The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00138

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
m-tM*m ntr,~4,*T Fort Lauderdale
wJemsti floridi&n
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 8 Number 13
Fort Lauderdale. Florida Friday, June 22, 1979
Price 35 Cents
New JCC-The Per/man Campus"
JCC Conference Highlights 'Bright Future'
5
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From the moment that
I chairman Johl Rotman
I called the meeting to order,
I there was an electrically -
I charged air of optimism
|and great hopes for the
lture of the Jewish
Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdale,
[as the Annual Conference-
Luncheon was held Sun-
day, June 10, at the Palm-
I Aire Country Club.
The series of speakers made
mention of the tremendous
dedication and leadership that
was exhibited in the past to bring
the JCC to its present status, but
I the future was stressed by all
who spoke to the large turnout
for the 1979 meeting.
pROClamation
VV11ERE AS. The Jewish Community of Fort Lauderdale wishes
to remember Louis L. Perlman for the dedication,
benevolence, and sensitivity that characterized his life.
AND WHEREAS. The Jewish Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale wishes to acknowledge and recognize the
devotion of both Anita and Lou Perlman whose tireless
efforts have assured the reality of a Jewish Campus in our
city.
fi THEREFORE. BE IT RESOLVED, that the new Jewish Com-
munity Center Campus be named in honor of the Perlman
family as a reflection of our appreciation for their love, their
guidance and their support!
I 'assed by a unanimous vote of the Board of Directors
of the Jewish Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdale. this 20th day of April, 1979.
'The future of the JCC is
bright, and we here today, with
the cooperation and support of
the entire community, will bring
this dream to the reality that is
so vitally important to the
Jewish community," stated
Anita Perlman, JCC president.
THE HIGHLIGHT of the
conference was the presentation
of a proclamation to Mrs.
Perlman by Ben Roisman naming
the new site as THE PERLMAN
CAMPUS. The proclamation was
approved unanimously by the
JCC Board of Directors as a
tribute "to the devotion of both
Anita and Lou Perlman whose
tireless efforts have assured the
reality of a Jewish Campus in our
city."
Keynote speaker Donald
Mintz, immediate past president
of the New Orleans JCC, spoke
UJA Annual Report
Highlights Historg
The United Jewish Appeal, in
s 10-year history of support to
uel and Jews around the
vnrld, has distributed $4.4
lion, according to the 1979
tnnual Report recently
published.
The United Jewish Appeal was
vated on Jan. 10, 1939, through
fie merger of the American
ewish Joint Distribution
ommittee (JDC), the United
^.destine Appeal and the
itional Coordinating Com-
ittee for Aid to Refugees. The
JA thus became the single
merican Jewish fund-raising
Kanization for the work of relief
d rehabilitation in Europe, for
migration and resettlement in
alestine and for refugee aid in
ie U.S. The action recorded the
<>f American Jews in response
the infamous Kristallnacht
nslaught of German Jews.
%
Since its creation, the UJA has
contributed to the rescue and
rehabilitation of over three
million men, women and children,
about half of them immigrants
brought to Israel.
There are 683 campaigning
communities in all 50 states that
hold annual UJA fund-raising
drives, and the average con-
tribution to UJA is 63 percent of
all monies raised- (Fort
Lauderdale s Federation last year
allocated 67 percent of the total
amount raised in this com-
munity).
The report states that over
130.000 Soviet Jews have been
resettled: over 500 agricultural
settlements in Israel were funded
by UJA funds and many refugees
from North Africa and Arab
countries have been brought to
Israel.
Quotable Quotes
"This country made us a people; our people made this country."
David Ben-Gurion
inspiringly of the purposes and
make-up of what constitutes a
good Community Center. He
emphasized that the "JCC has a
special role ... it should be
family oriented ... it should be a
place where there is contact
between young and old ... it
must be the focal point of Jews of
all backgrounds who can learn
and play together to strengthen
the entire Jewish community."
Mintz concluded his remarks by
saying, "Today we are living in
the best of times and the worst of
times for Jews the Jewish
Community Center is the hope
for the future."
Bill Goldstein, executive
director of the JCC, spoke of the
need for proper facilities to
implement the numerous
programs that are planned for all
age groups. He stated that active
committees are extremely im-
portant to the overall success of
the new JCC. After introducing
the professional staff, Goldstein
Continued on Page 8-A
Pictured, are Donald Mintz, keynote speaker who is the im-
mediate past president of the New Orleans JCC; Anita
Perlman; and Johl Rotman, chairman of the annual conference.
Ben Roisman, right, presents the proclamation to Anita Perlman, JCC president, designating
the new Jewish Community Center as THE PERLMAN CAMPUS. Leo Goodman, Jewish
Federation president, looks on.
MMMMMMMNaWaWMMMMMMM^
Mission to Israel for Federation Women
"To experience the past is to
understand the present and to
prepare for the future" is the
In Bonn
theme of the scheduled Women's
Division Mission to Israel, Oct.
15 to 28.
Verbal Fire, Brimstone
From PLO in Bonn
The Jewish Federation of Fort
Lauderdale is anxious to be
represented on this visit to Israel,
which will be nation-wide in scope
in that women from all parts of
the United States will take part.
Preliminary arrangements are
now being made. All women in
the Greater Fort Lauderdale area
who are interested in going on
this visit are urged to call Jan
Salit at the Federation office.
484-8200.
By LUDGER
STEIN-RUEGENBERG
Deutsche Zeitung
BONN It was highly ex-
plosive luggage that two Arabs
arrested April 26 on crossing the
border from Austria at Passau
carried in their rented car.
The Bavarian border police
found a hundredweight of plastic
explosive, detonators and fuses
specially prepared for time
bombs. A portable radio con-
tained nine passports. six
Mauretanian. an Argentinian, a
I^ebanese and a Cypriot.
On the following Sunday, two
more Palestinians were nabbed
crossing the border from Holland
at Elten.
THEY CARRIED Iranian
Continued on Page 6
32
IS COMING!
WATCH FOR IT
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Page 2
TheJewishFloridianofGreaterFortLauderdale
Friday, June 22,
1979
Young Leadership WsWi Itinerary Is Announced
Cr ..._____."mi .^lt.ii hv a visit to t.hp Arah >
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale's Young
Leadership Mission to Israel will
be leaving within two weeks on
what promises to be "the most
exciting and meaningful trip
most of us ever have taken,"
stated Mission co-chairmen Johl
Rotman and Ron Schagrin.
"The itinerary for the 10-day
visit has just been received, and
it's exciting just reading about
all of the places we will see and
the wonderful events that are
scheduled for the Fort
Lauderdale group," added the
mission leaders.
Highlights of the mission
begin upon arrival at Ben-Gurion
airport and the trip to Jerusalem
ISMWtHMMHMnMM
S^^^^^^^^^
Brandeis Women to Sponsor Lecture
Jack R. Fischel. Ph.D,
professor of history at Miller-
sville State College in Penn-
sylvania, will highlight a special
summer lecture, sponsored by the
West Broward Chapter of
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee, on
Monday, July 9, at 1 p.m. at
Deicke Auditorium in Plantation.
Dr. Fischel's presentation
concerns the topic, "Israel and
the Palestinians: Past, Present
and the Prospects for the
Future." He lectures extensively
throughout the Northeast on the
subjects of Arab-Israel relations,
the Holocaust and Jewish-
Church relations. He is the
recipient of numerous awards in
his field of modern Jewish history
and has
Zionism.
published a book on
Ruth Horowitz, president of
the West Broward Chapter, and
Linda Green, study group
chairperson, have invited the
community at large to attend the
lecture at no charge. Further
information may be obtained
from Ms. Horowitz or Ms. Green.
Anti-Nazis Deny Mail Bombs Are Theirs
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Manny Beck, chairman of the
International Committee Against
Nazism (ICAN), flatly denied
that the organization had or was
mailing parcel bombs to neo-Nazi
groups and former Nazi war
criminals living in the United
States.
Beck told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that some
group might have been
motivated to organize the
package bomb mailing campaign
by the ICAN's extensive mailing
of anti-Nazi literature. He said,
"this is going to hurt us."
HE DESCRIBED ICAN as
being made up of roughly 500
members but that it had been
forced to delay implementation of
a planned program for lack of
funds. He said the committee has
an office in Manhattan and one in
Toronto.
There were widespread reports
that parcel bombs had been
discovered in New Jersey,
Illinois, Nebraska and Virginia.
One of the news agencies
receiving a call affirming the
mailings was the JTA. The caller
said the ICAN was responsible
for the mailings and planned to
do more of them. He refused to
give his name.
ACCORDING TO police
reports, the mail bombs were
received by a Nebraska man
connected with a neo-Nazi group;
a former SS officer in Paterson,
N.J.; and a branch office of the
National Socialist Party in
Cicero, a suburb of Chicago
where the tiny neo-Nazi Party
has its headquarters.
Bombs also were reportedly
found in packages at post offices
in Chicago and Arlington, Va.
The parcel bomb in Chicago was
addressed to Frank Collin, head
of the Chicago neo-Nazi group
who created a major controversy
last year with a threat to march
in Skokie. home of thousands of
survivors of the Holocaust.
Collin dropped the threat when
he received court permission to
hold a rally in Chicago's
Marquette Park, located in a
racially mixed area.
POST OFFICE officials in
Arlington refused to give the
name of the person to whom the
parcel was addressed but
Arlington county sources said it
was mailed to the National
Socialist White People's Party. A
parcel bomb was received by
Tscherim Soobzokov, a former
SS officer.
The callers also claimed
responsibility for a package
bomb mailed to a Gerhard Lauck.
a member of an American Nazi
Party in Lincoln. Neb. None of
the explosive devices went off.
Arthur Meister, an FBI agent
in the FBI office in Newark, said
the FBI was "actively involved"
in an investigation. in
cooperation witth the U.S. Postal
Service, and that nationally the
probe was being coordinated by
the FBI headquarters
H*
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Featuring Judaica Books
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where the group will participate
in a Kabbalat Shabbat at the
Western Wall. A walking tour of
the old city and a visit to the
Israel museum will be followed
Dr. Jock Fischel
by a visit to the Arab Market.,
The planned trips include
Massada. Yad Vashem. the
Allenby Bridge, Golan Heights
and an overnight stay at *
Kibbutz. *
In addition, the local group will
visit the Good Fence along the
Lebanese border, Akko, to visit
the underground excavations
Haifa, Caesarea and Tel Aviv
The southern tour includes
Ashkelon, the Gaza Strip, and a
stop at a Moshav to meet with
settlers.
Israel missions are planned for
American Jews to expand their
Jewish consciousness by offering
a total encounter with the
promise and reality that is Israel
Further, Americans can see first
hand the progress and potential
of UJA-supported projects,.
designed to help ensure a high
quality of life for Israelies.
The co-chairmen announced
that there is still time to make
arrangements to be included in
this mission. A call to the
Federation office will provide all
details.
PS
Diamonds Bought
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Balogh is offering OUR HIGHEST PRICES ever.
Brokerage service available.
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The assurance
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At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
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Our staff of Riverside people consists of
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They are people who understand Jewish
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Since 1935, these policies have been
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It's a trust we've never taken lightly
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Kenneth M. Kay / ArthurGrossberg/ Joseph Rubin
P4-tt-Jt


Friday, June 22,1979
t....j.i. Pin-'J.'. ffi*t(r fort lmuukiuu-
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale

Page 3
Hawaiian Gardens Phase 4
UJA Breakfast June 24
B'rith and was active with the
American Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
A fund-raising breakfast on
behalf of'the Jewish Federation
United Jewish Appeal 1979
campaign will be held on Sunday,
June 24, at the clubhouse of
Hawaiian Gardens, Phase IV,
announced co-chairmen Dr. Ben
Zion Kite and Julius Mines.
"The residents of Phase IV
realize the urgency of greater
giving in this year's UJA
campaign to fund all of the
humanitarian programs of the
Federation in our community, in
Israel and the world over," stated
the co-chairmen.
Special guest speaker for the
10 a.m. function is Oscar Z.
Goldstein, who has been
associated professionally with
national Jewish organizations for
over 35 years. In the course of his
duties, Goldstein has traveled to Hawaiian Gardens Phase IV
45 countries and speaks several UJA co-chairmen are, left, Dr
languages. He was director of Ben Zion Kite and Julius
community services for Bnai Mines.
JNF Banquet for Brodzkis
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Brodzki
were honored recently at a ban-
quet attended by over 400 people-
Brodzki and his wife Peggy, both
leaders of Jewish National Fund,
were honored by the establishing
of the Brodzki Family Forest in
the Gov. Askew Park in Kfar
Hachorshim, Israel.
Dr. Alvin K. Colin, JNF
chairman. North Broward,
lauded Mr. and Mrs. Brodzki for
their dedication to JNF and
Israel. Victor Gruman, banquet
chairman, welcomed the dig-
nitaries and guests. Speaker was
Robert Evans, TV personality and
foreign correspondent. Guest
artist was tenor Misha Alexan-
drovich, accompanied by Shmuel
Fershko.
Participating in the program
were: Cantor Maurice Neu, Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowitz, Samuel
Soref, Ludwik Brodzki, Bernard
Oshinsky, Lee Shainman. Leo
Goodman and Zev W. Kogan.
Racism-Zionism Fomented by Soviets
LONDON (JTA) Sen.
Daniel P. Moynihan (D, N.Y.),
the former U.S. Ambassador to
t the United Nations, accused the
Soviet Union of being behind the
campaign which culminated in
the 1975 UN resolution equating
Zionism with racism.
The resolution, still not
rescinded by the General
Assembly, was inspired by an
article appearing in Pravda, the
Soviet Communist Party news-
paper, on Feb. 18-19, 1971,
FOUR YEARS after the anti-
Zionist resolution's adoption by
the General Assembly, in the face
of opposition by the U.S., Britain
and other Western countries, its
influence was still spreading,
Moynihan claimed. He noted that
association with Zionism was one
of the charges against two men
recently executed in Iran.
Moynihan himself was recently
described by an Indian
newspaper as "a Zionist racist
scorpion."
United Way Pacesetter Program
Broward County business
leaders recently met to commit
their participation and assistance
in the United Way of Broward's
1979-80 Pacesetter Program.
According to Byron Campbell,
Pacesetter chairman, "The
purpose of the Pacesetter
Program is to ask organizations
and chief executive officers to
exercise a leadership role for the
.United Way and to secure their
endorsement for the Fall cam-
paign."
Pacesetter volunteers will
- assist the United Way in
cultivating approximately 150
potential Pacesetter accounts
throughout the month of June.
In stressing the importance of
the program, Campbell reported:
"Of the $3.1 million raised last
year, $1.7 million was generated
by the Pacesetter accounts."
Despite the tremendous
volunteerism shown and the
substantial increase achieved in
the past campaign, the com-
munity only provided $3.1
million toward the $3.8 million
request from the agencies,
Campbell reported. "Falling
$700,000 short of the needs
meant that many prople went
without services which were truly
needed," he said.
Hermine Hoffman Heads
Brandeis Women
Hermine L. Hoffman of Fort
Lauderdak is continuing as
president of the Florida Region
and will be formally installed by
Esther P. Schwartz, national
president, during the Brandeis
University National Women's
Committee's (BUNWC) annual
conference.
The BUNWC was founded at
the same time aa the university in
,1948, and it is the largest
"friends of the library" move-
ment in the world. The 66,000
members have established 116
chptrs across the country and
"t year raised over $1 million to
support the Brandeis Libraries.
Mrs. Hoffman, a member of
the BUNWC since the early '50s.
was the first president of the
Westchester Shore Chapter
before moving to Florida, A
National Board Member, she
served aa executive vice
president of the Region in 1974-
1978. Her son, Fred Hoffman,
attended Brandeis.
Special guest of honor at the
conference was Sarah Caldwdl.
the "first lady of opera," who
received the Abram L. Sachar
Award.
Pictured at the airport are, from left, Leon Messing, co-chairman of the Federation's Russian
Resettlement committee, Herman Sondov, Valery Maslov, Gennady Maslov, Raisa Maslov,
Yevgenia Spivak, Albino Maslov, Dr. Miriam Udin and Israel Resnikoff, Russian Resettlement
co-chairman.
Russian Family Arrives in Lauderdale
The five members of the
Maslov family arrived in Fort
Lauderdale recently from the
Soviet Union to be resettled in
the community. The Jewish
Federation's Russian Reset-
tlement Committee, co-chaired
by Leon Messing and Israel
Resnikoff, made arrangements
for the family to reside in this
area.
The family includes Gennady
and Rais Maslov, the 39-year-
old parents, 19-year-old daughter
Albina and 14-year-old son,
Valery. In addition, Mrs.
Maslov's mother, Yevgenia
Spivak, accompanied her family
on the journey from their Russian
home in Tashkent.
The family, who will reside in
Inverness Village, Lauderhill,
will be assisted by Federation
funds until they are able to locate
employment and become self-
sufficient. Valery, who speaks
Israeli Wants Correspondents
A postcard was recently
received at the Jewish Federation
office from an Israeli citizen who
wishes to correspond with fellow
Jews in the greater Fort
Lauderdale area.
He wrote, "I believe that
corresponding develops better
understanding with friendship
between all. It is a useful activity
giving a good feeling to everyone.
I would like to exchange letters
... I also collect stamps and
coins."
Limitations
Extension
The writer's name is Mr. B.
Malachi at Tel-Aviv, POB-1890,
Israel.
English, will be enrolled in Nrva
Middle School in September.
Planning A Trip?
I Counctr 1979 Exciting Travel A
' Program to Israel, Europe, Wast'
1 Coast, Canadian Rockies and |
' Aliika la now available.
I NATIONAL COUNCIL I
| OF JEWISH WOMEN |
I Call I
I DOROTHY KLEIN 741-47421
L_______________I

FORT LAUDERDALE 776"6272
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Urged
In recent action in the Florida
House of Representatives, State
Rep. Fred Lippman and Rep. Hal
W. Spaet urged the U.S. Con-
gress to urge the German Federal
Republic to abolish or extend the
Statute of Limitations relating to
Nazi War Crimes.
Rep. Spaet noted: "There have
been a lot of holocausts in the
history of the world, but this one
has occurred recently enough to
give the citizens of the world
notice that it will never be
tolerated by mankind again."
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Leurni
NXSO


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 22,1979
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Jewish Floridian Test is Opening Salvo for Kids
Oil
OF OR EATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Bualneae Office 136 S. Federal Hwy., SuiteJOB, Danla. FU. M004
Telephone WMU
FRED K. SHOCHET ,ieai SUZJUTNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher c "" smtam Executive Editor
1 Not Cfcaaraatee The Kaahruta
> Advertised In Its Co lama*
1 Pestae Paid at Daaaa, Fla. MM
Published HI Weeklv
Federation Officers: President, Lao Goodman, Executive Vice President, Milton
Kelner, Vlca Presidents, Victor Gruman, Joel Reimtein, John Strtno; Secretary,
Rlcharo Romenofl; Treasurer, Joel Levitt, Executive Director, Leslie S. Gottlieb;
Public Relations Director, JoelH. Tetles.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
E2SL*L*a. Jw,*h TefeorapWc Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service, Nations 1 Editorisi Association, American Association of
'!S,Jih'J,wl$h NwPPers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (LocalArea) OneYear-t7.se
Out ot Town Upon Request.
Friday, June 22,1979
Volumes
27 SIVAN 5739
Number 13
Investing In Israel
In June, 1967, the future of Israel was at stake.
On the morning of June 5, Jews throughout the
world awakened to find an Israel at war, fighting on
all fronts for her survival. As the Six-Day War pro-
gressed, it became increasingly obvious to the people
of Israel that they were not alone.
As Israelis gave their lives, their brethren
abroad poured money, supplies and encouragement
into the beleagured land. Jews in the United States
who may never have performed a single "Jewish" act
called local synagogues to ask how they could help
Israel.
As tangible evidence of this spirit of solidarity,
568,000 Americans and Candians purchased Israel
Bonds in the amount of $217,547,100. Since most of
these Bonds had a 12-year maturity date, the sum of
$140 million the greatest dollar amount of Bonds
to mature in a single year comes due in 1979.
In March of this year, life in Israel changed no
less dramatically although in a different direction
than in 1967. A peace treaty with Egypt was
achieved, presenting Israel with new challenges, the
need to redeploy the population to be evacuated from
the Sinai while continuing to develop the economy
and embarking on an intensive development program
in the Negev.
Now, Israel's pressing economic needs lend
special significance to maturing 1967 Bonds. The
568,000 Bondholders, many of whom have relocated,
must be contacted and reminded that the Bonds are
maturing. This task is compounded by the fact that a
large number of Bonds are held by individuals other
than the purchasers children and grandchildren,
for instance.
Twelve years after the Six-Day War it is peace
that delineates Israel's need for funds. Israel Bonds
are a cogent way of meeting the need, and Operation
Reinvestment proves they are a safe way, too.
Nazi Deportation Hearing
To Be Discontinued
By ROCHELLE WOLK
ALBANY, N.Y., (JTA) -
The deportation hearing of Vilis
A. Hazners of Dresden, New
York, accused of Nazi atrocities
against the Jews of Riga, Latvia
during World War II, will not be
continued.
After several postponements
to accommodate a government
witness who is a West German
prosecutor and expert on Latvian
war crimes, the government and
defense attorneys have agreed to
a stipulation to accept a
deposition from this witness.
Instead of a public hearing, the
government now has 30 days to
file its final briefs before Judge
Anthony DeGaeto. Following
that, Ivars Berzins, Hazners'
attorney, will also be given 30
days to respond.
AFTER JUDGE DeGaeto
reads both briefs, his decision
should be expected in two to six
months, according to govern-
ment officials. Court proceedings
against Hazners began in Albany
in January 1977, and were
scheduled to resume last Apr. 4,
then May 17, before an-
nouncement of the completion.
Rabbi Paul Silton, co-chairman
of the Capital District Ad Hoc
Committee on Justice for Nazi
War Criminals, said that the
government's decision to
complete the case without further
public hearings will cause much
of the interest that has been
generated by the Hazners case to
be "swept under the rug.
"In the course of my 2'/i-year
involvement with this issue," he
said, "I've consistently been told
by government officials, in-
cluding Martin Mendelsohn, now
deputy director of the Justice
Department's revamped unit on
Nazi war criminals, that public
hearings serve the important
purpose of educating people
about the presence of these
alleged murderers here, and now
we've lost this opportunity."
SILTON SAID that "many
attorneys have told me that the
force of a deposition, as compared
to the appearance of a witness, is
much less effective. After visiting
Washington, D.C., on May 3 to
discuss the issue of Nazi war
criminals with the office of
President Carter's Commission
on the Holocaust and high
government officials in the White
House and the Justice Depart-
ment, I had some hope that the
transfer of the Special Litigation
Unit on Nazi War Criminals from
Immigration and Naturalization
Service to the Criminal Division
of the Justice Department would
mean progress."
THE FLAP over the func-
tional literacy test in the State of
Florida is understandable, but
opponents of the test are wrong
to contest it.
At issue is the testing of
would-be. high school graduates
to determine if they can read,
write and perform basic arith-
metic computation.
To begin with, we (and they)
ought to feel a profound sense of
embarrassment that young
people are permitted to advance
so far along in the public school
system and still be woefully
deficient in the intricacies of what
were once called the "3 R's" when
we call upon them at their
eleventh-hour to prove their skills
in them.
BUT THAT is the nature of
our educational dilemma today.
They are not only deficient; they
are hostile at being called to
account, and they and their civiJ
libertarian representatives go to
court as the injured parties as
if it were not their fault. This
exists not only in Florida but
throughout the nation, although
Floridians must finally face up to
the fact that their public school
system is among the worst in the
country.
The functional literacy test is
designed to force the high school
graduate, prior Jo getting a
diploma, to demonstrate that he
is on a level of academic achieve-
ment commensurate with what
the diploma presumably
represents.
It is designed to put the brakes
on a desnocratkally-inspired
egalitarian educational process
that has for decades sanctioned
automatic promotion from one
grade to the next on the basis
that not to do so is to dis-
criminate against certain in-
dividuals, ethnic groups, and /or
races.
THE HISTORY of this
philosophy of education, which
took insidious root after World
War II and its baby boom after-
math, is a sad chronicle of the
decline in quality education.
The fact is that academic
standards can not, or at least
should not, be modified to adapt
to the cultural norm. If the object
of education is to elevate people
from where they are to some
hypothetical level of achievement
representing where they ought to
be, then just the opposite is true:
people (the cultural norm) must
be modified (elevated) to adapt to
established academic standards.
This is an elitist position, some
will say, but there can be nothing
democratic or egalitarian about
the education process. Since
World War II, democratic and
egalitarian principles have eroded
that process until we now
graduate substandard high
school students as a matter of
course-
It is for this reason that the
functional literacy test has been
designed, and if there is any .
argument against it that makes
sense, it is that the test as *
brake against illiteracy comes too
late.
IT IS NOT an occasional
undeserving would-be graduate
we are holding back; it is many,
while those who pass the test .
only marginally raise the number 1
of essentially substandard
graduates and would-be
Continued on Page 10
h

:.* :--**Utmi*-**
Robert Sctjal
Attack on Newsmen Insidious
Not long after Pope John Paul
II let it be known that he was
going this Spring to visit Poland,
land of his birth, that nation's
politburo decreed that all
newsgatherers from non-Polish
lands coming to cover the
Pontiff's homecoming would
have to pay a tax of $350.
Thus the totalitarian mind at
work.
About the same time, in one of
the few surviving democracies, a
Massachusetts state senator
proposed a law requiring those he
branded "investigative repor-
ters" to post a $5,000 bond and
pay an initial fee of $750 plus
annual tax of $400 to continue as
part of the newspaper profession.
THESE SNOOPING jour-
nalists, he declared, amount to
private detectives and had to be
licensed. News spies packed too
much power and were too devilish
to continue to enjoy freedom of
the press.
Now the highest court in the
United States has held that a
plaintiff in a libel suit has a right
to ascertain the state of mind of
the newsgatherer preparing his
articles and of his associates
joining in that enterprise. The
case in point was that of Lt. Col.
Anthony B. Herbert, oft-
decorated Vietnam War veteran,
vs. Barry Lando, a producer of
CBS's explosive 60 Minutes
program.
For six years, this fascinating
libel litigation had journeyed
through the courts. At peak level,
the jurists did not limit pre-trial
questioning. Consequently,
loaded down with documents,
young Lando had gone through
26 days of questioning.
BUT THAT was not enough.
What were the inner thought
processes of Lando and his CBS
comrades, the trial lawyers
demanded to know. Just how had
they gone about trying to pin the
military hero to the wall? Much
was riding on such questions. Lt.
Col. Herbert, a tenacious
defender of his good name, was
seeking $44.7 million in damages.
Perhaps prior to the era of
electronic jourrnalism, abrim
with tape recorders, candid
cameras, and disconcerting
television lights, such litigation
would never have been dreamed
of. Anyone who has studied the
files of newspaper of a century
ago can not fail to have been
surprised at the vicious name-
calling of men prominent in
public life who, thus besmirched,
failed to collect a penny or even
went to the trouble of suing.
But this is a different day. And
with Chief Justice Warren
Burger at the hehn, a jurist
whose mistrust of the media is
already legendary, it is a different
court. Sue of the justices have
voted one more brake on the
enterprise of news gathering and
news production.
ONCE MORE, to bis great
credit, Judge Potter Stewart has
entered sharp dissent. The
Herbert suit, he averred, con-
cerned only what was published
What was not published has
nothing to do with the case.
Liability hinges in the end upon
the publisher's state of
knowledge of the falsity of what
he published and "not at all upon
his motivation in publishing it"
Dissenting Justice Thurgood
strove also to uphold the
foundations of traditional
American press freedom:
"Society's interest in enhancing
the accuracy of coverage of public *
events is ill-served by procedures
tending to muffle expression of
uncertainty. To preserve a
climate of free interchange
among journalists, the con-
fidentiality of their conversation
must be guaranteed.
Increasingly in these times,
shield laws protecting reporters
assurance that confidences will
not have to be violated are being
bypassed by courts
Increasingly, reporters are going
to jail for holding fast to their
files. In 1978, the Supreme Court
ruled, 5-to-3, that policemen
could rifle through newsrooms
pretty much at will Little
wonder those who place great
value on the right to inquire, to
write to publish are P-
prehensive.
"A free press is not a privilege
but an organic necessity u>
great society," Walter Lippm"
reasoned. How great is <
American dream, the enterprise
today?
J.



Friday, June 22,1979
.......'.!
m* .illitmi ntarmtmr Fort Lauderdale
The Jewish Floridian, of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
PLO Reacts With Rage
The reaction of the PLO to the signing of the peace treaty
between Israel and Egypt was one of rage, violence and un-
remitting hatred. The two 16-year-old youths killed by a bomb
on the main street of Tiberias May 14 were the most recent
victims of a vicious campaign of terror which began immediately
after the signing. *
In the first month alone, terrorist attacks included:
March 27 Bomb in Lod -1 killed, 21 injured.
April 5 Bomb in Jerusalem -13 injured.
April 10 Bomb in Tel Aviv market -1 killed, 22 injured.
April 14 Four PLO terrorists killed crossing into Israel from
Jordan.
Aprill7 Six terrorists killed crossing into Israel from Lebanon.
One Israeli killed, six wounded.
April 24 Terrorist attack in Nahariya four Israelis killed,
including two children.
World reaction was, as usual, almost non-existent. The UN,
which has designated 1979 as International Year of the Child,
was silent in the face of PLO slaughter of children: the toll since
Jan. 1 is 15.
Groundbreaking Set
For Margate Center
Groundbreaking ceremonies
for the new Margate Jewish
Center will be held on Sunday,
June 24, at 10 a.m., according to
David Klempner, publicity
director. The site for the new
complex is located at Roval Palm
Israel's Task:
Immigration
Based on the record-high
levels of Soviet Jewish immi-
gration at the end of 1978, we
predict that 40,000 immi-
grants will come to Israel in
1979, including a large num-
ber of Iranian Jews.
Approximately 8,000 Jews
have already left Iran for Is-
rael, entering as temporary
residents; another 4,000 are
believed to be temporarily
living in other countries.
That leaves an estimated
66,000 people in the Iranian
Jewish community.
Regarding Jews in the
Soviet Union, 4,200 exited
for Vienna in December, and
the trend continued in
January. The real basis of
our optimism, however, is
the record number of
requests by Soviet Jews for
qualifying affidavits.
During the last few years,
some 6,000 affidavits have
been requested annually. In
the last three months of
1978, 14,000 were requested.
During January alone, we
received requests for 20,000
affidavits.
Leon Dulzin, Chairman
The Jewish Agency
Executive
Boulevard and Rock Island
Road, Margate.
The new building will house
the sanctuary, Hebrew School,
two kitchens, study and a large
social hall.
Construction of the new center
will commence within a few days
after Sunday's ceremony, and
completion is anticipated by the
High Holidays of 1980.
The rabbi of the Margate
Jewish Center is Dr. Solomon
Geld: Max Gallub is cantor: and
center president is Emanuel
Schwartz.
OUR
Readers
wRite

EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Congratulations to Victor M.
Bienstock on his article about
Jewish trips to the Pyramids.
I have been actively involved
with Israel and Israeli affairs for
many years, and he voices my
sentiments to a "T", as well as
the sentiments of many Israelis
whom I spoke with on my recent
sojourn to Eretz.
While the leopard changes its
spots, let Israel keep her powder
dry lest the spots return after the
ink on the peace treaty dries.
MILTON L. SCHEINGARTEN
Lauderdale Lakes
I HELP WANTED
RETIRED MANAGEMENT EXECUTIVES TO
SERVE ON A VOLUNTEER COMMITTEE TO
BE A MANAGEMENT ADVISORY GROUP TO
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER.
BACKGROUND IN BUSINESS, FINANCE,
ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE, ECT.
RETIRED MEN IN ALL PHASES OF CON-
STRUCTION FIELD: CARPENTERS, ELEC-
TRICIANS, PLUMBERS, PAINTERS, ETC.
WE NEED YOUR HELP!
VOLUNTEER TODAY!
CALL SIDNEY ELKMAN AT THE JCC
484-767$ TO*700
Roz Ornstein, left, is shown
installing Mildred Tell, right,
for her second term as pres-
ident of the Aleph Council of
B'nai B'rith Women. The
ceremonies were held in the
Catherine Young Library,
Margate, and attended by
members of the 14 chapters
that make up the Aleph
Council.
RUSSIAN JEWISH
WOMAN SEEKS
EMPLOYMENT
A recently resettled Russian
Jewish woman is seeking a
position in the West Oakland
Park Blvd. area as a homemaker
or nurse's aide. Speaks Yiddish.
No sleep-in. Please call Shelly
Solomon at the Jewish Family
Service 927-9288.
Oil Struck Near Ashdod
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli drillers struck oil east
of Ashdod last week, but further drilling and tests are
required to determine whether the deposit is large enough
to make commercial exploitation feasible.
The strike was made at a depth of 2,500 meters by the
Ashdod-5 rig operated jointly by the Lapidot and Hana
companies. The gusher seemed promising. A good grade
of oil poured out of the well without the use of pump.
But oil experts cautioned that another 100 meters of
drilling would be necessary and more surveys made before
the strike can be evaluated.
Household Items
URGENTLY NEEDED
FOR RUSSIANJEWISH FAMILIES
An urgent plea has been made by the Jewish Family
Service agency for household items needed to furnish
apartments for the newly arriving Russian Jewish
families to be resettled in Fort Lauderdale.
VACUUM CLEANERS
SMALL APPLIANCES
SILVERWARE
DISHES
BLACK AND WHITE T.V. SETS
COOKING UTENSILS
The Jewish Family Service can arranged to pick up
any items you can donate.
PLEASE CALL SHELLY SOLOMON 927-9288
After theatre
there's nothing like a delicious
cup of coffee. Maxwell House
Coffee always makes it great.
Pleasant company after the theatre is
never the same without a cup of piping
hot Maxwell House Coffee. Its rich,
satisfying taste is brewed to be remem-
bered cup after cup, year after year.
Maxwell Housea tradition in Jewish
lifestyle for over half a century.
*
Good
to the
Last Drop"*
K
Certified
Kosher
A living tradition in Jewish homes for more than half a century.
./ I


Paget
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. June 22,1979
Verbal Fire, Brimstone from PLO Man
Continued from Page 1
passports though the name of one
of them tallied with the personal
data and the photograph in one of
the passports found in the
Passau grab.
At almost the same time. West
Berlin police arrested two
Lebanese who had a dozen
electric detonators in their
possession. Another Lebanese,
now a German citizen, was
arrested a short while later.
He had on himself the key to a
railroad locker in which the police
found 18 kilos of explosives and
five wristwatches prepared as
timing devices for bombs.
WERE PALESTINIAN
terrorists about to make true
their recent threats?
In an interview with the
illustrated weekly Stern, the head
of the Palestinian terrorist
organization. Black September,
Abu Iyyad, had intimated that
his kamikaze commandos might
again engage in punitive actions
on an international scale.
The threat clearly included the
Federal Republic of Germany,
whose policy, he said, was anti-
Palestinian.
The unofficial representative of
the PLO in Bonn, Abdalla
Frangi. has made it absolutely
clear that this country's
favorable attitude towards the
Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty
could prove detrimental to
German security.
FRANGI CARRIES an
Algerian diplomatic passport and
is officially a member of the Arab
League's Bonn office.
He greatly embarrassed the
Bonn government in 1977 when,
at a public function in Berlin, he
suggested that the only solution
to the Middle East problem
would be the elimination of the
Zionist, expansionist and fascist
state of Israel.
Indirectly, Bonn owed this
embarrassment to a Darmstadt
court, which, in 1974, refused to
uphold a deportation order issued
against Frangi in connection with
the 1972 massacre during the
Munich Olympics.
Abdalla Frangi, who is married
to a German, is now firmly
established in Bonn's political
scene.
THOUGH HIS dream of
gaining the status of official
representative of a PLO
recognized by Bonn is still far
from materializing, this does not
detract from his actual role.
Anyone seeking contact with
the PLO in Bonn knows that the
former guerrQlero is his man,
much to the chagrin of the
Israelis.
They officially ignore him but
have unofficially repeatedly
expressed displeasure at Frangi
being permitted publicly to
preach military action in the
Middle East, undeterred by the
German authorities,
agreements,' news and com-
mentaries of the Palestinian news
agency Wafa and reports on pro-
Palestinian and anti-Zionist
events in Germany.
OPENING JUNE 28 SPECIAL
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CONSTANT RABBINICAL SUFf RVISION
RAM I JOS. KAUFMAN
The material is most avidly
reprinted by the various
publications of the extreme left
like Arbeiterkampf and Kam-
pfende Jugend. But the
Palestinian PR men have also
been successful with leftist media
of a higher standard-
THE OFFICIAL information
organ of the PLO, Palestine, a
professionally made magazine
openly propagating violence, is
distributed by the Information
Office in English, French and
Arabic, the German edition
having been discontinued.
The Information Office also
operates as a mail-order house
for Palestinian books, brochures.
postcards, calendars and posters.
In addition it sells embroidery.
Frangi, who speaks German
fluently, uses as his headquarters
the Palestinian Information
Office in Bonn's Kaiserstrasse.
only a stone's throw from the
Chancellery.
THE INFORMATION Offta
staffed by both Palestinians and
Germans, is a registered
whose function it is to "inform
the German public about
problems and current
developments in Palestine"
The organization publishes the
weekly Palastina Bulletin. The
mimeographed six-page news-
sheet contains official PLO
Flatto Faces Music
For Election Abuses
mother-of-pearl inlay work,
Palestinian headgear, leather
goods, etc.
Apart from its PR work, the
office also serves as an in-
formation center and political
and intellectual headquarters ot
the 20,000 Palestinians living in
this country.
THEIR FORMER organi-
zations, like Generalunion
Palasttnensischer Arbeiter (GU-
PAI general union of
tinian workers wren
banm ter the Munich
li took until Juni i rthe
ipl idthi in In their
the judge* said these
organizations posed a thre
the I I'd. ra! Republic of Ger-
many's security because they
supported armed revolution by
means of hostage-taking,
skyjacking and similar acts of
violence.
Frangi s Information Office
has nothing to do with such
reprehensible acts. Security
experts believe that, due to their
cooperation with Palestinian
terror groups, the training at
their hands and the hideouts in
the Middle East, German
terrorists have an adequate
infrastructure and do not depend
on help from the semi-official
PLO representative office.
MOREOVER, cooperation
developed recently between the
PLO and the Federal Bureau of
Criminal Investigation (RK \
which helped the PLO solvi
fatal bomb attack on Al
closest collaborator. Al H
Salameh, in which a Gei
woman is said to havi beei
\ olved.
Speculation is rife on whi
the arrests in Passau and I
were manipulated by the [srai
secret service to put a spam,
the works of cooperation between
the PLO and the BKA
In any event, there can be no
doubt that the Israeli-
greally irked by the recent
contacts in Beirut.
'Mike' Solomon, Margate
Center Leader Dies
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Attorney General Yitzhak Zamir
confirmed that he intends to
prosecute MK Samuel Flatto-
Sharon for abuses of the election
law during his campaign for the
Knesset in 1977. Two ofhis aides,
Jacques Ben-Odis and Yaacov
Half on, will also be charged.
The charges culminate a two-
year investigation of allegations
that the former French mil-
lionaire, wanted in France for tax
evasion and fraud, literally
bought votes to secure a seat in
the Knesset. His election came as
a surprise second only to the
Likud victory in 1977.
ZAMIR SAID he would ask
the Knesset House Committee to
waive Flatto's immunity so that
he can stand trial. The committee
is empowered to do so in cases
where criminal charges are
brought against a member.
Flatto said that the decision to
press charges was a surrender to
the lynch atmosphere created by
his enemies. He said he would
not resign from the Knesset
unless a court found him guilty.
His aides claim they only paid
election workers for activity on
Flatto's behalf, something all
candidates do. According to Ben-
Odis, "The whole thing is a joke
of the year."
Myron J. ("Mike**')
Solomon, a former president
of the Margate Jewish
Center, died May 30.
The Solomons moved to
South Florida in 1966 after
Mike's retirement from
General Motors where he
was employed as an engineer
for the Cadillac Division.
During his term as president
of the Margate Jewish Cen-
ter, the facilities were in-
creased in size to its present
building; he was instru-
mental in the formation of a
vital Men's Club and offered
outstanding leadership
during this period of growth
of the center.
Mike was active in many
organizations as a Shriner. a
member of B'nai B'rith, was
president of B'nai David
Synagogue in Detroit and
was involved in numerous
activities in the communities
in which he resided.
A beloved father, grand
father and husband, Mike
leaves a heritage of "Yid-
dishkeit" to his eight chil-
dren, sixteen grandchildren
and four great-grand-
children.
The burial took place in
Detroit.

BE CHOOSEY
CHOOSE MOTT'S
Tiber]
I
Mott's chooses the best
sun-ripened apples and
prunes because they give
you more natural good-
ness. Next time you're in
the supermarket, choose
from the selection of
Mott's Apple and Prune
products. Choose the
quality product. Be
choosey with Mott's
K Certified Kosher
ngej


pHgeo
Friday, June 22,1979
mi r....._!. vt~~4^4~mr.tfirm*it+rFartLauderdale
The Jewish Floridiqn of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page-7
Action Message
AIPAC Policy Statement
Due to space limitations,
following is a condensed version
of policy adopted by the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AIPAC) at its 20th
annual policy conference in
Washington.
The bonds between the United
States and Israel are secured by
commitments to democracy,
justice and freedom, and by
common strategic goals. Their
peoples share ideals, values and
spiritual roots. AIPAC will
continue to stress these ties and
promote U.S. -Israeli friendship.
The Egypt-Israel peace treaty
is a fundamental breakthrough in
Arab-Israeli relations and is the
basis for genuine peace between
Israel and all its neighbors.
We condemn the refusal of
other Arab states to join indirect
negotiations with Israel. The
Arab boycott of Egypt and the
denunciation of the peace treaty
by most Arab states must not
obstruct the normalization of
relations between Egypt and
Israel.
ALTHOUGH A com
prehensive settlement in the
Middle East is a constructive
long-range goal, a policy of
American deference to extremist
Arab demands endangers the
achievement of that goal and
undermines the Egyptian-Israeli
peace treaty.
Permanent borders must be
negotiated by the governments
directly involved. Israel is en-
titled to secure and defensible
borders which were not provided
by the vulnerable armistice lines
of 1949. Israeli settlements in the
occupied territories, in light of
the Arab refusal to negotiate, are
not illegal, nor do they constitute
an obstacle to peace. Third-party
assurances, which have proved
ineffective in the past, are no
substitute for mutually
negotiated borders or for a
country's independent defense
capacity.
We commend the ad-
ministration and the Congress for
continuing to provide substantial
military and economic aid
essential to the maintenance ot
Israel's security. In withdrawing
from the Sinai, Israel is assuming
major risks for peace. Israel's
people, who already bear the
major burden of their own
defense, will underwrite much of
the cost of rebuilding new defense
facilities in the Negev. Sinai
relocation assistance will
promote the common strategic
interest of both the United States
and Israel.
We support Congressional
action to reduce assistance to
Syria. The United States should
not subsidize those opposed to
the quest for peace. In the ab-
sence of Jordanian cooperation,
reduction of U.S. aid to Jordan
should be considered.
WE CONDEMN the negative
role played by Saudi Arabia.
They joined with rejectionist
Arab states at two Baghdad
conferences. Because of the
treaty signing with Israel, the
Saudis broke relations with and
imposed a boycott on Egypt,
encouraging other states to do
the same. The Saudis continue to
finance PLO terrorism.
We urge the administration to
re-evahiate economic aid and
join
m-
the
arms sales to those Arab states
which jeopardize American
terests by refusing to
peace negotiations.
There can be no resolution of
the Arab-created Palestinian
refugee problem until Israel's
neighbors are prepared to
recognize and negotiate with
Israel.
The negotiations on Pales-
tinian autonomy should not
be dependent upon parties hostile
to peace with Israel and should
not obstruct the implementation
of peace between Egypt and
Israel. The United States should
be an impartial mediator, not an
advocate, in these negotiations.
WE CONDEMN the PLO for
its terrorist attacks on civilians
and for its attacks and threats
against Israel and the United
States. The PLO plays a major
role in training and supporting
international terrorist groups
threatening the entire western
world.
In recent months, the ad-
ministration has permitted PLO
officials to enter the United
States. We oppose this practice
and any other effort by the
administration to court the PLO
or to use a vague acceptance of
UN Security Council Resolution
242 as a basis for recognizing the
PLO. Such efforts violate the
spirit of the Sinai II pledge,
undercut Egypt, reinforce the
uncompromising position of Arab
rejectionists and encourage
terrorism.
United Jerusalem, the capital
of Israel, now flourishes as an
open city with free access to the
holy places for all faiths. Jews
and Israeli Moslems and
Christians must never again be
barred from any part of
Jerusalem as they were during
Jordan's 19-year occupation of
the Old City. To protect religious
freedom and the continued
development of the city for the
benefit of all its citizens,
Jerusalem must never be divided
again. The United States should
recognize Jerusalem as the.
capital of Israel, and the U.S.
embassy, now in Tel Aviv, should
be moved to Jerusalem.
The United States should
maintain an effective defense
posture to prevent Soviet
aggression against the United
States, its allies and friends. We
recognize the important role
Israel plays as a strategic asset in
this goal. We oppose cuts in the
defense budget which would
undermine the objective of
blunting Soviet designs.
DESPITE CURRENT anti-
boycott legislation, the Arab
boycott against Israel continues
T he (Artcipal Bond Peorje''
Halpert,
Oberst
and
Company
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to threaten the constitutional
rights of American citizens and
the principles of open and fair
trade. All agencies of the federal
government should vigorously
enforce the anti-boycott laws.
Growing U.S. dependence on
foreign energy sources gravely
threatens the security and
economy of this country and of
our allies. The United States
should make a strong, deter-
mined effort in concert with other
oil importing nations to break the
grip of OPEC on the world oil
market. The administration
should encourage the production
of non-OPEC oil, particularly in
the Western Hemisphere.
The United States must un-
dertake a comprehensive
program of energy conservation.
We support President Carter's
position on human rights and
regard the persecution of Jews
and other minorities in Syria,
Iraq, Iran, Ethiopia and
elsewhere as intolerable. The
tenuous status of Iran's Jewish
community is a cause of deepest
concern. The community's
political and social rights are now
totally dependent on Islamic
authorities known for their
hostility to Jews and Israel.
THE DETERIORATING
position of the Jewish com-
munities in Ethiopia, Syria and
Iraq are also cause for alarm. Our
government should seek to
protect the fundamental human
rights of these people, including
their right to emigrate.
We welcome the increased
outflow of Jews and the release of
a small number of prisoners of
conscience. We urge the ad-
ministration to continue to seek
the release of the remaining
prisoners of conscience and to
support the political and religious
rights of Jews remaining in the
Soviet Union.
The United Nations, and most
of its affiliated organizations,
have abandoned their founders'
ideals and become a rubber-
stamp for bloc voting, blatant
discrimination against Israel,
anti-democratic actions and the
condoning of terrorism. The
United States should assert
leadership in reestablishing the
principles upon which the United
Nations was founded.
Edmund Entin, Chairman,
Community Relations Com-
mittee,
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
gel
Jewish Community Center
Helen Nathan, Jewish Com-
munity Center senior adult
program director, has announced
the relocation of the "Gathering
Place," senior adult day care
program to the Jewish Fed-
eration building, 2999 NW 33rd
Ave., Lauderdale Lakes.
An expanded itinerary of daily
activities and entertainment is
now offered to the frail elderly
currently enrolled in the five-day,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. program, since it is
coordinated with the JCC and on-
site kosher nutrition facilities.
For further information and
registration forms, call Ann
Chestnut, day care supervisor.
FIDDLER ON
THE ROOF'
The Jewish Community Center
announces a stage production of
"Fiddler on the Roof" will be pre-
sented on Sunday, Aug. 12, at
Fort Lauderdale High School.
Tickets are going fast with
reserved sections being taken by
various groups for the evening
presentation. Many seats remain
for both the 3 p.m. and 7 p.m.
performances.
FATHERS DAY
PROGRAM
The kosher nutrition program
located at the JCC presented a
Father's Day program, Friday,
June 15. The program consisted
of the dance group, "The
Lockets," and songs by singer
Rachel Eisenstein, accompanied
by Charlotte Conn at the piano.
The
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The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. June 22,
Scenes jftom tk j>CC (AmmQ, Co^e/tenee
Continued from Page 1
thanked the United Way and the
Jewish Federation for their "vital
assistance" to the development
of the center.
JEWISH FEDERATION
president Leo Goodman stated,
"The Federation is proud of the
accomplishments to date this
is just the beginning of the new
JCC and the future is bright."
Sam Soref, one of the JCC's
Johl Rotman, chairman of the
annual conference, welcomes
the large crowd to the meet-
ing, held at the Palm-Aire
Country Club.
most active supporters, spoke of
the "dedication of a group of local
Jews who rallied to the cause of
the JCC and have brought us to
this point where we see the great
potential of this program."
Attorney Harvey Kopelowitz
announced that the closing on the
FAA property was held on May
29. He also spoke of the "im-
oortance that the membership
drive succeeds ... we need ail
age groups to join the JCC to
take advantage of the exciting
programming that will be
available."
Chairman of the grounds
planning committee Sidney Elk-
man reported on the progress to
date at the new site, but put out
an urgent call for more volunteers
to assist in the "enormous job
that must be done." He said the
Day Camp will start on June 18,
>eing the first activity on the
Perlman Campus. He noted that
the Hebrew Day School will move
into its new quarters in Sep-
tember and that much work
remains to prepare the facility for
the planned activities.
WECARE chairman, Sally
Radin, reported on the varied
volunteer activities that are
being conducted presently. She
indicated that "with the new
facilities, WECARE can expand
its programs to serve more needy
people in our area." Mrs. Radin
also commented on the Richards
WECARE Day to be held on
Aug. 9.
Mrs. Helen Soref presented the
report of the nominating com-
mittee for positions on the JCC
Board of Directors which was
unanimously accepted. County
Commissioner Jack Moss in-
stalled the new Board members,
who are Sylvia Begelman,
Stephen Belton, Milton
Edelstein, Marianne Falk, Judge
Hugh Glickstein, Irving Griff,
Victor Gruman, David
Jackowitz, Mel Katz. Rabbi
Philip Labowitz, Sunny Land %
-man. Dr. Sam Leder. S *
Levine, Mrs. Jack Levine *Z
Mrs. Michael Radin. and
Sam Soref, outstanding com-
munity leader, addressed the
audience on the "great poten-
tial" of the new JCC.
Milton Keiner, co-chairman of
the JCC Building Campaign,
reported on the fund-raising
drive and urged everyone "to
get more people involved in
working and giving."
Keynote speaker, Donald
Mint* of New Orleans, is seen
addressing the conference. He
stated, "The JCC is the hope
for the future."
Ok
Harvey Kopelowitz, a JCC
vice president, chairman of
the negotiating committee
and legal counsel, reports to
the annual conference that the
FAA property was acquired
on May 29.
Ludwig Brodzki is seen of-
fertng the invocation.'
Leo Goodman, president of
the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale,
commented that "the Feder-
ation is proud of the JCC ac-
complishmen ts."
Michael Weinberg, JCC vice
president, is seen receiving his
award for dedicated service to
the Jewish Community
Center.
Selma Telles, JCC program
coordinator and Day Camp
director, reported that the
camp has over 300 children
enrolled and is staffed "with
highly qualified counselors
and specialists."
4
Giving a report of progress to
date is Sidney Elkman, chair-
man of the planning commit-
tee for renovations and con-
struction at the new site He
issued a caU for "many more
volunteers to help with the
enormous job."
JCC vice president, Ben
Roisman, offers thanks to all
those "who have shown great
dedication" to the acquisition
of the new property.
Fabet Jt[T Pyb^J **own presenting awards to Rovi
mo/ramVLJSSrH %* honomry chairman of WECARE
progran^andSaliy Radin, chairman of WECARE
A report on the numerous
volunteer activities of the
WECARE program was given
by Sally Radin, chairman of
WECARE.
Iftii
liiSi
<*
The annual conference planning committee is pictured with Shown M "**''-"
s for tnetr dedication to the JCC.


Friday, June 22,1979
, nfflr*at*r Fort Lauderdale
_77te Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Organizations Announce Meetings
fage9
IOOFTOMEET
The Independent Order of
Oddfellows, Hatchee Lodge 71,
. meets every first and third
Thursday of the month at 1451
N. Dixie Highway, Fort
Lauderdale. The next meeting
will be June 21 at 8 p.m. For
information, contact Manuel
Barish.
JEWISH WAR
VETERANS
William Kretchman Post 730,
Jewish War Veterans of Fort
Lauderdale, will hold its monthly
meeting on Monday, June 25 at
7:30 p.m. at Whiting Hall, 6767
NW 24th St., Sunrise. Korean
and Vietnam veterans will be
given free dues for the year. New
members and transferees are
invited. For further information,
contact Artie Horowitz.
FREE SONS
OF ISRAEL
Fort Lauderdale Lodge No.
4 219, Free Sons of Israel, will hold
its next meeting on Thursday,
June 28, at 7:30 p.m. in the
Whiting Recreation Hall, NW
68th Avenue and NW 24th
Street, Sunrise. This will be the
last meeting before the summer
season.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
The Orah Chapter of Women's
League for Israel held its
season's final meeting and
luncheon at the Sea Grill
Restaurant in Deerfield Beach.
Faye Rosenstein, chapter
chairman of Tamarac, installed
officers Blossom Miller, chapter
chairman; Sally Findling, vice
president; Edna Ehrlich,
treasurer; Alice Botwinick,
t financial secretary; Natalie
Ingber, recording secretary; and
Cynthia Klein, corresponding
secretary. Ruth Sperber, Florida
representative, presented the
chairman with the first gavel, to
be handed down to each suc-
ceeding chairman.
Annette Kay, chapter
chairman of Bonaventure
Women s League for Israel,
hosted the season's final board
meeting and luncheon in her
home.
A plaque was presented to
Lillian Silitsky, the group's
treasurer, 'in appreciation" for
her devotion and great efforts
expended during the past two
years.
Women's League for Israel
announces it has closed its thrift
shop at 3272 N. State Road 7,
Lauderhill. A new shop will be
opened in the Fall.
Merchandise for this project is
being collected now, and a tax
deductible receipt will be given
by contacting Ruth Sperber.
HADASSAH
Hadassah Sunrise Shalom
Chapter is sponsoring a card
party and luncheon at
Salvatore's Restaurant, 2684 N.
University Dr., Sunrise, (near
Tom Tov) Tuesday, July 17, at
11:30 a.m. For tickets and in-
formation call Mildred Paris,
Shirley Klafter or Sadie Wade.
Esther Cannon, president of
the Florida Mid-Coast Region of
Hadassah, has announced that
the Ahava-Deerfield Chapter of
Hadassah has recently been
organized, the third Hadassah
unit to be established at Century
Village.
More than 25 women gathered
at the home of Toby Taus in the
Ventnor section for a dessert
luncheon to discuss
organizational plans for the new
chapter. In addition to Mrs.
Cannon, Priscilla Lippa, region
expansion chairman, and Pearl
Goldenberg, region advisor, also
were present to assist in the birth
of the new unit.
Elections were held, and the
first president will be Rosalie
Oseroff of Farnham N.
Installation of the entire slate of
officers and the presentation of
the charter will be scheduled for
September. Membership teas are
planned for the summer months.
Mrs. Oseroff has announced
that the first meeting will take
place on Wednesday, June 27, at
1 p.m. at the home of Esther
Levin, Ventnor P 4074.
The Ahava-Deerfield Chapter
will meet on Wednesdays, thus
giving Century Village residents
a third choice. The original
chapters of Kadimah and Scopus
meet on Mondays and Thursdays
respectively.
It is expected that by the end
of 1979, Century Village will have
a Hadassah membership of 1,000.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Blue Star Lodge
2912 will hold its next general
meeting June 24 at 9:30 a.m. at
Tamarac Jewish Center, 9101
N.W. 57 St., Tamarac.
Basil Rand, humorist, will
entertain. Breakfast will be
served. Members' wives are
invited.
B'nai B'rith Women,
Lauderhill Chapter, is winding up
the season with a paid-up
membership luncheon and card
party on Tuesday, June 26 at
noon at the Castle Recreation
Center. 4780 NW 22nd Court,
Lauderhill. Lee Wexler,
president, invites guests of
members to join in the season's
closing event.
The group has grown to almost
400 members and has been in-
volved in many facets of Jewish
and community life. Highlights
of the season include a luncheon
for the Children's Home in Israel
which honored Sally Radin,
program chairman, as the "B'nai
B'rith Woman of the Year."t A
joint meeting with the Men's
Lodge celebrated the 31st birth-
day of Israel with a musical
program attended by many
national and local leaders.
Members conducted monthly
Friday night services at the
Plantation Nursing Home and
were involved in helping Russian
families relocating in Lauderhill.
Traditional Chanukah candle
lighting ceremonies were held at
the two neighborhood Lauderhill
Malls.
Lauderdale Lakes Lodge of
B'nai B'rith 2940 was to present
the 22-voice Hawaiian Gardens
B'nai B'rith Songsters, under the
direction of Joe Gardner, with
Ida Sackman at the piano, in a
repertoire of popular music at the
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall, on
Thursday evening, June 21, at
7:30 p.m.
PARENTS FOR
AMERICAN ISRAELIS
A meeting of the Association
of Parents for American Israelis
will take place on Sunday, June
24 at 1:30 p.m. at the Jewish
Community Center. 2999 NW
33rd Ave., Lauderdale Lakes.
Parents of children residing in
Israel are invited. A convention
report will be given at this
meeting.
In Germany
Neo-Nazis Grilled in Court
By ALFRED SCHROEDER
BONN (JTA) The
Justice Ministry rejected charges
that it was too easy on neo-Nazis
and right-wing extremists who
glorify the Third Reich, spread
anti-Jewish propaganda and
claim the Holocaust never took
place. The Ministry said that a
study of 20 recent cases showed
that there were more convictions
than commonly assumed and
that sentences ranged from a 300-
Mark fine to two years in jail.
At the same time, the Justice
Minister of North Rhine-West-
phalia announced a full pardon
for anti-Nazi fighter Beate Klars-
feld. She received a two-month
jail sentence in Cologne in 1974
for inflicting bodily harm and
duress on former SS security
officer Kurt Lischka who was the
Gestapo chief in Paris during
World War II.
Lischka has been accused of
responsibility for the murder of
at least 22,000 French Jews. Mrs.
Klarsfeld, 40, and several French
friends, attempted to drag hun
into a car in 1971 to bring him to
France for trial. The kidnaping
failed and Mrs. Klarsfeld, who
returned to France, was tried and
sentenced by a Cologne court in
absentia.
An arrest warrant against her
was suspended after angry
criticism of the sentence abroad.
The procedure for a pardon was
initiated by West German legal
authorities on the basis of an
appeal by prominent German and
French citizens, among them
President Valery Giscard d'Es-
taing of France. Klarsfeld said at
the time that the kidnaping was
an attempt to focus world-wide
attention on Lischka and the fact
that many war criminals were
still at large in West Germany.
She said she had hoped it would
prompt the West German
authorities to bring the former
Gestapo chief to trial.
COME TO ISRAEL AND MEET YOUR PEOPLE
The Young Leadership Mission to Israel scheduled from July 5 to 15 will afford every
participant an opportunity of a lifetime to visit historic and cultural sights that will cer-
tainly leave a lasting impression. Jewish history and tradition abounds at every stop on
the outstanding itinerary that has been scheduled, you will see and enjoy.
Jerusalem
Masada
Yad vashem
Dead Sea
Hebrew university
Golan Heights
Safred
Haifa
Tel Aviv
Life on a Kibbutz
Brief ings with Israeli Leaders
And much, much more
YOUNG LEADERSHIP MISSION TO ISRAEL
JULY 5th -JULY 15th
Experience the Joy That Israel is Today
INCLUDES ROUND
$QQC per person trip air fare-
WWW N.Y.-TEL AVIV-N.Y.
5-STAR HOTELS, MEALS, LAND TRANSPORTATION.
NO EXTRA CHARGES!
DONT MISS OUT CALL OR WRITE TODAY
PHONE 484-8200
Jewish Federation
of Greater Ft Lauderdale
2999 N.W. 33rd Avenue
Ft Lauderdale, Florida 33311
PLEASE SEND BROCHURE ON THE JULY 5-15
ISRAEL MISSION
NAME____________________________
ADDRESS___________________________
CITY____
PHONE.
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i a-I.
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 22, 1979
Background Report
Vance Cozies Up to Arab Territory Viewpoint
By BARBIE ZELIZER
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance, who spoke for the
United States at the formal
opening of the Egyptian-
Israeli talks on Paelstinian
autonomy in Beersheba,
appeared to be closer to
the Egyptian position than
the Israeli on that sensitive
issue.
In his speech, Vance employed
the nomenclature of Egypt's
, Defense Minister, Kama] Hassan
AH, referring to the "self-
governing authority" to be
established under autonomy on
the West Bank and Gaza Strip
rather than to an "administrative
council" which is the term used
by Israel.
THE OPENING session was
marred by the last minute
decision of Egyptian Premier
Mustapha Khalil not to attend.
Hassan Ali spoke for Egypt and
Interior Minister Yosef Burg,
head of the Israeli negotiating
Pope Prays
For Victims
of Auschwitz
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Pope
John Paul II prayed for
the four million people,
most of them Jews, who
died at the Auschwitz and
Birkenau concentration
camps. The Pope, ac-
companied by nearly half a
million people, celebrated a
solemn mass at an open air
altar between the railway
lines which once brought
Jews from all over Europe
to the gas chambers of the
twin death camps.
The Polish-born Pontiff
seemed deeply moved as he
walked along the remaining camp
huts, the barbed wire, the watch
towers and the remnants of the
gas chambers. He said "This is a
place built on hatred in the
named of a crazed ideology. It is
the site of a terrible slaughter
that brought death to four
million people of different
nations."
THE POPE, who was ac-
companied by camp survivors
wearing the former striped
uniforms of inmates, said: "It is
my duty to recall the past in the
name of people who suffer all over
the world and to prevent similar
horrors from taking place again."
He spoke in moving tones
about the Jews who were
slaughtered in the camps. "They,
they were the main victims.
Innocent people killed for no
reason except their religion."
Then the Pope knelt in the
middle of the railway tracks and
Pope John Paul II
with bowed head and hands
crossed in prayer, said: "Here, I
kneel in prayer before the in-
scriptions recalling the Ausch-
witz victims in such languages as
Polish, English, Bulgarian,
Romany (Gypsy), Czech, Danish,
French, Greek, Hebrew, Yiddish,
Spanish, Flemish, Serbo-Croat,
German, Norwegian, Russian,
Rumanian and Italian."
AT BIRKENAU, about a mile
away from Auschwitz, the
Pope donned his vestments in the
blockhouse where SS officers
once watched their victims being
chosen for the gas chambers.
Here also he seemed deeply
moved as he blessed the dead in
the nightmarish atmosphere of
watch towers, bunkers, barbed
wire and gallows. A delegation of
Polish Jews attended the
ceremonies at Auschwitz.
Missiles in Lebanon
Are Confirmed
WASHINGTON tfTA) The State
Department has confirmed that Soviet-made SAM
anti-aircraft missiles are in place in Lebanon near the
Syrian border, but their number and purpose were
not disclosed.
Department spokesman Tom Reston said the
missiles are "an old story."
/ HE SAID "there is no indication they have been
moved southward (away from the Syrian border) or
that their number has increased."
Reston was unable to say who placed the
missiles in Lebanon. Asked if they might be used
against Israel in the event of Syrian-Israeli warfare,
he replied that he had "no military judgment to
offer.'
team, for his country. The session
was devoted to speeches, not
negotiations. The latter were
expected to begin when the two
sides meet again in Alexandria
Wednesday and Thursday.
All three diplomats spoke with
restraint. Hassan Ali avoided
any reference to the establish-
ment of a Palestinian state. Burg,
for his part, did not explicitly
demand the right of continued
free settlement and land ex-
propriation by Israel. The dif-
ferences between the Egyptian
and Israeli were most apparent
however in their references to
Jerusalem.
Burg spoke of the city as "the
eternal capital of Israel" while
Hassan Ali noted that "Arab
Jerusalem" is to be subject to the
"principle of inadmissability of
the acquisition of territory taken,
by the war" according to
Security Council Resolution 242.
HE STRESSED that all
Israeli actions taken to change
the area's status are "null and
void" But he did not specifical-
ly demand that East Jerusalem
which he referred to as "Arab
Jerusalem," be incorporated
under the future autonomous
authority.
It was Vance's remarks that
aroused the greatest interest in
Israel and consternation in some
quarters here. Following are
excerpts from the Secretary of
State's speech:
"The range of issues involved
in the Palestinian problem is far
too complex to be resolved at
once. The only realistic approach
therefore is to establish a
transitional period, during which
time the decisions that need to be
made can be dealth with in a
measured and logical way. The
approach was agreed by Egypt
and Israel and Camp David and
they have invited other parties to
the Arab-Israel conflict to
support it and join the
negotiations.
"WE REGRET the absence of
the Kingdom of Jordan and of
Palestinian representatives from
these proceedings today. If we do
not agree with their decision not
to attend at this time, we
nevertheless respect their right to
have a different view. We want to
make it clear that the invitation
to them to join us remains open.
At the sam%time, their absence
need not check the progress these
negotiations can make towards
the objectives which Jordan and
the Palestinians hold no less than
those of us at this table.
"I want to assure you in the
strongest possible terms that the
United States understands the
deep emotion and interests on all
sides that are touched by the
process which begins today. For
Egypt and the Arab world, the
primary focus is upon the
legitimate rights of the
Palestinian people. No peace can
either be just or secure for any
participant, if it does not resolve
this problem in its broadest
sense.
IN THE United States, we
believe that the Palestinian
people must have the right for
themselves and their descendants
to live with dignity and freedom,
and with opportunity for eco-
nomic fulfillment and political
expression.
"For Israel, meanwhile, a
lasting solution to the
Palestinian question and the
wider Arab-Israeli conflict will be
possible only if there is a genuine
acceptance of its right to live in
peace and security. We must also
go beyond these negotiations to
the broader aspects of the
Palestinian problem.
"We must make a start to deal
with the problems of Pa'estinians
Cyrus Vance
living outside the West Bank and
Gaza. They, too, must know that
an accepted and respected place
exists for them within the inter-
national community.
"SECOND, the security of
Israel is equally a central figure
of the Camp David framework.
As we seek ways to resolve the
range of issues of the West Bank
and Gaza, we must recognize that
Israel's security is of critical
importance to the success of
these negotiations because of the
special geographic and
demographic factors involved.
The negotiators must be sen-
sitive to these concerns, and
imaginitive and far-sighted in
proposing ways to meet them.
"Third, it is worth restating
that the UN Security Council
Resolution 242 remains the basic
statement of principles covering
a peace settlement. The Camp
David frameworks are built upon
it- It establishes as the fun-
damental equation for peace,
withdrawal from occupied
territories in exchange for
commitments to live at peace
with Israel within secure and
recognized boundaries.
"It is axiomatic that
Resolution 242 applies to all
fronts of the conflict. The
negotiating history of the
resolution leaves no doubt that
this was the understanding of all
parties when the resolution was
passed in 1967.
SSQtortills your cup with ta'am
not caff ein.
SanKO
SanW ^"W

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rage
. r....j.i. m~~iAi
iday, June 22, 1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
Vienna Summit
Mideast Not Likely to Be Important Topic
Koslov, also of the Institute;
Pravda commentator Georgi
Zhukov; and Nikolai Mostovets,
chief of the U.S. Section of the
Central Committee of the Soviet
Communist Party.
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
|jTA) At the highest
b.S. and Israeli official
levels in Washington, the
Considered opinion is that
'resident Carter and Soviet
'resident Leonid Brezhnev
Kill only briefly discuss
Middle East issues at their
(I'ienna conference Friday
hut without results that
vould significantly alter
Lheir present formulas for a
\liddle East settlement.
These officials believe the
Baders of the superpowers are
involved at present in their
particular approaches to change
hem abruptly. The U.S. is
eply committed to a "compre-
ensive" settlement through the
fcgyptian-Israeli treaty and
Lamp David processes. The
Soviets want to discard the
peaty and accords and settle all
\i a Geneva type conference of
Pair' the parties including the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion without preconditions. The
J.S. insists on the PLO ac-
epting conditions regarding
|srael before dealing with it.
AMONG East Europeans, who
lonitor both superpowers, a
liddle East specialist observed
that the Soviet Union cannot
>p its alliances with either the
'LO or the "rejectionist" Arab
ues for obvious political
easons that underpin its con-
tinuing drive for penetration of
the Middle East.
Thus it would seem that the
[Vienna summit will pass without
inother U.S. USSR agreement
that is in any way like the
bilateral agreement announced
Set. 1, 1977.
Nevertheless, the differences
etween Moscow and Washing-
Dn may not be as great as they
ppear judging from the dis-
jssions and joint statements at
tie recent Soviet-American
arley behind closed doors in
/illiamsburg, Va.
FOR THREE days in May, 17
deputies of the Supreme Soviet
ind top political technicians met
vith 24 Americans, including
everal Congressmen and leaders
the industrial and publishing
vorlds.
Leonid Brezhnev
It was the occasion of the Ket-
tering Foundation's 12th Dart-
mouth conference in 20 years.
Their conclusions were not har-
monious and only a few from each
side participated in the various
subject discussions including the
Middle East. But there was
movement towards under-
standing on some essential
elements.
"There was very clear
agreement that the next steps (in
the Arab-Israeli situation) must
be directed towards finding a
basic formula for involving all
parties to this conflict and the
building of a comprehensive
peace," a leading participant in
the Middle East discussion told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
HE CONFIRMED "abso-
lutely" that "all parties" include
the PLO. "New and imaginative
steps should be thought for that
might provide a new framework
and new procedures for dealing
with the question" of a "com-
prehensive" settlement and that
"full self-determination" should
be provided the Palestinian
Arabs, he said.
These positions would indicate
that the Americans in the dis-
cussion appeared to lean towards
scrapping part of the Camp
David accords to accommodate
Soviet approaches for its Arab
friends.
Other "common ground"
elements in the Williamsburg
discussions, the participant, who
asked not to be identified said,
were understanding that a
separate peace between Egypt
and Israel would not in itself
achieve a comprehensive settle-
ment and that the Palestinians
were the central issue.
THE PARTICIPANT ob
served the jointly approved
statement called for a "Pales-
tinian state." He said this was
"blurred by legitimate rights" of
Palestinians and "full self-
determination" for them. While
the two sides took strong op-
ixisine; positions on the Egyp-
Israeli treaty, the par-
ticipant said "emphasis was on a
Framework and procedures
so that all patties could be in-
volved." He said, The Russians
hardly mentioned Geneva. It was
lear they were looking for a new
formula with consultations by all
parties without saying 'return to
Geneva.' "
Told that the Russians agreed
"everybody would have to
recognize Israel," the JTA asked
whether the PLO would be in-
cluded before accepting President
Carter's conditions and whether
the PLO would first change its
charter that calls for Israel's
dissolution. These questions
angered the participant.
"THE PLO charter does not
mean a G-d thing at all. It's a
dead horse," he said. He said the
conferees did not go into the
timing of the consultations and
the "conditions" for the PLO's
entry were left "blurred."
Landrum Boiling, educator
and author, whose 1970 book,
Search for Peace in the Middle
East, was endorsed by the
American Friends Service Com-
mittee, and Evgend Primakov,
director of the Soviet Institute of
Near East and Middle East
Studies, were co-chairmen of the
Middle East discussion. In the
general American group were
Charles Yost, former U.S.
Ambassador to the United
Nations; David Rockefeller,
chairman of the Chase Man-
hattan Bank; Hedley Donovan,
retiring editor of Time, Inc.; Jim
Hoagland, Middle East specialist
for the Washington Post; J. C.
Hurewitz, director of Columbia
University's Middle East Insti-
tute: Robert G. Cholla, head of
Burg Posts Agenda
For Talks on Autonomy
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israeli ministerial team that will
negotiate with Egypt over
autonomy for the Palestinians on
the West Bank and Gaza Strip
was briefed by its chairman,
IInterior Minister Yosef Burg,
who just returned from talks with
Egyptian leaders in Cairo over
I the negotiating agenda.
The meeting, held in the office
I of Defense Minister Ezer
Weizman, was attended by five of
the six ministers. Foreign
Minister Moshe Dayan, who
himself returned from Cairo, was
I absent.
BURG told his colleagues of
I his talks with Egyptian Foreign
I Minister Butros Ghali and Prime
Minister Mustapha Khalil
separately shortly before he
| departed for Israel. Each meeting
lasted 90 minutes. W hile in Cairo.
(Burg also met with James
Leonard, deputy to Ambassador
Robert Strauss who will head the
American delegation at the
autonomy talks.
Burg reported that the
Egyptians accepted his proposals
to hold negotiating sessions once
every two weeks, each session to
last a day or two as required. He
produced a calendar of the
meetings for the next two
months.
He said the Egyptians also
agreed that the full negotiating
teams of both sides will attend
the initial sessions, after which
special subcommittees would be
established to discuss specific
details of the autonomy plan.
BURG FLEW to Cairo for the
purpose of arranging an agenda
for the first meeting held in
Alexandria last Monday. It was
learned that while some circles in
Israel and the U.S. regarded the
National Religious Party leady as
no more than a "figurehead
bereft of real negotiating
authority, the Egyptians, for
their part, view him as Israel s
top negotiator and intend to deal
with him as such
the Kettering Foundation; and
Norman Cousins, of the Saturday
Review.
RUSSIANS attending the
conference in general included
Georgi Arbatov, director of the
Soviet Institute of U.S. and
Canada Studies; retired Lt. Gen.
Mikhail Milstein and Alexander
Among the conferen
cussants was Rep.
Solarz (D.. N.Y.). When
asked about the join;
and specifically the refer
"full self-determination'
Palestinians, which is
tension of previous U.S
formulations, he said "I
with that formulation."
ce dis-
tephen
ie was
I ement
ice to
For the
m ex-
-ifficial
agree
Community Calendar
June 24
Temple Beth Israel Couples Club
June 25
National Council of Jewish Women General Meeting B'nai b rith
Women Deerfield regular meeting Palm-Aire ORT Board Meeting
Tamar Hadossah Board Meeting 10 a.m. to noon Temple Beth
Israel Men's Club General Meeting Coral Springs ORT Board
Meeting 8 p.m.
June 26
Choi Group Hadassoh -regulor meeting Shoshona Hadassah -
regular meeting Shalom Hadassah Board Meeting Plantation
Jewish Congregation Sisterhood Bowling Aleph Council B'nai
B'nth Women regular meeting 12:30 p.m. Hebrew Day School
Board Meeting 8:15 p. m.
June 27
Ramblewood East ORT Board Meeting Ramaz Hadassah general
meeting Scopus Hadassah regular meeting North Broward
Women's ORT American Jewish Puppet Show at Lauderdale Lakes
City Hall noon.
June 28
Temple Emanu-EI Board Meeting B'nai B'rith Hope Chapter -
general meeting 1 p.m. Deerfield B'nai B'rith regular meeting
Haverim Hadassah general meeting.
July 2
Workmen's Circle #1046 Executive Meeting
July 3
Margate B'nai B'rith regular meeting.
July 5
North Broward Region ORT Executive Meeting West Broward
Brandeis University National Women's Committee Board Meeting -
9:30a.m.
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-
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 22,1979
1
t
t
Donald M. Robinson (center), president of the Joint Distribution Committee, is shown
handing a check for $10,000 to Vasa Veskovic, Consul General of Yugoslavia, for earthquake
relief. Severe tremors along the southern Adriatic Coast recently caused hundreds of
casualties and left tens of thousands homeless. Left is Ralph I. Goldman, JDC executive vice
president, and at Robinson's left are Henry Taub, member of the JDC Executive Committee;
and Mile Weiss, secretary of the Association of Yugoslav Jews in the United States.
Headlines
Stone Chairs Hearings for Seniors
U.S. Sen. Richard Stone chaired hearings in
Miami Beach late last week to hear from senior
citizens whose food stamp benefits have been cut
drastically.
Stone is the sponsor of a bill, S. 928, that would
restore food stamps to elderly persons with high
medical expenses whose benefits were reduced
when Congress tightened up the food stamp
program to prevent abuses. The Senate Agri-
culture Committee, of which Stone is a member, is
expected to act on Stone's bill and others like it in
the next few weeks.
The State Department has confirmed that an
American military delegation, headed by Erich
von Marbod, deputy director of the Defense
Department's Defense Security Assistance
Agency, has gone to Cairo for talks with Egyp-
tian defense officials on American arms sales to
Egypt.
The talks are part of a series between Egyptian
and U.S. officials to determine how Egypt will use
the $1.5 billion in military credits granted it by
Washington. The semi-official Egyptian news-
paper, Al Ahram, said the U.S. will provide
Egypt with Phantom jet fighters, air defense
missiles, armored troop carriers, electronic equip
ment and naval units.
On May 23, the 30th anniversary of the Federal
Republic of Germany, Karl Carstens was elected
its fifth president. Carstens, currently president
of the Federal Parliament, received 628 votes out
of a possible 1,036 at the specially-convened
Federal convention in Bonn. Last-minute Social
Democratic (SPD) candidate, Annemarie Renger,
Deputy Speaker of Parliament, received 431
votes. The Christian Democratic (CDU) majority
at the convention carried for Carstens.
Carstens, M, is a lawyer. He is professor of
International Law at the University of Cologne
and studied at German and French universities
and at Yale. He was the first Federal Republic
representative to the Council of Europe in Stras-
bourg in 1954. He has been State Secretary in the
Foreign Ministry (1960-67) and in the Ministry of
Defense (1967). He was Chief of the Federal
Chancellor's office under Chancellor Kurt Georg
Kiesinger in 1968.
Henry O. Shor, of Baltimore, has been aj
national chairman of the Jewish National Fund
Foundation and a member of JNF's Adminis-
trative Committee, Rabbi William Berkowitz,
JNF national president, announced this week.
The JNF Foundation was created to ensure a
constant flow of income, over and above annual
fund-raising, through planned, or deferred giving
and bequests in wills.
As Foundation chairman, Shor will be
responsible for accelerating and expanding JNF
efforts in encouraging individual donors to take
advantage of the tax incentives in JNF's various
programs.
Standing at the edge of the village in remote,
desolate Siberia to which he has been
banished for five years, Vladimir Slepak, the
USSR's top Jewish activist, manages a smile
though bundled against severe springtime
cold, in a photo obtained by the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry.
The University cited Dr. Hyatt as one who
"has been in the front ranks of those who seek
interreligious, interracial and international
tolerance."
The Union of American Hebrew Congregations,
representing 1.2 million Reform Jews in the
United States and Canada, this week became the
first national Jewish organization to endorse
Senate ratification of the Strategic Arms
Limitation Treaty.
In a unanimously-adopted resolution, the
UAHC board of trustees said SALT II offered
"the most realistic possibility presently available
for checking an insane, wasteful and potentially
catastrophic nuclear arms race."
The president of the National Conference of
Christians and Jews has been cited by Columbia
University "for his humanitarian efforts."
Dr. David Hyatt was recently presented with
the "Distinguished Alumnus Award" of'
Columbia's Teachers College for his "leadership
as civic educator."
The NCCJ president received his PhD from
Teachers College in 1969.
Jewish college students and faculty from
throughout North America will gather to examine
the ethical crises of modern society at the
National Hillel Summer Institute at B'nai B'rith-
Perlman Camp, Starlight, Pa, in August.
"Students in Search of a Decent Life Style: An
Institute on Jewish Ethics" is a study conference
developed by an all-student steering committee to
meet the urgent need to give Jewish students a
forum in which to struggle with the difficult
moral questions of their society and daily lives.
Fred Silverman, president and chief executive
officer of the National Broadcasting Comnanv
received the 1979 Man of Achievement Award
from the Anti-Defamation League Wednesday in
the New York Hilton. The tribute to Silverman
was announced by MaxweU E. Greenberg, the
league s national chairman, who praised him for
his outstanding commitment to democracy."
With Scholars' Aid
Stone Pieces Ancient
History Together
TEL AVIV Chance coin-
cidence coupled with the co-
operation of Tel Aviv University,
Yale University and Munich Uni-
versity have enabled the recon-
struction of a hitherto unknown
page in Babylonian history.
Dr. Raphael Kutscher, of Tel
Aviv University's Institute of
Arachaeology, and Prof. Claus
Wilcke, of Munich University's
Institute of Assyrioktgy, were by
coincidence both attempting
simultaneously to decipher
identical ancient clay bricks
dating back to approximately
1800 BCE.
BOTH OF these Babylonian
bricks were badly damaged and
neither could be restored alone,
but each lacked different sec-
tions. In jigsaw-puzzle fashion,
the two texts complemented each
other, and the entire text of 97
lines was recreated, shedding new
light on the Kingdom of Baby-
lonian King Takil-ilissu.
Tel Aviv University's Dr.
Kutscher received the brick for
deciphering from Yale University
Curator of the Babylonian Col-
lection, Prof. William W. Hallo,
during his sabbatical year at Yale
University. The relatively large
brick (33cm long, 32cm wide,
8.5cm thick), acquired by the
Yale Collection in 1915, remained
undeciphered for over 60 years at
Yale due to its poor state of
preservation and despite its
supreme archaeological value.
The second tablet, at Munich
University, had just been ex-
cavated at the site of ancient Isin
in Iraq by the Munich archaeo-
logical expedition.
THE TEL AVIV Assyriologist
sent his partial transliteration
and translation of the text to
Prof. Dietz Edzard of Munich
University, a known expert in
Assyriology and a colleague of
Dr. Kutscher's. Edzard consulted
with Prof. Wilcke, who identified
the brick as an exact duplicate of
the one he was working on.
The text, inscribed in the Old
Babylonian dialect of Akkadian,
was written on each tablet twice,
once on the surface and once
around the sides. Thus, between
the four texts and the coincidence
of their simultaneous decipher-
ment, the experts were able to
bring alive an era in history
about which little detail was
hitherto known.
The tablet tells of Babylonian
King Takil-ilissu who reigned
over the state of Malgium, who
established a Temple dedicated
to the sky god, Anum, and his
aide, Ninshubur. and to the god-
dess Ulmashitum.
THE TABLET specifies daily
religious cultic procedures and
ceremonies as well as new moon
and full moon festivals. King
Takil-ilissu, whose interest in
inscribing the tablet may either
have been the public relations or
historical value of his con-
struction of the Temple, had to
wait over 3,700 years for the
world to find out about his con-
tribution, when the two scholars
published a joint paper.

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Friday, June 22,1979
.-L wumUtmm ntfir+ntmr Port Lauderdale
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
Test is Opening Salvo for Kids
Continued from Page 4
dilates to a critical level.
The war against illiteracy must
i waged not when our young-
^rs are ready to graduate but at
he first grade, when they begin
' eir public school careers.
Those who oppose the func-
onal literacy test argue that it is
discriminatory instrument,
specially against Blacks, whose
-integration education was
iibstandard. and that the test is
jierefore doubly punitive in a
nd of Catch-22 way: the public
bhool system has not success-
klly prepared the Black student
Lr graduation; and, if he finally
Jakes it through 12th grade at
st symbolically, he is barred
[>m graduation because he is not
epared to take the test success-
Uy.
MY OWN experience in a
ollege classroom daily shows me
legacy of our endemic
itional illiteracy, which im-
risons not only the Black
iident, but all manner of others
well: white Anglo-Saxon
atestant, Jewish and Catholic
every category from Hispanic
i European.
In the end, those who oppose
test as discriminatory can
ach us the most about our own
Uitudes toward education. Just
wt do we think it is? Joseph
idison, in the Spectator of
ivember 6,1711, wrote:
"I consider an human soul
Hthout education like marble in
quarry, which shows none of
inherent beauties till the skill
the polisher fetches out the
blours, makes the surface shine,
ad discovers every ornamental
oud, spot and vein that run
rough the body of it."
j And the Harvard University
lilosopher, George Santayana,
lid that education that ends at
:hool and not taken up at home
no education at all.
THOSE WHO oppose the
inctional literacy test are not
kique in seeing education as a
Ity to be performed by the
tiool alone especially because
ey fear, and rightly so, that the
ademic failure of their children
lys something about them-
selves. The sad fact is that most
Americans see school this way.
They reduce school to a slightly
more glorified babysitting insti-
tution. As parents, they bring
little or nothing of themselves to
their children's education.
nJ?.d0T,thi8 P8"**" need not be
PhD s. Rather they must inspire,
by the example of their own lives,
which they seem unable or un-
willing to do, a sense of reverence
and awe for education in the
minds of their children.
They must make their children
want to learn not simply to sit
back and morosely challenge
someone to teach them some-
thing. These are two very dif-
ferent things indeed.
IF PARENTS refuse this
responsibility, if they refuse to
inculcate a sense of respect for
knowledge and learning, then
their failure becomes their
children's, as well. They make in-
different clods of their children
even as they, themselves, are
indifferent. They inspire their
children to expect that teachers
perform some miraculous act by
which they will miraculously
become educated even as they,
themselves, expect such miracles.
When miracles fail to occur,
and they never do occur, both
parents and children, each in
their own way, are bitterly
disappointed.
A youngster who has not, as
Steele said over 250 years ago,
seen education as a process which
fetches out the colours, makes
the surface shine," blames his
teacher for this failure in himself.
And the parent who fails the
Add in inspiring him to want to
be a part of this process blames
the teacher, too, as a seemingly-
logical but dishonest alternative
to blaming himself.
THAT IS the lazy thing to do;
it is a natural outgrowth of the
decline in educational standards
since World War II unmodified
by misplaced egalitarianism and
in the Ioathesome rise in parental
permissiveness that leaves the
child to form his own ill-con-
ceived emotional attitudes
toward the educational process.
In such an egalitarian society
as ours, we have come to expect
some benign Big Brother, a
contradiction in OrweDian terms,
to do everything for us even to
educate us. Although it is too
late, the functional literacy test is
designed to reverse these crip-
pling cultural attitudes in at least
one area of our false expectations.
If nothing else, the test is a
starting salvo in the war to do so.
Thatcher Rumored Uninformed
On Affairs in Middle East
By JUDITH ROSEN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Eric Moonman, a former
Labor member of Parlia-
ment and president of the
British Zionist Federation,
said here that Britain's new
Conservative Prime Minis-
ter Margaret Thatcher was
relatively inexperienced in
foreign affairs, especially
the Middle East.
He said the main concern
of British Jewry was with
Mrs. Thatcher's principal
spokesman on foreign
affairs in the House of
Commons, Sir Ian
Gilmour.
MOONMAN, who was
defeated for reelection in the May
3 elections, noted that Sir Ian,
the Lord Privy Seal, is very
active in the Arab lobby in Eng-
land and has openly advocated a
Palestinian state on the West
Bank and Gaza Strip. He called
Thatcher's appointment of Gil-
mour, a founder of an Arab-
British friendship movement, a
"foolish and thoughtless move"
Asked during an interview
with the JTA about the effects of
the Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty
on fund-raising activities in
Britain, he admitted that
Zionism is easier to promote
"during a hot war and crisia."
However, he called peace a
"challenge" and said the Jewish
community must come to terms
with the situation and respond
with more creative techniques in
fund-raising to keep up the
momentum. In that connection,
he observed that while American
Jewish organizations had more
professionals than their counter-
parts in Britain, the relations be-
tween the lay and political
leadership was not always well
defined.
HE SAID he felt there was far
too much duplication of activities
among various Jewish organiza-
tions in the U.S. Moonman said
there was a problem in Britain
today of maintaining Jewish
identity.
He said the fight was against
indifference rather than-
assimilation.
Wallenberg Saga Opens For Airing After 34 Years
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Prime
Minster Menachem Begin of
Israel is expected to be asked to
help solve the mystery of
Swedish diplomat Raoul
Wallenberg, who may still be
imprisoned in the Soviet Union,
34 years after his abduction by
the Red Army. Wallenberg's
close relatives are flying to
Jerusalem this weekend following
fruitless attempts by the Swedish
government to reopen the case
with the Russian authorities.
Wallenberg who would now
be 66 was kidnaped in
Budapest, where he headed a
team of Swedish diplomats who
saved 30,000 Jews from
deportation by the Nazis. Many
of the survivors live in Israel.
In Britain, Winston Churchill
MP, grandson of the wartime
Prime Minister, and Greville
Janner MP, are organizing a
Parliamentary committee to
follow the case.
HIS HALF brother and half
sister, Prof. Guy von Dardel and
Mrs. Nina Lagergren, decided to
go to Jerusalem after hearing
that Begin had privately ex-
pressed an interest in the case. In
view of Israel's influence in the
human rights field, they will ask
Begins help in putting the
Wallenberg affair high on the
list of urgent individual cases
discussed in East-West contact.
Several politicians in other
Western countries have promised
their support. Sen. Frank Church
(D., Idaho), chairman of the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, has urged the
Kremlin to make a full disclosure
of its files on Wallenberg,
HOWEVER, although U.S.
Ambassador Arthur Goldenberg
is reported to have brought it up
at the Belgrade sequel to the
Helsinki Conference on Human
Rights, U.S. government interest
has been erratic.
At the end of 1973, the State
Department was on the brink of
ordering the U.S. Embassy in
Moscow to inquire about
Wallenberg. But at the last
moment, Henry Kissinger, then
Secretary of State, failed to
authorize the move.
Swedish press reports have
attributed this to his anger over
Sweden's anti-American policy
on Vietnam at that time.
Jews Urge Firing
Of Broadcast Official
Women in Jerusalem
We'd Do Better Job -Bella
JOHANNESBURG South
African Jewry is urging the
psmissal of a national broad-
sting official who has written a
soklet with anti-Semitic im-
lications, including a reference
Jews as a "problem" that
equires a "solution." The author
Bill Chalmers, head of religious
Dgraming of the publicly-
ned South African Broad-
casting Corp. That has a
monopoly over radio and
television in the country.
The South African Zionist
Federation has accued Chalmers
of "a deliberate attempt to foster
anti-Semitism" and Harold
Rudolph, a Jewish member of the
Johannesburg city council,
publicly challenged the Chalmers
views. The booklet, titled T*
Conspiracy of Truth, purports to
be a "Christian" response to
world problems.
Military Denies as 'False'
Report of Israeli Operation
TFT AVIV (JTA> A military spokesman
ran^VtXuy falie a ^port from Beirut WJdnjj^
ight that Israeli naval units aided by "*
fcked Tyre and the nearby Rashuhyeh refugee.camp
Eling 15 people. The spokesman said no naval or air units
fere in action against targets in Lebanon.
Israeli artillery fired on terrorist positions in south
ebanon after several Katyusha rockets were fired at
fittlements in Upper Galilee. It was reported that on
kraeli army patrol discovered a large terrorist arms cache
Ji the western slopes of Mt. Hemon. It contained Karl
[ustaff submachineguns, hand grenades, explosive
rges, axes, ropes and other equipment.
Belts filled with explosives were found, believed
ktended for use as "suicide jackets" indicating that the
ers would blow themselves up rather than be captured.
By Combined JTA Services
JERUSALEM "The world
would be a better place if women
ran it." So said former U.S.
Congresswoman Bella Abzug
Monday morning in preparation
for that night's opening session
of the World Conference of
Women Leaders in Jerusalem.
"Today, politics are run
generally by men, and they are
lacking in humanism and
compassion," the fervent ad-
vocate for women's rights ob-
served. "Women could bring that
same aspect into world
diplomacy and politics, and I'm
sure the world would be a better
place for it" She added that she
was dismissed from her recent
task as chairman of the
president's Council for Women's
Affairs because, "I fervently
opposed the national budget
submitted to Congress, which
reduced the amount allocated for
women's affairs/'
JERUSALEM The remains
of Dora Bloch were laid to rest
here Tuesday nearly three years
after she was murdered at
Kampala, Uganda, on the orders
of former President Idi Amin.
Mrs. Bloch, who held Israeli
and British citizenship, was a
passenger on the Air France jet
hijacked by Palestinian terrorists
to Entebbe in June, 1976. When
most of the hostages were
rescued by an Israeli raiding
party on July 3, she waa in a
Kampala hospital from where she
disappeared a day later.
Her remains were discovered
buried at a village near Kampala.
LOS ANGELES Swastikas
will no longer be provided by a
Mattel subsidiary, Monogram
Models, Inc.. for decoration of
scale model reproductions of
historic aircraft, ships and
vehicles, it was announced by
Harvey B. Schechter, director of
the Anti-Defamation League's
Pacific Southwest Regional
Office. This information was
given to ADL by Mattel because
of a complaint filed by ADL.
More than a year ago, "We
questioned the wisdom of
providing children in Germany
with swastika-adorned models,"
said Schechter, "and we are
pleased with the Mattel decision
which is based on a recent
decision of a West German
Supreme Court forbidding
further use or display of the Nazi
swastika with any consumer
products, packaging or pro-
motional material produced or
marketed in West Germany."
PARIS The French daily,
Le Matin Dimanche, quotes an
unidentified Jewish woman who
says she saw three men enter the
Djerba synagogue just before a
fire broke out last May 9. The 24-
year-old woman says she saw the
three men approach the
synagogue at 10:30 p.m. and
"forced their way in. A few
minutes later, she saw them leave
the building.
Another young Djerba Jew,
identified as David, told the
newspaper that there were no
candles burning that night in the
synagogue.
The paper quotes Tunisian
Chief Rabbi Fradji Uzan who
repeated his conviction that the
authorities are doing everything
in their power to find the origin of
the fire. Fradji stressed that the
country's Jews enjoy full and
equal rights.
JOHANNESBURG After
nine years of service in South
Africa, half of them as Israel's
ambassador, Itzhak Unna will
return to Israel next month, to
take up a new post in Jerusalem.
His term of office saw the
normalization of relations bet-
ween Israel and South Africa and
a growth in trade. In an in-
terview with the leading
Afrikaans daily, Die Burger,
Unna laid down what amounted
to a guideline for a Jewish envoy
to South Africa. He said:
"Do not forget your own
people's experiences in facing up
to the problems of South Africa.
Bear in mind the differences as
well as the similiarities, between
your country and South Africa.
Even while being critical,
remember that you are a guest in
a foreign land. Be well-versed in
South Africa'8 sociological and
historical development, and get a
feel for its contemporary literary
trends. It helps greatly, not least
when sounding critical of the
country's leading echelons, to
speak to Afrikaans.
?el5
I j
1
!
I
\
-., .. .V
-*<
y- .' '-


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 22,1979

Young Bond Leaders Travel to Israel QvnAGOGUe H6WS
JERUSALEM Leaders of
the 104-strong New Leadership
International Israel Bond
Delegation, winding up their two
week visit here, called on their
peer group to mobilize expanded
economic backing for Israel now
that a peace treaty has been
signed.
Issuing the call was James
Kravitz, Philadelphia builder and
delegation chairman. He said:
"Young American and Canadian
Jews have a responsibility both
as Jews and supporters of Israel,
to see to it that Israel is equipped
to bear the burdens of peace as
effectively as she has borne the
burdens of all her wars."
Kravitz disclosed that at
preliminary planning sessions
held here, it was decided to
convene 50 special meetings
throughout the United States
and Canada to bring home the
message of Israel's economic
peace burden.
"The widespread miscon-
ception that a Peace Treaty with
Israel lightens Israel's economic
and military burden, must be
exposed," said Kravitz.
During their stay, delegates
met with President Navon,
Deputy Prime Minister Yigael
Yadin, Deputy Finance Minister
Yehezkel Flomin, Opposition
Leader Shimon Peres, Ben-
Gurion University President
Joseph Tekoah, and former chief
of military intelligence, Prof.
Yehoshafat Harkabi.
The delegation had a unique
Shown above, from left to right, are Florida delegates to the
1979 Israel Bond New Leadership International Delegation:
Mr. and Mrs. Joel Reinstein of Plantation; Danny Halperin,
economic minister designate to Washington; and Arthur Kail
of Hollywood.
challenge thrown at it by
President Yitzhak Navon, who
extended an invitation to the
group to make Aliyah to Israel,
during a reception at the
Presidential Residence.
The tragedy of the Jewish
people, Navon told the delegates,
was that "for 2,000 years we had
the people but not the homeland.
Now we have the homeland but
not the people."
The New Leadership division,
now concluding its fourth
delegation to Israel, concentrates
on attracting previously unin-
volved young Jews in Canada
and the United States to identify
with Jewish life and Israel,
through Israel Bond activities.
Since inception of the Israel Bond
campaign in 1951, over $4.3
billion in securities have been
sold to provide development
capital for Israel.
Major areas of investment for
Israel Bond capital are such
infrastructure projects as
pipelines, highways, airports,
power generating plants,
telecommunication networks and
industrial parks.
Histadrut Fracas
Podium Hurled at Television Crew
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
The podium wa.-s physically-
hurled at a television crew
during a raucous session of
the Histadrut national
convention here which
heard a ranking govern-
ment official, Deputy
Defense Minister Mor-
dechai Zipori, denounce the
Someone
hospitalized?
Bring
them home
-to us.
Recuperation at home is often
(aster and smoother and
less costly We can hetp the in-
home patient with a highly
qualified RN. IPN. Aide or
Attendant QuaMy care ts easily
arranged
5664333
Histadrut as a "Mafia"
that protected "parasites"
later retracted and
Defense Minister Ezer
Weizman take a hard line
on the settlements issue
and attack American
policy.
Weizman, widely regarded as a
moderating influence in the
Likud government, has been
under attack by Herut die-hards
for allegedly opposing their credo
of massive Jewish colonization of
the occupied West Bank and
Gaza Strip. But he effectively
mended his fences on that issue
and predicted that while the
autonomy negotiations with
Egypt will be very difficult, the
U.S. would pose the greatest
obstacle to success.
INTERRUPTED BY hecklers
when he began his unscheduled
speech, Weizman drew en-
thusiastic applause when he said
he favored settlements in all
parts of the West Bank and
Gaza, not only for security
reasons but "to live up to Zionist
ideals. He said that while he
personally opposed the ex-
propriation of privately-owned
Arab lands for settlement
purposes, he would carry out any
decisions of the Cabinet.
"We shall have problems with
the Egyptians, but it will be the
Americans that will be the most
difficult partner in the autonomy
negotiations," Weizman said. He
accused the U.S. of being the
only party to the peace
agreement not to have modified
its stance in any way and to have
adjusted its attitude to "the new
reality."
Weizman said, "I often tell my
American colleagues that while
(President Anwar) Sadat agreed
to recognize Israel, and we agreed
to make considerable territorial
compromises, the Americans are
still talking about the 1967
frontiers with minor ad-
justments, just as they did years
ago, as if nothing new has
happened."
A GENERAL free-for-all broke
out at the opening of the session
when supporters of Herut
firebrand Geula Cohen attacked
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
for not being tough enough in the
peace negotiations. Begin
loyalists tried to rush the
speaker, but the Prime Minister
himself stopped them and
defended the right of his critics to
criticize.
At that point, a television
crew, moving in to film the near
scuffle, had to duck as the
podium flew through the air
aimed at them.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Temple Beth Israel announces
its 1979-1980 officers and Board
of Directors. They are as follows:
OFFICERS: president, Martin
I. Lipnack; administrative vice
president, Al Lang; temple
management vice president, Fred
Greene: membership vice
president, Dr. Sheldon Feldman;
recording secretary, Dennis
Gershowitz: financial secretary,
Irving Seid and treasurer,
Marilynn Levine. BOARD OF
DIRECTORS: Erwin Abrams,
Gerry Block, Jacob Brodzki,
Chuck Deich, Leon Heller, Ed
Hirschberg, Arthur Kwiat,
Bernie Oshinsky, Lenny Feiner,
Libo Fineberg, Neil Kemess,
Jerry Kraus, Stu Levin, Nate
Richstone, Phyllis Schulman and
Marvin Welles.
The congregation unanimously
elected Jules Shapiro to the
position of president emeritus.
Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Israel held its last meeting of the
year with a planning session for
the coming year and a review of
the activities of the past year.
This was followed by a musical
program and refreshments.
REOON8TRUCTIONIST
SYNAGOGUE
The Friday night service of
The Reconstructionist
Synagogue, 7473 NW 4 St.,
Plantation, will begin with a
Sabbath Seder starting at 7 p.m.
On Sunday evening, June 24, the
synagogue will host a mem-
bership information night at 8
p.m. Anyone interested in
learning about the synagogue
and Reconstructionism is invited
to attend.
TEMPLE OHEL
B'NAI RAPHAEL
The Sisterhood of Temple Ohel
B'nai Raphael will hold its final
meeting of the season with a
Strawberry Festival on Wed-
nesday, June 27 at noon. All
members are invited to bring a
friend.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Dr. Morton Malavsky,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth *J
Shalom, announces that the tour
to Israel, departing June 19,
which he will be leading, is a
complete sell-out.
This year's group consists of
99 people. Included will be the
mayor of Hollywood, David
Keating and Mrs. Keating.
Assisting Dr. Malavsky, as
assistant tour host, will be Leon
Weissberg, director of education
at Beth Shalom.
Following the Israel portion of
the tour, Dr. Malavsky and 18
travelers will visit Greece, cruise
the Greek Islands with special
emphasis and visitations in-
cluding Rhodes, the synagogues
in Athens and Jewish Com- *
munity Center.
Bar, Bat Mitzvahs k
MICHAEL SCHATZBERG,
ST ACE Y S AKOFF
Michael Schatzberg, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Steven Schatzberg, and
Stacey Sakoff, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Theodore Sakoff, will be
called to the Tor ah as Bar Mitz-
vot on Saturday, July 7, at
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise.
BETH KLEIN
Beth Klein, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Harvey Klein, will be
Bat Mitzvah Friday evening,
June 22 at Tamarac Jewish
Center Temple Beth Torah.
HENRY GEFTER
Henry Gefter, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Saul Gefter, will be Bar
Mitzvah Saturday morning, June
23, at Tamarac Jewish Center -
Temple Beth Torah.
MICHAEL APPELBAUM
SCOTT STROLLA
Michael Appelbaum, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Appel-
baum, and Scott Strolla, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Chuck Strolla, will i
be Bar Mitzvah Saturday ,
morning, June 30, at Tamarac '
Jewish Center Temple Beth
Torah.
y
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Marvin J. Powers
announces
The relocation of his offices to
3213 N. OCEAN BLVD.
(at Gait Ocean Mile)
FORT LAUDERDALE 33308
Telephone 561-5055
Specialising in
Estate and Tax Planning Real Estate
Negligence/Accident Bankruptcy
Criminal Defense Immigration and
Naturalization
Admitted to the Florida Bar 1970
MASTECTOMY
Professional Fittings
In our Knoche-Mastactomy
Salons:
Holiday Irwt-FL Lauderdale
3000 E. Las Olai Blvd.
Thurs. June 14 3:00 p.m.
Holiday Inn-HlatMh
I960 W. 49th St.
Tues. June 19 3.-00 p.m. .
HoMday Inn-Boca Raton
8144 Glades Rd.
Wed. June 20 3:00 p.m.
A Completely Realistic
Breast Prosthesis
THE NEW KtiOCHE
NATURAL BREAST
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Looks and feels to very natural'
nipple, areoU, weight, shape and
color. You' forget you art wearing a
prostheslsl Totally different not
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bra. (No special pocket needed.)
Available in three skin colors and in
sizes 36 50 Won't slip or press on scar
no heat build up. Will not absorb
water. Fantastic for swimming,
tennis and other sports. Also Ideal for
the underdeveloped woman four
year guarantee.
Mile Marker 80
WedJuna27 3tt)p.m.
1711 North University Drive
Thura. June 28 3:00 p.m.
IN ORLANDO AREA Call: (305) 855-6888
Visit the Salon without obligation.
Every full hour 15-min. Color/Sound
Movie shown.
OB FOB PRIVATE FITTING
In your homo call
MIAMI 667-9866
POMPANO BEACH 428-2*29
NEW exclusive patent custom made
prosthesis made with the Kneche
Impression material for the
radical surgery. By Appt. only.
very
OFF
Introductory Otter


Friday, June 22,1979
* r-w-~ ~tr.~ntr Fnrt Lauderdaie
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
Page 15
Profile
Ofira Savon: What A First Lady Does
By ILAN SEIDNER
By what title does one address
a woman who is a trained
sergeant, a former beauty queen,
manager of a ten-room mansion,
a housewife, and the mother of
two small children? If you are in
Israel, you would call her Madam
First Lady. Ofira Navon is not
just the wife of Israel's fifth
president, Yitzhak Navon, but as
her credentials indicate, a woman
of caliber in her own right.
While waiting to interview the
First Lady, I am slightly ap-
prehensive. The sitting room in
the Presidential residence where
the talk will take place is com-
fortably plush but not gaudy.
One of Mrs. Navon s hobbies is
interior decorating, and I assume
that her touch can be seen in
arranging the room's decor and
the gracious way in which
refreshments are served. Her
work desk is at the rear of the
room and free of clutter. I sense
that the First Lady likes ef-
ficiency and requires it of her
staff.
OFIRA NAVON has been
compared to Jacqueline Kennedy
Onassis, and that is probably the
reason for the apprehension.
Certainly at first glance, whether
on television or in the
newspapers, there is a physical
resemblance. But as Mrs. Navon
comes into the room, wearing an
attractive flower print dress and
gliding lightly on her feet, all
thoughts of "Jackie" are
dispelled.
While her dark brown eyes and
friendly smile are captivating,
the "Sabra" in her radiates a
matter-of-factness and down-to-
earth quality that the media,
which operate in only two
dimensions, can never quite
portray.
In the beginning, the role of
interviewer and interviewee are
reversed. The President's wife
(they have been in office for
about a year) likes to delve into
Religious
Directory
LAUDERDALELAKES
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE
4151 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Modern Orthodox Congregation
Murray Brick man. president.
EMANU EL TEMPLE. 3425 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Reform Rabbi San
ford M Shapero. Cantor Jeroine
Klement.
SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE, 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative
Rabbi Philip A. Labowltz. Cantor
Maurice Neul42).
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER, INC. 8049
West Oakland Park Blvd. Conser
vative. Rabbi Albrt N. Troy. Cantor
Jack Marchant. and Hy-.Solof^presi
ntBREW CONGREGATION OF LAU
DERHILL. 204B NW 48th Ave., Leu
derhill Conservative Max Kronisn,
president
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER 9106
NW S71h St Conservative Rabbi Is
roc! 2irnmcrrr.;r!_J'.'-),
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE 4171 Stirling
Rd Orthodox Rabbi Moshe Bomier
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION 400 I. Nob Hill Rd. Liberal
Reform Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr (64)
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNAGOGUE
7473 NW 4th St Hank Pitt, president.
the heart of the matter. We speak
about my background. She
mentions that she has read some
things that I have written. Any
apprehension which might have
been present before she entered
has long since disappeared. The
conversation is informal, more
like a chat among friends than an
official visit.
CREATING A relaxed, less
formal, one might say almost in-
timate atmosphere, is important
to Ofira Navon, because it is part
of her philosophy on how Israeli
society should behave. "What is
important to me is that we return
to the atmosphere of care and
concern that existed in pre-State
days," she said.
She fondly remembers the
times when as a little girl it
seemed as if the whole country
were part of a big family.
"Neighbors cared for each other.
No one hesitated to ask for help
and no one refused. How many
can make that claim today?" she
asked-
She goes on, "This is how I see
the problem of attracting Aliyah.
What can we offer them? Comfort
and luxury? A higher standard of
living? Peace and prosperity? We
must try on different bases and
levels. Ben-Gurion used to speak
of the need to create a model
society in Israel. This has many
faces, and one of its most im-
portant elements is the
relationship between people to
give every Jew who comes here
the feeling of being part of a
family, a solid and united unit
which sincerely cares for each
other. An atmosphere of
fraternity and solidarity and a
higher quality of life may be one
of our sources of attraction for
the Jews in the Diaspora."
THE FIRST LADY'S duties
are varied and at times arduous.
She is first and foremost
responsible for running the
Presidential residence. "Also for
entertaining thousands of guests
each month, for the way the
house looks, the food that is
served, the flower arrangements
(another hobby of hers), the gifts
for official visitors, and so on,"
she remarks, seeming slightly out
of breath.
In addition, she must attend
functions of voluntary
organizations and occasionally
accompany her husband on
whirlwind tours, one day in the
Galilee, and the next in Tel Aviv.
It is a schedule that allows little
free time, for the two things that
Violence
are nearest and dearest to her.
Those are her six-year-old
daughter, Nira (who is adopted),
and five-year-old son, Erez.
"I am really torn between the
children and my official duties. I
try to arrange it so that I have
the afternoon and the hours
before their bedtime free for
them, and put them to bed
myself. But sometimes it doesn't
work out. They are too young to
feel the pressure of being the
President's children. They still
have their friends and many toys.
Only now they are lacking what
they had before a mother
totally free for them alone."
AS MRS. NAVON explains it,
she is determined not to let her
status interfere with her duties as
a mother. And surely it is only in
Israel that the First Lady can
leave the Presidential mansion,
go to a neighbor's house, knock
on the door, and excusing herself,
say that she came to give her son
his evening bath.
"Erez was afraid that I came to
take him home," she says
laughing. "I just wanted to bathe
him and, as he requested, tell him
a bedtime story."
Her interest in children i9 not
limited to her own. As First
Lady, she is patron for the
International Year of the Child
activities in Israel. And as a child
psychologist she headed
children's wards in different
hospitals. She also has worked
with the Ministry of Education
on a project designed to discover
gifted children from un-
derprivileged homes.
OFIRA NAVON is not a
political feminist, but she
believes that a woman's place in
Israeli society which is for the
most part traditional can be
bettered. "The status of women
is not bad, but there is still
progress to be made" She recalls
that in the early days of
Zionism, women settlers shared
jobs with the men. both in
civilian and army life.
"When I was in the army, I
taught men how to use firearms,"
she says with pride. "Masculine
attitudes towards equality for
women still have a way to go.
Israeli men find it difficult to
accept a woman in a position of
authority. This covers all ethnic
groups."
Mrs. Navon also derides the
in
lent
;aU
\ \
Ofira Navon: call her Madam
'
the
I as
2nd
ian
fact that much human potential administrative difficulties to
is wasted in Israeli society, overcome. But I feel that it would
"While on a visit to Romania make an important difference to
with my husband, I noticed that our women and to our economy."
they split the work day into two
four-hour shifts from 8-12 and
from 12-4. This enabled mothers
whose children were in kin-
dergarten or elementary school to
work in the morning and be home
to greet their children for lunch.
They also had the rest of the
afternoon for housework," she
says.
AS THE First Lady explains
it, the afternoon shift could be
taken up by women whose
children are grown up, who finish
their housework by 12, and who
have little to do until their
husbands come home in the late
afternoon.
"I realize that it might be hard
to organize. There would be
Levitt
memorial chapel;
1921 Pembroke Bd
Hollywood. Fl*.
921 7200
Sonny Levitt. F.O.
13385 S.W. Dixie Hwy.
Nortn Miami. Fla.
949-6315
ONE LAST question seems to
catch her off her guard. "Would
you want to do this all over?" She
thinks it over, and I can visualize
her weighing the new problems
with which she has to live and the
little pleasures that she has had
to forfeit as opposed to the
wealth of experience she has
acquired and the reward of
serving the country. She shakes
her head.
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES, INC.
OIRECtORS
IrwmJettei Medvcn Jetlei AlwnJetlei
IN NEW YORK
IBB 11 HILLSIDE AVE MOlllS LINY
12B3 CONEY ISLAND AVE BKtVN N Y
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munili. '. N inoni
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1
POMPANOBEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM 132 SE 11th Avf.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A Skop.
Cantor Jacob Renier <4).
MARGATE
BETH HILLELCONGREGATION. 7440
Margate Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Joseph Bergla*.
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. t01
NW th St Conservative Rabbi Or
Solomon Geld. Cantor Max Gallub
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR. J1S1 Riverside
Drive, Reform. Rabbi Leonard ZoM.
OEERFIELO BEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL.at Century
Village East Conservative Rabbi
David Berent (42)
BOCA RATON
TEMPLE BETH EL, I
Avenue. Boca R*tn
Singer.
SW 4th
Rabbi MerleS.
Jewish Attacks Against Arab
Homes on W.Bank Deplored
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Defense Minister Ezer
Weizman angrily deplored violence committed^ against
Arabs by Jewish Bettlora on Vuv. West Bank. In the course
of a Knesset debate on the matter, he referred specifically
to the break-in into Arab homes in Hebron by Jewish
vandals who Deal up 'he occupants and destroyed their
furniture.
"THE MILITARY GOVERNMENT will
continue to be in charg, of security and public order in the
territories, regardless of whether they are inhabited by
Jews or Arabs." he said.
He noted that six suspects have been detained in
connection with the Hebron incident. Most of them are
American citizens who belong to Rabbi Meir Kahane s
Kach" party.
"1 have no doubt that legal measures will be taken!
following the police investigation of the matter," Weiz-'
man said.
HE ALSO called on women squatters from the
Orthodox town of Kiryat Arba to end their three week -
old sit-in at the old Hadassah building in Hebron.
That matter was referred to the Knesset's Foreign
Affairs and Security Committee. ........


Page 14
Page 16
The Jewish Floridinn nffi*~.*~ '
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. June 22,1979
State Department Says
U.S.
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The United States said Tuesday
that it "deeply regrets" Israel's
decision to build another settle-
ment near the Arab town of
Nablus on the West Bank and
that it considered "absolutely
reprehensible" the Palestine
Liberation Organization's
acknowledged assassination of a
Moslem religious leader in Gaza
for supporting the Israeli-Egyp-
tian peace treaty.
But in neither case, however,
did the Carter administration
indicate any moves to alter its
relationship with Israel or its
policy toward the PLO.
STATE DEPARTMENT
spokesman Hodding Carter dis-
cussed both matters at a press
briefing. He said, "The point
most disturbing" about the
Israeli Cabinet's decision Sunday
is that the "establishment of new
settlements is harmful to the
peace process," and "it is par-
ticularly regrettable at this time
with negotiations just begin-
ning" among the U.S., Egypt
and Israel "to establish a new
relationship" for the West Bank
and Gaza Strip.
"We feel it is detrimental and
prejudging the outcome of the
negotiations," Carter said.
"The point we are trying to
stress is that we are getting down
to negotiating this real estate"
and the settlement "is bound to
have a negative effect on the par-
ticipants" Later he withdrew the
term "real estate" and
acknowledged that "obviously
we consider this an extra-
ordinarily sensitive issue"
CARTER SAID, however,
that the U.S. would not take any
steps to prevent further settle-
ments in the future, observing
rhetorically, "other than dip-
lomatic steps between friends
no." He said he was not aware of
any pledge by Israel not to estab-
lish further settlements. He
replied "yes" when asked if this
is a continuing problem.
Asked if privately-owned land
was being expropriated for the
settlement near Nablus, Carter
said, "We don't know what the
lonH i If anv Drivate land is
involved, we would deeply regret
that aspect of it. Taking private
Regrets Israels New Settlement
but to-**" .i **.' SJfts. tL
sag KMflsyaas ses
the PFLP (Popular Front for the > BSSBSsination "is not ac-
property is distressing."
Concerning the murder Friday
night of Sheikh Hashem
Alhuzander, the Jman (religious
leader) of Gaza, Carter said he
was "incapable of making an
accurate assessment of the ef-
fect" of the assassination.
"BUT IT can't be anything
,Wp graphic Agency what position
the the U.S. would take against the
the
Liberation o! Palestine) seem
eager to take credit, we include
them in the condemnation,"
Carter said.
Asked by the Jewish Tele-
that assassination "is not ac-
ceptable." But he would not
indicate any action that would
alter the U.S. position toward the
PLO of which the PFLP is an
integral part.
MONTREAL (JTA) -
About 300 Palestinians and their
supporters paraded through
Montreal recently to protest the
31st anniversary of Israel's
independence and the Israeli-
Egyptian peace treaty. The
parade was sponsored by the
Quebec Palestine Committee.
Marchers shouted such slogans
as "Yesterday the Shah, tomor-
row Sadat.
V
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ABOUTTO
REPEAT ITSELF?
1961. Wilkinson
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Shavers went scurrying from
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comfortable Silver
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< Regis
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