The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00139

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
^jj_ ~tr.~nfr Part Lauderdaie
& Jewish Florid tan
Volume 8 Number 14
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, July 6,1979
Price 35 Cents
Luncheon Kicks Off Richards-WECARE Day
"If the enthusiasm displayed
at the kick-off luncheon carries
forward to our sale day, it has got
to be an enormous success," said
Richards WECARE Day chair
person Anne Fleischman,
following the "Launchin'
Luncheon" held on June 12 at
Richards Lauderhill Mall store.
With the tremendous co-
operation of Richards depart-
ment store and our corps of
\ t .In ii t eers. we anticipate a
record-breaking fund-raising day
for WECARE." stated Sally
Radin. general chairman of WE-
CARE.
The luncheon, hosted by
Richards, was the official begin-
ning of a promotional campaign
for the third annual sale day to be
held on Thursday, Aug. 9, at the
Richards Lauderhill Mall store.
The sales jamboree provides the
WECARE program with funds
drawn from a percentage of gross
sales for the day, plus an ad-
ditional $1 to WECARE for each
| charge account opened on Aug. 9.
"WITH THE partnership of
I Richards and WECARE, we have
Ian opportunity to receive a large
[amount of money to provide
I funds for the ongoing activities of
lour program that has become so
important in the community,"
(added Rovi Faber, founder of
I WECARE.
The host of dignitaries at the
luncheon attested to the im-
portance of the annual sales
event. The first sales day was
held in 1977. and last year's
project was even more successful.
The Richards sales day is the
first by a South Florida depart-
ment store in behalf of a philan-
thropic cause.
The "Launchin' Luncheon"
opened with an invocation
presented by Rabbi Philip
Labowitz of Temple Beth Israel.
Richards president Robert
O'Connell, expressed thanks to
the large group of area dig-
nitaries who attended and said,
"I am looking forward with great
enthusiasm to the WECARE
Day, and it should prove to be a
big event."
Richards-WECARE Day
' Chairman Anne Fleischman
remarked. "Our joint program
proves that big business and
charitable organizations can
work together for a common
cause." Leslie Gottlieb. Jewish
Federation executive director,
commented. "WECARE says it
all we do care." He offered the
Federation's thanks to Richards
for their cooperation.
JEWISH Community Center
Continued on Page 6
a

I
Pictured, from left, are Bill Goldstein, executive director of the JVC; Hilda Robbins, WECARE
coordinator; JCC president Anita Perlman; Anne Fleischman, chairperson for Richards WE-
CARE Day; Martin Fleischman, transportation chairman; and Sally Radin, WECARE general
chairman.
In Czechoslovakia
Brodzki 'Tenth Man' for Services
U.S. Urged to Help Refugees
NEW YORK (JTA) American Jewish organizations
urging President Carter to take action on the plight of the
thousands of Southeast Asian refugees fleeing the Communist
regime in Vietnam.
American Jewish Committee president Richard Maasssent
a telegram to Carter asking him to double the U.S. quota for
admission of the refugees and to provide necessary funding for
such action.
"As Jews who have suffered the trauma of being abandoned
bj I he world when our brothers and sisters were being sys-
tematically put to death, we find it morally impossible to stand
bj idly while such destruction of human lives, all created in the
sacred image of God. takes place before our eyes." Maassex-
plained.
"It was one of the most heart-
warming experiences of my life,"
said Jacob Brodzki as he re-
counted the feeling of attending a
Yiskor service in Czechoslovakia
during a recent visit to that
country.
Two years ago Jacob and his
wife, Peggy, visited his native
Poland, returning for the first
time since the Holocaust. "I did
not find any Jewish life there.
The nearly 1,000 years of Jewish
existence in Poland was com-
pletely wiped out by the Nazis,"
said Brodzki.
This year the Brodzkis
traveled to another country
behind the Iron Curtain for a
three-week stay. They visited a
health spa resort in the small
town of Piestany, Czechoslo-
vakia, beautifully situated in a
valley brimming with parks and
gardens and surrounded by
mountains. "The scenery was
breathtaking." Brodzki said.
PEOPLE FROM all over
Europe and other parts of the
world came to the spa in hopes of
getting relief from various types
of rheumatic conditions. The
Brodzkis were constantly hearing
different languages spoken:
German, Czech. French. Spanish.
Italian. Polish and occasionally.
English.
To Jacob's amazement, a man
from Frankfurt. Germany, whom
he had spoken to briefly, ap-
proached Brodzki to inquire if he
was aware that the next, day was
the second day of Shavuoth and
that he was trying to get 10
Jewish men together for a
minyan to enable them to con-
duct a Yiskor service. Brodzki
eagerly accepted the invitation.
The village building that was
once a synagogue was now
boarded up and hidden from the
street by a high wall. The group
entered the yard through a gate
in the wall and gathered in a
small meeting room adjoining the
larger building. No Jewish
services had been held in the
synagogue for a number of years,
and each man was overcome by
the solemnity of the occasion.
"I closed my eyes and my
thoughts drifted back to the days
of my boyhood in Poland. It was
a most touching moment for me.
and I'm certain that this feeling
Continued on Page 12-
Cabinet Approves
Defense Minister Weizman
Resigns From Autonomy Talks
UNIFIL Mandate Extended;
Israeli Role Criticized
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Defense Minister Ezer
Weizman resigned, with the
approval of the Cabinet
Sunday, from the six-man
ministerial delegation
negotiating with Egypt and
the U.S. on autonomy for
the West Bank and Gaza
Strip.
Weizman, who has been at
odds with Prime Minister
Menachem Begin over the
government's settlement policy
and other issues, said he wanted
to leave the negotiating team
because he felt it was too large.
His formal request to be
relieved of that duty was
presented to the Cabinet by
Begin and approved without
Continued on Page 9-
Quotable Quotes
Jerusalem: the city which miraculously transforms man
into pilgrim: no one can enter it and go away unchanged.
Elie Wiesel
Ezer Weizman
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The United Nations Security
Council approved a double-bar-
relled resolution extending for
another six months the mandate
of the United Nations Interim
Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) and
criticizing Israel for its activities
in Lebanon. The vote was 12-0.
The United States, while
calling the condemnation of
Israel one-sided, voted for it. The
Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia
abstained and China, as usual,
did not participate. China op-
poses use of UN forces in prin-
ciple.
The American delegate,
Richard Petree, assailed Israel
for "contributing" to tensions in
Lebanon by failure to cooperate
with UNIFIL.
Petree said the U.S. could not
accept constant harassment of
UNIFIL troops by Christian
militia supplied and supported by
Israel. But he also said the Arab
world must help to end Pales-
tinian "extremist" attacks
against Israel.
The U.S. "deplores equally"
acts of violence and terrorism
"directed indiscriminately
against Israeli citizens," he said.
32
WILL BE
HERE SOON
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Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 6, 1979
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Worldwide Celebrations Mark ORT Centennial
In April of 1880, five respected
Jewish leaders wrote an appeal in
St. Petersburg, then capital of
Czarist Russia, calling for con-
tributions "to ameliorate the
position of the mass of our co-
religionists through a
thorough and systematic
development ... of artisanal and
agricultural occupations."
More than 30,000 contributors
responded: an organization called
"ORT" came into being later the
same year.
ORT has been a mirror of
Jewish history. Since that day.
changing ORT programs have
reflected changing Jewish needs.
In its hundredth year, this world-
wide vocational and technical
education program will for the
first time be helping more than
100,000 men, women and young
people.
WORLDWIDE celebrations
will mark the ORT Centennial,
culminating in a series of events,
notably a World Congress in
Jerusalem in the summer of 1980.
In the United States, observance
of the hundredth anniversary is a
joint yearlong project of the
American ORT Federation and
Women's American ORT.
The celebration takes place at a
time when worldwide ORT ac-
tivities are the most extensive in
history. In its early years ORT
its initials stand for Organization
for Rehabilitation through
Training focused almost
entirely on the needs of Jews in
Eastern Europe: today ORT
vocational, educational and tech-
nical programs reach 100,000
students in more than 700
schools and training programs in
24 countries.
The largest single program is
in Israel, whose Rovernment has
Revival of Islam Cause for Alarm
By CARL ALPERT
HAIFA There is danger
that the euphoria of peace be-
tween Egypt and Israel may
anesthetize the world against a
growing menace which threatens
not merely Israel, but the entire
western Christian world. If the
current revival of Islam is seen in
its historic context, there are
indeed grounds for considerable
alarm by Christians everywhere.
Historians should remind us
that in the eighth century Islam
had snowballed militarily,
politically, economically,
culturally and had overrun a
good part of Asia, North Africa,
and from there had gained a
foothold in southwestern Europe.
The influences of that period are
still to be seen in Spain and
Portugal. The Christian crusades
were in effect a response to that
expansionism, but they served
only temporarily to contain the
spread.
In the post-Crusade period,
Islam went on the march again,
and wherever Islam became
dominant, Christianity was
effaced. It is little known that
even Constantinople was once a
Christian city, until its people
were massacred by the Muslim
armies marching in the name of
Allah. In the 16th century Islam
spread into Eastern Europe, and
both Hungary and Rumania fell
under its sway.
EVENTS ARRESTED
Muslim expansionism until the
more recent resurgence. Now, in
our own days, we are witness to a
terrifying reawakening of the
same forces, once called
"Saracens" or "infidels" when
combated by the Christian world.
The most recent manifestation of
this revival has been in Iran.
Observers watch solmenly as
they see secular, democratic
Turkey poised on the edge.
Afghanistan and Pakistan are
the next likely victims.
The power of the Islam world
extends far beyond the Arab
states. It penetrates deep into the
heart of Africa, where millions of
Blacks have adopted the faith.
There are also 50 million Muslims
in the Soviet Union.
The sole bulwark against the
consolidation of the power of
Islam in the Middle East has
been Israel. The Christian
population of Lebanon, now
already decimated, has been
saved from outright massacres
(like the Christian Armenian
genocide of 60 years ago) only by
direct support from Israel. The
rest of the Christian world
continues to sit by, apparently
with little comprehension of the
enormity of the threat which
faces it.
Dr. Abraham I. Katsh reminds
us that though there are many
sects and movements in Islam,
almost all agree on certain basic
concepts the goal of
"Islamizing" the rest of the
world. In their religion, the world
is divided into two parts, d'Ar Al-
Islam, that section under full
Islam control, and d'Ar Al-Harb,
the area of war.
THERE CAN be no com-
promise between the two. In the
eyes of the Muslim leaders,
Sadat, though a Muslim, has
betrayed the tenets of the faith
because by making peace with
Israel, he has accommodated
himself to d'Ar Al-Harb. The war
in behalf of Islam is sacred, it is
Jihad. And wars can be fought in
many ways: with the sword, with
bombs, or with that most potent
weapon of all in our days, control
of the supply of oil.
Ayatullah Khomeini has
proclaimed his goals, and they
are not limited to Iran. Col.
Qaddafi, the Muslim zealot of
Libya, had referred to the need to
reconquer Spain and Portugal. In
an otherwise discreetly worded
cover story not long ago, Time
magazine provided one of its
aptly succinct descriptions when
it wrote that Islam has had "a
dynamic manifest destiny ... it
is a political faith with a yearning
for expansion." Hitler once wrote
a book frankly revealing his plans
for world conquest. The rest of
the world dismissed him; he was
only against the Jews. Will
Christendom make the same
mistake now in the face of the
revival of Saracen "manifest
destiny?"
Egypt To Get New Cabinet
President Anwar Sadat instructed Prime Minister
Mustapha Khalil to form a new peacetime government following
their party's overwhelming victory in the recent national
elections. A new Cabinet will be announced before the convening
Saturday of the Peoples' Assembly. The elections, held earlier
this month, were the first multi-party contests since the 1952
revolution.
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already announced plans for a
commemorative stamp to mark
the Centennial and to honor
ORT's contributions to the
Jewish State.
In the United States, plans call
for a year-long series of national
and community events, jointly
sponsored by Women's American
ORT and the American ORT
Federation. One highlight will be
a Spring, 1980, celebration in
New York City's Avery Fisher
Hall. A National Council of
Sponsors is in formation, to
include leading religious,
political, labor, industry and
entertainment figures.
WOMEN'S American ORT,
with 137,000 members in more
than 1,100 chapters from coast to
coast, is the largest voluntary ^
organization in 40 nations which
support the global ORT program
The American ORT Federation
receives funds for its programs
from its more than 100 men's
chapters and other organizational
activities, and from the Joint
Distribution Committee, a mem-
ber agency of the United Jewish
Appeal which is supported bv
Jewish federations and welfare
funds throughout the country.
RETIRED MANAGEMENT EXECUTIVES TO
SERVE ON A VOLUNTEER COMMITTEE TO
BE A MANAGEMENT ADVISORY GROUP TO
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER.
BACKGROUND IN BUSINESS, FINANCE,
ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE, ECT.
RETIRED MEN IN ALL PHASES OF CON
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TRICIANS, PLUMBERS, PAINTERS, ETC
WE NEED YOUR HELP!
VOLUNTEER TODAY!
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484-7676
792-6700
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Today, each of Riverside'schapels
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And in that tradition we serve every
family, regardless of financial
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rrorr lonwfiw"
Friday. July 6,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
Orleans Father and Son Team
Shares a Love of the Land
1
Like father, like son.
(* Further, father likes son; son
likes father.
And, together, father (A.P.)
and son (M.O.) constitute the
visionary and highly energized
"force" behind the astonishing
growth of FPA Corp.
"M.O." is Marvin Orleans,
chairman of the board, FPA Cor-
poration. "A.P." is Alfred Phillip
Orleans, Marvin's father and
member of the board of directors,
FPA Corp., and partner in the
vast Orleans Construction Co.
THE RELATIONSHIP be-
tween Marvin Orleans and his
dad is close, mutually respectful,
deeply shared and totally enjoy-
able to both.
Their most apparent mutual
interest is a love of the land, plus
an ongoing zest for converting
raw acreage into affordable and
highly attractive residences for
middle- and upper middle-class
Americans.
They've done remarkably well,
and A. P. Orleans speaks pride-
fully of over 30,000 homes he
built since the mid-30's. "We
built beautiful six-room houses
with stone foundations and brick
or stone construction for $3,990.
Today," he says, with obvious
pleasure, "those homes are easily
worth $50,000. How's that for
appreciation?"
A.P. built 30.000 homes and
over 8,000 apartments in Phila-
delphia Greater Northeast
Philadelphia, "in the West Oak
Lane area," and in Cheltenham
Township in northern
Philadelphia-
IT WAS to Philadelphia that
A. P. Orleans came, in 1905, from
his home in Prushina in Grodno,
eastern Russia, to study
medicine. Instead, he fell in love
with Lillie Silverstein, who also
came from Russia, and they were
married in 1908. He worked in the
insurance business until 1918,
but he was dissatisfied. His
interests were in the land, an
interest he'd acquired from his
father, a prosperous lumberman
and wholesale lumber purveyor in
Russia.
A. P. Orleans prospered in the
real estate and development
industries in Philadelphia, and by
1935 had become a strongly
established national figure in the
real estate industry. He was one
of 50 others in that industry to
organize the National Asso-
ciation of Home Builders, which
now has over 110,000 members.
He was for many years president
of the Philadelphia division,
NAHB. and is still an active
member and director.
Meanwhile, Marvin Orleans
had finished high school, and
joined his father in business in
Philadelphia. Like his dad,
Marvin was ambitious and
quietly energetic. He attended
night school at Drexel Institute
of Technology, majoring in ar-
chitecture. "At the same time,"
he says, "I was learning the busi-
ness from my father."
And he became aware, during
these years, of the development
of Florida, and particularly of
South Florida.
CAME World War II, and
Marvin Orleans joined the Air
Corps. As a bomber pilot, Capt.
Orleans was in combat with the
490th Bomb Group, 851st
Squadron, flying B-24s and B
17s. He flew 30 missions over
Germany, won a Distinguished
Flying Cross and an Air Medal
with four clusters. He also
received an R&R furlough to
Florida, and was assigned as a
pilot instructor at Homestead Air
Force Base. And he continued to
study the development and
the potential of the area.
The Orleans Construction Co.,
Philadelphia, had continued to
grow, and from late 1939 had
become one of the largest con-
struction and development hrms
in the U.S., with vast interests in
the Philadelphia and South
Jersey areas.
Today, Orleans Construction
Company is one of the most
active construction companies in
Pennsylvania. As a subsidiary of
Orleans Construction Company,
its chairman of the board is A. P.
Orleans, and Marvin Orleans is a
member of the board of directors
and a partner of the firm. The
company's day-to-day operation
is headed by 32-year-old Jeffrey
Phillip Orleans, Marvin's son.
The company's developments,
and management interests,
include the Bustleton Shopping
Center and the Red Lion
Shopping Center in northeast
Philadelphia, and Gimbel's
Cheltenham Shopping Center, in
the Cheltenham area, and
thousands of apartments owned
and operated by the company.
(BOTH A.P. and Marvin
Orleans retain residences in
Philadelphia. They also have
residences in Florida. Marvin
lives at Palm-A ire in Pompano
Beach; his father lives at Sea
Coast Towers in Miami Beach.)
In July 1965, Marvin Orleans
was invited to buy stock in the
initial Palm-Aire development in
Pompano Beach.
"It included a golf course, a 50-
room lodge, and a part of a club-
house," Orleans recalls.
Orleans ultimately bought 400
acres in the present Palm-Aire
section. He kept 300 acres, and
sold a hundred.
In 1967, he became strongly
aware that Florida was facing an
unprecedented demand for
residential housing, and that
condominium construction was
perfectly tailored to meet the
need.
"I SAW this growing need as
one that included all income
levels, and 1 felt that quality,
upper-income residences could be
developed as a condominium
resort community," Orleans said.
"Palm-Aire has always had an
ongoing love affair with golf
courses, and we now have five 18-
hole courses. Later on, our in-
coming residents began to dis-
play a comparable interest in
tennis, so we've built 31 tennis
courts. And these facilities were
built not simply for our residents,
but for guests of our resort
hotels, of which we now have
four.
"And of course, the Spa at
Palm-Aire is one of the best-
known in the world, and, con-
trary to what many persons
think, it is not designed for
people who are out of shape. It's
actually intended as a facility for
those who are in shape and
want to stay that way."
The Palm-Aire Country Club
community in Pompano Beach
has more than 4,000 con-
dominium residences completed
from apartments to single
family villas and townhouses. An
additional 500 units are being
constructed, and work is now
underway on enlargement of the
facilities of the Spa Hotel and
other resort-oriented facilities.
Loehmann's Plaza at Palm-Aire,
a 160,000 square foot shopping
center, was completed in 1978.
A new luxury single-family
home community Del-Aire
Golf Club is being developed
near Defray Beach by the
company and a major banking
firm.
Marvin and his father divide
their time between Philadelphia
and Florida. Marvin spends five
to six months in Florida, on a
relatively fixed schedule. He also
commutes regularly to his
Florida office during the summer.
MARVIN'S FATHER follows
a slightly less rigorous schedule,
confining his Florida visits to the
winter months.
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11
Marvin Orleans, right, board chairman of Florida Palm-Aire,
greets his father and business associate, A. P. Orleans, in front
of the company's Pompano Beach offices.
n t ii.- Dad" with obvious pleasure.
Orleans shows up lor work in his
tasteful office in Philadelphia. And they get down to
Son Marvin Orleans stands up, business, just as they have for
smiles, says "Good morning, nearly 40 years.
Israel Price Index Soars
e
s
d
n
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Even the most pessimistic eco-
nomic experts were surprised by
the announcement that the price
index soared by 8.7 percent last
month, the highest monthly
increase in 27 years without a
drastic devaluation of the Pound.
April's figures showed that
housing costs led the upward
spiral and, together with higher
food prices, accounted for 70
percent of the increase.
Several Cabinet ministers re-
portedly have appealed to Prime
Minister Menachem Begin to
intervene personally in economic
policy, hitherto solely the
province of Finance Minister
Simcha Ehrlich. Begin was said
to have told them that he feared
galloping inflation would en-
danger Likud's prospects in the
next elections.
Prices increased by 23.4
percent during the first four
months of the year. Inflation is
currently running at an annual
rate of 88 percent, one of the
highest if not the highest in the
world.
The chief contributor is the
price of apartments which went
up by an average of 25.5 percent
in April. The cost of an apart-
ment in the coastal area north of
Tel Aviv increased by 35.9
percent. A one-room flat in a
good neighborhood in Jerusalem
currently sells for IL 1 million,
about $40,000. These increases
came on top of last year's rise in
housing costs which amounted to
133 percent.
And, almost daily, A. P. ^r
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Hebrew Day School
Hlllel
Jewish Community Center
Jewish Family Service
Nutrition Program
Social Welfare Fund
TAY-SACfcfS
WECARE
Young Leadership
UNITED
JEWISH
(Israel & Jews
in need around
the world)
67%
LOCAL
16%
FUND ||%|
RAISING
A DUES
RAMS-----------
5%


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July i
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Jackson-Vanik Amendment
Supporters of the Soviet Jewry emigration
movement should be prepared for a concerted drive
by the Carter Administration to repeal the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment or at least find some way to
circumvent it. President Carter had made no secret of
his desire to extend Most Favored Nation trade
status to the Soviet Union, especially since it is to be
granted to the People's Republic of China.
And with the signing of the SALT II agreement
in Vienna, this will be a major administration
operation.
Many members of Congress, including Rep.
Charles Vanik (D., Ohio), co-author of the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment, are known to believe that serious
consequences may result if China is given the trade
benefits and they are denied to the Soviets.
Many others are being influenced by the in-
creasing number of Jews allowed to leave the USSR
and by the release of Soviet dissidents and Jewish
activists from Siberian prisons.
But these moves have not convinced Sen. Henry
Jackson (D., Wash.), the other co-author of the
amendment, and such Senators as New York's Jacob
Javits, a Republican, and Daniel Moynihan, a
Democrat.
Jackson correctly pointed out that "many of
those who are now urging repeal because the
numbers (of emigrants) have been going up, were
urging repeal last year because they said the
numbers were going down." Jackson said the
amendment must remain law "as long as the
prisoners remain in jail," as long as people are
"punished for asking to emigrate" and as long as
people have "to wait two, three, four, even six or
seven years for a visa."
He said the President has promised, in writing,
to uphold the Jackson-Vanik Amendment, and "I
intend to hold him to that promise." The American
Jewish community can do no less.
Tribute to Milton Parson
Milton M. Parson deserves the congratulations
of the community. Currently, he is celebrating his
24th year with the South Florida Israel Bonds
Organization and his seventh at its helm.
When Parson first stepped into his present
position, bond sales in South Florida were $8 million
annually. But in 1979, sales in the area have exceeded
that amount through the current month alone, and it
is expected that sales by the end of the year will be
two and a half times greater than in 1972.
This is a truly remarkable achievement and a
tribute to Parson's professional leadership.
Parson has had a long and varied career in
organizational and communal service, having
previously been a supervisor for the State of Israel
Bonds in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut,
Delaware and Pennsylvania.
His past almost quarter-century of service in
South Florida has helped to enrich the philanthopic
life of the area in the cause of the State of Israel.
(Jewish Floridiam
J>F "EAT *OHT LAUDERDALE
Business Office 136 S. Federal Hwy., Suite 306, Danla, Flm SS004
Telephone 030-9018
FRED K. SHOCHET mwAwvioun.
Editor and Publisher *"" ^i?JF?F7
_ __ Executive Editor
1W Jewish FlerMiM DM Not Guarantee The Ka.hn.th
OfTheMercaaadlse Advertised In Its Columns
Seccaa (ka Psslafe Paid at Daala. Fla. Mill
PoMastod Biweekly
Undying Spirit of Phil Randolph
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Not all American history books
record that John Adams and
Thomas Jefferson, the second
and third Presidents of the
United States, both died on July
4, 1826, precisely 50 years after
the Declaration of Independence
was adopted. This mystical bit of
chronicling leads to musing over
a current similar dramatic coin-
cidence: A. Philip Randolph, a
titan among American Black
leaders, died May 16, not many
hours before the 25th anniversary
of the Warren Court's monu-
mental ruling outlawing racial
segregation in public schools.
Branded "the most dangerous
man in America" by Virginia-
born Woodrow Wilson, Phil Ran-
dolph was cast as David against
that industrial Goliath, the Pull-
man Company. A hall porter at
$4 a month in his youth, he
suffered the indignities and racial
oppression inflicted upon
thousands in menial jobs.
BUT AS aspiring intellectual
and indomitable fighter for
human rights, he shepherded his
small black union of sleeping car
porters to triumph over the en-
trenched Pullman Company
titans.
When he passed on at 90, our
statesmen searched earnestly for
words to say farewell in
thoughtful respect. Phil Ran-
dolph was born to American
greatness. He brought strength
to the doctrine and practice of
Nonviolent Civil Disobedience.
He was stranger to obsequence,
companion to courage.
Projecting the original march
on Washington in 1941 to
dramatize American necessity to
attack job discrimination as the
nation tooled up to fight the lords
of fascism, he induced Franklin
Roosevelt to issue Executive
Order 8802, matrix of FEPC.
FROM THAT juncture on.
Americans were in a second revo-
lution whether they knew it or
not. A giant force had been dis-
lodged from granite, ingrained
bigotry. Twenty-five years ago,
when the Supreme Court made a
black nine-year-old Topeka
schoolgirl, Linda Brown, a
celebrity by ruling in Brown v.
Board of Education of Topeka
that all seggregation in public
schools was "inherently
unequal," the battle for full
equality in a free society burst
upon the nation.
A sleepy American giant arose
for a crucial encounter, not yet
ended, a fight destined to bring
to the light of judgment the best
and the worst in this nation "s
ethos.
The starch in Harry Truman's
back had been partially respon-
sible for integration of our armed
forces, beginning in 1948. The
monumental 1954 Court ruling
for an end to public school seg-
gregation, followed by the 1955
"all deliberate speed" deseg-
regation decision, provided heavy
artillery for the classic struggle.
Seventeen southern and border
states which had legislated dis-
crimination began to feel the
blast of the court rulings.
THEN this nation moved pas-
sionately into two decades, of
debate, violence, marches,
demonstrations, on to the brink
of another civil war. In 1958,
Nashville's desegregated high
school was blown up and Gov
Orval Faubus defied the law Z
behalf of Little Rocks embattlj
schools, obliging Presiden
Eisenhower to dispatch federa
troops. *
In that same period of thrusi
and counter-thrust, Martin
Luther King began his slow nor,
violent climb to freedom and
glory. James Meredith fought his
way into lily-white University of
Mississippi in 1962, thus humil-
iating Gov. Ross H. Barnett.
The next year, Gov. Georgj
Wallace took a quixotic stand in
an Alabama schoolhouse door
and lost while snatching a hectic
ride to national political
notoriety.
Cattle prods smote the fair
name of justice in the face in
Birmingham in 1963; riot '
erupted in Watts in 1966 and L
125 major American cities not
long thereafter.
FROM THESE cauldrons of*
turmoil, head bashing, murder.
and arson, there flowed on to the
Continued on Page 9
*
ATWO-WW STRpET
AUTONOMY
AVENUE
ACLU Leader Defends Enemies
OwtofTownUponooet. ^
Friday, July 6,1979
Volume 8
11TAMUZ6739
Number 14
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
The threat by a small group of
Chicago-based Nazis to march
through Skokie, 111., in full Nazi
regalia, had a traumatic effect on
the American Jewish community.
During the 16-month period
ending in June, 1978, the planned
Nazi march angered Jews
throughout the United States not
just because more than half of the
Chicago suburb's population is
Jewish, but more specifically
because some 7,000 of them are
Holocause survivors.
This is why Frank Collin, head
of the National Socialist Party of
America, picked Skokie. Collin's
real aim was to force Chicago to
allow him to hold a demon-
stration in the racially-troubled
Marquette Park area. When the
courts threw out the city's
requirement that his group post a
bond, he dropped plans to march
in Skokie, something by that
time he was not too eager to do
anyway.
THE SKOKIE controversy
also had a traumatic effect on the
American Civil Liberties Union,
the group which defended the
rights of the Nazis to march and
which has long had many Jews
among its membership. The
ACLU lost 30,000 members, 15
percent of the total membership,
as a result of its defense of
Collins group, at a cost of
$500,000 in annual dues.
Hardest hit by the attack on
the ACLU by Jews was of course
David Goldberger, legal director
of the Illinois ACLU, who
defended Collin and found
himself strongly criticized by his
fellow Jews in Chicago. But also
personally affected was Aryeh
Neier, who was the ACLU's
national executive director from
1970-1978.
Neier, who as a child fled the
Nazis from his native Berlin with
his parents and sister, received
many letters denouncing him.
"My only hope is that if we are
both forced into a march some
day to some crematorium, you
will be at the head of the parade,
at which time you will in your
rapture have an opportunity to
sing hosannahs in praise of
freedom of speech for your
tormentors," one letter said.
NEIER, in Defending My
Enemy (New York: Dutton,
182p., $9.95), argues for his view
that there is no contradiction in
supporting freedom of speech and
being against Nazis or any other
racist or pro-tolitarian group. The
book offers a good review of the
entire Skokie controversy, and
Neier leans over backwards to be
fair to his critics. But it deserves
a reading by the Jewish com-
munity for the views presented,
views which for the most part
have long been held by most
American Jews.
Neier s basic argument is
simple yet hard for many to
understand. "The freedom of our
enemies must be defended if we
are to Dreserve our freedom."
zis,
inyJ
A
This is the basis of the Bill of
Rights and of American
democracy. The ACLU was
founded in 1920 to protect
freedom of speech at a time when
labor union organizers were
threatened and when U.S.
Attorney General A. Palmer
Mitchell's infamous raids
resulted in the jailing of
thousands of aliens and
suspected radicals.
Throughout the years, th
ACLU has defended Nazis
Communists, radicals and many
persons who were denied the
rights simply because their vie
differed with the prevalent
sentiments.
PERHAPS THE best
argument that the defense of free
speech works was made recently
by the Yugoslav dissident,
Mihajlo Mihajlov. Writing on
Impressions of America in the
New Leader after a 10-month
visit in the United States,
Mihajlov notes: "During my
very first days in the United
States, I realized I was in a place
far different from the one I had
lived for 44 years. Driving on the
outskirts of Washington, DC. I
saw a red Nazi flag waving in the
air, with its white circle and black
swastika. I detest fascists, but,
when I saw no one paid attention
to the flag I understood for the
first time in my life the true
strength of democracy.
"The United States
Ihr (ISA
Continued on Page
fought


K'
Friday, July 6, 1979

rjj__~tn~~,tr Pnrt I Auderdale
TheJewishFloridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
U.S. Moves to Begin
Talks With Palestinians
Pompano JWV Receives
Service Award
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Carter Administration has
officially opened the door for
"Palestinians" in Jerusalem.
Lebanon and wherever else they
may be living to enter the Israeli-
Egyptian-U.S. peace process
related to the West Bank and
Gaza.
The Administration did not
specifically name Jerusalem in
making known its decision but
said that talks are to begin by the
U.S. officials with "a number of
Palestinians both inside and out-
side of the West Bank and
Gaza."
Since all of Jerusalem in-
cluding East Jerusalem has
been part of Israel since 1967, the
U.S. decision not to exclude the
holy city explicitly is certain to
create serious U.S.-Israeli dif-
ficulties.
THE CARTER Adminis-
tration decision came in response
to an "urgent" Saudi Arabian
call in Riyadh for the U.S. to
start "an immediate dialogue"
with the Palestine Liberation
()rganization.
The Administration reiterated,
however, it will continue its long-
standing conditions against talk
w ith the PLO itself. The U.S.
decision on the widened scope of
its "talks" became known when
tin' .Jewish Telgraphic Agency
inquired at the State Department
about the Saudi suggestion in a
newspaper report.
Saudi Arabian Crown Prince
l.ilul suggested in Riyadh that
U.S.-PLO talks could lead to the
PLO accepting Security Council
Resolution 242 and acknowledge
Israel's right i<> exist. These are
requirements set down by
President Carter before U.S.
talks Ix'gin with the PLO.
The PLO receives major
financial Bupport from Saudi
\rabia where tens of thousands
cit Palestinians occupy important
important positions in the oil rich
count!*) 's pel roleum industry and
thus have a grip <>n the country's
economy and security,
In an interview with New York
Times columnist Anthony Lewis.
I'ahd stated. "It is incumbent on
the U.S. to talk to the PLO
because it is a, if not the, political
fact in the conflict. It is the sole
legitimate representative of the
Palestinian people."
"WE UNDERSTAND Crown
Prince Fahd's concern that the
legitimate rights of the Pales-
tinians must be dealt with as part
of any comprehensive peace," the
State Department said in a pre-
pared statement in response to
questions from the JTA.
"The question is the central
focus in the negotiations now
"T
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underway. the Department
added. "As you know, both the
Camp David frameworks and the
letters by President (Anwar)
Sadat and Prime Minister Begin
sent to President Carter March
26 call for Palestinian par-
ticipation in these negotiations.
"We desire that participation
and will continue to work for it in
the days ahead." the State De-
partment added. "In this con-
junction, obviously we will be
talking to a number of Pales-
tinians both inside and outside
the West Bank and Gaza."
Action Line
Shifting Winds
At the meeting of the "Non-Aligned Movement" in
Colombo. Sri Lanka, of 91 nations and organizations, Third
World governments have begun to place limits on the radical
Arab s ability to use international organizations as part of their
anti-Israel and anti-Egypt machinery.
Anti-Egyptian motions and their suspension from the
conference were headed off. Marxist Angola and conservative
Zaire both opposed moves of other African nations against
Egypt at the meeting. The trend represented by the Non-
Aligned Conference and by the World Health Organization's
recent refusal to suspend Israel or move a regional headquarters
out of Egypt hasn't affected their criticism of Israel's "ex-
pansionist, Imperial Policy" and their opposition to the peace
treaty.
However, recent revelations of the extent of the involve-
ment of the PLO in Id.i Amin's eight despotic years of rule in
Uganda have seemed to cause the Third World, led by Black
Africa, to turn a corner.
Another reason for the change of heart among some world
leaders is the changed political picture of Egypt, not Israel, now
being the object of attack..It was the prestige of Egypt, the
largest Arab nation and the second largest country in Africa,
that caused many leaders to go along with an anti-Israel policy.
Now many other Third World nations have apparently decided
to adopt the policy representing their rationale.
The meeting of non-aligned nations, based upon the past
number ol years, seems to represent a softening of some
positions and could hopefully represent a slow step-by-step pos-
sibility ol international support of the Middle East treaty in the
not lixi distant future.
Edmund Entin, Chairman
Community Relations Council
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
The Jewish War Veterans of
Pompano Beach, Post 196,
received the Freedman Award for
outstanding service during the
past year. This ranks the local
post among the best in Florida,
according to Adjutant Max
Krasner.
The group also was given a
special award for their news-
paper, The Bugler, of which Dave
Skop is editor.
Post 196 officers are: Irving
Chook, commander; Jack Malin,
senior vice commander; Coleman
Weinberg, first junior vice com-
mander; Ben Bloom, second
junior vice commander; Lester
Cantor, judge advocate: Ix>uis
Eager, quartermaster; Jay
Riseman, chaplain; and Leo
Rosskamm, officer of the day-
Coin, Stamp Show
The Juvenile Diabetes Foun-
dation announces the sponsor-
ship of a professional Coin and
Stamp Show to be held at
Lauderhill Shopping Center. Fort
Lauderdale. on Sunday, July 8,
between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. The
show helps support diabetes
research.
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K Certified Kosher



Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater tort Lauderdale
Friday, July b, 19vy
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Robert O'Connell, president of
Richards Department'Stores,
addressing the large crowd at
the "Launchin' Luncheon."
Luncheon Launches
WECARE Fund-Raiser
Continued from Page 1
president Anita Perlman
ad-
x "i
The head table scene from left, Rovi Faber, Leslie Gottlieb and
Anita Perlman listening to Dick Basile's remarks. Basile is
Richards sales promotion director.
(Pi
J
wm
\
\ .4
Anita Perlman, JCC
president, addressing the
guests stating that "the entire
community is proud of the
WECARE program," while
Robert O'Connell looks on.
Principals of the Richards WECARE Day are, from left, Robert
O'Connell, Richards president, Anne Fleischman, Sally Rodin
and Robert Daughton, vice president, director of sales.
dressed the group, saying, "The
JCC is very proud of the WE-
CARE program and their great
accomplishments over the years.
You are outstanding people who
care and help others and improve
the quality of life in the Fort
Lauderdale area. Aug. 9 is a big
day and it must be successful in
order to continue WECARE's
humanitarian programs."
Sally Radin, general chairman
of WECARE, gave a brief history
of the program. "We have over
500 volunteers who provide all
sorts of services on a non-
sectarian basis to all who need
help. We have volunteers who
help the sick, the shut-ins, handi-
capped, the lonely; we visit
nursing homes and hospitals and
offer moral support to those who
might never have visitors. We do
the shopping for those who
cannot shop themselves, trans-
port the elderly to doctors' ap-
pointments and work with blind
persons."
Mrs. Radin commented further
that WECARE sponsors blood
drives and collects used eye-
glasses and hearing aids for dis-
tribution to the needy. "Our
volunteers receive much personal
satisfaction from this work in
knowing that they are helping
people really in need."
Some of the area personalities
in attendance were Mayors
Eugene Cipdlloni of Lauderhill
Prank VelW of Plantation;'
Howard Craft of Lauderdale
Lakes, Lenny Kimmel of North
Lauderdale, George Liederman of
Margate, City Manager Ed Gross
of Tamarac. Deputy City
Manager George Mudd of
Margate and Judge Harvey S.
Ford. This group, along with
leading clergymen and dig.
nitaries of community organiza-
tions, lent their support.
THE WECARE committee for
the sale day includes Fran Gold-
stein, publicity; Harry
Haimowitz and Bobbe Hassman,
door prizes; Esther Solomon and
Lucille Stang, host and
hostesses; Marianne Falk, charge
accounts; Martin Fleischman,
transportation; Leo SUverstein,
special events; Mimi Bederman
and FritzieHozansky, telephone.
olds 11
Pictured from left are Fran Goldstein, publicity chairman; Leo
SUverstein, special events chairman; Bobby Breen, well known
entertainer; Hilda Bobbins, WECARE coordinator; and Anne
Fleischman.
Seated at the head table are, from left, Sally Radin, WECARE
general chairman; Robert Daughton, vice president, director of
Richards Stores; Rabbi Philip Labowitz of Temple Beth Israel;
and Richards' Lauderhill store manager, Miles Antonoff.
Leslie S. Gottlieb, executive
director of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, offers greetings
on behalf of the Federation.
-J
Mildred
Women,
Sally Radin.
Tell, president of the Aleph Council of B'nai B'rith
admires the buffet table with Anne Fleischman and
Leo SUverstein, standing, special events chairman, is seen
addressing the luncheon. Enjoying his remarks are Robert
O'Connell, Richards president and Anne Fleischman.
rom left, Anne Fleischman, Howard Craft, mayor of Lauder-
dale Lakes; Sally Radin and Judge Harvey S. Ford
Telling the group of the
transportation arrangements
is Martin Fleischman.
Distinguished guests included, from left, Howard Craft, mayor
of Lauderdale Lakes; Lenny Kimmel, North Lauderdale mayor-
and Mitchie Libros, president of the Jewish Federation's
Women's Division
Seen greeting the large guest
turnout is Richards president,
Robert O'Connell.
a^frnm^Jl?Jer\at th$ **""** WECARE Day luncheon
CiooUnni iL./un8' city mger of Tamarac; Eugene
theLau^ilnerhl11 mayr; Irvin* Rosenbaum, assistant to
manager m Enjoying the pre-luncheon conversation are, from left, Judge
Harvey Ford; Elsie Staska, director of community services for
the city of Sunrise; Frank Veltri, mayor of Plantation; and Rev
Mahesh Chavda of the Good News Fellowship Church.
Posing for the camera prior to the luncheon are, left to right.
I,Zt aT' a PresUient of the Hebrew Congregation of
LoutlerhUl; Anne Fleischman; Martin Fleischman; SaUy
Hadin, and Bruce raylor, public relations director of the Palm
Heath Broward Council of B'nai B'rith.

thr

ffiSay, juiyu, !/
*___. C,- J niimrt\n\
TheJewishFloridion of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
/If {A/A Conference
/oung Rabbis Pray for Sharansky
Libraries Present Free Film Nights
NEW YORK Rabbis at
lending a recent United Jewish
Appeal Young Rabbinic Leader-
ship Seminar in Washington,
DC., went en masse to a site just
opposite the Soviet Embassy to
pray for Anatoly Sharansky.
Their action came after Avital
Sharansky, wife of the im-
prisoned Jewish dissident, told
the rabbis that she had recently
received information that her
husband's health had
dangerously deteriorated.
Mrs. Sharansky, who received
the information initially from a
source in Israel, has been in
contact with a number of sym-
pathetic Washington officials
whose help now, she said, "is
more urgent than ever."
Sharansky is suffering from
severe loss of sight, rapid weight
loss, constant fevers and per-
sistent migraine headaches,
according to additional reports
which have reached Mrs.
Sharansky.
As the rabbis recited first the
mincha (afternoon) .service and
then tehillim (Psalma), they were
I
An Open Letter
To The Jewish Community
As the WECARE coordinator for the past year, I want to
publicly thank those caring individuals the VOLUNTEERS
- who are the backbone and strength of this humanitarian
program. They seek no fame, no glory or compensation for their
time and service, but only the self-satisfaction in knowing they
have brought some measure of comfort to someone in a time of
stress.
With the population growth in Broward County increasing
faster than the city services could accommodate, the WECARE
volunteer program became a welcomed "helping hand" to all of
the social agencies in our area, and has earned a commendable
reputation for outstanding cooperation.
For example, when one of our neighbors suffering from
cancer needed someone to accompany her to a hospital in Texas,
a WECARE volunteer responded; when transportation was
required to drive a patient to a local hospital for dialysis treat-
ment, a WECARE volunteer responded; when a young blind
MS victim called for a friendly visitor, a WECARE volunteer
responded.
During my stay, WECARE Blood Bank replaced 63 pints
of blood; has shipped 2,068 pairs of used eyeglasses to "New
Eyes for the Needy" in New Jersey for world-wide distribution;
20 volunteers calling on hospitals weekly have visited over 3,400
patients; 65 volunteers making monthly visits to eight area
nursing homes totaled over 1,600 hours of volunteer time; 105
phone volunteers contributed about 630 hours of time just
reaching potential blood donors for WECARE blood drives.
We must not overlook the helpful clerical volunteers who
are ready on short notice to assist in the heavy mailings from
time to time.
Working in this program has been a rewarding experience
.n getting to know so many giving people. Our committee chair-
|x-rsons have given generously of themselves, and our volun-
teers are TOPS. Though retiring from this post, I shall continue
in the program as hospital visitation chairperson.
If you would like to give some time to this most worthy
effort, call Linda at 484-7676.
Yours in WECARE,
Hilda Robbins,
WECARE Coordinator
observed by Soviet Embassy
personnel and by several police-
men, one of whom crossed the
street to request and record
details about the quiet gathering.
After prayers and promises to
Mrs. Sharansky of further action
on behalf of her husband, the
rabbis departed to their home
cities across the eastern and Mid-
western portions of the country.
During the conference, the
young rabbis attended briefing
sessions with White House of-
ficials, including Edward San-
ders, presidential advisor, and
Zvi Brosh, an official of the
Israeli Embassy.
Their program also included
discussions with Dr. Michael
Berenbaum, deputy director,
President's Holocaust Com-
mission, and several sessions
devoted to an overview of the
American Jewish community and
the 1980 UJA campaign. Session
leaders were: Rabbi Stanley
Rabinowitz, chairman of the UJA
Rabbinic Cabinet; Melvyn H.
Bloom, UJA assistant executive
vice chairman, and Rabbi Melvin
L. Libman. director of the UJA
Rabbinic and Faculty Advisory
Cabinets.
After several group discus-
sions, the rabbis expressed their
unanimous decision to meet
again for further delineation of
their group goals, to hold
seminars across the country to
involve other committed young
rabbis, and to consider plans to
bring more young rabbis into the
UJA Rabbinic Cabinet.
In addition, the rabbis declared
their determination to become
more actively involved in their
local campaigns and work with
increased effort on behalf of
Soviet Jewish Prisoners of
Conscience.
Bar Mitzvah
MICHAEL BLOCKSBERG
On Saturday morning, July 7,
Mr and Mrs. B. M. Blocksberg
will sponsor the kiddush in honor
of the Bar Mitzvah of their son
Michael Alan. Services will be led
by Rabbi Albert N. Troy and
('amor Jack Marchant.
Planning A Trip?
I
| Council's 1979 Exciting Travel I
Program to Israel, Europe, West '
Coast, Canadian Rockies and I
laska Is now available. f
NATIONAL COUNCIL I
I OF JEWISH WOMEN |
We do business
the right way.
Uoo W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.33311
Phone: 735-1330
OAKLAND TOYOTA
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
776-6272
r a
ACKAGING
1201 N E 45 STREET
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Call f
I DOROTHY KLEIN7414742 j
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Household Items
URGENTLY NEEDED
FOR RUSSIANJEWISH FAMILIES
An urgent plea has been made by the Jewish Family
Service agency for household) items needed to furnish
apartments for the newly arriving Russian Jewish
families to be resettled in Fort Lauderdale.
VACUUM CLEANERS
SMALL APPLIANCES
SILVERWARE
DISHES
BLACK AND WHITE TV. SETS
COOKING UTENSILS
The Jewish Family Service can arrange to pick up
any items you can donate.
PLEASE CALL SHELLY SOLOMON 927-9288
Tuesday is film night at the
Fort Lauderdale Branch of the
Broward County Library. The
following films will be shown for
adults and students from 7:30 to
8:45 p.m.:
July 10, "Universe," produced
by NASA. July 17, "Bernice
Bobs Her Hair," based on a short
story by F. Scott Fitzgerald. July
24, "Case of the Bermuda
Triangle.'.1 July 31. "Hollywood:
The Dream Factory."
Thursday is film day at the
Lauderdale Lakes Branch. The
following films will be shown for
adults and young adults from 3
to 4 p.m.:
July 5, "River of Grass,"
which shows man's encroach-
ment on the Everglades. "Fort
Lauderdale Gift of the Sea"
and "St. Augustine: the Oldest
City."
July 12, "Living Wilderness"
and "Rails Across the Summit."
July 19, "Atlantic Parks." "Bon-
jour Montreal" and "Edmonton
Klondike Days." July 26, "Van-
couver" and "Discover Nova
Scotia."
All films are shown free of
charge. '-.
UJA Automotive Division Mission
NEW YORK A 10-day
United Jewish Appeal Mission to
Israel, especially organized for
leaders of the automotive in-
dustry, was announced by Edgar
Cadden of Skokie, 111., and Victor
Gelb of Moreland Hills, Ohio, co-
chairmen of the UJA Automotive
Division. The mission will leave
New York on Sept. 9 and return
on Sept. 19.
Among the highlights will be
an automotive mini-trade show,
meetings with Israeli manu-
facturers, briefings by Israeli
military and diplomatic leaders,
tours through the West Bank and
Sinai and a walking tour of Old
Jerusalem.
"This mission is the first
created for the particular needs of
our industry." Cadden and Gelb
stated. "We welcome the oppor-
tunity of exchanging ideas and
information with people in
similar or related businesses and
expect to achieve special insights
into the enormous problems
facing Israel's people and indus-
trial community in these
demanding times. We further
welcome the opportunity to
travel throughout Israel, seeing
the realities behind the events
and places that fill our head-
lines."
Announcing NEW facilities at
Florida
Medical
Center
A 400 bed acute care hospital serving south
Florida
Heart Institute of Florida...
110 coronary beds...one of
the largest & most modern
coronary care units in the
world...a new cardiac
rehabilitation unit.
Florida Cancer Institute...
the largest & finest equip-
ped radiation therapy
facility in the south.
Pulmonary Medicine...
Complete care & treatment
for patients with acute lung
problems.
The NEW Florida Medical Center...
West Broward's largest
medical complex
5000 West Oakland Park Blvd. Ft. Lauderdale
Florida
For more information about the hospital and its
medical staff, contact Ted Rosenberg, Associate Ad-
ministrator at
7356000, ext. 4068


Page 8
Jewish Community Center
Stages June Celebrations
Pictured are participants at the recent anniversaries
and birthday celebrations for the month of June held for
congregants of the JCC kosher nutrition program. A
program of dance and songs was presented, featuring
"The Locketts" and Rachel Eisenstein.
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 6,1979
Organizations Announce Meetings
Brandeis Women Elect Gloria Boris
h
June wedding anniversary celebrants are, seated, Mr. and Mrs.
A Rubin. Standing, from left, Mr. and Mrs. J. Koch, Mr. and
Mrs. J. Fleigelman.
June birthday celebrants are. from left, F. Nathan, M.
Grossberg, S. Tessel, R. Goldberg and Mr. and Mrs. O.
Frankel.
*W
. r-i i J
JCC Kosher Nutrition Site administrative staff, pictured before
a recent party, are, from left, David Gaines, Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Perlis and Joe Hoffman.
NURSING HOME
VOLUNTEERS
The Castle Singles Chaplaincy
Assistants, under the chairman-
ship of Lillian Schoen, will con-
tinue conducting services at the
Plantation Nursing Home on the
third Friday of the month during
the summer.
Services were conducted June
15 by Lillian Schoen, assisted by
Helen Cooper, Augusta Breg-
man, Gert Goldenberg, Matte
Haber, Ruth Kay and Sylvia
Mulhouser. This is one of the
groups sponsored by the WE-
CARE volunteer program of the
Jewish Community Center.
Challah and wine were supplied
by the nursing home.
MRS. BERKOWITZ
SAYS THANKS
Max Berkowitz, who has been
attending the Gathering Place, a
day care center for the frail and
elderly, is now in the hospital in
New York City and is very ill.
Mrs. Berkowitz said, "I want
you to know what a blessing it
was to have the Gathering Place
to go to. During some of his
worst days now, when it is most
difficult for him to talk, he
whispers, "Take me home. I want
to go to the Gathering Place.' He
associates his present nurse with
Ann Chestnut, LPN and day care
supervisor (an angel of mercy)."
Mrs. Berkowitz stated, "I wish
I could adequately express my
feelings and gratitude about the
staff of the Gathering Place.
Thank you,' two small words,
cannot begin to say what I feel in
my heart. Those who give of
themselves to bring better life to
the less fortunate are a gift from
God. Blessed are those who give,
and people of the Jewish Com-
munity Center be blessed with
good health to always be able to
continue their great work."
YOGA CLASS
CONTINUES
The Claire Tuttie Yoga Class,
featuring "soft exercise," is
scheduled to continue throughout
the summer months beginning
Monday. July 9 at 9:30 a.m. at
1 he Reconstructionist Temple.
Plantation. The six-week sessions
have a limited enrollment due to
requirements, so interested
participants should register this
week by calling the JCC.
Gloria Boris of Fort
Lauderdale was elected a national
vice president of Brandeis
University's National Women's
Committee (NWC) during its
recent annual conference on the
Brandeis campus.
Ms. Boris, a member of the
NWC since 1967, was one of eight
vice presidents elected in the new
slate of officers.
Ms. Boris was the founding
president of the Fort Lauderdale-
Pompano Beach Chapter and
later served as regional vice
president, executive vice presi-
dent and president.
Active in civic and community
affairs, she is a board member of
the Jewish Federation and the
Jewish Community Center, as
well as serving as vice president
of the Fort Lauderdale Children's
Theater.
The Fort Lauderdale resident
attended Bard College and
Parson School of Design before
becoming affiliated with a family
retail business.
State JWV Officers Meet
An organizational conclave
consisting of elected and ap-
pointed officers of the Depart-
ment of Florida, Jewish War
Veterans, was held at the home of
State JWV Commander Alvin
Rose in Miami recently.
More than 40 representatives
from various sectors of the state
of Florida attended the session in
which Commander Rose outlined
his program for 1979-1980.
The state commander pre-
sented a program which will
consist of public housing; JWV
Action Committee; a JWV forest
project in Israel; veterans' legis-
lation; Americanism workshop:
participation in Allied Veterans
Council activities, an out-patient
clinic for Mm ward County; com-
munity relations; fund-raising
and participation in the building
of a proposed Jewish Chapel at
the U.S. Military Academy at
West Point, N.Y.; a Boy Scout
activity program; JWV Florida
Department newspaper, and a
public relations program that will
encompass all forms of media-
Rose thanked the assemblage
for their dedication. He stated.
"The proof of the pudding is the
increased membership in the
state of Florida."
The Jewish War Veterans is
the oldest veterans organization
in the United States.
" if
n
/.
Nettie Rothstein, president of the Masada Margate Chapter of
Hadassah, is shown holding a special award for "Group of The
Year." The Masada Group won second place for the en tin-
region. Looking on is Esther Cannon, president of the Mid-
Coast Region of Hadassah.
Israeli Tennis Stars
On American Tour
SAN DIEGO Four Israeli
tennis stars, ages 9 to 12, are here
on a 35-day exhibition tour across
the country and Canada before
representing Israel in National
Junior Tournaments.
These children are the top
players of more than 15,000
young Israelis now playing at the
Israel Tennis Centers. Dalia
Kuriat, Moroccan born, has
already represented Israel
against England in the youngest-
ever international tournament.
She hopes to reach world class
before she joins the Israeli army.
GILAD BLOOM, 12, Sabra,
started playing tennis at nine. He
was a member of the first Israeli
team to play in American junior
competition.
Max Oshoroff, 11, Russian -
born, immigrated to Israel three
years ago. A natural athlete, his
dream is to represent Israel in the
Davis Cup.
The fourth is Roni Barak, 10,
Sabra, number one in his age
group, nicknamed "Gerulaitis"
because he is the image of Vitas
with his blond hair and green
eyes.
DR. IAN FROMAN. a former
South African Davis Cup player,
and Shlomo Zoreff, their coach,
are accompanying the children.
Hr Froman ia executive dire* tor
of the Israel Tennis Center.
Israel's new infatuation with
tennis is attributed to the
opening of the Israel Tennis
Center. The first free, public
tennis facility in the world where
children have court preference,
the Israel Tennis Center offers
free lessons and equipment to
children throughout Israel.
The National Center is located
in Ramat Hasharon with 16
courts, a 4,800-seat stadium, 31
hitting walls, changing rooms
and an air-raid shelter an
indispensable feature of all Israeli
architecture.
THE SECOND Center opened
this month in Jaffa South Tel
Aviv. It services 12,000 children
from low-income families, living
within a one-mile radius of the
Center. The third Israel Tennis
Center will open in Kiryat
Shmona in September, and three
additional Centers are planned
for construction by 1981.
The Israel Tennis Center is a
gift to the youth of Israel from
over 4,000 contributors world-
over. Among its supporters are
such sports notables as Jimmy
Connors, Tom Okker, Harold
Solomon. Tony Trabert, Arthur
Ashe, Dick Savitt, Hank Green-
berg, Roger Staubach and
Howard Cosell.
The Israel Tennis ('enter is
ented by the Israel Tennis
( enters \ssociation. a world
wide volunteer organization with
international headquarters in San
I liego.
BRANDEIS WOMEN
The Hollywood-Hallandale ov
Chapter of Brandeis Women
recently received the Louis
Award and an honor roll for out*
standing service and contribution
to Brandeis for the past year.
Sylvia Simons was president of
the group. The new president,
Katherine Packer, attended the
annual installation when the
group was honored.
The Brandeis University
National Women's Committee
presented $1,010,000 to the
Brandeis Library.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
North Broward Section,
National Council of Jewish
Women, will hold a Chinese
luncheon and card party at thr not-
Golden Palace Restaurant, Sun'nd i.
rise, on Wednesday. July 25, at ""t
noon. For tickets, call Lillian
Feinstein or Ros Jackson.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women. Lauder-
hill Chapter, closed the current
season with a card party and
luncheon at the Castle Recreation
Center, Lauderhill, on June 26.
Following reports of various
activities. I^ee Wexler. president,
reminded the group that B'nai
B'rith would be participating in
the WECARE celebration,
sponsored by the Jewish
Federation in conjunction with
Richards Department Store.
Lauderhill Mall, early in August.
Sally Hadin. program chair-
person of B'nai B'rith Women, is
serving as chairperson of the
WECARE event.
INDEPENDENT ORDER
OF ODD FELLOWS
The Independent Order of
Oddfellows. Hatchee Lodge 71.
meets every first and thin
Thursday oi the month at the.
temple at 1451 Dixie Highway.
Fort Lauderdale. The next
meeting was to be July 5. at 8
p.m. For information, call
Manuel Barish.
I
Weizman
Continued from Page 1
rancor, The atmosphere at the
session was said to be free of the
tensions between ministers that
characterized the earlier Cabinet
meeting.
EARLIER, Weizman and
Begin conferred privately. No
details of their conversation were
disclosed, but the Prime
Minister's office issued a
statement later saying that
Begin did not ask the Defense
Minister to carry out the
government's decisions because
he has been doing that as aST
ma ttr of course "
It is understood that Weizman
reiterated his opposition to tht tl
controversial Gush Emunin viev
settlement of Alon Moreh near 'it
Nablus and also complained that
the autonomy committee did not
function efficiently. He did not,
however, resign from the
government as some rumors
predicted he would.
Weizman reportedly stressed
that he would continue to carry
out government decisions even if
he disagreed with them. He cited
as proof the assistance the army
rendered the Alon Moreh settlers
as soon as the government ap-
proved the settlement.
Interior Minister Yosef Burg.
chairman of the autonomy
committee, told reporters after
the Cabinet meeting that ho die,'* 1
not believe Weizman's departure
would have much effect on the
delegation's tasks "If there are
quesi ions oi security and defense I
Ezt r Weizman promised he
would participate," Burg said.


rr>-----*
|Friday,July6.1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
ACLU Leader Defends Enemies
Continued from Page 4
Nazi Germany, yet, believing in
man and in the idea that the
majority of people will not
voluntarily choose evil instead of
good, it allows a flag to fly that
belongs to an enemy. This is the
spiritual basis of democracy."
Having lived in a totalitarian
I society, and been jailed for his
writings, Mihajlov understands
I the need for free speech.
NEIER ALSO takes his
1 argument specifically to his
I fellow Jews. He stresses that
] Jews are uniquely vulnerable,"
and as a Jew he wants restraints
Ion power "which ensure that I
cannot be squashed by power
unnoticed by the rest of the
world. If I am in danger, I want
to cry out to my fellow Jews and
to all those I may be able to enlist
as my allies ... I want restraints
Iwhich prohibit those in power
Ifrom interfering with my right to
speak, my right to publish, or my
right to gather with others who
also feel threatened ... To
defend myself. I must restrain
power with freedom, even if
temporary beneficiaries are the
enemies of freedom."
Neier expands on this theme to
show how laws against a par-
ticular evil group can be used
against legitimate groups. Many
of the laws that were written to
be used against Nazis in the
1940s were used against anti-
Vietnam War dissenters in the
1960s.
Neier points out that in
England anti-racist laws have
been used by pro-Arab university
students against Jews. I thought
this an overstatement until a
recent report by the Anti-
Defamation League of B"nai
B'rith revealed that Arab
students at the University of
California at Riverside were
successful in excluding the
Jewish Student Union from a
program on the gounds that the
Union "is pro-Zionism and
Zionism is a form of racism."
THE ARGUMENT that
Weimar Germany was also a free
society, which is used by those
who want to ban Nazi demon-
strations, is effectively
demolished by Neier. He points
out that Weimar did not protect
free speech. Nazis and other
groups that broke up demon-
strations were not jailed and the
government failed to enforce the
provisions of its own con-
stitution. "If the lesson of
Weimar Germany means
anything, it is that the gover-
nment must act vigorously to
prevent violence from any source
even from people with good
motives," Neier writes.
Neier s book is important
because it stresses the necessity,
especially by Jews, to see that
freedom of speech is not un-
dermined. But it must be
stressed that the Chicago area
Jewish community was correct in
organizing to deal with the
Skokie crisis. Emotions were
running high and there were
threats of violence.
IT,
IN THE end, the Chicago area
Jewish community and all
American Jewry were the victors
in the Skokie controversy even
though the court battles were
lost. Jews in the Chicago area
organized a counter-
demonstration and Jews
throughout the U.S. rallied to
join them. Frank Collin and his
Nazi group, as the date for their
June demonstration neared.
appeared none too eager to carry
out their march and were
probably relieved when they had
an excuse to cancel it.
This is the real answer to Nazis
and any other anti-Semitic
groups. The Skokie case showed
that American Jews are ready to
unite when they are threatened
just as they unite in support of
Jews abroad. This strength,
coupled with the constitutional
guarantees of civil liberties, is the
best protection American Jewry
has for its survival.
Undying Spirit
Of Phil Randolph
Continued from Page 4
law books of the nation even-
tually, the removal of dis-
criminatory road blocks to
housing, jobs, public trans-
portation, hotels, resorts,
churches, playgrounds and burial
grounds.
Long, long ago, Emerson's
soul transmitted to his journal:
"The civility of no world can be
perfect while another race is
degraded the might and right
are here .here is man; and if
you have man. Black or white is
an insignificance."
America has waded through
hell to validate that lofty af-
firmation. Validated? Not totally.
But the marchers advance; and
up front is the undying spirit of
the good soldier. Phil Randolph.
n
,t
11
e
s
d
n
NONGOVERNMENT
SAVINGS REGULATIONS
TRANSLATED HERE.
There is page upon page of new
government savings regulations now
in effect. If you understand them,
you can earn more money.
Unfortunately, the regulations are
complicated, interest rates change
monthly, sometimes weekly. It really
fakes on expert to understand them.
That's why American Savings has
Earn More Desks in all of our offices.
The people behind these desks are
professional Savings Counselors who
can explain how the new government
regulations work and how to make
them work for you.
Take a few minutes and stop by an
American Savings Earn More Desk.
You'll find a friendly face, and a simple
explanation of how you can make
more money on your money.
PAYING THE HIGHEST INTEREST ALLOWED DY LAW SINCE 195a
AMERICAN SAVINGS fc
25 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU IN 19 SOUTH FLORIDA CITIES
In Dade 673-5566 In Broword, 485-0200 In Palm Beach, 392-6960
I American Savings & Loon Association of Florida. Assets exceeding $1.5 billion
Yoor savings insured to $40,000 by an Agency of the Federal Government.
Listed and traded on the New York Stock Exchange


Page 10
Members of Temple Beth Israel Board of Directors are, left to right, Jules Shapiro, Fred
Greene, Al Lang, Mark H. Rackin, Cantor Maurice A. Neu, Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz, Martin
I. Lipnack, Dennis Gershowitz, Dr. Sheldon Feldman and Irving Seid.
Lipnack Heads Temple Beth Israel
Local attorney Martin I.
Lipnack has been elected presi-
dent of Temple Beth Israel of
Fort Lauderdale. He has been
active in the temple as a member
of the Board of Directors, vice
president for membership and
administrative vice president. He
is also a member of the Men's
Club of the temple and was one of
the founders of the Young
Couple's Club.
Born in New York City,
Lipnack received his under-
graduate degree from Brooklyn
College. He obtained his law
Synagogue
News
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER
Sunrise Jewish Center Men's
Club will present an all-star show
at the temple in Springtree Plaza,
on Saturday, July 14, at 9 p.m.
Featured will be Bobby Breen,
plus comedian Ruth Mc Mahan
and Prince Hara, "The Thief of
Baghdad."
Tickets are available at the
temple from Sunday to Friday,
10 a.m. to noon.
TAMARAC JEWISH
CENTERTEMPLE
BETH TO RAH
The Men's Club of Temple
Beth Torah-Tamarac Jewish
Center is sponsoring a dance and
entertainment on Saturday, July
7, at 8:30 p.m. Featured are Mac
Thaler and his Orchestra, and
Roz Dawson, singer. For tickets
and information, contact the
temple office.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Bingo is played every Monday
night at 7:15 at Temple Emanu-
El. The games are played in the
auditorium and are run by
members of the congregation. All
proceeds go to Temple Emanu-
El. The public is invited.
Someone
hospitalized?
Bring
them home
-to us.
Rocupar MM al homt often
faster and smooth* and
tess costly We can h#p the m
home patient with a highly
qualified RN. LPN. Aide or
Attendant OuaMycarMty
arranged
5664333
degree from Brooklyn Law
School and practiced law in New
York City and Liberty, N.Y.,
before moving to Florida.
Lipnack has established two
main priorities first, to have
the temple address itself to the
issues and needs of the Jewish
community of Greater Fort
Lauderdale and, second, to
promote creative active programs
for the youth, senior citizens, and
young families of the temple and
community.
Other newly elected officers are
Al Lang, administrative vice
president; Fred Greene, temple
management vice president; Dr.
Sheldon Feldman, membership
vice president; Dennis Gersho-
witz, recording secretary; Irving
Seid, financial secretary:
Marilynn Levine, treasurer.
Members of the Board of
Directors include Erwin Abrams,
Gerry Block, Charles Deich,
Leonard Feiner, Libo Fineberg,
Edward Hirschberg, Neil Ker-
ness, Jerome Kraus, Arthur
Kwiat, Stuart Levin, Bernard
Oshinsky, Nathan Richstone,
Phyllis Schulman and Marvin
Welles.
j Bonds Reinvested j
At Rapid Rate
More than a half a million
dollars worth of Israel Bonds
have been reinvested in new pur-
chases during the last five weeks,
according to Milton M. Parson,
executive director of the South
Florida State of Israel Bonds Or-
ganization.
The Israel government per-
mitted the full maturity value of
the bonds to be applied to new
purchases, regardless of when in
1979 the bonds matured. Most of
the bonds were purchased in June
1967 at the time of the Six Day
War.
Parson said nearly $144 million
in Israel Bonds will be maturing
this month and many bond
owners have forgotten that they
are in possession of the securities.
"The bonds were purchased in an
outpouring of emotion toward
Israel and the Jewish people, and
in 12 years' time, many people
have forgotten that the bonds are
stored in their safety deposit
boxes.
"Israel needs the reinvested
dollars at this time to develop the
Negev area," Parson stressed.
"The terms of the Israel-Egyp-
tian Peace Treaty provided for a
return of the Sinai to Egypt, so
the cities, developed areas and
industry in the Sinai must now be
reconstructed in the Negev. This
process will cost billions of
dollars, some of which will be
supplied by world Jewry through
their purchase of Israel Bonds
and their participation in the new
billion dollar Negev development
loan issue which was authorized
by the Israel government.
Parson said that all those
wishing to reinvest their matured
Israel Bonds may contact the
Bond office in the Roney Plaza on
Miami Beach.

Local
land
Long Distance Moves"
Storage Needs in our Dehumidified Warehouse
581-1711
:ALL JO I" 1 / 1 X FOR PROMPT FREE ESTIMATE
31 Years Same Address and Owner
ATLANTIC TRANSFER I STORME CO.
jam *. nomn mo. ft. lmjocrorle iwitid m uus ,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Marvin J. Powers
announces
The relocation of his offices to
3213 N. OCEAN BLVD.
(at Gait Ocean Mile)
FORT LAUDERDALE 33308
Telephone 561-5055
Specializing in
Estate and Tax Planning Real Estate
Negligence/Accident Bankruptcy
Criminal Defense Immigration and
Naturalization
Admitted to the Florida Bar 1970
July 9
Temple Emanu-EI -Bingo -7:15 p.m.
July 10
West Broword Brandeis National Women's Committee 12:30 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Fort Lauderdale Chapter *345 Board
Jury 11
Women's Environ Club Inverrory Board p.m. Sunrise Jewish
Center Sisterhood Board.
July 12
Temple Emanu-EI Executive Committee 7:30 p.m.
July 14
Sunrise Jewish Center Sisterhood All-Star-studded Show at
Temple.
July 16
Temple Emanu-EI Bingo 7:15 p.m.
July 18
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I'age o
iFriday, Juiy 6,1979
------*n,.,m*B Pnrf 1 siurierdale
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
CJF Assembly Approves Study
Charting Future for Federations
> DENVER (JTA) A
three-year study charting
the future of Jewish Fed-
erations and Welfare Funds
and their umbrella agency,
the Council of Jewish Fed-
erations, for the 1980s was
adopted at a special CJF
General Assembly here by
an overwhelming majority
of the 300 delegates rep-
resenting most of the 190-
member Federations in the
United States and Canada.
The community represen-
tatives adopted the final review
report which emerged from three
years of analyses and con-
sultations involving more than
1,500 community leaders in the
United States and Canada.
Morton L. Mandel of
Cleveland, CJF president, said
the review report examines every
major aspect of the CJF
philosophy, operation and ob-
jectives and how the CJF can
best meet the needs of its
member Federations.
REVIEW COMMITTEE re
commendations approved by the
delegates covered the following
areas: strengthening com-
munities and Federations:
United Jewish Appeal-CJF
relations: priorities and plan-
ning: national and overseas
Jewish agencies cooperation;
governance of CJF: com-
munications; human resources
and staff organization; and
budget. Mandel said periodic
evaluations will be made of the
implementation of the recom-
mendations and results reported
to the Federations.
Mandel said the review "took
account of the major changes
taking place in Jewish life both
here and in North America and in
Israel and overseas. The CJF has
a responsibility to identify and
anticipate change and to help
communities cope with them as
quickly and effectively as
possible."
He added that the review
"recommends a number of
specific revisions in the Council's
services, procedures, structure,
staffing and budget. All the
recommendations are in the
context of developing more
cohesive and stronger Jewish
communities."
The delegates also unan-
imously adopted the report of the
CJF Personnel Task Force
recommending a comprehensive
personnel development program
to meet the future professional
staff needs of Federations.
THE DELEGATES also
changed CJF by-laws im-
plementing key provisions of the
review report providing for
greater involvement of com-
munity representatives in the
governance of CJF. The
necessary budget changes also
were approved by the delegates
to permit implementation of the
review recommendations to begin
in September.
More than 140 communities
were visited during the review
process to obtain information,
with Federation officers,
executive committee members
and staff professionals con-
tributing their views.
The review committee which
drafted the final document was
headed by Raymond Epstein of
Chicago, former CJF president.
Forty lay and professional
community leaders worked with
him, as did a CJF professional
consultant / staff team headed by
Henry L. Zucker, vice president
emeritus of the Jewish Com-
munity Federation of Cleveland.
iaiJB
CJF President Morton L. Mandel of Cleveland, center, presents
special recognition gifts to Raymond Epstein of Chicago, left,
chairman of the CJF Review Committee, and Henry L. Zucker
of Cleveland, right. Review Committee chief consultant,
following adoption of the review by a special General Assembly
June 14 in Denver.
The CJF Personnel Study
Task Force report was presented
by Samuel J. Silberman of New
York. He noted the three key
Task Force recommendations:
extension of the CJF Federation
Executive Recruitment and
Education Program (FEREP),
which provides scholarship / loan
assistance to outstanding young
people to undertake careers in
Federation fields; continuing
professional education programs
..':'..'....'
Group Formed to Combat Assimilation
FALLSBURG. N.Y. (JTA)
The formation of a national
commission on Jewish survival
headed by prominent scholars,
educators and rabbis to combat
assimilation and inter-marriage
was announced by Rabbi Bernard
Rosenzweig, president of the
Rabbinical Council of America.
Rabbi Rosenzweig made this
lunnouncement in addressing the
TH:,rd annual convention of the
Orthodox group at the Pineview
flint el here.
Inter-marriage has reached
Ic.n.isirophic levels," he said. "In
Imany communities the rate
[exceeds 50 percent. If this trend
is not reversed, the whole fabric
the Jewish communcal
Structure will suffer irreparable
lamage. The problem of inter-
marriage among our college
>"outh is particularly severe and
Constitutes a serious threat to
Jewish communities and to the
pirvival of traditional Judaism."
THE COMMISSION will be
headed by Kabbi Gilbert
Klapperman of Lawrence, N.Y.
as chairman, and Rabbi Rafael
Grossman of Memphis, Tenn. as
co-chairman. "This commission,"
Rosenzweig indicated, "will be
broad based, and will welcome
participation from other Jewish
groups which are committed to
Jewish survival as a primary
goal."
The commission seeks to
stimulate action within and
outside the synagogue. The
commission also plans a coun-
seling service for college students
and adults, and a seminar and
lecture series.
Rosenzweig also decried the
recently announced campaign of
Reform Judaism to actively seek
converts from unaffiliated
Christians.
Rosenzweig also criticized
those Reform rabbis who
solemnize intermarriages. "We
must not become tolerant of this
cancerous growth which can only
destroy Jewish ranks." he
declared.
This is an irresponsible and
shocking endeavor which can
only evoke the enmity of the
Christian world towards Jews,"
he said. "It took several decades
of interfaith contact to convince
both Catholic and Protestant
ranks to suspend their
missionary efforts among Jews.
We persuaded them that such
acts offend us, deeply. Now for
Reform Judaism to initiate a
missionizing campaign among
Christians is the height of in-
discretion and is calculated to
cause much harm. No one group
in Jewish life has a right to take
steps which can adversely affect
the entire American Jewish
community."
ADL Reports
Holocaust Textbooks Inadequate
NEW YORK (JTA) Not
a single textbook in current use
by high schools in the United
ayan Undergoes Operation
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
oraign Minister Moshe Dayan
(fas operated on June 24 for the
emoval of an intestinal polyp
rid was reported resting com-
ttrtably at the Tel Hashomer
Jedical Center near Tel Aviv.
According to his close aide.
iftalie Lavie, the doctors were
ncouraged by the results of the
jrgery. Lavie. in a telephone
lirview with the Jewish
^graphic Agency, seemed to
)ly that the polyp was found
be non-malignant.
He said Dayan would be
discharged by next weekend or
shortly afterwards and would
spend the following week to 10
days convalescing at his home.
The 64-year-old Foreign
Minister was admitted to the
hospital June 23 after having
undergone a series of tests during
the preceding weeks. There
appeared to have been some
concern in circles close to him
that the polyp might be
malignant. But Lavie sounded
relieved and optimistic on the
telephone.
Negotiators Try for Agenda
HERZLIYA "Hopefully
carefully." was the wat-
vord coined by Israel's chief
jptiator Yosef Burg Monday,
echoed by his Egyptian
fnterpart Mustapha Khalil, as
Israeli-Egypt autonomy talks
ned at a luxury hotel in the
Bide resort.
e legates held a brief late
ling meeting and a longer
Irnoon session, attempting
to hammer out an agreed
nda. The Israeli side said
i the day's talks begain that
fould press to start con-
ing the practical issues of
involved in creating the
projected Palestinian autonomy:
The holding of elections,
eligibility of candidates, voting
suffrage, etc.
The Egyptians, however, have
shown no urgency to date in their
desire to enter into these details.
Their proposals for an agenda
were couched in much more
generalized, political-ideological
terms (comprehensive set-
tlement, the self-governing
authority, the transitional period,
Resolution 242, etc.)
It was this wide divergence of
approach that has held up
substantial progress until now,
Israeli sources said.
States adequately covers the
subject of the Nazi Holocaust,
according to a report released by
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, which sponsored an
"analytical examination" of 43
such texts.
"The failure is quantitative as
well as qualitative." said
Theodore Freedman. ADL's
program director, in presenting
the study to the ADL's 66th
National Commission meeting
here. The study was conducted
during the past year by Glen S.
Pate, an assistant professor in
the Department of Secondary
Education at the University of
Arizona.
Pointing out that even the five
books with the most extensive
coverage on the subject were
found wanting, Freedman
declared that "this woeful
deficiency spurs us to raise
serious questions about the kind
of education our children are
receiving."
HE WENT on to say that
"even among these five the
best of the lot none deals
satisfactorily with the causes ot
the Holocaust or the role of the
United States: none has
suggested reading for students;
only one refers to resistance; (one
uses the term, genocide,' and one
the term. Holocaust'); three do
not mention the Nuremberg
trials, and none refers to the
survivors."
The study by Pate was made
under the auspices of ADL's
(enter for Studies on t'.ie
Holocaust. Pate examined the
texts exhaustively to determine
objectively the extent and
content of their treatment of the
Holocaust. He said that "authors
and textbook companies have not
seen the Holocaust as relevant to
American history or con-
temporary society."
Disagreeing with this attitude,
he declared: "We need to learn
the lessons of the Holocaust not
only to improve our society
today, but to safeguard the
future. Some of the lessons of the
Holocaust could help us
recognize the harbingers of
tragedy.
Lebanese Army Revives
Lebanon's fledgling army entered two of Beirut's Christian
neighborhoods, marking its first major attempt to establish
order in the area since the 1975-76 civil war. "Long live our
army!" shouted Christians as an 1,100-man force moved into the
districts of Furn El Shubbak and Ein El-Rummaneh Militiamen
relinquished their weapons and no resistance was reported as the
soldiers took over the militia positions and began dismantling
the concrete and sandbag positions.
to advance the knowledge and
skills of present Federation
professionals: and an Alternate
Track Program to train and
recruit people for middle
management and executive
positions in Federations.
Mandel said key provisions for
the new by-laws adopted at the
special General Assembly specify
that community delegates to the
CJF General Assembly be ap-
pointed at the beginning of each
calendar year, and be involved in
guiding CJF programs
throughout the year;
enlargement of the CJF Board of
Directors to include leaders from
more cities; and reorganization of
CJF committees.
Religious
Directory
LAUDERDALELAKES
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE
4351 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Modern Orthodox Congregation
Murray Brickman, president
EMANU EL TEMPLE. 3425 W Oak
land Park Blvd Retorm. Rabbi
Jellrey Ballon Cantor Jerome
K lement
SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE, 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu (42).
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER. INC. 8049
West Oakland Park Blvd Conser
vative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy. Cantor
Jack Marchant. and Hy. Solo*, presi
dent.
MtBREW CONGREGATION OF LAU
DERHILL, 2048 NW 48th Ave Lau
derhill. Conservative Max Kronish.
president.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
NW 57th St. Conservative Rabbi Is
rael Zimmerman J44A)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUOERDALE. 4171 Stirling
Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshc Bomzer
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION 400 S Nob Hill Rd. Liberal
Reform Rabbi Sheldon J. Hmrr (44).
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNAGOGUE
7473 NW 4th St. Hank Pitt, president
POMPANO BEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM T32 SE 11th Ave.
Conservat ve Rabbi Morris A. Skop
Cantor Jacob Renter (49).
MARGATE
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION 7640
Margate Blvd. Conservative Rabbi
Joseph Berglas.
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 4101
NW 9th St Conservative Rabbi Dr.
Solomon Geld. Cantor Max Gaiiub
LORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform. Rabbi Leonard Zoll.
DEERFIELD BEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL, at Century
Village East. Conservative. Rabbi
David Berent (62).
BOCA RATON
TEMPLE BETH EL, 333 SW 4tti
Avenue, Boca Raton. Rabbi Merle S.
Singer.
Levitt m
memorial chapels"
1921 Pembroke Rd.
Hollywood. Fla
921-7200
Sonny Levitt. F.D.
13385 SW. Dixie Hwy.
North Miami, Fla
949*315
n
it
U
e
5
d
n


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Fr"day.July6

For Your Information: The Peace Treaty in Brief
By J. RUSSELL KRAUS
As millions of viewers around
the world witnessed the telecast
of the peace treaty signing in
Washington, implementation of
the terms of the document was
already being set in motion. The
negotiations leading up to the
treaty's present form were long
and arduous, often frustrating,
and always complex. The
following is a condensed form of
the preamble and nine articles of
the treaty which was signed by
Prime Minister Begin and
President Sadat, and witnessed
by President Carter on March 26
in Washington:
Preamble: Reaffirms the need
for an overall settlement, con-
forming to UN Resolutions 242
and 338; affirms that the treaty
is only the first phase of an
overall accord and calls upon the
other parties in the conflict to
participate in the peace process.
Article I: Declares an end to
the state of war; provides for the
withdrawal of Israeli forces to the
Israel-Egypt international
boundary; establishes normal
relations at the end of the first
nine-month stage of the with-
drawal.
Article II: Recognizes the
international border between the
two countries as existed during
the Mandate era, as the legal
frontier between the two nations.
UJA Presents Award for Excellence
NEW YORK The United
Jewish Appeal's 1978 Sapir
Award for campaign excellence
among cities of intermediate size
was presented to the Jewish Fed-
eration of the North Shore during
its annuiil meeting at the North
Shore Jewish Community Center
in Marblehead, Mass. The award
was given in recognition of
almost SI.5 million raised by the
Federation in 1978, an 18 percent
increase over the 1977 total of
approximately $1.2 million.
Making the presentation in
behalf of the United Jewish
Appeal was Dr. George S. Freed-
man, current Federation
president. Accepting the award
for the community were Norman
S. Rosenfield, 1978 Federation
president, and Dr. Gerald S.
Ferman, North Shore executive
director, acting in behalf of
Burton M. Harris, 1978 cam-
paign chairman.
Community leaders attribute
the success of the 1978 campaign
to an extensive mobilization
effort, a strong missions
program, sustained high level
giving in the advanced and major
gifts categories, and a Jewish
awareness program which
strengthened Jewish identity and
focused on developing a growing
corps of Jewish leaders.
In a congratulatory letter to
Burton Harris, which was read
during the presentation, UJA
national chairman Irwin S. Field
praised the North Shore Fed-
eration for a succession of suc-
cessful campaign years and
expressed confidence that the
North Shore would "show the
Two Israeli Arabs
Victims of Own Bomb
i
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
two Israeli Arabs killed when a
bomb exploded in their pick-up
truck outside the central bus
station here June 24 were iden-
tified
Security sources said they were
victims of their own device which
they had intended to plant in the
bus terminal although neither
man had a record of past contacts
with extremist or terrorist
groups.
The dead are Issa Ismail
Yousouf, 43, a dealer in Arabic
books in Kfar Kassem village
who owned the Ford pick-up
truck and George Theodori, 24
an employe of the East Jerusalem
Electric Corp., an independent
utility that supplies East Jeru-
salem and neighboring villages
with electricity.
Commodities Course
The Fort Lauderdale Branch of
the Broward County Library will
offer a three lecture course on
"The ABC's of Commodities" to
be conducted by Michael Fitz-
patrick of Thomson McKinnon
Securities. Classes will be held on
Thursdays, July 5, 12 and 19
from 7:15 to8:15 p.m.
Party to Benefit
Big Brothers
The Mamas and Papas of
Broward will sponsor its first
annual "Friday the Thirteenth"
party, from 7 p.m. to midnight,
Friday, Jury 13, at Ken Cox's Le
Club International, Fort Lauder-
dale.
The Mamas and Papas are a
non-profit organization com-
prised of single, professional men
and women, who donate their
time and energy to raise money
for Big Brothers/Big Sisters of
Broward. This organization
provides nearly $15,000 per year
for services to children of single
parent homes in Broward
County.
The July fund-raiser is open to
the public.
YOUSOUF was described as a
wealthy man of a respectable
family. His relatives said today
that the bomb 5 kgs. of high
explosives was placed in his
truck without his knowledge. .
But security sources believe
Yousouf was employed by ter-
rorists to transport the bomb
because his vehicle carried Israeli
license plates that would not
arouse suspicion in Tel Aviv.
They're also investigating
whether Theodori, an electrical
engineer, might not have been
engaged in preparing bombs and
timing devices.
According to security sources,
the bomb intended for the bus
station was set to detonate in
mid-morning. However, an
unusual traffic jam may have
caused a fatal delay, they said or.
"lternatively, the bomb may have
tploded when the truck was
brought to a sudden stop. In any
event, numerous lives were
spared. The explosion caused
slight injuries to five passersby
from flying glass. There were no
other fatalities.
Brodzki Is
'Tenth Man'
Continued from Page 1
was shared by the other men,"
recalled Brodzki.
THERE IS virtually no Jewish
community in Czechoslovakia;
only a handful of Jews remain in
that country and those who still
live there are quite elderly.
In summing up his feelings on
this unusual experience, Brodzki
said, "We Jews in America have
no idea how fortunate we are to
be able to worship freely without
interference from the govern-
ment. We are able to enjoy our
total freedom as Jews, as
Americans, and it is only when
one is personally involved in a
totalitarian situation that he can
truly appreciate our good fortune
in being able to live in the United
States."
way in the forthcoming 1980
campaign."
The Sapir Award, given an-
nually, is named for the late
Pinchas Sapir. former finance
minister of Israel and chairman
of the Jewish Agency, who con-
tinuously expressed his faith in
the American Jewish com-
munity's commitment to the
well-being of the people of Israel.
In defining the spirit behind the
award, Dr. Freedman quoted this
statement by Pinchas Sapir:
"Together we possess the means
and the organization to streng-
then Jewish life. If we work
together, there are no impossible
dreams there are no im-
possible hopes."
Article III: Prohibits
aggression by either party
against the other; ends the boy-
cott and restrictions on move-
ments by nationals of the other
country.
Article IV: Provides for UN
forces to supervise the military
arrangements; establishes a
mixed commission to supervise
security arrangements.
Article V: Allows freedom of
passage for Israeli ships through
the Suez Canal and the Red Sea.
Article VI: Each party agrees
not to undertake treaty
obligations contrary to the peace
accord.
Article VII: Provides for nego-
tiations on differences over
application of the treaty, should
they arise.
Article VIII: Arranges for a
commission to deal with financial
claims by both sides.
Article IX: Provides for the
exchange of ambassadors at the
end of nine months after the
signing of the agreement; recog-
nizes that the treaty replaces the
interim accord of 1975: stipulates
that talks on the normalization of
relations between the two nations
will begin within six months of
signing.
ling
The Annexes to the t^.^ .
with a military wSfiS,^
Israeli forces aBBS
the pemnsuU into tu^S
zones, with specific limEaHl
Egyptian armament^'M
in each zone after b2i3
drawal. As importaM
section is the letter siL?
President Sadat "&A
Minister Begin dealing
negotiations for the SJ*
Judea, Samaria and Gaza
The Question of Oil
resolved by agreement betwT
Israel and Egypt. israe|^
withdraw from the oil fields*!
the end of seven montj
following ratification of t
treaty. Egypt commits itself 1
an additional two months i
supply Israel with the amount,
oil it had been pumping prior.
the withdrawal. After the t
months period. Israel is tobeac
to purchase oil (mm EgyM *
world market pn< i |
In addition, the U.S. andlsrj
signed a memorandum of apm\
merit which pledges that theILSI
will consider and consult [
Israel on variou*- steps incwrfl
violation of the IsraelEgwl
peace treaty. A second agreemaiI
contains U.S. assurances to mat I
any shortfalls in Israeli &\
supplies from Sinai for 15 yetrs.
Having a
Cousins'
Club?
Don't forget
to invite
the great
taste of
Maxwell
House -
Coffee.
fiX?no?U,Se uCffe? has ,hat rich' C,ub ^Joys noshing. Smart Cousins
herpHTil ?' uWed,! be remem- Club hostesses have been serving it for
fish safac TH Sab'eLand Whi,e- over haIf a ce" tisn salad or whatever the Cousins"

i
Good
lothe
Last Drop"
r
k
Certified
kosher
A living trading in Jewish homes for more than half a century


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