The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00142

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
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itrjj------tn~~t*r Pnrt. Isiudenlule
& Jewish Meridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 8 Number 17
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, August 17,1979
Price 35 Cents
'Incredible Experience in an Incredible Land'
Say Young Leaders Returning From Mission
I//A" WESTERN WALL: Photo by Nina Nemerofsky, taken during the visit to the famous
\'al! of Prayer by the Young Leadership Mission from the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
auderdale. Other pictures. Page 8.
"An incredible experience in an incredible land," declared Johl
Hot man on his return from the Young Leadership Mission to Israel led
last month by Ken Bierman, Campaign Director of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Johl, who co-chaired the Mission with Ronald Shagrin, told Alan
Margolies, director of Greater Fort Lauderdale's Jewish Federation
Young Leadership Division, "After viewing the hundreds of slides I
took on the trip, I'm ready to go back again."
He and his wife and the seven other couples made what they
called "an unforgettable trip," re-living the history of Western
Civilization from its earliest Biblical days to the present era of peace
between Israel and Egypt, and meeting with top officials of the Israel
government for in-depth briefings of the prospects for continued peace
and development of Eretz Yisrael.
The trip and meetings were set up and coordinated by UJA per-
sonnel living in Israel.
And from the moment the group arrived at Ben-Gurion Inter-
national Airport, and uttering the eternal She hecheyanu blessing
upon entering Jerusalem, and 10 days later leaving Israel, the Young
Leaders were enthralled, fascinated, and ecstatic about what they raw,
heard, and experienced.
Since they arrived on Friday in time for the welcome to the Shabbat,
the group went from their King David Hotel for Kabbalat Shabbat
service at the Western Wall. Pictured on this page is a photo taken by
Nina Nemerofsky of the group and others at the Wall.
Other pictures on Page 8 include a visit to the reconstructed
synagogue in the Old Jewish Quarter which, with the Wall, were off-
limits to Jews during the Jordanian occupation of East Jerusalem
from the time of the 1948 War of Independence to the Six-Day War of
1967 when the Israel Defense Forces drove King Hussein's forces back
to Jordan.
Continued on Page 8
No Showdown Seen
In Autonomy Round
By HELEN SILVER
V\ VSHINGTON (JTAI
Ambassador Fphraim
Ja "hi had a luncheon meeting at
|i' Slate Department Monday
Uih Harold Saunders. assistant
"'tary of stale for Near East
d South Asian Affairs, ap-
rently to discuss the Israeli
pibinet resolution Sunday
urnling reported U.S. efforts to
Iclude the Palestine Liberation
pganizalfon in Middle East
goiiuiions.
I Slate Department spokesman
|uin Itesion said that Saunders
eived a letter from Evron
Sunday. He said thai Evron dis-
cussod the Israeli message with
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance
In telephone, but there were no
plans for the ambassador to see
Vance Monday.
Reslon would not say whal the
letter contained. "We will be
studying it and we will reply in
due course," he said
Hut in Israel, it was announced
thai Foreign Minister Moshe
Das an was instructed to tran-
smit the Cabinet resolution
privately to the U.S. through
Evron. The ambassador is also
scheduled to meet with President
Carter for lunch this week.
Frankly, Oil
Israel Seethes as U.S. Picks Up Arab Cause
State Department, who declared countries on an agenda" for the
late last week that the United Aug. 23 UN debate on Pales-
States is "working with other Continued on Page 10
Prime Minister's Mission
Sparks 1980 Campaign
Quotable Quotes
If we are to remember the Holocaust, it is not only because
of the dead; it's too late for them; nor only because of the sur-
vivors; it may be too late for them. Our remembering aims at
' saying as many men and women as possible from apathy toward
evil, if not from evil itself. We wish to transform as many human
beings as possible. We hope to share with anyone willing to
listen our awareness and conviction that when war unleashes its
evil against one people, all are engulfed in the fire.
Elie Wiesel
Chairman, President's Commission
on the Holocaust
Editor's Note: Elie Wiesel and other members of the
President s Commission on the Holocaust are completing a
Mission to concentration camp sites in Germany and Kussia
They attended Shabbat services at Moscow s Central
Synagogue where they were warmly greeted by worshippers.
JERUSALEM Israeli
sources are reacting with
extreme anger to reports of
confirmation that the
United States is engaged in
intermediary discussion
with the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization on the
establishment of a separate
Palestinian state.
Joining in the angry
responses are leaders of the
American Jewish com-
munity, as well.
TALAL NAJI, a member of
the PLO executive committee,
has confirmed the reports that
Western European countries are
acting as intermediaries for the
United States in the discussions.
It is understood that this means
West Germany and France.
Also confirming the reports is
Tom Reston, spokesman for the
Yigael Yadin
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale will be
represented among the 300
American Jewish leaders who will
participate in Prime Minister
Menachem Begin's Mission to
Israel.
In a special message to the
American Jewish community, as
these leaders prepared for the
1980 United Jewish Appeal
(UJA) campaign, the Begin
statement calls on American
Jewry "to respond to the chal-
lenges of peace with even greater
urgency than during time of
war."
The Prime Minister's Mission
participants will arrive in Israel
on Aug. 27 for four intensive
days of high level briefings.
Geared to major 1980 Campaign
issues, the itinerary includes
visits to Negev resettlement
sites, Jewish Agency absorption
centers and meetings with Israel
President Yitzhak Navon.
Deputy Prime Minister Yigael
Yadin, Foreign Minister Moshe
Day an, and Jewish Agency
officials. Leon Dulzin. chairman,
and Akiva Lewinsky, treasurer.
Prime Minister Begin, in his
message, urged the American
Jewish community to join people
of Israel "in welcoming new im-
migrants with decent conditions
with proper homes in which to
live, with adequate eduation for
their children, with all the social
services which make settling in
Eretz Yisrael easier."
He noted that the Mission
participants, inaugurating the
1980 Campaign, are facing the
challenges of peace; that the
UJA's Campaign represents the
beginning of a new decade. He
said: "It also marks a new decade
of responsibility a decade
when ancient dreams are realized.
Our greatest dream is peace.
Peace is the beauty of life. It is
the hope of a better life for all of
us ... From Jerusalem, the
eternal and indivisible capital, I
extend to you all my greetings for
the New Year 5740 and gratitude
for all that you have done and
shall yet do."
32
WILL BE
FOR YOU!
n
it
II
s
d
n



Page 2
The Jewish Flnridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale^
Friday, August 17,
iy

Perspective
The West Bank and Israeli Settlements
POLITICAL ISSUES
t
In view of the on-going
negotiations concerning the West
Bank and Israeli settlements, the
Community Relations Council
(CRC) of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale calls
attention to an editorial by Jim
Hampton, editor of The Miami
Herald, Sunday, Aug. 5; in which
he notes "certain broad principles
that we (The Miami Herald)
should guide U.S. policy in the
Mideast." In brief, one of those
principles follows: "No West
liank settlement is acceptable to
us if it jeopardizes Israel's
security."
Along those lines, it is im-
portant to know the background
of the West Bank and Israeli
Settlements issue. American
Israel Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC), based in Washington,
D.C. has issued the following
memorandum:
BACKGROUND
The West Bank region (Judea
and Samaria) was designated by
the 1947 United Nations par-
tition plan as a new Arab state.
The Arab world and local
Palestinian Arabs rejected the
plan. In May 1948, when the
British forces withdrew and
Israel proclaimed its statehood,
the surrounding Arab nations
and local Arabs attacked Israel
and the Jewish settlements that
had existed on the West Bank for
decades.
Transjordan's troops occupied
the region and, in 1950, annexed
the West Bank and East
Jerusalem. The annexation was
condemned by many nations,
including those in the Arab
world. Only Britain and Pakistan
ever recognized Jordan's
sovereignty over the West Bank.
No Jews were allowed to live
on the West Bank after the 1948
war. Jewish communities were
destroyed in the fighting and. in
sonif cases, their defenders were
massacred. Among these were
the towns and villages of Kfar
Etzion, Atarot, Revadim, Neve
Ya'akov, Bet Ha'arava. Ein
Tzurim and Massuot Yitzchak.
(The Jewish population in
Hebron had already fled after
Arab massacres in 1929 and
1936.1
From 1948 until 1967, the West
Bank was used as a base for
launching terrorist activities
against Israel. During the 1967
war Jordan ignored an Israeli
warning, transmitted through
the United States, and attacked
Israel. Israeli forces coun-
terattacked and routed the
Jordanian army from the region.
ISRAEL'S SETTLEMENT
POLICY
The vast majority of Israel's 50
settlements in the West Bank are
in strategically important,
sparsely populated areas, or on
the sites of Jewish towns
destroyed by the Arabs in the
1930s and '40s.
Following the war, the Israeli
army established military
outposts in the region to prevent
infiltration and sabotage. Many
< i today's West Bank set-
lements began as such camps,
explaining their strategic
location along the Jordan River,
along the north-south high ridge
which divides the West Bank,
and along the pre-1967 Jordan-
Israel armistice line the "green
line." B valley and the green line areas are
sparsely populated.
Almost all of the land used for
the new communities was in the
category of state domain or
ownerless property. In the cases
of private property or land owned
by absentee landlords, the
owners, when they could be
located, were given the choice of
cash compensation or alternative
land. Dissatisfied owners have
access to the Israeli courts, and
in several instances have won
their cases.
Sons and daughters of the
defenders of Jewish communities
destroyed in the 1948 attack were
among the first to reestablish
these villages after 1967. Other
settlers were determined to
establish communities on the
sites of biblical Jewish com-
munities. In these cases, such as
at Hebron and Nablus, Israeli
authorities restricted them to
locations outside of Arab towns.
The total population of Jewish
inhabitants in the West Bank's
50 settlements is approximately
6,000 less than one percent of
the West Bank's total
population.
LEGAL ISSUES
Because of the acknowledged
uncertainty over sovereignty of
the West Bank, the settlements
in Judea and Samaria cannot be
considered "illegal." Secretary of
Slute Vance stated, on Julv 29.
1977, "It is an open question as
to who has legal right to the West
Bank." Jordan's occupation was
never recognized by the United
States or most other countries
and. in the words of one legal
scholar. Israel's claim to the
region is superior to Jordan's
"since Jordan's presence in the
West Bank was the result of its
aggression in 1948, while Israel's
arose from the exercise of its
legitimate right of self-defense in
1967. ."
Since there has been no in-
ternational agreement on the
status of the West Bank and
Gaza since the UN. partition
resolution of 1947, the areas
remain unallocated portions of
the old British Mandate. As
such, some legal scholars have
argued, the provisions of the
Mandate should still prevail. The
Mandate permitted Jewish
settlement in the West Bank and
Gaza,
Even though it is doubtful that
it applies to the West Bank
occupation, Israel conducts itself
in accordance with international
"belligerent oc-
JCC Program
Registration Day Sept. 9
Members of the Jewish
Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale are being
enrolled, and Sunday, Sept. 9,
li.is been scheduled for a Gala
Registration Day for different
courses of study and lectures at
the Perlman Campus ol JCC at
6500 Sunrise Blvd.. Plantation.
JCC officials invite those who
are not receiving their
newsletters and bulletins to call
792-6700 to be placed on the
mailing list.
An invitation is extended to all
persons to visit the 16-acre
campus and the buildings that
ore being renovated to contain
the expanded activities of the
JCC. Tours are scheduled every
Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. to
noon under the direction of
trained volunteers.
r
Feminist First
Woman Rabbi
Heads Synagogue
NEW YORK Rabbi Linda
Joy Holtzman, a 1979 graduate
of the Reconstructionist Rab-
binical College in Philadelphia,
has been elected as spiritual
leader of Beth Israel Con-
gregation, Coatesville, Pa., it was
announced by Newton Duitch,
president of the 55-year-old Con-
servative congregation. The 110-
member family congregation
thus becomes the only synagogue
in the Northern Hemisphere to
have a woman rabbi at its helm.
Rabbi Holtzman will also serve
as education director of the syna-
gogue. She is a native of Phila-
delphia who, during her student
days at the RRC, served as
student rabbi at the Bristol
Jewish Center in Bristol, Pa.
RABBI HOLTZMAN also
spent a year studying at the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
She received her BA and MA
degrees in English from Temple
University, and a Bachelor of
Hebrew Literature degree from
Gratz College in Philadelphia.
In commenting upon the elec-
tion of Rabbi Holtzman to the
pulpit of Beth Israel Congre-
gation, Rabbi Ludwig Nadel-
mann, executive vice president of
the Jewish Reconstructionist
Foundation said, "The appoint-
ment of Rabbi Linda Holtzman
represents an important break-
through' for women rabbis.
'Until now, women have only
been elected as assistants, or, as
is the case in a unique arrange-
n-n
ment at Beth El Zedeck Congre-
gation in Indianapolis, the
Sussos, Dennis and Sandy, func-
tion as co-rabbis of their con-
gregation."
PLAN
TODAY
FOR
TOMORROW
Provide for Jewish
continuity and support
life giving programs
in Israel through
a bequest or deferred
trust to HADASSAH
.^gggife
'"Vdfd in ^
For more information write
Hadassah Wills & Bequests
50 West 58th Street
New York, NY. 10019
Telephone: (212) 355-7900
aW Tv "cludinK the 1949 of a peace treaty between E^
i1;:;;; V\ieneva SentL. The and Israel illustrates that*!!
nton was clearly intended settlements are not "obs-
Svern short-term military peace. In the Sinai, ov,
n.1 ion during the course of a Egypt s sovereignty was
law governing
c
r
conv
to gov
occupation during
conflict or immediately
thereafter, and should not apply
to Israeli administration.
In fact, the Israeli ad-
ministration often exceeds the
requirements of the Geneva
Convention. For example, the
convention does not call for
uccess by local populations to the
courts of the administering
power; as noted, residents of the
Weal Hank and Gaza have such
access to Israeli courts. The
convention makes no provision
for elections; under Israeli ad-
ministration the West Bank has
had two free municipal elections.
It was also under Israeli ad-
ministration that West Bank
women were permitted to vole for
the first time.
The U.S. Administration
repeated charges about tl
illegality of the Israeli s
dements pre-judges the course,
negotiations on the future of t|]
region. The successful complete
obstacles t
er whic
never!
question, all of the Israel, se
dements and towns will |j
turned over to Egypt as part <
the Israeli-Egyptian peac
treaty.
Under the terms of the Cam
David agreements, Israel and it
yel-to-emerge negotiatin
partners are "to determine th
linal status of the West Bank an
fiuzu ... by the end of tlielfivi
year) transitional period." ,
unilateral Israeli freeze on se
dements, as called for by th
Administration, would el
feclively foreclose Israel's ow
claim to sovereignty over th
West Bank five years before th
issue is to be decided i
negotiations.
Women's Division Mission
Come fly with us to our past, present and future join the
UJA National Women's Division Mission to Rumania and
Israel. Spend three days touring the joint Distribution Com-
mittee institutions and the shtetls of our forefathers. Next stop
our present and future Israel the proposed itinerary is
three days in Netanya on the Mediterranean, then on to the
King David in Jerusalem seeing Israel as one can only see it
through a UJA Mission. We will be gone from Oct. 15-28, 1979.
The cost is $1,982.00 inclusive from Fort Lauderdale. Any
questions, more information, please call the Federation office
and ask for Jan Salit. Director. Women's Division at 484-8200.
H77
The assurance
of service. In the
cfewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
communityand the high standards
demanded by Jewish Lawand Custom.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a family of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood-920-1010
Ft. Lauderdale (Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
Riverside
Memorial Chapel. Inc /Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Kenneth M. Kay' ArthurGrossberg/ Joseph Rubin
P8 17-79


Friday, August 17,1979
The Jewish Floridian o[Greqter Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
Levine Heads Federation Rovi Faber Named Catering Consultant
Public Relations
Max Levine of Lauderhill,
native of Newark, N.J., has been
appointed public relations
consultant for the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, it was announced by
Leslie Gottlieb, executive
director of the Jewish Federation.
Levine will be assigned to
public relations services and
Community Relations Council
activities formerly directed by
Joel Telles, who will be working
on United Jewish Appeal
Campaign activities for the
Federation.
Levine, an experienced
newspaperman and publicist, has
had considerable experience with
Federation and CRC activities,
having been on Missions to Israel
several times and attended
General Assemblies of Council of
Jewish Federations, Plenary
Sessions of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council, and national conferences
of the United Jewish Appeal.
Rovi Faber, founder of the
WECARE Volunteer program
and active in many Jewish
organizations, has been ap-
pointed catering consultant for
the Hilton Hotel, Gait Ocean
Mile.
In her new position, Mrs.
Faber will be responsible for
handling all social, business and
organizational functions for both
the Hilton and the Ocean Manor
Resort Hotel.
Prior to her marriage to Arthur
Faber, Rovi was associated with
the Nautilus Hotel and opened
the Lucerne Hotel, both on
Miami Beach, serving as their
social director and liaison be-
tween guests and management.
In that position she was
responsible for all social func-
tions.
"We are very excited about the
renovations being done to the
Hilton for the coming season, and
we will be able to accommodate
all social and banquet functions
for groups numbering a dozen to
100 persons," said Mrs. Faber.
Rovi is well known in the
Jewish community as a result of
her numerous activities with a
Olympics Concern
Israeli Sports Leaders
Max Levine
Sen. Stone Reports
U.S. Won't Press Israel
To Negotiate With PLO
Richard Stone, D-
a report to the
U.S. Sen.
Florida, in
Community Relations Council
(CRC) of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, said
that the United States would
veto attempts in the United
Nations to give the Palestinian
people the right to self-
determination.
Sen. Stone, who is chairman of
the Senate Foreign Relations
Middle East subcommittee, met
with Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance at a breakfast meeting
earlier this month. Secretary
Vance told him. Stone reported,
that the U.S. is not trying to
negotiate its own modification of
UN Resolution 242.
This is in sharp contradiction
to Israeli Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan's charge that the
U.S. is pushing for changes in
Resolution 242 to please Saudi
Arabia in an effort to ensure a
steady supply of oil.
Vance, however, reaffirmed a
U.S. promise to Israel in 1975 not
to negotiate with or recognize the
Palestinian Liberation
Organization (PLO) unless it
affirms the right of Israel to exist
within recognized and defensible
borders.
Sen. Stone quoted Vance as
saying that the "United States
stands by its moral commitment
to Israel and he denied that the
U.S. is negotiating its own
language" of resolution changes.
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Concern has grown in Israeli
sports circles that the Soviet
Union may resort to the denial of
entry visas or other ad-
ministrative measures to prevent
Israel from participating in the
Olympic Games in Moscow next
summer despite its promise that
every nation will be welcome to
compete.
The possibility of such action
by the Soviet authorities seemed
likely after Alex Giladi, a senior
Israeli television official, received
word that his application for a
visa to enter the USSR was
rejected.
Giladi. who had covered the
Olympic Games in Munich and
Montreal for Israeli television, is
slated to head the Israeli TV crew
at the 1980 Games in the Soviet
capital. He was scheduled to go
to Moscow along with 39 senior
officials of the European
Broadcasting Union (EBU) to
cover the "Spartakiada." a
general rehearsal for the Olympic
Games. Of all the applicants, he
apparently was the only one
denied a visa.
DOUBTS ABOUT Soviet
intentions toward the Israeli
Olympic team were increased by
the discriminatory treatment
given 40 Israeli political scien-
tists who had asked to attend the
'Shalom'Show
Airs Weekly
Richard Peritz is the host and
producer of a weekly TV
presentation, "Shalom," Sun-
days at 12:30 p.m. on Channel 51.
The program, with the aid of
Jewish Agency emissaries to
South Florida, was started the
first Sunday after the signing of
the peace treaty between Egypt
and Israel.
Iv
Petit/., who lives in Fort
Lauderdale with his father and
lister, is a multi-talented young
man who hopes to expand the
show into a one-hour program,
urrently, the show runs 30
ninutes with costs running
between $450 and 8500 for time
and production charges. Neither
lie not the emissaries who have
been assigned u> South Florida
b) the Jewish Agency in Israel, a
beneficiary of United Jewish
Appeal funds raised by the
Jewish Federation of Greater
For! Lauderdale, receive any
remuneration lor their TV efforts.
Yossi Netz, Itzhak Aloni.
David Meroz and Sam Alpert
assist Peritz in getting guests for
the Sunday noon-time show. The
shows, designed to develop an
awareness of Jewish identity and
interest in the Jewish community
and a bettor understanding of
Israel, its heritage, its culture,
and its humanitarian works, have
included community leaders
interviewed on various subjects,
singers, musicians and films
about Israel.
Richard Peritz, right, produces and hosts the weekly 'Shalom'
television program. Shown on the set are Theresa Tieman.
presenter; and Itzhak Aloni, Jewish Agency emissary to the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
\L
TV SETS NEEDED
For Russian Families.
Must Be In Good Working Order.
A Great Aid In Helping The Famines
To Learn English.
To Arrange Pick-Up Call;
Shelly Solomon
7634340
I
i
International Congress of
Political Science which opens in
Moscow on Aug. 12.
Prof. Asher Arian of Tel Aviv
University, head of the Israeli
chapter of the Political Science
Association, reported that only
30 of the 40 applicants have been
notified that they will receive
visas. The others have received
no notification. Moreover, none
of the applicants has yet been
notified about accommodations
and it appears that no reser-
vations have been made for them.
Unless the full delegation
receives visas and ac-
commodations, Israel may have
Rovi Faber
host of Jewish groups. She is
presently a board member of the
Jewish Community Center, was a
board member of Temple Emanu-
El. the Jewish Family Service
and is honorary chairman of
WECARE.
Rovi is a graduate of the
University of Miami, department
of Hotel Management and Guest
Relations.
Planning A Trip?
to cancel its participation in the | *"" r "w
forum. According to Arian, the
American and French political | Council's 1979 Exciting Travel |
science associations have Program to Israel, Europe, West"
promised that if all 40 Israelis are I Coatl, Canadian Rockies and I
_,.. n------itnntt^A .u,...,^ij f Alaska Is now available.
Rockies
not allowed to attend, they would I M,"" no"' "*>'
cancel their participation. | NATIONAL COUNCIL
It was pointed out however. 4 OF JEWISH WOMEN j
that a decision by Israel to *
boycott the congress would be I Call I
collective. The academicians with .
visas could go to Moscow on an \ DOROTHY KLEIN-741-4742 \
individual basis if they chose to
but would not be part of an w -~- -^ -^ -^ <^ J
Israeli delegation.
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
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?
?
?
All-Points Bulletin
DO YOU SPEAK SIGN
LANGUAGE?
WE NEED VOLUNTEERS ON A
BASIS, TO ACT AS INTERPRETERS FOR ?
MEMBERS OF THE JEWISH COM-\
MUNITY CENTER.
CALL 792-6700 \
LIMITED J
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 17, 1979
Omission Would be Better
Even if it were true at the moment, it would be
ill-advised for an American Jewish leader to an-
nounce to the world that American Jewish influence
in Washington is strong and growing because U.S.
Jews are "educated, affluent, intense, cohesive and
articulate."
This was the opinion of Howard Squadron,
president of the American Jewish Congress, at the
15th annual American-Israel Dialogue of the Con-
gress held in Jerusalem.
But the trend in Washington, in our view, is
precisely the opposite. There is almost no way in the
world that alleged American Jewish influence can
alter the course of President Carter's determination
to assure the flow of oil by butchering Israel.
What is even worse is that Mr. Squadron's
reasoning feeds the mill of anti-Semites who blame
the current energy crunch on American Jews and all
that education, affluence, cohesiveness and ar-
ticulation (the anti-Semitic charge is "Jewish control
of the media") that we are supposed to have.
Either way, we can't win, as Mr. Carter's
policies show. And as the anti-Semitic propaganda
against American Jewry these days shows.
Then what was the point of the statement?
The American Jewish Congress performs
marvelous service in the cause of human rights
generally, not just Jewish rights. In this case,
however, we simply wish that Mr. Squadron had said
nothing.
Carter's War on Israel
Even the most cursory glance at President
Carter's campaign statements back in 1975 would
show that the President has come a long way in his
full-circle trip on the Middle East. What he said then
is not what he is saying now a characteristic
charge against him not only on the Middle East
issue.
This 360-degree turn is perhaps the most
brutally meddlesome performance in the presidency
since the 1956 Suez-Sinai war when then-Secretary of
State John Foster Dulles, acting in the name of
President Eisenhower, forced the British, French and
Israelis back out of the Suez Canal area and reversed
the historic achievement of a military victory that
would have prevented many of the problems now
facing the industrialized world. Including oil.
What President Carter is doing is reversing the
1967 Six-Day War achievement. He has learned
nothing from the grim Dulles-Eisenhower action, as
indeed Secretary Dulles himself did in the end, when
it was too late.
This would be sad enough, but it takes on an
aura of Greek tragedy because of the 'doubling' of
its negative implications and because the Pre? .ent
fully believes he is acting in the best interest j not
only of the Arabs, but of Israel, as well.
There is a kind of chutzpah in this sort of
heinous righteousness, which may be good as
preachment in the President's Sunday School ser-
mons, but which is doing terrible service to the world
at large a fact neither he nor his partners in
Europe, presumably the West Germans and the
French, can see at the moment, so blinded are they
all by the sand of oil.
The President's brutal attempt to reverse
history to achieve "rights" for the Palestinians at
the cost of violating Israel's rights is only the first
phase of his campaign against Jerusalem. Watch, in
our opinion, for the Texan the President's special
envoy, the President's "court Jew," Robert Strauss,
to press for a sundering of Jerusalem far more
quickly than anyone expects at this time.
President Carter needs victories to veil the
tissue of his failures in other areas. Jerusalem, an
emotionally explosive issue throughout the world,
may well be what he will grasp for, with the hands of
his Jewish aide, Strauss.
^Jewish Floridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Business Office 138 S. Federal Hwy Suite 206. Danla, Fla. 33004
Telephone B20-8O18
E5SP K -u^F i,frMShocK,l SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Free-Shoehef Executive Editor
. The Jewish Floridian Doe* Not Guarantee The Ksvahruth
t- Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Second Class Postage Paid at Danla, Fla. 89M20
Published Bl Weekly
Federation Officers: President, Leo Goodman. Executive Vice President. Milton
Keiner, Vice Presidents, Victor Gruman, Joel Reinstein, John Streng, Secretary,
Richard Romanoff; Treasurer, Joel Levitt; Executive Director, Leslie S. Gottlieb
The Jewish Floridian
A Part Doesn't Make the Whole
IN GENEVA the other week,
Britain's Chief Rabbi Immanuel
Jakobovits made a brilliant
point His assumption was that
we are becoming victims of a
"Holocaust mentality."
In essence, said Rabbi Jako-
bovits, we have begun to brood
upon our survival as individual
Jews rather than upon the sur-
vival of Judaism.
The logical inference here is
that we have become obsessed
with the demise of six million
Jews, but we appear to be less
distraught by the decimation and
virtual disappearance of the great
and irreplacable German Jewish
community, or of the other
vibrant Jewish communities of
Eastern Europe that fell victim
to the Hitlerian horde.
AND SO. according to Rabbi
Jakobovits. our despair is mis-
placed. The Holocaust should not
be the focal point of an eternal
Jewish shiva; rather, it must
confirm our allegiance to the
testament of a Jewish continuum
that no Holocaust can destroy.
The shiva must terminate in a
purgation of thoughts of death
THE AUSTRIAN rttPEKHAN^eR,
and renew our commitment to
life.
A Holocaust may interrupt the
Jewish continuum, but it can
never put a halt to it. This must
be our visceral intellectual and
emotional condition, and to brood
upon the individual losses,
though they be reckoned in the
millions, rather than pledge our-
selves to the eternality of the
principle which the individuals
constitute, is not only wasteful.
It is also self-destructive.
In Geneva. Rabbi Jakobovits
also had some startling things to
say about Israel and Zionism. To
mix the metaphor of two great
civilizations. Israel rose like the
ancient phoenix out of the ashes
of the Holocaust.
IN THIS sense, we regard
Israel as a State dedicated to the
survival of Jews as individuals in
the hopeful belief that a
Holocaust of the type (if not
necessarily the dimension)
unleashed by the Nazis on
European Jewry is impossible in
Israel today by definition.
And so. modern political Zion-
ism, as the root from which
Israel has sprung, is in these
terms limited in its vision. For
once again, it is not individual
Jews who are the issue, but
Judaism.
Reasons Rabbi Jakobovits:
Israel must transcend this
brooding existential egotism.
Israel must become the core of
the noblest Jewish virtues in the
prophetic tradition. Only in this
way can Israel rise above the
view of itself as a perennial
refugee camp and achieve the
status of keeper of the key to the
Klernal Jew.
THERE IS no doubt that this
makes eminently good sense
except that in Rabbi JakoboviU
view i>f Israel as the instrument
ol Jewish prophetic virtue, he
errs.
For ii was the Prophet Nathan
who first warned the Jews
against nationhood, pointing out
Continued on Page 12
Our Obligation to Affirmative Action
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year$7.so
Out of Town U pon Request.
Friday, August 17,1979
Volume 8
24 AB 5739
Number 17
Way back in 1971. Marco
DeFunis. a member of a
Sephardic Jewish family and a
Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the
University of Washington, was
turned down when he applied for
admission to that Seattle in-
stitution's law school. He was
admitted to four other law
schools, but his alma mater was
his top choice; and his fight to
get in eventually reached the
Supreme Court.
Many folks sensed anti-Jewish
leanings in the DeFunis case;
others said, oh, no, the
University of Washington was
just trying to make it easier for
blacks to become lawyers. In any
event, Justice William O.
Douglas pushed the legal button
that gave a victory of sorts to
young DeFunis.
THIS ALL LEFT a cloud of
ambiguity hanging over the issue
of justice in college admissions.
And matters drifted along until a
year ago when the Supreme
Court handed down a sharply
divided ruling in the famous
Allan Bakke case. That time
around, the Court upheld con-
sideration of race in school entry
programs while at the same time
ordering Bakke, who is white,
admitted to the University of
California Medical School at
Davis where he is currently
trudging along towards his
degree
Just as the DeFunis case left
shadows of uncertainty, so did
Bakke. The Jewish community
by and large hailed the Bakke
decision as a blow at college
quotas while continuing to
subscribe to the important
principle of affirmative action.
Robert
Segal
The Black community was
understandably upset by the
Bakke decision. Dr. Alvin
Poussaint, Harvard professor of
psychiatry and a prominent
member of the Black community,
complained: "Legally, I think it
(the Bakke ruling) is going to
open a Pandora's box; it invites a
testing of affirmative action
programs all over the place."
BUT NOW with the decisive 5-
to-2 ruling by the Supreme Court
in the case of Brian Webber vs.
the Kaiser Aluminum and
Chemical Company, we have
moved away from the important
but somewhat circumscribed area
of discrimination in education to
the much broader issue of
discrimination in employment.
The DeFunis and Bakke cases
impinged upon the destinies of
several hundred thousand; the
Webber case packs a message to
millions of workers and many,
many employers.
At issue in the Webber case
was Webber's complaint that the
Kaiser Company, in selecting
candidates to train employes for
upgrading, ignored Webber's
seniority by using a racial quota.
That the case originated in
Louisiana, where equality was
long consigned to the dungeon
implicated the issue.
Moreover, it appeared rather
certain that the Kaiser Louisiana
plant, taking on the hue of the
immediate environment, had
indulged in bias against Blacks.
CONFRONTED by such
factors, steeped in doubt, the
American Jewish Congress and
the American Jewish Committee
decided to sit out the Webber
case. (Both agencies had filed
briefs in the Bakke case. I The
Anti-Defamation League, which
had also been active in the Bakke
case, filed in support of Webber;
and, judging by early reports of
reactions to the 5-to-2 ruling, the
ADL is unhappy about the
outcome.
Not so the Black community,
certain sectors of organized labor,
and a number ol governmental
units. The dismay of the ADL
folks is understandable: they fear
a rebirth of a drive for quotas.
Actually, many who have
fought for equality of op-
portunity for years are not too
upset, indeed rather encouraged
by the Court's Webber ruling.
They feel confident that neither
Chief Justice Burger's nor
Justice Rehnquist's negative
branding of their judicial
brothers as "escape artists such
as Houdini" will endure the test
of time.
RATHER THEY take heart
from the tact that Justice Black
manno fiery liberalwas with
the majority. Even more to
delight is the decision of the
majority to sound a clear call for
employers and unions to self
examine and to self evaluate their
onploynienl practices and to
endeavor to eliminate, so far as
Continued on Page 12


Friday. August 17, 1979
rj-t. tn^miMmm n$Cirmatr Fnrt Jjauderdale
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
Tales of Development Towns Show Israeli Spirit
A number of stories in the certain nH..u.; ;_ .u. ._... ...
I *'
A number of stories in the
Hebrew Press during the past
four weeks have provided new
evidence of the spirit, resour-
cefulness and strength of Israel's
people under trying conditions.
The selections below, both from
Tediot Achronoth, demonstrate
these qualities in action in two
development towns: one under
intermittent terrorist attack, one
in a state of social transition.
THE MAALOT STORY
Twenty-four hours after a
recent terrorist attack on Maalot,
a Maalot resident for the past
seven years named Annette told
a reporter quietly: "You may ask
me how it feels to be on the front
line and I will ask you: "Are we
the only ones on the front line?
The entire people of Israel are on
the front line! It seems to me that
Tel Aviv is no less on the front
: line than Maalot though the
forms of attack are different. So
why should we get excited too
much?"
Her husband Shimon says:
"Listen, we have other problems.
For example, we have some
teachers who are not of the
highest quality and we would like
lo solve the problem fast and the
sooner the better."
ESTHER PARRITA is
thinking of leaving Maalot but
not because of the terrorists. She
has a baby of four months and a
boy of three years and the un-
certain education in the town
bothers her. Her mother, who
lives in Akko, rushed to her side
when she heard of the attack.
"Things are happening here all
the time and I was worried," she
says, "but it was as if nothing
happened." Esther sometimes
wonders if her calmness is giving
her mother too many worries.
In the office of the Workers'
Council, there was a lively
reaction to the attack in the
form of a party. Mounds of cake
and quarts of cold drinks and
coffee were prepared by the
women of Maalot for the soldiers
who came to help the town. They
were also given a place to sleep
over in the building. Some
seemed a little shaken, but not by
the dangers of the battle they
fought with the two PLO
terrorists before killing them.
What seemed to concern them
was the youthful age of one of the
dead terrorists who was killed in
battle.
Itivkah Spitz, who moved to
Maalot a year ago from Tel Aviv
where she had served as police
sergeant, told a reporter that she
decided to move to the
development town just in order
u> change the atmosphere." She
anil her husband Jack built their
home within the framework of the
program Bneh Betcha I build your
house) in a very high place from
where they could observe the
previous day's attack on Maalot.
Inflation Soars in Israel
The impact of inflation continues to grow in Israel. Information
received from Israel indicates the following changes in costs which
indicate the extremely high inflationary pressure: the price of frozen
meat will increase by 55 percent: the price of fuel by approximately 40
percent: the price of cooking gas by approximately 32 percent. These
massive increases will affect the consumer price index by 2.2 percent.
What follows is a list of new fuel prices in Israeli pounds:
Formerly
Now
One liter 83 octane fuel 12.10
One 1 iter octane fuel 11.30
One liter heating oil 4 35
One liter kerosene 470
12 kilograms container cooking gas 40.00
One ton crude oil for industry 2205.00
The exchange rate currently is 25.45 Israli pounds to one U.S.
dollar.
16.90
15.80
6.10
6.60
185.00
3000.09
HELP WANTED
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED TO TEACH ENGLISH
TO THE RESETTLED RUSSIAN FAMILIES
EVENINGS AT THE JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE
3500 N. STATE ROAD 7 (441). ,
IF YOU CAN SPARE AN EVENING OR TWO
A WEEK, CALL SHELLY SOLOMON AT
763-6340
POSITION NEEDED
Recently Resettled
Russian Jewish Woman
Seeks Employment As A
HOUSE KEEPER
OR
NURSE'S AIDE
Must Be In West Oakland Park Blvd. Area
PLEASE CALL SHELLY SOLOMON AT
JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE.
763-6340
Jack opened his supermarket,
though it was Saturday, to
distribute food to the soldiers
who became a part of the land-
scape of Maalot for the
weekend.
Jack told the reporter: "Am I
thinking of leaving Maalot? I'd
be crazy to do such a thing.
Where else would I find a town
with such a high quality of life?
Maalot is not just a development
town. Its half that and half
kibbutz. My children love it here
and want to stay here."
ONE LITTLE boy told the
reporter: "Why do you ask me if
I in afraid? Here I am standing
on the road on which those two
PLO people came but I'm not
afraid. Why be afraid of them?
Let them be afraid of us."
THE ASHKELON STORY
Ashkelon's young mayor. Eli
I >a\ an. talks about his town with
both pride and realism:
"Ashkelon is a town of many
contrasts; on the one hand it is a
beautiful town with trees, flowers
and gardens and with progressive
educational institutions and
health facilities.
"On the other hand, there are
also gome Shechunot with a
sizable poor population which
needs care and rehabilitation,
('specially Shechunat Shimshon,
which was built with little
thought and planning and with
insufficient services. There are a
lot of tense and disappointed
people in Shimshon Well,
maybe not so disappointed now.
"The Jews of England took a
leaf from the UJA book in un-
dertaking some special project to
help them through Project
Renewal. They are starting to re-
plan the neighborhood, now, and
sometimes you feel excitement
From them, not tension.
"SOME OF the inhabitants
will be moved to other
Shechunot, and conditions will be
created for absorbing middle
class people and young couples in
Shimshon.
"The master plan is being
worked out by the residents
themselves and is very com-
prehensive. It will include
physical, social and economic
programs, and there will be a lot
of emphasis on education. We
established a special fund for
developing a social and
educational system which will
run parallel to the physical
rehabilitation program.
"Better housing alone won't
do what we want to do. The
Neighborhood Steering Com-
mittee has been very busy, and
they have approved a number of
projects: four kindergartens.
restoration of old parks, four
laundry clubs, a dental clinic
where dentist volunteers from
England will work, a mobile
denial clinic and a special
scholarship fund.
"We are also introducing the
"Bneh Betcha" plan (Build Your
House.) Altogether, according to
plan, :t(() houses will Imj built of a
high-level quality. These houses
will attract a new population. To
1 lie east of Shimshon, we will put
in a large park .
"ALTHOUGH WE are
concentrating on solving the
problems of the needy
Shechunot, we are not neglecting
the Shechunot Afridar and
Barnea which are typical sub-
urban sections for the middle
class. We grow and attract more
inhabitants. In actual fact, the
Shechunat can serve as a good
example for all the other
Shechunot in town. There is a
plan for developing the area of
Afridar and Barnea and adding
some reeds, sidewalks, parking
lots and sports Fields.
"Culture and art activities
should be developed by
establishing more community
centers. We are going to open
four centers next year near
schools in all the Shechunot in
the town. They will be open in th-
afternoon and evening hours, and
maybe there won't be so many
dropouts .
"I believe the resetllcmcm
from the Sinai to the Negev will
benefit Ashkelon. 1 want any
construction that goes on in
Ashkelon for resettlement to be
coordinated with Project
Renewal construction of
.Ashkelon. The real master plan i--
lo get a dynamic mixture ol
people here in Ashkelon each
distinct, each contributing in his
own way and working together. I
want a town with a positive social
atmosphere, to make its special
character as a tourist and
vacation center even more
special."
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Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. Auguat 17.1979
Page6 ....._________- -"-________The Jewish Floridian ofUreater ton uauu*~~
UJA Appoints Cadden Jewish Magazines Provide Good Reading
National Cash Chairman
NEW YORK Edgar L.
Cadden of Chicago has been
appointed National Cash
Chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal, it was announced by
Irwin S. Field, UJA National
Chairman.
"A constant cash flow is vital
to the Jewish lifeline of
humanitarian services," he said.
"With increased Soviet
migration, the cost of peace and
the impact of inflation, the need
of the UJ As beneficiary agencies
for cash is immediate. Ed Cadden
is the kind of leader who will
insure that this need is met."
Vice chairman of the board of
the Jewish Fund of Metropolitan
Chicago. Cadden is chairman of
its Project Renewal Committee.
Previously, he served as the
Jewish United Fund's 1978
General Campaign chairman,
1977 Special Gifts chairman and
1976 chairman of Trades,
Industries and Professions
Division. Also in Chicago, he has
been a leader in the Crusade of
Mercy, the United Way Cam-
paign, a member of the Joint
Distribution Committee's board
of directors and is vice chairman
of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations.
Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr of
Plantation Jewish Congregation-
Temple Kol Ami noted in the
August issue of the
congregation's newsletter Late,
that members should consider
subscribing to one or more of
several "very fine magazines of
Jewish interest.
He mentioned Moment, P.O.
lox 922, Farmingdale, N.Y.
11737. founded by Elie Wiesel
and Leonard Fein, and in the
rabbi's opnion "the finest in-
dependent Jewish periodical
being published today; Corn-
York 10022. pushed by the
American Jewish Committee,
considered to be a leading in-
tellectual magazine among the
Silberman Named Chairman
Of UJA Florida Cabinet
NEW YORK Morton
Silberman of Miami has been
appointed chairman of the
Florida Regional Cabinet of
United Jewish Appeal. The
announcement was made by UJA
National Chairman Irwin S.
Field.
Field described Silberman as a
"dynamic Jewish leader whose
invaluable contributions to
Jewish life make him an out-
standing choice to lead his region
as we enter a decade of decision in
Jewish life. There are few among
us as energetic, committed and
effective as Mort. and the
national leadership of UJA looks
forward to a long and productive
association with him."
"Silberman's involvement in
Jewish communal life goes back
many years, and he has served in
numerous leadership roles on the
local, regional and national
levels. He is currently vice
president of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee, and
recently received the Human
Relations Award of the American
Jewish Committee.
From 1976 to 1978. Silberman
served as president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation: prior
to that he was vice president of
the Federation for six years.
Before moving to Miami, he was
founding president of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Secretary-treasurer of the East
Coast Supply Company,
Silberman resides in Miami with
his wife Val and two daughters.
Local Brandeis Women



! Honor Braward Librarian WV Post Installs Officers
Lonnie Golenberg (left), past
president of the West Broward
Chapter of Brandeis University
National Women's Committee,
presented a Certificate of
Appreciation to Tobia Geberer of
the West Broward Branch of the
Broward County Library.
The chapter also donated to
the library A History of Israel
from the Rise of Zionism to Our
Time by Dr. Howard Sachar, son
of Abram Sachar, chancellor of
Brandeis University. In addition,
a Book Plate honoring the
Broward County Library was
donated to the Brandeis
University Library at Waltham,
Mass.
Also similarly honored for
cooperation with the Brandeis
group were Betty Hoffman,
founder, director and chairman of
the board of the Plantation
Public Library; and Chris
Baffron, on behalf of the Plan-
tation Department of Parks and
Recreation.
Ruth Horowitz is president of
the West Broward Chapter and
invites interested members of the
community to contact her or
Leonore Greenfield, membership
chairman.
Temple Emanu-El
Welcomes New Rabbi
Temple Emanu-El welcomed
Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon aa he
preached his first service in July,
assuming leadership of the
temple.
Appropriately, the portion of
the week quoted Moses' words
from Deuteronomy "go and
begin." That, said the rabbi, will
be the theme of his inaugural
year in Fort Lauderdale.
Martin Yohalem, temple
president, officially presented the
rabbi to the congregation. Mrs.
Jerold Mills, Sisterhood
president, ushered in the Sab-
bath, reciting the traditional
prayer as she kindled the Sab-
bath candles. Mrs. Matthew
Newman chanted the prayers
preceding and following the
scriptural readings.
Cantor Jerome Klement sang a
rousing Israeli hymn dedicated to
Rabbi Ballon; and Nat Baker,
president of the Men's Club,
recited the ritual blessings. Roy
Robert, representing the Youth
Group, was also seated on the
pulpit, as all ages shared in the
Sabbath of welcome.
Sabbath social hour, hosted by
Sisterhood officers, followed the
services as the congregation
greeted Rabbi Ballon and his
family.
Charles Pace of Tamarac and
Sybil Swirsky of Sunrise will be
installed as commander and
president, respectively, of the
newly-organized Edward
Goldberg Post No. 519, Jewish
War Veterans (JWV) and Ladies
Auxiliary. They will be installed
at special ceremonies Sunday,
Aug. 19, at 7:30 pjn. in the
Jordan Building, 11030 Wiles
Rd., Coral Springs.
Willard Zweig, director of media
for the JWV Department of
Florida, announced that, in
addition to the installation of
officers, the Post will be
presented with national charters.
These presentations will be made
by Alvin F. Rose, state com-
mander of JWV Department of
Florida, and Mrs. Harold Uhr,
past department president.
Delegations from Broward,
Palm Beach and Dade Counties
will join numerous dignitaries
from various JWV posts and
auxiliaries and allied veteran
organizations in the state.
nation's periodicals; Present
Tense, also published by AJ
Committee, considers itself "The
Magazine of World Jewish
Affairs."
Rabbi Harr also calls attention
to The Jerusalem Post, published
in Jerusalem with a weekly
edition airmailed to thousands of
subscribers around the world;
The Jewish Press, Hadassah
Magazine, National Jewish
Monthly and the National Post
and Opinion.
Another publication of utmost
importance to concerned Jews is
the Near East Report, published
by American Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPACl
which conducts public action to
maintain and strengthen the
friendship between the United
States and Israel. AIPAC
maintains contact with the White
House Administration. Congress
and various officials. AIPAC is
located at 444 N. Capitol St..
N.W., Washington, DC 20001.
Task Force Has
Speaker's Bureau
Broward County's Task Force
on Organized Crime has a
Speaker's Bureau made up of
prominent local law enforcement
officials and civic leaders who are
available to speak on "Our
Attack against Organized Crime,
Narcotics, Drug Abuse and
Marijuana."
Waiiam T. Love Jr., ad-
ministrative assistant of the
Task Force, located at 915
Middle River Dr.. Fort
Lauderdale, will make
arrangements to schedule a
speaker for an organization's
meeting.
Marc J. Goldberg, M.D., F.R.C.S. (C.)
Eye Physician and Surgeon
announces the opening of his office
in the
Florida Medical Center
4900 West Oakland Park Boulevard, Suite 201
Lauderdale Lakes, Florida 33313
Office hours by appointment
(305) 739-6533
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HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
AT
TEMPLE SHOLOM
"The only conservative synagogue in Northeast
_______________Broward"
RABBI MORRIS A. SKOP
CANTOR JACOB J. RENZER
ROSH HASHANAH
Friday Sept. 21 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Sept. 22 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Sept 23 9:00 a.m.
YOM KIPPUR
Sunday Sept. 30 7:00 p.m.
Kol Nidray
Monday Oct. 1 9:00 a.m.
YEKOR MEMORIAL SERVICE
12 noon
RESERVATIONS AND MEMBERSHIPS NOW BEING ACCEPTED AT TEMPLE OFFICE
_________ 942*410
Hebrew school registration for all das*M
Sunday,sept9th 9imi.r*~


ITiday, August 17, 1979
l.L t'lJ. nlCil
*r Fort I^auderdale
1 he Jewish tlondian of Ureater fort LauUeraaie
... .
Fow/iflr, Old Enjoy Inter-generational Shabbat
Fifty of the youngest members of the more than 300
children attending the first Day Camp activity on the Perlman
Campus of the. Jewish Community Center of Greater Fort
Lauderdale greeted a group of JCC Senior Adults for the "first
time ever inter-generational Oneg Shabbat.
On the afternoon of Friday, Aug. 3, in the shade of trees on
the campus of the former Florida Air Academy at 6500 Sunrise
Blvd., the AVi to 5-year-olds came trooping in led by Penny
Rubin, unit head.
Ani naturally, the first order of business was benching
hcht (blessing over the Sabbath candles), the motzi (blessing
over the challah), and the brey pree-hagufen (sancfification of
the wine). Then songs, dances, and a skit portraying the
preparation for a Shabbat family dinner with guests, and once
again, these little ones recited their blessings in Hebrew praising
God for light, the fruit of the earth, and fruit of the vine.
Day Camp Director Selma Telles and Helen Nathan,
coordinator of adult activities for JCC, which is a major con-
stituent agency of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, collaborated with Penny Rubin in the Oneg
Shabbat program. Penny had the full cooperation of her
counselors, junior counselors, and counselors-in-training in the
rehearsals the youngsters had in preparation for the event.
It was a tremendous highlight for the Day Camp's first year
on the Perlman Campus. The Camp will have its closing
ceremonies on Friday, Aug. 17, and begin making preparations
for its second year beginning at the start of summer in 1980.
m
W--
Preparing to light candles (left to right): David Habib, CIT; Sol Simon (the Hebrew prompter
who said the kids didn't need prompting), Linda Kaufman, counselor, and the children:
Rebecca Propis, Shana Sachs, Gabe Lembeck, Martin Schwartz, SheriGalin.

Oneg Shabbat dancers observed by junior counselor Shari
Zimmerman with Stacy Frank providing guitar accompaniment
for Eric Pressman, Jennifer Salame, Joshua Dubin, Sherri
Riefs, Eric Feinberg.
I
, AMI
u
Among those standing in back of the children as they prepare to recite the "motzi" are Debbie
Citrin, junior counselor, Hope Plevy, CIT, and Sol Simon. The children (left to right) are Lee
Israch, Madelyn Trumpkin, Michelle Coudin, Jill Kopelowitz, Maria Bernstein, Robyn Lieb-
man, Paul Greenspan, Kevin Davis, and Benjamin Glazier.
\

Setting the table for Shabbat dinner: 'Mama" Meredith Baker
with "daughters" Kimberley Dachelet, Audrey Halpern and
^Robyn Lyn Herbert.
Preparing for the Shabbat
dinner, "Mama" and daugh-
ters Kimberley Dachelet and
Audrey Halpern go to the
Fish Market run by Craig
Hoffman.
Grandpa and Poppa, who
arrived early for the Shabbat
dinner, were directed to take
their pipes and go to the back
room to wait for the guests.
The "actors": Jonathan Barr
(left) and Brian Bomberg.
And among the audience, more youngsters and some of the senior adults, each
'of whom is scheduled to receive gifts made in the arts and crafts sessions of the
JCC Day Camp.
And still more of the youngsters and more of the adults who enjoyed the
thrilling experience of hearing blessings in Hebrew "out of the mouth of
babes," plus singing, dancing, and a skit.
, *.
I k -


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 17,1979
-
At extreme left is Yossi Dagan, the articulate, experienced guide, who helped
make the Mission for Greater Fort Lauderdale's Young Leaders of the Jewish
Federation so tremendously thrilling. The State of Israel flag flies high over the
military outpost overlooking Syria with the United Nations Force in a camp be-
tween Israel and Syria. The Young Leaders meet a Bedouin who sells rides on
his camel and that's Nina Nemerofsky enjoying the ride aboard a dromedary.
*-*
r
<***;*# "
A Hassid heading for The Western Wall (left photo). In the center is a view of
the restored Old Jewish Synagogue in the Old Jewish Quarter near the Wall.
And at the right is a picture of the Young Leaders leaving the Dome of the
Rock, the Temple of Islam, where Mohammed, legend says, rose to heaven.
Incredible Experience in an Incredible Land'
Continued from Pag* 1.
Other highlights:
Riding the cable car to the
top of Masada to view the ruins
of the area where the zealots,
after withstanding the on-
slaughts of Roman Legions for
three years, committed mass
suicide rather than submit to
capture, torture and degradation
by the Roman Legionnaires;
A poignant, solemn visit to
Yad Vashem, the Memorial to the
Six Million, where the Young
Leaders participated in a special
Yizkor service in memory of the
heroes and martyrs of the
Holocaust;
And like a page out of
history books, meeting with
ultra-Orthodox Jews in the Mea
Shearim section of Jerusalem;
Continuing on the northern
outposts of the Golan Heights,
overlooking the Syrian city of
Kunetra, where the flag of Israel
flies high over the rugged land
defended by young members of
the Israel Defense Force.
Bill to Seize Bedouin Land Passes
By GIL SEDAN Tamir and ^^ among
JERUSALEM (JTA) SSttSSggtBZL
A controversial bill that Rabin and Yigal Allon favored
would allow the govern
ment to seize some 40,000
acres of Bedouin lands in
the Negev without the right
of appeal passed its first
reading in the Knesset by a
vote of 46-44. But the nar-
row margin was a disap-
pointment to coalition
leaders who had hoped for a
broad consensus on the
issue in view of the strong
internal and international
criticism of the measure.
The opposition was led by the
Labor Alignment which had been
importuned by Finance Minister
Simcha Ehrlich and Justice
Minister Shmuel Tamir at
meetings at least to abstain if it
could not support the bill.
THE LANDS in question are
needed for the construction of one
of three U.S.-financed air bases to
replace those Israel will give up
in Sinai Under the terms of the
Israeli-Egyptian peaoe treaty the
bases must be completed within
three years.
For that reason, the govern-
ment-sponsored bill bans the
right of the Bedouins to appeal
the confiscation of their land to
Israeli courts, a process that
could seriously delay work on the
airfields. The Bedouins would be
offered compensation, however,
and the right to appeal if they
consider the offer to be in-
sufficient.
Members of the Labor Align-
ment's Knesset faction met
several times with Ehrlich and
abstention, they were overruled
by junior MKs. The Labor
faction voted 19-7 against ab-
stention and as a result the party
opposed the bill en bloc.
IT CAME to a vote after the
coalition and opposition factions
failed to agree on a compromise
which would have postponed
Knesset action while a more
moderate version of the bill was
worked out with Bedouin par-
ticipation.
The Labor Alignment did not
question the need for the lands
but felt that the new measure was
too arbitrary and that the issue
could be resolved within existing
legislation covering land ex-
propriation.
Ehrlich aruged that "supreme
to be located in the Tel Malhata
area south of Beersheba,
inhabited by about 6,000
Bedouins.
THE BILL provides that the
State will acquire title to the
lands specified on the date the
law takes effect. The inhabitants
defense necessity" and a desire would be given three months to
not to jeopardize the peace treaty evacuate and turn over the land
were the only reasons the govern- to the State. The measure was
ment presented the bill. He noted sent to the Knesset Foreign
that uninhabited lands were Affairs and Security Committee
selected for two of the projected for further discussion. The
air bases but the third, in the
opinion of military experts, had
Texas Dispute Over
KncwM. which adjourned for
summer rocr-ss Aug. 1. may be
called back into special session
for the required second and third
readings of the bill.
t And then across the land to
northernmost sector of Israel
where the fence separates Israel
from Lebanon but where the
barrier, now re-named "Good
Fence,' has a gate permitting
Lebanese Arabs to enter Israel.
Here the group saw Israel's
humanitarian efforts to aid those
Arabs by providing jobs in shops
in Metuila and other com-
munities nearby, by giving
medical aid to those in need, and
oilier services.
Meeting new Russian and
South American immigrants at
an Absorption Center learning
nuvliiu; other newcomers settled
id ,i new town in the Upper
liuiilvc,
And enjoying the home
hospitality of Kibbutz members
and then staying overnight at the
fumed Ayelet Hashachar Kibbutz
Guest House on the Sea of
Galilee.
With Johl Rotman of Coral
Springs, was his wife, Jane; also
Ronald and Jane Snagrin, and
Chuck and Greta Sussman, Fort
Luuderdale; Gil and Nedra
Friedman, Melvin and Joyce
Jurolem, Harry and Leona
Levey, and Stephen and Nina
Nemerofsky, all of Plantation.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) A
dispute at the University of
Texas in Austin between the
school's History Department and
its Center for Middle Eastern
Studies over the appointment of
an Israeli-born historian has been
settled with the Israeli joining
the university' faculty for the
1980 spring term, the American
Jewish Committee reported.
Sheba Mittelman, a member of
the AJCommittee's special
programs department, said that
Abraham Marcus, a 31-year-old
Tel Aviv University graduate
now completing work on a
Doctorate at Columbia
University, will join the
university's history faculty and
will bo listed in the catalogue of
the Mideast Center. She said that
Marcus, whose field is modern
Arab history, is satisfied with the
outcome and will go to Austin in
January.
THE DISPUTE began when
the History Department, which
was asked by the Center to find a
historian to be jointly appointed
by the department and the
Center, recommended Marcus.
The Center, which is partially
funded by Arab governments,
said Marcus was not qualified.
The departnu.it said Marcus-
was a qualified scholar of great
promise. Marcus never par-
ticipated in the public dispute
about the appointment which
broke out last May.
The AJCommittee has been
monitoring the dispute. Its
special programs department,
headed by Ira Silverman, last
March proposed guidelines for
American colleges and univer-
sities receiving funds from
foreign sources, especially Arab
countries. The Center reportedly
receives about S 100,000 a year
from Arab governments.
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THREE ELEVATORS* POOL


.1 Pl'^m. n(flr~n
t.r Fnrt Lauderdale
Friday, August 17,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
Synagogue News
*
PLANTATION
JEWISH CONGREGATION
Plantation Jewish
Congregation Temple Kol Ami
will host an open house for new
members on Aug. 26 at 8 p.m. at
' the temple. All prospective
members are invited to attend
und tour the facilities.
The congregation announces
the appointment of Stephanie
King to the staff of the religious
school. Ms. King will head the
seventh to tenth grade high
school department.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
The Abraham Haber Torah
School of Temple Beth Israel
(Conservative), 7100 West
Oakland Park Boulevard,
Sunrise, is now conducting
registration in all departments:
primary, elementary, middle and
high school.
The temple youth groups,
K.idimuli und USY, are also
accepting new members at this
time. For additional information,
contact Stanley L. Cohen,
director of education and youth.
SUNRISE
JEWISH CENTER
The worship service of the
Sunrise Jewish Center (Temple
Sha-arai Zedek) was held Aug.
10, to usher in the Shabbath.
Cantor Jack Merchant chanted
the liturgy, and Irving
Sleinhaus, the second vice
president conducted the services
while Rabbi Albert N. Troy is
away on a two month vacation in
Israel.
A highlight of the evening was
a talk by Jack L. Sackman, the
retired attorney of Lauderdale
Lukes, whose topic was "Jewish
Hoots."
The Kiddush following the
services on Saturday, Aug. 11,
was sponsored by Mr. and Mrs.
Phil Mitchell in celebration of
their 50th wedding anniversary.
The temple is located at 8049
West Oakland Park Boulevard,
Sunrise. AU are welcome to join
the congregation in worship.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Temple Sholom of Pompano
lluach is now accepting reser-
vations for the High Holy days
services seating, celebrating the
Jewish New Year 5740 and Yom
Kippur, the Day of Atonement.
Services for Rosh Hashanah will
be held on Sept. 22, and 23 and
Yom Kippur Oct. 1. Services will
be conducted by Rabbi Morris
Skop, assisted by Cantor Jacob
Huiuner. Early reservations are
suggested due to limited seating.
For information call the temple
office.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Dr. Morton Malavsky,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Shalom, Hollywood, announces a
lour to Israel, scheduled for Dec.
I. Cull the Utuipiu for details.
Call the temple for details.
THE REOONSTRUCTIONIST
SYNAGOGUE
f, Rabbi Ludwig Nadelman,
executive vice president of The
Jewish Reconstructionist
Foundation in New York City,
will speak at The Recon-
"llructionist Synagogue, 7473
"*NW 4th St., Plantation, on
Thursday, Aug. 23, at 8 p.m.
Rabbi Nadelman was born in
Germany, grew up in Ecuador
and received his higher education
in New York. He is a contributor
to The Encylopedia Judaica, the
treasurer of The American
Section of the World Jewish
Congress and is on the faculty of
Phe Reconstructionist College in
Philadelphia. Visitors are
welcome to attend.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Temple Beth Orr Sisterhood is
having an "Affordable Art
Affair" Sunday, Aug. 26, from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. at the temple. With
the cooperation of United
Liquidators and Art
Distributors, original oils, prints
and lithos will be on display and
for sale. Included in the day's
selling will be custom crafted
designer costume iewelrv.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER
The Men's Club and
Sisterhood are sponsoring a
Labor Day weekend (Aug. 31 to
Sept. 3) at the Crown Hotel in
Miami Beach. For information
call the temple office.
Bar, Bat Mitzvahs
MARC WEISS '
The Plantation Jewish
Congregation-Temple Kol Ami
will have three B'nai Mitzvah
this month. Rabbi Sheldon J.
I tin i will conduct services at
10:30 a.m., Saturday. Aug. 18,
when Marc Weiss, son of Mrs.
Shellie Weiss, becomes a Bar
Mitzvah. Mrs. Weiss will sponsor
the Oneg Shabbat at the temple,
8200 Peters Rd., Plantation,
following the regular Shabbat
service Friday, Aug. 17.
EDWARD ROSEN
On Saturday, Aug. 25, Edward
Rosen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Larry
Rosen, will be called to the Torah
for his Bar Mitzvah service. Mr.
and Mrs. Rosen will sponsor the
Oneg Shabbat Friday evening,
Aug. 24.
RANDY MAYROVITZ
And on Saturday, Aug. 3
Randy Mayrovitz, son of Harve.
und Sandra Mayrovitz, wil
become a Bar Mitzvah.
MARCIAWACHTEL
Marcia Eden Wachte!
daughter of Dr and Mrs. Garr;
II. Wachtel, will become Bat
Mitzvah at the 10 a.m. service of
The Reconstructionist
Synagogue, on Saturday, Aug.
25.
Dr. Ludwig Nadelman, a leader
of the Reconstructionist
movement, will officiate at the
service which will be held at
Deicke Auditorium, Cypress
Road, Plantation.
The oneg following the Friday
evening Aug. 24 service will be
sponsored by Mr. and Mrs.
William Dennis, grandparents of
Lbs Bat Mitzvah, following the
8:15 service at The Recon-
structionist Synagogue. 7473
NW 4th St., Plantation.
MARIELLE SAMOUN
Marielle Samoun, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Samoun,
will be Bat Mizvah Friday, Aug.
17, at 8 p.m. at Tamarac Jewish
Center, Inc.-Temple Beth Torah.
KOSHER
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Cftoum
uCIWfAOUT
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUKKOTH
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5 Days i 4 N*hts sqc I I Days 15 Wgtils 11 f E
Aug. 31 to Sept. 4 93 Aug. 30 to Sept. 4 I 13
Tenms FacilrtiesSauna-Hand BaH-WotteybalKMympic Swimming
Poor-Fun Block of Private Beach-Cntertainment-TV in Rooms-DaMy
Synagogue Services-Therapeutic Whirlpool
Tour Hosts Michael lethowitz A Alex Srmlow
For AeeiilK>ns Phone: l-53c 10
laily
Tamarac Jewish Center Appoints Cantor
Ben Bernstein, president ot the
Tamarac Jewish Center, has an-
nounced the appointment of
Cantor Henry Belasco of New
York City.
Born in Warsaw, Poland,
Cantor Belasco is a descendant of
cantors. He studied at the Con-
servatory of Music in Europe. He
later emigrated to Israel where he
continued his studies and was a
leading tenor with the Israeli
National Opera. He has sung in
concerts in Paris, Rome, Naples
and Warsaw. In 1948 he served in
Israel's War of Independence.
His previous posts were in
Philadelphia, Harrisburg,
Edmonton. Canada and
Luurelton. L.I.
Cantor Belasco will be par-
ticipating in Sabbath MTVIces
commencing in mid-August.
The Air Conditioned
kosher wjirrs wouse tel
Cantor Belasco
Volunteers Needed
The Jewish Community Center
Kosher Nutrition Program needs
volunteer entertainers for its
senior citizen program, such as
n,i ii ,n. ii ., choral groups, dancers
and comics. Call Sara Perlis at
the Jewish Community Center.
Reserve Now For the
HIGH HOLY
DAYS
piC1
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Services Conducted on Premises by Cantor Israel Zygelbaum
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
vwiky, August i;,iy/
:::
Organizations
In The News
i
88
HADASSAH
The Kavanah Chapter of
Hadassah, Plantation, will hold
its first New Membership Tea for
the 1979-80 season at 8 p.m.,
Wednesday, Aug. 29, at the home
of Sandra Falk, 9341 NW 32nd
St.. Sunrise.
The Plantation L'Chayim
Chapter of Hadassah will hold a
luncheon and card party at 11:?0
a.m. Aug. 21, at Deicke
Auditorium, 5700 Cypress Rd.,
Plantation.
The Blyma Margate Chapter,
Hadassah. is sponsoring a
luncheon card party at the
Catherine Young Library, Park
Drive, Margate; on Thursday
Aug. 23 at noon. For tickets, call
chairman Shirk-,- Epstein.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
IVnai U'rilh Women, Inverrary
Chapter, will hold a luncheon and
card party on Aug. 22, at noon, at
Reef Restaurant, 2700 S.
Andrews Ave. Call Ruth
Goldman for reservations.
B'nai B'rith Women. Tamarac
Chapter No. 1479 will hold a
regular meeting on Thursday,
Sept. 6, at the Tamarac Jewish
Center, 9101 NW 57th St. at
12:15 p.m. The program will
feature an original script by
Florence Krantz entitled
"Getting to Know You." New
members are welcome.
DISABLED
AMERICAN VETERANS
Disabled American Veterans,
Chapter 138, Plantation, will hold
its monthly meeting on Tuesday,
Aug. 28, at the Plantation
Community Center, 5555 Palm
Tree lid., at 7:30 p.m.
Counseling of veterans, ad-
vising them of their benefits, is
held every Tuesday at Roarke
Center, Sunrise, from 9 to 11:30
.1111., and Thursday at the
Plantation Community Center
from 1 to 3 p.m. New members
and transferees are invited to
allend. For further information,
contact Artie Horowitz.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
William Krelchman Post 730
Jewish War Veterans of Fort
Lauderdale. will hold its monthly
meeting on Monday, Aug. 27, at
7:30 p.m. at Whiting Hall, 6767
NW 24th St., Sunrise. New
members and transferees are
invited to attend. For further
information, contact Artie
Horowitz.
ODDFELLOWS
Hatchee Lodge No. 71,
Independent Order of Odd-
fellows, meets regularly every
first and third Thursday of the
month at its temple. 1451 N.
Dixie Highway. Fort Lauderdale.
Contact Manuel Barish. past
grand master, for information.
DYSAUTONOMIA
FOUNDATION
A benefit show starring the
recording artists. "The
Avellows.' is planned for Aug. 23
at 8 p.m. at Nob Hill Recreation
Center, 10(XM) Sunset Strip.
Sunrise. The show is sponsored
by the South Florida Chapter of
the Dysautonomia Foundation.
Dysaulonomia is a genetic
disease affecting children of
European descent.
jwiiiwiiijMniijw^^
ICommunity
Calendar A
Aug. 19
Edward Goldberg JWV Post 519 Joint Institution and Installation of
Officers Refreshments Coral Springs Masonic Hall, Jordan
Building (2nd floor), 11030 Wiles Road, Coral Springs 7:30 p.m.
Aug. 20
ORT Ocean Mile Chapter board meeting 10 a.m. Regency
South Rec. Room, 3750 Gait Ocean Drive, Fort Lauderdale *
Hadassah Armon Castle Garden Chapter card party p.m. -
Castle Garden Rec. Hall Temple Emanu-EI Bingo 7:15 p.m.
Aug. 21
Hadassah, Plantation L'Chayim Chapter card party
Avg.22
ORT Lauderdale Chapter card party refreshments Lauderdale
LakesCityHoll-12:30 p.m.
Aug. 23
Temple Emanu-EI Executive Committee meeting 7:30 p.m.
Temple Emanu-EI board meeting 7:45 p.m. Hadassah Haverim
Fort Lauderdale Chopter board meeting 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith -
Hope Chapter #1617 membership meeting
Aug. 24
Workmen's Circle #1046 general meeting
Aug. 26
UJA Prime Minister's Mission Departure B'nai B'rith Sunrise
Chapter #1527 luncheon and card party Sea Horse at Lat Ola
Blvd.
Aug. 27
Temple Emanu-l Bingo 7:15 p.m. Hodawah Tamor Fort
Lauderdale Chapter board meeting
Aug. 21
Hadassah Kavanah of Plantation membership tea Hadassah -
Rayus Group of West Broward board meeting
Aug. 30
UJA Prime Minister's Mission Return Hadassah Sabra board
meeting 8 p.m.
Israel Leaders Seethe
Continued from Page 1
tinian rights.
The debate, as reported from
the United Nations, was post-
poned last week following in-
dications that the PLO is willing
to modify its hardline stance on
Palestinian rights notably its
refusal until now to recognize the
existence of the State of Israel.
IT IS FELT here that what the
U.S. is attempting to do is to
force Israel to consent to giving
broader self-rule powers to Pa'.es-
tininns living in Judea, Samaria
and in Gaza in its ongoing nego-
tiations with Egypt. These nego-
tiations resumed this week in
Haifa.
State Department personnel,
in addition to Reston, point to a
New York Times report as saying
that unless negotiations for a
Palestinian homeland show
genuine progress, there will be an
increase of Arab-inspired
terrorism.
More important. Western
problems will increase in getting
oil from the Arab oil-producing
combine.
JOSEPH BURG, chief of the
Israeli negotiating team with
Egypt, responded here angrily,
noting that U.S. suggestions go
far beyond what President Sadat
himself is demanding, thus
hardening the Egyptian position
and making the negotiations
more difficult.
Also. Burg noted that if the
U.S. continues to pursue its
position, it is in effect forcing the
peace talks beyond the limits as
established by the Camp David
accord.
Meanwhile. Deputy Prime
Pilot FirmsBegin
Campaigning
Four of Broward County's
largest business organizations
agreed to be pilot firms and
began their United Way fund-
raising efforts Aug. 6 to help set
the pace for the official campaign
period which kicks off in Sep-
tember.
According to Byron Campbell,
chairman of the Pacesetter and
Pilot Campaigns, the pilot firms
are American Express, Gore
Newspapers, Landmark Bank
and Motorola. "As Pilot cam-
paigners, these four
organizations will run their
campaigns in advance, providing
leadership for the campaign and
act as models for the rest of the
community to follow," Campbell
said.
The combined goal of the pilot
organizations is to raise $100,000
new employee-contributed dollars
for the United Way agencies.
Minister Yigael Yadin declared
that the United States is at-
tempting to "build upon" UN
Resolution 242 to encourage the
PLO to recognize Israel's right to
exist and thus to facilitate U.S.-
Palestinian talks.
"ANY ATTEMPT to change
Resolution 242 explicitly or by
implication in order to soften the
PLO stand will result in a serious
obstacle to further progress in
the peace negotiations," Yadin
said.
Said Yehiel Kadishai, a top
aide to Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin: "We exist. We don't
expect anybody to recognize our
existence. It is an insult to our
intelligence."
JOt
<5
< I
>
In an attempt to overcome voter apathy, Jane Carroll, left,
supervisor of elections for Broward County, is recruiting
honorary deputy supervisors. Any registered voter in Broward
County is qualified, and among those serving are Mr. and Mrs.
Nat Applebaum of Sunrise Lakes, right. The ambassadors visit
new residents and encourage them to vote.
Hebrew Congregation of Lauderhill will hold HIGH
HOLIDAY Services at Camelot Hall49 Ave & 21 St.
Rabbi H. Levy .Cantor L. Feldman will Officiate.
Tickets available. For Information Call-484-9722
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For registration and further informjtK>^!!fiHTH
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Bert Rodgers Schools of Real Estate
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_____ Phone (305) 666 3348

"JL


y, August 17,1979
Mk-vj.. fOiMr Fnrt Lauderdale
The Jewish Floridian ofGreater Fort LauderdaU
Page 11
A Retrospective
Jack Levine's Works in Traveling Exhibit
By ALFRED WERNER
[Currently, a large retrospective
of Jack Levine's work,
zanized by New York's Jewish
luseum, is traveling through
is country. Now thousands of
nericans, who had heard of
erica's foremost "painter of
rial protest," and of the
rongest of those Realists who
kve been inspired by the
Jewish motif," will be able to
some of the original works
Ither than just reproductions in
Vllege textbooks.
I What a joy it will be for art
vers in West Palm Beach,
emphis. Montgomery. Por-
and (Oregon) and St. Paul to
alk in a leisurely fashion among
i masterpieces.
SO MUCH has been written in
raise of Levine who, ad-
littedly, has had adversaries as
ell that it might be difficult
try to find new words of praise.
there are few who know his
Dry, for this Bostonian in-
Dvert, quite unlike Dali,
ficasso, or Chagall, has rarely
nd almost reluctantly given
Jterviews or publicly interpreted
i pictures.
Levine, who recently turned
wants his paintings and
ints to speak to the art lovers
lirectly, to feel the impact of his
korks, his politics, philosophy,
. But on the many occasions
it I have asked him questions,
has answered them patiently
and, at times, through a single
emark. opened an entirely new
orld to me.
The son of immigrants from
pzarist Russian, Levine was
icky enough to have been born
Boston, one of America's
kldest artistic centers. He spent
Vis first eight years in the South
! Jewish, Italian and Irish
Newcomers.
THE NEXT stop was the
komewhat more affluent Rox-
tmry, which had a Jewish Center.
there, by an accident of fate, an
exceptionally bright and
progressive young man was in
of the drawing class.
larold Zimmerman was only
ine years older than Jack; he
trying to eke out a living as a
acher while studying at the art
Bchool of the Boston Museum.
Another name must be
Mentioned, too the "Brahmin"
Jr. Denman Waldo Ross, who, in
.his youth, had been a personal
riend of several of the
.ipressionist painters in France,
had founded Harvard's Art
department Old Dr. Ross took
ree young Jews under his wing.
He enabled Zimmerman to set
IP his own teaching studio, and
took a paternal interest in the
id, Hyman Bloom (who was
so to become a leading artist).
Levine still feels indebted to
Zimmerman who died
ematurely in 1940. Zimmerman
fas a perfectionist who drilled
young man in draftsmanship
igorously, "as a violinist would
) drilled by Leopold Auer."
AS FOR Dr. Ross, he not only
t*ve Levine private instruction
it also supplied him, far a
riod of three years, with a
allowance of $12, a nice
in those pre-Depression
days. Ross' greatest contribution
to Jack's education was,
probably, in urging him to study
the Old Masters in the rich
collections in Boston and nearby
Cambridge. As Levine once
recalled:
"He put me in touch with the
European tradition and the great
painting of the past at an early
age, when I knew nothing about
it. He gave me roots a long way
back I owe to Ross what I'm
interested in, continuity."
There was nobody to give roots
to Levine's contemporary,
Jackson Pollock from Wyoming,
and Ross would never have
considered Pollock's techniques
of dripping and splashing paint
on canvas as part of the practice
of art
BUT HAD he lived to see the
grim, satirical oils produced by
Levine after the mid-thirties,
Ross, with his puritan-patrician
background, would, in all
likelihood, not have cared for his
ex-student's new style and
subject matter either. Yet he
loved young Levine's "Classical"
drawings. He exhibited them at
Harvard's Fogg Art Museum.
Levine was not yet 20 in 1934
when the late Edith Halpert, the
discoverer of many an artist,
gave him his first one-man show
at her Dowtown Gallery in
Manhattan. He was among the
youngest of the thousands of
artists who, in the era of the
Great Depression, were saved by
the Federal Arts Project,
sponsored by the Work Projects
Administration (WPA), created
under President Roosevelt to
salvage many creative people.
Levine was one of the most
productive and versatile of these
young men and women. In 1936,
his Feast of Pure Reason was
included in the Museum of
Modern Art Exhibition, "New
Horizons in American Art" (It
created a controversy among the
wealthy trustees, for in his
picture Levine had portrayed
John Pierpont Morgan in an
unpleasant underworld setting
with unsavory political and police
chacters, as if to say, 'See, they
are all pals in skullduggery," but
the majority on the Board was
liberal and permissiive, and the
picture remained on the wall.)
String Quartette, in the
Metropolitan Museum of Ait,
became the most widely known of
the more than 50,000 easel
paintings produced in the WPA
era; through Life magazine and
through New York subway
posters it reached a vast public
JUST BEFORE the outbreak
of World War II, Levine was
represented in Paris at the Three
Centuries of American Art at the
Jeu de Paume (which is ad-
ministered by the Louvre).
While there were individuals
who deplored the money
"wasted" on the WPA Art
Project which provided artists
with such necessities as a roof
over their head, food, clothes, and
materials for work, it was enough
just to point at Levine to
demonstrate that the funds were
quite necessary.
The WPA Project petered out
in the year 1943. By that time,
private citizen Levine had
become Technical Sergeant
Levine in the Engineer Corps,
stationed on Ascension Island,
an isolated army base in the
South Atlantic
Welcome Home, 1946.
In those 20 dreary months of
service he had little time to
devote to his art. Yet he
managed, nonetheless, to paint a
crucifixion for the Catholic
chapel: "The boys needed
something to look at on that pile
of slab," he explained.
AFTER THE WAR, he settled
in New York, where he married
the painter, Ruth Gikow, who
bore him a daughter. Some years
ago, the Le vines bought a
charming small house with red
walls on Morton Street, in
Greenwich Village The upper
floor contains Miss Gikow's
studio, while her husband has his
own atelier in another old house,
only a few hundred yards away.
Except for traveling repeatedly
in Europe where they seem to
-know thoroughly nearly every
important museum the
Levines have, on the whole, lived
quiet lives what the ordinary
man might call "uneventful"
lives, not realizing that the
creation of every work of art is an
event
I do not know how many
pictures Levine has painted, but
there must be hundreds of them,
the monograph about him, with
text by Frank Getlein, issued by
Harry N. Abrams, in the mid-
sixties, contained 169
illustrations; most of the pictures
shown were oils, the inspiration
of El Greco, Rubens, Rembrandt,
Daumier can be felt, as well as an
affinity to Rouault, Kokoschka,
and Soutine.
MANY OF these pictures have
been appreciated mainly on
account of their satirical subject
matter. But many art-conscious
people also love bis portraits, his
works inspired by literature and
religion. Several of his small
paintings deal with heroes of the
Old Testament and with
historical Jewish figures.
On these little canvases, the
artist lavishly bestowed his
painter's riches, as delightful as
those of medieval miniatures.
The New York Graphic Society
once issued six of them in an
album of excellent color
reproductions. In his prefatory
note, Prof. Sachs, the gree' old
man of Harvard's Art Depart-
ment pointed out to those who
needed some enlightenment, that
Levine was more than a bitter
social satirist and that the
pictures in which he castigates
his contemporaries with irony,
with cynicism compounded with
a touch of wry humor, and
usually with vitriolic gusto," tell
only part of the story:
"To evaluate this complex,
spectacularly talented artist
properly, we need not only to
know his satirical side, as
Shammai, 1976.
triumphantly revealed in his
masterpiece, Gangster's Funeral,
but also the group of paintings
and drawings in which we are
touched by a deep, gentle, tender
side of the artist's nature as
presented in the excellent
reproductions in this portfolio,
made from the series of
beautifully painted Old
Testament figures, small in scale.
In them Jack Levine seems
actually identified with his
subjects. Knowing these figures
we are satisfied that unlike most
of his contemporaries, he is heir
to that ancient compound of
religion and poetry, mythology
and fable, which in the great
epochs of the past supplied ar-
tists with subject matter."
At 64, Levine can look back
upon several decades of incessant
and, on the whole, most suc-
cessful endeavor, but, judging by
my talks with him, he is not the
man to believe that he has
reached his peak and can now
"relax." Indeed, compared to
Oskar Kokoschka, who is 93, and
Marc Chagall, who is 92, Levine
is still a youngster.
HE HAS grown as a painter,
and is constantly growing. If, at
one time, his approach to life and
art may have appeared somewhat
heavy-handed, the mature Levine
commands a brush that is both
buoyant and spontaneous.
Piorteer Woman
London JewlshChronldt


Page 10
Page 12

Thp.Irwi&h FlnriHinn nf drmntmr Pnn* Tj,A*r*tnla
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale_
frlkay^^itir^g
Jewish Leaders Criticize Carter
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
American Jewish leaders are
reacting sharply to President
Carter's statement likening the
Palestinian issue to the civil
rights movement in the United
States. They point out that the
civil rights movement never
resorted to violence, while the
Palestinian movement is charac-
terized by acts of terrorism.
The sharp and angry response
by the American Jewish leader-
ship followed by a wide-ranging
interview in The New York
Times, in which the President
declared that he does not think
that stable peace can come to the
Mideast without a solution to the
Palestinian problem and said
that the Palestinian cause could
be likened to the "civil rights
movement here in the United
States."
CARTER WAS reported to
say that if the Israelis permitted
the Palestinians to come back to
the West Bank, they (the Pales-
Haifa Talks Geared by What
Happened in Alexandria
By GIL SEDAN
ALEXANDRIA (JTA) -
When President Anwar Sadat
once again stressed here at his
joing press conference with Prime
Minister Menachem Begin the
need to reach "a comprehensive
peace," he actually meant to
convey, according to assessments
by analysts following the press
conference, that the time was
approaching when the entire
Arab-Israeli conflict could no
longer be isolated from what now
seems to be a process of nor-
malization between Israel and
Egypt
When both Sadat and Begin
mentioned the crisis in Lebanon
as one of the issues they
discussed, they actually meant
that the issue at hand is the
situation in Syria and its possible
affects on the peace process. And
when they spoke about their
differences over the settlements,
they were actually speaking
about long-term differences over
the future of the administered
territories.
YET, despite those basic
disagreements and the fact that
there was no breakthrough on
any controversial issue, the talks
will go on, and next month
Sadat's yacht will probably
anchor in the Haifa Harbor.
It appears, therefore, that the
Alexandria summit has
established what seemed to be
information at earlier meetings
an alternative channel of
negotiations in addition to lower
rank, ministerial, negotiations.
It seems, according to ob-
servers, that Begin and Sadat are
determined to keep this channel
open, whatever the scope of the
disagreements. The channel will
remain open as long as they deem
it necessary, and it will be less
affected by the ups and downs of
the regular negotiations.
It also seems, observers noted,
that the two have reached an
understanding that the
autonomy talks should continue
as if they did not meet and that
they should continue meeting as
if there were no difficulties
concerning the autonomy talks.
THE COMMON approach
says: let the ministers talk
specifics and let us continue
dealing with the more "global''
issues, such as south Lebanon,
Syria and even Jerusalem.
One guess here was that Sadat
relies heavily on the Americans
to do the difficult task of
pressuring Israel. He did not
seem to back down on any of his
earlier positions. The official
Egyptian daily Al Gumhuriya
wrote that Egypt demanded
"full" self-government for the
Palestinians, a far cry from the
limited administrative council
that Begin talks about. Thus,
each party continues to talk its
own language, but they both
continue to talk.
One indication of the wide gap
between the two leaders was
Begin's response during the press
conference as to whether he
would accept international
supervision over the elections for
autonomy. 'There is no need for
supervision," Begin said.
tinians) would be satisfied with
"just the right to do it."
But, the President reportedly
added, only a relatively small
number of Palestinians, scattered
throughout the Arab world,
would want to return to the
poverty of the area.
Carter expressed the hope that
American Jewish leaders he
named two, according to the
interview: Sol Linowitz. a
Washington lawyer who helped
negotiate the Panama Canal
treaties, and Robert Strauss, the
President's special envoy to the
Mideast will support his ef-
forts that will give autonomy to
the Palestinians on such issues as
schools, police, housing and im-
migration on the West Bank.
THE PRESIDENT also said,
according to the interview, he
believed that the Palestinian
Arabs would be willing to accept
the physical presence of Israeli
units as a safeguard of their
national security. Based on polls
he has seen. Carter said he
believed the majority of the
Israeli people favor a settlement
with the Palestinians based on
Security Council Resolution 242.
Responding to this report, the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations said in a state-
ment: "We are dismayed and
disappointed that the President
should even think of the civil
rights movement, characterized
by non-violent means and
seeking the liberties that our
Constitution promises to all
Americans, in the same breath as
the obscene acts of a terrorist
Kang which seeks through violent
means to eliminate the Jewish
State.
"Moreover, in terms of the
rights of the Palestinian Arabs
there can be no doubt that they
enjoy a higher standard of living,
longer life expectancy, greater
Segal: Obligation
To Affirmative Action
Continued from Page 4
possible, the last vestiges of an
unfortunate and ignominious
page in this country's history."
We must refuse to allow the
reentry of quotas: but we also
have an obligation to give the
basic philosophy of affirmative
action an uncluttered chance to
advance the ideal of equality in
schooling, in jobs, in housing,
and in public accommodations.
TRIPLE TAX-FREE INCOME
7.10%*
NEW YORK MUNICIPAL TRUST SERIES 6
FEATURES
DIVERSIFICATION TOTAL REINVESTMENT
MONTHLY OR SEMI ANNUAL CHECK
PROFESSIONAL SELECTION VOLUME DISCOUNT
NO MANAGEMENT FEE NO SERVICE CHARGES
New York Municipal trust. Series 6 provides interest income which, in the opinion
of counsel, is tree from all Federal, New York State and New York City income
taxes. All the bonds in the Trust are rated A or better by either Standard 4 Poor's
Corporation or Moody's Investors Service, Inc.
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buy any ol Ihaaa aacuimat Tha oHai 11 mada only by In. Prolpaclul and only
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This rapitMnll lha aalimalrd annual incoma altar aatimatad annual
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opportunity for education and
employment and more benefits
affecting their daily lives under
Israeli administration than they
ever knew when they were living
under the rule of Jordan, the
British and the Turks before
that. The President's comparison
is regrettable; we can only
assume that it was a slip of the
tongue and not a serious ex-
pression of this Administration's
viewpoint on such a crucial
issue."
CHARLOTTE JACOBSON,
chairman of the World Zionist
Organization American Section,
declared: "President Carter will
lose the confidence of the Amer-
ican Jewish community if he tries
to equate the Palestinian cause
with the U.S. civil rights move-
ment. It makes a mockery of the
civil rights cause and distorts the^
opportunities for the Palestiniai %
people to solve their problems by he
negotiating with Israel. The
Palestinians stood in their own
way not Israel." Jt
Bertram Gold, executive vice x
president of the American Jewish
Committee, stated that "Carter
does an injustice to the U.S. civil
rights movement when he likens
the Palestinian issue to it. The
civil rights movement never
resorted to the acts of terrorism
against innocent people that so
characterizes the activities of the
PLO, which is the most visible
part of the movement for Pales-
tinian rights."
I,eo Mind I in
A Part Doesn't *
Make the Whole
Continued from Page 4
that a secular king is redundant
to the transcendant heavenly
Jewish king. It was Nathan who
warned that nationhood does not
secure a people's ideals; it
corrupts them.
Nationhood is a political beast
unrelated to the people who
compose it. Nationhood lies,
steals, murders, wars and other-
wise oppresses the people it
presumes to represent whose
lives it presumes to secure. But
nationhood is really a thing unto
itself dedicated to the survival of
nationhood at whatever human
and ethical cost.
FOR ALL these reasons,
Nathan warned the Jews against
nationhood and urged them to re-
dedicate themselves to the
principles of their divinity in-
stead not to emulate their
neighbors in vain allegiance to
secular institutions.
In Israel's struggle to survive
today, we sadly see the eroding of
Jewish ideals which fall victim to
expedient nationhood precisely
as Nathan prophesied. From the
dynasty of King Saul to the
victory arches in Rome and
Jerusalem celebrating the final
collapse of ancient Judea, we are
made intensely uncomfortable by
his foresight
It is not Israel, it is not in-
dividual Jews as tragic sacrifices
of the Holocaust we must focus
upon. It is the glory of our past
history, wherever we are, which
must impel us toward our future.
ISRAEL ARGUES, with con-
siderable justification, that this
can best be done in Israel. That
may well be so- Still, the struggle
we face to loosen ourselves from
our holocaust ic obsession is
common to Jews in Israel as well
as out
Our special status, if we have
one. lies not in growing ac-
customed to the wheelchair of our
most recent misery, but in our
stars. And these shine in celestial
splendor everywhere.
If this is not so. then all our *
efforts, in behalf of Israel and
ourselves, are an absurdity. We
dedicate ourselves to the success-
ful survival of Israel as a haven of |f,
Jewish security, we say Masada *\
shail not fall again, at the same
time that we assimilate ourselves
out of Jewish existence by rising
rates of intermarriage or, what is
worse, sheer indifference. In
which case, of what use is our
drive for security except as a
contradiction in terms a self-
cancelling of our destiny?
\
IS THIS YOU?
/*
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VOIUlIgg
Number iv


'riday, August 17,1979
....i-i. Bt.w*. ~tflv*r Fort iMuderdale
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13

SHARAHSKTS:1
Shrouded, chain-clanking
Kremlin ghouls' hold a 'black
anniversary' at Aeroflot Rus-
sian Airlines to mark the year
since Moscow emigration
activist Anatoly Sharansky
was sentenced to 13 years for
'treason.' Actually members of
the Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry, the 'ghouls' pointed up
Sharansky's seriously deter-
iorated state of health in the
notorious Chistipol Prison.
Headlines
tipc
Passion Play Revision 'Gratifying'
A national Jewish leader has expressed
I gratification that revisions have significantly
| reduced the anti-Semitic potential from the 1980
Passion Play in Oberammergau, West Germany.
Nat Kameny. chairman of the national program
I committee of the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. praised Oberammergau officials and
villagers "for their willingness to listen to Jewish
I criticisms of the traditional pageant and to make
[changes in accordance with the spirit, principles
?mil guidelines of Vatican II."
Pointing out that League officials have been
linvited to witness the presentation of the 1980
pageant*, Kameny said that he expects "our
[cooperative relationship with Oberammergau to
continue and the momentum of the forward
go on to an even more positive
of the Jewish foundations of
[movement to
(interpretation
hristianity."
The Senate has approved an amendment to the
Export Administration Act that would prohibit
llic U.S. from exporting to countries that
liinonstrated a pattern of support for in-
ternational terrorism, any goods or technology
that could contribute to such countries' military
lolential or enhance their ability to support acts
f international terrorism. The amendment also
provides for suspension of such ban by the
'resident if he deems it to be in the interests of
national security.
The amendment was introduced by Sen. Jacob
Javits (R.. N.Y.I. He observed. "It is a fact that
three countries are now named by the Depart-
nent of State as aiding and abetting international
erorism. The countries are Iraq, South Yemen
and Libya." Javits noted, however, that other
countries could be added to this list.
Solutions for problems such as the overheating
if airplane or missile parts in supersonic flight,
approvement of combustion and efficiency in a
piston engine, and many others can be found
through research on shock waves the subject of
[n international symposium being held at the
?ebrew University of Jerusalem this week under
tl joint sponsorship of the Hebrew University
rid the Haifa Technion. Chairmen are Prof. Assa
jjfschitz for the Hebrew University and Prof.
eph Rom for Technion.
The sonic boom that rattles windowpanes when
plane passes above the speed of sound is an
Kample of the phenomenon known as shock
(raves.
Shock waves can be created in the laboratory in
rial tubes called shock tubes. This makes it
Dssible to study chemical reactions and physical
processes which occur at very high temperatures.
, Senators Frank Church. Claiborne Pell, Daniel
Patrick Moynihan and Rudy Boschwitz an-
nounced the formation of the Free Raoul
X'allenberg Committee in the United States.
The announcement in New York was made in
finnection with Mrs. Nina Lagergren, Wallen-
berg's hall '-sister. The committee, which will be
lo-chaired by the four senators, will cooperate in
pn international campaign to obtain the release of
^Vlenberg from a Soviet prison, where he is
eueved i<> hava bean held since World War II.
Wallenberg, a diplomat of neutral Sweden, was
working in Budapest, Hungary, during World
War II in a successful effort to save thousands of
Hungarian Jews from extermination in Nazi
concentration camps.
When the Soviet army captured Budapest in
1945, Wallenberg was promptly arrested, whisked
off to Moscow, and sentenced to prison without
trial on a charge of espionage.
A major split in the leadership of the neo-Nazi
National Front has been triggered by the Front's
weak showing in the recent general election, in
which its vote dropped by over half from 2.9
percent to 1.3 percent.
The election defeat has sparked a row between
John Tvndall. the party leader, and Martin
Webster, its activities organizer, who according
to press reports, has been "suspended" from
duty. Despite the Front's reverses. Jewish
defense leaders here warn that it is still a
dangerous threat.
The Jewish War Veterans of the U.S.A. have
voted to support the Salt II Agreements about to
lie debated by the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee. The resolution was passed at the
JWV 84th national convention being held in San
Diego. Passage of the resolution followed a debate
between Charles Kupperman, Committee on the
Present Danger and Thomas Halstead of the U.S.
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
Eighteen Congressmen, representing a wide
political spe^'rum of Republicans and Democrats,
liberals and conservatives have spoken out in the
House of Representatives for freedom for im-
prisoned Argentine publisher Jacobo Timerman.
The bipartisan effort is aimed at "demon-
strating the sincere and strong support of the U.
S. Congress for Jacobo Timerman (who is a)
champion of the cause of human rights in and
outside of Argentina," Rep. Benjamin A.
Gilman (R., N.Y.) told the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. The League awarded
Timerman. founder of the Buenos Aires daily La
Opinion, its Hubert H. Humphrey Freedom Prize
on June 17, an award accepted by the publisher's
son, Hector.
Rep. Gilman is one of several Congressmen who
have met the publisher since his arrest.
Cabinet Ministers Ariel Sharon and Gideon Patt,
former Defense Minister Shimon Peres. ex-
Ambassador to Washington Simcha Dinitz,
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek and author A.B.
Yehoshua are among the leading Israeli figures
who will address the second annual Singles
Convention of the American Jewish Congress in
Israel. Aug. 7 to 21.
Some 150 Americans between the ages of 18
and 39 will take part in the two-week convention,
which will combine tourism, meetings with
government officials and political leaders, and
panel discussions on matters of common concern
with single Israelis of the same age. interests and
occupations.
Carter Wants
To Pow-Wow
With the PLO
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department
indicated here that President Carter "has said he would
be willing to talk with the PLO" if it recognized Israel's
right to exist. The Department's chief spokesman,
Hodding Carter, made that assertion in response to
reporters' questions as to whether the U.S. would deal
directly with the Palestine Liberation Organization.
REITERATING THAT the U.S. stands firmly
behind United Nations Security Council Resolutions 242
and 338, Carter stressed that the U.S. is trying to bring
the Palestinians into the current peace negotiating
process. He said all parties to this process can bring in
their own participants, but if one participant does not
wish to deal directly with another, it would not have to.
"We continue to hope," the State Department
spokesman said, "that the PLO will change its firmly-held
position and concede and grant Israel's right to exist in
which case the President has said he would be willing to
talk with the PLO. There is no assumption that anybody
else will be willing."
HE ADDED, "Our efforts are aimed specifically at
the Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza to indicau
we want them to be participants as called for in the peace
treaty."
According to a report in The New York Times,
President Carter, in a wide-ranging interview, likened the
Palestinian issue to the "civil rights movement here in the
United States," depicting it as a highly emotional issue
and a matter of rights. The State Department Spokesman
had no comment on The Times' story.
MEANWHILE, Assistant Secretary of State for
Near East and South Asian Affairs, Harold Saunders,
appeared before the House Foreign Affairs Committee, to
answer questions about the pending sale of 300 M-60
tanks to Jordan.
The Administration has postponed the sale for six
weeks to allow the Congress more time to examine the
deal which has aroused criticism in Israel. By law,
Congress must have 30 days to consider any major
overseas weapons sale. If, after that period, the sale is not
vetoed by either House, it goes through automatically.
Carter's Palestinian
Stand 'Explained'
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
In an effort to clarify President
Carter's remarks in The New
York Times, Presidential Press
Secretary Jody Powell told
reporters at the White House:
"The President's comment
with respect to the American civil
rights movement and the
Palestinian issue related to a
specific point in the Camp David
accords, namely Section A, West
Bank and Gaza. Paragraphs 3
and 4. The President made the
point that he felt the right of
return was important to
Palestinians as a matter of
principle, even though many
would not choose to exercise it, as
certain rights are important to
certain Black citizens as a matter
of principle.
"REFERENCES TO the civil
rights movement in the context
of the Palestinian issue un-
derscores the personal views of
the President and the position of
the American government, in
total opposition to terrorism and
violence.
"The American civil rights
movement was and continues to
be successful largely because it is
and continues to be non-violent.
The efforts of this and previous
American Presidents have been
directed toward the resolution of
long-standing differences by
peaceful means rather than
through death and destruction."
Dr. K. Says Hussein Wants
No Confrontation With Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) _
Former Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger said here that King
Hussein of Jordan is not bent on
a military confrontation with
Israel. Kissinger returned to
Israel after visiting Amman and
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Speaking
at a press conference, he said the
fact that Hussein received Robert
Strauss. President Carter's
special envoy to the Middle East,
last Saturday means that the
purpose was to "explore what
possibilities exist for
negotiations; otherwise it
wouldn't make any sense."
ASKED IF Saudi Arabia was
linking oil supplies to the
autonomy talks, the American
diplomat said, "I would hate to
think that our position in these
negotiations depends on ex-
pectations of the supply of oil. "
He agreed completely with
what Strauss reportedly said in
Cairo, rejecting oil blackmail.
Strauss was quoted as saying
that the United States will not
talk with the Palestine Liberation
Organization under pressure
from the oil-producing Arab
nations.


.....
Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 17,1979
The Petrobillions Conquest

,
The Seven-Pronged Invasion of America

R ur\An i cmo Libya was the onlv countlT >n the
By HOAG LEVINS world to aid Ugandan dictator Idi
Sen. Frank Church has not had Amin in the revolution that led to
i easy time of it with the his overthrow this spring.
member
League.
The first
frontation
Khashoggi
Digging in,
nations of the Arab
major public con-
came with the
investigation,
the Subcommittee
exposed extensive details of a
worldwide web of connections in
which people like Khashoggi
shuttled petrobillions and war
materiel which generated a
copious '.'commission" flow. Thei
Church hearings opened the1
window on. a lot of the newj
connections and inroads the
Arabs have made in Washington
and other seats of power. When
the Subcommittee investigated
his dealings with American
defense contractors, Khashoggi
was represented by Clark Clif-
ford, former Secretary of
Defense, known as the dean of
the capital's lawyers.
DEMOCRAT CHURCH,
Chairman of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, is one of
the most powerful men in
Washington. He has consistently
opposed moves to sell highly
sophisticated military hardware
to the Arabs. Last year, Church's
fight against the controversial F-
15 proposal was bitterly criticized
by the White House.
In another arena, Church has
become locked in a low-profile but
high-intensity battle behind the
scenes with Libya, which has
been lobbying for the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee to
drop the prohibitions that have
held up the export of military
equipment to that country.
The controversy began some
years ago, when Libya purchased
five C:130 Hercules planes, two
Boeing 727s, large numbers ot
Oshkosh trucks and spare parts
from American manufacturers.
The equipment was to add to the
formidable arsenal Libya has
already assembled with $2 billion
in Russian military equipment,
including 100 MIG jets manned
by crack North Korean fighter
pilots.
The C-130s were the central
part of the American purchase.
Although usually characterized
in press reports as only "cargo"
planes, the Hercules is the most
versatile warplane ever built. It
has been the workhorse of the
American military for 20 years.
THE FOUR-ENGINE turbo-
prop aircraftknown to U. S.
troops as "Herks" or "Herky
birds are designed for rough-
field landings and lightning
military strikes; Israeli troops
flew C-130s to make their famous
1976 rescue raid at Entebbe
Airport in Uganda. The planes
are also designed for rapid
paratroop drops, have a 5,000-
mile range and can carry. 110,000
pounds of jeeps, trucks, heavy
artillery and similar cargos.
Herks are also easy to convert
into lethal gunships, like the ones
which ravaged the Ho Chi Minn
Trail during the Vietnam War.
These seemingly innocuous
"cargo'' planes can be quickly
fitted with an astounding array
of weapons, including 105
milimeter howitzers, 40 milimeter'
cannons, bomb racks, missile
pods, grenade dispensers and the
infamous six-barrel "Vulcan" 20
milimeter machine gun which can
shred a trnck convoy or a
barracks in seconds with its
3,000-rounds-per-minute firing
capacity.
THREE PRESIDENTS, the
State Department and the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
decided that it waa not a good
idea to put such equipment in the
hands of Libyan strongman
Muammar al-Qadaffi. Qadaffi baa
openly allowed his country to be
used as a haven and staging bas-
for PLO commandos, hijackers
and other international terrorieta.
Qadaffi has been unable to get
the U. S. export licenses he needs
to move the C-130s and other
equipment from American
warehouses to military bases in
Libya. He has vowed to change
American opinion about Libya,
and has mounted an all-stops-out
campaign to persuade the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee to
approve those export licenses.
BUT COMMITTEE Chairman
Frank Church has refused to
relent or even soften his views
on the Libyan planes.
So, late in 1977, the Arabs
began an economic invasion of
Idaho aimed at "neutralizing"
the Senator.
First, Kuwait bought up the
sprawling Idaho Harding
Livestock and Land Company,
one of the largest land and cattle
companies in the state.
Then Libya began making
arrangements to buy almost
everything else.
Idaho can best be described by
the short list of things it is
nationally famous for: baking
potatoes, exploding grain silos,
Sun Valley's ski slopes. And
Frank Church. It is the least
populated state in the Union,
with fewer than 800.000 residents
on its 84,000 square miles.
Seventy percent of those people
live on the rural farmlands that
are Idaho's economic backbone;
22.000 of them belong to the
Idaho Farm Bureauthe state's
most powerful political group.
TWO YEARS AGO, the Arabs
started arriving in this unlikely
spot in America's isolated north-
western corner. They began to
buy thingsin units measurable
in tens of millions of dollars.
Officially, Washington has
made no mention of what is
happening in Idaho. Unofficially,
senior State Department officials
have expressed increasing
concern with Arab activities they
describe as "an interesting end
run around the federal govern-
ment to establish a beachhead
in the mountains of Idaho."
So far, this is what has hap-
pened in Frank Church's
backyard:
'Israel's fate may
well be deter-
mined on the Lot
Angeles Freeway
or the New Jer-
sey Twrnpike.'
% After Kuwait purchased
Idaho Harding, Libya sent a
seven-member "trade
delegation" which prowled the
state, meeting with state of-
ficials, farmers, sheep ranchers,
newspaper editors and university
officials. They mentioned two
things very frequently: their
desire to make massive purchases
of local products and their
displeasure that Senator Church
was helping to hold up delivery of
their cargo planes.
Three separate junkets of
Idaho congressmen, state of-
ficials, farmers and university
leaders have toured Libya, where
they were wined, dined, en-
tertainedand introduced to
Arab officials who invited them
to discuss "the possibility of new
trade programs."
I Then Arabs began meeting
frequently in both Idaho and
Washington D. C. with Idaho
Congressman Stevens Symms. a
Republican who has announced,
that he will run against Frank
Church next year. An arch-
conservative with seven years in
Congress, Symms is not
popularly known in Idaho for any
major legislative ac-
complishments. He is perhaps
best known for his right-wing
rhetoric, his backing of the
"liberty Amendment" which
calls for the abolition of all in-
come taxes, and his catchy
campaign slogan, 'Take a bite of
government.
t Symms' office has told the
local press that the Libya
aren't so bad, that Qadaffi has
promised that Libya will mend
its ways and "no longer give aid
or support to terrorists," and
"We believe him."
Arabs have negotiated the
purchase of about $40 million in
wheat. They have stated an
interest in making future buys
into Idaho's corn, soybeans and
lamb products.
Arabs have announced they
intend to give a half million dollar
Agricultural Studies grant to the
University of Idaho.
Libya has coyly suggested
that it might want to establish its
U. S. trade mission office in
Boise. Idahoif it would be
"welcome."
The 22,000-member Idaho
Farm Bureau is now aggressively
trying to "convince" the Libyans
to put their trade mission in
Boise. It has begun caustic
criticism of Senator Church for
; not actively backing the project.
t Sen. Church, who is
preparing to open his campaign
for reelection in Idaho next year.
is keeping a very low profile on
the subject.
"IN EFFECT, Sen. Church is
running for election against the
Arabs. I don't think there has
ever been a race like this in which
a foreign country has taken such
a direct part. And let me tell you,
we're watching it," explained one
Washington Congressional aide
who has been on the Hill since
1970.
"But Church is not the only
one feeling pressure from the
Arabs," the aide continued.
"They are now a major force in
Washington. The progress they
have made is incredible. Four
years ago, the Arab lobby was a
joke. You had maybe two people
here who knew what they were
doing. The rest of them were
tiptoeing around like nuns in a
whorehouse. They didn't know
what they were doing or even
how to find out. They didn't even
understand the theory of the
system, let along how it works
here on the Hill.
"No more. They are well
organized, highly polished
and it goes without
sayingextremely well financed.
They have govu uff people and
they know how to keep their
fingers on the pulse and deliver
well-documented position papers
or backgrounders to 'balance' the
issues. They also have some
dynamic law firms and former
Hill people ex-senators,
representatives and
aidespounding the drum for
them.
"THE JEWISH LOBBY is
still far more formidable because
it can bring down the public
wrath of the local communities.
But the Arabs are closing. They
have tightened their act to the
point where they have real clout.
You only have to look at the F-15
deal to understand that. I mean,
that was all-out war. We have
every Jewish organization you
can imagine, and bigwigs from
Israel, coming in. There was arm-
twisting like you can't
believeon both sides.
Everything but the kitchen sink
came floating down the halls on
that one.
"And the Arabs won. Israel
has never lost a vote like that one
before. It was 55-54 to sell the
planes to the Arabs. Israel had
gone all out to defeat it. But they
lost. I don't think most folks out
there in the real world un-
derstand just how significant
that was.
"From where we sit, it was a
major watershed. The Arabs
demonstrated they now have the
know-how and connections to
affect the passage of legislation.
"Not a lot of people will admit
it publicly, because the topic is
such a touchy one. It's explosive
now with the oil situation. But
Israel lost ground behind the
scenes on that vote. They've lost
ground in general; you could see
that in the concessions they made
for the Egyptian negotiations.
There is a growing undercurrent
hereif we want to keep the oil
flowing, we've got to take a new
look at our relationships with the
Arabs.
"Egypt and Israel may be
friends now, but that doesn't
lessen the tensions. Egypt is a
bankrupt country armed with
equipment left over from the
Russiansequipment they can't
get parts for. They are not an oil
power and we expect them to
stay under fire from the Arab oil
states for striking a deal. Right
now, you can't move on an issue
involving the Mideast until you
take Arab oil money into ac-
count. When it comes to the
Midwest, man, 'balance' is the
new catchword here."
THE F 15 DEAL was at the
center of a story of controversy in
the winter and spring of 1978. It
involved something more than
the sale of jets to Arab countries.
The legislation set a major
precendent by linking sales of
top-of-the-line military equip-
ment to Israel with mandatory
sales of the same equipment to
Arab states.
The F-15 is no mere jet, but a
superplane: the sleek, twin-tailed
fighter is the most advanced
aircraft in the world. It is a
flying, computerized, total
overhead destruction machine,
armed with 20 milimeter machine
guns. Sparrow air-to-air missiles,
Sidewinder rocketsand an
arsenal of other ordinance for
destroying buildings and
bunkers, men and machines, like
no other plane can.
With the fall of the shah in
Iran, the "balance" achieved by
selling the jets to both Israel and
Saudi Arabia in 1978 now ap-
pears to have gone out of kilter.
One of the first public acts of
Khomeini's Islamic regime was
to pledge full support to the
PLO's campaign to destroy
Israel. That pledge carried with it
the weight of the arsenal of
American weapons that the new
Iranian government inherited
from the old. Overnight, a new
fleet of F-15s was added to those
now being purchased by Saudi
Arabia, shifting the "balance" in
drastic lopsided favor of the Arab
League.
The coffee arrives in delicate
bone china cups rimmed with
gold flake, set on an antique
mahogany serving tray.
Vanishing as quickly as she
materialized, the secretary doses
the thick wooden door, leaving
the two men alone again. Across
the desk, the man in the blue suit
remains standing. For the second
time in as many minutes, he
seeks verbal assurance that the
interview is off the record.
Strictly off the record. Speaking
in vaguely apologetic tones, he
gestures toward the window and
the Washington streets below as
he explains. "The Arab-Israeli '
situation is a very, sensitive
subject at this time."
Mr. Bluesuit has been in and
around Washington's central
power core for more than two
dozen years. A former high of-
ficial in two government agen-
cies, he is now a private con-
sultant to government and in-
dustry on legal and financial
matters involving international
trade.
BLUESUIT UNFURLS a
large map of the world across his
desk. Its corners are held down
by crystal paperweights and
empty gold-rimmed coffee cups.
Its surface is etched with colored
lines that criss-cross heavily in
some places, obscurring large
sections of geographical detail.
Red lines. Green lines. Blue
lines. Yellow lines. Each starts at ft
some major point in the Americas
or Europe or Asia and stretches
seaward, to join with others. The
lines form colored cables that arc
across the oceans, round the ^
capes, cross the channels and
traverse canals that bring them
to one final massive coagulation
in the vicinity of the Persian
Gulf.
Tanker routes. Traced across
Continued on Page 1ft
Religious
LAUDEROALELAKfci
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE.
43S1 Wtst Oakland Park Boulevard.
Modern Orthodox Congregation.
Murray Brick man, president.
EMANU-EL TEMPLE, 142$ W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Reform RabtM
Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome
Clement.
SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE, 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip A. Labow.ti Cantor
Maurice Neu (42).
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER, INC. 004f
West Oakland Park Blvd. Con-
servative. Rabbi Albert N, Trove-.
Cantor Jack Merchant, and Hy SokE
president.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF
LAUDERHILL, 2041 NW 41th Ave., -
Lauderhiii. Conservative. Ma,
K ronish, president. At]
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. *1.
NW 5'th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman (44A).
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 4l*l Stirling
Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bomzer
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH
CONGREGATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd.
Liberal Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J.
Harr(4).
REC0NSTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE
?4'J NW 4th St. Hank Pitt, president.
POMPANO BEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM. IJ2 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Jacob Renier (4*).
MARGATE
BETH HILLELCONOREGATION.7440
Margate Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Joseph Bert las.
MNSi.*J[E.JfW,$H CENTER, Sin
nw enj St. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Solomon Geld. Cantor Mai Galkib.
,.., CORAL SPRINGS
Orlve, Reform. Rabbi Leonard Zoiu't
%%
D.vT..^<.3cr"- "" *
_________ OCA RATON %,
ftS?* ** ebW Merle $.
i


* V------'-l WPl*,m4Jiti
friday, August 17,1979
. *.#/3*Mftw Fnrt iMuderdale
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page II
By JUDITH ROSEN
|NEW YORK (JTA) Ten
ousand people gathered at the
nited Nations for a rally on
(half of the "boat people." The
|ly, organized by the Com-
pttee Against Genocide by
etnam. was cosponsored by a
alition of more than 100
jinese- American, Jewish,
(iristian and civic groups.
The Jewish community was
presented by Martin Begun, a
Itional officer of the American
(wish Congress and vice
esident of the Jewish Com-
jnity Relations Council of New
brk.
[BEGUN REFERRED to the
lousands of Jewish refugees
Jring World War II who were
ised haven from the death
ips of Nazi Germany.
["They were forced to return to
Holocaust in Europe, and
lath," Begun said. "It seems
credible that the world has such
short memory."
| Analogies to the Holocaust
ere the theme of the rally.
jeakers such as Donald
cAvoy, vice president of the
itional Conference of
iristians and Jews, and Reps.
|illiam Green (R., N.Y.) and Ted
Nss (D., N.Y.) recalled the
iilarities between the genocide
kmmitted by Germany to that of
ie Vietnamese actions today.
Thousands Rally for Boat People
McAvoy noted, "We failed the
test of humanity during World
War II. This is a second chance
for humanity and we dare not fail
again."
ONE OF the most stirring
speakers was Bayard Rustin,
president of the A. Philip
Randolph Institute and a
prominent civil rights leader.
Rustin, exhorting the audience to
condemn Vietnam for its
"shame" in the wholesale ex-
plusion of the largely Chinese
ethnic population of Vietnam,
added that the probable result of
the rally's appeal to the United
Nations will result in further
inaction on the organization's
part.
"Not a damn thing will
happen," he warned. "Shame on
Japan for taking in only 10
refugees. Shame on the so-called
world democracies" for doing
nothing.
Rustin made an appeal to the
United States government, "If
the United States has to take
them alltake them." He later
led the crowd in the famous civil
rights song, "We Shall Over-
come," as the rally proceeded on
a march through mid-town
Manhattan.
OTHER SPEAKERS included
Stephen Cohen, Deputy
Assistant Secretary for Human
Rights at the State Department,
bearing a message of support
from President Carter; Richard
Kuo, Deputy to Mayor Edward
Koch, with a proclamation of
today as "Indochinese Refugee
Day"; Bishop James Wetmore,
of the Cathedral of St. John the
Divine; Elizabeth Holtzman (D.,
N.Y.); Chien Shiung Wu,
Professor of Physics at Columbia
University; and Kenneth Mei,
president, National Association
of Chinese Americans, New York
Chapter.
As an expression of its concern
for the plight of the "Boat
People," Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion has
arranged to sponsor an
Indochinese refugee family, it
was announced by Dr. Alfred
Gottshalk, president.
The sponsorship of the family
is being arranged in cooperation
with the International Rescue
Committee.
IN ANOTHER step to
mobilize help for Indochinese
refugees, Gottschalk has written
to the rabbinic alumni of Hebrew
Union College who led the
Reform congregation of the
United States, urging that each
congregation sponsor a refugee
family.
There are approximately 700
such congregations in the
country. ,
Southern Israelite
I LONDON An evaluation
am the Jewish point of view of
vo recent political developments
hs been made by the Institute of
Swish Affairs in London.
I One report deals with the
iropean elections. Although
ere are expectations that the
freitly elected Parliament will
icome a more powerful body,
re IJA explains that there are a
imber of considerations which
mild appear to limit the poten-
il for change- Whether or not
ke new Parliament of the EEC
fcreases in importance, it will
obably adopt similar attitudes
kwards matters of Jewish in-
krest as its predecessor.
ANALYZING the political
9upings, the report shows that
I coalition of center-right groups
fould produce a majority of 210
the 410-seat Parliament, but
use of the cross-cutting of
itional interests and ideological
rientations, permanent lineups
! unlikely to occur.
"Majorities will be rather fluid
nd ad hoc, varying from issue to
Bsue." the report predicts Nine
ewish members were elected
>m three countries; they rep-
ent a wide range of political
Viewpoints, with Mme. Simone
reil from France, who headed the
' pro-Giscardian UDF list, the
ewly-chosen president- Very few
light-wing extremists were
fleeted, and they are too isolated
i be effective.
The report explains that, under
lie Treaty of Rome, the terms of
nerence of the EEC are limited
pnost exclusively to economic
utters; of these, the Arab boy-
tt is of particular Jewish in-
prest But the nine member
:ites discuss "in political co-
eration" all sorts of other
nlitical matters, and all these
Duld certainly be raised in the
furopean Parliament
THE OLD Parliament dis-
Jssed, among others, human
|ights, discrimination, terrorism
nd the Middle East conflict As
irt of the European electorate,
fewish communities in the nine
ountries, cooperating in the
amework of the World Jewish
Congress EEC Committee, are
Jstif ied in seeking the support of
iheir new representatives on
these issues. If the significance of
the Parliament increased, so
would the value of such support.
A second report deals with the
meeting of the non-aligned states
Coordinating Bureau in Colombo
in June, which prepared the
agenda for the Havana Summit
planned for September. Events
there indicate serious rifts within
the non-aligned movement which
may well lead to its break-up and,
if this occurs, "a particularly
vociferous anti-Israel front" will
cease to exist.
The IJA report explains that
blocs have begun to emerge
within the non-aligned movement
"whose very raison d'etre is
inextricably bound up with the
struggle to eradicate power bloc
conflict"
THERE IS a conflict between
two opposing conceptions of the
purpose of the movement
Castro's "attempt to make it an
instrument of Moscow" and
Tito's desire to "adhere to the
original aim of non-alignment
strict neutrality between the two
major military blocs"
In addition, there is a variety
of regional conflicts Arab
rejectionist anger at Egypt's uni-
lateral peace efforts being one of
them. The Bureau was unable to
resolve any of these problems.
The report focuses on the
attempt by the rejectionist Arab
states to get Egypt expelled from
the movement because of her
peace treaty with Israel. As a
result of strong opposition on the
part of the Black African states,
this move was blocked.
ACCORDING to the IJA's
analysis, the prospects for the
Havana Summit of the non-
aligned are not good.
Some participants at the
Colombo meeting felt that the
airing of disagreements was a
sign of the movement's strength,
but the report suggests that "the
conflicting interests are rapidly
becoming irreconcilable." If the
differences remain unresolved,
"the possibility of some insti-
tutionalized split in the move-
ment cannot be ruled out"
Vietnamese mother pleads for help for her sick child on board a
small fishing boat carrying 58 refugees.
rew European Parliament
From Jewish Viewpoint
Protest Reduction of Military Sentence
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
group of about 150 reserve
soldiers have protested to Chief
of Staff Gen. Raphael Teytan
over his reduction of the sentence
imposed by a military court on an
Israeli officer convicted of
murdering four Arab prisoners
during Israel's occupation of
south Lebanon in the spring of
1978.
The 12-year prison term
originally imposed was reduced
to eight years by an appeals court
but later cut to two years by
Eytan who is empowered to
approve or reduce military
sentences.
THE SOLDIERS expressed
grave concern, in a letter to
Eytan, about the morale and
integrity of the armed forces in
light of his action. The matter
has also been taken up in the
Knesset where a number of MKs
have demanded that the Chief of
Staff be stripped of his power to
reduce sentences determined by a
court of appeals.
Eytan himself expressed some
criticism of Israeli youth to
members of the Knesset
Education Committee who were
visiting army educational
facilities.
He said there was a drug
problem in the army and serious
suspicion that outside sources
were flooding the country and the
armed forces with narcotics. He
alleged the same was done with
the U.S. Army in Vietnam.
THE MKS were also told by
the Chief of Staff that Israeli
youth today is not as good as the
Zionist-inspired youth of past
years. He claimed that Zionist
motivation of youth is on the
decline in their homes, schools
and universities and that few
Israeli youngsters today
associate themselves with the
Zionist youth movements.
He proposed that the
military's education branch set
up classes in basic Zionism.
Gotham Cops Recruit 1,100 Jews
By ANDY EDELSTEIN
NEW YORK Following an
intensive, three-month
recruitment drive, more than
1,100 Jews took the qualifying
examination last month for
openings on the New York City
Police Department. Among this
group were a record number of 76
Sabbath observers, including 20
women.
"We're quite pleased by the
results," said Detective Alan
Sperling, who directed the Jewish
recruitment effort. Jewswho
make up only 1.7 percent of the
total NYPDwere one of several
minority groups targeted for
recruitment in an effort to make
the department more
representative of the population
at large.
SPERLING SAID that Police
Commissioner Robert McGuire
had encouraged the recruitment
of Orthodox and Hasidic Jews
and had slated a separate Sunday
examination for Sabbath ob-
servers. In the effort to reach
these communities, Sperling said
he visited day schools, Yeshiva
University, and Stern College, as
well distributing leaflets in the I
heavily Orthodox neighborhood i
of Boro Park.
"The reaction of the young
people that I spoke to was not as
bad as their parents' reaction,"
Sperling related.
"Traditionally, police work is ;
not a job that was looked
favorably by the Jewish com-1
munity. Parents want their kids 1
to be lawyers, doctors,
physicists.
"BUT I WAS able to persuade
rabbis that there was a need for
Jewish officers. When I went to
the yeshivas I met a lot of
resistance from the faculty but
after speaking to the kids and
stressing the benefits of the job
such as good starting salary and
ability to receive a free college
education, many became in-
terested," Sperling said.
Sperling stressed to his
audiences that they would not be
required to work on the Sabbath
or on Jewish holidays. "I have
not once had to work on a Jewish
holiday during my 33 years on
the force," he said.
During the recruitment
campaign, bilingual Jewish
applicants were told they would
receive "selective certification" if
they spoke Yiddish or Russian.
However, the only language
provisions specified on the exam
were for Spanish and Chinese. "It
was our understanding that
Yiddish and Russian would be
included," Sperling said, "but it
turned out to be a false
assumption on our part."
ABOUT 36.000 people took the
police examination which was
held on June 30. The first hirings
will be made in October and
between 800 and 1,500 persons
are expected to be hired within
the next year.
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940431S
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
DIRECTORS
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IN NEW YOML
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Page 16
The Jewish Floridian ofGreater^ortLauderda^
Friday. August 17,1979"

o
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Continued from Page 14
the globe like some enormously
complex elecrical schematic,
wiring the continents together.
Outling the delicate and color-
fully intricate structure through
which the black viscous blood of
industrialized civilization flows.
From the desert kingdoms of the
Middle East to the refineries and
factories and gas pumps of the
rest of the world.
BLUESUIT LEANS across
the map, ignoring the cigarette
ash that begins collecting in the
area of Australia. "This," he
says, tapping to indicate the
entire surface of the world, "is
the new strategy map for the
Mideast War.
"Journalists and the general
electorate of America have failed
to comprehend that there has
been a genuine revolution in the
world since 1973," he continued.
"We have experienced a drastic
change in the definition of the
basic units of monetary value and
a radical alteration in the
previous-recognized concepts of
international 'power.' "
"In effect, the Western in-
dustrialized societies which ruled
the world in 1972 have been
transformed into revenue-
producing colonies of the Arab
world in 1979. This reality has
not yet been throughly absorbed
by the general c!tizenry or
political machinery of our
country. It is not a concept that
the traditional American psyche
can readily tolerate.
"WE HAVE also seen the
evolution of a new kind of warfare
that you might term 'econo-
conflict,' in which one national
group battles another without
ever firing a shot. Sure, economic
measures of one form or another
have always been a part of
modern war. But not quite like
this. The billions of dollars worth
of various Arab transactions in
America you asked me about
earlier are only one portion of a
larger picture. The Arab nations
have spread out to use the entire
planet as a strategy board on
which they plan to settle their
border dispute with Israel. In
short, what they failed to do in
the desert with their tank
charges, they are now attempting
to do in board rooms and
brokerage houseswith their
petrodollars.
"You're top young to
remember, but just prior to
World War II, there was a
controversy over the question of
using airplanes and aircraft
carriers as primary weapons of
war. It had never been done and
Americans did not want to think
about the crazy idea that ships
with airplanes on top of them
could be major weapon of war.
It was too unusual a thought. So
for years, while the controversy
continued, we did nothing. We
sat there, confident in our own
battleships and watched the
horizon for the enemy battleships
to comebecause that is how
war had always come in the past.
Then, at Pearl Harbor, in the
space of a few hours, a handful of
planes bombed the hell out of us.
We were forced to take notice of
the fact that the art of war had
changed, and battleships did not
matter so much any longer. You
see, it took a catastrophe to bring
home that simple realization.
"THIS IS SIMILAR to what's
happening in Washington right
now. The old heads of the Jewish
movement down here insist on
thinking in old terms. In effect,
they are still watching the
horizon for the next wave of Arab
tanks to come. That is how war
has always happened in the
Mideast. But that is now how the
Arabs are operating any longer.
Now they are attacking with
money.
"The influential American
Jews with whom I deal on a
regular basis seem to dwell on the
old vision: Israel has little to
worry about because it has
proved its invincibility in tank
battles, muzzle-to-muzzle, time
and time again. Their primary
We do business
the right way.

17M W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale.Fla. 33311
Phone 7 35 1330
concern here is to make sure that
Israel receives enough new tanas
and other hardware. Quite
frankly, I've been amazed by
their inability as a group to see
that they are now engaged in a
war of nozzles, rather then
muzzles: the nozzles on every
gasoline pump in America. I m
not being at all facetious when I
suggest that the ultimate fate of
Israel may well be determined on
the freeways of Los Angeles or
the New Jersey Turnpike.
"If I were Jewish and felt a
deep personal attachment to
Israel as it now exists, I'd be
pretty damned worried about this
country's devil-may-care attitude
about energy. The Arabs have
used our own money -each one 01
us gave it to them when we filled
our cars with gasoline-to
acquire the new position of power
and influence from which they are
subtly changing American at-
titudes about Israel."
Rolling up the map, Bluesuit
reached inside a desk drawer and
handed his visitor a manila folder
whose contents he characterized
as "a little more food for
thought."
INSIDE THE FOLDER were
the results of a national Gallup
poll conducted within the last
year. The poll surveyed American
attitudes about Arabs and Israel.
The report showed that 42
percent of the Americans sur-
veyed were more sympathetic to
the Arabs than they had been a
year before.
During the same year, 34
percent of the Americans sur-
veyed had become less sym-
pathetic toward Israel.
As this series concludes,
events and changes continue with
lightning speed across the Middle
East. Two disturbing
newspaper stories appeared
within a single week:
WASHINGTON D.C.A
Senate report drawing on sub-
poenaed oil company documents
concludes that Saudi Arabis will
limit its oil production in the
1980s to not more than 12 million
barrels a day-a level so low it
could possibly touch off 'a fierce
political and economic struggle'
among the consuming countries.
(The present daily production
'In Idaho, a stats
hnown for tx.
pioding grain si-
los rural farm.
ktnd and baking
potatoes, the
Arabs art estab-
lishing a political
beachhead'
level stands at an alarming eight
and one-half million barrels.)
RIYADH Crown Prince
Fahd, long identified by Ameri-
can ambassadors and policy-
makers as the key to stability
and stronger U. S. ties to Saudi
Arabia, is yielding much of his
power to other members of the
Saudi royal family, according to
U. S. intelligence reports.
The causes of Fahd's declining
influence still are not clear to
U.S. analysts. But the decline
has suddently become a major
preoccupation for the Carter
administration, which fears that
the Fahd problem may be part of
a potential crisis in Saudi
leadership that could vitally
threaten the most fundamental
and basic premises of the U.S.
foreign and energy policy.
FxpoMagatine
OAKLAND TOYOTA
MM.11.11.1'.''.' '.' irm.nrro .......'-> '~4j
SWEDEN'S
That outrageously rich
Swensen's Ice Cream
FT. LAUDERDALE, 2477 E. Sunriaa Blvd.
PLANTATION, In tha naw Broward Mall
HOLLYWOOD, Hollywood Blvd. at 4Btn Ay*
VERO BEACH. 1902 South Fadaral Hwy.
LIGHT HOUSE POINT 5000 N Fadaral Hwy
1979 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co
Warning, The Surgeon General Has Determined
Thai Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
lllM4i iT
13 mg "m".nomj nKWtn pa,cigsfitti.FIC Repc" MAY78


Full Text
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
r nOty* au|
:::::::::::::::::::::*:-:-:-x-x'::-:':':%
S-:*:*:*:*:*:*:*:-:*:*:^
Organizations
In The News
ail
1
I
HADASSAH
The Kavanah Chapter of
Hadassah, Plantation, will hold
its first New Membership Tea for
the 1979-80 season at 8 p.m.,
Wednesday, Aug. 29, at the home
of Sandra Falk. 9341 NW 32nd
St., Sunrise.
The Plantation L'Chayim
Chapter of Hadassah will hold a
luncheon and card party at 11:90
a.m. Aug. 21, at Deicke
Auditorium, 5700 Cypress Rd.,
Plantation.
The Blyma Margate Chapter,
Hadassah, is sponsoring a
luncheon card party at the
Catherine Young Library, Park
Drive, Margate; on Thursday
Aug. 23 at noon. For tickets, call
chairman Shirlev Epstein.
B'NAI BRITH WOMEN
B'nai U'rith Women, Inverrary
Chapter, will hold a luncheon and
curd party on Aug. 22, at noon, at
Reef Restaurant, 2700 S.
Andrews Ave. Call Ruth
Goldman for reservations.
B'nai B'rith Women, Tamarac
Chapter No. 1479 will hold a
regular meeting on Thursday,
Sept. 6, at the Tamarac Jewish
Center, 9101 NW 57th St. at
12:15 p.m. The program will
feature an original script by
Florence Krantz entitled
"Getting to Know You." New
members are welcome.
DISABLED
AMERICAN VETERANS
Disabled American Veterans,
Chapter 138, Plantation, will hold
its monthly meeting on Tuesday,
Aug. 28, at the Plantation
Community Center. 5555 Palm
Tree lid., at 7:30 p.m.
Counseling of veterans, ad-
vising them of their benefits, is
held every Tuesday at Roarke
Center, Sunrise, from 9 to 11:30
a.m., and Thursday at the
Plantation Community Center
from 1 to 3 p.m. New members
and transferees are invited to
attend. For further information,
contact Artie Horowitz.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
William Kretchman Post 730
Jcwiah War Veterans of Fort
Luudcrdalc. will hold its monthly
meeting on Monday, Aug. 27, at
7:30 p.m. at Whiting Hall, 6767
NW 24th St.. Sunrise. New
members and transferees are
invited to attend. For further
information, contact Artie
Horowitz.
ODDFELLOWS
Hatchee Lodge No. 71,
Independent Order of Odd-
fellows, meets regularly every
first and third Thursday of the
month at its temple. 1451 N.
Dixie Highway. Fort Lauderdale.
Contact Manuel Barish. past
grand master, for information.
DYSAUTONOMIA
FOUNDATION
A benefit show starring the
recording artists. "The
Avellows." is planned for Aug. 23
at 8 p.m. at Nob Hill Recreation
Center. 10000 Sunset Strip,
Sunrise. The show is sponsored
by the South Florida Chapter of
the Dysautonomia Foundation.
Dysautonoinia is a genetic
disease affecting children of
European descent.
ll|||||lllgM|^M^^IIIIII|lllillllHllinilt||ll>lll||lllini|||^
I [Community
II Calendar A
im^^umi^imi^iMmmiNhMiiii
Aug. 19
Edward Goldberg JWV Post 519 Joint Institution and Installation of
Officers Refreshments Coral Springs Masonic Hall, Jordan
Building (2nd floor), 11030 Wiles Road, Coral Springs-7:30 p.m.
Aug.20
ORT Ocean Mile Chapter board meeting 10 a.m. Regency
South Rec. Room, 3750 Gait Ocean Drive, Fort lauderdale
Hadassah Armon Castle Garden Chapter card party p.m. -
Castle Garden Rec. Hall Temple Emanu-EI Bingo 7:15 p. m.
Aug. 21
Hadassah, Plantation I'Chayim Chapter card party
Aug. 22
ORT Lauderdale Chapter card party refreshments Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall-12:30 p.m.
Aug. 23
Temple Emanu-EI Executive Committee meeting 7:30 p.m.
Temple Emanu-EI board meeting-7:45 p.m. Hadassah Haverim
Fort Lauderdale Chapter board meeting 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith -
Hope Chapter #1617 membership meeting
Aug. 24
Workmen's Circle #1046 general meeting
Aug. 26
UJA Prime Minister's Mission Departure B'nai B'rith Sunrise
Chapter #1527 luncheon and card party Sea Horse at Las Olas
Blvd.
Aug. 27
Temple Emanu-EI Bingo 7:15 p.m.
Lauderdale Chapter board meeting
Hadouah Tamar Fort
Aug. 21
Hadassah Kavanah of Plantation membership tea Hadouah -
Rayus Group of West Broward board meeting
Aug. 30
UJA Prime Minister's Mission Return Hadassah Sabra board
meeting-8 p.m.
Israel Leaders Seethe
Continued from Page 1
tinian rights.
The debate, as reported from
the United Nations, was post-
poned last week following in-
dications that the PLO is willing
to modify its hardline stance on
Palestinian rights notably its
refusal until now to recognize the
existence of the State of Israel.
IT IS FELT here that what the
U.S. is attempting to do is to
force Israel to consent to giving
broader self-rule powers to Pales-
tinians living in Judea, Samaria
and in Gaza in its ongoing nego-
tiations with Egypt. These nego-
tiations resumed this week in
Haifa.
State Department personnel,
in addition to Reston, point to a
New York Times report as saying
that unless negotiations for a
Palestinian homeland show
genuine progress, there will be an
increase of Arab-inspired
terrorism.
More important, Western
problems will increase in getting
oil from the Arab oil-producing
combine.
JOSEPH BURG, chief of the
Israeli negotiating team with
Egypt, responded here angrily,
noting that U.S. suggestions go
far beyond what President Sadat
himself is demanding, thus
hardening the Egyptian position
and making the negotiations
more difficult.
Also, Burg noted that if the
U.S. continues to pursue its
position, it is in effect forcing the
peace talks beyond the limits as
established by the Camp David
accord.
Meanwhile. Deputy Prime
Pilot FirmsBegin
Campaigning
Four of Broward County's
largest business organizations
agreed to be pilot firms and
began their United Way fund-
raising efforts Aug. 6 to help set
the pace for the official campaign
period which kicks off in Sep-
tember.
According to Byron Campbell,
chairman of the Pacesetter and
Pilot Campaigns, the pilot firms
are American Express, Gore
Newspapers, Landmark Bank
and Motorola. "As Pilot cam-
paigners, these four
organizations will run their
campaigns in advance, providing
leadership for the campaign and
act as models for the rest of the
community to follow," Campbell
said.
The combined goal of the pilot
organizations is to raise $100,000
new employee-contributed dollars
for the United Way agencies.
Minister Yigael Yadin declared
that the United States is at-
tempting to "build upon" UN
Resolution 242 to encourage the
PLO to recognize Israel's right to
exist and thus to facilitate U.S.-
Palestinian talks.
"ANY ATTEMPT to change
Resolution 242 explicitly or by
implication in order to soften the
PLO stand will result in a serious
obstacle to further progress in
the peace negotiations," Yadin
said.
Said Yehiel Kadishai, a top
aide to Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin: "We exist. We don't
expect anybody to recognize our
existence. It is an insult to our
intelligence."
In an attempt to overcome voter apathy, Jane Carroll, left,
supervisor of elections for Broward County, is recruiting
honorary deputy supervisors. Any registered voter in Broward
County is qualified, and among those serving are Mr. and Mrs.
Nat Applebaum of Sunrise Lakes, right. The ambassadors visit
new residents and encourage them to vote.
Hebrew Congregation of Lauderhill will hold HIGH
HOLIDAY Services at Camelot Hall49 Ave & 21 St.
Rabbi H. Levy.Cantor L. Feldman will Officiate. *
Tickets available. For Information Call484-9722
NEW 1979
Styles & Fashions
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New Style furs Cleanwq Repairing Restylino
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WIPES POLYETHYLENE
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FORT LAUDERDALE
FLORIDA 33334
"Do It Right the Brat Time!"
REAL ESTATE LICENSE COURSE
Including Required Educational Course
Salesman License Course Begins Broker License Course Begins
MIAMI-SOUTH MIAMI-NORTH HALLANDALE MIAMI-SOUTH
September 10
7:00 P.M.
Twice Weekly
Bert Rodger* School of RE
Madruga Building
1550 Madruga Avenue, Suite 100
Coral Gables
September 12
7:00 P.M.
Once Weekly
i Inn
101 An.ln Blvd.
l-95.IH.lland.lo
Beech Blvd.
Hallandale
September 11
7:00 P.M.
Twice Weekly
Bert Rodger* School of RE
Madruga Building
1550 Madruga Avenue Suite 100
Coral Gables
r-1
For registration and further informalionvvriteorcainoinree
firr
Bert Rodgers Schools of Real Estate
Incorporated
1550 Madruga Ave. e Suite 100
Coral Gable*, Florida
Phone (305) 666-3348


Friday. August 17, 1979
i___i_i-
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Tales of Development Towns Show Israeli Spirit
A niimKur *\t ^abIu .i
A number of stories in the
Hebrew Press during the past
four weeks have provided new
evidence of the spirit, resour-
cefulness and strength of Israels
people under trying conditions.
The selections below, both from
Tediot Achronoth, demonstrate
these qualities in action in two
development towns: one under
intermittent terrorist attack, one
in a state of social transition.
THE MAALOT STORY
Twenty-four hours after a
recent terrorist attack on Maalot.
a Maalot resident for the past
seven years named Annette told
a reporter quietly: "You may ask
me how it feels to be on the front
line and I will ask you: Are we
the only ones on the front line?
The entire people of Israel are on
the front line! ll aims to me that
I'tl Aviv is mi less on the front
line than Maalot though the
forms <>f attack are different. So
why should we gel excited too
much?"
Her husband Shimon
"Listen, we have other problems.
I'oi example, we have some
teachers who are not of the
highest quality and we would like
io solve the problem fast and the
Booner the better
ESTHER PARRITA is
thinking of leaving Maalot but
not because of the terrorists. She
has a baby of four months and a
Ixiv ol three years and the un-
certain education in the town
bothers her. Her mother, who
lives in Akko. rushed to her side
when she heard of the attack.
"Things are happening here all
the time and I was worried,"' she
says, "but it was as if nothing
happened."' Esther sometimes
wonders if her calmness is giving
her mother too many worries.
In the office of the Workers'
Council, there was a lively
reaction to the attack in the
form of a party. Mounds of cake
and quarts of cold drinks and
coffee were prepared by the
women of Maalot for the soldiers
who came to help the town. They
were also given a place to sleep
over in the building. Some
seemed a little shaken, but not by
the dangers of the battle they
fought with the two PLO
terrorists before killing them.
What seemed to concern them
was the youthful age of one of the
dead terrorists who was killed in
battle
Kivkah Spit/, who moved to
Maalol a year ago from Tel Avh
where she had served as police
sergeant, told a reporter thai she
decided to move to the
development town just in order
to "change the atmosphere." she
and her husband .lack built their
home within the framework of the
program Bneh IJetcha (build your
house) in a very high place from
where they could observe the
previous dav's attack on Maalot.
Inflation Soars in Israel
The impact of inflation continues to grow in Israel. Information
received from Israel indicates the following changes in costs which
indicate the extremely high inflationary pressure: the price of frozen
meat will increase by 55 percent; the price of fuel by approximately 40
percent; the price of cooking gas by approximately 32 percent. These
massive increases will affect the consumer price index by 2.2 percent.
What follows is a list of new fuel prices in Israeli pounds:
One liter 83 octane fuel
()ne 1 iter octane fuel
One liter heating oil
One liter kerosene
12 kilograms container cooking gas
One ton crude oil for industry
The exchange rate currently is 25.45 Israli pounds to one U.S.
dollar.
Formerly
12.10
11.30
4.35
4.70
40.00
2205.00
Now
16.90
15.80
6.10
6.60
185.00
3000.09
HELP WANTED
^V*TEERS NEEDED TO TEACH ENGLISH
I?,ISE RESETTLED RUSSIAN FAMILIES
fZEWWfffJJ11* JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE,
3500 N. STATE ROAD 7 (441).
IF YOU CAN SPARE AN EVENING OR TWO
A WEEK. CALL SHELLY SOLOMON AT
763-6340
POSITION NEEDED
Recently Resettled
Russian Jewish Woman
Seeks Employment As A
HOUSE KEEPER
OR
NURSE'S AIDE
Must Be In West Oakland Park Blvd. Area
PLEASE CALL SHELLY SOLOMON AT
JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE.
763-6340
lack opened his supermarket,
though it was Saturday, to
distribute food to the soldiers
who became a part of the land-
scape of Maalot for the
weekend.
Jack told the reporter: "Am I
thinking of leaving Maalot? I'd
be crazy to do such a thing.
Where else would I find a town
with such a high quality of life?
Maalot is not just a development
town. It's half that and half
kibbutz. My children love it here
and want to stay here."
ONE LITTLE boy told the
reporter: "Why do you ask me if
I'm afraid? Here I am standing
on the road on which those two
PLO people came but I'm not
afraid. Why l>e afraid of them?
Let them be afraid of us."
THEASHKELON STORY
Ashkelon's young mayor. Ell
I tayan, talks about his town with
both pride and realism:
Vshkelon is a town of many
contrasts; on the one hand it is a
beautiful town with trees, flowers
and gardens and with progressive
educational institutions and
health facilities
"Oil tlie other hand, there are
also gome Shechunot with a
sizable poor population which
needs care and rehabilitation,
especially Sbechunat Shimshon.
which was built with little
thought and planning and with
insufficient services. There are a
lot ol tense and disappointed
people in Shimshon Well,
maybe not so disappointed now.
Tlii' .Jews of Kngland look a
leal from the U.I A book in un-
dertaking some special project to
help them through Project
Renewal. They .ire starling to re-
plan the neighborhood, now. and
sometimes you feel excitement
from them, not tension.
"SOME OF the inhabitants
will be moved to other
Shechunot, and conditions will be
created lor absorbing middle
(lass people and young couples in
Shimshon.
"The master plan is being
worked out by the residents
themselves and is very com-
prehensive. It will include
physical, social and economic
programs, and there will be a lot
of emphasis on education. We
established a special fund for
developing a social and
educational system which will
run parallel to the physical
rehabilitation program.
"Better housing alone won't
do what we want to do. The
Neighborhood Steering Com-
mittee has been very busy, and
they have approved a number of
projects: four kindergartens,
restoration of old parks, four
laundry clubs, a dental clinic
where dentist volunteers from
Kngland will work, a mobile
dental clinic and a special
scholarship fund.
"We are also introducing the
"Bneh Ik-lchu plan (IJuild Your
I louse. I Altogether, according to
plan. .SOU houses will lie' built of a
high-level quality. These houses
will attract a new population. To
the east ol Shimshon. we will put
in a large park .
"ALTHOUGH WE are
concentrating on solving the
problems of the needy
Shechunot. we are not neglecting
the Shechunot Afridar and
Banna which are typical sub-
urban sections for the middle
class. We grow and attract more
inhabitants. In actual fact, the
Shechunat can serve as a good
example for all the other
Shechunot in town. There is a
plan for developing the area of
Afridar and Barnea and adding
some reeds, sidewalks, parking
lots and sports fields.
"Culture and art activities
should be developed by
establishing more community
centers. We are going to open
four centers next year near
schools in all the Shechunot in
the town. They will be open in lh"
afternoon and evening hours, ami
maybe there won't be so many
dropouts .
"I believe the resettlement
from the Sinai to the Negev will
benefit Aahkelon. I want any
construction that goes on in
Ashkelon for resettlement to be
coordinated with Project
Renewal construction ol
Ashkelon. The real master plan is
to get a dynamic mixture of
people here in Ashkelon each
distinct, e.nh contributing in his
own way and working together. I
want a town with a positive social
atmosphere, to make its special
character as a tourist and
vacation center even more
special."
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Friday, August 17,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
A Retrospective
Jack Levine's Works in Traveling Exhibit
By ALFRED WERNER
Currently, a large retrospective
show of Jack Levine's work,
organized by New York's Jewish
Museum, is traveling through
this country. Now thousands of
Americans, who had heard of
America's foremost "painter of
social protest," and of the
strongest of those Realists who
have been inspired by the
Jewish motif," will be able to
see some of the original works
rather than just reproductions in
college textbooks.
What a joy it will be for art
lovers in West Palm Beach,
I 'Memphis, Montgomery, Por-
tland (Oregon) and St Paul to
walk in a leisurely fashion among
his masterpieces.
SO MUCH has been written in
praise of Levine who, ad-
mittedly, has had adversaries as
well that it might be difficult
to try to find new words of praise.
But there are few who know his
story, for this Bostonian in-
trovert, quite unlike Dali,
Picasso, or Chagall, has rarely
and almost reluctantly given
interviews or publicly interpreted
his pictures.
Levine, who recently turned
64, wants his paintings and
prints to speak to the art lovers
directly, to feel the impact of his
works, his politics, philosophy,
love. But on the many occasions
that I have asked him questions,
he has answered them patiently
and, at times, through a single
I' remark, opened an entirely new
world to me.
The son of immigrants from
Czarist Russian, Levine was
lucky enough to have been born
in Boston, one of America's
oldest artistic centers. He spent
his first eight years in the South
End, a slum section inhabited by
Jewish, Italian and Irish
newcomers.
THE NEXT stop was the
somewhat more affluent Rox-
bury, which had a Jewish Center.
There, by an accident of fate, an
exceptionally bright and
progressive young man was in
charge of the drawing class.
Harold Zimmerman was only
nine years older than Jack; he
was trying to eke out a living as a
teacher while studying at the art
school of the Boston Museum.
Another
must be
! .-An.iLiici name
mentioned, too the "Brahmin"
kDr. Denman Waldo Ross, who, in
tfua youth, had been a personal
v nend of several of the
"Impressionist painters in France,
*~\d had founded Harvard's Art
Department Old Dr. Ross took
three young Jews under his wing.
He enabled Zimmerman to set
up his own teaching studio, and
he took a paternal interest in the
two adolescents, Levine and his
friend, Hyman Bloom (who was
also to become a leading artist).
Levine still feels indebted to
Zimmerman who died
prematurely in 1940. Zimmerman
was a perfectionist who drilled
the young man in draftsmanship
rigorously, "aa a violinist would
be drilled by Leopold Auer."
AS FOR Dr. Rosa, he not only
gave Levine private instruction
but also supplied him, for a
Veriod of three years, with a
weekly allowance of 112, a nice
aum in those pre-Depression
days. Ross' greatest contribution
to Jack's education was,
probably, in urging him to study
the Old Masters in the rich
collections in Boston and nearby
Cambridge As Levine once
recalled:
"He put me in touch with the
European tradition and the great
painting of the past at an early
age, when I knew nothing about
it. He gave me roots a long way
back I owe to Ross what I'm
interested in, continuity."
There was nobody to give roots
to Levine's contemporary,
Jackson Pollock from Wyoming,
and Ross would never have
considered Pollock's techniques
of dripping and splashing paint
on canvas as part of the practice
of art.
BUT HAD he lived to see the
grim, satirical oils produced by
Levine after the mid-thirties,
Ross, with his puritan-patrician
background, would, in all
likelihood, not have cared for his
ex-student's new style and
subject matter either. Yet he
loved young Levine's "Classical"
drawings. He exhibited them at
Harvard's Fogg Art Museum.
Levine was not yet 20 in 1934
when the late Edith Halpert, the
discoverer of many an artist,
gave him his first one-man show
at her Dowtown Gallery in
Manhattan. He was among the
youngest of the thousands of
artists who, in the era of the
Great Depression, were saved by
the Federal Arts Project,
sponsored by the Work Projects
Administration (WPA), created
under President Roosevelt to
salvage many creative people.
Levine was one of the most
productive and versatile of these
young men and women. In 1936,
his Feast of Pure Reason was
included in the Museum of
Modern Art Exhibition, "New
Horizons in American Art" (It
created a controversy among the
wealthy trustees, for in his
picture Levine had portrayed
John Pierpont Morgan in an
unpleasant underworld setting
with unsavory political and police
chacters. as if to say, 'See, they
are all pals in skullduggery," but
the majority on the Board was
liberal and permissiive, and the
picture remained on the wall.)
String Quartette, in the
Metropolitan Museum of Ait,
became the most widely known of
the more than 50,000 easel
paintings produced in the WPA
era; through Life magazine and
through New York subway
posters it reached a vast public
JUST BEFORE the outbreak
of World War II. Levine was
represented in Paris at the Three
Centuries of American Art at the
Jeu de Paume (which is ad-
ministered by the Louvre).
While there were individuals
who deplored the money
"wasted" on the WPA Art
Project which provided artists
with such necessities as a roof
over their head, food, clothes, and
materials for work, it was enough
just to point at Levine to
demonstrate that the funds were
quite necessary.
The WPA Project petered out
in the year 1943. By that time,
private citizen Levine had
become Technical Sergeant
Levine in the Engineer Corps,
stationed on Ascension Island,
an isolated army base in the
South Atlantic
Welcome Home, 1946.
In those 20 dreary months of
service he had little time to
devote to his art. Yet he
managed, nonetheless, to paint a
crucifixion for the Catholic
chapel: "The boys needed
something to look at on that pile
of slab," he explained.
AFTER THE WAR, he settled
in New York, where he married
the painter, Ruth Gikow, who
bore him a daughter. Some years
ago, the Levines bought a
charming small house with red
walls on Morton Street in
Greenwich Village. The upper
floor contains Miss Gikow's
studio, while her husband has his
own atelier in another old house,
only a few hundred yards away.
Except for traveling repeatedly
in Europe where they seem to
know thoroughly nearly every
important museum the
Levines have, on the whole, lived
quiet lives what the ordinary
man might call "uneventful"
lives, not realizing that the
creation of every work of art is an
event
I do not know how many
pictures Levine has painted, but
there must be hundreds of them,
the monograph about him, with
text by Frank Getlein, issued by
Harry N. Abrams. in the mid-
sixties, contained 169
illustrations; most of the pictures
shown were oils, the inspiration
of El Greco, Rubens, Rembrandt,
Daumier can be felt, as well as an
affinity to Rouault Kokoschka,
and Soutine.
MANY OF these pictures have
been appreciated mainly on
account of their satirical subject
matter. But many art-conscious
people also love his portraits, his
works inspired by literature and
religion. Several of his small
paintings deal with heroes of the
Old Testament and with
historical Jewish figures.
On these little canvases, the
artist lavishly bestowed his
painter's riches, as delightful as
those of medieval miniatures.
The New York Graphic Society
once issued six of them in an
album of excellent color
reproductions. In his prefatory
note, Prof. Sachs, the grea' old
man of Harvard's Art Depart-
ment pointed out to those who
needed some enlightenment that
Levine was more than a bitter
social satirist end that the
pictures in which he castigates
his contemporaries with irony,
with cynicism compounded with
a touch of wry humor, and
usually with vitriolic gusto," tell
only part of the story:
'To evaluate this complex,
spectacularly talented srtist
properly, we need not only to
know his satirical side, as
Shammed, 1976.
triumphantly revealed in his
masterpiece. Gangster's Funeral,
but also the group of paintings
and drawings in which we are
touched by a deep, gentle, tender
side of the artist's nature as
presented in the excellent
reproductions in this portfolio,
made from the series of
beautifully painted Old
Testament figures, small in scale.
In them Jack Levine seems
actually identified with his
subjects. Knowing these figures
we are satisfied that, unlike most
of his contemporaries, he is heir
to that ancient compound of
religion and poetry, mythology
and fable, which in the great
epochs of the past supplied ar-
tists with subject matter."
At 64, Levine can look back
upon several decades of incessant
and, on the whole, moot suc-
cessful endeavor, but judging by
my talks with him, he is not the
man to believe that he has
reached his peak and can now
"relax." Indeed, compared to
Oskar Kokoschka, who is 93, and
Marc Chagall, who is 92, Levine
is still a youngster.
HE HAS grown as a painter,
and is constantly growing. If, at
one time, his approach to life and
art may have appeared somewhat
heavy-handed, the mature Levine
commands a brush that is both
buoyant and spontaneous.
Pioneer Woman
r
I
i
London Jewish Chronicle


rag*
Friday. August 17,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
Shrouded, chain-clanking
'Kremlin ghouls' hold a 'black
anniversary' at Aeroflot Rus-
sian Airlines to mark the year
since Moscow emigration
activist Anatoly Sharansky
was sentenced to 13 years for
'treason.' Actually members of
the Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry, the 'ghouls' pointed up
Sharansky's seriously deter-
iorated state of health in the
notorious Chistipol Prison.
Headlines
Passion Play Revision 'Gratifying'
A national Jewish leader has expressed
gratification that revisions have significantly
reduced the anti-Semitic potential from the 1980
Passion Play in Oberammergau, West Germany.
Nat Kameny. chairman of the national program
committee of the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. praised Oberammergau officials and
villagers "for their willingness to listen to Jewish
criticisms of the traditional pageant and to make
changes in accordance with the spirit, principles
;inil guidelines of Vatican II."
Pointing out that League officials have been
invited to witness the presentation of the 1980
pageant, Kameny said that he expects "our
cooperative relationship with Oberammergau to
continue and the momentum of the forward
movement to go on to an even more positive
interpretation of the Jewish foundations of
Christianity."
The Senate has approved an amendment to the
Export Administration Act that would prohibit
ilu IS from exporting to countries that
demonstrated a pattern of support for in-
ternational terrorism, any goods or technology
that could contribute to such countries' military
potential or enhance their ability to support acts
"f international terrorism. The amendment also
provide! for suspension of such ban by the
President if he deems it to be in the interests of
national security.
The amendment was introduced by Sen. Jacob
Javits (R., N.Y.). He observed. "It is a fact that
three countries are now named by the Depart-
ment of State as aiding and abetting international
terorism. The countries are Iraq. South Yemen
and Libya." Javits noted, however, that other
countries could be added to this list.

Solutions for problems such as the overheating
of airplane or missile parts in supersonic flight,
wprovement of combustion and efficiency in a
piston engine, and many others can be found
'hrough research on shock waves the subject of
Ve international symposium being held at the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem this week under
** joint sponsorship of the Hebrew University
and the Haifa Technion. Chairmen are Prof. Assa
Lifschitz for the Hebrew University and Prof.
Joseph Rom for Technion.
The sonic boom that rattles windowpanes when
a plane passes above the speed of sound is an
example of the phenomenon known as shock
waves.
Shock waves can be created in the laboratory in
special tubes called shock tubes. This makes it
possible to study chemical reactions and physical
processes which occur at very high temperatures.
Senators Frank Church, Claiborne Pell. Daniel
trick Moynihan and Rudy Boschwitz an-
*unced the formation of the Free Raoul
Wallenberg Committee in the United States.
r; 'he announcement in New York was made in
connection with Mrs. Nina Lagergren, Wallen-
Hrtj s half-sister. The committee, which will be
co-chaired by the four senators, will cooperate in
*"' international campaign to obtain the release of
*Wwnberg from a Soviet prison, where he is
*eved U> have been held since World War II.
Wallenberg, a diplomat of neutral Sweden, was
working in Budapest, Hungary, during World
War 11 in a successful effort to save thousands of
Hungarian Jews from extermination in Nazi
concentration camps.
When the Soviet army captured Budapest in
1945, Wallenberg was promptly arrested, whisked
off to Moscow, and sentenced to prison without
trial on a charge of espionage.
A major split in the leadership of the neo-Nazi
National Front has bam triggered by the Front's
weak showing in the recent general election, in
which its vote dropped by over half from 2.9
percent to 1,3 percent.
The election defeat has sparked a row between
John Tyndall, the party leader, and Martin
Webster, its activities organizer, who according
(c press reports, has len "suspended" from
dutj Despite the Front's reverses. Jewish
defense leaders here warn that it is still a
dangerous threat
The Jewish War Veterans of the U.S.A. have
voted to support the Salt II Agreements about to
Ik' debated by the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee. The resolution was passed at the
JWV 84th national convention being held in San
Diego. Passage of the resolution followed a debate
between Charles Kupperman, Committee on the
Present Danger and Thomas Halstead of the U.S.
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
Eighteen Congressmen, representing a wide
political spe'" rum of Republicans and Democrats,
liberals and conservatives have spoken out in the
House of Representatives for freedom for im-
prisoned Argentine publisher Jacobo Timerman.
The bipartisan effort is aimed at "demon-
strating the sincere and strong support of the U.
S. Congress for Jacobo Timerman (who is a)
champion of the cause of human rights in and
outside of Argentina," Rep. Benjamin A.
Gilman (R., N.Y.) told the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. The League awarded
Timerman. founder of the Buenos Aires daily La
Opinion, its Hubert H. Humphrey Freedom Prize
on June 17. an award accepted by the publisher's
son. Hector.
Rep. Gilman is one of several Congressmen who
have met the publisher since his arrest.
Cabinet Ministers Ariel Sharon and Gideon Patt,
former Defense Minister Shimon Peres. ex-
Ambassador to Washington Simcha Dinitz,
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek and author A.B.
Yehoshua are among the leading Israeli figures
who will address the second annual Singles
Convention of the American Jewish Congress in
Israel. Aug. 7 to 21.
Some 150 Americans between the ages of 18
and 39 will take part in the two-week convention,
which will combine tourism, meetings with
government officials and political leaders, and
panel disc-ussions on matters of common concern
with single Israelis of the same age, interests and
occupations. _________^________
Carter Wants
To Pow-Wow
With the PLO
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department
indicated here that President Carter "has said he would
be willing to talk with the PLO" if it recognized Israel's
right to exist. The Department's chief spokesman,
Hodding Carter, made that assertion in response to
reporters' questions as to whether the U.S. would deal
directly with the Palestine Liberation Organization.
REITERATING THAT the U.S. stands firmly
behind United Nations Security Council Resolutions 242
and 338, Carter stressed that the U.S. is trying to bring
the Palestinians into the current peace negotiating
process. He said all parties to this process can bring in
their own participants, but if one participant does not
wish to deal directly with another, it would not have to.
"We continue to hope," the State Department
spokesman said, "that the PLO will change its firmly-held
position and concede and grant Israel's right to exist in
which case the President has said he would be willing to
talk with the PLO. There is no assumption that anybody
else will be willing."
HE ADDED, "Our efforts are aimed specifically at
the Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza to indicau
we want them to be participants as called for in the peace
treaty."
According to a report in The New York Times,
President Carter, in a wide-ranging interview, likened the
Palestinian issue to the "civil rights movement here in the
United States," depicting it as a highly emotional issue
and a matter of rights. The State Department Spokesman
had no comment on The Times' story.
MEANWHILE, Assistant Secretary of State for
Near East and South Asian Affairs, Harold Saunders,
appeared before the House Foreign Affairs Committee, to
answer questions about the pending sale of 300 M-60
tanks to Jordan.
The Administration has postponed the sale for six
weeks to allow the Congress more time to examine the
deal which has aroused criticism in Israel. By law,
Congress must have 30 days to consider any major
overseas weapons sale. If, after that period, the sale is not
vetoed by either House, it goes through automatically.
Carter's Palestinian
Stand 'Explained"
WASHINGTON |JTA> -
In an effort to clarify President
Carter's remarks in The New
York Times, Presidential Press
Secretary Jody Powell told
reporters at the White House:
"The President's comment
with respect to the American civil
rights movement and the
Palestinian issue related to a
specific point in the Camp David
accords, namely Section A. West
Bank and Gaza. Paragraphs 3
and 4. The President made the
point that he felt the right of
return was important to
Palestinians as a matter of
principle, even though many
would not choose to exercise it, as
certain rights are important to
certain Black citizens as a matter
of principle.
"REFERENCES TO the civil
rights movement in the context
of the Palestinian issue un-
derscores the personal views of
the President and the position of
the American government, in
total opposition to terrorism and
violence.
"The American civil rights
movement was and continues to
be successful largely because it is
and continues to be non-violent.
The efforts of this and previous
American Presidents have been
directed toward the resolution of
long-standing differences by
peaceful means rather than
through death and destruction.''
Dr. K. Says Hussein Wants
No Confrontation With Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Former Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger said here that King
Hussein of Jordan is not bent on
a military confrontation with
Israel. Kissinger returned to
Israel after visiting Amman and
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Speaking
at a press conference, he said the
fact that Hussein received Robert
Strauss. President Carter's
special envoy to the Middle East,
last Saturday means that the
purpose was to "explore what
possibilities exist for
negotiations; otherwise it
wouldn't make any sense"
ASKED IF Saudi Arabia was
linking oil supplies to the
autonomy talks, the American
diplomat said, "I would hate to
think that our position in these
negotiations depends on ex-
pectations of the supply of oil."
He agreed completely with
what Strauss reportedly said in
Cairo, rejecting oil blackmail.
Strauss was quoted as saying
that the United States will not
talk with the Palestine Liberation
Organization under pressure
from the oil-producing Arab
nations.



!
I
I


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 17,1979
Jewish Leaders Criticize Carter
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
American Jewish leaders are
reacting sharply to President
Carter's statement likening the
Palestinian issue to the civil
rights movement in the United
S.ta.tes- .They point out that the
civil rights movement never
resorted to violence, while the
Palestinian movement is charac-
terized by acts of terrorism.
The sharp and angry response
by the American Jewish leader-
ship followed by a wide-ranging
interview m The New York
Times, in which the President
declared that he does not think
that stable peace can come to the
Mideast without a solution to the
Palestinian problem and said
that the Palestinian cause could
be likened to the "civil rights
movement here in the United
States."
CARTER WAS reported to
say that if the Israelis permitted
the Palestinians to come back to
the West Bank, they (the Pales-
Haifa Talks Geared by What
Happened in Alexandria
By GIL SEDAN
ALEXANDRIA (JTA) -
When President Anwar Sadat
once again stressed here at his
joing press conference with Prime
Minister Menachem Begin the
need to reach "a comprehensive
peace," he actually meant to
convey, according to assessments
by analysts following the press
conference, that the time was
approaching when the entire
Arab-Israeli conflict could no
longer be isolated from what now
seems to be a process of nor-
malization between Israel and
Egypt.
When both Sadat and Begin
mentioned the crisis in Lebanon
as one of the issues they
discussed, they actually meant
that the issue at hand is the
situation in Syria and its possible
affects on the peace process. And
when they spoke about their
differences over the settlements,
they were actually speaking
about long-term differences over
the future of the administered
territories.
YET, despite those basic
disagreements and the fact that
there was no breakthrough on
any controversial issue, the talks
will go on, and next month
Sadat's yacht will probably
anchor in the Haifa Harbor.
It appears, therefore, that the
Alexandria summit has
established what seemed to be
information at earlier meetings
an alternative channel of
negotiations in addition to lower
rank, ministerial, negotiations.
It seems, according to ob-
servers, that Begin and Sadat are
determined to keep this channel
open, whatever the scope of the
disagreements. The channel will
remain open as long as they deem
it necessary, and it will be less
affected by the ups and downs of
the regular negotiations.
It also seems, observers noted,
that the two have reached an
understanding that the
autonomy talks should continue
as if they did not meet and that
they should continue meeting as
if there were no difficulties
concerning the autonomy talks.
THE COMMON approach
says: let the ministers talk
specifics and let us continue
dealing with the more "global''
issues, such as south Lebanon.
Syria and even Jerusalem.
One guess here was that Sadat
relies heavily on the Americans
to do the difficult task of
pressuring Israel. He did not
seem to back down on any of his
earlier positions. The official
Egyptian daily Al Gumhuriva
wrote that Egypt demanded
"full" self-government for the
Palestinians, a far cry from the
limited administrative council
that Begin talks about Thus,
each party continues to talk its
own language, but they both
continue to talk.
One indication of the wide gap
between the two leaders was
Begins response during the press
conference as to whether he
would accept international
supervision over the elections for
autonomy. There is no need for
supervision," Begin said.
tinians) would be satisfied with
"just the right to do it."
But, the President reportedly
added, only a relatively small
number of Palestinians, scattered
throughout the Arab world,
would want to return to the
poverty of the area.
Carter expressed the hope that
American Jewish leaders he
named two, according to the
interview: Sol Linowitz, a
Washington lawyer who helped
negotiate the Panama Canal
treaties, and Robert Strauss, the
President's special envoy to the
Mideast will support his ef-
forts that will give autonomy to
the Palestinians on such issues as
schools, police, housing and im-
migration on the West Bank.
THE PRESIDENT also said,
according to the interview, he
believed that the Palestinian
Arabs would be willing to accept
the physical presence of Israeli
units as a safeguard of their
national security. Based on polls
he has seen. Carter said he
Ix'lieved the majority of the
Israeli people favor a settlement
with the Palestinians based on
Security Council Resolution 242.
Responding to this report, the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations said in a state-
ment: "We are dismayed and
disappointed that the President
should even think of the civil
rights movement, characterized
by non-violent means and
seeking the liberties that our
Constitution promises to all
Americans, in the same breath as
the obscene acts of a terrorist
gang which seeks through violent
means to eliminate the Jewish
State.
"Moreover, in terms of the
rights of the Palestinian Arabs
there can be no doubt that they
enjoy a higher standard of living,
longer life expectancy, greater
Segal: Obligation
To Affirmative Action
Continued from Page 4
possible, the last vestiges of an
unfortunate and ignominious
page in this country's history."
We must refuse to allow the
reentry of quotas; but we also
have an obligation to give the
basic philosophy of affirmative
action an uncluttered chance to
advance the ideal of equality in
schooling, in jobs, in housing,
and in public accommodations.
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opportunity for education and
employment and more benefits
affecting their daily lives under
Israeli administration than they
ever knew when they were living
under the rule of Jordan, the
British and the Turks before
that. The President's comparison
is regrettable; we can only
assume that it was a slip of the
tongue and not a serious ex-
pression of this Administration's
viewpoint on such a crucial
issue."
CHARLOTTE JACOBSON,
chairman of the World Zionist
Organization American Section,
declared: "President Carter will
lose the confidence of the Amer-
ican Jewish community if he tries
to equate the Palestinian cause
with the U.S. civil rights move-
ment. It makes a mockery of the
civil rights cause and distorts th-
opportunities for the Palestinian'e,
people to solve their problems by
negotiating with Israel. The
Palestinians stood in their own
way not Israel." '
Bertram Gold, executive vice
president of the American Jewish
Committee, stated that "Carter
does an injustice to the U.S. civil
rights movement when he likens
the Palestinian issue to it. The
civil rights movement never
resorted to the acts of terrorism
against innocent people that so
characterizes the activities of the
PLO, which is the most visible
part of the movement for Pales-
tinian rights."
Leo Mindlln
A Part Doesn 't
Make the Whole
Continued from Page 4
that a secular king is redundant
to the tra ascendant heavenly
Jewish king. It was Nathan who
warned that nationhood does not
secure a people's ideals; it
corrupts them.
Nationhood is a political beast
unrelated to the people who
compose it- Nationhood lies,
steals, murders, wars and other-
wise oppresses the people it
presumes to represent whose
lives it presumes to secure. But
nationhood is really a thing unto
itself dedicated to the survival of
nationhood at whatever human
and ethical cost
FOR ALL these reasons.
Nathan warned the Jews against
nationhood and urged them to re-
dedicate themselves to the
principles of their divinity in-
stead not to emulate their
neighbors in vain allegiance to
secular institutions.
In Israel's struggle to survive
today, we sadly see the eroding of
Jewish ideals which fall victim to
expedient nationhood precisely
as Nathan prophesied. From the
dynasty of King Saul to the
victory arches in Rome and
Jerusalem celebrating the final
collapse of ancient Judea, we are
made intensely uncomfortable by
his foresight \
It is not Israel, it is not in-
dividual Jews as tragic sacrifices
of the Holocaust we must focus
upon. It is the glory of our past
history, wherever we are, which
must impel us toward our future.
ISRAEL ARGUES, with con-
siderable justification, that this
can best be done in Israel. That
may well be so. Still, the struggle
we face to loosen ourselves from
our holocaustic obsession is
common to Jews in Israel as well
as out
Our special status, if we have
one, lies not in growing ac-
customed to the wheelchair of our
most recent misery, but in our
stars. And these shine in celestial
splendor everywhere.
If this is not so, then all our
efforts, in behalf of Israel and
ourselves, are an absurdity. We
dedicate ourselves to the success-
ful survival of Israel as a haven of
Jewish security; we say Masada
shad not fall again, at the same
time that we assimilate ourselves
out of Jewish existence by rising
rates of intermarriage or, what is
worse, sheer indifference. In
which case, of what use is our
drive for security except as a
contradiction in terms a self-
cancelling of our destiny?
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pJewnslh Manclln<3i in
Volume 8- Number 17
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, August 17,1979
Price 35 Cents
Incredible Experience in an Incredible Land'
Say Young Leaders Returning From Mission
THE WESTERN WALL: Photo by Nina Nemerofsky, taken during the visit to the famous
Wall of Prayer by the Young Leadership Mission from the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. Other pictures. Page 8.
"An incredible experience in an incredible land," declared Johl
Rotman on his return from the Young Leadership Mission to Israel led
last month by Ken Bierman, Campaign Director of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Johl, who co-chaired the Mission with Ronald Shagrin, told Alan
Margolies, director of Greater Fort Lauderdale's Jewish Federation
Young Leadership Division, "After viewing the hundreds of slides I
took on the trip, I'm ready to go back again."
He and his wife and the seven other couples made what they
called "an unforgettable trip," re-living the history of Western
Civilization from its earliest Biblical days to the present era of peace
between Israel and Egypt, and meeting with top officials of the Israel
government for in-depth briefings of the prospects for continued peace
and development of Eretz Yisrael.
The trip and meetings were set up and coordinated by UJA per-
sonnel living in Israel.
And from the moment the group arrived at Ben-Gurion Inter-
national Airport, and uttering the eternal She'hecheyanu blessing
upon entering Jerusalem, and 10 days later leaving Israel, the Young
Leaders were enthralled, fascinated, and ecstatic about what they saw.
heard, and experienced.
Since they arrived on Friday in time for the welcome to the Shabbat,
the group went from their King David Hotel for Kabbalat Shabbat
service at the Western Wall. Pictured on this page is a photo taken by
Nina Nemerofsky of the group and others at the Wall.
Other pictures on Page 8 include a visit to the reconstructed
synagogue in the Old Jewish Quarter which, with the Wall, were off-
limits to Jews during the Jordanian occupation of East Jerusalem
from the time of the 1948 War of Independence to the Six-Day War of
1967 when the Israel Defense Forces drove King Hussein's forces back
to Jordan.
Continued on Page 8
f
No Showdown Seen
In Autonomy Round
Frankly, Oil
Israel Seethes as U.S. Picks Up Arab Cause
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
lsratli Ambassador Ephraim
E\ ron had u luncheon meeting at
the Stale Department Monday
with Harold Saunders, assistant
ncrelary of state for Near East
and South Asian Affairs, ap-
parently to discuss the Israeli
Cabinet resolution Sunday
rejecting reported U.S. efforts to
include the Palestine Liberation
Organization in Middle East
negotiations.
State Department spokesman
Tom Reston said that Saunders
Wived a letter from Evron
Sunday. He said that Evron dis-
cussed the Israeli message with
Sivriarv of State Cyrus Vance
In lilt phone, but there were no
plans for the ambassador to see
Vance Monday.
Reston would not say what the
letter contained. "We will be
studying it and we will reply in
due course," he said.
Hut in Israel, it was announced
that Foreign Minister Moshe
Duyun was instructed to tran-
smit the Cabinet resolution
privately to the U.S. through
Evron. The ambassador is also
scheduled to meet with President
Carter for lunch this week.
Quotable Quotes
If we are to remember the Holocaust, it is not only because
of the dead; it's too late for them; nor only because of the sur-
vivors; it may be too late for them. Our remembering aims at
saving as many men and women as possible from apathy toward
evil, if not from evil itself. We wish to transform as many human
beings as possible. We hope to share with anyone willing to
listen our awareness and conviction that when war unleashes its
evil against one people, all are engulfed in the fire.
Elie Wiesel
Chairman, President's Commission
on the Holocaust
Editor'a Note: Elie Wleael and other members of the
President's Commission on the Holocaust are completing a
Mission to concentration camp sitee in Germany and Russia.
They attended Shabbat aervicea at Moscow s Central
Synagogue where they were warmly greeted by worshippers.
JERUSALEM Israeli
sources are reacting with
extreme anger to reports of
confirmation that the
United States is engaged in
intermediary discussion
with the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization on the
establishment of a separate
Palestinian state.
Joining in the angry-
responses are leaders of the
American Jewish com-
munity, as well.
TALAL NAJI, a member of
the PLO executive committee,
has confirmed the reports that
Western European countries are
acting as intermediaries for the
United States in the discussions.
It is understood that this means
West Germany and France.
Also confirming the reports is
Tom Reston, spokesman for the
State Department, who declared
late last week that the United
States is "working with other
countries on an agenda" for the
Aug. 23 UN debate on Pales-
Continued on Page 10
Prime Minister's Mission
Sparks 1980 Campaign
Yigael Yadin
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale will be
represented among the 300
American Jewish leaders who will
participate in Prime Minister
Menachem Begins Mission to
Israel.
In a special message to the
American Jewish community, as
these leaders prepared for the
1980 United Jewish Appeal
(UJA) campaign, the Begin
statement calls on American
Jewry "to respond to the chal-
lenges of peace with even greater
urgency than during time of
war."
The Prime Minister's Mission
participants will arrive in Israel
on Aug. 27 for four intensive
days of high level briefings.
Geared to major 1980 Campaign
issues, the itinerary includes
visits to Negev resettlement
sites. Jewish Agency absorption
centers and meetings with Israel
President Yitzhak Navon.
Deputy Prime Minister Yigael
Yadin, Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan, and Jewish Agency
officials, Leon Dulzin. chairman,
and Akiva Lewinsky, treasurer.
Prime Minister Begin, in his
mi -age, urged the American
Jewish community to join people
of Israel "in welcoming new im-
migrants with decent conditions
with proper homes in which to
live, with adequate eduation for
their children, with all the social
services which make settling in
Eretz Yisrael easier."
He noted that the Mission
participants, inaugurating the
1980 Campaign, are facing the
challenges of peace; that the
UJA's Campaign represents the
beginning of a new decade. He
said: "It also marks a new decade
of responsibility a decade
when ancient dreams are realized.
Our greatest dream is peace.
Peace is the beauty of life. It is
the hope of a better life for all of
us ... From Jerusalem, the
eternal and indivisible capital, I
extend to you all my greetings for
the New Year 5740 and gratitude
for all that you have done and
shall yet do."
32
WILL BE
FOR YOU!
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Pane 12
Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 17,1979
The Petrobillions Conquest
The Seven-Pronged Invasion of America

Libya was the only country in the
world to aid Ugandan dictator Idi
Amin in the revolution that led to
his overthrow this spring.
Qadaffi has been unable to get
the U. S. export licenses he needs
to move the C-130s and other
equipment from American
investigation.' warehouses to military bases in
the Subcommittee Libya. He has vowed to change
By HOAO LEVINS
Sen. Frank Church has not had
an easy time of it with the
member nations of the Arab
League.
public
with
major
came
con-]
the
The first
frontation
Khashoggi
Digging in,
exposed extensive details of a
worldwide web of connections in
which people like Khashoggi
shuttled petrobillions and war
materiel which generated a
copious "commission" flow. The
Church hearings opened the
window on a lot of the new
connections and inroads the
Arabs have made in Washington
and other seats of power. When
the Subcommittee investigated
his dealings with American
defense contractors, Khashoggi
was represented by Clark Clif-
ford, former Secretary of
Defense, known as the dean of
the capital's lawyers.
DEMOCRAT CHURCH,
Chairman of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, is one of
the most powerful men in
Washington. He has consistently
opposed moves to sell highly
sophisticated military hardware
to the Arabs. Last year. Church's
fight against the controversial F-
15 proposal was bitterly criticized
by the White House.
In another arena, Church has
become locked in a low-profile but
high-intensity battle behind the
scenes with Libya, which has
been lobbying for the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee to
drop the prohibitions that have
held up the export of military
equipment to that country.
The controversy began some
years ago, when Libya purchased
five C-130 Hercules planes, two
Boeing 727s, large numbers ot
Oshkosh trucks and spare parts
from American manufacturers.
The equipment was to add to the
formidable arsenal Libya has
already assembled with $2 billion
in Russian military equipment,
including 100 MIG jets manned
by crack North Korean fighter
pilots.
The C-130s were the central
part of the American purchase.
Although usually characterized
in press reports as only "cargo"
planes, the Hercules is the most
versatile warplane ever built. It
has been the workhorse of the
American military for 20 years.
THE FOUR-ENGINE turbo-
prop aircraftknown to U. S.
troops as "Herks" or "Herky
birds are designed for rough-
field landings and lightning
military strikes; Israeli troops
flew C-130s to make their famous
1976 rescue raid at Entebbe
Airport in Uganda. The planes
are also designed for rapid
paratroop drops, have a 5,000-
mile range and can carry 110,000
pounds of jeeps, trucks, heavy
artillery and similar cargos.
Herks are also easy to convert
into lethal gunships, like the ones
which ravaged the Ho Chi Minh
Trail during the Vietnam War.
These seemingly innocuous
"cargo" planes can be quickly
fitted with an astounding array
of weapons, including 105
milimeter howitzers, 40 milimeter'
cannons, bomb racks, missile
pods, grenade dispensers and the
infamous six-barrel "Vulcan" 20
milimeter machine gun which can
shred a trnck convoy or a
barracks in seconds with its
3,000-rounds-per-minute firing
capacity.
THREE PRESIDENTS, the
State Department and the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
decided that it was not a good
idea to put such equipment in the
hands of Libyan strongman
Muammar al-Qadaff i. Qadaffi has
openly allowed his country to be
used as a haven and staging bas'
far PLO commandos, hijackers
and other international terroriaU.
American opinion about Libya,
and has mounted an all-stops-out
campaign to persuade the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee to
approve those export licenses.
BUT COMMITTEE Chairman
Frank Church has refused to
relent or even soften his views
on the Libyan planes.
So, late in 1977, the Arabs
began an economic invasion of
Idaho aimed at "neutralizing"
the Senator.
First, Kuwait bought up the
sprawling Idaho Harding
Livestock and Land Company,
one of the largest land and cattle
companies in the state.
Then Libya began making
arrangements to buy almost
everything else.
Idaho can best be described by
the short list of things it is
nationally famous for: baking
potatoes, exploding grain silos,
Sun Valley's ski slopes. And
Frank Church. It is the least
populated state in the Union,
with fewer than 800,000 residents
on its 84,000 square miles.
Seventy percent of those people
live on the rural farmlands that
are Idaho's economic backbone;
22,000 of them belong to the!
Idaho Farm Bureauthe state's
most powerful political group.
TWO YEARS AGO, the Arabs
started arriving in this unlikely
spot in America's isolated north-
western corner. They began to
buy thingsin units measurable
in tens of millions of dollars.
Officially, Washington has
made no mention of what is
happening in Idaho. Unofficially,
senior State Department officials
have expressed increasing
concern with Arab activities they
describe as "an interesting end
run around the federal govern-
ment to establish a beachhead
in the mountains of Idaho."
So far, this is what has hap-
pened in Frank Church's
backyard:
'Israel's fate may
well be deter-
mined on the Los
Angeles Freeway
or the New Jer-
sey Turnpike.'
t After Kuwait purchased
Idaho Harding, Libya sent a
seven-member "trade
delegation" which prowled the
state, meeting with state of-
ficials, farmers, sheep ranchers,
newspaper editors and university
officials. They mentioned two
things very frequently: their
desire to make massive purchases
of local products and their
displeasure that Senator Church
was helping to hold up delivery of
their cargo planes.
Three separate junkets of
Idaho congressmen, state of-
ficials, farmers and university
leaders have toured Libya, where
they were wined, dined, en-
tertainedand introduced to
Arab officials who invited them
to discuss "the possibility of new
trade programs."
Then Arabs began meeting
frequently in both Idaho and
Washington D. C. with Idaho
Congressman Stevens Symms, a
Republican who has announced,
that he will run against Frank
Church next year. An arch-
conservative with seven years in
Congress, Symms is not
popularly known in Idaho for any
major legislative ac-
complishments. He is perhaps
best known for his right-wing
rhetoric, his backing of the
"liberty Amendment" which
calls for the abolition of all in-
come taxes, and his catchy
campaign slogan, 'Take a bite of
government.'
Symms' office has told the
local press that the Libyans
aren't so bad, that Qadaffi has
promised that Libya will mend
its ways and "no longer give aid
or support to terrorists," and
"We believe him."
t Arabs have negotiated the
purchase of about $40 million in
wheat. They have stated an
interest in making future buys
into Idaho's corn, soybeans and
lamb products.
9 Arabs have announced they
intend to give a half million dollar
Agricultural Studies grant to the
University of Idaho.
9 Libya has coyly suggested
that it might want to establish its
U. S. trade mission office in
Boise, Idahoif it would be
"welcome."
9 The 22,000-raember Idaho
Farm Bureau is now aggressively
trying to "convince" the Libyans
to put their trade mission in
Boise. It has begun caustic
criticism of Senator Church for
not actively backing the project.
9 Sen. Church, who is
preparing to open his campaign
for reelection in Idaho next year,
is keeping a very low profile on
the subject.
"IN EFFECT, Sen. Church is
running for election against the
Arabs. I don't think there has
ever been a race like this in which
a foreign country has taken such
a direct part. And let me tell you,
we're watching it," explained one
Washington Congressional aide
who has been on the Hill since
1970.
"But Church is not the only
one feeling pressure from the
Arabs," the aide continued.
"They are now a major force in
Washington. The progress they
have made is incredible. Four
years ago, the Arab lobby was a
joke. You had maybe two people
here who knew what they were
doing. The rest of them were
tiptoeing around like nuns in a
whorehouse. They didn't know
what they were doing or even
how to find out. They didn't even
understand the theory of the
system, let along how it works
here on the HilL
"No more. They are well
organized, highly polished
and it goes without
sayingextremely well financed.
They have guud oUff people and
they know how to keep their
fingers on the pulse and deliver
well-documented position papers
or backgrounders to 'balance' the
issues. They also have some
dynamic law firms and former
Hill people ex-senators,
representatives and
aides pounding the drum for
them.
"THE JEWISH LOBBY is
still far more formidable because
it can bring down the public
wrath of the local communities.
But the Arabs are closing. They
have tightened their act to the
point where they have real clout.
You only have to look at the F-15
deal to understand that. I mean,
that was all-out war. We have
every Jewish organization you
can imagine, and bigwigs from
Israel, coming in. There was arm-
twisting like you can't
believeon both sides.
Everything but the kitchen sink
came floating down the halls on
that one.
"And the Arabs won. Israel,
.
_

SUIU
I has never lost a vote like that one
before. It was 55-64 to sell the
planes to the Arabs. Israel had
gone all out to defeat it. But they
lost. I don't think most folks out
there in the real world un-
derstand just how significant
that was.
"From where we sit, it was a
major watershed. The Arabs
demonstrated they now have the
know-how and connections to
affect the passage of legislation.
"Not a lot of people will admit
it publicly, because the topic is
such a touchy one. It's explosive
now with the oil situation. But
Israel lost ground behind the
scenes on that vote. They've lost
ground in general; you could see
that in the concessions they made
for the Egyptian negotiations.
There is a growing undercurrent
hereif we want to keep the oil
flowing, we've got to take a new
look at our relationships with the
Arabs.
"Egypt and Israel may be
friends now, but that doesn't
lessen the tensions. Egypt is a
bankrupt country armed with
equipment left over from the
Russiansequipment they can't
get parts for. They are not an oil
power and we expect them to
stay under fire from the Arab oil
states for striking a deal. Right
now, you can't move on an issue
involving the Mideast until you
take Arab oil money into ac-
count. When it comes to the
Midwest, man, 'balance' is the
new catchword here."
THE F-15 DEAL was at the
center of a story of controversy in
the winter and spring of 1978. It
involved something more than
the sale of jets to Arab countries.
The legislation set a major
precendent by linking sales of
topof-the-line military equip-
ment to Israel with mandatory
sales of the same equipment to
Arab states.
The F-15 is no mere jet, but a
superplane: the sleek, twin-tailed
fighter is the most advanced
aircraft in the world. It is a
flying, computerized, total
overhead destruction machine,
armed with 20 milimeter machine
guns, Sparrow air-to-air missiles,
Sidewinder rocketsand an
arsenal of other ordinance for
destroying buildings and
bunkers, men and machines, like
no other plane can.
With the fall of the shah in
Iran, the "balance" achieved by
selling the jets to both Israel and
Saudi Arabia in 1978 now ap-
pears to have gone out of kilter.
One of the first public acts of
Khomeini's Islamic regime was
to pledge full support to the
PLO's campaign to destroy
Israel. That pledge carried with it
the weight of the arsenal of
American weapons that the new
Iranian government inherited
from the old. Overnight, a new
fleet of F-15s was added to those
now being purchased by Saudi
Arabia, shifting the "balance" in
drastic lopsided favor of the Arab
League.
The coffee arrives in delicate
bone china cups rimmed with
gold flake, set on an antique
mahogany serving tray.
Vanishing as quickly as she
materialized, the secretary closes
the thick wooden door, leaving
the two men alone again. Across
the desk, the man in the blue suit
remains standing. For the second
time in as many minutes, he
seeks verbal assurance that the
interview is off the record
Strictly off the record. Speaking
in vaguely apologetic tones, he
gestures toward the window and
the Washington streets below as
he explains. "The Arab-Israeli
situation is a very, sensitive
subject at this time."
Mr. Bluesuit has been in and
around Washington's central
power core for more than two
dozen years. A former high of-
ficial in two government agen-
cies, he is now a private con-
sultant to government and in-
dustry on legal and financial
matters involving international
trade.
BLUESUIT UNFURLS a
large map of the world across his
desk. Its corners are held down
by crystal paperweights and
empty gold-rimmed coffee cups.
Its surface is etched with colored
lines that criss-cross heavily in
some places, obscurring large
sections of geographical detail.
Red lines. Green lines. Blue
lines. Yellow lines. Each starts at
some major point in the Americas
or Europe or Asia and stretches
seaward, to join with others. The
lines form colored cables that arc
across the oceans, round the '
capes, cross the channels and
traverse canals that bring them
to one final massive coagulation
in the vicinity of the Persian
Gulf.
Tanker routes. Traced across
Continued on Page lft
Religious
Directory
LAUDERDALE LAKfcs
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE
4351 Wtst Oakland Park Boulevard.
Modern Orthodox Conarttton.
Murray Brick man, pretWant.
EMANU EL TEMPLE. 34JS W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi
Jtffrty Ballon. Canter Jtrama
K lament.
SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE, Hat w.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowiti. Canter
Maurice Neu (42).
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER. INC.Mat
West Oakland Park Blvd. Con-
servative. Rabbi Albert N. Trey.*
Cantor Jack Merchant, and Hy Soloi,
president.
HEBREW CONOREOATION OF
LAUDERHILL, 2041 NW 41th Avc
Lauderhiii. Conservative. Ma
K ronish, president.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER, ft
NW 5*th St. Conservative. Rabto.
Israel Zimmerman (44A).
YOUNG ISRAEL OP HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 4171 Stirling
Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi MosheBomier
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH
CONGREGATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd.
Liberal Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J.
Harr(*4).
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE
1*>1 NWathSt. Hank Pitt, president.
POMPANOBEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM 132 SE 11th Ave
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Jacob Renter (4>.
MARGATE
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION7*40
^LS'S "'r* Conservative. Rabbi
Joseph Berelas.
Mt.5J%I1e.3?W,,M "?.
NW th St. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Solomon GekL Canter Mai GaIk*.
CORALSPRIMOS
TEMPLE BETH ORR, 21 $1 Riverside
Drive, Reform. Rabbi Leonard Zeil.
DEER FIELD BEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL at Centery
TEMPLE "*?" ^ i*
iSO* ** Maria I.
)F .
A
>



Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, Augmt 17,1979
UJA Appoints Cadden
National Cash Chairman
Jewish Magazines Provide Good Reading
NEW YORK Edgar L.
Cadden of Chicago has been
appointed National Cash
Chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal, it was announced by
Irwin S. Field, UJA National
Chairman.
"A constant cash flow is vital
to the Jewish lifeline of
humanitarian services," he said.
'With increased Soviet
migration, the cost of peace and
the impact of inflation, the need
of the UJ As beneficiary agencies
for cash is immediate. Ed Cadden
is the kind of leader who will
insure that this need is met."
Vice chairman of the board of
the Jewish Fund of Metropolitan
Chicago, Cadden is chairman of
its Project Renewal Committee.
Previously, he served as the
Jewish United Fund's 1978
General Campaign chairman,
1977 Special Gifts chairman and
1976 chairman of Trades,
Industries and Professions
Division. Also in Chicago, he has
been a leader in the Crusade of
Mercy, the United Way Cam-
paign, a member of the Joint
Distribution Committee's board
of directors and is vice chairman
of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations.
Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr of
Plantation Jewish Congregation-
Temple Kol Ami noted in the
August issue of the
congregation's newsletter "Life,"
that members should consider
subscribing to one or more of
several "very fine magazines" of
Jewish interest.
He mentioned Moment, P.O.
Box 922, Farmingdale, N.Y.
11737. founded by Elie Wiesel
and Leonard Fein, and in the
rabbi's opnion "the finest in-
dependent Jewish periodical
being published today; Com-
mentary, 165 E. 56th St. New
York 10022, published by the
American Jewish Committee,
considered to be a leading in-
tellectual magazine among the
Silberman Named Chairman
Of UJA Florida Cabinet
NEW YORK Morton
Silberman of Miami has been
appointed chairman of the
Florida Regional Cabinet of
United Jewish Appeal. The
announcement was made by UJA
National Chairman Irwin S.
Field.
Field described Silberman as a
"dynamic Jewish leader whose
invaluable contributions to
Jewish life make him an out-
standing choice to lead his region
as we enter a decade of decision in
Jewish life. There are few among
us as energetic, committed and
effective as Mort, and the
national leadership of UJA looks
forward to a long and productive
association with him."
"Silberman's involvement in
Jewish communal life goes back
many years, and he has served in
numerous leadership roles on the
local, regional and national
levels. He is currently vice
president of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee, and
recently received the Human
Relations Award of the American
Jewish Committee.
From 1976 to 1978, Silberman
served as president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation; prior
to that he was vice president of
the Federation for six years.
Before moving to Miami, he was
founding president of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Secretary-treasurer of the East
Coast Supply Company,
Silberman resides in Miami with
his wife Val and two daughters.
Local Brandeis Women mmmmmmmmmmm
Honor Broward Librarian WV Post Installs Officers
Lonnie Golenberg (left), past
president of the West Broward
Chapter of Brandeis University
National Women's Committee,
presented a Certificate of
Appreciation to Tobia Geberer of
the West Broward Branch of the
Broward County Library.
The chapter also donated to
the library A History of Israel
from the Rise of Zionism to Our
Time by Dr. Howard Sachar, son
of Abram Sachar, chancellor of
Brandeis University. In addition,
a Book Plate honoring the
Broward County Library was
donated to the Brandeis
University Library at Waltham,
Mass.
Also similarly honored for
cooperation with the Brandeis
group were Betty Hoffman,
founder, director and chairman of
the board of the Plantation
Public Library; and Chris
Baffron, on behalf of the Plan-
tation Department of Parks and
Recreation.
Ruth Horowitz is president of
the West Broward Chapter and
invites interested members of the
community to contact her or
Leonore Greenfield, membership
chairman.
Temple Emanu-El
Welcomes New Rabbi
Temple Emanu-El welcomed
Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon as he
preached his first service in July,
assuming leadership of the
temple.
Appropriately, the portion of
the week quoted Moses' words
from Deuteronomy "go and
begin." That, said the rabbi, will
be the theme of his inaugural
year in Fort Lauderdale.
Martin Yohalem, temple
president, officially presented the
rabbi to the congregation. Mrs.
Jerold Mills, Sisterhood
president, ushered in the Sab-
bath, reciting the traditional
prayer as she kindled the Sab-
bath candles. Mrs. Matthew
Newman chanted the prayers
preceding and following the
scriptural readings.
Cantor Jerome Klement sang a
rousing Israeli hymn dedicated to
Rabbi Ballon; and Nat Baker,
president of the Men's Club,
recited the ritual blessings. Roy
Kobert, representing the Youth
Group, was also seated on the
pulpit, as all ages shared in the
Sabbath of welcome.
Sabbath social hour, hosted by
Sisterhood officers, followed the
services as the congregation
greeted Rabbi Ballon and his
family.
Charles Pace of Tamarac and
Sybil Swirsky of Sunrise will be
installed as commander and
president, respectively, of the
newly-organized Edward
Goldberg Post No. 519, Jewish
War Veterans (JWV| and Ladies
Auxiliary. They will be installed
at special ceremonies Sunday,
Aug. 19, at 7:30 p.m. in the
Jordan Building, 11030 Wiles
Rd., Coral Springs.
Willard Zweig, director of media
for the JWV Department of
Florida, announced that, in
addition to the installation of
officers, the Post will be
presented with national charters.
These presentations will be made
by Alvin F. Rose, state com-
mander of JWV Department of
Florida, and Mrs. Harold Uhr,
past department president.
Delegations from Broward,
Palm Beach and Dade Counties
will join numerous dignitaries
from various JWV posts and
auxiliaries and allied veteran
organizations in the state.
nation's periodicals; Present
Tense, also published by AJ
Committee, considers itself "The
Magazine of World Jewish
Affairs."
Rabbi Harr also calls attention
to The Jerusalem Post, published
in Jerusalem with a weekly
edition airmailed to thousands of
subscribers around the world;
The Jewish Press, Hadassah
Magazine, National Jewish
Monthly and the National Post
and Opinion.
Another publication of utmost
importance to concerned Jews is
the Near East Report, published
by American Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPAC)
which conducts public action to
maintain and strengthen the
friendship between the United
States and Israel. AIPAC
maintains contact with the White
House Administration, Congress
and various officials. AIPAC is
located at 444 N. Capitol St.,
N.W., Washington, DC 20001.
Task Force Has
Speaker's Bureau
Broward County's Task Force
on Organized Crime has a
Speaker's Bureau made up of
prominent local law enforcement
officials and civic leaders who are
available to speak on "Our
Attack against Organized Crime.
Narcotics, Drug Abuse and
Marijuana."
William T. Love Jr., ad-
ministrative assistant of the
Task Force, located at 915
Middle River Dr., Fort
Lauderdale, will make
arrangements to schedule a
speaker for an organization's
meeting.
Marc J. Goldberg, M.D., F.R.C.S. (C.)
Eye Physician and Surgeon
announces the opening of his office
in the
Florida Medical Center
4900 West Oakland Park Boulevard, Suite 201
Lauderdale Lakes, Florida 33313
Office hours by appointment
(305) 739-6533
PRESENTS
A DAILY DESIGNER
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Volume 8
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
AT
TEMPLE SHOLOM
'The only conservative synagogue in Northeast
_______________Broward"
RABBI MORRIS A. SKOP
ROSH HASHANAH
Friday Sept. 21 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Sept. 22 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Sept 23 9:00 a.m.
CANTOR JACOB J. RENZER
YOM KIPPUR
Sunday Sept. 30 7:00 p.m.
Kol Nidray
Monday Oct. 1 9:00 a.m.
YIZKOR MEMORIAL SERVICE
121
RESERVATIONS AND MEMBERSHIPS NOW BEING. ACCEPTED AT TEMPLE OFFICE
942-6410
Habraw school registration for all dasaaa
Sunday, Sapt 9th 9 to 11^
Number 17


Friday, August 17,1979
The Jewish Floridian o[ Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
Levine Heads Federation Rovi Faber Named Catering Consultant
k Public Relations
xi
>s
Max Levine of Lauderhill,
native of Newark, N.J., has been
appointed public relations
consultant for the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, it was announced by
Leslie Gottlieb, executive
director of the Jewish Federation.
Levine will be assigned to
public relations services and
Community Relations Council
activities formerly directed by
Joel Telles, who will be working
on United Jewish Appeal
Campaign activities for the
Federation.
Levine, an experienced
newspaperman and publicist, has
had considerable experience with
Federation and CRC activities,
having been on Missions to Israel
several times and attended
General Assemblies of Council of
Jewish Federations, Plenary
Sessions of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council, and national conferences
of the United Jewish Appeal.
Rovi Faber, founder of the
WECARE Volunteer program
and active in many Jewish
organizations, has been ap-
pointed catering consultant for
the Hilton Hotel, Gait Ocean
Mile.
In her new position, Mrs.
Faber will be responsible for
handling all social, business and
organizational functions for both
the Hilton and the Ocean Manor
Resort Hotel.
Prior to her marriage to Arthur
Faber, Rovi was associated with
the Nautilus Hotel and opened
the Lucerne Hotel, both on
Miami Beach, serving as their
--cKi.il director and liaison be-
tween guests and management.
In that position she was
responsible for all social func-
tions.
"We are very excited about the
renovations being done to the
Hilton for the coming season, and
we will be able to accommodate
all social and banquet functions
for groups numbering a dozen to
400 persons," said Mrs. Faber.
Rovi is well known in the
Jewish community as a result of
her numerous activities with a
Olympics Concern
Israeli Sports Leaders
Max Levine
Sen. Stone Reports
U.S. Won't Press Israel
To Negotiate With PLO
Richard Stone, D-
a report to the
I
U.S. Sen.
Florida, in
Community Relations Council
(CRC) of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, said
that the United States would
veto attempts in the United
Nations to give the Palestinian
people the right to self-
determination.
Sen. Stone, who is chairman of
the Senate Foreign Relations
Middle East subcommittee, met
with Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance at a breakfast meeting
earlier this month. Secretary
Vance told him, Stone reported,
that the U.S. is not trying to
negotiate its own modification of
UN Resolution 242.
This is in sharp contradiction
to Israeli Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan's charge that the
U.S. is pushing for changes in
Resolution 242 to please Saudi
Arabia in an effort to ensure a
steady supply of oil.
Vance, however, reaffirmed a
U.S. promise to Israel in 1975 not
to negotiate with or recognize the
Palestinian Liberation
Organisation (PLO) unless it
affirms the right of Israel to exist
within recognized and defensible
borders.
Sen. Stone quoted Vance as
saying that the "United States
stands by its moral commitment
to Israel and he denied that the
U.S. is negotiating its own
language" of resolution changes.
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Concern has grown in Israeli
sports circles that the Soviet
Union may resort to the denial of
entry visas or other ad-
ministrative measures to prevent
Israel from participating in the
Olympic Games in Moscow next
summer despite its promise that
every nation will be welcome to
compete.
The possibility of such action
by the Soviet authorities seemed
likely after Alex Giladi, a senior
Israeli television official, received
word that his application for a
visa to enter the USSR was
rejected.
Giladi, who had covered the
Olympic Games in Munich and
Montreal for Israeli television, is
slated to head the Israeli TV crew
at the 1980 Games in the Soviet
capital. He was scheduled to go
to Moscow along with 39 senior
officials of the European
Broadcasting Union (EBU) to
cover the "Spartakiada." a
general rehearsal for the Olympic
Games. Of all the applicants, he
apparently was the only one
denied a visa.
DOUBTS ABOUT Soviet
intentions toward the Israeli
Olympic team were increased by
the discriminatory treatment
given 40 Israeli political scien-
tists who had asked to attend the
'Shalom'Show
Airs Weekly
Richard Peritz is the host and
producer of a weekly TV
presentation, "Shalom," Sun-
duys at 12:30 p.m. on Channel 51.
The program, with the aid of
Jewish Agency emissaries to
South Florida, was started the
first Sunday after the signing of
the peace treaty between Egypt
and Israel.
Peritz, who lives in Fort
> Lauderdale with his father and
sister, is a multi-talented young
man who hopes to expand the
n -Jiow into a one-hour program.
. vk^Jurrently. the show runs 30
^ Vaii Mjnutes with costs running
Richard Peritz, right, produces and hosts the weekly 'Shalom'
television program. Shown on the set are Theresa Tieman,
presenter; and Itzhak Aloni, Jewish Agency emissary to the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
' Wwcen $450 and $500 for time
i
and production charges. Neither
he nor the emissaries who have
been assigned to South Florida
by the Jewish Agency in Israel, a
beneficiary of United Jewish
Appeal funds raised by the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, receive any
remuneration for their TV efforts.
Yossi Netz, Itzhak Atom,
David Meroz and Sam Alpert
assist Peritz in getting guests for
the Sunday noon-time show. The
shows, designed to develop an
awareness of Jewish identity and
interest in the Jewish community
9 and a better understanding of
Israel, its heritage, its culture,
and its humanitarian works, have
included community leaders
*J interviewed on various subjects.
singers, musicians and fums
about Israel.
\L
TV SETS NEEDED
For Russian Families.
Must Be In Good Working Order.
A Great Aid In Helping The Famines
To Learn English.
To Arrange Pick-Up Call;
Shelly Solomon
763-6340
i
International Congress of
Political Science which opens in
Moscow on Aug. 12.
Prof. Asher Arian of Tel Aviv
University, head of the Israeli
chapter of the Political Science
Association, reported that only
30 of the 40 applicants have been
notified that they will receive
visas. The others have received
no notification. Moreover, none
of the applicants has yet been
notified about accommodations
and it appears that no reser-
vations have been made for them.
Unless the full delegation
receives visas and ac-
commodations, Israel may have
Rovi Faber
host of Jewish groups. She is
presently a board member of the
Jewish Community Center, was a
board member of Temple Emanu-
El, the Jewish Family Service
and is honorary chairman of
WECARE.
Rovi is a graduate of the
University of Miami, department
of Hotel Management and Guest
delations.
Planning A Trip?
to cancel its participation in the I
forum. According to Arian, the
American and French political | Council's 1979 Exciting Travel I
science associations have Program to Israel, MM west
promised that if all 40 Israelis are Cosst C*""*'" ,nd |
not allowed to attend, they would *'
cancel their participation. \
It was pointed out, however, |
that a decision by Israel to *
boycott the congress would be |
collective. The academicians with __ _IM ... A-.9i
visas could go to Moscow on an \ DOROTHY KLEIN-741-47421
individual basis if they chose to I j
but would not be part of an U^^^^^^ ^^
Israeli delegation.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
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jyjdav AnniM7 1ft7fl
Friday, August 17,1979
Synagogue News
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
f
PLANTATION
JEWISH CONGREGATION
plantation Jewish
Congregation Temple Kol Ami
will host an open house for new
. numbers on Aug. 26 at 8 p.m. at
' [he temple. All prospective
members are invited to attend
and lour the facilities.
The congregation announces
ilic appointment of Stephanie
King to the staff of the religious
school. Ms. King will head the
seventh to tenth grade high
school department.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
The Abraham Haber Torah
School of Temple Beth Israel
(Conservative), 7100 West
Oakland Park Boulevard,
Sunrise, is now conducting
registration in all departments:
primary, elementary, middle and
high school.
The temple youth groups,
Kudimah and USY, are also
accepting new members at this
time. For additional information,
contact Stanley L. Cohen,
' director of education and youth.
SUNRISE
JEWISH CENTER
The worship service of the
Sunrise Jewish Center (Temple
Sliuarai Zedek) was held Aug.
10, to usher in the Shabbath.
Cantor Jack Marchant chanted
the liturgy, and Irving
Sleinhaus, the second vice
president conducted the services
while Rabbi Albert N. Troy is
away on a two month vacation in
Israel.
A highlight of the evening was
a talk by Jack L. Sackman, the
retired attorney of Lauderdale
Lukes, whose topic was "Jewish
ltools."
The Kiddush following the
services on Saturday, Aug. 11,
was sponsored by Mr. and Mrs.
Phil Mitchell in celebration of
their 50th wedding anniversary.
The temple is located at 8049
West Oakland Park Boulevard,
Sunrise. AU are welcome to join
the congregation in worship.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Temple Sholom of Pompano
Beach is now accepting reser-
vations for the High Holy days
services seating, celebrating the
Jewish New Year 5740 and Yom
Kippur. the Day of Atonement.
Services for Rosh Haahanah will
be held on Sept. 22, and 23 and
Yom Kippur Oct. 1. Services will
be conducted by Rabbi Morris
Skop, assisted by Cantor Jacob
Renzner. Early reservations are
suggested due to limited seating.
For information call the temple
office.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Dr. Morton Malavsky,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Shalom, Hollywood, announces a
lour to Israel, scheduled for Dec.
I Cull tin- ample fur details.
Call the temple for details.
THE RECONSTRUCTIONIST
SYNAGOGUE
.. Rabbi Ludwig Nadelman,
executive vice president of The
..Jewish Reconstructionist
foundation in New York City,
BSddU speak at The Recon-
Der.ructionist Synagogue, 7473
NW 4th St., Plantation, on
Thursday, Aug. 23, at 8 p.m.
Rabbi Nadelman was born in
Germany, grew up in Ecuador
and received his higher education
in New York. He is a contributor
to The Encylopedia Judaica, the
treasurer of The American
Section of the World Jewish
Congress and is on the faculty of
The Reconstructionist College in
Philadelphia. Visitors are
welcome to attend.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Temple Beth Orr Sisterhood is
having an "Affordable Art
Affair" Sunday, Aug. 26, from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. at the temple. With
the cooperation of United
Liquidators and Art
Distributors, original oils, prints
and lithos will be on display and
for sale. Included in the day's
selling will be custom crafted
designer costume jewelry.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER
The Men's Club and
Sisterhood are sponsoring a
Labor Day weekend (Aug. 31 to
Sept. 3) at the Crown Hotel in
Miami Beach. For information
call the temple office.
Bar, Bat Mitzvahs
MARC WEISS *
The Plantation Jewish
Congregation-Temple Kol Ami
will have three B'nai Mitzvah
this month. Rabbi Sheldon J.
Hurr will conduct services at
10:30 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 18.
when Marc Weiss, son of Mrs.
Slullie Weiss, becomes a Bar
Milivah. Mrs. Weiss will sponsor
the Oneg Shabbat at the temple,
H200 Peters Rd., Plantation,
following the regular Shabbat
service Friday, Aug. 17.
EDWARD ROSEN
On Saturday, Aug. 25, Edward
Rosen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Larry
llosen, will be called to the Torah
for his Bur Mitzvah service. Mr.
and Mrs. Rosen will sponsor the
Oneg Shabbat Friday evening,
Aug. 24.
RANDY MAYROVfTZ
And on Saturday, Aug. 3
Handy Mayrovitz, son of Harve
and Sandra Mayrovitz, wil
become a Bar Mitzvah.
MARCIAWACHTEL
Marcia Eden Wachte!
daughter of Dr and Mrs. Garr
II. Wachlel, will become Bat
Mitzvah at the 10 a.m. service of
The Reconstructionist
Synagogue, on Saturday, Aug.
25.
Dr. Ludwig Nadelman, a leader
of the Reconstructionist
movement, will officiate at the
service which will be held at
Deicke Auditorium. Cypress
Road. Plantation.
The oneg following the Friday
evening Aug. 24 service will be
sponsored by Mr. and Mrs.
William Dennis, grandparents of
the But Mitzvah. following the
8:15 service at The Recon-
structionist Synagogue, 7473
NW 4th St., Plantation.
MARIELLE SAMOUN
Marielle Samoun. daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Samoun,
will be Bat Mizvah Friday, Aug.
17, at 8 p.m. at Tamarac Jewish
Center. Inc.-Temple Beth Torah.
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Tamarac Jewish Center Appoints Cantor
?
Ben Bernstein, president oi the
Tamarac Jewish Center, has an-
nounced the appointment of
Cantor Henry Belasco of New
York City.
Born in Warsaw, Poland.
Cantor Belasco is a descendant of
cantors. He studied at the Con-
servatory of Music in Europe. He
later emigrated to Israel where he
continued his studies and was a
leading tenor with the Israeli
National Opera. He has sung in
concerts in Paris, Rome, Naples
and Warsaw. In 1948 he served in
Israel's War of Independence.
His previous posts were in
Philadelphia, Harrisburg,
Edmonton, Canada and
Laurelton, L.I.
Cantor Belasco will be par-
ticipating in Sabbath services
commencing in mid-August.
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narrators, choral groups, dancers
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Page 2
The. Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 17,19791
Perspective
The West Bank and Israeli Settlements
In view of the on-going
negotiations concerning the West
Bank and Israeli settlements, the
Community Relations Council
(CRC) of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale calls
attention to an editorial by Jim
Hampton, editor of Tht Miami
Herald, Sunday, Aug. 5'in which
he notes "certain broad principles
that we (The Miami Herald)
should guide U.S. policy in the
Mideast." In brief, one of those
principles follows: "No West
Bank settlement is acceptable to
us if it jeopardizes Israel's
security."
Along those lines, it is im-
portant to know the background
of the West Bank and Israeli
Settlements issue. American
Israel Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC), based in Washington,
D.C. has issued the following
memorandum:
BACKGROUND
The West Bank region (Judea
and Samaria) was designated by
the 1947 United Nations par-
tition plan as a new Arab state.
The Arab world and local
Palestinian Arabs rejected the
plan. In May 1948, when the
British forces withdrew and
Israel proclaimed its statehood,
the surrounding Arab nations
and local Arabs attacked Israel
and the Jewish settlements that
had existed on the West Bank for
decades.
Transjordan's troops occupied
the region and, in 1950, annexed
the West Bank and East
Jerusalem. The annexation was
condemned by many nations,
including those in the Arab
world. Only Britain and Pakistan
ever recognized Jordan's
sovereignty over the West Bank.
No Jews were allowed to live
on the West Bank after the 1948
war. Jewish communities were
destroyed in the fighting and, in
some cases, their defenders were
massacred. Among these were
the towns and villages of Kfar
Etzion, Atarot, Revadim, Neve
Ya'akov, Bet Ha'arava, Ein
Tzurim and Massuot Yitzchak.
(The Jewish population in
Hebron had already fled after
Arab massacres in 1929 and
1936.)
From 1948 until 1967, the West
Bank was used as a base for
launching terrorist activities
against Israel. During the 1967
war Jordan ignored an Israeli
warning, transmitted through
the United States, and attacked
Israel. Israeli forces coun-
terattacked and routed the
Jordanian army from the region.
ISRAEL'S
POLICY
SETTLEMENT
access to the Israeli courts, and
in several instances have won
their cases.
Sons and daughters of the
defenders of Jewish communities
destroyed in the 1948 attack were
among the first to reestablish
these villages after 1967. Other
settlers were determined to
establish communities on the
sites of biblical Jewish com-
munities. In these cases, such as
at Hebron and Nablus, Israeli
authorities restricted them to
locations outside of Arab towns.
The total population of Jewish
inhabitants in the West Bank's
50 settlements is approximately
6,000 less than one percent of
the West Bank's total
population.
LEGAL ISSUES
Because of the acknowledged
uncertainty over sovereignty of
the West Bank, the settlements
in Judea and Samaria cannot be
considered "illegal." Secretary of
State Vance stated, on Julv 29.
The vast majority of Israel's 50
settlements in the West Bank are
in strategically important,
sparsely populated areas, or on
the sites of Jewish towns
destroyed by the Arabs in the
1930s and '40s.
- Following the war, the Israeli
army established military
outposts in the region to prevent
infiltration and sabotage. Many
of today's West Bank set-
dements began as such camps,
explaining their strategic
location along the Jordan River,
along the north-south high ridge
which divides the West Bank,
and along the pre-1967 Jordan-
Israel armistice line the "green
line." B*"th the Jordan River
valley and the green line areas are
sparsely populated.
Almost all of the land used for
the new communities was in the
category of state domain or
ownerless property. In the cases
of private property or land owned
by absentee landlords, the
owners, when they could be
located, were given the choice of
cash compensation or alternative
hind. Dissatisfied owners have
1977. "It is an open question as
to who has legal right to the West
Bank." Jordan's occupation was
never recognized by the United
States or most other countries
and, in the words of one legal
scholar, Israels claim to the
region is superior to Jordan's
"since Jordan's presence in the
West Bank was the result of its
aggression in 1948, while Israel's
arose from the exercise of its
legitimate right of self-defense in
1967. ."
Since there has been no in-
ternational agreement on the
status of the West Bank and
Gaza since the U.N. partition
resolution of 1947, the areas
remain unallocated portions of
the old British Mandate. As
such, some legal scholars have
argued, the provisions of the
Mandate should still prevail. The
Mandate permitted Jewish
settlement in the West Bank and
Gaza.
Even though it is doubtful that
it applies to the West Bank
occupation, Israel conducts itself
in accordance with international
oc-
1949
JCC Program
Registration Day Sept. 9
Members of the Jewish
Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale are being
enrolled, and Sunday, Sept. 9,
liiix Ikmjii scheduled for a Gala
Registration Day for different
courses of study and lectures at
the Perlman Campus of JCC at
6500 Sunrise Blvd., Plantation.
JCC officials invite those who-
are not receiving their
newsletters and bulletins to call
792-6700 to be placed on the
mailing list.
An invitation is extended to all
persons to visit the 16-acre
campus and the buildings that
are being renovated to contain
the expanded activities of the
JCC. Tours are scheduled every
Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. to
noon under the direction of
trained volunteers.
Feminist 'First
Woman Rabbi
Heads Synagogue
NEW YORK Rabbi Linda
Joy Holtzman, a 1979 graduate
of the Reconstructionist Rab-
binical College in Philadelphia,
has been elected as spiritual
leader of Beth Israel Con-
gregation, Coatesville, Pa., it was
announced by Newton Duitch,
president of the 55-year-old Con-
servative congregation. The 110-
member family congregation
thus becomes the only synagogue
in the Northern Hemisphere to
have a woman rabbi at its helm.
Rabbi Holtzman will also serve
as education director of the syna-
gogue. She is a native of Phila-
delphia who, during her student
days at the RRC, served as
student rabbi at the Bristol
Jewish Center in Bristol, Pa.
RABBI HOLTZMAN also
spent a year studying at the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
She received her BA and MA
degrees in English from Temple
University, and a Bachelor of
Hebrew Literature degree from
Gratz College in Philadelphia.
In commenting upon the elec-
tion of Rabbi Holtzman to the
pulpit of Beth Israel Congre-
gation, Rabbi Ludwig Nadel-
mann, executive vice president of
the Jewish Reconstructionist
Foundation said, "The appoint-
ment of Rabbi Linda Holtzman
represents an important 'break-
through' for women rabbis.
"Until now, women have only
been elected as assistants, or, as
is the case in a unique arrantce-
17-7______________
PLAN
TODAY
FOR
TOMORROW
Provide for Jewish
continuity and support
life giving programs
in Israel through
a bequest or deferred
trust to HADASSAH
^OEO ?*
For more information write.
Hadassah Wills & Bequests
50 West 58th Street
New York, NY. 10019
Telephone: (212) 355-7900
law governing "belligerent
cupancy," including the
'Fourth Geneva Convention. The
convention was clearly intended
to govern short-term military
occupation during the course of a
conflict or immediately
thereafter, and should not apply
to Israeli administration.
In fact, the Israeli ad-
ministration often exceeds the
requirements of the Geneva
Convention. For example, the
convention does not call for
ment at Beth El Zedeck Congre-
gation in Indianapolis, the
Sassos, Dennis and Sandy, func-
tion as co-rabbis of their con-
gregation."
POLITICAL ISSUES
The U.S. Administration's
repeated charges about the
illegality of the Israeli set-
tlements pre-judges the course of
negotiations on the future of the
region. The successful completion
of a peace treaty between Egypt
and Israel illustrates that the
settlements are not "obstacles to
peace." In the Sinai, over which
Egypt's sovereignty was never in
question, all of the Israeli set-
tlements and towns will be
turned over to Egypt as part of
the Israeli-Egyptian peace
treaty.
Under the terms of the Camp
David agreements, Israel and its
yet-to-emerge negotiating
"to determine the
access by local populations to the gJi'SlJs of the West Bank and
courts
of the administering
power; as noted, residents of the
West Bank and Gaza have such
access to Israeli courts. The
convention makes no provision
for elections; under Israeli ad-
ministration the West Bank has
had two free municipal elections.
It was also under Israeli ad-
ministration that West Bank
women were permitted to vote for
the first time.
Gaza ... by the end of the (five-
year) transitional period." A
unilateral Israeli freeze on set-
tlements, as called for by the
Administration, would ef-
fectively foreclose Israel's own
claim to sovereignty over the
West Bank five years before the
issue is to be decided in
negotiations.
Women's Division Mission
Come fly with us to our past, present and future join the
UJA National Women's Division Mission to Rumania and
Israel. Spend three days touring the joint Distribution Com-
mittee institutions and the shtetls of our forefathers. Next stop
our present and future Israel the proposed itinerary is
three days in Netanya on the Mediterranean, then on to the
King David in Jerusalem seeing Israel as one can only see it
through a UJA Mission. We will be gone from Oct. 15-28,1979.
The cost is $1,982.00 inclusive from Fort Lauderdale. Any
questions, more information, please call the Federation office
and ask for Jan Salit, Director, Women's Division at 484-8200.
Theassurance
of service. In the
Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a family of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish 4
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft. Lauderdale (Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
Riverside
Memorial Chapel.Inc /Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Kenneth M. Kay / ArthurGrossberg/ Joseph Rubin
!7-7
177*


Friday. August 17,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 15
By JUDITH ROSEN
NEW YORK (JTA) Ten
jwusand people gathered at the
'United Nations for a rally on
behalf of the "boat people." The
rally, organized by the Com-
mittee Against Genocide by
Vietnam, was cosponsored by a
coalition of more than 100
Chinese-American, Jewish,
Christian and civic groups.
The Jewish community was
represented by Martin Begun, a
national officer of the American
Jewish Congress and vice
president of the Jewish Com-
munity Relations Council of New
York.'
BEGUN REFERRED to the
thousands of Jewish refugees
during World War II who were
refused haven from the death
camps of Nazi Germany.
"They were forced to return to
the Holocaust in Europe, and
death," Begun said. "It seems
incredible that the world has such
a short memory.'"
Analogies to the Holocaust
were the theme of the rally.
Speakers such as Donald
McAvoy. vice president of the
National Conference of
Christians and Jews, and Reps.
William Green (R... N.Y.) and Ted
Weiss (D., N.Y.) recalled the
similarities between the genocide
committed by Germany to that of
the Vietnamese actions today.
Thousands Rally for Boat People
McAvoy noted, "We failed the
test of humanity during World
war II. This is a second chance
lor humanity and we dare not fail
again.
ONE OF the most stirring
speakers was Bayard Rustin,
president of the A. Philip
Randolph Institute and a
prominent civU rights leader.
Rustin. exhorting the audience to
condemn Vietnam for its
"shame" in the wholesale ex-
plosion of the largely Chinese
ethnic population of Vietnam,
added that the probable result of
the rally's appeal to the United
Nations will result in further
inaction on the organization's
part.
"Not a damn thing will
happen," he warned. "Shame on
Japan for taking in only 10
refugees. Shame on the so-called
world democracies" for doing
nothing.
Rustin made an appeal to the
United States government, "If
the United States has to take
them all-take them." He later
led the crowd in the famous civil
rights song, "We Shall Over-
come," as the rally proceeded on
a march through mid-town
Manhattan.
OTHER SPEAKERS included
Stephen Cohen, Deputy
Assistant Secretary for Human
Rights at the State Department,
bearing a message of support
from President Carter; Richard
Kuo, Deputy to Mayor Edward
Koch, with a proclamation of
today as "Indochinese Refugee
Day"; Bishop James Wetmore,
of the Cathedral of St. John the
Divine; Elizabeth Holtzman (D.,
N.Y.); Chien Shiung Wu,
Professor of Physics at Columbia
University; and Kenneth Mei,
president, National Association
of Chinese Americans, New York
Chapter.
As an expression of its concern
for the plight of the "Boat
People," Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion has
arranged to sponsor an
Indochinese refugee family, it
was announced by Dr. Alfred
Gottshalk, president.
The sponsorship of the family
is being arranged in cooperation
with the International Rescue
Committee.
IN ANOTHER step to
mobilize help for Indochinese
refugees, Gottschalk has written
to the rabbinic alumni of Hebrew
Union College who led the
Reform congregation of the
United States, urging that each
congregation sponsor a refugee
family.
There are approximately 700
such congregations in the
country.
Southern Israelite
LONDON An evaluation
from the Jewish point of view of
two recent political developments
has lMt>n made by the Institute of
Jewish Affairs in London.
One report deals with the
European elections. Although
there are expectations that the
directly elected Parliament will
become a more powerful body,
the IJA explains that there are a
number of considerations which
would appear to limit the poten-
tial for change. Whether or not
the new Parliament of the EEC
increases in importance, it will
probably adopt similar attitudes
towards matters of Jewish in-
terest as its predecessor.
ANALYZING the political
groupings, the report shows that
a coalition of center right groups
would produce a majority of 210
m the 410-seat Parliament, but
because of the cross-cutting of
national interests and ideological
orientations, permanent line-ups
are unlikely U> occur.
"Majorities will be rather fluid
and ad hoc, varying from issue to
Bsue," the report predicts. Nine
Jewish members were elected
from three countries; they rep-
resent a wide range of political
viewpoints, with Mm*. Simone
^VeU from France, who headed the
"-Giscardian UDF list, the
. "ly-chosen president Very few
right-wing extremists were
elected, and they are too isolated
to be effective
The report explains that, under
the Treaty of Rome, the terms of
reference of the EEC are limited
"'most exclusively to economic
natters; of these, the Arab boy-
cott is of particular Jewish in-
terest But the nine member
states discuss "in political co-
operation" all sorts of other
Political matters, and all these
gw'd certainly be raised in the
European Parliament
THE OLD Parliament dis-
CUtrffed' amon*> others, human
"ghts, discrimination, terrorism
nd the Middle East conflict As
part of the European electorate,
Jewish communities in the nine
jwntnes, cooperating in the
J^nwwork of the World Jewish
^ngrees EEC Committee, an
Justified in seeking the support of
new representatives on
these issues. I f the significance of
the Parliament increased, so
would the value of such support-
A second report deals with the
meeting of the non-aligned states
Coordinating Bureau in Colombo
in June, which prepared the
agenda for the Havana Summit
planned for September. Events
there indicate serious rifts within
the non-aligned movement which
may well lead to its break-up and.
if this occurs, "a particularly
vociferous anti-Israel front'' will
cease to exist.
The IJA report explains that
blocs have begun to emerge
within the non-aligned movement
"whose very raison d'etre is
inextricably bound up with the
struggle to eradicate power bloc
conflict"
THERE IS a conflict between
two opposing conceptions of the
purpose of the movement
Castro's "attempt to make it an
instrument of Moscow" and
Tito's desire to "adhere to the
original aim of non-alignment
strict neutrality between the two
major military blocs."
In addition, there is a variety
of regional conflicts Arab
rejectionist anger at Egypt's uni-
lateral peace efforts being one of
them The Bureau was unable to
resolve any of these problems.
The report focuses on the
attempt by the rejectionist Arab
states to get Egypt expelled from
the movement because of her
peace treaty with Israel. As a
result of strong opposition on the
part of the Black African states,
this move was blocked.
ACCORDING to the IJA's
analysis, the prospects for the
Havana Summit of the non-
aligned are not good-
Some participants at the
Colombo meeting felt that the
airing of disagreements was a
sign of the movement's strength,
but the report suggests that "the
conflicting interests are rapidly
becoming irreconcilable. If the
differences remain unresolved,
"the possibility of some insti-
tutionalized split in the move
ment cannot be ruled out"
Vietnamese mother pleads for help for her sick child on board a
small fishing boat carrying 58 refugees.
New European Parliament
From Jewish Viewpoint
Protest Reduction of Military Sentence
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
group of about 150 reserve
soldiers have protested to Chief
of Staff Gen. Raphael Teytan
over his reduction of the sentence
imposed by a military court on an
Israeli officer convicted of
murdering four Arab prisoners
during Israel's occupation of
south Lebanon in the spring of
1978.
The 12-year prison term
originally imposed was reduced
to eight years by an appeals court
but later cut to two years by
Eytan who is empowered to
approve or reduce military
sentences.
THE SOLDIERS expressed
grave concern, in a letter to
Eytan, about the morale and
integrity of the armed forces in
light of his action. The matter
has also been taken up in the
Knesset where a number of MKs
have demanded that the Chief of
Staff be stripped of his power to
reduce sentences determined by a
court of appeals.
Eytan himself expressed some
criticism of Israeli youth to
members of the Knesset
Education Committee who were
visiting army educational
facilities.
He said there was a drug
problem in the army and serious
suspicion that outside sources
were flooding the country and the
armed forces with narcotics. He
alleged the same was done with
the U.S. Army in Vietnam.
THE MKS were also told by
the Chief of Staff that Israeli
youth today is not as good as the
Zionist-inspired youth of past
years. He claimed that Zionist
motivation of youth is on the
decline in their homes, schools
and universities and that few
Israeli youngsters today
associate themselves with the
Zionist youth movements.
He proposed that the
military's education branch set
up classes in basic Zionism.
Gotham Cops Recruit 1,100 Jews
By ANDY EDELSTEIN
NEW YORK Following an
intensive, three-month
recruitment drive, more than
1,100 Jews took the qualifying
examination last month for
openings on the New York City
Police Department. Among this
group were a record number of 76
Sabbath observers, including 20
women.
"We're quite pleased by the
results," said Detective Alan
Sperling, who directed the Jewish
recruitment effort. Jews who
make up only 1.7 percent of the
total NYPDwere one of several
minority groups targeted for
recruitment in an effort to make
the department more
representative of the population
at large.
SPERLING SAID that Police
Commissioner Robert McGuire
had encouraged the recruitment
of Orthodox and Hasidic Jews
and had slated a separate Sunday
examination for Sabbath ob-
servers. In the effort to reach
these communities, Sperling said
he visited day schools, Yeshiva
University, and Stern College, as
well distributing leaflets in the I
heavily Orthodox neighborhood,
of Boro Park.
"The reaction of the young
people that I spoke to was not as
bad as their parents' reaction,"
Sperling related.
"Traditionally, police work is ;
not a job that was looked
favorably by the Jewish com-
munity. Parents want their kids i
to be lawyers, doctors,
physicists.
"BUT I WAS able to persuade
rabbis that there was a need for
Jewish officers. When I went to
the yeshivas I met a lot of
resistance from the faculty but
after speaking to the kids and
stressing the benefits of the job
such as good starting salary and
ability to receive a free college
education, many became in-
terested," Sperling said.
Sperling stressed to his
audiences that they would not be
required to work on the Sabbath
or on Jewish holidays. "I have
not once had to work on a Jewish
holiday during my 33 years on
the force," he said.
During the recruitment
campaign, bilingual Jewish
applicants were told they would
receive "selective certification" if
they spoke Yiddish or Russian.
However, the only language
provisions specified on the exam
were for Spanish and Chinese. "It
was our understanding that
Yiddish and Russian would be
included," Sperling said, "but it
turned out to be a false
assumption on our part."
ABOUT 36,000 people took the
police examination which was
held on June 30. The first hirings
will be made in October and
between 800 and 1,500 persons
are expected to be hired within
the next year.
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1
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 17,1979


Omission Would be Better
Even if it were true at the moment, it would be
ill-advised for an American Jewish leader to an-
nounce to the world that American Jewish influence
in Washington is strong and growing because U.S.
Jews are "educated, affluent, intense, cohesive and
articulate."
This was the opinion of Howard Squadron,
president of the American Jewish Congress, at the
15th annual American-Israel Dialogue of the Con-
gress held in Jerusalem.
But the trend in Washington, in our view, is
precisely the opposite. There is almost no way in the
world that alleged American Jewish influence can
alter the course of President Carter's determination
to assure the flow of oil by butchering Israel.
What is even worse is that Mr. Squadron's
reasoning feeds the mill of anti-Semites who blame
the current energy crunch on American Jews and all
that education, affluence, cohesiveness and ar-
ticulation (the anti-Semitic charge is "Jewish control
of the media") that we are supposed to have.
Either way, we can't win, as Mr. Carter's
policies show. And as the anti-Semitic propaganda
against American Jewry these days shows.
Then what was the point of the statement?
The American Jewish Congress performs
marvelous service in the cause of human rights
generally, not just Jewish rights. In this case,
however, we simply wish that Mr. Squadron had said
nothing.
Carter's War on Israel
Even the most cursory glance at President
Carter's campaign statements back in 1975 would
show that the President has come a long way in his
full-circle trip on the Middle East. What he said then
is not what he is saying now a characteristic
charge against him not only on the Middle East
issue.
This 360-degree turn is perhaps the most
brutally meddlesome performance in the presidency
since the 1956 Suez-Sinai war when then-Secretary of
State John Foster Dulles, acting in the name of
President Eisenhower, forced the British, French and
Israelis back out of the Suez Canal area and reversed
the historic achievement of a military victory that
would have prevented many of the problems now
facing the industrialized world. Including oil.
What President Carter is doing is reversing the
1967 Six-Day War achievement. He has learned
nothing from the grim Dulles-Eisenhower action, as
indeed Secretary Dulles himself did in the end, when
it was too late.
This would be sad enough, but it takes on an
aura of Creek tragedy because of the "doubling" of
its negative implications and because the Pres: ..ent
fully believes he is acting in the best interests not
only of the Arabs, but of Israel, as well.
There is a kind of chutzpah in this sort of
heinous righteousness, which may be good as
preachment in the President's Sunday School ser-
mons, but which is doing terrible service to the world
at large a fact neither he nor his partners in
Europe, presumably the West Germans and the
French, can see at the moment, so blinded are they
all by the sand of oil.
The President's brutal attempt to reverse
history to achieve "rights" for the Palestinians at
the cost of violating Israel's rights is only the first
phase of his campaign against Jerusalem. Watch, in
our opinion, for the Texan, the President's special
envoy, the President's "court Jew," Robert Strauss,
to press for a sundering of Jerusalem far more
quickly than anyone expects at this time.
President Carter needs victories to veil the
tissue of his failures in other areas. Jerusalem, an
emotionally explosive issue throughout the world,
may well be what he will grasp for, with the hands of
his Jewish aide, Strauss.
, "JTewislb Floridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Business Office 136 S. Federal Hwy., Suite 306, Danla, Fla. MOW
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Out of Town Upon Request.
A Part Doesn 't Make the Whole
IN GENEVA the other week,
Britain's Chief Rabbi Immanuel
Jakobovits made a brilliant
point. His assumption was that
we are becoming victims of a
"Holocaust mentality-"
In essence, said Rabbi Jako-
bovits, we have begun to brood
upon our survival as individual
Jews rather than upon the sur-
vival of Judaism.
The logical inference here is
that we have become obsessed
with the demise of sue million
Jews, but we appear to be less
distraught by the decimation and
virtual disappearance of the great
and irreplacable German Jewish
community, or of the other
vibrant Jewish communities of
Eastern Europe that fell victim
to the Hitlerian horde.
AND SO, according to Rabbi
Leo
Mindlin
Jakobovits. our despair is mis-
placed. The Holocaust should not
be the focal point of an eternal
Jewish shiva: rather, it must
confirm our allegiance to the
testament of a Jewish continuum
that no Holocaust can destroy.
The shiva must terminate in a
purgation of thoughts of death
THE AUSTRIAN PAPeRHAN^
A
and renew our commitment to -*\
life
A Holocaust may interrupt the
Jewish continuum, but it can
never put a halt to it. This must
be our visceral intellectual and
emotional conditioa and to brood
upon the individual losses,
though they be reckoned in the
millions, rather than pledge our-
selves to the eternality of the
principle which the individuals
constitute, is not only wasteful.
11 is also self-destructive.
In Geneva, Rabbi Jakobovits
also had some startling things to
say about Israel and Zionism. To
mix the metaphor of two great
civilizations, Israel rose like the
ancient phoenix out of the ashes
of the Holocaust.
IN THIS sense, we regard
Israel as a State dedicated to the
survival of Jews as individuals in
the hopeful belief that a
Holocaust of the type (if not
necessarily the dimension)
unleashed by the Nazis on
European Jewry is impossible in
Israel today by definition.
And so. modern political Zion-
ism, as the root from which
Israel has sprung, is in these
terms limited in its vision. For
once again, it is not individual
Jews who are the issue, but
Judaism.
Reasons Rabbi Jakobovits:
Israel must transcend this
brooding existential egotism
Israel must become the core of
the noblest Jewish virtues in the
prophetic tradition. Only in this
way can Israel rise above the
view of itself as a perennial
refugee camp and achieve the
status of keeper of the key to the
Eternal Jew.
THERE IS no doubt that this
makes eminently good sense -
except that in Rabbi Jakob<>\ 11 a
view of Israel as the instrument
of Jewish prophetic virtue, he
errs.
For it was the Prophet Nathan
who first warned the Jews
against nationhood, pointing out
Continued on Page 1-
Our Obligation to Affirmative Action
Friday, August 17,1979
Volume 8
24 AB 5739
Number 17
Way back in 1971. Marco
DeFunis, a member of a
Sephardic Jewish family and a
Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the
University of Washington, was
turned down when he applied for
admission to that Seattle in-
stitution's law school. He was
admitted to four other law
schools, but his alma mater was
his top choice; and his fight to
get in eventually reached the
Supreme Court.
Many folks sensed anti-Jewish
leanings in the DeFunis case;
others said, oh, no, the
University of Washington was
just trying to make it easier for
blacks to become lawyers. In any
event, Justice William O.
Douglas pushed the legal button
that gave a victory of sorts to
young DeFunis.
THIS ALL LEFT a cloud of
ambiguity hanging over the issue
of justice in college admissions.
And matters drifted along until a
year ago when the Supreme
Court handed down a sharply
divided ruling in the famous
Allan Bakke case. That time
around, the Court upheld con-
sideration of race in school entry
programs while at the same time
ordering Bakke, who is white,
admitted to the University of
California Medical School at
Davis where he is currently
trudging along towards his
degree
Just as the DeFunis case left
shadows of uncertainty, so did
Bakke. The Jewish community
by and large hailed the Bakke
decision as a blow at college
quotas while continuing to
subscribe to the important
principle of affirmative action.
Robert
Segal
The Black community was
understandably upset by the
Bakke decision. Dr. Alvin
Poussaint, Harvard professor of
psychiatry and a prominent
member of the Black community,
complained: "Legally, I think it
(the Bakke ruling) is going to
open a Pandora's box; it invites a
testing of affirmative action
programs all over the place."
BUT NOW with the decisive 5-
to-2 ruling by the Supreme Court
in the case of Brian Webber vs.
the Kaiser Aluminum and
Chemical Company, we have
moved away from the important
but somewhat circumscribed area
of discrimination in education to
the much broader issue of
discrimination in employment.
The DeFunis and Bakke cases
impinged upon the destinies of
several hundred thousand; the
Webber case packs a message to
millions of workers and many,
many employers.
At issue in the Webber case
was Webber's complaint that the
Kaiser Company, in selecting
candidates to train employes for
upgrading, ignored Webber's
seniority by using a racial quota.
That the case originated in
Louisiana, where equality was
long consigned to the dungeon,
complicated the issue.
Moreover, it appeared rather
certain that the Kaiser Loui
plant, taking on the hue of the
immediate environment, had
indulged in bias against Blacks
CONFRONTED by such
factors, steeped in doubt, the
American Jewish Congress and
the American Jewish Committee
decided to sit out the Webber
case. (Both agencies had filed
briefs in the Bakke case.) The
Anti-Defamation League, which
had also been active in the Bakke
case, filed in support of Webber;
and, judging by early reports of
reactions to the 5-to-2 ruling, the
ADL is unhappy about the
outcome.
Not so the Black community,
certain sectors of organized labor,
and a number ol governmental
units. The dismay of the ADL
folks is understandable: they fear
a rebirth of a drive for quotas.
Actually, many who have
fought for equality of op-
portunity for years are not too
upset, indeed rather encouraged
by the Court's Webber ruling.
They feel confident that neither
Chief Justice Burger's nor
Justice Rehnquist's negative
branding of their judicial
brothers as "escape artists such
as Houdini" will endure the test
of time.
RATHER THEY take heart
from the fact that Justice Black-
manno fiery liberalwas with
the majority. Even more to
delight is the decision of the
majority to sound a clear call for
"employers and unions to self-
examine and to self-evaluate their
employment practices and to
endeavor to eliminate, so far as
Continued on Page 12


y, August 17,1979
ifo j'eibiSn fiShaiafi'df u tea ftrtdrt uhudetauu:
Pntwm 11 I
Young, Old Enjoy Inter-generational Shabbat
Fifty of the youngest members of the more than 300
children attending the Bret Day Camp activity on the Perlman
Campus of the. Jewish Community Center of Greater Fort
Lauderdale greeted a group of JCC Senior Adults for the "first
time ever inter generational Oneg Shabbat.
On the afternoon of Friday, Aug. 3, in the shade of trees on
the campus of the former Florida Air Academy at 6500 Sunrise
Blvd., the 3'/j to 5-year-olds came trooping in led by Penny
Rubin, unit head.
And naturally, the first order of business was benching
licht (blessing over the Sabbath candles), the moUi (blessing
over the chaUah). and the brey pree-hagufen (san edification of
the wine). Then songs, dances, and a skit portraying the
preparation for a Shabbat family dinner with guests, and once
again, these little ones recited their blessings in Hebrew praising
God for light, the fruit of the earth, and fruit of the vine.
Day Camp Director Selma Telles and Helen Nathan,
coordinator of adult activities for JCC, which is a major con-
stituent agency of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, collaborated with Penny Rubin in the Oneg
Shabbat program. Penny had the full cooperation of her
counselors, junior counselors, and counselors-in-training in the
rehearsals the youngsters had in preparation for the event.
It was a tremendous highlight for the Day Camps first year
on the Perlman Campus. The Camp will have its closing
ceremonies on Friday, Aug. 17, and begin making preparations
for its second year beginning at the start of summer in 1980.
wor'
Preparing to light candles (left to right}: David Habib, CIT; Sol Simon I the Hebrew prompter
who said the kids didn't need prompting), Linda Kaufman, counselor, and the children:
Rebecca Propis, Shana Sachs, Gabe Lembeck, Martin Schwartz, Sheri Galin.
Oneg Shabbat dancers observed by junior counselor Snari
Zimmerman with Stacy Frank providing guitar accompaniment
for Eric Pressman, Jennifer Salame, Joshua Dubin, Sherri
Riefs, Eric Feinberg.

J.i
Setting the table for Shabbat dinner: "Mama" Meredith Baker
with "daughters" Kimberley Dachelet, Audrey Halpern and
" Robyn Lyn Herbert.
Among those standing in back of the children as they prepare to recite the "motzi" are Debbie
Citrin, junior counselor, Hope Plevy, CIT, and Sol Simon. The children (left to right) are Lee
Israch, Madelyn Trumpkin, Michelle Coudin, Jill Kopelowitz, Maria Bernstein, Robyn Lieb-
man, Paul Greenspan, Kevin Davis, and Benjamin Glazier.
Hi
Preparing for the Shabbat]
dinner, "Mama" and daugh-\
ters Kimberley Dachelet and]
Audrey Halpern go to the\
Fish Market run by Craig]
Hoffman.
Grandpa and Poppa, who
arrived early for the Shabbat
dinner, were directed to take
their pipes and go to the back
room to wait for the guests.
The "actors": Jonathan Barr
(left) and Brian Bomberg.
, And among the audience, more youngsters and some of the senior adults, each
of whom is scheduled to receive gifts made in the arts and crafts sessions of the
JCC Day Camp.
And still more of the youngsters and more of the adults who enjoyed the
thrilling experience of hearing blessings in Hebrew "out of the mouth of
babes," plus singing, dancing, and a skit.



Page6
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 17,1979
At extreme left is Yossi Dagan, the articulate, experienced guide, who helped
make the Mission for Greater Fort Lauderdale's Young Leaders of the Jewish
Federation so tremendously thrilling. The State of Israel flag flies high over the
military outpost overlooking Syna with the United Natwns Force ma camp be-
tween Israel and Syria. The Young Leaders meet a Bedouin who sells ndes on
his camel, and that's Nina Nemerofsky enjoying the ride aboard a dromedary.
A Hassid heading for The Western Wall (left photo). In the center is a view of
the restored Old Jewish Synagogue in the Old Jewish Quarter near the Wall
And at the right is a picture of the Young Leaders leaving the Dome of the
Rock, the Temple of Islam, where Mohammed, legend says, rose to heaven.
Incredible Experience in an Incredible Land9
Continued from Page 1
Other highlights:
t Riding the cable car to the
top of Masada to view the ruins
of the area where the zealots,
after withstanding the on-
slaughts of Roman Legions for
three years, committed mass
suicide rather than submit to
capture, torture and degradation
by the Roman Legionnaires;
0 A poignant, solemn visit to
Yad Vashem, the Memorial to the
Six Million, where the Young
Leaders participated in a special
Yizkor service in memory of the
heroes and martyrs of the
Holocaust;
And like a page out of
history books, meeting with
ultra-Orthodox Jews in the Mea
Shearim section of Jerusalem;
Continuing on the northern
outposts of the Golan Heights,
overlooking the Syrian city of
Kunetra, where the flag of Israel
flies high over the rugged land
defended by young members of
the Israel Defense Force.
Bill to Seize Bedouin Land Passes
By OIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A controversial bill that
would allow the govern-
ment to seize some 40,000
acres of Bedouin lands in
the Negev without the right
of appeal passed its first
reading in the Knesset by a
vote of 46-44. But the nar-
row margin was a disap-
pointment to coalition
leaders who had hoped for a
broad consensus on the
issue in view of the strong
internal and international
criticism of the measure.
The opposition was led by the
Labor Alignment which had been
importuned by Finance Minister
Simcha Ehrlich and Justice
Minister Shmuel Tamir at
meetings at least to abstain if it
could not support the bill.
THE LANDS in question are
needed for the construction of one
of three U.S.-financed air bases to
replace those Israel will give up
in Sinai Under the terms of the
Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty the
bases must be completed within
three years.
For that reason, the govern-
ment-sponsored bill bans the
right of the Bedouins to appeal
the confiscation of their land to
Israeli courts, a process that
could seriously delay work on the
airfields. The Bedouins would be
offered compensation, however,
and the right to appeal if they
consider the offer to be in-
sufficient.
Members of the Labor Align-
ment's Knesset faction met
several times with Ehrlich and
Tamir and caucused among
themselves. While the top party
leaders Shimon Peres, Yitzhak
Rabin and Yigal Allon favored
abstention, they were overruled
by junior MKs. The Labor
faction voted 19-7 against ab-
stention and as a result the party
opposed the bill en bloc
IT CAME to a vote after the
coalition and opposition factions
failed to agree on a compromise
which would have postponed
Knesset action while a more
moderate version of the bill was
worked out with Bedouin par-
ticipation.
The Labor Alignment did not
question the need for the lands
but felt that the new measure was
too arbitrary and that the issue
could be resolved within existing
legislation covering land ex-
propriation.
Ehrlich aruged that "supreme
defense necessity" and a desire
not to jeopardize the peace treaty
were the only reasons the govern-
ment presented the bill. He noted
that uninhabited lands were
selected for two of the projected
air bases but the third, in the
opinion of military experts, had
Texas Dispute Over
to be located in the Tel Malhata
area south of Beersheba,
inhabited by about 6,000
Bedouins.
THE BILL provides that the
State will acquire title to the
lands specified on the date the
law takes effect. The inhabitants
would be given three months to
evacuate and tum over the land
to the State. The measure was
sent to the Knesset Foreign
Affairs and Security Committee
for further discussion. The
Kiwrapt. which adjourned for
summer recess Aug 1. may be
called back into special session
for the required second and third
readings of the bill.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) A
dispute at the University of
Texas in Austin between the
school's History Department and
its Center for Middle Eastern
Studies over the appointment of
an Israeli-born historian has been
settled with the Israeli joining
the university' faculty for the
1980 spring term, the American
Jewish Committee reported.
Sheba Mittelman, a member of
the AJCommittee's special
programs department, said that
Abraham Marcus, a 31-year-old
Tel Aviv University graduate
now completing work on a
Doctorate at Columbia
University, will join the
university's history faculty and
will he listed in the catalogue of
the Mideast Center. She said that
Marcus, whose field is modern
Arab history, is satisfied with the
outcome and will go to Austin in
January.
THE DISPUTE began when
the History Department, which
was asked by the Center to find a
historian to be jointly appointed
by the department and the
Center, recommended Marcus.
The Center, which is partially
funded by Arab governments,
said Marcus was not qualified.
The departmt.it said Marcus,
was a qualified scholar of great
promise. Marcus never par-
ticipated in the public dispute
about the appointment which
broke out last May.
The AJCommittee has been
monitoring the dispute. Its
special programs department,
headed by Ira Silverman, last
March proposed guidelines for
American colleges and univer-
sities receiving funds from
foreign sources, especially Arab
countries. The Center reportedly
receives about $100,000 a year
from Arab governments.
And then across the land to
northernmost sector of Israel
where the fence separates Israel
from Lebanon but where the
barrier, now re-named "Good
Fence," has a gate permitting
Lebanese Arabs to enter Israel.
Here the group saw Israel's
humanitarian efforts to aid those
Arabs by providing jobs in shops
in M etui la and other com-
munities nearby, by giving
medical aid to those in need, and
other services.
Meeting new Russian and
South American immigrants at
un Absorption Center learning
meeting other newcomers settled
in .1 new town in the Upper
(jliKv.
And enjoying the home
hospitality of Kibbutz members
and then staying overnight at the
famed Ayelet Hashachar Kibbutz
Guest House on the Sea of
Galilee.
With Johl Rotman of Coral
Springs, was his wife, Jane; also
Ronald and Jane Shagrin, and
Chuck and Greta Sussman, Fort
Lauderdale; Gil and Nedra
Friedman, Melvin and Joyce
Jarolem, Harry and Leona
Levey, and Stephen and Nina
Nemerofsky, all of Plantation.
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THREE ELEVATORS* POOL


Page 14
Page 16
The Jewish Floridian ofGreater Fort Lauderdale
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jtf.1879
Friday, August 17,1979
i
i

r
!
;
(
i
I
I
c
Arab Invasion
Continued from Pag* 14
the globe like some enormously
complex elecrical schematic,
wiring the continents together.
Outling the delicate and color-
fully intricate structure through
which the black viscous blood of
industrialized civilization flows.
From the desert kingdoms of the
Middle East to the refineries and
factories and gas pumps of the
rest of the world.
BLUESUIT LEANS across
the map, ignoring the cigarette
ash that begins collecting in the
area of Australia. "This," he
says, tapping to indicate the
entire surface of the world, "is
the new strategy map for the
Mideast War.
"Journalists and the general
electorate of America have failed
to comprehend that there has
been a genuine revolution in the
world since 1973," he continued.
"We have experienced a drastic
change in the definition of the
basic units of monetary value and
a radical alteration in the
previous-recognized concepts of
international 'power.'"
"In effect, the Western in-
dustrialized societies which ruled
the world in 1972 have been
transformed into revenue-
producing colonies of the Arab
world in 1979. This reality has
not yet been throughly absorbed
by the general c'tizenry or
political machinery of our
country. It is not a concept that
the traditional American psyche
can readily tolerate.
"WE HAVE also seen the
evolution of a new kind of warfare
that you might term 'econo-
conflict," in which one national
group battles another without
ever firing a shot. Sure, economic
measures of one form or another
have always been a part of
modern war. But not quite like
this. The billions of dollars worth
of various Arab transactions in
America you asked me about
earlier are only one portion of a
larger picture. The Arab nations
have spread out to use the entire
planet as a strategy board on
which they plan to settle their
border dispute with Israel. In
short, what they failed to do in
the desert with their tank
charges, they are now attempting
to do in board rooms and
brokerage houseswith their
petrodollars.
"You're too young to
remember, but just prior to
World War II, there was a
controversy over the question of
using airplanes and aircraft
carriers as primary weapons of
war. It had never been done and
Americans did not want to think
about the crazy idea that ships
with airplanes on top of them
could be major weapon of war.
It was too unusual a thought. So
for years, while the controversy
continued, we did nothing. We
sat there, confident in our own
battleships and watched the
horizon for the enemy battleships
to comebecause that is how
war had always come in the past.
Then, at Pearl Harbor, in the
space of a few hours, a handful of
planes bombed the hell out of us.
We were forced to take notice of
the fact that the art of war had
changed, and battleships did not
matter so much any longer. You
see, it took a catastrophe to bring
home that simple realization.
"THIS IS SIMILAR to what's
happening in Washington right
now. The old heads of the Jewish
movement down here insist on
thinking in old terms. In effect,
they are stul watching the
horizon for the next wave of Arab
tanks to come. That is how war
has always happened in the
Mideast. But that is now how the
Arabs are operating any longer.
Now they are attacking with
money.
"The influential American
Jews with whom I deal on a
regular basis seem to dwell on the
old vision: Israel has little to
worry about because it has
proved its invincibility in tank
battles, muzzle-to-muzzle, time
and time again. Their primary
concern here is to make sure that
Israel receives enough new tanks
and other hardware. Quite
frankly, I've been amazed by
their inability as a group to see
that they are now engaged in a
war of nozzles, rather then
muzzles: the nozzles on every
gasoline pump in America. I'm
not being at all facetious when I
suggest that the ultimate fate of
Israel may well be determined on
the freeways of Los Angeles or
the New Jersey Turnpike.
"If I were Jewish and felt a
deep personal attachment to
Israel as it now exists, I'd be
pretty damned worried about this
country's devil-may-care attitude
about energy. The Arabs have
used our own money each one of
us gave it to them when we filled
our cars with gasoline to
acquire the new position of power
and influence from which they are
subtly changing American at-
titudes about Israel."
Rolling up the map, Bluesuit
reached inside a desk drawer and
handed his visitor a manila folder
whose contents he characterized
as "a little more food for
thought."
INSIDE THE FOLDER were
the results of a national Gallup
poll conducted within the last
year. The poll surveyed American
attitudes about Arabs and Israel.
The report showed that 42
percent of the Americans sur-
veyed were more sympathetic to
\
the Arabs than they had been a
year before.
During the same year, 34
percent of the Americans sur-
veyed had become less sym-
pathetic toward Israel.
As this series concludes,
events and changes continue with
lightning speed across the Middle
East. Two disturbing
newspaper stories appeared
within a single week:
WASHINGTON D.C.A
Senate report drawing on sub-
poenaed oil company documents
concludes that Saudi Arabis will
limit its oil production in the
1980s to not more than 12 million
barrels a dava level so low it
could possibly touch off 'a fierce
political and economic struggle'
among the consuming countries.
(The present daily production
'In Idaho, a state
known for tx-
poding grain si-
Jo*, rural farm.
land and baking
potatoes, the
Arabs are estab-
lishing a political
beachhead.'
level stands at an alarming eight
and one-half million barrels.)
RIYADH Crown Prince
Fahd, long identified by Ameri-
can ambassadors and policy-
makers as the key to stability
and stronger U. S. ties to Saudi
Arabia, is yielding much of his
power to other members of the
Saudi royal family, according to
U. S. intelligence reports.
The causes of Fahd's declining
influence still are not clear to
U.S. analysts. But the decline
has suddently become a major. <
preoccupation for the Carter
administration, which fears that
the Fahd problem may be part of
a potential crisis in Saudi
leadership that could vitally
threaten the most fundamental
and basic premises of the U.S.
foreign and energy policy.
Fxpo Maq.uine
r'WWj'.
We do business
the right way.
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Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33311
Phone:735-1330
OAKLAND TOYOTA
SHEEN'S
That outrageously rich
Swensen'i Ice
FT. LAUDERDALE, 2477 E. SunrlM Blvfl
PLANTATION. In the naw Broward Mall
HOLLYWOOD, Hollywood Blvd. at 48th Ava
VERO BEACH. 1902 South Fadaral Hwy.
LIGHT HOUSE POINT 9000 N. Federal Hwy
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1970 P. J Reynold! Tobacco Co.
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Deiermined
Thai Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
"3 mg "Uf.0.9mg.nicotm per oownt.rTC Repoii MAY 78
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