p.m.
Tempts Beth Orr Games River-
side Dr. & Roysl Pslm Blvd., 7:45
p.m.
Women's League lor Israel Bons-
vsnturs Chsptsr Board
meeting, home of Charlotte
Goldstein
Pioneer Women Natanya aim of
Margate Meeting at Boca Raton
Bank Aud., Gabrielle Greenspan
book review of "Mrs. Shapiro's
Knitting Book." Refreshments. 1
p.m.
THURSDAY.OCT.il
Temple Emanu-El Executive
committee meeting, 7:30 p.m.
Hadasaah Sunriss Shalom Chsp-
tsr Meeting Tamarac Jewish
Center. "Twiddler on the Roof"
presented by Phase III Choral
Group. Refreshments, noon.
Hadassah Haverlm Ft. Lauderdale
Chsptsr General meeting, 8
p.m.
Hadasssh Blyma Chsptsr of
Margate Bosrd meeting, Beth
Hillel Temple, a.m.
Temple Shalom Men's Club -
Meeting
Hsdssssh Holiday Springs Orly
Chapter Board meeting
Hadasaah Somerset Shoshana
Chapter Board meeting, Rec.
Hall, 10a.m. to noon.
ORT N. Broward Region Donor
Luncheon, 11:30 a.m.
B'nal B'rlth Hops Chsptsr #1617 -
Board meeting
FRIDAY. OCT. 12
Women's League lor Israel Wood-
lands Chsptsr Membership
Tea, horns of Frieda Rosen.
Slides & narration, "Faces of ths
Future" 10a.m. to noon.
Hadassah Rayua Group of W.
Broward Regular meeting,
Tamarac Jewish Center, noon.
Tempts Kol Ami Slmchat Torah,
p.m.
OCT. 12,16,26
Hadasssh Ramaz, Rsyus *
Shoshana Chapters Leadership
Training Course for members
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Page 10
Th* Jewish Floridian of Grgafrr Fort Laudtrdak
I

I

Da van Testing the Waters
Makes Israel's Political Arena Feel Very Nervous
By UZI BENZIMAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Moshe Dayan has done it again.
As so often in the past, he is once
more the focus of public attention
and a cause of nervousness in the
Israeli political arena. Politicians,
Cabinet Ministers, journalists
and commentators are once again
pondering and discussing the
Foreign Minister's motives in-
tentions.
This extraordinary man, who
for 30 years has held an as-
sortment of posts at the center of
political events, is once again
triggering curiousity and
speculation. Since he recovered
from his recent major operation,
Dayan has astonished the
Cabinet with several ideas and
declarations that left his
colleagues stunned. During each
of the recent Cabinet meetings
the Foreign Minister has ex-
pressed views that surprised the
other Ministers and made them
wonder about his true goals.
Especially now, that he has
raced off to Bonn to discuss West
Germany'8 apparent shift toward
the Arabs.
AT THE first Cabinet session
following his discharge from the
hospital, Dayan suggested a
comprehensive reconsideration of
Israels foreign policy, arnguing
that the overall situation in the
Middle East had radically
changed since Camp David.
He recommended that Israel
make an effort to convince the
U.S. to take over the
sophisticated military bases in
Sinai which are to be restored to
Egypt under the peace treaty.
Dayan told his Cabinet
colleagues that the U.S. may
have an interest in operating the
air bases as a contribution to the
strategy of establishing a chain
of Middle East states affiliated to
the Western world.
At the next Cabinet meeting,
Dayan urged his colleagues to
resist the American intention to
establish a United Nations
observers force in Sinai in place
of the UN Emergency Force
( whose mandate was not renewed
by the Security Council because
the Soviet Union refused to go
along).
A WEEK LATER, at the next
Cabinet meeting, Dayan warned
the government that Egypt was
violating the terms of the peace
treaty. Cairo, he said, was
ignoring the treaty's stipulation
that civilian, not military per-
sonnel run the El Arish Airfield,
handed back in May. Dayan also
accused several government
ministries of maintaining
separate ties with Egypt and
with the U.S., without coor-
dinating with the Foreign
Ministry.
At the next Cabinet meeting,
Dayan astounded the Ministers
by criticizing government,
charging it with incompetence in
the economic and social field.
Dayan used sharp and un-
conventional terms in expressing
his views about the government's
poor image:
"We are described as a corpse,"
said the Foreign Minister. He
revealed to the Ministers that
U.S. Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance had se%t him a message
asking whether information
reaching the State Department
that Israel faces economic
disaster was correct.
DAYAN SAID angrily: "A
system of cover up prevails
here. Nobody believes nor do I
that this government is
capable of taking decisions. "A
day later, Dayan exposed the
same views to the public in in-
terviews to the two mass cir-
culation papers. The Foreign
Minister told hifl mUwviswers
that the government suffers from
a serious malfunctioning.
He complained that its poor
image was encouraging the U.S.
to step up its pressure on Israel.
Warning of a dangerous
"change" in the American policy
towards Israel and the
Palestinians, Dayan asserted
that Israel has enough strength
to protect its vita! interests.
Dayan's statements stirred up
dramatic reactions: the Likud
caucus expressed criticism of the
functioning of the government
(though several of the party's
Knesseters expressed their
reservations at Dayan's public
attacks). Several of the Cabinet
Ministers protested publicly
and to Prime Minister Menachem
Begin privately at Dayan's
political ethics as expressed in
the interviews. The press was full
of comments and explanations of
Dayan's "real" intentions.
CIRCLES CLOSE to the
Foreign Minister give the
following simple explanation to
Dayan's moves: he genuinely is
worried, they say, about the
government's functioning and
about U.S. intentions towards
the Palestinian problem. His
warnings are aimed at getting the
Cabinet to realize the dangers in-
herent in the situation, so that it
will urgently set about improving
its efficiency.
Dayan, moreover, these circles
say, seeks to signal Washington
that Israel will not yield to
American pressure that con-
tradicts Jerusalem's vital in-
terests.
There are, however, other
interpretations of Dayan's
conduct. Several political ob-
servers believe that Dayan is
preparing the way for his own
resignation from the government
soon because he disagrees with
its policy regarding the
autonomy talks and the nor-
malization of the relations with
Egypt. Others claim that the
Foreign Minister seek to per-
suade Begin to make a persoi^l
reshuffle around the Cabi* 1
table.
SOME SPECULATE
Dayan's recent statermT
should be understood againtf
background of his heakj
namely, his reaction to the i
he was stricken with (thouj
was successfully operated
Some "Dayan analysts" even*]
his recent moves as aiming J
heal the scars between him ud
his former colleagues in tht|
Labor Party.
There are columnists wbtl
explain Dayan's statements asi]
reflection of his emotional needul
sound alarm bells, as a result oil
his misconception on the eve oil
the 1973 Yom Kippur War. "ft I
weeks ahead will provide a man
accurate answer to the Dayul
enigma. Meanwhile, he continue I
to fascinate the Israeli coal
munity as he has done for 31 ]
years.
/s NOW Boycott a Violation?
AJC Asks Court Not to Punish Missouri Chapter
NEW YORK Is NOW's
boycott of anti-ERA states a
violation of federal anti-trust
laws?
The American Jewish
Congress has asked the Eighth
Circuit Court of Appeals in St.
I .mi is to reject efforts by the
State of Missouri to punish the
National Organization for Wom-
en (NOW) for allegedly violating
the Sherman Anti-Trust Act in
withholding convention business
from slates that have not ratified
the Equal Rights Amendment
(ERA).
The organization argued, in a
brief amicus curiae, (1) that
NOW's campaign was protected
by First Amendment guarantees
of freedom of speech and
association and (2) that the
boycott did not fall within the
sphere of activity at which the
antitrust laws were aimed.
MISSOUR'S Attorney
General, in suing NOW, claimed
that NOW's actions in voting not
to hold national meetings in
Missouri and other non-ratifying
states, and in urging other
organizations to apply the same
policy, constituted an illegal
restraint of trade.
At the trial in Federal District
Court, Esther Polen of
Philadelphia, a vice president of
the American Jewish Congress,
testified that the Jewish group
had adopted the same boycott
policy as NOW, that it did so
before NOW acted, and that the
policy was adopted as a way of
demonstrating support for the
ERA.
Mrs. Polen said further that
AJCongress' principles barred it
from meeting in a state which
had shown hostility to the cause
of equality.
DISTRICT COURT Judge
Elmo B. Hunter, after taking
evidence, dismissed the Missouri
complaint. The state then took an
appeal to the Court of Appeals
for the Eighth Circuit, to which
the American Jewish Congress
submitted its brief.
The American Jewish
Congress argues first in its brief
that anti-trust legislation does
not apply to "essentially non -
economic activity, engaged in not
for monetary gain but to achieve
political, philosophical or per-
sonal objectives." It points out
that the NOW case does not
involve the "vast accumulation
of wealth in the hands of cor-
porations and individuals" which
Chief Justice White declared to.
be the principal concern of the
Sherman Act in the Standard Oil
decision handed down in 1910.
A holding that the anti trust
laws apply to NOW's activity,
the American Jewish Congress
brief says, "would undermine the
credibility of those laws in their
proper functioning of preventing
restraints of trade that spring
from the pursuit of economic
advantage. '
ON THE Constitutional issue,
the brief argues that a holding
against NOW's action would
mean that "independent
organizations sharing a common
commitment to political and
social concerns would be hesitant
to adopt similar stands, even
though they had concluded in-
dependently that a refusal to
patronize was called for, or even
required, bv the principles they
were created to uphold."
The brief points out that many
organizations have adopted the
same ERA boycott policy as
NOW and that this tactic was
identical with efforts by "the civil
rights movement, labor
organizations, environmentalists
and other groups desiring to
make known their positions on
issues of public concern in the
most effective way possible. '
The brief urges affirmance i]
the District Court rulini |
asserting: "Selective patronajj
is one of the most effective men]
of assuring the robust debate i|
public issues that the Firs 1
Amendment protects. To p reveal
its use would cut off an avennj
long used by civil rights anil
other groups pursuing the goaldj
equality."
Germans Sentenced
For Attempting to Shoot Down Airliru
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
West German national im-
prisoned in Israel following their
arrest in Nairobi, Kenya in
January, 1976 for attempting to
shoot down an Israeli airliner,
were given 10-year prison set-
tencies by a military tribunal
after a lengthy closed trial that
ended last week.
But the defendants, Brigitte
Schulte, 28, and Thomas Reuter,
27, will be released and deported
from Israel early in 1981 after
five years' incarceration.
THE REDUCED prison term
was part of a deal between the
State Attorney and the defense
under which the defendants
pleaded guilty to lesser charges
and the prosecution withdrew its
demand for life sentences Three
Arab accomplices arrested at the
same time are standing trial
separately.
The trial and the incident that
led to it were shrouded in secrecy
from the start and strained
relations between Israel and the
West German government. (The
Bonn Foreign Ministry said that
it was surprised by the sen-
tencing.)
Israeli authorities had also
come under mounting inter-
national pressure to dispose of
the three-year-old case which, for
reasons unknown, did not come
to trial until 10 months ago.
Except for the announcement
of the sentences and the plea bar-
gaining deal, no further in-
formation has been forthcoming
from Israeli sources.
ACCORDING to an account of
events by foreign sources,
Schulte, Reuter and the three
Arabs had been under surveil-
lance by Israeli and Kenyan
security agents for some time
before their arrest near Nairobi
International Airport. During
that period they visited the air-
port several times, apparently to
gather intelligence.
They were seized shortly before
an El Al airliner with 160
passengers aboard was due to
land at Nairobi from Johannes-
burg. According to the accounts,
the five suspects were in pos-
session of Russian-made shoulder
missiles of the SAM-7 type
known as "Strela."
They were jailed in Kenya until
February, 1976, when at the
request of President Jomo Ken-
yatta, they were transferred to
Israel and held incommunicado.
ISRAEL refused for many
months to acknowledge their
presence but finally did so after
repeated representations by West
German authorities and the
parents of the two German
suspects. The latter began a cam-
paign to secure the release of the
suspects, assisted by the Red
Cross, Amnesty International
and West German authorities.
No outsiders were admitted to
the trial, but the military tnbu
allowed a representative of
West German Embassy U> I
present and a representative!
the International Red Cross. I
ikinn Foreign Ministry spoil
man said that the Embassy
not informed in advance when.
sentence would be pronouncaj
and he was not certain wheth
the Embassy representative w]
in the courtroom at the time.)
Film Available
The Broward Bureau of ftl
Miami Herald has a 30-minul(l
color film, "Freedom to Know, I
narrated by Henry Fonda, avail-1
able for showing to groups. Pro-
duced by Knight -Ridder News-1
papers, the film contains no com-
mercial message, but details the
struggle to maintain one of I
America's cherished freedoms
Carl Dixon, at the Broward |
office, has more information.
Canada's Emissary
On Fact-Finder
For Embassy Site
By BARBIE ZELIZER
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Robert Stan field, the special
emissary of Canada's Prime
Minister Joe Clark, met with
Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan
for one hour here and met with
Interior Minister Yosef Burg in
the first stage of his fact-finding
mission to determine whether the
Canadian Embassy should be
moved from Tel Aviv to
Jerusalem. No details were given
about their talks.
Foreign Ministry sources said
Stan field and Dayan had "a good
meeting," which included dis-
cussion of the Camp David
agreements. Burg characterized
his meeting with the Canadian
envoy as very important.
HE SAID he gave the visitor
an historical overview
Jerusalem and of the West B*
He said the Jordanians m
conquered Jerusalem, and *
Israelis were its liberators-
also claimed that the contro-
versial Jewish settlements oatMl
West Bank were proof that Je
can live in Arab areas just*
Arabs live in Jewish neignW
hoods.
Stanfield was assigned his
mission by Clsrk after the latter*
election campaign pronuse w
move the Canadian Embasayv>
Jerusalem drew protests from ioe
Arab states and from Cnd*n
business interests active in* _
Arab countries. He wul vw*
number of Arsb capitate Wore
returning to Canada to prof*"
his recommendations ""
Embassy shift. He was fives***
year for the task.


Friday, September 28,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Oregon Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
Organizations In The News
service will be conducted at that
time.
PIONEER WOMEN
Natanya Pioneer Women will
meet on Wednesday, Oct. 10, at 1
p.m. in the Boca Raton Bank
Auditorium, 1334 N. State Road
7 (near Grand Union).
Gabrielle Greenstein will give a
book review of the story of "Mrs.
Shapiro's Knitting Book."
Refreshments will be served prior
to the meeting.
Pioneer Women, Hatikvah
Chapter, will meet on Tuesday,
Oct. 2, at Whiting Hall, 6767 -
24th St., Sunrise, at noon. A
playlet, "Who is a Jew," will be
presented.
On Sunday, Oct. 21, at
Whiting Hall at 7:30 p.m.. Max
Denner will give a dramatization
and music review of the book The
Lady and The Law. Refresh-
* ments. For tickets, contact Dora
Frucht.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Women's American ORT,
North Braward Region, met
Wednesday, Sept. 26, at Deicke
Auditorium, and saw an
educational movie, "The Making
of a Man" and planned for t
brunch at Danny's, Browarc
Mall, Wednesday, Oct. 31, at 11
a.m. Call Yetta Cowan or Let
Palley.
Tamarac Chapter of Women's
American ORT meets Thursday,
Sept. 27, at noon in Colony Club
Circle, Rec II. Shirley Sutter,
president of the North Broward
Region ORT, will be guest
speaker. A lunch will be served.
For information call Sarah S.
Weissman in Sunrise-
Women's American ORT
Landerdale-RJdge Chapter, meets
Thursday, Sept. 27, at 12:30 p.m.
at Lauderdale Lakes City Hall,
4300 NW 36th St. and State Rd.
7.
Barbara Camins, a skin
anah/st, will demonstrate cos-
metics. Refreshments will be
served.
HADASSAH
Tamar Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its regular meeting, Oct.
8, at Lauderdale Lakes City Hall
at 12:30. A film, "For the Good
of All," will be shown and
refreshments served.
The Bermuda Club Herri
Chapter of Hadassah will hold its
meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 10.
The Herd Chapter consists of
Bermuda Club residents only.
A skit based on a Shalom
Aleichem story will be presented
for the October program.
The Pine Island Ridge Chapter
of Hadassah will have its instal-
lation meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 9
at 12:30 p.m. in the Recreation
Hall.
Officers to be installed are
Margaret Goldstein, president:
Renee Fox, Mollie Rothschild,
Trudy Edelstein, Frances Sheir,
vice presidents; Sylvia Michaels,
treasurer; Ida Weiskoph, finan-
cial secretary: Ruth Gorney,
recording secretary; Rae Gold-
berg, corresponding secretary.
The installing officer will be
Libby Liff, founder of the Mayim
Group of the Point East Chapter
of Hadassah, and Ann Salkin,
vice president of the Florida Mid-
Coast Region of Hadassah will
present the charter to the new
chapter.
There will be a musical
program and refreshments will be
served.
A paid-up membership brunch
will be sponsored by Rayus
Group of West Broward
Hadassah on Tuesday, Oct. 16, at
noon at the Tamarac Jewish
Center. 9101 NW 67th St..
Tamarac All paid-up and hie
members are invited.
Millicent Sones is chairman.
Assisting her are Lillian
Shulman, Betty Marcus, Edythe
Schenker and Frances Gr
baum. Members are urged to
remit their dues and make their
reservation to Mrs. Schenker or
Mrs. Marcus before Oct. 1.
Mrs. Anna S. Silman,
president of West Broward
Chapter has arranged a Leader-
ship Training Course for mem-
bers of the three groups
Ramaz, Rayus and Shoshana.
Three consecutive sessions, on
Friday, Oct. 12, 19 and 26 will
take place. These will be con-
ducted by Mrs. Lee Rich, leader-
ship training chairman for Mid-
Coast Florida Region of
Hadassah.
Sunrise Shalom Chapter will
meet Thursday, Oct. 11, at the
Tamarac Jewish Center, 9101
NW 67th St., Tamarac, at noon.
"Twiddlers on the Roof" will be
presented by the Phase III
Choral Group. Refreshments will
beserved.
Somerset Shoshana Chapter of
Hadassah will have its next
regular meeting on Oct. 23 in the
clubhouse lounge at 12:30.
Esther Cannon will report on the
convention held in Chicago. The
chapter's dancers and a pianist
will perform..
Armon-Castle Garden Chapter
of Hadassah will hold the next
meeting on Oct. 8 at the Castle
Recreation Hall at noon.
Advance notice is made of the
reception for paid-up members to
be held Nov. 6. There will be a
program by the Lillian Hahn
Cantata Group, "Listen World."
L'Chayim Chapter of
Hadassah, Plantation, will bear a
book review by Anne Ackerman
about Raquela by Ruth Gruber,
Wednesday, Oct. 10, 12:30 p.m.
at Deicke Auditorium, 6701
Cypress Road, Plantation.
Refreshments.
A four-day trip is being
planned by liana Hawaiian
Gardens Hadasaah for Thanks-
giving weekend commencing
Thursday, Nov. 22, until Nov. 25,
at the Saxony Hotel, 3201 Collins
Ave., Miami Beach. Proceeds go
to the Hadassah Hospital.
JEWISH WAR
VETERANS
The Ladies Auxiliary meets at
12:30 p.m.. Wednesday, Sept. 26,
at NW 16th Street, Lauderhill, in
back of Wag's Restaurant.
Speaker, after the business
meeting, will be past NEC mem-
ber, Comrade Bernard Weiael-
berg. His topic: "The Relation-
ships and Responsibilities be-
tween the Post and the
Auxiliary."
BRANDEIS WOMEN
The Inverrary Woodlands
Chapter of the Brandeia Univer-
sity Women's Committee will
hold an opening luncheon
meeting on Monday, Oct. 8, at
11:30 a.m. at the Inverrary
Country Club.
Reservations will be accepted
by Ann Jacobs. In addition to the
presentation of the "Louie"
Award, a study group showcase
will be featured.
Study groups being offered
this year include Contemporary
Novel, the Classics, Conver-
sational Jewish, Notable Amer-
ican Women, Shakespeare,
Opera, Art, Current Jewish
Affairs, Museum Tours.
B'NAI B'RITH
Paul Karma, regional director
of B'nai B'rith insurance plans in
Broward County, will be the
speaker at the 7:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, Oct. 9, meeting of
Margate B'nai B'rith Lodge at
Margate Jewish Center.
B'nai B'rith Women, Ocean
Chapter, will hold a general
meeting on Oct. 9 at 12:30 p.m.
at Jarvis Hall, 4601 Ocean Drive,
Lauderdale-by-the-Sea. The
program will be a talk on Home
Health Services, and there will be
a demonstration of Am-Way
products. Refreshments will be
served.
FREE SONS
OF I8RAEL
Fort Lauderdale Lodge No.
219, Free Sons of Israel, will hold
a memorial meeting on Thursday,
Sept. 27, at 8 p.m. in the Whiting
Recreation Hall, NW 68th
Avenue and NW 24th Street,
Sunrise. Rabbi Zimmerman will
conduct the service.
ZOA
A Zionist Organization of
America National Jewish
Leadership Conference on
America-Israel Relations will be
held in Miami Beach, Oct. 24-28,
under the chairmanship of
Gordon B. Zacks, of Columbus,
Ohio, according to an annouce-
ment made by ZOA president,
Ivan J. Novick.
Zacks, who is a widely
recognized Jewish communal
leader, is a national vice chair-
man of the UJA and a past chair-
man of the Young Leadership
Cabinet of the UJA. The con-
ference will take place at the
Doral Hotel.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
On Monday, Oct. 8, Ti
Chapter holds a board meeting.
Monday, Oct. 8, Orah Chapter
of Century Village, Deerfield
Beach, holds its first meeting of
the season in the home of chapter
chairman, Blossom Miller. Irving
Fox, president, Memorabilia
Club, Century Village, is speaker.
Wednesday, Oct. 10,
Bonaventnre Chapter holds
board meeting in the home of
Charlotte Goldstein.
Friday, Oct. 12, Woodlands
Chapter holds its first member-
ship tea of the season at 10 a.m.
in the home of Frieda Rosen.
Slides and narration, "Faces of
the Future," will be presented.
SUNRISE JEWISH
CENTER SISTERHOOD
Sunrise Jewish Center Sister-
hood will hold its meeting
Wednesday, Oct. 17, at the
temple at 11:30 a.m. A mini-
lunch will be available. Atlantic
Federal Savings and Loan will
present the program.
On Wednesday, Oct. 31, the
Sunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood
will present an Afternoon with
Ann Ackerman. Leah's Journey
will be reviewed at 1 p.m. at the
Sunrise Jewish Center. Refresh-
ments will be available. For
tickets contact Renee Cohen.
PLANTATION JEWISH
CONGREGATION
Plantation Jewiah
Congregation Temple Kol Ami
will sponsor a Dinner-Dance
Saturday, Sept. 29 at 7:30 p.m. in
honor of the outgoing and in-
coming officers and directors.
On Friday, Oct. 6 at 8:15 p.m.,
the Family Service, celebrating
Sukkot, features the donation of
canned goods on this holiday of
Jewish Thanksgiving. These will
be distributed to needy families.
The Senior Youth Group will
build and decorate an outdoor
Sukka which will be visited
during the week by con-
gregational members and
students of the preschool and
religious schools.
Plantation Jewish
Congregation-Temple Kol Ami
will be the site of a Blood Donor
Program on Monday, Oct. 8 from
4 to 8 p.m. Further information is
available through the temple.
Friday evening, Oct. 12,
Temple Kol Ami will celebrate
Simchat Torah with consecration
of kindergarten and first grade
students who have entered the
Religious School. The con-
secrants will receive miniature
Torahs and the entire con-
gregation will participate in the
hakafot (marching around the
sanctuary with the Torahs).
Saturday morning, Oct. 13, a
service at 10:30 marks the con-
clusion of Sukkot. A Yizkor
Temple Kol Ami Plantation
Jewish Congregation Sisterhood
will meet on Oct. 15 at 10 a.m.
Program is "Getting In Shape,"
presented by European Health
Spa. Dress casual.
HILLEL SCHOOL
The Samuel Scheck Hillel
Community Day School, 19000
NE 25th Ave., North Miami
Beach, announces its annual Art
Auction, Saturday evening, Sept.
29, at the school with preview at
8:30 and auction of the Howard
Mann Art Center collection at
9:15.
AMERICAN
RED MAGEN DAVID
American Red Magen David is
presenting a variety show at 8
p.m., Sunday, Oct. 28, at Sunrise
Musical Theater. Reserved seats
may be had by calling Phil
Erstling, or Helen and Phil
Levine.
SENIOR ADULT CLUB
The first meeting of the new
season of the Senior Adult Club
of the JCC wul be held on
Thursday, Oct. 4, at 1:30 p.m at
the new JCC Building, 6501 W.
Sunrise Blvd., Plantation. Dis-
cussions, nominations of officers,
and a travelogue by Delta Air-
lines will be featured.
TECHNION SOCIETY
Women's Division, Technion
Institute of Israel, will hold its
next meeting Tuesday, Oct. 2, at
David Park Pavilion, Margate, at
1 p.m. A social and refreshments
will follow a brief business
meeting.
WORKMEN'S CIRCLE
Workmen's Circle-Greater
Lauderdale Branch 1046 meets
on Friday, Sept. 28 at 7:30 p.m.
at Lauderdale Lakes City Hall,
4300 NW 36th St. Sen. Minerva
Kaplan reports on "Silver Haired
Legislation."
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
The singing troupe Songs of
Broadway, led by Forrest
Willingham, will appear at
Temple Beth Israel, 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd., on Sunday.
Oct. 14, at 8:15 p.m. Tickets are
available from the temple.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Sisterhood of Temple Emann-
El, 3245 W. Oakland Park Boule-
vard, will again sponsor a course
of six two-hour intermediate
bridge lessons to be taught by
Mabel Pavlicek, professional
bridge teacher, at the temple, on
Monday morninga, beginning
Oct. 15 at 10 a.m.
All aspects of bridge will be
covered, including bidding, play
of the hand, and defense. These
lessons provide the experienced
bridge player the opportunity of
sharpening his or her game. The
class features bidding and
olaying specially prepared hands
M be followed by analysis and
explanation of all aspects of the
game. The class is open to women
and men.
Janice Starrels, Jeanette
Siegel, and Mabel Pavlicek are
handling reservations.
Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-
El will present a Fashion Fan-
tasia featuring styles from
Maggie's, women's European
clothier, E. Commercial
Boulevard, Fort Lauderdale. The
designs are being coordinated by
Joska, who will be the com-
mentator.
The luncheon will be held in the
Social Hall of the temple, 3245
W. Oakland Park Boulevard,
Fort Lauderdale, on Tuesday,
Oct. 16, and will be preceded by a
sherry hour. This affair is the
Sisterhood's annual paid-up
membership luncheon. Ad-
mission will be by advance reser-
vations only, which can be made
by calling Mary Blumberg or
Jessica Olef son.
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood
will hold its annual Rummage
Sale, Sunday, Oct. 21 through
Wednesday, Oct. 24. Hours are
Sunday noon to 6 pjn., Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
SWEBFNa
That outrageously rich
Swenaen'a Ice Cream
FT. LAUDERDALE. 2477 E SunrlM Blvd.
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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. September 28,1979
Empire State Report
Bigots Terrorize Long Island Family
&
ByBENGALLOB
NEW YORK-(JTA) -
An official of the Anti-Def-
amation League of B'nai
B'rith said here that he was
outraged by the inaction of
the police department in
providing protection for a
Suffolk County, L.I.,.
Jewish mother, Mindy Pin-
sky, who repeatedly re-
ported to police that she
and her four children and
their rented home in Mastic
Beach are targets of anti-
Jewish physical attacks,
and have been for weeks,
including a fire-bombing
that destroyed the family
Melvin Cooperman, ADL
director for Nassau and Suffolk
Counties also told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency in
telephone intervipw from his East
Meadow office that anti-Semitic
and anti-Black harassment has
been constant in both counties
during the six years he has been
ADL director and that he has
evidence of three neo-Nazi groups
operating in and around Nassau
County, and that the Ku Klux
Klan was increasingly active.
HE SAID he had been
pressing government and police
officials in the two counties for
years to stop treating the in-
cidents as "boyish pranks" and
to create effective police pro-
grams to track down and arrest
the perpetrators. He said he had
received a call from Suffolk
County Executive John Klein
and that Klein, after being in-
formed of the harassment of Mrs.
I'insky and her children, said he
would set up a meeting "shortly"
between Cooperman and county
police commissioner Donald
Dilworth.
The harassment of Mrs.
Pinsky and her two sons and two
daughters was brought to the
attention of the Jewish Defense
League. Becker said Mrs. Pinsky I
knew a local Jew, whom Becker
called a JDL supporter, who
called the JDL office in New York
City to report on the harassment.
While there are substantial
concentrations of Jews in the two
Long Island counties, Mrs.
Pinsky lives in an area of Mastic
Beach in which the Pinskys are
the only Jewish residents.
BECKER SAID he had been
called last Sunday by Mrs.
Pinsky who said the police were
not protecting her family. She
said she and her children were
being "terrorized" and that
bricks were regularly thrown
through the windows of the
rented home. Becker told the
JTA the Pinskys had decided to
leave the area and are moving out
at the end of the week.
Becker declined to say where
the Pinskys are moving, "to
protect the family," but ap-
parently they are remaining in
Suffolk County. Cooperman said
that also was his understanding.
Becker said he had sent three
JDL members to be with the
family Sunday night a week ago
and that, during that night, three
bricks were thrown through
windows of the house. He said
the front door has big holes made
by a would-be intruder who tried
to break in with a hatchet.
L. BECKER SAID the JDL hired
a guard for $60 who patrolled the
house the next night but it was
beyond the resources of the New
York JDL office to hire guards on
a regular basis. He told the JTA
that three JDL members went to
the Pinsky house and that two of
them remained through the
night. He said be had been told
by one of the two JDL members
that someone had pointed a gun
at him from outside but no
hooting took place.
Becker said "at least" three
1 JDL members stayed in the
Pinsky residence to help the.
move to the new residence they
will occupy. He said the Pinskys
had received death threats by
telephone and letter and that one
son, 14, and one daughter, 16,
had been "beaten up" by "local
punks." "
The* son was hospitalized
briefly, Becker said he had been
told. Becker said he had called
Cooperman who promised him a
comprehensive investigation and
action on the plight of the
Pinskys.
COOPERMAN said that, after
he talked to Becker, he called the
Pinsky home and spoke to the
older daughter, Michelle. Mrs.
Pinsky was not available because i
she has a job. After talking to
Michelle, Cooperman said, he
made a series of calls to various
county officials to initiate action
and to provide protection for the
Pinsky family.
The ADL official said he had
called Hank Johnston of the
Suffolk County Human Rights
Commission, asking him to
investigate the Pinsky harass-
ment and to check the lack of
thoroughness of the reaction of
the police in the local Fifth
Precinct.
He said he also called Arthur
Bergman, deputy to County
Executive Klein, asking him to
visit the Pinsky family and to
discuss the Pinsky and other
such incidents with police.
Cooperman said he was
following up each telephone call
with a letter, asking for a "close
watch" on police procedures in
such cases. He told the JTA that
he felt that police attention to
such incidents was ineffective.
HE CITED as an example his
discovery that six neighbors saw
the firebombing destruction of
the Pinsky car and that not one
of them had been called in by
local police for Questioning an
Syria
Demolishes
Old
Synagogue
NEW YORK (JTA) The
centuries old synagogue and
yeshiva of Beth Nassi in Aleppo,
Syria, was demolished by Syrian
authorities, according to reliable
reports received here by the
Committee for the Rescue of
Syrian Jewry, committee
president Abraham Dwek
reported. According to the
report, Dwek said, Syrian
authorities also ordered the
destruction of an entire Jewish
section in Aleppo and the
eviction of Jewish families whose
belongings were thrown into the
street.
Dwek said he sent a telegram
to President Carter, reporting on
the "distressing situation" of the
Jews of Syria and asking the
President to instruct the State
Department to protest "this
outrageous act of sacrilege and
demolition" of the synagogue
and yeshiva, located near the Bab
el Faraj Square in the heart of
Aleppo, as well as the destruction
of the Jewish section.
Dwek said he reiterated his
appeal to Carter to call on Syrian
President Hafez Assad to permit
the remnant of the Jewish
community, an estimated 6,000
Jews, to emigrate.
eyewitnesses. Cooperman also
confirmed a report by Becker
that the sign on the Mastic Beach
Hebrew Center had been defaced
and that its bulletin board had
been smashed recently.
The ADL official said that, in
response to his repeated earlier
warnings, extra police sur-
veillance had been provided
during the past three years for
between 120 to 140 synagogues in
the two counties for the High
Holy Days. He also disclosed
that a Jewish family in East Islip
had sold their home a few years
ago and fled to another location
when the anti-Semitic harass-
ment became unbearable.
Cooperman said he had ap-
peared, on invitation, at a
meeting of the Nassau County
Board of Supervisors on Aug. 27
and read a prepared statement in
which he asserted that in recent
months there had been a variety
of acts of terrorism cross
burnings and swastika smear ings
in many communities, in-
cluding Valley Stream, Port
Washington, Woodmere, Union-
dale and Long Beach.
HE SAID he told the
supervisors these were not
isolated or unusual incidents but
rather "a sad fact of life" on Long
Island. He criticized the per-
sistent official attitude of dis-
missing the incidents as "youth-
ful pranks," asserting they
revealed the "tip of an iceberg" of
silent support of such bigotry in
the general population.
He told the supervisors the
"immediate problem" was that of
preventing further acts by
making apprehension of the per-
petrators a matter of urgency.
Cooperman also proposed estab-
lishing a special unit in the
Nassau County Police Depart-
ment, with funds from the federal
Law Enforcement Assistance Act
and close police department
relations with the federal Justice
Bureau Civil Rights Division and
the New York State Attorney
General.
MWMMHMMHMBBHHHBHHI^MI
MM
Yarmulke Month'
Hester St. Becomes a Fever of Activity
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
June was "yarmulke" month. Hester Street on
New York's Lower East Side is the center of the
yarmulke industry and if you were out of em-
ployment, you could at least get temporary work
there at this period. It is in June that, the
yarmulke demand is at its height...
Yarmulkes, of course, are worn at other times
of the year, too. Recently, President Carter in
Israel was shown wearing one but at weddings
they are an essential and June is the most popular
month for marrying.
Someday no doubt there will be a history of the
world written from the standpoint of the
headgear. If you think of the American
Revolutionary period, how can you avoid
thinking of the three-cornered hat? It would have
been impossible to achieve independence without
it. Try putting on a derby or any of the modern
styles of hats on George Washington and no more
does he look like the father of his country.
AFTER THE passing of the revolutionary
period, about the time of Andrew Jackson, you
could have gone over the entire country and
scarcely been able to pick up one of the old three-
cornered hats. The so-called top hat, "stove
pipe." as more commonly designated, became the
great fashion. If you went to party conventions in
the decade before the Civil War, you would see
most of the delegates arrayed in them. Lincoln
apparently used to stuff some of his note papers
in his spacious top hat.
In the west, the broad-brimmed cowboy hat
became the fashion. It has been appropriated
from the Mexican sombreros.
So hats come and go. The yarmulke has stayed
for a long time. One reason perhaps is because it
is so small and light. It can easily be carried in
one pocket. But along with practical con-
siderations there are higher reasons.
If you put on a cowboy hat, you get the feeling
that you are in Arizona and you look about for a
horse. If you put on a yarmulke, the prosaic and
business world vanishes from your mind. You get
a spiritual feeling or that someone around you has
found the object of his love There is no mandate
for wearing a yarmulke. But as the old Jewish
saying has it, a minhag brtcht a din, a custom
transcends a law.
THE BUSINESS of marrying in June itself is a
custom Among Jews of old, oddly enough, the
great day of love was Yom Kippur. It was th*
custom among Jews of old for the young women
on Yom Kippur to gather in front of the
synagogue and dance All the girls borrowed
clothes. This was to give the poor girls an even
break with the rich. The young men stood around
looking on and before the stars came out on Yom
Kippur, marking the end of the fast, many had
found their future mates.
It seems incongruous that the most awesome o*
the holidays should be chosen for love, and yet
there was good sense and practical logic behind it
for Yom Kippur brought the maximum at-
tendance at the synagogue, so one had the widest
possible choice.
Also perhaps it is best to make one's choice of
| love partner on an empty stomach. If you pledge
I your troth after a good dinner, you can t be sure if
i wasn't the steak or the cakes that did it, but when
i you choose on an empty stomach, you know that
I gastronomy did not enter into it.
Perhaps the practice offered a further ad
I vantage. Instead of thinking aobut the stomach
I on the fast day, you thought of the heart.
| Nowadays, the institution of marriage seems to
!be facing some hard knocks. Marriages are still
plentiful, but so are divorces.
PERHAPS THE fact that the old-time Jewish
| marriage was often negotiated by the shadchan
-. was a good thing. The lovers themselves perhaps
approach the problem*too one-sidedly. The
I shadchan considered the situation from a broader
i perspective.
There is no lack of advice to lovers about how
I ^> Pursue their love-making. For instance, the
I Bible tells us that Naomi was worried about
I beautiful Ruth being without a husband. She has
I v SvV rich bachelor. Boaz, who has a farm.
I She tells Ruth to take the Gime: bus and go down
J there and he down on the field. Naomi no doubt
I !w "?e/aying of the Midrash that pleasure is
I d""8- when il come8 y way of surprise. So
I Kuth is lying down in the com field, and Boaz
comes along and is hooked.
But, alas, we don't get much advice on how to
tT t!i ""T1?8! a 8u??i88 One of the rabbis of
the Talmud had an idea. His wife seemed to
rr2f u if Way9 V* him what ne didn't want
to eat. If he wanted peas, she gave him a nice dish
of carrots, and if be asked for carrots, she gave
" Ti.Bu.tJ!t.didn't h*- *"* He ust asked
tor what he didn't want and got what hswantil
H is just a matter of art


Friday, September 28,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
Victor Bienstock
U.S. Policy Ignores Our Own History
Continued from Page 4
the Villa forces. Hia instructions
were:
You will promptly organize
an adequate military force of
troops under the command of
Brig. Gen. (John J.) Pershing
and will direct him to proceed
promptly across the border in
pursuit of the Mexican band
which attacked the town of
Columbus and the troops there
on the morning of the ninth
instant. These troops will be
withdrawn to American territory
as soon as the de facto govern-
ment of Mexico is able to relieve
them of their work. In any event,
the work of these troops will be
finished as soon as Villa band or
bands are known to be broken
ud."
Secretary Baker noted in
aublic announcements that the
President had stressed the
operation would be carried out
"with scrupulous regard for the
sovereignty of Mexico."
ON MARCH 16, 1916, the
advance units of "Black Jack"
Pershing's forces crossed the
border, and the last elements of
the expedition did not return to
United States soil until
February, 1917, having remained
on Mexican soil for 11 months
and having penetrated the
country to a depth of 300 miles.
The American units left Mexico
only after it was clear that the
Villista forces had been ef-
fectively destroyed, and Carranza
had substantially consolidated
his control over the country.
When the Pershing expedition
entered Mexico, Carranza
protested loud and long against
this violation of his country's
sovereignty although there was
strong suspicion that, secretly,
he welcomed the American
undertaking to destroy the
Villista threat his own troops
were unable to contain.
The Americans expected
cooperation from Carranza's
troops but never received it,
meeting instead with all sorts of
obstacles including blocking of
supplies and even false in-
formation on the location of Villa
strongholds. At one stage,
Carranza generals passed down
orders that the American
columns were to be blocked if
they moved in any direction
except northwards back towards
the border.
THERE ARE, naturally,
some differences between
the Villa scenario and the
current Lebanese situation
but not enough to render the
Wilsonian principle inapplicable.
Instead of a dissident Pancho
Villa, there are a Yasir Arafat
and the PLO engaged in the same
murderous activities against
Israel that Villa practiced against
the United States.
Dorothy Welch, Inc.
811E. La. Ola. Blvd. Fort Lauderdale
527-9146
A Happy New Year To All
Instead of a Carranza
desperately trying to consolidate
his hold on the presidency and
the country, there is a Syrian -
controlled puppet regime which
has no authority and no control
over the country. Wilson's appeal
to the Mexicans was ignored;
Begins appeal to the Lebanese
was rebuffed.
As the United States respected
the border with Mexico, so
Irsrael respected the border with
Lebanon until it realized, as the
Americans finally did, that
guerrilla, terror attacks could
only be prevented by reaching in
and destroying the attackers in
their hideouts. Most Lebanese
would be as happy as the Israelis
if the attacking power of the
PLO, which brought down the
democratic government of
Lebanon, were to be eliminated.
The United States had no
desire to compromise Mexican
sovereignty, and President
Wilson tried to get Gen.
Carranza's regime to assume
responsibility for order along the
international border, but
Carranza refused to negotiate
while American troops were on
Mexican soil.
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Fort Lauderdale 33309
971-7770


Page 14
ThtJtwisk Floridian ofGreater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, oeptemoer *o, n"
Jewish Quislin
Iran's Ancient Jewish Community Under Surveillance
By BARBIE ZELIZER
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The 4,500-member Jewish
community in Damascus is
dominated by an 80-year-old
Jewish supporter of the Syrian
regime who is regarded with1
distrust by the Jewish
population, two American Jewish
students recently told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency.
The two, Terry Magady, 23,'
and Dan Weiner, 22, both of
California, spent five days last
month in the Syrian capital as
part of a personal "fact-finding"
tour of the region, including
Egypt, Jordan and Israel. They.
were put in touch with the JTA
by an official of the Jewish'
Agency student department.
"EVERY OFFICIAL tran
saction, including applications to
go abroad, must go through a
man called Mr. Totah," they
explained. "He acts as a liaison
between the government and the
Jewish community. Unfor-
tunately, he acts largely out of
self-regard and sells information
to Syrian officials about the
comings and goings of the
community."
The figurehead leader, as
Magady and Weiner described
him, is regarded by the Jewish
community, who call him "a 50-
50 Jew," with a mixture of
distrust and fear. "Talk to Mr.
Totah first." thev were told.
"Totah will make a phone call
and everything will be OK."
Totah is also reportedly in
regular contact with the
American Embassy in
Damascus.
"We avoided Totah for as long
as we could, because we knew
that meeting with him might
prevent us from reaching the
community at large," they said.
Totah, however, "caught up"
with them on the fourth day of
their visit, greeting them by
name at one of the local
synagogues. The next day, which
was by coincidence their last, two
"well-dressed" men visited them
at the youth hostel at which they
were staying, telling them "to be
sure they were on their scheduled
flight to Amman the next
morning." They were.
TOTAH PRESENTED the
two students with what they
termed a "white-washed"
overview of Jewish life in Syria,
denying any problems and
minimizing the political op-
pression to which Syrian Jews
are subjected. They received a
different picture, however, from
other, more forthcoming com-
munity members.
"We found an extremely af-
fluent community, with sur-
prisingly strong Jewish values
and a strong Jewish identity,
spiritually led by the well-liked
and voung Rabbi Albert
UNIFIL Helps
Terrorists to Infiltrate
By RAY SAIDEL
BINT EL-JEBEYL, South
Lebanon Smashed in
Lebanon's civil war, crushed as a
PLO command center in
Operation Litani, Bint el-Jebeyl s
tumbled buildings house a
resilient people headquarters
for some of the Moslem militia of
Hadad's Joint Christian Shia
Moslem Force combatting the
PLO.
I came to see a friend of a
friend, Captain Abu Emil, but
he is away.
My contact introduces me to
Sheik Moussa Fares-sares,
deputy commander of Bint el-
Jebeyl, Maroun, Arss-Marun,
Yaroun and Beit Kounem. He
said angrily, "Between here and
Beirut are over 300 terrorist
centers. United Nations
(UNIFIL) helps them infiltrate
this area not just on foot but by
jeep."
THE TOWN had been reduced
by the terrorists to 500 people
before the Israeli incursion. Now
it has more than 11,000 again,
plus 3,000 here for the summer.
In the last 60 days, this area
received four major attacks
supported by artillery, missile
and RPG fire.
"We hope to establish peace
here," the sheik said. "We are not
really strong enough yet to at-
tack the terrorists, but we see
they fortify their positions,
strengthen arms and increase
their number. They mean to
attack us and we must answer.
"UNIFIL will not deter them,
they wdl hot save us. For that we
must go inside their area and
take the terrorists' positions to
defend our homes and families, to
push the terrorists away so they
cannot shell our homes and kill
our children."
"IT IS my hope," he said, "We
can see they are getting ready to
attack and kill our families, and
we are not ready to accept this.
One day we have to liberate our
whole country. We haven't the
forces, but it's our duty to believe
in that and to that.
I asked if he could get help
from Chamoun of Gamliel's
forces in the north.
He said, "They have their own
problems fighting the PLO and
the Syrians. It is not easy."
"I ASK YOU," said Sheik
Moussa, "I ask you to tell the
whole world, "Where is the whole
world? Where is the free world?
The PLO are inhuman here, they
kill our families, and the whole
world, it does nothing. Where is
the conscience of the world?' I
have lost my ideals.
"What have they to do in
Lebanon, the PLO terrorists?
Does Lebanon belong to the
Palestinian terrorists? The only
help we have is in Israel."
Later, guns piled on the win-
dow ledge, we hate humus in
olive oil, peta, onions, strong
good shaslik and kabob and with
good Holland beer we toasted our
friendship and the absent
commander "To Abu-Emil!"
THE WAR in South Lebanon
is not a war of Christian against
Moslem. It has become a war of
the South Lebanese people under
the banner of Free Lebanon
against the hated Palestinian
Liberation Front.
A visitor from Israel is most
welcome in this small Shi'ite
village. Mohamed Kablan
showed me his house, the rocket
hole before it, and the second
rocket hole through the wall.
Ten days ago his son, his son's
wife, his two granddaughters,
seated at dinner, were killed
outright, Their fresh graves are
across the road.
DRY-EYED, the grandfather
softly said, "We must work to
liberate our country, and we feel
it is our duty to pay the price
necessary."
His neighbors were introduced,
"I lost my son, and this man his
daughter. The terrorists took
them from us. They were never
seen again."
We shake hands, "The enemy
of my enemy is my friend."
Ilamrah," Magady said. "But
this community is denied even
minimal political freedoms and is
subjected to an ever presented
feeling of tension that things
could get worse at any point."
Specifically, those concerns
center on a political take-over by
Islamic radicals or another war
with Israel. Most important, all
want out of Syria.
Magady and Weiner reported
that community members
branded the controversial
screening of a CBS-TV 60
Minutes program on Syrian
Jewry a few years ago as a "total
farce." They pointed to the
presence of Syrian officials who
accompanied the television crew
abroad, provided they leave their
family and a $7,000 deposit
behind. In addition, some 400
women lack partners for
marriage; emigration is a for-
bidden topic of discussion; and a
plain-clothes policeman regularly
at all times as ample evidence of
the one-sided picture of con-
tentment and freedom which
resulted.
"WE WOULD give up
everything we have here, all our
possessions and money, if we
could just get out," community
members told the two students,
with many expressing a desire to
immigrate to Israel. "All we want
is to be with our family and to
keep our Jewish identity
anywhere but here." Time and
again, the two students heard
expressions of bewilderment over
the fact that many Iranian Jews
chose lo remain in Iran after the
Shah was deposed. For them, the
implications of the ascent of an
Islamic republic are all too clear,
Weiner and Magady related.
For this reason, as well as one
of safety, the Jewish community
in Damascus is a cohesive one,
clinging to remnants of Jewish
tradition as a means of retaining
their heritage. All shops close on
the Sabbath, some of the com-
munity observes kashrut, and
attendance is high at two Jewish
day schools and three
synagogues.
SIX MEN are studying for
their rabbinical ordination and
religious artifacts are freely
brought in from abroad. Daily life
for many of the community
members, most of whom are
brass and copper merchants, is a
good one, and Weiner added that
the impressive Jewish com-
munity center is reminiscent of a
local Jewish community center
back in the U.S.
Tensions between the Jewish
community and Moslems have
largely died down since the 1973
Yom Kippur War. But Magady
and Weiner reported that it is an
enforced, and perhaps illusory
picture of harmony.
Entire families are arbitrarily
punished for the act of one in-
dividual and only family heads
are allowed to go on periodic trips
patrols the shops in the Jewish
quarter.
COMMUNITY MEMBERS,
the two students said, praise the
pressure exerted on the Syrian
government by American of-
ficials and world Jewry, con-
tending that it is largely
responsible for the fact that acts
of violence committed against
them are now at a minimum. But
all fear that this respite is
temporary and that time works
against them.
They look to Israel with great
pride, listening regularly to Israel
Radio's Arabic-language
broadcasts and tending to glorify
Israeli military prowess. "If only
Israel would destroy this regime
and free us," Magady and Weiner
said one person told them. "For
this we wait, because it is the
only way we will ever get out of
Syria." ____
.LA
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V.


^September 28,1979
The Jewish Floridianof Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pairn S
Page 15
rMONITOR
The Times Light the Way
an impressive, editorial on
9, The New York Times
j on the Carter adminis-
tion to abandon its vain
suit of a "comprehensive
tlement" in the Middle East
it destroy the Camp David
ords and the Israeli-Egyptian
j treaty.
Times argued that a
aprehensive settlement is an
ssible dream because it
litates sabotage by enabling
radical Arab states to
cise a destructive veto.
Ireover, it would reinstate
which will never co-
! since, as The Times
out, it "can have Arab
endents only so long as some
Ife continues."
[Having brokered the mar-
ze between Egypt and Israel,
[uny Carter seemed unwilling
the newlyweds furnish their
house," The Times said.
Washington pursues a fantasy:
aagic moment when all the
: can be herded into one
and 'settled' in an orgy of
apromise."
"EARS THAT the con-
versy over Andrew Young's
Ignation as America's UN
[>oy would strengthen the PLO
isolate Israel are un-
ranted, judging by editorials
columns in newspapers
dss the country.
The consensus holds that
iing was responsible for his
dismissal, that his followers
knot justifiably blame Israel or
herican Jews, and that court-
Ip of the PLO would appease
jorism and violate the com-
kment to Israel.
)n another front, many editors
plore the "inflammatory"
ck-Jewish confrontation and
i>al for its swift resolution.
The Los Angeles Times (Aug.
wrote, "What was decisive
that Young was not candid
his superiors ... It became
ossible for him to continue in
x>st."
[he Detroit News (Aug. 17)
Young's record of be-
ng the United States and
ilting its allies and suggested
Young might have become
| towering figure in world af-
s" had he not possessed the
flaw of ego-driven indis-
lion."
(>N THE same day, the New
Bans Times-Picayune editor-
ed, "The triggering incident
of his own making and he
aid have been fired long ago
|other sufficent reasons." Said
New Orleans States Item:
fmng brought on bis own
'all. His lying to his own
Department was in-
|rable."
The Richmond Times-Dispatch
tag- 21) wrote that Young's
|havior was, for an ambas-
|r, completely intolerable .
firing offense When it
|es to discrimination .
|s, as a people, probably know
about how it feels to be vic-
than any other group on
|h His action seemed to
1 a threat to Israeli
rity."
[he Press Herald of Portland,
(Sept. 1) declared that the
m of American Black
pera to condemn the virulent
ansm" of the PLO would do
eparable damage to the civil
Its movement."
the Washington Star (Aug.
paid, "When the exercise is
sited selective, appears
Bful ... in a spirit that
sta a tactic of political
Pge, that is no service to the
tk community, to its basic
"cal interests, or indeed to
cause espoused."
Washington letter on
American policy in the Middle East
The Dayton Daily News (Aug.
17) wrote, "There is an obligation
to reassure Israel about any
change The United States
has left its one proven Middle
East ally shaken and angry."
The Kansas City Star (Aug.
28) said, "Since the Andrew
Young fiasco ... a new crop of
pseudo and politically oppor-
tunistic 'experts' have decided
that both Israel and the U.S.
have had their heads in the sand
over the Palestinian question and
that since Andy Young is a nice
guy, then Yasir Arafat must be a
nice guy, too."
There are many, many more.
, I. L. Kenen
Now, outgoing UN Ambas-
sador Young is urging Black
African nations to re-establish
diplomatic links with Israel and
become a moderating influence in
the Middle East. Several African
nations broke off ties with Israel
following the 1973 Yom Kippur
War thinking the Arab nations
would be helpful to them.
And Young, hearing of Rev.
Jesse Jackson's recent comments
about Israel, rejected criticism of
Israel for its trade with South
Africa meager in comparison
to that of African and other
nations saying: "Israel
becomes too easy a scapegoat for
other problems we have."
No Mideast Summit
Vance Declares
WASHINGTON (JTA) Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance upheld Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan's recent meetings with two Palestinians as being
within Israeli-American understandings about such
contacts and characterized them as aiding the "autonomy
negotiations" between Israel and Egypt for the West
Bank and the Gaza Strip.
REPLYING TO a reporter's question at a news
conference, Vance said, regarding Dayan's meetings, that
"It has always been clear that both Israel and the U.S.
could have discussions with them. They are both helpful
and useful for the autonomy negotiations."
Vance virtually ruled out an American-Egyptian-
Israeli summit conference for this autumn in Washington,
saying that there are "no plans" for it. He said that his
session late this month with Day an and Egyptian Defense
Minister Kamal Hassan Ali is the "only meeting thus far"
that is planned. That session, Vance said, will deal with
the monitoring in Sinai related to Israel's withdrawal
from the area under the Camp David accords.
Cotetta King on Jews-Blacks
Denies Jewish Support of Blacks
Has Been Based on Self -Interest'
ATLANTA (JTA) Mrs.
Coretta Scott King, widow of the
late civil rights leader, Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr., made a
statement on the status of Black-
Jewish relations in America,
excerpts of which follow:
"Because Blacks and Jews
share a common heritage as two
of the most oppressed minorities
in the history of humankind, any
viable coalition for social
progress in America must include
both of these groups if it is to be
successful.
"I cannot agree with those who
have suggested that strong
Jewish support of the civil rights
movement led by my husband
was based mostly on self-interest.
It is true that it is in the self-
Hy Sirota Named to
Bonus Leadership
Hy Sirota, director of public
relations for Menorah Chapels,
has been named coordinator for
condominiums and organizations
of the State of Israel Bonds Or-
ganization in north Broward
County. The announcement was
made by William Littman, chair-
man of the board of governors,
Broward County Israel Bonds.
Long active in
Jewish commun-
al affairs, Sirota
has been a com-
munity and civic
leader for some
time. He is char-
ter president of
Sunrise B'nai
B'rith and past
president of the (
South Broward Sirota
Council ot
B'nai B'rith Lodges. He is also a
member of the fundraising com-
mittee of the U.S. B'nai B'rith
Foundation Cabinet.
Sirota was honorary president
of AABC in Irvington, N.J., and
is past president of the Syna-
gogue Council of Essex County.
He has served in many leadership
positions within the Israel Bonds
Organization and the UJA and
has been honored by both. Sirota
is a member of the Sunrise
Jewish Center.
iinterest of minorities to join
together to insure their survival,
but Jewish support of Black
Americans in their sturggle for
equality has always transcended
the dictates of political ex-
pediency.
"FROM THE earliest days of
the civil rights movement to the
present day, Blacks have counted
on the support of the Jewish
community. A number of my
husband's closest allies, some of
whom have dedicated an entire
lifetime to the movement for
racial equality, were Jews .
There can be no doubt that this
commitment was based on
fundamental human decency and
not simple self-interest.
"In recent years, however,
many observers have noted a
deterioriation of Black-Jewish
relations. Large Islamic
populations in many African
countries and growing numbers
of Black Americans who have
joined the Islamic faith has
prompted some increase in iden-
tification with the cause of the
Palestinian Arabs. Others saw a
fundamental conflict of interest
emerge in the Bakke case and the
question of affirmative action in
general. .
"Finally, the recent furor over
Andrew Young's resignation
from his post at the United
Nations is seen by many as cause
for a serious split between Blacks
and Jews. The responsible Black
leadership has always stood fast
for the right of Israelis to a
homeland and peace with
security and will continue to do
so. I have faith that the
responsible Jewish leaders will
continue to support the struggle
of Blacks for racial justice.
"BUT THERE is another,
larger issue at stake. It is a
universal principle that applies to
all political conflict between
the people of Northern Ireland
and the British, the struggle in
Southern Africa as well as the
conflict between Israelis and
Palestinian Arabs. It is the prin-
ciple of open communication that
is essential for nonviolent recon-
ciliation We, who deeply
believe in the nonviolent method,
can never condone a policy of
non-communication with political
opponents. There can be no hope
of peace without a willingness to
talk.
"I know that I am not alone in
this belief. It was recently
reported that a number of
prominent American Jews like
Philip Klutznick, Nahum Gold-
niunn, George Gruen and Her-
man Edelsberg met with PLO
representatives as early as 1976.
"For many years I have
worked closely with Jewish
groups on common issues like full
employment and discrimination.
I am deeply committed to the
world-wide struggle of Jews and
all people for human rights. I
have served as honorary chair-
person of the Women's Plea for
Soviet Jewry in Atlanta because
I believe, as my husband said,
'We are all tied together in a
single garment of destiny.' It is
my sincerest hope that Black and
Jewish Americans will continue
to respect each other's right to
formulate independent policies
even as we join together in our
mutual quest for social decency
and justice."
Levitt M
memorial chapel
1921 PembfOKe hd
Hollywood, Fl.
921 7200
Sonny Levitt. F.O.
13385 S W DmtHwy
North Mliml.FI*.
_ 949*315
"North Broward's
Only
All Jewish cemetery"


-.
Page 16
Tt *^ r J1

fc-s
The Jewish Fhridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Triday, September 28,1979
Iran's Jewish Community Given Life Line
WJC Prepared to Use Political Connections to Help
By YITZHAK SH ARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Philip
M. Klutznick, president of the
World Jewish Congress, said here
that the WJC stands ready to use
its wide political connections on
behalf of Jews wishing to leave
Iran. Addressing a meeting of the
WJC's Israeli Executive here,
both he and former WJC presi-
dent, Dr. Nahum Goldmann
expressed dismay that until now
most Iranian Jews have chosen
to remain in their country despite
the turmoil and their uncertain
future.
Goldmann said that Jews do
not tend to heed warnings. He
said that if European Jews had
listened to the warnings of the
1930s, millions would have been
alive today. The situation in Iran
is very similar, Goldmann said,
but Jews there are waiting until
the last moment when it may be
too late to save themselves.
KLUTZNICK AGREED that
Iranian Jews seem unaware of
the dangers that lie in the present
political upheaval, especially
those in the smaller, remote com-
munities. In spite of urgent calls
and invitations from Israel, Jewa
do not come to Israel, he said.
The Joint Distribution Com-
mittee and the Jewish Agency
have readied the means for
transferring Iranian Jews, yet
they do not want to leave,
Klutznick stated.
He noted that while the WJC is
not a rescue organization and
lacks the manpower and
machinery for a rescue operation,
it has access to influential
political circles and every channel
is open to act on behalf of Iranian
Jews.
He said he wanted to draw the
attention of world Jewry to small
Jewish communities scattered
around the globe which are
forgotten until an emergency
arises.
IRANIAN JEWS not only are
not leaving for Israel in substan-
tial numbers but some already
here are returning, hoping that
the new civilian government in
Teheran will be able to restore
law and order.
Debate OverDeath
to Terrorists
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Cabinet debate that resulted
in a 7-5 vote in favor of applying
11 ir death penalty to terrorists
who commit acts of extreme
violence and cruelty saw the
emergence of sharp differences of
opinion on the subject that fore-
shadow another grueling debate
when the matter is taken up by
the Knesset.
A number of ministers are
known to have suggested
deferring the discussion. But
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
insisted that the Cabinet act now
on his proposal.
An El Al plane that left for
Teheran Monday morning carried
80 Iranian Jews. There were some
200 passengers waiting for its
return flight to Tel Aviv. But
most of them are Israelis who are
being evacuated. Solel Boneh, the
Histadrut construction company,
has suspended its work on three
Erejects in Iran and is bringing''!
ame its workers and engineers.
Only five supervisors will
remain in Iran for the time being
to look after the $2 million-worth
of equipment left behind.
Sadat's Daughter Visits
HAIFA (JTA) The eldest daughter of
President Anwar Sadat, Ma ha, said here that she hopes
to return to Israel for a more extensive tour of the
country, adding that she is impressed with the warmth
and hospitality accorded her by the Israeli people.
"People here have really been so warm to me," she
told a reporter for Israel Radio, "and I'd love to come,
back at the first opportunity."
THE YOUNG and attractive woman was taken on an
impromptu tour of Haifa, during which she requested to
meet with an Israeli family.
And on the
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Full Text
r, September 28,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
men's Division Plans a Special Event
imic communications con-
it, Rosalie H. Smith, whose
appears in several pree-
Who'a Who volumes, is
to town to orchestrate an
two-day Education
ate for the Women's
lion of the Jewish Federation
ater Fort Lauderdale.
important dates for the
invited to take part in the
nry premiere of the
len's Division year of ac-
in 32nd year of Israel's life
is with the overture Monday
ig, Nov. 5, and resumes
ay morning, Nov. 6, until
call at 3 p.m., with coffee
i and lunches entre-acts.
at more important is the
trledge that Rosalie Smith,
graduate of University of
tford, Conn., who has studied
University of Lausanne,
Borland and continued doc-
studies at Southern Con-
Icut College and the Hartford
3logical Seminary, will be the
r of the twoday Repertory
He Jewish Community Center,
Iman Campus, 6601 W. Sun-
[Blvd.
le provides training and con-
ing services in speech and
r-personal communications.
Rosalie Smith
She teaches in the Management
Development Program of the
Hartford Graduate Center and
the Counseling Center of Hart-
ford College for Women. A
former assistant professor of
communications and theater at
the University of Hartford, and a
certified speech pathologist, she
was also director of the univer-
sity's Speech Clinic.
A year ago she, with her
husband, Dr. Jay D. Smith,
visited Israel under the auspices
of the Friendship Flight spon-
sored by President Jimmy Carter
to serve as a cultural and familial
exchange of Americans and
specified foreign countries. Dr.
Smith served as flight surgeon
for the group.
Her interests in Israel and the
Jewish community in the U.S.
parallel her extensive back-
ground in public speaking, oral
interpretation, group dynamics,
and interpersonal com-
munications. She chaired the
annual Women's Seminar of the
Women's Division of Hartford
Jewish Federation, was a
representative on the Young
Leadership UJA Mission to
Israel, received Israel's Woman
of Valor Award, coordinated the
Special Gifts division of the
Hartford Women's Division UJA
Campaign and served as
president of Hartford Jewish
Children'8 Service Organization.
And her methods of developing
awareness and improving skills
for increased efficiency and
greater productivity in inter-
personal communications and
presentations to small and large
groups will be vividly demon-
strated on Nov. 5 and 6 for the
Women's Division in their two-
day session to be held at the JCC
Perlman Campus.
Spewak to Lead Woodlands
Campaign for Second Time
Postal Receives CJF Smolar Award
2W YORK A special
liar Award for Excellence in
ih American Jewish Jour-
was presented by the
il of Jewish Federations
r) to Bernard Postal, editor,
lalist and author.
Dstal's many outstanding
ributions to Jewish journal-
lover the course of a 50-year
won him the special
in, according to Smolar
rd Committee Chairman
| Viener of Richmond, Va.
ice 1970, he has been the
ciate editor of The Jewish
in New York and author of
weekly column, "Postal
Founder and editor of the
thly magazine, The Jewish
1st, Postal served as director
of public information for the
Jewish Welfare Board from 1946-
1970, as founder and editor of
"The JWL Circle" and editor of
"This is JWB." Previously he
was B'nai B'rith's national in-
formation director.
Founder of both the American
Jewish Press Association and the
American Jewish Public
Relations Society, Postal has co-
authored The Jewish Tourist's
Guide to the U.S.; Landmarks of
a People, Encyclopedia of Jews in
Sports and Jewish Landmarks in
New York.
CJF confers its regular Smolar
Awards annually at the General
Assembly. Named for Boris
Smolar, editor emeritus of the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
attic Flow at Temple Emanu-El
lartin Yohalem, president of
pie Emanu-El, 3246 W. Oak-
Park Blvd., Fort Lauder-
recently met with the
ctor of the traffic engineering
sion of the Broward County
of Commissioners, to
jss how best to facilitate
fie flow in and out of the
iple.
tastbound drivers on Oakland
Blvd., coming from West
yard Countv, should turn left
nple Beth Shalom of
Uywood and Fort Lauder-
has appointed Rabbi Jay
tfeld, most recently of San
fo and Vancouver, as
ttant youth director. He
serve with Shirley M.
en, youth coordinator, and
Leslie Wasserman, head
ifisor, in meeting the needs
the 300 teenagers enrolled
he temple's program*.
on NW 36th Avenue, go north
one short block, turn right on
NW 32nd Street and proceed to
the temple property, and turn left
for parking.
Those who live east of the
temple should exit the property
via the east driveway into West-
bound Oakland Park Boulevard
traffic, and make a U-turn at 33rd
Avenue where a left turn signal is
active and a U-turn is permitted.
Permission for signs, to be
provided and installed by the
congregation, is being sought by
the Traffic Engineering Division.
Meanwhile, directional signs
have been posted on the temple
property. All vehicular traffic
there has a one-way flow only.
Emanu-El
Sukkot
Festival
On Sunday, Oct. 7, at 4:30
p.m., Temple Emanu-El members
will gather at the temple, 3246 W.
Oakland Park Boulevard, Fort
Lauderdale, to celebrate the
festival of Sukkot at an outdoor
dinner and service, followed by
Israeli singing and dancing.
Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon and
Cantor Jerome JJ
conduct the service from 5:30 to 6
p.m. Congregants will beWto
the Sukka which will be
decorated with fruits and leaves
in the traditional manner. Lisa
Fox will lead the musical
festivities.
(JTA), the awards encourage the
highest standards of integrity,
creativity and professionalism in
Jewish journalism of the United
States and Canada.
The Council of Jewish Fed-
erations is the association of
more than 190 Federations,
Welfare Funds and Community
Councils which serve nearly 800
communities and embrace over
95 percent of the Jewish
population of the United States
and Canada. Established in 1932,
the Council serves as a national
instrument to strengthen the
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leadership
in developing programs to meet
changing needs in the Jewish
community; through the ex-
change of successful experiences
to assure the most effective com-
munity services; through estab-
lishing guidelines for fundraising
and operation; and through joint
national planning and action on
common purposes dealing with
local, regional, national and
international needs.
One good turn deserves
another particularly, if that
was so successful that it didn't
require a command performance
for Sidney Spewak to accept the
chairmanship for a second year
for the Jewish Federation's
Woodlands UJA Campaign for
1980.
His efforts, with the aid of a
dedicated group of volunteers,
produced more than a half-million
dollar campaign for the 1979
Campaign. Now, echoing the
theme of the new Campaign,
Spewak has assured Campaign
Chairman Milton Keiner, "1980
means we must do more than
ever, and I'm happy accepting
the challenge."
Spewak, recently elected to the
>oard of directors of Woodlands
Country Club, was previously
active in the Allied Jewish
Appeal of Southern New Jersey;
and the UJA Campaign in Wood-
crest Country Club in his former
home town. Now the retired
CPA, a graduate of Temple
University in Philadelphia, is
enjoying Florida living with his
wife, Maxine. They have two
sons, Stephen and Michael.
Co-chairman with Spewak in
the all-important campaign in the
Woodlands will be Bernard
Singles 'Break Fast'
The Young and Active Singles
of the Jewish Community Center
of Greater Fort Lauderdale will
have a "Break the Fast" party at
the close of Yom Kippur services
Monday, Oct. 1, at the home of
Joan Saperstein, 4421 N. 41st
Ct., Hollywood.
Sidney Spewak
Libros, chairman of the Jewish
Federation's publicity com-
mittee, and an ardent, committed
campaigner like Spewak in pre-
senting the needs of supporting
the Jews of Israel, the Jewish
way of life in North Broward
County and elsewhere in the
world. Now more than ever they
promise their 32 days of cam-
paigning will be dedicated whole-
heartedly to the 32 years of Israel
living. ______
Planning A Trip?
councils 1979 Exciting Travel
'Program to Israel, Europe,
, west coast, Canadian Rockies
' and Alaska is now available.
National council
of Jewish women
Felicia B. Sussman
733-0662 or
Lily Lester
484-3492
YAHRZEIT TABLETS
For Dignified Fund-raising
Over 52 years experience In furnishing all
kinds of Bronze and Aluminum Tablets,
Memorials, Donor Plates, Trees of Life Awards
Portrait Tablets, Letters, Testimonials,
Dedicatory Tablets, Original Sculpture, Etc.
Send for free calalog or call.
UNITED STATES BRONZE
& ALUMINUM CORP.
1065 E. 28thSt. Hialeah, Fla. 33013
______ 836-2880 or 836-2908
Light tt\e candle
and remember?
As our fathers before us, light the
candle and remember those who
have left us. Hold this day for
reflection and thoughtfulness; in
solemnity, strength of purpose
and hope.
Menorah Chapels, to preserve the
traditions of our faith, wishes to
offer a gift of remembrance. A
Yahrzeit Calendar in the name of
the departed. A part of our
religious life, now and through
the ages.
THE ONLY JEWISH-OWNED CHAPELS
IN BROWARD COUNTY
REPRESENTING
KIHSCHlNSAUM ROS IfC
New von
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Call or write for your Yahrzeit Calendar at:
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313
742-6000
In Dade, call 861-7301
In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME DATE
AND TIME OF DEATH OF THE DEPARTED.
Chapels also in Deerfield Beach and Margate


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. September 28,1979
Empire State Report
Bigots Terrorize Long Island Family
>'
ByBENGALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An official of the Anti-Def-
amation League of B'nai
B'rith said here that he was
outraged by the inaction of
the police department in
Sroviding protection for a
uffolk County, L.I.,.
Jewish mother, Mindy Pin-
sky, who repeatedly re-
ported to police that she
and her four children and
their rented home in Mastic
Beach are targets of anti-
Jewish physical attacks,
and have been for weeks,
including a fire-bombing
that destroyed the family
car.
Melvin Cooperman, ADL
director for Nassau and Suffolk
Counties also told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency in a
telephone interview from his East
Meadow office that anti-Semitic
and anti-Black harassment has
been constant in both counties
during the six years he has been
ADL director and that he has
evidence of three neo-Nazi groups
operating in and around Nassau
County, and that the Ku Klux
Klan was increasingly active.
HE SAID he had been
pressing government and police
officials in the two counties for
years to stop treating the in-
cidents as "boyish pranks" and
to create effective police pro-
grams to track down and arrest
the perpetrators. He said he had
received a call from Suffolk
County Executive John Klein
and that Klein, after being in-
formed of the harassment of Mrs.
Pin.sky and her children, said he
would set up a meeting "shortly"
between Cooperman and county
police commissioner Donald
Dilworth.
The harassment of Mrs.
Pinsky and her two sons and two
daughters was brought to the
attention of the Jewish Defense
League. Becker said Mrs. Pinsky'
knew a local Jew, whom Becker
called a JDL supporter, who|
called the JDL office in New York
City to report on the harassment.
While there are substantial
concentrations of Jews in the two
Long Island counties, Mrs.
Pinsky lives in an area of Mastic
Beach in which the Pinskys are
the only Jewish residents.
BECKER SAID he had been
called last Sunday by Mrs.
Pinsky who said the ponce were
not protecting her family. She
said she and her children were
being "terrorized" and that
bricks were regularly thrown
through the windows of the
rented home. Becker told the
JTA the Pinskys had decided to
leave the area and are moving out
at the end of the week.
Becker declined to say where
the Pinskys are moving, "to
protect the family," but ap-
parently they are remaining in
Suffolk County. Cooperman said
that also was his understanding.
Becker said he had sent three
JDL members to be with the
family Sunday night a week ago
and that, during that night, three
bricks were thrown through
windows of the house. He said
the front door has big holes made
by a would-be intruder who tried
to break in with a hatchet.
BECKER SAID the JDL hired
a guard for $60 who patrolled the
house the next night but it was
beyond the resources of the New
York JDL office to hire guards on
a regular basis. He told the JTA
that three JDL members went to
the Pinsky house and that two of
them remained through the
night He said he had been told
bTone of the two JDL members
that someone had rjotatod *
,t him from outside but no
shooting took place.
Becker said "at least" three
JDL members stayed in the
Pinsky residence to help the
move to the new residence they
will occupy. He said the Pinskys
had received death threats by
telephone and letter and that one
son, 14, and one daughter, 16,
had been "beaten up" by "local
punks." '
The* son was hospitalized
briefly, Becker said he had been
told. Becker said he had called
Cooperman who promised him a
comprehensive investigstion and
action on the plight of the
Pinskys
COOPERMAN said that, after
he talked to Becker, he called the
Pinsky home and spoke to the
older daughter, Michelle. Mrs.
Pinsky was not available because
she has a job. After talking to
Michelle, Cooperman said, he
made a series of calls to various
county officials to initiate action
and to provide protection for the
Pinsky family.
The ADL official said he had
called Hank Johnston of the
Suffolk County Human Rights
Commission, asking him to
investigate the Pinsky harass-
ment and to check the lack of
thoroughness of the reaction of
the police in the local Fifth
Precinct.
He said he also called Arthur
Bergman, deputy to County
Executive Klein, asking him to
visit the Pinsky family and to
discuss the Pinsky and other
such incidents with police
Cooperman said he was
following up each telephone call
with a letter, asking for a "close
watch" on police procedures in
such cases. He told the JTA that
he felt that police attention to
such incidents was ineffective.
HE CITED as an example his
discovery that six neighbors saw
the firebombing destruction of
the Pinsky car and that not one
of them had been called in by
local police for Questioning as
eyewitnesses. Cooperman also
confirmed a report by Becker
that the sign on the Mastic Beach
Hebrew Center had been defaced
and that its bulletin board had
been smashed recently.
The ADL official said that, in
response to his repeated earlier
warnings, extra police sur-
veillance had been provided
during the past three years for
between 120 to 140 synagogues in
the two counties for the High
Holy Days He also disclosed
that a Jewish family in East Islip
had sold their home a few years
ago and fled to another location
when the anti-Semitic harass-
ment became unbearable.
Cooperman said he had ap-
peared, on invitation, at a
meeting of the Nassau County
Board of Supervisors on Aug. 27
and read a prepared statement in
which he asserted that in recent
months there had been a variety
of acts of terrorism cross
burnings and swastika smearings
in many communities, in-
cluding Valley Stream, Port
Washington, Woodmere, Union-
dale and Long Beach.
HE SAID he told the
supervisors these were not
isolated or unusual incidents but
rather "a sad fact of life" on Long
Island. He criticized the per-
sistent official attitude of dis-
missing the incidents as "youth-
ful pranks," asserting they
revealed the "tip of an iceberg" of
silent support of such bigotry in
the general population.
He told the supervisors the
'immediate problem" was that of
preventing further acts by
making apprehension of the per-
petrators a matter of urgency.
Cooperman also proposed estab-
lishing a special unit in the
Nassau County Police Depart-
ment, with funds from the federal
Law Enforcement Assistance Act
and close police department
relations with the federal Justice
Bureau Civil Rights Division and
the New York State Attorney
General.
Yarmulke Month'
Hester St. Becomes a Fever of Activity
Syria
Demolishes
Old
Synagogue
NEW YORK (JTA) The
centuries old synagogue and
yeshiva of Beth Nassi in Aleppo,
Syria, was demolished by Syrian
authorities, according to reliable
reports received here by the
Committee for the Rescue of
Syrian Jewry, committee
president Abraham Dwek
reported. According to the
report, Dwek said, Syrian
authorities also ordered the
destruction of an entire Jewish
section in Aleppo and the
eviction of Jewish families whose
belongings were thrown into the
street.
Dwek said he sent a telegram
to President Carter, reporting on
the "distressing situation" of the
Jews of Syria and asking the
President to instruct the State
Department to protest "this
outrageous act of sacrilege and
demolition" of the synagogue
and yeshiva, located near the Bab
el Faraj Square in the heart of
Aleppo, as well as the destruction
of the Jewish section.
Dwek said he reiterated his
appeal to Carter to call on Syrian
President Hafez Assad to permit
the remnant of the Jewish
community, an estimated 6,000
Jews, to emigrate.
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
June was "yarmulke" month. Hester Street on
New York's Lower East Side is the center of the
yarmulke industry and if you were out of em-
ployment, you could at least get temporary work
there at this period. It is in June that, the
yarmulke demand is at its height.i.
Yarmulkes, of course, are worn at other times
of the year, too. Recently, President Carter in
Israel was shown wearing one but at weddings
they are an essential and June is the most popular
month for marrying.
Someday no doubt there will be a history of the
world written from the standpoint of the
headgear. If you think of toe American
Revolutionary period, how can you avoid
thinking of the three-cornered hat? It would have
been impossible to achieve independence without
it. Try putting on a derby or any of the modern
styles of hats on George Washington and no more
does he look like the father of his country.
AFTER THE passing of the revolutionary
period, about the time of Andrew Jackson, you
could have gone over the entire country and
scarcely been able to pick up one of the old three-
cornered hats. The so-called top hat, "stove
pipe," as more commonly designated, became the
great fashion. If you went to party conventions in
the decade before the Civil War, you would see
most of the delegates arrayed in them. Lincoln
apparently used to stuff some of his note papers
in his spacious top hat.
In the west, the broad-brimmed cowboy hat
became the fashion. It has been appropriated
from the Mexican sombreros.
So hats come and go. The yarmulke has stayed
for a long time. One reason perhaps is because it
is so small and light. It can easily be carried in
one pocket. But along with practical con-
siderations there are higher reasons.
If you put on a cowboy hat, you get the feeling
that you are in Arizona and you look about for a
horse. If you put on a yarmulke, the prosaic and
business world vanishes from your mind. You gat
a spiritual feeling or that someone around you has
found the object of his love. There is no mandate
for wearing a yarmulke. But as the old Jewish
saying has it, a minhag brecht a din, a custom
transcends a law.
THE BUSINESS of marrying in June itself is a
custom. Among Jews of old, oddly enough, the
' day of love was Yom Kippur. It was tht-
custom among Jews of old for the young women
on Yom Kippur to gather in front of the
synagogue and dance. All the girls borrowed
clothes. This was to give the poor girls an even
break with the rich. The young men stood around
looking on and before the stars came out on Yom
Kippur, marking the end of the fast, many had
found their future mates.
It seems incongruous that the most awesome of
the holidays should be chosen for love, and yet
there was good sense and practical logic behind it
for Yom Kippur brought the maximum at-
tendance at the synagogue, so one had the widest
possible choice.
Also perhaps it is best to make one's choice of
love partner on an empty stomach. If you pledge
your troth after a good dinner, you can't be sure if
wasn't the steak or the cakes that did it, but when
you choose on an empty stomach, you know that
gastronomy did not enter into it.
Perhaps the practice offered a further sd
vantage. Instead of thinking aobut the stomach
on the fast day, you thought of the heart.
Nowadays, the institution of marriage seems to
be facing some hard knocks. Marriages are still
plentiful, but so are divorces.
PERHAPS THE fact that the old-time Jewish
marriage was often negotiated by the shadchan
was a good thing. The lovers themselves perhaps
approach the problem*too one-sidedly. The
shadchan considered the situation from a broader
perspective.
There is no lack of advice to lovers about how
to pursue their love-making. For '"*, the
Bible tells us that Naomi was worried about
beautiful Ruth being without a husband. She has
a relative, a rich bachelor, Boas, who has a farm-
She tells Ruth to take the Gimel bus and go down
there and lie down on the field. Naomi no doubt
knew the saying of the Midrash that pleasure is
intensified when it comes by way of surprise. So
Ruth is lying down in the corn field, and Boaz
comes along and is hooked.
But, alas, we don't get much advice on how to
make a marriage a success. One of the rabbis of
the Talmud had an ides. His wife seamed to
delight in always giving him what he didn't want
to eat. If he wanted peas, she gave him a nice dish
of carrots, and if ha asked for carrots, she gave
him peas. But it didn't bother him. He just asked
for what he didn't want and got what he wsnted.
It is just a matter of art


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today, September 28,1979
The Jewish Flqridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
victor Bienstock
U.S. Policy Ignores Our Own History
Continued from Page 4
Villa forces. His instructions
!"You wiD promptly organize
adequate military force of
aps under the command of
ing. Gen. (John J.) Pershing
nd will direct him to proceed
promptly across the border in
irsuit of the Mexican band
rhich attacked the town of
slumbus and the troops there
jn the morning of the ninth
istant. These troops will be
thdrawn to American territory
soon as the d* facto govern-
rat of Mexico is able to relieve
i of their work. In any event,
r.ie work of these troops will be
[finished as soon as Villa band or
[bands are known to be broken
Secretary Baker noted in
blic announcements that the
sident had stressed the
[operation would be carried out
with scrupulous regard for the
sovereignty of Mexico."
ON MARCH 16, 1916, the
vance units of "Black Jack"
ershing s forces crossed the
der, and the last elements of
expedition did not return to
United States soil until
February. 1917, having remained
on Mexican soil for 11 months
and having penetrated the
country to a depth of 300 miles.
The American units left Mexico
only after it was dear that the
Villista forces had been ef-
fectively destroyed, and Carranza
had substantially consolidated
his control over the country.
When the Pershing expedition
entered Mexico, Carranza
protested loud and long against
this violation of his country's
sovereignty although there was
strong suspicion that, secretly,
he welcomed the American
undertaking to destroy the
Villista threat his own troops
were unable to contain.
The Americans expected
cooperation from Carranza's
troops but never received it,
meeting instead with all sorts of
obstacles including blocking of
supplies and even false in-
formation on the location of Villa
strongholds. At one stage,
Carranza generals passed down
orders that the American
columns were to be blocked if
they moved in any direction
except northwards back towards
the border.
THERE ARE, naturally,
some differences between
the Villa scenario and the
current Lebanese situation
but not enough to render the
Wilsonian principle inapplicable.
Instead of a dissident Pancho
Villa, there are a Yasir Arafat
and the PLO engaged in the same
murderous activities against
Israel that Villa practiced against
the United States.
Instead of a Carranza
desperately trying to consolidate
his hold on the presidency and
the country, there is a Syrian
controlled puppet regime which
has no authority and no control
over the country. Wilson's appeal
to the Mexicans was ignored;
Begins appeal to the Lebanese
was rebuffed.
As the United States respected
the border with Mexico, so
Irsrael respected the border with
Lebanon until it realized, as the
Americans finally did, that
guerrilla, terror attacks could
only be prevented by reaching in
and destroying the attackers in
their hideouts. Most Lebanese
would be as happy as the Israelis
if the attacking power of the
PLO, which brought down the
democratic government of
Lebanon, were to be eliminated.
The United States had no
desire to compromise Mexican
sovereignty, and President
Wilson tried to get Gen.
Carranza's regime to assume
responsibility for order along the
international border, but
Carranza refused to negotiate
while American troops were on
Mexican soil.
Jetnaco
Distributors
Inc.
1701 Riverland Road
Fort Lauderdale
525-3624


9e ext&nd SuMdtiy ^eeUrt^
lo uou, amdvoul a*nip, .
Mr. Jerry Joest

*
mmmmmmmmm&mm
Dorothy Welch, Inc.
811 E. La. Ola. Blvd. Fort Landerdale
527-9146
A Happy New Year To All
Charlie Frymyer Paving, inc.
PAVING CONTRACTOR
Driveway and Parking Lota
609 Northeast 43rd Street
Fort Lauderdale 33334
Phone. 564-5680
He Mb4 ou* tohmA a &mMy and' ,?&z/i/iy, Ye** <&ea*
'
rai*HAPPYV%
New year
f.


Greenstein
Trucking
Company
Nationwide Hauling
280 Northwest 12th Avenue
Pompano Beach 33061
946-3520
Happy Rosh Hashanah to the Jewish People All Over the World.
onan roe rven
Craven & Thompson
Associates Inc.
5901 Northwest 31st Avenue
Fort Lauderdale 33309
971-7770


1
t
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
IVIOiii i
Friday, September 28,1979
Seventh Russian Family Arrives
ITS HEAVEN FOR SEVEN: The welcoming party at the arrival of the seventh Russian
Jewish family of immigrants to be re-settled in the Greater Fort Lauderdale area this year
included Jewish Federation representatives, Leon Messing, Israel Resnikoff and his wife, at the
extreme left, and Louis Balitzer and Sy Vinokor. In between are the newly-wed Alvina Lud-
manov, her mother Raia Maslov and her "bubba" Jennie Spivak, flanking the Abram Spivak
family: son Solomon, Mr. and Mrs. Spivak and their daughter, Elona.
"MOMMA!" With that
shout, Abram Spivak had a
joyful meeting with his
mother, Jennie Spivak the
first such meeting since they
left Russia some months ago.
Number seven was heaven for
the Abram Spivak family who
had been delayed by illness in
Rome, Italy, from reaching the
land of freedom. Abram, a 42-
year-old Russian Jewish factory
worker; his wife, Luba, their 16-
year-old son Solomon and their
14-year-old daughter Elona, were
reunited with family already
living in Lauderhill.
The Spivaks are the seventh
family to arrive in the area
through the combined efforts of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale and the Jewish
Family Service in conjunction
with the national HIAS (Hebrew
Immigrant Aid Society)
program.
The Federation's Russian Re-
settlement Chairman Leon
Messing and his co-chairman,
Israel Resnikoff, and additional
volunteers Louis Balitzer and Sy
Vinokor, brought Abram
Spivak's mother, Jennie, his
sister, Raia Maslov, and his
niece, Alvina, who was married
Sept. 2 to Loyva Ludmanov, to
the airport to greet the new
Broward County emigres. And
then came the loading of all the
earthly possessions of the Abram
Spivaks, two suitcases and two
tightly-roped cartons, into cars
for the ride to the Lauderhill
apartment secured for them by
the Federation's committee.
Young Leaders to Trace Jewish Roots
Sydna and Ross Wexler will
host the next meeting of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale's Young
Leadership Program on Wednes-
day evening, Oct. 17. This will be
the group's second session, and
the topic to be covered is
"Tracing Oi; Jewish Roots."
Jayne Rotman serves on the
Young Leadership steering com-
mittee working on each month's
program. She announced that
Arthur Kurzweil, "one of the
world's leading Jewish genealo-
gists," will be the guest speaker.
Kurzweil is a graduate of
Hofstra University in New York
and has a master's degree from
Florida University. Genealogy
has always been a hobby which
grew out of his fascination with
family history. Even before Alex
Haley made "Roots" so popular,
Kurzweil was researching his
Pioneer Women
Leaders of more than 30
Pioneer Women chapters and
dubs in Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach counties will meet
Monday, Oct. 8, in the Diplomat
Hotel, Hollywood, for a South-
east Region conference oc
"Images of Israel."
The all-day event, which will
include a luncheon, is designed to
.educate, train and inform of-
ficers, directors and' committee
chairmen of Pioneer Women, the
world's largest Jewish women's
organization.
The conference is open to all
Pioneer Women members. Reser-
vations may be made at in-
dividual Pioneer Women units or
at the office of the Pioneer
Women Council of South Florida,
Miami Beach.
Chairman of the day will be
Mildred Weiss of Deerfield
Beach, Southeast Region co-
ordinator and a member of the
national board of Pioneer
Women. Conference program
chairman and coordinator is
Harriet Green, president of the
Pioneer Women Council and
national vice president of the
American Zionist Federation.
Reservation chairman for Dade
County is Margot Bergtbal, and
Grace Herskowitz is Broward
reservation chairman. Lillian
Davis, social secretary of the
South Florida Council, is in-
vitations chairman.
Morning workshops will be led
by Bebee Pullman of Fort
Lauderdale, national chairman of
Friends of Pioneer Women;
Lilian Hoffman, chairman of the
speakers bureau for the regional;
and Gait Aaron of Hallandale,
area membership cochairman.
Luncheon program win ieaiuie
a panel discussion of current
developments in the State of
Israel and the Middle East by
representatives of Israeli
organizations and the Govern-
ment of Israel as well as Florida
Zionist and Pioneer Women
leaders.
family's background in Eastern
Europe.
"The history of the Jewish
people is an incredible one,"
Kurzweil commented. "We can
gain a great insight into our
history as we discover how our
families evolved in the framework
of many turbulent and often un-
believable times.''
Kurzweil's work has taken him
back to the year 1500 when
relatives on his mother's side of
the family lived in what is now
the eastern half of Czecho-
slovakia. This journey of 500
years soon will be published in a
book entitled, From Generation
to Generation, which Kurzweil
has written for the William Mor-
row Company.
In recent years, Kurzweil's
writings have appeared in The
New York Times Magazine, The
Washington Post, The Los
Angeles Times and Moment
Magazine.
STATE OF
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H83 .
1521 ^

JSttST '521
TArWRftC MT9
BERMUDA HOPE
FRIENDSHIP OCERN

Mildred Tell {left), president of Aleph Council of B'nai B'rith
Women, and Council officers Bernice Davis and Hilda Goldman
display the banner of their chapters adorning a car during the
motorcade that preceded WECARE Sale Day at Richards.
Many members of the Council took part in the motorcade and
the Sale Day activities.
Notice
Reserve these dates for an exciting experience!!! July 1-11, 1960
Second Annual Young Leadership Mission to Israel
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
2999 NW 33rd Avenue
Fort, Lauderdale, FL 33311 484-8200
*s
FORT LAUDERDALE 776-6272
TAPES BUSINESS FORMS
CARTONS TAGS-LABELS
HANGERS BAGS BOXES
WIPES POLYETHYLENE
HOWARD
APER A
ACKAGING
INC
1201 NE 45th ST
FORT IAUDER0ALE
FLORIDA 33334
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935,these policies have been
our assurance to a fami ly of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft. lauderdale (Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
ERiverside
Memorial Chaoel.lnc /Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Kenneth M. Kay/ ArthurGrossberg/ Joseph Rubin
.F-4.2t.7V
>-2t-7
F-*-2t-7
" -'