The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00140

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
jMmm ~(r.~t*r Fnrt I^auderdale

"'
^Jewish Floridii&m
rVolume 8 Number 15
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, July 20,1979
Price 35 Cents
Arab Takeover
How America
Is Losing
[The Quiet War
By HOAG LEVINS
This is a story about a loud
| peace and a quiet war.
It is the lengthy, complex tale
I of a six-year effort by more than a
dozen Arab nations to fashion a
new ultimate weapon. The story
of a continuing battle for annihil-
ation of a Jewish State in the
Middle East. The account of a
soundless offensive that jeopar-
dizes the safety and well-being of
1200 million Americans.
That ultimate Arab weapon
I has now been perfected. And
I even as the world has been
celebrating the Israeli-Egyptian
I peace engineered by Jimmy
Carter, its full force has been
I positioned and detonated.
THAT WEAPON is money:
unlimited petrobillions now being
used in a secret, organized cam-
paign that has already over-
turned the world's monetary
system; revolutionized
traditional concepts of inter-
I national battle and accomplished
[the most drastic realignment of
I world power since World War II.
That campaign employing a
potent, seven-pronged oper-
ational strategy inside the United
[States has directly involved
[every American as an unwitting
pawn on a global Arab battle
[board where every move has one
[initial goal: the breakdown of the
[American support that has
(i nabled Israel to withstand three
decades of Arab ground and air
attacks.
A good place to start the story
is amid the gaudily-colored col-
lection of circus tents which were
stretched across the lawns of the
White House on Mar. 26. There,
thousands of revelers and cele-
brants pranced before the TV
cameras to declare peace and sit
down to a feast of steak and
champagne.
BUT THOSE TV cameras did
not show the entire story of the
day to their audiences around the
world. They did not show how
two of the private firms Chase
Manhattan and the Bank of
America which donated funds
for that peace banquet have been
serving as willing and creative
partners in the revolutionary
form of secret warfare first un-
leashed back in 1973.
They did not show how the
brother, best friend and various
Continued on Page 11
Young Leaders Mission in Israel
The happy group pictured above is part of the
Young Leadership Mission that left for Israel on
July 5. The young leaders left Fort Lauderdale
Airport for New York, where they boarded an El
Al 747 for the trip to Ben-Gurion Airport.
Kenneth Bierman, Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale campaign director,
pictured in the front row, is leading the Mission
which will span a 10-day period.
The itinerary includes Jerusalem, where the
group participated in a Kabbalat Shabbat at the
Western Wall on the evening they arrived;
Massada, Yad Vashem, the Allenby Bridge,
Golan Heights and an overnight stay at a kib-
butz.
In addition, the Mission will visit the Good
Fence along the Lebanese border, Akko, to see
the underground excavations, Haifa, Caesarea,
and Tel Aviv. The southern tour includes
Ashkelon, the Gaza Strip and a visit to a Moshav.
Johl Rotman and Ronald Shagrin are co-
chairmen of the tour, sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of Fort Lauderdale.
Sale Day Plans Progress
"Plans are progressing at a
rapid clip for our gala Richards
WECARE Day Sale on
Thursday. Aug. 9," said Anne
Fleischman, chairperson for the
sale day.
"We have scheduled a
motorcade for Wednesday, Aug.
8. that will cover virtually all of
north Broward County," added
Mrs. Fleischman.
The route for the parade, which
begins at 11 a.m. at Lauderhill
Mall, will cover Coral Springs.
Century Village, Margate,
Tamarac. and Lauderdale Lakes.
The mayors of each city will
participate in the motorcade.
Day Camp Offers Fun, Learning
The new Perlman Campus,
[located on Sunrise Boulevard, in
Plantation, is bustling with
[activity five days each week, as
the JCC Day Camp reaches the
[half-way mark in its first season
I on the new site.
Over 300 children from all
[parts of north Broward are en-
uoying the wholesome activities
(which are carefully planned for
each age group, ranging from pre-
schoolers to tweens.
The camp, which opened on
June 18, continues through Aug.
17, 'Monday through Friday from
9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
The varied Day Camp program
includes nature studies, Israeli
programs, arts and crafts,
gymnastics, music, swimming
and all sorts of athletic events.
Swimming instruction is a must
for all campers, and progress
thus far has been excellent.
The senior counselors are
mostly school teachers and
college students, while the junior
counselors are high school seniors
and juniors. The overall staff is
mature and highly capable in
their task for assuring each child
a summer of fun and learning.
Selma Telles, Day Camp director, checks the day's activities
with Ed Basan, JCC physical education director, and Rick
Fisher, right.
?un in the fresh air and sunshine. Looks like a photo finish.
Quotable Quotes
Israel alone is called upon for a traumatic surgical ex-
perience, required to dismantle naval installations, uproot
airfields, give up direct access to an oil supply, remove settlers
from new and cherished homes and renounce the strategic depth
on which we have largely relied for a sense of security over the
past 11 years We are prepared to make those sacrifices
because of the immense benefits involved. The "price of peace"
can never reach such dimensions as to equal the smallest
fraction of war's deadly cost.
ABBA S. EBAN



Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 20,
At Day Care Center
time of the year. The party wa
enhanced by parfaits, donated 1
Marty Steinberg, owner of tl
Carvel Ice Cream Store
The WECARE
program, which
WECARE Sponsors Holiday Party
Tamarac
'The children enjoyed the
program, and the women had
volunteer
in three years
has become a most important
agency in helping others in the
North Broward area, does not
limit its services to the elderly
nor does it service only Jewish
individuals or groups.
The program is non-sectarian
in scope and, as an example of the
varied activities the program
affords, WECARE sponsored a
party for 55 underprivileged
children at the Carver Ranches
Day Care Center on July 3.
The center, located at 4033 SW
22nd St. Hollywood, is under the
directorship of Fay Marsh
Lowery. Children at the center
range in age from two to six
years.
The Lime Bay Knitters, under
the direction of Ida Steiner,
knitted dolls, clowns and animals
out of brightly colored yarn.
Instead of distributing these
Pictured above at the Carver Ranches Day Care Center program are, from left, Ida Speigel,
Faye Lowery, director of the center, Sally Rodin, WECARE chairman, Ida Steiner, Sylvia
Keller and Anne Braverman.
JCC Has BETA Jobs Still Unfilled
Unemployment may be a
problem to some Broward
County residents, but it can also
be a problem for employers that
have positions going vacant.
County Commissioner Jack
Moss, who is the county's
representative on the Broward
Employment and Training
Administration (BETA), recently
heard this complaint from Sid
Elk man. the chairman in charge
of planning and construction for
the new Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Community Center on
West Sunrise Boulevard.
The Community Center was
recently purchased from Florida
Air Academy, and Elkman and
the board of directors of the
Jewish Community Center are
..tempting to complete con-
' struction and renovations as soon
as possible They recently
received a grant from BETA for
nine positions to train individuals
in building painting and
maintenance. Only two of the
spots, however, have been filled
as of this week.
"Sid Elkman is eminently
qualified to be representing the
Jewish community on this im-
Art Instruction
Offered at JCC
Helen Nathan, Jewish Com-
munity Center adult program co-
ordinator, has announced the
continuation of the art instruc-
tion sessions at "The Gathering
Place" with Sharon Muraskin.
The seven sessions are
scheduled for Thursday after-
noons from 1:30 3:30 at 8765
NW 57th St., Tamarac.
Nathan also reminds theater
buffs that all tickets for the two
performances of "Fiddler on the
Roof," Aug. 12 at Fort Lauder-
dale High School are selling
briskly. Call the JCC for reserved
tickets.
portent project," Moss said.
"Elkman is a retired engineer and
builder from up north, so he is
more than just a volunteer leader
of this construction project,"
Moss added.
Individuals looking for
training positions to become
painters or permanent main-
tenance personnel can apply at
the BETA office at: 330 North
Andrews Avenue, Fort
Lauderdale, Florida, or at the
State Employment Services
located at: 105 East Broward
Boulevard, Fort Lauderdale,
Florida. These training positions
have a starting salary in excess of
$6,000 a year and for the right
people, could lead to a permanent
position.
Planning A Trip?
i
I
JCC Offers Tours
Of New Campus
The Jewish Community Center
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, in an
effort to acquaint the Jewish
community with all of the facil-
ities available at the new Perlman
Campus, located on Sunrise
Blvd.. Plantation, has
inaugurated a program of weekly
tours. Tours will be conducted
every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to
noon.
The JCC will offer a host of
programs for all age groups,
starting in September. The Day
Camp is currently in its first
season on the new site. The
HELP WANTED
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED TO TEACH ENGLISH
TO THE RESETTLED RUSSIAN FAMILIES.
EVENINGS AT THE JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE,
3600 N. STATE ROAD 7 (441).
IF YOU CAN SPARE AN EVENING OR TWO
A WEEK, CALL SHELLY SOLOMON AT
763-6340
| Council's 197S Exciting Travel I
' Program to Israel, Europe, West "
| Coast, Canadian Rockies and |
Alaska Is now available. f
I NATIONAL COUNCIL I
| OF JEWISH WOMEN j
I Call j
| DOROTHY KLEIN-7414742 j
i----------------------------1
Hebrew Day School will move
into its new quarters in time for
the new school year in Sep-
tember.
Victor Gruman, patron
membership chairman, invites
the community to participate in
the patron program at an annual
membership of $500. These mem-
bers will, by their generosity
help provide services for those
unable to pay their share of the
cost. Anyone interested in be-
coming a patron is urged to
contact Sandy Jackowitz at 792
6700.
MEMBERSHIP RATES
PATRON ..........................................$500
Contributing membership. Helps provide services
for those unable to pay their share of
the cost.
SUSTAINING......................................$250
FAMILY...........................................$175
Includes dependent children to age 22.
SINGLE PARENT FAMILY...................... $125
Includes dependent children to age 22.
FAMILY WITH NO CHILDREN .....................$150
SENIOR ADULT COUPLE ..........................$65
Applies when one member is 60 or over.
SENIOR ADULT SINGLE............................$35
60 years or over.
SINGLE ADULT...................................$115
22 to 59 years.
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewish tradition
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Si nee 1935, these pol icies have been
our assurance to a family of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
Miami Beach/ Miami/ North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft. Lauderdale (Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
Riverside


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Memorial Chacfi. Inc / Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Kenneth M. Kay / ArthurGrossberg/ Joseph Rubin


e r* ___D~_ I M*tAv*iml*
Friday, July 20,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale

Page 3
Plight
of
Ida Nudel
We are reprinting the statement made on the floor of the House
of Representatives by Edward J. Stack, representative to the
Congress, Broward County.
Congressional Tttcord
PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES Of THI
06*
CONGRESS, HRST SESSION
Vl. m WASHINGTON, THURSDAY, JUNB 21, 1979
N.. $}
House of Representatives
BUST ANNIVERSARY OF IDA NU-
DEL 8 TRIAL ON JUNE 11
HON. EDWARD J. STACK
IN THI HOUSE OF RXPRXSINTATIVEfa
Thwday, June it, 197f
Ui. STACK. Mr. Speaker, an of the
nation* which signed the Helsinki Final
Act. Including the Soviet Union, pledged
to do everything possible to reunite f nml-
Uesseparted by political boundaries.
Because the Soviet Union Is not living
up to that promise. I would like to bring
to the attention of my colleagues the
plight of Ida Nudel, on the first anni-
versary of her trial and sentencing. Ida
Nudel was the "guardian angel" to the
prisoners of conscience Inside the Soviet
Union until she herself became a prison-
er of conscience last summer. On June 21,
1978, Nudel was sentenced to 4 years of
internal exile in Siberia for "malicious
hooliganism" after unfurling a banner
with the words "KOB glva me a visa."
For Ida, the commitment to emigrate
to Israel has become deeper and deeper
and her work on behalf of other "Prison-
ers of zion" has made her greatly loved
and respected. David Chemoglag, who
served $ years in a strict regime labor
camp, said of her when she arrived in
Israel: "The one person above all others
who helped to keep up morale and who
constantly helped with letters and par-
cels, the person rated by all to be a super-
human angel, is Ida Nudel."
Such work In the face of considerable
KGB harassment and Intimidation takes
Its toll Ida's sister. Elena, recently point-
ed out that when she last saw her sister
In 1(72, she was a strong young woman
Now she has heart trouble.
In October 1073 Ida discovered that
she was being "treated" for alcoholism
and not for her heart condition, as she
was led to believe when she acciden-
tally saw her medical chart at the 89th
Volgord District Clinic. Ida does not
drink at all.
Thirty-five Moscow Jews protested to
the head of the KOB. Yuri Andropov, on
Ida's behalf: 'the officials of the
KOB are fabricating, with the assistance
of the physicians of polycllnlc No. 89.
a false charge against Ida Nudel. calling
her an alcoholic In order to carry out
a lawless reprisal against her. Such an
absurd accusation shows very clearly the
aspiration of the KOB to present the
Jews, who have been demanding permis-
sion to go to Israel for a long time, in
an amoral and antisocial light" Attempts
to discredit Ida continue with the latest
threats by Soviet authorities.
This callous Soviet disregard for basic
human rights and the terms of the Hel-
sinki agreement is intolerable. We In the
Congress must do all we can to exert
pressure on the Soviet Government so
that one day soon Ida Nudel, and the
thousands of other Soviet Jews, can be
reunited with their famlles .
DEERFIELD BEACH -.
Four Broward County high
school seniors have been named
recipients of the Ed Kromer
Memorial Scholarship Fund,
Florida Atlantic Builders Asso-
ciation (FABA) officials an-
nounced.
This marks the second straight
year FABA has awarded scholar-
ships to graduating seniors in the
Broward and Palm Beach area.
Winners this year were:
Amanda Monroe, Coconut
Creek High School, $1,500. Ms.
Monroe will be attending Florida
State University.
John Weiss, valedictorian of
Deerfield Beach High School,
$1,000. Weiss will be attending
Dartmouth University.
L. J. Pertesis, Coral Springs
High School, $1,000. He will be
attending Georgia Institute of
Technology.
Janice Crowe, co-valedictorian
of Pompano Beach High School,
$600. She will be attending the
University of Notre Dame.
The scholarships were pre-
sented by R. Bowen Gilleapie at
FABA'9 general membership
meeting held at Crystal Lago
Country Club in Pompano Beach.
Family Brought to Freedom
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale,
through its Russian Reset-
tlement Program, brought the
sixth Russian Jewish family to
this community since the
program began in January of this
year.
The program, totally funded
by Federation, works in
cooperation with HIAS in
bringing the families to this
community, and with Jewish
Family Service agency, which
works directly with the Russians
once they arrive.
The Ayzenberg family is the
latest arrival, being greeted on
June 29 at the Fort Lauderdale
Airport after a flight from New
York City. The Ayzenbergs lived
in Odessa; which they left on
April 18 for Vienna. They spent
two months in Rome before
coming to the United States.
Valery Ayzenberg, 37, was
employed as a welder and
plumber in the Soviet Union
while his wife, Albina is a
hairdresser. Thirteen-year-old
Igor will be enrolled in Nova
Middle School in September, and
Valery's mother, Mrs. Yevgenia
Ayzenberg, 60, is retired.
The family will reside in
Inverness Village, an apartment
complex in Lauderhill, where all
of the Russian families live.
Posing shortly after their arrival in Fort Lauderdale is the
Ayzenberg family. Pictured from left, Sy Vinocur who acted as
interpreter, Mrs. Yevgenia Ayzenberg, Albina, Valery and
Igor, and Leon Messing, chairman of the Federation's Russian
Resettlement Program. ,
Temple Emanu-El Names Rabbi
Rabbi Jeffrey L. Ballon will
join Temple Emanu-El of Fort
Lauderdale, 3245 W. Oakland
Park Boulevard, as the new
religious leader on July 20, and
will conduct Sabbath Eve ser-
vices at the temple every Friday
beginning J uly 27, at 8:15 p. m.
Rabbi Ballon comes to Temple
Emanu-El from Temple Beth
Jacob in Pontiac, Mich He has
also served congregations in New
York, Connecticut and Texas.
A native of Biloxi, Miss.,
Rabbi Ballon was a National
Merit Scholar semi-finalist. He
received his bachelor's degree
from Brown University. Rabbi
Ballon continued his education at
the Hebrew Union College-Jew-
ish Institute of Religion at both
the Cincinnati and New York
campuses and brings with him 14
years of experience in the rab-
binate
He has been active in many
community organizations, and
also served as a part-time
military chaplain; he holds the
rank of captain in the U.S. Army
Reserves.
Rabbi Ballon believes the
presence of the Jewish spiritual
leader in the community is
beneficial to both the Jewish
members of the community and
the community members at
large; and he is interested in
creative and diverse program-
ming in order to bring a sense of
purpose and activity to both the
Jewish and general community.
Rabbi Ballon will lead Temple
Emanu-El for a minimum of two
years. He replaces Dr. Sanford
M. Shapero, who has joined the
administrative staff of the City of
Hope.
Rabbi Ballon is 37 years old, is
married and has two children.
DID YOU KNOW:
Some 193,000 Jews have
come out of the Soviet Union
since the early 1970s;
140,000 of them have gone to
Israel and most of the rest to
the United States.

Women's Division Mission
Come fly with us to our past, present and future join the
UJA National Women's Division Mission to Rumania and
Israel. Spend three days touring the joint Distribution Com-
mittee institutions and the shtetls of our forefathers. Next stop
our present and future Israel the proposed itinerary is
three days in Netanya on the Mediterranean, then on to the
King David in Jerusalem seeing Israel as one can only see it
through a UJA Mission. We will be gone from Oct. 15 28,1979.
The cost is $1,982.00 inclusive from Fort Lauderdale. Any
questions, more information, please call the Federation office
and ask for Jan Salit, Director, Women's Division at 484-8200.
On June 24, groundbreaking ceremonies were held at the site of
the new Margate Jewish Center at the intersection of Rock
Island Road and Royal Palm Boulevard in Margate. Several
hundred people attended Shown in photo is the temple's rabbi,
j Dr. Solomon Geld, delivering the sermon. Pictured (left to
right) are Harry Hirsch, temple first vice president and chair-
man of building committee; Sidney Brown, temple past
president and master of ceremonies; Rabbi Geld; George
Liederman, mayor of Margate; Emanuel Schwartz, current
temple president. Construction will start in a week or two by
Fisher-Payne Construction Co.
FABA Awards Four Scholarships
PLAN
TODAY
FOR
TOMORROW
Provide for Jewish
continuity and support
life giving programs
in Israel through
a bequest or deferred
trust to HADASSAH
*3SSaK!%
For more information write:
Hadassah Wills-* Bequests
50 West 58th Street
New York, NY. 10019
Telephone: (212) 355-7900
ojvlenoiah CtjapeJS.
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ready to serve.
A funeral requires every convenience and consideration available
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Knowing that Menorah Chapels are close by, in three prime
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 20,1979
The Statute Victory
The debate in Germany over eliminating the
Statute of Limitations on war crimes was long and
hard, and now there are congratulations rolling into
Bonn from around the world that, finally, the
Government has done the "right thing."
We are, of course, delighted that closeted Nazi
criminals will not now be able to come out into the
light of day with arrogant impunity, immune as of
January, 1980 from punishment until the end of their
unnatural lives.
In this sense, the Bonn victory is laudable. It
demonstrates the Federal Republic's determination
that its post-war, 30-year-young democracy, the
strongest and ablest in the European community,
will not flinch from past history.
Much has been spoken of in the past about West
Germany's indifference to war criminals in its midst,
but somehow we manage to overlook the landmark
sentencing in Frankfurt at the end of June of an
Erwin Schoenborn, for example, a leading neo-Nazi
activist to 18 months in prison. Or of life sentences in
Hamburg now being demanded for one Viktor Araja,
a former SS major of the Nazi Latvian Legion, and
Walter Knopp in Cologone, a former SS sergeant.
As well, there is the case against Dr. Aribert
Heim, the former Nazi physician at Mauthausen
concentration camp in Austria, who has been
charged in Baden-Baden with murdering inmates
there.
Other examples of this prosecution activity are
legion and deserve to be acknowledged.
Time No Longer an Ally
None of this is to suggest that we do not join the
rest of the congratulating world. The point, however,
that we would Tike to make is that those who opposed
eliminating the Statute of Limitations are no sui
generis closet Nazis themselves. Many of them in-
clude Germany's most liberal and dedicated
democratic leaders. Their objection to the elmination
of the Statute was rooted in sound principles of
jurisprudence as they saw it.
The victor}' is not cut and dried in legal terms.
Constitutional sacrifices have been made. The
debate, itself, demonstrated the greatest
achievement thus far: the horror of the Nazi Third
Reich will never die; it must never be permitted to
die as a historical phenomenon unparalleled in
inhumanity.
The Federal Republic acknowledges this, and out
of that horror has emerged a new nation with suf-
ficient strength of purpose to make precisely those
legal sacrifices to which we refer in Bonn's striking
down of the Statute of Limitationsin Bonn's legal
move to let the Nazi beast know that time is no
longer his ally.
Kreisky's Self-Hatred
There can be nothing more cynical in inter-
national politics than that Austria, which welcomed
the Hitlerian horde with open arms, should today
have a Jewish chancellor.
Or that the Jewish chancellor, Bruno Kreisky,
should speak in the tones of typical Austrian politics.
Kreisky's meetings with Palestine Liberation
Organization Chief Yasir Arafat of course give both
Arafat and the PLO added credibility in the
European community, which is already heavily
weighted in the direction of betraying Israel's best
interests for Arab oil.
But that Kreisky should also serve as Arafat's
mouthpiece, "assuring" one and all that neither the
terrorist leader nor his terrorist organization is in-
terested in the extermination of Israel, is a turn of
events we must not permit ourselves to tolerate.
Kreisky'8 Jewish self-hatred is by now legion.
"Jewish Floridian *}
OP OR EATER PORT LAUDERDALE
Business Office IX 8. redaraJHwy., Suit. KM. Dnl, Fla. MOM
Telephone WO-OOli
FREDK.SHOCHET ... .. SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher "m ""*' Executive Editor
I iiiiiinirmiiit~iiirn "inmiiiitii iuiiiits.
Of Tt M^BRRRRlM MTRthll lS<
IBIWMUy
rattan OHicari: President. Laa Goodman; Executive Vice President, Milton
r; Vie* Praaldantl, Victor Oruman. Joal Reinjtoin, John Straus; Secretary,
Richard Romanoff; Treeturer. Joel Levitt, Executive Director, Leslie S. Gottlieb;
Public R otattoni Director, Joal H. Toilet.
The Jewish Floridian Has absarben Mia Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly
?nraphlc Aoency, Savon Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide New* Service, National
Enaflsh-J ewlsh Newt pa oars, and the Flertso Prats Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year-W.SS
Out ef Town Upon Reqvast.
Itsec lotion, American Association of
Leo Mindlin
Divided Berlin Glitters Sadly
e
WEST BERLIN It is dif-
ficult for me to set foot onto the
ground at the airport in Frank-
furt. I .have missed my con-
necting plane to Berlin, and
making new arrangements pre-
occupies me so that I don't have
to cope with the traumatic exper-
ience. Many decades have passed
since the terror of National
Socialism NS as the Germans
call it. History is, after all, what
was; but here it lingers like a pall
upon me as if it still is.
Now the new arrangements are
completed. The short flight to
Berlin is over, and I am on terra
firma. I am in what was the
political and military nerve
center of that awful era. I am pre-
pared to hear the smart boots of a
goose-stepping horde, shrink
from the cries of NS enemies still
in their agonies. I anticipate a
Yellow Star set upon my sleeve
by some magic of history re-
wound like a giant newsreel so
that yesterday is today, and
nothing has changed.
BUT THE realities of Berlin,
as of all those parts of Gerrmany
I have visited, have changed very
much indeed. Here, in this
divided city, and elsewhere in the
land, there are occasional pock-
marks of the past, architectural
bruises of the Great War not yet
attended to, or else healed but
still showing signs of their new-
ness-
Some buildings are ultra-
modernistic steel, glass and
concrete complexes little dif-
West Berlin's Gedachtniskirche on the famous Kur-
fflrstendamm combines the bombed-out church relic flanked by
j two modernistic towers a sign of the old and the news, like
the divided city itself, in an uneasy alliance.
S:fi:**w
ferent from, say, the post-war.
construction in London. Others *
have been redone to retain the
continuity of medieval and later
baroque city life to match the
gutted cadavers of bombed-out
sites, many of them centuries old
and more. They match the
design, the texture, the color of
the past like a perfect false tooth
in a smile; only the brightness
betrays their newness in the way
that the phony caryatid in the
Erectheion on the Acropolis in
Athens does.
A day passes, and I sense that
the fears I feel, the sounds I hear,
the past impelled to play out its
drama on a giant screen these
things are my feelings and needs.
They are my compulsions. They -
are not rosily here in Berlin on
any street or in any of the people
I meet. What emerges is a sense
of German history somehow gone ^
awry, which is explained when I
press for explanations, in various
ways depending upon whom I
have managed to buttonhole.
MOSTLY, however, there is a
sense of feverish activity here, a
commitment to the present with
Berlin's present problems, and
they are difficult enough without
having to dwell upon how things
were, and how things might have
been if only .
The sense of activity is infec-
tious, and soon it is ss if I am in
any great and ancient city of
Europe torn by history for
whatever reason. And which
great and ancient city of Europe
has not been so torn?
Ask not why the American
thumbprint is everywhere ap-
parent. Observe merely that it is
here: in the smart shops along ,
the fabled Kurfurstendamm: in
the 1960 s-flavored kiosks at the
rim of the Europe Center, with
their ubiquitous posters of James
Dean, Elvis Presley, Marilyn
Monroe, John Travolta and,
sudden in its timeliness to prove
the point, John Wayne heroes
all, without regard to whether
they are still living or already
dead, and all selling for out-
rageously high prices; in the
discos and record bins labeled in
English that have become a part
of the pop culture German
vocabulary "Country," "Rock,"
"Soul," "Dixieland," and
"Jaw"; among the spaced-out
hippie types who station them-
selves every day at the rebuilt
ruin of the Kaiser Wilhelm
Gedachtniskirche, naked to the
waist, drinking and smoking.
A SUBSURFACE struggle
exists here in Berlin between an
ancient German past and an
Continued on Page 10

V**^^
Capitol Hill Report
Surprise Mideast Influence in Haiti
Friday, July 20,1979
Volume 8
26TAMUZ6739
Number 16
By REP. BILL LEHMAN
U.S. Congressman
13 th District of Florida
Too often foreign assistance to
Israel is considered to be a one-
way street The truth is that
Israel's own foreign aid programs
exist in many of the world's
developing nations. When 1 was
in Haiti recently investigating
the problem of Haitian refugees
coming to South Florida, I
visited an Israeli irrigation
project and was again shown that
with Israel, foreign aid flows in
both directions
Israel has a history of ex-
tending a helping hand to those
in need. Because the Israelis have
had so much successful ex-
perience in water conservation
and irrigation, Israel has made a
valuable contribution to coun-
tries, such as Haiti, needing
water irrigation programs.
GOLDA MEIR had a vision
back in 1958 when she made her
first trip to Africa as Israel's
Foreign Minister. Upon her
return from Africa, Mrs. Meir set
up the Department for Inter-
national Cooperation under
Israel's Ministry of Foreign
Affairs. Under the new depart-
ment, shoestring aid programs
sugar cane) in one season each
year producing an average an-
nual income of about $80 per
family.
Because the area has little
water, it was necessary to dig
wells for irrigation, the one
Israeli agricultural expert
assigned to the project suggested
farming the cluster of separate
.1
-----. ,~----j T tws$iuio tanning me Cluster ui sjssssssm"
were initiated during the early holdings as a cooperative, while
s to share with the world the leaving the ownership of the plots
knowledge gained by Israelis in
transforming a predominantly
arid, unproductive land into a
land of milk and honey.
The governments of Haiti and
Israel agreed in 1966 to start a
small pilot program aimed at
increasing the agricultural
productivity of Haitian farmers
in the Cul-de-Sac Valley. A group
of 117 peasant families in-
dividually harvested a few crops
(maize, red beans, millet, and
------------...,, .. ...~. -,, -
untouched. Local farmers would
share the use of the irrigation
pump and thus promote
cooperation. The wells eventually
became a type of community
center for the children to
congregate and play in the water.
PROGRESS WAS slow at
first, but with the introduction of
fertilizer, irrigation, and other
modern farming techniques,
tomatoes, tobacco, and sweet']
Continued on Page.
8tttttt8N8Ntt8M8tte^^


i .. .J.I. Dt.
~ffZ.
Fnrt lauderdale
~.
Friday, July 20,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page5
Kashruth Supervisory Board Formed;
Intermarriage Hotline Introduced
FALLSBURG, NY. The
Rabbinical Alliance of America,
the organization of orthodox
rabbis and Torah scholars, at its
annual convention at -the
Lakehouse Hotel here, has
unanimously decided to establish
a new kashruth supervisory
Tamarac Mausoleum
Construction Proceeds
TAMARAC Construction
on the Har Tzion Mausoleum at
Star of David Memorial Gardens
of Tamarac is well under way
with Phase II nearing completion
and Phase III and the chapel area
scheduled to be finished in two to
four months. Phase I is already
completed.
"Phase II just had its roof
completed," said Jon Thomas,
president of Cem-A-Care, the
Fort Lauderdale-based cemetery
management firm that operates
Star of David Memorial Gardens
of Tamarac. "It will be prepared
to accept entombments within
weeks. Phase III, which already
has its walls finished and the first
few levels of crypts poured,
should be complete and ready for
entombments in two months. Our
chapel area is expected to be
finished in four months.
"The first three phases and
chapel area represent initial
construction activity in this
mausoleum. We expect that the
entire mausoleum will eventually
have facilities for thousands of
entombments. Already many
residents of North Broward have
made pre-need arrangements for
crypts in the Har Tzion
Mausoleum. There is a strong
demand for this type of cemetery
service. We will keep building to
fulfill the needs of the Jewish
community in this area."
The Har Tzion Mausoleum is
the principal structure in the Star
of David Memorial Gardens of
Tamarac which is located on
Bailey Road, just west of State
Road 441. Dedicated and con-
secrated by the Broward County
Board of Rabbis, the cemetery
and mausoleum observe strict
Hebrew laws and traditions.
Natural green pathways are
featured in the memorial gardens
and an open-air, meditation
chapel is available for private
meditation as well as for com-
munity memorial services.
The cemetery is also a per-
petual-care facility. The trust
funds are regulated by the
comptroller of the State of
Florida. Cem-A-Care is
responsible for administering all
aspects of the cemetery's
operation.
The rabbis have also decided to
introduce an anti-intermarriage
board.
Thank You!
The Jewish Family Service,
an agency of the Jewish Fed-
eration, wishes to thank
everyone who so generously
donated furniture and house-
hold items to the resettled
Russian Jewish families.
The following letter was sent to
President Carter from the
National Jewish Community Re-
lations Advisory Council, of
which the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale is a
member.
Dear
Jimmy
President Jimmy Carter
The White House
Washington, DC 20500
Dear Mr. President:
The Executive Committee of the National Jewish Com-
munity Relations Advisory Council, the coordinating body for
11 national and 107 local Jewish community relations agencies,
at its meeting on June 24 requested that I, as Chairman of the
NJCRAC, convey their appreciation to you for your human-
itarian efforts in behalf of the Indochinese refugees.
Through your initiative, the United States has already
accepted more of these victims of totalitarianism 215,000
than any other country and has now doubled its monthly quota
from 7,000 to 14,000. Ever mindful of the callous indifference
which confronted Jews in Nazi Germany and elsewhere in
Europe during the 1930s, we trust that if the situation continues
to worsen, as we fear, even this number will have to be sub-
stantially revised upward.
We applaud your effort at the Tokyo conference to prod the
civilized nations of the world into saving the refugees and hope
you will continue to use your leadership role to stimulate world-
wide action.
The NJCRAC constituent agencies cannot help but com-
pare the racist expulsion of ethnic Chinese to Hitler's Nurem-
berg laws concerning Jews. In this Asian version, Vietnamese
citizens with even one Chinese grandparent, or married to a
Chinese, are being victimized expelled from their jobs, their
schools and businesses closed, they are given a choice of moving
to so-called New Economic Zones which often lack water, food
and shelter, or buying their right to flee by sea in boats which
are all but guaranteed to sink. Thus, we urge you to instruct the
U S Ambassador to the United Nations to seek that body s
condemnation of Vietnam's treatment of its ethnic Chinese.
We strongly endorse your proposal for new U.S. legislation
to bring order, efficiency, continuity and greater justice to the
admission and resettlement of refugees through a "Refugee Act
of 1979." We want you to know that the Jewish community, and
particularly the national and local agencies we represent, are
prepared to cooperate in any way we can to help this nation to
remain, as she has been traditionally, a haven for the homeless
and oppressed.
Sincerely yours,
Theodore R. Mann
Chairman
^aaaaaaaj"""
hotline and have called for a
moratorium on orthodox con-
versions for a six-month period.
According to R.A. president,
Rabbi Abraham B. Hecht,
"There is a crying need for a new
kashruth board inasmuch as
many existing kashruth cer-
tifications rely on on-site super-
vision by 17-year-old yeshivah
students and senior citizens well
beyond retirement age."
The R. A.'s kashruth board
will'be comprised of rabbis and
scientists who will jointly inspect
and supervise the certification of
any product In addition, the
kashruth board will maintain a
kashruth certification committee
which will license mashgichim
(kashruth supervisors). The
certification committee will
require candidates to have a full
command of English, an un-
derstanding of product makeup
' and manufacturing processes,
and a thorough knowledge of
kashruth laws.
In February of this year the
R.A. formally established its
Commission Against Inter-
marriage. The convention
adopted measures to actively
combat this occurrence. A 24-
hour hotline is being introduced
which will be available to young
Jews contemplating inter-
marriage who wish to give
Yiddishkeit a last chance.
It will also be available to
parents of children intending to
marry outside the faith and'who
have nowhere to turn for
guidance and advice. Through
the hotline, interested parties will
be steered to special teams
comprised of rabbis,
psychologists and therapists who
will help young Jews through
this critical phase
The conclave also called for a
moratorium on Orthodox con-
versions for a six-month period in
order to check on recent and
potential conversions and re-
assess the criteria whereby
conversions are being performed.
"There appears to have been too
many hasty and ill-conceived
conversions recently whose
motivations were not pure,"
Rabbi Hecht said.
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>
I
I


"^"^^'"^"
Pie6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, Jury 20,1979
Gaza Plan:
An Old Idea Revived
In past years, one of the great sticking points of any
proposed Middle East settlement has been the question of
Palestinian autonomy in Israeli-occupied territory. And, when
this controversial issue arose, it was usually in the context of the
West Bank, an area which has been a hotbed of radical Arab
activity. So it was with equal amounts of surprise and ad-
miration that diplomats hailed the key compromises in the new
treaty: the United States' proposal to use the Gaza area as the
testing ground for Palestinian self-rule and deal with the issue of
the West Bank later.
Although President Carter was widely hailed for this dip-
lomatic breakthrough, a similar idea was originally raised by
Israeli leaders three decades ago and revived just last year by
Sen. Richard Stone of Florida. The background of this dramatic
deal is this:
In 1949, according to State Department documents, the
United States suggested to Israel that a way to achieve peace
at least with Egypt was for Israel to allow the return of the
Palestinian refugees who were displaced during the nation's war
of independence. Despite a strongly worded warning from
President Truman, the Israelis rejected the proposal
The nation's then Prime Minister, David Ben-Gurion,
Eroposed an alternative: that the Gaza, then occupied by Egypt,
b given to Israel in return for which 300,000 stateless Pales-
tinians there would be given full Israeli citizenship rights with
the door apparently left open for autonomy. Truman supported
the idea, but Egypt's King Farouk flatly said no.
So there matters stood until last summer when Stone, who
heads the Senate's Near East Subcommittee, met with some of
his aides and State Department official Harold Saunders. One of
the aides, subcommittee staffer Stephen Bryen. had just read
some recently declassified documents on the 1949 exchange and
brought up the Ben-Gurion proposal. Stone liked the sound of
placing the focus on the Gaza rather than the sensitive West
Bank and asked Bryen to draw up a confidential memo on the
plan. This was ultimately turned into a 10-page letter to
President Carter. Although Carter received this prior to the
Camp David summit, it is unclear whether it was discussed
there. Indeed, when Stone briefed the Egyptian and Israeli
ambassadors, it was news to them.
But apparently word got back. When Sen. Henry Jackson
visited President Sadat this January, the Egyptian leader,
according to Bryen, "mentioned that Gaza was the only
solution' to the stalemate.
This response reached Washington, and the Gaza proposal
was raised during the President's shuttle diplomacy. And so, on
the basis of a staff memo and a 30-year-old plan, a compromise
was achieved.
David Rosenthal
Terrorism Increased Since Treaty
J^^^.Mnil rkrknr (TfrtlirVR it. n^l.-ll^inK (iaknnnnM
TEL AVIV Terrorists have
stepped up their attacks on Israel
since the peace treaty with
Egypt, the chief of military
intelligence, Aluf Yehoshua
Saguy, said here.
There have been more at-
tempts to penetrate through
UNIFIL and Christian-held
territories in south Lebanon, he
told military correspondents. The
Christian forces foiled some
attacks, and while UNIFIL
disarmed other groups, it
released the men, thus delaying
but not preventing attacks, he
said.
There were few attacks outside
the Middle East and these caused
little damage, but the important
fact is that the terrorists decided
to renew them, he said
Because infiltrating over land
has become more difficult, the
terrorists have strengthened
their sea arm, recruiting former
Cantor Dworkin at Temple Beth Orr
Rabbi Leonard S. Zoll and
Richard Suss, vice president of
Temple Beth Orr, have an-
nounced that Cantor Harold
Dworkin will be participating at
services at Temple Beth Orr
beginning this month.
Cantor Dworkin graduated
from the School of Sacred Musk
of the Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion in
New York City and has had a dis-
tinguished career as a musician
and interpreter of Jewish musice.
The entire community is in-
vited to join with Temple Beth
Orr in greeting Cantor Dworkin
to its pulpit.
Soviet Jews Fear Expulsion
Moscow refuseniks report that
they fear that Soviet authorities
are planning to expel Jewish
activists from Moscow during the
1980 Olympics. A number of
refuseniks have been told during
KGB interrogations that the
Canadian government expelled
dissidents from Montreal during
the 1976 Olympics and that the
Soviet government considers this
a precedent that can be followed
during the Moscow Olympics,
according to refusenik cyber-
neticist Viktor Brailovsky.
Soviet Jews were beaten while
attending the World University
Games in Moscow in 1973. Since
then, Soviet Jewry activists here,
in Israel and throughout the
world have warned that Jews in
Moscow and other cities in which
Olympic activities are to take
place may face harassment,
detention or explusion in order to
prevent them from meeting with
tourists and foreign newsmen.
Meanwhile a spokesman for
the Canadian government said
that no one had been expelled
from Montreal during the 1976
Olympics. The Canadian Jewish
Congress also denied the
allegation
SWAN'S
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Organization Meetings
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Mrs. Clare Klugman, president
of the new Ocean Mile Chapter,
invites all to a night on the town,
in celebration of the 100th an-
niversary of World ORT.
A Theatre Party is planned,
Tuesday, July 31, at 6:30 p.m. at
Cypress Creek Dinner Theatre.
For tickets, contact Mrs. Jaffe
at Playa del Sol or Mrs. Lichten-
stein, Playa del Mar.
Ocean Mile Chapter of
Women's American ORT invites
all to attend a tea at the residence
of Mrs. Sonia Orlan, 3900 Gait
Ocean Drive, Apt. 1217, Wednes-
day, July 25, at 1 p.m.
RSVP to Mrs. Klugman,
president, or Mrs. Anker.
HADASSAH
The Masada Margate Chapter
Bar Mitzvah
SCOT BLECHER
Mr. and Mrs. Mel Blecher
announce the Bar Mitzvah of
their son, Scot The Bar Mitzvah
will take place on Saturday, July
21, at the Sunrise Jewish Center
(Temple Sha'arey Tzedek),
located at 8049 West Oakland
Park Boulevard, Sunrise.
Rabbi Albert N. Troy will
conduct the services, and Cantor
Jack Merchant will assist. All are
welcome to attend. In celebration
of this occasion, Mr. and Mrs.
B lee her will sponsor the K iddush
following the Shabbat services.
of Hadassah will hold a luncheon
and card partv on Tuesday. July
24, at 11:30 a.m. at the Margate
Jewish Center. Bring friends and
neighbors.
DEBORAH HOSPITAL
The Lakes Chapter of Deborah
Hospital is sponsoring a Rosh
Hashanah weekend from Sept.
21-24 at the Marco Polo Hotel,
located at 192nd Street and the
ocean. For reservations, call Lee
Gordon or Essie Gelfand.
Palestinian fishermen.
Saguy said that Israel had
scored some "nice hits" in
Lebanon raids but did not reveal
casualty figures. He said the
intelligence service will be giving
up its best bases when the Sinai
is returned to Egypt
Saguy noted that Egypt will
no longer be "top priority" for
the intelligence corps, the
position it long held. But he said
Israel must still be on guard
against a new united front
against it comprised of Syria,
Jordan, and Iraq, which makes
war without Egypt a real
possibility.
Saguy said that Syria is
struggling with internal
problems, and reported that it
did not move SAM anti-aircraft
missiles into Lebanon, as had
been reported. Such a move, he
said, would signal that Syria
wanted to turn Lebanon into a
confrontation state.
Jerusalem Post Reporter
RETIRED MANAGEMENT EXECUTIVES TO
SERVE ON A VOLUNTEER COMMITTEE TO
BE A MANAGEMENT ADVISORY GROUP TO
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER.
BACKGROUND IN BUSINESS, FINANCE,
ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE, ETC.
RETIRED MEN IN ALL PHASES OF CON-
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WE NEED YOUR HELP!
VOLUNTEER TODAY!
484-7676
CALL SIDNEY ELKMANAT THE JCC
"" 792-6700
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AH Sunshine cookies and crackers are baked with 100 o vegetable shortening
and &We evr
/erVone
i


Friday. July 20,1979
___tfim~M**r Pert Isiuderdale
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
'
City of Hope Names Dr. Shapero
Dr. Sanford M. Shapero,
lormer rabbi at Temple Emanu-
El of Fort Lauderdale, has ben
appointed national director of
community affairs of the City of
rHope, according to executive
director Ben Horowitz.
"He will bring to the
management team of our
organization a wealth of expertise
as gerontologist, business
executive, administrator, clergy-
man, consultant, public speaker
and author," Horowitz saief
"Dr. Shapero will assume
leading responsibilities in con-
nection with the functions of the
City of Hope and its role in com-
munities throughout the nation.
He will serve as an authoritative
spokesman on our behalf."
A NATIVE of Cincinnati, Dr.
Synagogue News
%
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER
Under the spiritual guidance of
Rabbi Albert N. Troy and with
the assistance of Cantor Jack
Marchant, the Friday night
services July 20 at the Sunrise
Jewish Center (Temple Sha'arey
Tzedek) will take place at 8 p.m.
.The temple is located at 8049
est Oakland Park Boulevard,
Sunrise. Following the services,
the Oneg Shabbat will be
sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Rubin who wish all to celebrate
with them, Sam's 70th birthday.
Sunrise Jewish Center
Sisterhood held a meeting
Wednesday, July 18, at the
temple
Rita Reich, who is associated
Libraries Plan
Children's Events
Broward County Library
announces the following events:
On Friday, July 20, from 10:30
to 11:15 a.m. a craft program on
{making sock puppets is planned
for youngsters ages three to five
at the Fort Lauderdale branch.
Register in advance.
A session on magic is slated
Saturday, July 21, from 2 to 2:30
p.m. at the Lauderhill Branch.
Phil Tagliaferri, who has per-
formed at schools and private
parties, will entertain.
On Saturday, July 21, from
1:30 to 2:30 p.m. three films will
be shown at the Dania branch.
They are "American Music,"
"Patrick" and "Sorcerer's
Apprentice." Disco dancing will
follow the films.
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TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Reform Congregation Temple
Emanu-El, 3245 West Oakland
Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, has
installed new officers for the
1979 80 year.
President is Martin Yohalem;
vice presidents are Dr. Jerold
Mills, Paula Polsyn and Fran
Smith; recording secretary is
Sylvia Friedman; financial
secretary is Bernard Haligman;
treasurer is Ted Eisen.
Sabbath Eve Services con-
ducted by Cantor Jerome
Klement begin at 8:15 o.m everv
Friday.
Shapero, 50, was schooled at the
University of Dayton and
Hebrew Union College where he
was ordained in 1955 and earned
his doctorate in education in
1959.
He comes to the City of Hope
from the Institute for Creative
Development, a national geron-
tology training center which he
founded and served as director,
at the University of Georgia. He
has also served as president,
World Gerontology Systems,
Inc., and vice president, National
Interfaith Coalition on Aging.
His background also includes
further education at North-
eastern University, Harvard
Graduate School of Business,
University of Chicago and
University of Michigan.
His articles have been
published extensively in pro-
fessional journals, college mono-
graphs and books in the subjects
of religious law, gerontology,
health, sociology and music.
Dr. Shapero has appeared in
public lecture series in 200 cities
since 1973, speaking before
gerontology groups, family
service organizations, civic
groups and service clubs. He has
also lectured at numerous
colleges and universities, and was
an invited speaker at the 1978 -
11th International Congress on
Gerontology in Tokyo.
Ageless
By L. L. FEIGENBAUM
When your youth hides under cover, and old age reveals the
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When your outlook turns inward, and your eyes betray the fears
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JEWISH
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ItieJ ewish floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 20,1979
Impact of Peace on Israel's Economy
By H. BRAIDMAN
And J. RUSSELL KRAUS
The state of war in which Israel
found itself for the past 30 years
greatly bolstered many of the
weaker aspects of the economy.
Paradoxically, the economy now
faces greater challenges than ever
before in the wake of the peace
treaty signing with Egypt.
As Israelis begin to gear
themselves for peace, they
already realize that their natural
desire for improving their
standard of living and quality of
life will suffer a serious setback.
Implementation of the peace
treaty will inevitably cause social
and economic strain, the extent
of which may not yet fully be
appreciated.
Many economists in Israel are
estimating the direct and indirect
effect the pullout from Sinai and
the massive inflow of $3 billion in
armanents and funds for
relocating Israeli forces in the
Negev will have on the economy.
AT LEAST half of the
American aid will be spent in the
United States. The rest of the
money will flow into the local
economy. Among other things,
the money will pay for the
operators of heavy mechanical
equipment, contractors,
prefabricated building firms and
trucks. Thousands of workers
employed on these operations will
receive high wages because of the
difficult working conditions. The
Ministry of Finance is con-
sidering the feasibility of im-
porting foreign labor and
equipment to keep the costs
down. Also being weighed is the
increasing of tax deductions at
source from contractors and
employees alike, to raise income
and to restrain inflationary
pressures.
Inflation, which reached 50
percent in 1978, is expected to
reach 70 100 percent in 1979, as
Israeli exports to Egypt of
agricultural machinery, irrigation
equipment, refrigerators, air
conditioners, television sets,
cooking ovens, computers,
electronic instruments, medicines
and medical equipment, fer-
tilizers, pesticides, hothouses,
fresh and processed foods,
inexpensive textiles, fashion
goods, plastics and petrochemical
products. At present, the
majority of Israel's exports of
textiles, sophisticated electronic
equipment and citrus fruits are
destined for European and
American markets.
WITHIN A YEAR, about
50,000 Egyptian visitors are
expected to visit Israel and many
Israelis travel to Egypt. Because
of a shortage of hotel rooms and
accommodation in Egypt,
camping sites might be erected
for Israeli visitors arriving in
buses or cars. El Al is already
the enormous construction
contracts go into effect. The
demand for labor for the building
in the south, combined with the
increased call-up of many tens of
thousands of reservists to help in
the redeployment will tax Israel's
manpower resources to the limit.
Even fewer workers will be
available for industry and ser-
vices, encouraging pressure for
wage increases.
Similarly, the existing acute
housing shortage can also be
expected to worsen with the
massive diversion of workers and
building materials to the Negev.
By the end of the first nine-
month withdrawal period, Israel
will have given back the valuable
Alma oil fields in the Sinai.
Although it will be able to buy oil
from Egypt, instead of receiving
royalities as in the past, from
then on, Israel will have to spend
an extra S150 million for
petroleum, equal to 1/4 of the
national consumption.
COUPLED WITH the loss of
Sinai oil, is the relinquishing of
the valuable fisheries in the
Bardawil lagoon off northern
Sinai. The return of the Yamit
region and Red Sea Coast set-
tlements represent losses running
into millions of dollars invested
in homes, roads, agricultural
installations and tourism
facilities.
Despite the tremendous
financial burden that the entire
peace treaty places upon Israel,
there are long-range forecasts for
economic potential, indicating
that part of the loss in petroleum
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revenues might be offset by
exports to Egypt
But these ties are expected to
develop slowly, over a period of
time, depending on whether trade
will be free in practice or if, in-
stead, a high degree of control
and supervision will be imposed.
Good possibilities exist for
concluding an air agreement with
Egypt Air which would permit
stop-overs in Cairo for flights
between Israel and New York.
The Ministry of Commerce,
Industry and Tourism has now
set up three special committees
to deal with economic ties with
Egypt One committee will deal
with trade and tariffs, including
customs, passage of civilian
vehicles, trade manifest
regulations and joint Egyptian
Israeli projects. Another com-
mittee will handle compensation
for investments in Sinai, mostly
from Israelis who invested in
tourism. The third committee wiHf
look into the treaty's im-
plications to Israel's in-
ternational trade ties, including
the effects of mutual trade on
the EEC and the
of joint Israeli-
Egyptian'tariff agreements under
GATT terms.
Although no one yet can
exactly calculate the impact the
peace process will have on
Israel's economy, it is evident
that the price of peace will be
high in economic terms._________
links with
possibility
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3301:


Friday, July 20,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Louder dale
Page 9
U.S. Bankers See Israel
As Mideast Switzerland
Israel Helps Haiti Agriculture
JERUSALEM (JTA> An
llsrael Bond Organization
bankers delegation, whose banks
|and bank holding companies list
assets of nearly $30 billion and
have already invested
significantly in Israel Bonds,
?redicted a role for Israel as the
P'Switzerland of the Middle
Sast" provided a lasting peace is
achieved.
This was the view of Frederick
Jeane Jr., chairman and chief
executive officer of the Bank of
Virginia in Richmond, speaking
at the closing dinner of the
delegation which visited Israel
lor a week under the auspices of
Israel Bonds.
THE DINNER, addressed by
Israel Manufacturers Association
sident Avraham Shavit,
ovided an opportunity for the
bankers to assess their im-
pressions of Israel "as bankers
who are interested in lending
noney and getting it back."
Deane summed up his views:
|*I think that the achievement in
ndustry has been fantastic
particularly when you consider
"iat it's been going on while you
ad war at the same time"
A theme heard more than once
vas the "bad press" Israel gets
n the United States. William
irenton, chairman of Brenton
tanks of Des Moines, Iowa, said,
"This is a very dynamic country.
Instead of Bank Leumi buying
U.S. banks, they ought to buy
U.S. newspapers. The message of
this country has not been
brought to us."
A SIMILAR note was struck
by Harvey Kershaw Jr., chair-
man of the Provident Savings
Bank of Baltimore. "Many
misconceptions have been
reversed. These people are among
the most hard working groups in
the world. Israel and her people
deserve the greatest amount of
encouragement The West is less
informed than it should be," he
said.
If a Middle East development
fund can amass S30-S60 billion
in the next decade to boost
economic development within
both Egypt and Israel, the peace
process will really succeed, the
Governor of the Bank of Israel,
Arnon Gafni, told the Americans.
Unless this economic un-
derpinning of peace is provided,
he saw disillusion with the peace
setting in within lVi to two years.
Gafni called on the U. S., West
Germany, Japan and the
European Economic Community
(EEC), as well as world money
markets to join forces in
providing support
Allan May Challenge Peres'Post
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Yigal Allon, who served
Foreign Minister in the
st two Labor govern-
ents and derives his po-
Itical support from the
Labor oriented kibbutz
movement, has indicated
at he may challenge Shi-
no Peres for leadership of
lie Labor Party well before
be next elections.
In a radio interview here, Allon
ud the next Labor Party con-
Intion would probably have to
loose between two or possibly
ree candidates for the office of
nan. At the moment, the
Cumbent, Peres and former
hme Minister Yitzhak Rabin
the only candidates men-
Ined although Rabin has given
indication that he would
dlenge Peres.
>N HINTED strongly
It he would enter the race.
lose who reject competition
over the office give the Labor
Party the image of a rabbit
party," Allon said in an apparent
jab at Peres. He rejected
allegations that he was using last
week's merger between the
former Mapai and former Achdut
Avodah kibbutz movements to
advance his own political career.
Allon spoke only a day after
Peres himself suggested that the
Labor Party elect a "shadow
government" on the style of
the British opposition within
the year. He stressed that the
idea was not to appoint people to
specific posts in a future Labor
Cabinet but simply to elect a
party leadership in preparation
for the next selections.
Addressing the Labor Party
Bureau, Peres denied that he
would head a "shadow govern-
ment." But he suggested that
Rabin be Foreign Minister, Allon
Defense Minister and Yaacov
Levinsohn, chairman of the Bank
Hapoalim, Finance Minister. He
offered no suggestions for Prime
Minister.
j Hebrew Congregation of Lauderhill will hold HIGH
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BINGO, COCKTIAL PARTIES
THREE ELEVATORS* POOL
Continued from Page 4-A
potatoes were being grown, and
the Haitian government took
over responsibility for extending
credit to the project
By 1973, the village of Bas
Boen was organized into a
bonafide credit and marketing
cooperative. One measure of
success was the growing scarcity
of children in the fields The
farmers could now afford to keep
their children in school rather
than at work in the fields.
The qualitative and quan-
titative success of this project is
staggering. The overall income of
a peasant family from one
cultivated hectare was $1,140 in
1977, quite an improvement from
$80 before the project began
some ten years earlier.
INTERNATIONAL granting
institutions became interested in
extending the project and
recommended its expansion to
include 3,000 families in the
entire valley region. The ex-
pansion is now in progress with
some assistance from West
Germany and Holland, as well.
Israel's aid programs con-
centrate primarly on agricultural
development The host country is
required to find funding for the
project with Israel providing the
technical expertise. The Haitian
government pays for all the local
expenses while Israel and the
Organization of American States
(OAS) share all other expenses'
equally.
The emphasis on field work has
helped make the Bas Boen
project cost-efficient. The
unavailability of prepared
literature on the Haiti project
suggested to me a non-
bureaucratic operation. Two
Israeli experts guiding me
through Bas Boen emphasized
their goal of attaining a com-
pletely self-sufficient system with
as little external bolstering as
possible Instructing local far-
mers in the techniques utilized in
Haiti so that they could carry on
independently was a major thrust
of the program
ALTHOUGH ISRAEL has no
geographic area of concentration
for agricultural aid programs,
diplomatic relations must exist
between the host country and
Israel, and there must also be a
"needing" sectorlow income
with a need for technical
assistance
A great deal .of technical
training is carried out in Israel
Israel currently sponsors
similar programs in the
Dominican Republic, Jamaica,
Costa Rica, and Peru. Despite all
the problems facing Israel, her
willingness to share the technical
expertise with those who are in
need is commendable.
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Brodzhi were honored recently at the
annual banquet of the Jewish National Fund Greater Fort
LauderdaU. Over 400 attended. Shown, from left to right, are
Mike tndovich, Ludwig Brodzki, Jacob Brodzki, Leo Good-
man, Allan Boer, Al Gross and AI GarniU.
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 20,1979

.-
Leo Mindlin's Berlin Diary
Divided City Feels the Politics of Isolation
compulsive need to relive history,
which I seek out on the str
Continued from Page 4
international tinsel present'
marked by prosperity and plenty.
The blinking neon Sony signs
along the "Kudamm" say it best-
But this bifurcation is com-
plicated further by the sour,
totalitarian Soviet / East Ger-
man presence in East Berlin only
a stone's throw away and the
anachronistic territorial division
of West Berlin among the re-
maining three allied "occupying'
powers the United States,
France and Great Britain.
If this trio is largely a geo-
political relic from World War II,
the Soviet-dominated German
Democratic Republic of East,
Germany (GDR) is hardly that at
all. On the contrary, it is like an
amoeba whose nucleus is, simply,'
Berlin, and which embraces and,
isolates West Berlin deep in GDR ,
territory.
Only to tourists from the west
on a day's tour of East Berlin do i
GDR police and guides refer.
grudgingly to the divided status
of their capital city. Their lips -
tighten, their tongues slur as
they make mumbled reference to
West Berlin. For tourists from
the west, it is a part of history
the police and the guides can
not rewrite. For their own people,
the wall the GDR erected in 1961
is intended to make them believe
there is no West Berlin, no West
Germany. Certainly, no West
Anything that is worthwhile.
THE BIFURCATION be-
tween past and present is com-
plicated further still by the West
Germans themselves. From the
West German point of view,
Berlin of 1979 is not Berlin of
1939 or 1900 or, indeed, of any
other time. Berlin is no longer
Germany's capital city. It is no
longer Germany's political and
cultural center. It is not the
nucleus of the state, as it is for
the GDR.
For the Federal Republic of
Germany, for West Germany,
Berlin may be a throbbing
It is no good, this dedicated need to relive tragedy
symbol of ancient glories and a
silent hope for a reunified future
about which not even politicians
have spoken to me except in the
most vaguely idealistic terms.
But it is distant, situated today
deep in "enemy" territory, self-
sustaining only with great dif-
ficulty. And so why should
anyone want to live here, work
here, invest energy or funds here?
The best one can say is that
West Berlin for the Federal
Republic is an isolated outpost in
the Iron Curtain heartland, a
determined symbol that the last
word on the boundaries of
r
Bombed Car Neo-Nazis
i
PARIS (JTA> A
mysterious neo-Nazi organiza-
tion, "Odessa," has assumed
responsibility for the bomb ex-
plosion which last week
destroyed the car of Nazi-hunter
Serge Klarsfeld. "Odessa" is the
secret organization which used to
smuggle wanted Nazi criminals
out of Europe in the post-war
years. "
The organization, in a letter to
the French news agency, A.F.P.,
said that unless "the Jews stop
persecuting our comrades we
shall have to envisage an extreme
solution (for Klarsfeld)."
Klarsfeld and his wife, Beatte,
have left their Paris apartment
and are now staying at a secret
address under police protection.
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Eastern Europe were far from
spoken at Potsdam after World
War II. But mainly this is true
for West Berlinere who do live
here, work here, invest energy
and funds here.
THE WORST is that, like all
symbols, from a practical and
hardheaded point of view, too
many Germans regard Berlin's
special status as a fairyland
phenomenon and wonder if the
hassle needed to retain interest in
it is worthwhile. In this sense,
GDR propaganda against the
west has taken slender hold in a
most unexpected place and way.
A former Wthrmacht officer
tells me: "The trouble with
Berlin is that there are no Jews
here anymore. The Jews have all
gone, and so is the art, the com-
merce, the great intellectual and
academic ferment." I want to
remind him why that is, but I
wait to hear his explanation. He
merely repeats himself: "It has
all gone with the Jews." There is
an unmistakable sadness in his
tone that leaves me bewildered.
The mixture of historical per-
spectives is mind-boggling.
None of what he has said
explains the political isolation of
Berlin or the vast attendant eco-
nomic problems involved in
maintaining Berlin as a western
showcase in Communist Eastern
Europe. I can only wonder
whether if, in speaking to me the
former officer could face up to
why there are no more Jews, he
might better understand what
has happened to this once
glorious city.
IN THE END, what can be
deduced from all of this is that
Berlin, once a flourishing center
of art, science, philosophy, com-
merce and industry, is today still
a weighty chess pice in the real-
politik of the unstated war be-
tween East and West needing
dedicated and costly support
both from the Federal Republic
and its western partners.
What is especially true for me
is that Berlin is a cosmopolitan
center in which I have rapidly
learned to draw a comfortable
breath. I want to continue my
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here. At the Reichstag, all
again I see the flames set by th.
crafty National Socialists to dis-
credit the Weimar Republic and
launch the takeover by the Nari
war machine.
In Munich, I tread the streets,
the very stones, upon which
Hitler began his Beer Hall
Putsch. Which stones felt the
Hitlerian footfall? Whkh those of
Gen. Ludendorff? At the
National Theatre there, at an
exquisit performance of Mozart's
ZauberfUfte, my eyes search for
his favorite box.
A former Wthrmacht officer
tells me: 'The trouble with
Berlin Is that there an no Jews
here anymore. The Jews have
all gone, and so Is the art, the
commerce, the great In-
tellectual and academic
ferment.' I want to remind him.
why that la, but I welt to heal
his explanation. He merely
repeats himself: 'It has all
gone with the Jewa."... The,
mixture of historical per-
spectives Is mind-boggling.
AT DACHAU, the stench of
putrid flesh, the cries of the
victims of Nazi splendor fill my
eyes with rageful tears, my
senses generally with angry
revulsion.
But it is no good, this
dedicated need to relive tragedy.
German officials with whom I
speak here know this past as well
as I. So do the ordinary Berliners,
and it almost disturbs me,
because I want to fight with
them, to lecture them, to be the
great moralizer, that they do not
flinch from the past but are just
as anxious to talk about the more
current realities. They want not
to fight but to point with pride U-
their 30-year-young democratic
society and to their role as the
leading power in the European
Economic Community a
remarkable metamorphosis fron.
the tragic shadows still stalking
their past.
Like easing into a hot tub, I
accustom myself to taking such
measure of Germany here as is
being permitted me both its
turbulent past and its frankly
exciting and often enviable
present.
Community
Calendar
Jlrh/23
ORT Ocean Mile Chapter Board Meeting Regency S. Recreation
Room, 3750 Gall Ocean Drive* Temple Emanu-EI -Bingo-7:15 p.m.
July 25 .
North Broward National Council Jewi*h Women Card Party ORT
Ocean Mile Chapter Membership Tea Residence of Sonia Orlan
3900 Gait Ocean Dr., Apt. 1217-1 p.m. ORT Lauderdale Chapter
Card Party at Lauderdale Lakes City Hall Noon.
Juh/26
Temple Emanu-EI Executive Committee Meeting Temple Emanu-
EI Board Meeting 7:45 p.m.
July 27
Workmen's Circle #1046 General Meeting.
Jsh/30
Temple Emanu-EI Bingo 7:15 p.m.
My SI
ORT Ocean Mile Chapter Dinner/Theatre at Cypress Creek Dinner
Theatre-6:30p.m.
Avf. 1
B'noi B'rjth Sunrise Lodge #2953 Board Meeting P.M. Kavanah
Hadossoh of Plantation General Meeting Brandeis National
Women's Committee Fort LauderdaU/Pompano Board Meeting.
Ana. 2
ORT -North Broward Chapter Executive Meeting West Broward m
Brandeis University National Women's Committee Board Meeting
Hodossah Bat Yam Chapter Board Meeting.
it


.~tn..
ffnrt 1jiuderdale
Kday, July 20,1979
Arab Takeover
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
How America is Losing the Quiet War
Continued from Page 1
ther political and business col-
lies of President Carter have
n a direct and aggressive
srt in that secret war.
jy did not show how, on the
r\e day the peace treaty was
ied, Arab leaders of this new,
northodox secret effort met in
eneva to map out a new battle
ategy.
[ Their initial move was masked
i yet another oil price hike an
^crease that brought the cost per
el to an unprecedented
55. In effect, that increase
ened a harsh offensive in the
war whose prime targets
te now Egypt, Israel and the
f nited States.
WHAT FOLLOWS is the
:>ry of the complete evolution of
at six-year war: a global
r lict that now involves dozens
combatant countries, wildly
inovative war-making tech-
jues, Arab operatives,
rominent American col-
orators. And a new battle tool
awesome potential for
ernational havoc exceeds that
weapon ever used by one
Ition against another. Except
kssibly the atomic bomb.
[Strangely, what follows has
ver been told before in its
tirety, although much of this
formation has been readily
lable to anyone curious
and sufficiently con-
ned about the future of
And America.
espite the denials of govern-
ent officials and the silence of
media, Expo has discovered
It tens of billions of petro-
collected from U.S. con-
srs have been recycled since
to finance a nationwide
npaign through which Arab
ficials, operators and entre-
pneurs have bought their way
America's highest social
ancial, military and political
cles.
X'ORDS at the Depart-
of State. Commerce and
Religious
Directory
LAUDERDALELAKES
EL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE
West Oakland Park Boulevard
dern Orthodox Congregation.
rray Brick man, president.
VNU EL TEMPLE, 3425 W. Oak
Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi
ellrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome
[lement
SUNRISE
I ISRAEL TEMPLE, 7100 W.
Ikland Park Blvd. Conservative
ibbi Philip A. Labowlti. Cantor
jrlce Ntu<42).
USE JEWISH CENTER, INC. 0049
fesl Oakland Park Blvd. Conser
tive. Rabbi Albert N. Troy. Cantor
Marchant. and Hy-.SoW^prtril-
tEW CONGREGATION OF LAU
ERHILL. 204S NW 40th Ava., LSU-
Conservative Max Kroolsh,
resident.
KRAC JEWISH CENTER. 10
.. STtti St. Conservative. Rabbi It-
el Zimmerman **A I
JNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
?ORT LAUDERDALE. 4171 Stirling
Id Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bomzer
PLANTATION
kNTATION JEWISH CONGREGA-
400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Liberal
tform. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr (4).
ICONSTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE
73 NW 4th St. Hank Pitt, president.
POMPANO BEACH
UPLE SHOLOM. T32 SE Uth Ave.
nservat've. Rabbi Morris A. Shop.
ntor Jacob Renwr (4?).
MARGATE
I HILLELCONGREGATION 7*40
irgate Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
i Berglas.
BATE JEWISH CENTER, *H>1
titi St. Conatrvatlve. Rabbi Dr
Geld Cantor Max Gallub
CORAL SPRINGS
PLE BETH ORR, Riverside
, Reform Rabbi Leonard Zoil
DEER FIELD BEACH
UPLE BETH ISRAEL, at Century
lege fast. Conservative Rabbi
rid tenant (el).
Defense; at the Securities and
Exchange Commission; in federal
and local courts, Congressional
testimony and published
financial reports and records
indicate that Arab nationals have
been involved in hundreds of
billions of dollars worth of
financial activity in America
during the past sue years.
Cross-referencing the patterns
of these transactions, Expo has
been able to reconstruct a seven-
pronged petrodollar penetration
strategy through which Arab
countries have gained entry into
and rapidly expanding influence
on the mainstream institutions of
American life.
Those seven areas of activity
are:
DIRECT PHYSICAL ac-
quisition, through takeover, buy-
in or merger, of hundreds of
properties including billion-dollar
banks; office buildings; hotels
and other real estate; brokerage
houses; manufacturing plants;
construction companies; cattle
ranches, farms and grain futures.
FINANCIAL "paper" ac-
quisitions involving various
stocks, bonds and similar com-
mercial paper investments.
Treasury Department records
indicate that Arab investment in
U.S. Treasury bonds, bills and
notes rocketed from $2.2 billion
in 1973 to $10.7 billion in 1975.
Treasury Bulletins and Inter-
national Capital Movement
Reports indicate that between
1973 and 1977, Arab investment
in non-Treasury stocks went from
$365 million to $1.4 billion;
holdings in other bonds zoomed
from $685 million to $1.7 billion.
However, this includes only
directly traceable investments
made openly in the international
market. Much of the recent Arab
investment in all fields has been
made through third-party
countries or international cor-
porations set up to hide the
investors* true identities. At the
same time, a 1978 survey by
Business Week magazine found
that Saudi Arabia is now the
largest holder of the paper of the
Federal National Mortgage
Association. The association,
which has $40 billion in assets
and is the sixth largest cor-
poration in America, is the major
supplier of home mortgage loan
money in this country.
I SHORT-TERM bank
deposits for use as immediate
political leverage. Late in 1975,
the Senate Foreign Relations
Subcommittee on Multinational
Corporations tried to determine
exactly how much control foreign
investors had in American banks,
and sought to subpoena
American bank records as part of
that investigation. Kuwait and
Saudi Arabia openly challenged
the Subcommittee and said they
held about $11 billion in
American banks including
$7.3 billion in short-term
deposits; and that they would
transfer the money to European
institutions if the Subcommittee
did not stop trying to subpoena
the American bank records that
showed the extent of Arab
holdings.
The Subcommittee backed
down and stopped that portion of
its investigations; Subcommittee
members explained that they had
"no other choice." It was the
second time since the 1974 Rabat
Summit that the Arab bloc
threatened to collapse the
Federal Reserve System if they
did not get their way. They
apparently succeeded both times;
Congress never did pass legis-
lation to control or even require
registration of Arab investments
in America.
LE
OCA RATON
BETH L, 333
SW 4th
* ***?**** ***

PETRODOLLAR court-
ships aimed at buying contact*
and "advisors" in the highest
tj% Mewoiiii *******************
circles of government. Among
those currently known to be
directly involved in representing,
counseling or in the direct employ
of Arab financial operatives are a
major candidate for the United
States Presidency in 1980; the
former U.S. Director of the
Budget and close friend of
President Carter; the brother of
President Carter; a former poll-
taker and personal friend of
President Carter; a former U.S.
Vice President; a former CIA
director; two former CIA station
chiefs; two former Senators,
including the former head of the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee; a former U.S. Attorney
General; four former Assistant
Secretaries of State; a former
Assistant Secretary of the U.S.
Treasury; a former Secretary of
Defense and former Secretary of
the Air Force.
"LINKAGE" programs
designed to draw segments of top
U.S. industry close to Arab
governments. This is reflected in
the reports of Arab-American
Ventures Inc. of San Francisco,
which indicate that U.S. exports
to Arab countries just prior to
the 1973 Mideast war were less
than $1 billion annually. By late
last year, that figure had in-
creased to more than $15 billion.
The extent of this new wave of
"linkage" is also seen in the
recruitment efforts of the Arab-
American Association for Com-
merce and Industry, head-
quartered in New York and open
to "any private corporation,
partnership or membership which
is interested in the aims and
purposes of the Association."
The Association, which rep-
resents the member nations of
the Arab League, is financed by
dues paid by the 167 member
companies. Those dues, ac-
cording to the Association's
records, support Arab research,
forum meetings, business
briefings, informal luncheons,
conferences, industry workshops
and trade missions across the
United States. Records show that
the dues-paying member com-
panies include 18 of America's
top 100 defense contractors,
among them Western Electric,
Westinghouse and General
Electric; 21 of Fortune
magazine's top 100 U.S. cor-
porations with combined yearly
sales totaling $400 billion such
companies as the Ford Motor
Company, IBM, ITT, Union Car-
bide and U.S. Steel; and ten of
America's top 20 banks with
combined assets of about $280
billion, including the Bank of
America, Chase Manhattan and
Bankers Trust Company.
One of the most recent new
recruitments is Hill and
Knowlton, Inc. Headquartered in
New York, the company is the
world's largest public relations
firm. Hill and Knowlton signed
on with the Arab Association last
November.
| DIRECT political action
through a greatly expanded and
highly sophisticated lobbying
effort in Washington and
through direct financial involve
ments in the home districts of
legislators whose actions have
displeased the Arabs. The Arab
lobby, now acknowledged as
"formidable" in the capital, is
credited with being the pivotal
force in last year's controversial
Congressional vote on the F-15
jet deal.
A chilling example of local
political action can be seen in the
situation of Idaho's Sen. Frank
Church. Church has investigated
Arab financial dealings, helped
block military equipment ship-
ments to Arab countries and
opposed such proposals as the F
the Arabs
Idaho and
neutralize Church,
have now landed in
begun buying support for a pro-
Arab candidate who is gearing up
to run against Church in 1980.
EDUCATIONAL grants
and endowments through which
Arab nations, according to the
State Department, have in-
creased their "linkage" with
American colleges more than ten
times over since 1973. At least 75
universities and colleges have
accepted gifts from various Arab
states for the establishment of
Arab Studies programs. Typical
is a $1 million gift from Saudi
Arabia received by the Univer-
sity of Southern California to
fund a professorship in Arab
Studies. To get the money, the
University agreed to allow the
Saudi government to approve the
instructors chosen to direct the
program.
Even when university officials
stand fast against Arab attempts
to dictate hiring policy and
violate federal anti-dis-
crimination regulations, alternate
routes are found to accomplish
the same goal. One device in-
volved an Arab-endowed $1.5
million working grant to MIT for
engineering studies of various
problems in desert societies.
When the grant stipulated that
no Jews be allowed to participate
in the program, the school balked
at signing such an agreement. So
the Arabs hired away all the non-
Jewish MIT experts they needed
to set up the identical program
as a "private business" with no
official ties to MIT's resources.
THERE ARE no indications
that the Arabs have softened on
their stated intention of using all
business dealings and "linkages"
in America as a direct political
tool:
Hoag Levins, a nation-
ally-known investigative
reporter, is the only jour-
nalist to have won the
Philadelphia Grand
Award for Best Reporting
for three consecutive
years. Tulitzer nominee
Levins also received the
1978 Keystone State
Award for Best Investi-
gative Reporting and the
Philadelphia Bar Associa-
tion's first annual Media
Award for Outstanding
Journalism. His report
here is published courtesy
of Expo Magazine.
Levitt m
memorial chapel;
1921 Pembroke Rd
Hollywood, Fla.
921-7200
Sonny Levitt, F.D.
13385 SW Dixie Hwy
North Miami, Fla.
949-0315
Middle East magazine is the
official business organ of the
Arab world and journal used by
American firms seeking trade
there. The opening pages of
Middle East's October 1978 issue
pull no punches. In an editorial
directed toward readers, adver-
tisers and prospective clients, the
magazine states bluntly, "The
day when you can expect to do
business with the Arab world and
not take note of what they believe
in and fight for is long gone. The
Arab world is sufficiently strong
today not only to fight for what it
believes in, but to expect that its
friends and allies will stand up
and be counted.
"Today, politics and economics
not only mix, but are totally
interdependent. There is a con-
sensus among the Arabs that to
do business with the Arab world
means taking a political stand
not incompatible with Arab
interests and legitimate rights."
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
DIRECTORS
IrwinJettw Medwin JeHei AlvinJetler
IN NCW YORK
188-11 HlllSI0tAVt.H0lUS.ll. NY
1263C0NEY ISLAND AVt BKIYN.NY
212/776-8100
IN F10RI0A
OAOf COUNTY I338S W WXU HWY
947-1185 BROWARD COUNTY 1921 PfMBROKf R0
925-2743 Rm t>y *.
PAIM BtACH COUNTY w" o>uimomi aivo
1-925-2743 Reiib.'-We.nsiein ID
Services available in all com
miimties m New York and throughout
Ihe Greater Miami area
4 Family Protection'
Pre-Arrangments At
A Savings
15 agreement. In an effort to
W.WM-,..

......*.....
...V.W.W.W


Page 12
The Jewish Fhridian of Greater Fort LauderdaU
Frfcby, July 20,1979



JCC Fun At Day Camp
G
a
m
Swimming is best fun of all.
m
Lunchtime, one of the most popular activities at camp.
At Day Camp
and Crafts is fun especially when you can draw
anything you want on the plate.
Swimming instruction is a most important part of the Day
Camp schedule.
*&
Stacy Frank is leading the children in singing Israeli songs.


I
This happy group of girls is showing off its latest Arts and
Crafts creations.
Tueen Camp counselor Judy Telles is seen passing out the
goodies for lunch.
This player evidently didn't ;
I like the referee's call and is j
; voicing his disaproval.
Could this trio of hockey players become the Rangers or Flyers
of tomorrow ?
An eager group waiting their turn to kick the ball
Surely a budding Picasso.
warn
This young man is not think-
ing of anything except the de-
licious frankfurter he is ob-
viously enjoying. Who's got the puck f


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