The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00137

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
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^Jewislh Floridlain
8 Number 12
Ime f
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
____f"ort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, June 8,1979
Price 35 Cents
leo Goodman Reelected President
jinual Meeting Notes'Year of Accomplishment'
[Our 1978-79 year was a most
L-ial one for our Federation,
Id while all of the problems are
|i completely solved, I believe
have come through with
king colors," commented
[deration president Leo Good-
n in the opening of his report
[the annual meeting held on
^v 21 at Temple Beth Israel.
}oodman 9tated, in outlining
Federation's accomplish-
nts, "First, we reaffirmed our
commitment to Israel by in-
creasing our fund-raising to an
all-time record, thus allowing us
to send more to Israel than ever
before. Second, we are continuing
to bring the Jewish community
closer together. Our programs are
improving and increasing in
numbers as well as costs, and to
meet these rising costs we must
raise even more in the 1980 cam-
paign $3,000,000 will be our
goal for next year."
The president listed many of
the local programs funded and
sponsored by the Federation and
highlighted the various activities
of each. He spoke of the WE-
CARE program with its more
than 500 volunteers; the kosher
nutrition program which serves
over 1,000 hot kosher lunches
weekly (Goodman thanked
Continued on Page 10
<*1
*
*1
"
to right standing: Edythe Morgano, chairperson of Charge Account Committee; Esther Solomon,
mrperson of Host and Hostess Committee; Harry Haimowitz, chairman of Door Prize Committee;
\be Hassman, co-chairperson of Door Prize Committee; Leo Silverstein, chairman of Special Events
\ Projects Committee. Seated, left to right: Lucille Stang, co-chairperson of Host and Hostess Com-
ttee; Frances Goldstein, co-chairperson of Publicity Committee; Anne Fleischman, chairperson of
\ards W EC ARE Day; Rovi Faber, founder and honorary chairman of WECARE program; Sally
fin, general chairman of WECARE.
Kick off for Richards WECARE Day
Jewish Federation president, Leo Goodman, welcomes the large crowd
to the annual meeting.
Keiner, Gruman
To Head Campaign
l"ht "Launchin' Luncheon" to
I held on Tuesday, June 12, at
phards LauderhUl Mall store,
II kickoff the third annual
thards WECARE Day. which
I set this year for Thursday.
The luncheon will provide an
Ithusiastic beginning for the
1st promotional activities
pli'H: up to this sale day that is
pidlv becoming a tradition in
Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pa
The sales jamboree provides
WECARE program with
!>ds drawn from a percentage of
day's receipts at Richards
is an additional dollar for every
charge account opened on
ft day.
The luncheon will be attended
a galaxy of civic, community,
siness, media, religious and
Uanthropic leaders and per-
palities. Among those expected
[attend are Lauderbill Mayor
gene Cippoloni; Frank Veltri,
lyor of Plantation; Sunrise
kyor John Loroello; and
[uderdale Lakes Mayor
?ward Craft; and Lennv
Kimmel, mayor of North
Lauderdale. County Com-
missioner Jack Moss will be in
attendance and Congressman
Edward Stack, who. although not
able to attend the lunch, has
agreed to be honorary chairman
for the sale day.
Robert O'Connell, president of
Richards will head a large group
of top executives of the depart-
ment store indicating the im-
portance ot this overall program.
Campaign Sets Record
of $2.5 Million
"We did it! We, the entire
Jewish community of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, pulled together
and raised the $25 million that
was necessary to reach this year's
campaign goal." happily com-
mented Richard Romanoff,
general campaign chairman for
the 1979 UJA campaign, at the
May 21 annual meeting as he
announced the results of the
current drive.
Romanoff continued, "Each of
us who gave of our time and
money has the enormous good
feeling of knowing that the funds
raised are building schools in
Quotable Quotes
| We must strive to understand. We must teach the lessons of the
I Holocaust. And most of all, we ourselves must remember.
President Jimmy Carter
Rotunda Memorial
Israel, getting Jews out of the
Soviet Union, aiding a local
Jewish child in getting a Hebrew
education and offering assistance
to many of our elderly in our own
community."
The chairman's report noted
that, in addition to reaching new
heights in the total amount
raised, the number of individual
gifts to UJA greatly increased
over last year.
Romanoff offered thanks to all
of the volunteers who worked
diligently during the campaign
and said, "A campaign chairman
sometimes has the good fortune
to have outstanding volunteers
... I was very lucky ... I had
the best."
Romanoff concluded his
remarks by saying, "We have
made great strides over the
years, and this success should
instill us with added commitment
to increase our goals in the
future."
Leo Goodman, president of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, announced that
Milton Keiner will be general
chairman and Victor Gruman,
vice chairman of the 1980 Jewish
Federation / United Jewish Ap-
peal Campaign.
Both men long have been
active in Federation work, in
addition to many other Jewish
philanthropic endeavors and
have been outstanding leaders in
the local community.
Keiner, who received his law
degree from the University of
Michigan, moved to Fort
Lauderdale from Indianapolis
where he was engaged in business
acquiring, operating and merging
a variety of manufacturing
concerns including Majestic
Trading Corp., King Industries,
Hartford Glass Co. and Gas
Appliance Supply Corporation.
HE WAS a member of the
Young President's Organization
and Chief Executives Forum,
Board of Directors of the First
National Bank of Marion, Ind.,
and chief judge of the National
Junior Achievement President -
of the Year Contest.
Locally, Keiner is a Board
member of the Junior Achieve-
ment; chairman of the Executive
Committee of Points of America;
served as a Board member, sec-
retary and president of the
Woodlands Country Club; mem-
ber of the Anti- Defamation
League Society of Fellows; is
presently executive vice presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation of
Fort Lauderdale and is co-chair-
man of the capital fund drive of
the Jewish Community Center.
Gruman, a vice president of the
Federation, resided in Min-
neapolis prior to taking up
Continued on Page 10
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The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 8
Federation Women Host Presidents
Pictured at the President's Council meeting are from left, Mitchie
Libros, president of the Women's Division of the Jewish Federation;
Sandra Nisenbaum, co-chairman of the council; Shirley Rudolph,
council chairman; and Ruth Pine, director of cultural arts for the
Jewish Community Center.
Pictured above and below, a portion of the large turnout for the
President's Council meeting held at the Jewish Federation offices. The
women represented the Jewish women's organizations in the Fort
Lauderdale area
Shirley Rudolph, chairman,
and Sandy Nisenbaum, co-chair-
man, report an attendance of over
50 presidents representing all
Jewish women's organizations in
the Fort Lauderdale area at the
May 14 President's Council
meeting.
Among the organizations rep-
resented were Pioneer Women.
B'nai B'rith, Brandeis, Women's
League for Israel, Hadassah,
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood.
Temple Shalom Sisterhood,
Women's ORT, Jewish War
Veterans Auxiliary, Temple
EmanuEl Sisterhood. Margate
Jewish Center Sisterhood,
Yiddish Club Circle and National
Council of Jewish Women.
The theme and program for the
morning was to acquaint the new
presidents with the workings of
the Jewish Federation. Ruth
Pine, director of cultural arts for
the Jewish Community Center,
presented a pictorial story of the
Federation; and Leslie S. Gott-
lieb, director of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, held a question and answer
period explaining that unity of
the community is one of the most
important elements for the
survival of the Jewish com-
munity.
THE PRESIDENTS re-
sponded with enthusiasm. Each
was asked to submit a calendar
for a Community Calendar
meeting Thursday, June 14.
Among the many women who
attended were Hannah Spitalnik.
Esther Cannon. Elaine Stone,
Thank You
The Jewish Federation
wishes to thank the
dedicated volunteers of
Sunrise Lakes Ph ase '' wno
made calls as part of the
Federation's Phone-a-thon.
Featuring Judaica Books
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Rachel Stenn. Annette Kay and
Henny Leibowitz, who took an
active part in explaining their
organization's needs and how
Federation can assist in the
growth of the community. Nov. 5
is a tentative date set for the
Federation Education Day forii]
Jewish organizations, presidents
and their boards. Each of the
organizations will be asked tsk
select a liaison to work on. thiT
community education day.
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::"^v>:::::---.
Dayan Defends Begin's
Bank Autonomy Plan
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan
defended the autonomy plan to
settlers on the West Bank and
assured them that it will effect no
significant changes in the status
of Jewish settlements.
Addressing a meeting at
Tomer in the Jordan Valley north
of Jericho, Dayan called for an
increase in the number of settle-
ments and the number of settlers.
He said he "could not imagine"
any future Israeli government
adopting a different policy.
DAYAN SAID that the Sinai
pattern whereby Israel agreed to
remove its settlements and set-
tlers would not serve as a
precedent for the West Bank
because the status of the two
areas is different.
Sinai was under Egyptian sov-
ereignty and now will revert to
Egyptian sovereignty, he said.
Hi' also observed that the Golan
Heights were formerly under
Syrian sovereignty, leading some
observers to ((include that he was
signaling a readiness by Israel to
treat the Golan as it did Sinai.
But with respect to the West
Bank, Dayan insisted that the
status of the Jewish settlements
would remain "the same as
Nahalal or Degania" even after
the abolition of the military
government."
CAMP DAVID accords de-
liberately used the words "with'
drawal of" with respect to the
military government but Dayan
blurred the distinction.
He stressed that autonomy
was intended for the Arab
villages and towns on the West
Bank, not the Jewish set
Moments.
"It is better for Israel to base
its relations with the local Arabs
on autonomy since the per
petuation of the military govern
ment is impractical and inad
visable," Dayan said.
But he cautioned that
autonomy was only a transitional
arrangement and after five years
"border and peace" will have to
Ik> negotiated between Israel and
Jordan.
For generations
a symbol of
Jewish tradition.
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upon our assurance of service that fulfills
the high standards evoked by Jewish
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Today, each of Riverside's chapels
serving Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
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people who understand Jewish tradition
and honor it.
And in that tradition we serve every
family,regardlessof financial
circumstance.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft. Lauderdale (Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
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For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
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{"
Friday, JuneS. 1979
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
Jack Moss to Install New JCC Officers
<

"Commissioner Jack Moss will
be installing officer at the June
10 annual Jewish Community
Center conference luncheon at
Palm-A ire," announced Johl
Rot man, chairman of the day.
"Jack Moss has demonstrated an
understanding of the human
needs of our community, and we
are honored to have him as our
installing officer."
The commissioner is chairman
of the Broward County Energy
Conservation Committee, chair-
man of the Broward Employment
and Training Administration and
president of the State Asso-
ciation of County Com-
missioners. He is a member of the
Board of Directors of B'nai
B'rith. Temple Beth Israel.
Jewish Federation of Fort
Lauderdale. und the Regional
Board of the Anti-Defamation
League.
The newly elected Board of
Directors to be installed are:
Sylvia Begelman, Stephen S.
Belton. Milton Edelstein,
Marianne Falk, Judge Hugh
Glickstein. Irving Griff, Victor
Gruman, David Jackowitz, Mel
Katz, Rabbi Philip Labowitz,
Sunny Landsman. Dr. Sam
Leder, Ivy Levine, Mrs. Jack
Levine and Mrs. Michael Radin.
Jewish Community Center's
executive director. Bill Goldstein,
enthusiastically commented that
"Donald Mintz. the keynoter,
brings a studied background in
Jewish life and a natural
dynamism that is certain to add a
dimension to the conference."
Anita Perlman. president of
the Jewish Community Center,
looks forward to the pleasure of
greeting the committed friends of
the Jewish Community Center.
"... They are truly an in
spiration to me and my officers,
and Board and staff."
Environ Women's Division
Outlines 1980 Campaign
Brou ard County Commis-
sioner Jack Moss will be the
installing officer at the Jew-
ish Community Center's
annual conference on June
10.
The Environ campaign com-
mittee of the Inverrary Women's
Division met Thursday, May 24,
at the home of Lee Dreiling to
map plans for the 1980 United
Jewish Appeal drive, announced
Gladys Daren. Women's Division
general campaign chairman.
"Environ for the first time will
take its rightful place among the
other areas of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. The women are
anxious to be of service to help
Jewish people in our community
and the world over. They realize
that there are Jewish taxes and
responsibility wherever Jewish
people live together," said Mrs.
Daren.
Kenneth Bierman. campaign
director of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, was
guest speaker at the meeting
which was attended by Claire
Rothstein, Irene Kronick,
Martha Solofsky, Elaine Gross.
Jerry Bromberg, Irene Freed-
land. Dee Hahn, Lee Dreiling,
Florence K. Straus and Gladys
Daren.
On Tuesday, May 29, several
of the women who attended the
meeting went to the Federation
building to witness first-hand the
hot kosher meal program which
provides lunches for 200 people
daily at two sites. They per-
sonally became aware of the
needs of the elderly and ex-
pressed a strong desire to educate
all Environ residents of the
Jewish needs in the local com-
munity.
Nat Bodner Named 'Honorary Mayor'
I. Ft,
Margate Mayor George Liederman, right, presented a certificate of
commendation as "Honorary Mayor" to Nat Bodner for his efforts on
behalf of his community and for his fund-raising work for Israel.
Coral Springs B'nai B'rith,
Federation Host Meeting
The Coral Springs B'nai B'rith
Lodge 3018 and the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale will co-sponsor the
June 18 lodge meeting to be held
at Temple Beth Orr.
In an effort to explain the
Federation's role in the com-
munity and overseas, Joel Telles,
Federation public relations
director, will present a brief out-
line of the Federation's history
and its overall function as the
focal point for Jewish life in the
North Broward area.
Rabbi Leonard S. Zoll of
Temple Beth Orr also will ad-
dress the meeting on a variety of
subjects including the current
situation in Israel and the im-
portance of the strong Jewish
community locally. Rabbi Zoll is
chaplain for the Federation.
Robert Feigenbaum, chapter
president, and Johl Rotman,
chairman of the Coral Springs
Jewish Federation / UJA cam-
paign, urge all lodge members to
attend this important meeting.
Nat Bodner. a resident of
Paradise Gardens Section 2, was
recently awarded an "Honorary
Mayor" commendation by
Margate Mayor George
Liederman. The certificate of
commendation was granted to
Bodner on the 31st anniversary
of Israel in recognition of his
tireless efforts on behalf of Israel
and Jewish causes.
Bodner, an eight-year resident
of Paradise Gardens, is active in
numerous Jewish organizations.
He is the past vice president of
the Margate Jewish Center, past
fund-raising chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal drive and
has raised funds for BBYO and
Hillel. He is currently par-
ticipating in the Israel Bond
drive.
Nat's wife, Gertrude, has
received numerous citations over
Planning A Trip?
| Council's 1979 Exciting Travel |
' Program to Israel; Europe, WettJ
I Coast, Canadian Rockies and I
' Alaska Is now available.
I NATIONAL COUNCIL I
| OF JEWISH WOMEN |
I Call I
| DOROTHY KLEIN7414742\
L___________J
the years for her involvement in
Jewish organizations and joins
her husband in
activities.
manv Jewish
FURNITURE, APPLIANCES URGENTLY
NEEDED
FOR RUSSIAN JEWISH FAMILIES
An urgent plea has been made by the Jewish Family
Service agency for household items needed to furnish
apartments for the newly arrived Russian Jewish
families resettled in Fort Lauderdale.
FURNITURE
SMALL APPLIANCES
SILVERWARE
DISHES
BLACK AND WHITE T.V. SETS
COOKING UTENSILS
it ir it -it
The Jewish Family Service can arrange to pick up
any items you can donate.
PLEASE CALL SHELLY SOLOMON 927-9288
Israel Frees 16 Arabs
As Begin Vowed to Sadat
TEL AVIV (JTA) Less than 24 hours after
the Sadat-Begin announcement about release from
prison of a number of prisoners, Israel has freed 16
Arabs suspected and indicted for terrorist activities.
It might be the first group of freed terrorists in
accordance with an agreement for an Israeli gesture to
Sadat and two more groups might be released soon.
IT WAS LEARNED that the group of 16 includes
ten persons detained upon an administrative order (not
sentenced) and six who were sentenced by courts for
imprisonment two or three years with only one who
was sentenced to five years imprisonment.
It was stated that the guideline of the released
prisoners was that they do not endanger Israels
security. Seven of the freed prisoners have crossed the
El Arish checkpoint into Egyptian-held territory. I he
others preferred to stay in Judea and Samaria and the
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For your free copy of the booklet
just call one of these Canada Life Agents. Or mail
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..~aa> ._ J
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 8,1979
Jewish Floridian Capital Punishment Needs to be Studied
Of GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Business Office 138 S. Federal Hwy Suite 206. Danla. Fla .13004
Telephone W0-M18
FREDK SHOCHET a fmHShoehml' SUZANNE SHOCHE I
Editor and Publisher vmvwnmmm> Executive Editor
The Jewish Floridian Does Nst Guarantee The Kashnith
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Second Class Postage Paid at Dank.. Fla. MMZO
Published Bi-weekly
Fsderstion Offlceri: Pr.jid.nt, Leo Goodman; Executive Viet President, Milton
Kelner; Viet Pr.iid.nrs, Victor Gruman, Joel Reinjtein, John Strtno, SecreUry.
Richard Romanoff; Trssiurer, Joel Ltvitt; Executive Director, Ltslit S. Gottlltb;
Public R elations Director, Joel H. Telles.
The Jtwish Floridian hat absorbed the Jewish Un.ty and the Jtwi.n Weekly
Member of tnt Jtwish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide Ntws Service, National Editorial Association, American Association ot
Englisn-Jawish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One YearS7.50
Out of Town Upon Request.
Friday, June 8, 1979
Volume 8
13 SIVAN 5739
Number 12
A Kremlin Report
It is only a Kremlin report. On the other hand,
the Kremlin wants things from Uncle Sam, and
pronto. The Kremlin wants Most Favored Nation
status, thus necessitating the scrapping or at least
major modification of the Jackson Amendment.
Also, the Kremlin wants a successful meeting
with President Carter on June 15 to bring SALT II
to a conclusion in accordance with the Communist
view of things.
And so, Anatoly Sharansky and 11 other Soviet
Jewish dissidents now in prison may be released.
As we say, it is only a report duly noted in
Moscow on Sunday by Lev Ulyanovsky, a dissident
Jewish spokesman, who said that the Kremlin
decision was revealed by a low-to-medium placed
Russian bur3aucrat, Alexei Shibayev.
Shibayev calls Sharansky and the 11 others
"prisoners of Zion." We urge readers to let that
phrase roll over the convolutions of their brains:
"prisoners of Zion."
We call them prisoners of an oppressive dic-
tatorial state who fight for the right of a free con-
science nurtured by their Jewish heritage. But in
whatever way the Soviets seek to disguise their
abominable politics by insults hurled upon their
"enemies," in the end it is they who are the enemy.
Should the Kremlin report prove true, should
Sharansky and the 11 others in fact be freed, then
they themselves will be able to tell us whether they
were "prisoners of Zion" or of the Kremlin strangle-
hold on the free human spirit.
Ethiopian Jews Urge U.S.
To Take Up Cause of Falashas
By JUDITH ROSEN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An Ethiopian Jew, now a
citizen of Israel, urged Jews
in the United States and
Canada to take up the
cause of his fellow Falashas
in Ethiopia who he said are
facing extinction. Zecharias
Yona, secretary general of
the Association of Ethio-
pian Jews in Israel, charged
that the problem of the
Falashas has been ignored
by the Israeli government
and Jewish organizations.
Yona, a reserve sergeant in the
Israeli Army, and Simcha Jaco-
bovici, chairman of the North
American Jewish Students Net-
work, spoke to Jewish media at a
press conference which concluded
Yona's speaking tour of the U.S.
and Canada under NAJSN's
auspices.
JACOBOVICI urged a
massive letter writing campaign
to President Carter and to Zionist
and Jewish organizations urging
them to devise a "creative ap-
proach" to the problem of the
Falashas.
Yona, noting the efforts to
rouse world opinion over the
arrest of Jewish activist Anatoly
Sharansky in the Soviet Union,
asked whether the slaughter of
thousands of Ethiopian Jews
in the last few years could not
also be made into an inter-
national cause.
The Falashas, who numbered
250,000 in the 19th Century and
28,000 in 1976, are believed now
to number only 20,000. They live
in northwest Ethiopia which has
been the center of a civil war
since the overthrow of Emperor
Haile Selassie in 1972.
THOU8ANDS have been
killed, many sold into slavery and
an estimated 7,000 are refugees,
according to reports.
Prior to 1972, when Yona
immigrated to Israel, the aliya of
Falashas was hindered by doubts
over their Jewishness. In 1972,
Israel's two Chief Rabbis
recognized Falashas as Jews.
Yona said that some 300
Falashas now in Israel are fully
accepted and integrated into
Israel life.
But Yona said that although
124 Falashas made aliya in 1977,
the situation in Ethiopia is
desperate and nothing is being
done to get the Falashas out of
Ethiopia. He took pains to stress
that he was not blaming the
Ethiopian government for the
plight of the Falashas.
YONA WAS among a group of
Falasha immigrants who staged
demonstrations in Israel last
December to urge help for their
fellow Falashas in Ethiopia. Both
the Israel government and the
Jewish Agency who were
criticized by the Falashas, said
they were doing things to aid the
Falashas but could not reveal
them.
THE PHOTO tells the story.
Dramatis personae are John
Spenkelink's sister (right), Carol
Myers, who stands numbly,
staring vacant-eyed forward,
almost detached in her agony
because it is too painful to exper-
ience otherwise; and an
anonymous protester (left),
hysterical face torn by anguish of
tears, comforted in the arms of
another protester, back turned
toward the camera to show a
shirt bearing the declaration,'
"Don't Murder."
Spenkelink's sister is dumb-
founded by her individual
tragedy, and I am of course
speculating, but it appears that
she has no interest in the case
except her brother's execution.
Leo
Mindlin
But the hysterical protester's
interest lies beyond the case; it is
embedded in a cause, capital
punishment.
THAT IS what it means to be
a protester; it means to be com-
mitted to a principle, not neces-
sarily to people. Protesters would
like us to think that principles
and people are the same thing
but they are very different in-
deed.
It is for this reason that the
protester can resort to hysteria
while victims like Carol Myers
woven into the fabric of personal
tragedy, resort to the anesthesia
of numbness.
Capital punishment as cause
rather than case is, of course, the
higher issue in the Spenkelink
execution, but orchestrated
hysterical vigils in Stark.
Tallahassee or Washington are
self-defeating because thev
appeal to the hokus pokus of
"blood guilt." not to the principle
of lex talionis (tooth for a toothl
brought down to earth across a
short circuit of 2,500 volts. It is
lex talionis that is at issue in
capital punishment. not
emotional outbursts about ar-
chaic notions of "blood guilt."
WHAT I found most com-
pelling in the arguments of
Spenkelink himself, as well as of
others in the case who joined his
cause, was the allusion to con-
temporary philosophical treatises
on capital punishment that can
hardly be accidental.
Spenkelink's open letter from
Death Row on Tuesday, May 22,
declares: "I've learned a lot since
I've been in prison, with all the
reading I ve had time to do. The
things that we said in my legal
papers were not just issues
brought up by my lawyer. They
had to do with facts about the
death penalty ."
Surely, these are not the
sentiments, and certainly not the
words, of a murderer. They show
an almost literal translation of
the core of the argument against
capital punishment by Albert
Camus in his classical essay,
"Reflections on the Guillotine."
CAMUS ARGUES that
Continued on Page 15
Moscow Miracle
Ginzburg Digs Deeply into Thoreau
With the release by Moscow of
five heroic men two Jews, one
Baptist, one Orthodox Christian,
and one Ukrainian nationalist
most who puzzle daily over the
inscrutable ways of the USSR are
speculating on valid reasons for
the sudden decision in the Krem-
lin.
Others are so fascinated with
the drama of liberation that they
fasten on to the words of those
freed so abruptly, and finally find
in an absurd world without
heroes new hope for faltering
mankind.
AND MANY point with op-
timism to recent figures on exit
grants by the Russian govern-
ment, praying that Moscow will
now turn the spigot of emigration
even farther.
First, then, why this Spring-
time miracle? Towering largest
among the reasons are the desire
by the USSR to have SALT II
signed and sealed, the need to
win most-favored-nation trade
agreement, a wish to bring two
key spies back to the Soviet
Union, help in making Russia's
role as host for the Olympics
more palatable, and a determina-
tion not only to keep up with the
Chinese but to outdistance those
new friends of Washington.
Eventually, latent explana-
tions may burst to the surface.
The USSR is a nation of unend-
ing surprises: just yesterday,
Moscow was backing Idi Amin
with vigor; today Tanzania has
the Russian blessing.
As to the joyful thoughts
expressed by the best known
prisoner released. Aleksandr
Ginzburg turned to Henry
Thoreau for expression of his
Robert
Segal
thankssgiving: "Under a govern-
ment which imprisons unjustly,
the true place for a just man is
also a prison."
DEEPER INTO Thoreau,
Ginzburg undoubtedly had
found: "Must the citizen ever for
a moment resign his conscience
to the State? Why then has God
given to every man a con-
science?"
Rejoicing in their rush to liber-
ty, the Russian prisoners com-
pared their electrifying exper-
ience with that of astronauts
finding themselves on the moon.
"The heavy weight of unfree-
dom" startled them even-as it
brought ecstasy to their hearts.
Eduard Kuznetsov and Mark
Dymshits, the Soviet Jews jailed
for allegedly trying to flee by
hijacked plane in 1970, are now at
home in Israel. Valentin Moroz
("Don't call me a Russian dissi-
dent; I am an Ukrainian dissi-
dent") appears certain to accept
an offer to study and teach in
Harvard's Ukrainian Research
Institute.
WHEN WE TURN to statis-
tics on emigration of Jews from
the Soviet Union, we need to be
practical: True, some 4,408 Rus-
sian Jews were permitted to leave
mM?rch and approximately
5000 in April. True, experts in
the field expect a 50,000 total in
1979, some 20,000 above the 1978
figure. But as the crack in the
Russian door widens a bit. the
number emboldened to apply for
visas rises. Hence the percentage
of those actually winning free-
dom compared with the roll of
applicants is not all that encour-
aging.
It is essential also to keep in
mind the importance of Moscow's
desire to gain Most Favored Na-
tion trade status with the U.S.
Congressman Charles A. Vanik
of Ohio, one of the authors of the
Jackson-Vanik trade amend-
ment, has been in Moscow
recently exploring with Russian
leaders their desire to vault over
a portion of the trade restraints
tied to emigration policy by that
law.
SEN. ADLAI Stevenson of
Illinois has introduced a bill that
would grant $2 million in foreign
trade credits to the USSR and
China and replace provisions of
the Jackson-Vanik legislation
requiring assurances of healthier
USSR emigration practices.
Jewish leaders would be disap-
pointed to see the Stevenson
effort succeed. The Jackson-
Vanik amendment, they point
out, already contains a waiver
section for trade credits and Most
Favored Trade benefit on those
occasions when the USSR
behaves as it is now behaving.
Let Moscow continue to try to
water down the U.S. law which,
in the Soviet view, is too tough;
let the rest of us hold firm to that
valuable piece of legislation. And
let us all get on with the task of
bringing Anatoly Sharansky, the
still-imprisoned prisoner of con-
science, to freedom.


MomoP
n-----
Friday, June 8,1979
The Jewish FhndifuiofgreqterJ'ort Lauderdale
P*ge5
Circle of Yiddish Clubs Expands &ik to Be Honored
Over 35 enthusiastic leaders of
Yiddish Clubs in the Greater Fort
Lauderdale community met
recently in the Federation
building to exchange ideas and
programs for next year.
"It was an excellent meeting
with so many new ideas for con-
tinuing programs to be sponsored
by the various Yiddish Clubs,"
said Helen Nathan, supervisor
for adult activities at the Jewish
Community Center.
"Many of the 'old-timers' were
present, but we were delighted to
see a number of newcomers to the
group," remarked Sunny Lands-
man, coordinator of the Yiddish
Clubs.
AMONG THE new con-
dominiums represented were
Cypress Chase, Oriole Golf and
Tennis Club Phase I. Lauderdale
Oaks. Omega. Castle Gardens
and Environ.
The Circle will be meeting
again in September to finalize
programs for the coming year.
The history of the Circle dates
back to December of 1975, when
the Jewish Community Center
opened its doors and its first
performer was Sunny Landsman,
who emceed a Chanukah party,
hosting over 300 people. No
podium, no microphone, just a
box covered with a cloth, and
wall-to-wall people. Yiddish
stories and songs were heard.
From then on. Sunny was a
frequent visitor at the center,
starting a Yiddish class and
going on from there to do Yiddish
shows, including Purim Shpiels,
Chanukah performances, and the
American-Yiddish Theatre per-
forming "The World of Sholom
Aleichem."
IN AUGUST 1978. Sunny
conceived the idea of having a
Circle of Yiddish Clubs, for by
this time a number of Yiddish
Clubs had sprung up in the com-
munity. Mamalushen came alive
and was thriving in Broward
County. There has been a resur-
gence of Yiddishkeit throughout
South Florida. Groups of people
in condominiums and in homes
meet weekly to brush the cob-
Katzenstein
+ Oakland Estates
UJA Breakfast
Set June 17
A Jewish Federation United
Jewish Appeal fund-raising
breakfast will be held by residents
of Oakland Estates on Sunday.
June 17, at 11 a.m.. according to
Oakland campaign chairman
Paul Katzenstein.
The event is being held at ZZ's
Restaurant. 5305 North State
Road 7. and will feature as guest
speaker Rabbi Leonard S. Zoll of
Temple Beth Orr. Coral Springs.
Rabbi Zoll. who is chaplain for
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. will present a
program concerning conditions in
Israel and will discuss the
Federation's role in the local
community.
THE OASTMALTSR FAMILY MOTEL
PARAMOUNT
PARKSVILLE, N.Y. 117M
OPEN ALLY BAB
AM SMr cnfrtlnmnt
REASONABLE BATES
PORSpRINO*
SUMMER VACATIONS
PRIVATE LAKI FREEOOLP
DIETARY LAW! OBSERVED
MASHGIACH ON PREMISES
WRITE erCALL: (?M) It1-7M
All Malar Craatt Carat Hanarad
23
0PENIN6 JUNE 28 SPECIAL
Ptf Pison
DouDit Occupancy
?0 of 145 Rooms
TO AUGUST 23
V. DISCOUNT FOR 14 DAY STAY
2 GREAT KOSHER MEALS
& LUNCHEON SNACK DAILY
CHILDREN S OAY CAMP
MANY ARTS CRAFTS
CALL (305) 866-8831
.HitiMl.'MVU
r
Homt '> ajui Pitt- n linn
On Mia Ocaan at 67th Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
HIGH HOLY DAYS SEPT. 20-0CT. 2
CONSTANT RABBINICAL SUPERVISION
RABBI JOS KAUFMAN
I DAVID ROBRBR B
ffHJffi
owMia wnuuTritai
webs off the mother tongue. The
language is increasingly
becoming what it was at another
time ... a necessary component
of the intellectual and cultural life
of those who think and feel as
Jews.
There are over 30 Yiddish
Clubs in Broward County, and
they encompass well over 1,000
individuals who meet from time
to time to share their en-
thusiasms and their talents.
Sunny has started 10 clubs, and
there is a constant call "How Do
You Start A Yiddish Club?"
The Circle of Yiddish Clubs
meets about every three months
to compare notes and exchange
ideas and programs. A few of the
stalwart supporters of the
program are Jack Fishman,
Lauderdale West; Joseph
Goldhar, Sunrise Lakes; Charles
Blowstein. Oakland Estates;
Margot Green and Nat Shriftman
of Lime Bay; Sam Spivak of
Ramblewood East: Daniel Starr
of Bermuda Club; and others too
numerous to mention.
The Circle has always had the
firm support of the members of
the Jewish Community Center,
and is particularly grateful to
Helen Nathan, senior adult
supervisor.
at Hawaiian Gardens
Frank Stein will be honored at
a United Jewish Appeal break-
fast scheduled for Sunday, June
10, at the Phase VIII Clubhouse
of Hawaiian Gardens, according
to Jack Alper, chairman, and Lou
Tenner, co-chairman of the event.
Stein has been long active in a
variety of organizations as well as
being entertainment chairman of
the Phase III buildings. He is a
charter member of the Jewish
War Veterans. American Ijeeinn
and the Odd Fellows and was
awarded the Purple Heart.
Joseph Calig, assistant i
director of the Jewish Federation!
Frank Stein
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, will
be the guest speaker at the 10
a.m. breakfast.
HELP WANTED
RETIRED MANAGEMENT EXECUTIVES TO SERVE ON
A VOLUNTEER COMMITTEE TO BE A MANAGEMENT
ADVISORY GROUP TO THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER. BACKGROUND IN BUSINESS, FINANCE,
ENGINEERING, ARCHITECHTURE. ETC.
RETIRED MEN IN ALL PHASES OF CONSTRUCTION
FIELD: CARPENTERS, ELECTRICIANS, PLUMBERS,
PAINTERS, ETC.
WE NEED YOUR HELP! VOLUNTEER TODAY!
KALL SIDNEYELKMANATTHEJ.C.C. 484-7676or 792-670QJ

fg
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
Thai Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
4
i
4
it
I
l
1979 R. J. Reynold* Tobicco Co
/'. .llB.lIMlIi.l I
!3 mg. "ib",0.9 mg.mcotm *v per cigawie. FTC Repon MAY 78


ni>l A*> -.-*
i ne J eivisnt lonaian of Greater tort Lauderdaie
h'nday, June 8,1979,
Pi
ti
b
F
b

a
e
5
I
1
1
i
I
i
1
i
Jewish Community Center Presents
..-- .................. .^,,, .. .^.................................ijimuMirunnfln.ri.finnnnrii
Snllv RHin WBT4BIT Mi w;__________-.u..om;_ tk TmuUV, Pnmmunitv Center On Sunday, Aug. 12, at 3 and 7
Sally Radin, WECARE general chairman, reports that 801 pairs The Jewish Community Center
of discarded used eyeglasses were shipped this week to New Eyes Foil of Greater Fort Lauderdaie will
The Needy, Inc. for distribution world-wide. present a musical performance by
Edythe Morgano, chairman of this project, announced, "This is ^ 35-member company of the
an on-going project of WECARE. and collection for our next shipment Baltimore Actors
already has begun. Anyone who would like to collect in her or his
condo may call Hilda Robbins. WECARE coordinator. Drop-off point
is the Jewish Community Center."
Sunday, Aug.
p.m. "Fiddler on the Roof" will
be presented at the Fort
Lauderdaie High School
Auditorium.
Pictured from left are Sally Radin, WECARE general chairman; Hilda
bobbins, H ECARE coordinator; Edythe Morgano, New Eyes for the
Needy chairman; and Helen Zudick, volunteer.
Ethel Schein smiles with joy at being accepted as a blood donor after
Wy\ J T\ TT 1 J m Ethel Schein smiles with jox at being accepted as a mooddonur apcr
DlOOG I JriVP HPIfl 1TI I StmamO several precious rejections' Looking on arc Sally Radin. WECARE
1CiU 111 A *lCll Bank chairperson.
Sally Radin, WECARE gen-
eral chairperson, announced that
31 pints of life-saving blood were
donated by volunteers at the
recent WECARE Blood Drive
held at the Tamarac Jewish
Center. This was the ninth drive
held in conjunction with the
Broward Community Blood
Center.
"The continuous response to
the WECARE Blood Drives,"
said Ms. Radin, "guarantees our
being able to supply blood when
needed. Anyone wishing to be a
donor should contact Hilda
Robbins. coordinator, at the
Jewish Community Center."
WHO Pulls
Back To Suspend
Israel's Vote
GENEVA (JTAI The
World Health Organization
shelved for one year an Arab-
sponsored move to suspend
Israel's voting rights in the
organization. The shelving
followed a move by a main com-
mittee of WHO's annual
assembly which accepted a com-
promise proposal from its
Mozambique chairman after a
series of behind-the-scenes nego-
tiations to avert an open clash
between Islamic states and
Western nations.
The proposal noted that a
special WHO committee on
health conditions in Israeli-
occupied areas had not visited
the region this year. It called for
the three-member team to
conduct a new on-the-spot inves-
tigation and report back next
year.
June Music Jam
The Mamas and Papas of
Broward will sponsor a June
Music Jam from 4 to 8:30 p.m.,
Saturday, June 9, at Bojangles.
The event will be a fund-raiser
with proceeds benefitting Big
Brothers/Big Sisters of
Broward.
Having a
Cousins'
Club?
Don't forget
to invite
the great
taste of
Maxwell
House"
Coffee.
Maxwell House* Coffee has that rich,
satisfying taste, brewed to be remem-
bered. Serve it with sable and white-
fish salad or whatever the Cousins*
Club enjoys noshing. Smart Cousins'
Uub hostesses have been serving it for
over half a century.
'TrcMumopoi BordPeople" W m Halpert,
1___I Obcrst and
Wm%~AWm Company WiiiiaaM. Ha.
mto.dil.4M 0101 Dad. Ca. MS-aJ.3 Mw Mm ii affiat mi Hradbaef SariariJ.*aWa-,V.t>ra.. *DraJl.C-*f,V.ft.
"Good
to the
Last Drop"

K
Certified
Kosher
A living tradition in Jewish homes for mom than half a century.
NOTICE
thank you for your mtetrest m receivim mJ
Booklet Exploring the Jewish Heritaoi^
Spain', unfortunately, due to a grmn
strike in Spain, the printing 0f tm<
puoilcatlon, as well at others has nn
delayed and we expect to receive it in si
aweexs Jor
as soon as we receive this oookiet we Ml
mall It to you
Sincerely;
SPANISH NATIONAL TOURIST OFFICE
Let Iberia
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occupancy Single supplement S1 IS ji
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li.p.irtur. 1,11 \
Datnlii from from j 1.
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Friday, June 8,1979
* ftrjt ntn~~*mr Pnrt Tjauderdale
The Jewish Flqridian of Greater Fort LauderdaU
rtgrJ*
Page 7
35

.i;^^^tv..

II tl
St
re
le
la
ie
of
re
<*
*m

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i.
.......n "' "
*#T
/* Jfr
?yv^
Come to Spain and revis
the Golden Age of Judaism.
In a quiet corner of the old Jewish quarter in
Cordoba, stands the statue of Moshe ben Maimon
Ha-Sepharti (Maimonides)Born Cordoba 1139.
Died Cairo 1205.
There was once in Spain a Golden Age of Judaism.
Come to Spain to see the places from this
Golden Age and to feel the rebirth of the Sephardic
tradition. In Toledo, Granada, Lucena, Sevilla, Malaga,
Madrid, Barcelona and other cities.
To learn more, send for the free booklet,
"Exploring the Jewish Heritage in Spain."
Please send me your new booklet
"Exploring the Jewish Heritage
in Spain"
Name.
Sine
-Z.P.
Send to: Spanish National Tourist
Office, P.O. Box 5135, FDR Station,
New York, N.Y. 10022
* L


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Pi
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tri
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by
R*
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Ho
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Ku^O"
Scenes from The Fede

Cantor Maurice Neu leads the
singing of the "Star Spangled
Banner" and "Hatikvah.
Proudly displaying his award is
Charles Locke, who was
presented with the AWARD OF
HONOR for his many years of
dedicated service to the Jewish
Federation.

Recipient of the OUT-
STANDING SERVICE Award
as-chairman of the Board of Jew-
ish Education. Phyllis Chudnow,
offers remarks of thanks.
Richard Romanoff, general cam-
paign chairman, proudly displays
the award presented to him by
the Federation for "his out-
standing leadership and
dedication that served as an
inspiration to the entire com-
munity."
Federation executive director
Leslie S. Gottlieb, who presented
the awards to the campaign
volunteers from all segments of
the Greater Fort Lauderdale
area
I MM
1
' /
Johl Rotman, winner of the
YOUNG LEADERSHIP
AWARD, addresses the audience
and thanks the Federation for
"bestowing this high honor" to
him.
Newly elected treasurer, Joel Levitt, is being congratulated by in-
stalling officer Allan Boer.
,* -^
Serving as the installing officer is
Allan Boer, a past president of
the Federation.
N W
* ^
i -
-Jitchie Libros, president of the
Federation s Women's Division,
highlights the women's activities
during 1978-79.
Milton Keiner, newly elected
executive vice president and
general chairman of the 1980
Jewish Federation / UJA cam-
paign, is seen addressing the
annual meeting.

fr^?:^^^^
as
Women's Division Campaign
Chairman, Gladys Daren, an-
nounces that the women raised in
excess of $415,000 in this year's
UJA campaign.
Pictured is Victor Uruman as ne
presented the report of the Nom-
inating Committee for officers
and Board of Directors for 1979-


i ffPl/p/J/ivrf i VnifM-* ntClvntmr Port Lauderdale
>>age b
s ation Annual Meeting
p\iqn Volunteers pose apteR Beceivmq aw*R6s
t
e
h
e
a
e


rage iu
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 8,1979
Federation Officers,
Board Elected
VbaJ*?- 8late of officere "<> Board of Directors of the Jewish
3^n' 5s pre8e,ILted by the Nominating Committee, was
accepted and all officers and Board members were elected
unanimously.
They are:
President
Leo Goodman
Executive Vice President
Milton Keiner.
Vice Presidents
Victor Gruman
Joel Reinstein
John Streng
Secretary
Richard Romanoff
Treasurer
Joel Levitt
General Campaign Chairman
Milton Keiner
Vice Chairman-Campaign
Victor Gruman
BOARD OF DIRECTORS:
Two Year Members
(1979-1981)
Alvin Capp
Dr. Alvin Colin
Louis Colker
Edmund Entin
Arthur Faber
Dr. Robert Grenitz
Ervin Harvith
Samuel Leber
Jack Levine
Adolph Levis
Bernard Libros
Charles Locke
Leon Messing
Comm. Jack Moss
Ben Roisman
Johl Rotman
Dr. Robert Segaul
Jean Shapiro
Brian Sherr
Sidney Spewak
Robert Taylor
Michael Weinberg
One Year Members
(1979-1980
Sidney Bobick
Sidney Elkman
Martin Kurtz
Irving Friedman
Seymour Gerson
Alven Ghertner
Alfred Golden
Sen. Samuel L. Greenberg
Joseph Kaplan
Harvey Kopelowitz
David Jackowitz
Joseph Novick.
Anita Perlman
Irving Resnikoff
Albert Segal
Florence K. Straus
Women's Division Presidnt
Mitchie Libros
Women's Division Campaign
Chairman
Gladys Daren
Honorary Board Members For Life
Samuel Goldfarb
Samuel Soref
Past Presidents
Allan E. Baer
Jacob Brodzki
Ludwik Brodzki
Martin Fridovich
Albert Garnitz
Alvin Gross
Howard Miller
Annual Meeting Notes
'Year of Accomplishment'
Continued from Page 1
Congressman Edward Stack and
County Commissioner Jack Moss
for their assistance in keeping up
the kosher meal program);
Jewish education which an-
ticipates an enrollment of over
100 next year; Jewish Family
Service and Russian Resettle-
ment program which has
counseled over 1,400 cases in
North Browaxd alone, and has
successfully resettled four Jewish
families from the Soviet Union.
GOODMAN CONTINUED by
commenting on the Hebrew Day
School, which will move to the
new Sunr-se Boulevard site in
Septembn with an increased
enrollmwn of 50 to 75 percent;
the chaplaincy program .that
supervise* visits to hospitals and
nursing : Ties in the area; the
Commur Relations Committee
which has che responsibility of
keeping local residents aware of
events on the local, national and
international level; the Jewish
Community Center, which will be
the first occupant of the new site
with its Day Camp starting June
18. Goodman stressed the vital
need for support of the JCC and
said, "Your support of the Air
Academy property is a must for
our community."
The president urged Jews in
the North Broward area "to
stand up and be counted when
the call goes out for campaign
volunteers for the 1980 drive .
become part of our community."
Goodman closed his annual
message with a tribute to the late
Louis Perlman who was "a
remarkable man, a successful
businessman, a leading philan-
thropist, a good American and a
good Jew." The audience rose for
a moment of meditation in his
memory.
The
KOSHER
JS^^ AIR CONDITIONED
Crouih

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40th to
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JULY 4tl WMHB CHEBRATION
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Federations Help Flood Victims
The assessment of flood
damages sustained by the Jewish
community of Jackson, Miss.,
and the assistance required has
been made by the Council of
Jewish Federations through on-
site inspection by its staff and by
leaders and staff of the Memphis I
Jewish Federation.
Twenty-two Jewish families
suffered major damage to their
homes, and four offices of Jewish
professionals and two business
sites were devastated, it was
reported.
Drawing on experience gained
Campaign
Chairmen
Named
Continued from Page 1
residency in Inverrary. As
president and chairman of the
Board of the O. J. Gruman Steel
Co., Gruman was a community
leader in civic, philanthropic and
Jewish causes. He was president
of the Emmanuel Cohen Jewish
Community Center; a Board
member of Beth-El Synagogue, a
Board member of B"nai Jacob
Synagogue and was a member of
the Housing and Redevelopment
Association of Minneapolis.
On the local scene, Gruman's
Federation activities include co-
chairman of the Inverrary drive
in 1978 and chairman of the
Inverrary Advance Gifts in 1979.
He is on the Board of Governors
of the Jewish Community Center
and was chairman of this year's
Jewish National Fund dinner.
Keiner stated, "We have set
our goals for the 1980 campaign,
and with the vital help of the Fort
Lauderdale Jewish community
we will succeed in the important
task that we have dedicated our-
selves to accomplish.''
assisting the Jewish communities
of Wilkes-Barre and Johnstown,
Pa., during severe flooding, the
Council of Jewish Federations
arranged meetings between
Jackson's Jewish leadership and
the Coordinator of Disaster Relief
of the Federal Disaster Adminis-
tration Agency. At those
sessions the community was
apprised of. the full range of
federal assistance available to
them, and the procedures for
obtaining it.
Federal disaster relief loans,
administered through the Small
Business Administration, are
available to individuals, busi-
nesses and organizations whose
homes, offices and other sites
were damaged by flooding.
Funds are also available for up to
one year to pay rent on apart-
ments for families whose homes
are being repaired. Many Jewish
families were initially sheltered
by friends whose homes lay
beyond the flood line; now most
are being relocated in apart-
ments. V
The CJF Washington Action
Office is advising the community
on expediting the process of
government assistance.
A family service caseworker
from the Memphis Jewish
Federation who worked with the
Jackson community directly
following the flood has been
requested by Council to return
and provide further counseling.
CJF President Morton L.
Mandel of Cleveland stated he
was "deeply grateful to the
Memphis Jewish Federation that
has taken the initiative to
provide direct assistance to the
Jewish people of Jackson."
Based on guidelines developed
in previous flood relief efforts,
Council assisted Jackson's
Jewish community in forming a
committee to supervise flood
relief and in beginning to draw up
assessment reports of financial
needs and resources.
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gday, June 8, lfffo
T* -. f ... J.wJn/
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
tfage.iJ
Why Israel Opposes a Palestinian State
Negotiations begin shortly
[on Palestinian autonomy in
the West Bank and Gaza,
and while the ultimate out-
come of these negotiations is
still open, Israel has made it
clear they will not lead to an
independent West Hank
Gaza state led by the Pales-
tinian Liberation
(irganization.
It should be obvious that
although Israels initial
proposal for Palestinian
autonomy is subject to nego-
Liation, there will never be a
PLO state within artillery
range of Israel population
centers-
Israel's reasons for op-
posing a Palestinian state
should be well known by
now. but it is surprising how
many people, including the
U.S Executive Branch,
don't know them.
11 There it now a
Palestinian state! It is called
Jordan! It consists of three
fourth- of the land mass of
PalestUM as determined by
the League of Nations ... of
tin two million people living
in Jordan, nearly all are
Palestinians ... so a
Palestinian state on the
West Bank would be a
second Palestinian state.
2) Israel is under no ob-
ligation, legal or moral, to
deal with the PLO which
expresses its frustration by
deliberately murdering
women and children. Sym-
pathy among many Arabs
for the PLO is primarily
based upon the assessment
that the PLO is more capable
of ending the Israeli oc-
cupation than is King
Hussein of Jordan. U.S.
overtures to the PLO, not to
mention United Nations
recognition of the PLO. has
encouraged that assessment.
3) President Sadat of
Egypt indicated that the
solution to the Palestinian
problem may not lie with the
PLO. The West Bank and
Gaza do not belong to the
PLO, they belong to us and
the rest of the Arab Nation,
said Sadat, vowing to press
on with autonomy nego-
tiations with Israel despite
PLO opposition. This signal
to Jordan went unheeded.
The White House should
have listened.
Edmund Entin
Chairman, Community
Relations Committee
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
No-Confidence Motions Defeated
In Knesset on Economic Issues
Histadrut Foundation
Women's Day Luncheon
The upcoming Annual
i omen's Day luncheon, spon-
)red by the Israel Histadrut
lundation. was announced this
L,-ek by its South Broward chair
I)r Morton Malavsky.
jiritual leader of Temple Beth
halom in Hollywood. It will be
fid at noon on Wednesday. June
at the Holiday Inn on Holly-
ood Beach.
Dr. Sol Stein, national presi-
lent of the Israel Histadrut
foundation, will present Harriet
jreen, president of Pioneer
men Council of South Florida,
vilh the Histadrut Heritage
Jerusalem Award for her out-
standing leadership in the cause
Zion and Jerusalem.
Guesl speaker will be Elaine
jloom. former state represen-
t from Dade County in the
Florida Legislature and State
i candidate in 1978 During Elaint Bloom
her two terms in office, over 30
lulls authored by Mrs. Bloom
were passed into law in Florida
What a lunch!
TETLEY TEA )
IN THE GLASS '
ON THE RYE
Your thirst will tell you-
iced Tetley Tea is iced tea
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ttmdt up to ice. Its flavor
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made with tiny tea leaves
for big flavor. Deep rich
color, too. Since Tetley
starts out stronger it lasts
longer. No wonder the fa-
vorite in Jewish homes has
been Tetley since 1875-now
beginning a second century!
r|* K on the pucknge means certified Kosher
A(BMY01J)J1D1I1L
ranging in subject matter from
education to the economy and
family law to senior citizens'
concerns. Her national legislative
service includes the vice
presidency of the National Asso-
ciation of Jewish Legislators.
Mrs. Bloom, moderator of
several television and radio
shows, is a sought-after lecturer
and an extraordinary community
leader having served on the
Boards of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
American Friends of the Hebrew
University, and Miami Com-
mit tee on Foreign Relations.
In 1971 at the age of 33, she
became one of the youngest
presidents of the Greater Miami
Section of the National Council of
Jewish Women. Numerous
honors and awards have been be-
stowed upon her by political,
Jewish and women's organiza-
tions and Florida universities. In
JERUSALEM UTA) A
series of opposition no-confidence
motions on economic issues were
defeated in the Knesset by a
majority of 52-44. The only
breach of coalition discipline
came from a section of the Laam
tact ion led by Yigael Hurwitz,
the former Trade Minister, which
did not participate in the vote as
an expression of its grave doubts
over the government's economic
policj
As the debate proceeded, word
filtered through that the Finance
Ministry intends to slash a
further II. 3-4 billion from this
year's annual budget on top of a
IL 3.3 billion cut promised
earlier.
FINANCE MINISTRY
sources explained that the at-
mosphere engendered in the
Cabinet by the shock of an 8.7 per
cent increase in the cost-of-living
index in April was favorable to
budget cuts. Finance Minster
Simcha Ehrlich and his aides lost
no time in preparing a sup-
plementary program of cut s This
will lx- presented to the Cabinet
Sunday.
The no-confidence motions
were presented by Labor the
Shai faction and the Com-
munists. They were supported by
other left and liberal faction
Labor Party Chairman Shimon
Peres flayed the government for
its ostensibly liberal economic
policy which he said was directly
responsible for the galloping
inflation.
THE FAMILY JACOBS'
9 25th A COLLINS
MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 33139
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iwn
T* Ju;wh Fbridian of Greater Fort Laudwdai*
Friday, Jam 8,1979
3 Soviet Jews Given
Harsh Sentences
Organizations in the News
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Three Moldavian Jewish refus-
niks arrested Jan. 5 in a Beltsy
cafe for brawling with anti-
Semitic thugs have received
harsh prison sentences for their
part in the melee, according to
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry (NCSJ). The seven
hooligans who provoked the
incident were never arrested.
Aleksandr Milner has been
sentenced to six years in prison,
while Arkady Feldman and
Yankel Groberman each received
four-vear terms. Their trial was
Apr. 13.
AN UNIDENTIFIED non-
Jew who came to their defense
during the fight and was arrested
with them drew an even longer,
although unknown sentence, the
NCSJ reported.
The three men, all.of whom had
applied to emigrate to Israel,
were celebrating Feldman's
receipt of his visa at the restaur-
ant when seven youths began to
insult and taunt them with such
statements as "How long must
we put up with you lousy Yids?"
Eventually the Jews were
provoked into defending them-
selves and were aided by the
incensed Russian customer, the
NCSJ said.
GROBERMAN, who was
released from custody prior to the
Apr. 13 trial and was to be a
material witness, actually ap-
peared as one of the accused.
His parents, wife and children,
and Milner's father all live in
Israel. Groberman s exit applica-
tion had been denied on the
grounds that he holds state
secrets as a result of his army
service.
The
HAD ASS AH
Plantation Polyneaian
Hebrew Bay School News
The children and teachers of
the Hebrew Day School have
been involved in culminating the
year's activities. The kinder-
garten through the fourth grade
students took the CTBS stan-
dardized tests. The results will be
shared with the parents during
parent-teacher conferences.
The kindergarten children are
completing their own dictionary,
complete with illustrations. The
first graders have completed
their autobiographies to demon-
strate their language facility and
creativity. Third and fourth
graders have been finishing a
creative writing unit, where they
write a different story every day.
The Language Arts curriculum at
the Hebrew Day School places a
high premium on creativity
within the framework of learning
to express one's ideas correctly.
The science segment of the
upper grades consisted of a com-
prehensive unit in health. The
children have been studying the
body systems. Learning by doing
has involved the children in
making models, skeletons, and in
creating games to reinforce
names for muscles and body
parts. The children learned the
construction and usage of a
stethoscope as part of their
cardiac sub-unit.
On May 29 the children heard
John Jarvie Jr. talk about the
laser. Jarvie, an employe of
Southern Bell Telephone Com-
pany, taught a lesson about the
communications laser and its
impact on current and future
communications. The pre-
sentation was highlighted by
filmstrips. transparencies and
models of the laser.
The Hebrew Day School
program would not be complete if
the physical education program
were not included as an integral
part of the school. The children
who participated and won awards
as part of the Presidential Fit-
ness Program were honored at
Kabbalat Shabbat Services at the
school on Friday, June 8. Ms-
Penny Rubin said the fourth
grade boys were all recipients of
an award.
The entire student body has
been briefed on the Hebrew Day
School's move to the JCC
campus in September.
June 10 at 8 p.m. is the date set
for the open meeting for the
Hebrew Day School familes and
friends. The winner will be an-
nounced in the drawing for a trip
for two to Las Vegas. The
proceeds of this drawing will help
the Day School in their move.
Anyone interested in purchasing
tickets should contact the school
office-
Preparations were begun early
for the holiday of Shavuoth at the
Hebrew Day School. The pre-k
and kindergarten children made
their own tablets from day- They
studied the story of Shavuoth
and made the tablets to take
home as a reminder of the Ten
Commandments.
The first through fourth
graders learned a more in-depth
knowledge of the meaning of the
holiday. The integration of
Shavuoth into the secular
program was accomplished by
having the children incorporate a
values unit in the language arts-
social studies program. The first
and second grade students talked
about admirable traits they
wanted and wrote about who
they would like to be. Discussion
of why they admired an in-
dividual was the pivotal point for
the values work. Children then
proceeded into the work on what
the Ten Commandments teaches.
The older classes had the children
decide which Commandment was
most important. Tracing the
Commandments back to the
original Hebrew helped the
children understand the hidden
meanings behind the words.
Gardens Chapter of Hadassah,
newest chapter of the Florida
Mid-Coast Region of Hadassah,
will receive its charter at a special
meeting on Monday, June 11, at
1 p.m. at the Diecke Auditorium,
Plantation.
Esther Cannon, region
president, will present the charter
following her installation of the
recently elected officers.
First president of the new
chapter is Bertha Fishman. Other
officers to be installed are
education vice president Hen-
rietta Schwartz: fund-raising vice
president Jeanne Gadd; member-
ship vice president Ida Medvin:
program vice president Evelyn
Schildiner: treasurer Yetta
Cogen; financial secretary Mollie
Markell; recording secretary
Grace Gottlieb: and corres-
ponding secretary Harriet
Gil man.
Judith Garbus, chairman of
the day, has announced a social
hour starting at 12:30 preceding
the major event. Prospective
members in the area are invited.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Installation of officers of the
Aleph Council of B'nai B'rith
Women for 1979-1980 was held
May 22 at the Catherine Young
Library in Margate. Mildred Tell
was installed as president for a
second term.
brunch was served to
Ocean Drive, in Apartment 2212*
A on Tuesday, June 12 at 1:30
p.m. R.S.V.P. to Mrs. Paula
Pollock or Mrs. Clare Klugman.
SWEDEN'S
members and friends of the 14
rhnntprs of B'nai B'rith Women,
Spring ^ph Council. A I fl B ft
musical program followed. .. m
PIONEER WOMEN
Natanya Club of Pioneer
Women will meet on Wednesday.
June 13, at 12:30 p.m. in the
meeting room of the Boca Raton
Bank in the Grand Union
Shopping Center on 441. Every-
one is welcome.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Mrs. Clare Klugman. president
of the new Ocean Mile Chapter of
Women's American ORT, an-
nounces a membership tea, to be
held at Playa del Mar. 3900 Cult
That outrageously rich
Swensen's Ice Cream
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^iday, June 8,1979
i. mt~uM~m ~tr.r*at*r Fort Lauderdale
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
ilitant Sinai Settlers Vacate Land Only After Putting Up Stiff Fight
By YITZHAK SH ARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
f ilitant settlers from Neot Sinai
reluctantly to evacuate
heir vegetable fields near El
pish but only after driving off
narmed Israeli soldiers with
_ning torches, chemical insec-
cides and a barrage of stones,
uits and vegetables.
A number of soldiers and
pttlers were slightly injured in
melee early May 24. The
elds, along with the town of El
rish, were to be handed over to
pe Egyptians May 25.
THE SETTLERS balked and
bcupied the fields in defiance of
[ilitary Government orders.
hey promised to leave volun-
krily after Deputy Premier
figael Yadin, who flew to the
fcene from Jerusalem, relayed a
romise from Prime Minister
Jenachem Begin in London that
would try to persuade
resident Anwar Sadat to allow
hem access to the fields.
Yadin made it clear that Begin
auld only raise the matter with
adat and could guarantee
athing. The vegetable fields are
the area returned to Egypt
day 18 under the arrangements
tade by the Israeli-Egyptian
Dint military committee and
sproved by the Knesset under
be terms of the Israeli-Egyptian
eace treaty.
The settlers, reinforced by
Sympathizers from the Gush
Jmunim and other die-hard
groups opposed to the peace
eaty, fortified themselves in the
pelds with tractors, barbed wire
nd steel pipes. They angrily
Rejected appeals to leave
t'acefully from Justice Minister
shmuel Tamir and Defense
^Minister Ezer Weizman.
THEY PELTED Weizman
with vegetables and denounced
him as a "traitor" and an "agent
Df Egypt." They rejected similar
urgings early from the local army
commander, Brig. Moshe Dahan,
and the commanding officer of
the southern region, Gen. Dan
Shomron.
Israeli army units had been
deployed around the fields but
Itook no action to remove the
[settlers. Before dawn, however,
I unarmed soldiers, only a few of
them equipped with helmets
moved into the Fields behind a
bulldozer used to uproot toe
I barbed wire.
Although Gen. Shomron in
[formed the militants that the
jtroops were weaponless and
begged them not to resort to
violence, the approaching
Mdiers were attacked with
I flames, missiles and, most
I dangerous, chemical sprays that
Bar Mitzvah
JAMES RAVEDE
On Saturday, June 9, at 10:30
a.m., James Ravede, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Shimon Ravede, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah at Plantation Jewish
Congregation-Temple Kol Ami.
In honor of this occasion, Mr. and
Mrs. Ravede will sponsor the
Oneg Shabbat following the
regular Shabbat service on
Friday, June 8.
CANTOR AVAILABLE FOR
HIGH HOUDAYS
ItetJred cantor with beautiful
voice, excellent Nusactv would like
to serve a conservative congre-
gation. Also available for an major
noways and Shabbat 454-7586
could cause blindness.
They were exhorted by the
settlers to disobey their orders.
The soldiers withdrew, and no
further attempts were made to
use force.
YADIN WAS summoned from
Jerusalem at that point, having
earlier reported to Begin in
London by telephone. He said the
Prime Minister was pained by the
events and would try to make
Sadat understand the settlers'
motivations and attachment to
the land. Yadin said that since
Sadat himself was once a farmer,
he might understand. But if not,
there is not other way but to
return the land to the Egyptians,
Yadin said.
Later, the settlers began to
leave Neot Sinai just hours before
the Egyptians were to come in.
Tempers were cooled and in an
effort at reconciliation, the
settlers and soldiers shook hands
and saluted each other.
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Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 8,1979
*


Prep 'ng for the symbolic turning of the earth during official groundbreaking ceremonies by
Rive de Memorial Chapels for Broward County's newest and largest Jewish funeral chapel
were rom left) Cantor Maurice Neu of Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise; Rabbi Emanuel Shenk;
Rabb: Bernard Shoter of Temple-in-the-Pines; Rabbi Milton Schlinsky of Sharon Gardens;
Riverside executive vice president Alfred Golden; Rabbi Philip Labowitz of Temple Beth Israel
and president of the North Broward Rabbinical Association; Rabbi Seymour Friedman,
execwive director of the United Synagogue of America; Rabbi Sheldon Harr of Plantation
Jewis Center; Rabbi Paul Katz of Temple Sinai, Hollywood; and Rabbi Albert Troy of Sunrise
Jewi; Center.
Riverside Memorial Chapels To
Open West Broward Facility
Riverside Memorial Chapels of
Floridii has broken ground on
Brow, rd County's newest,
larges: and most modern Jewish
funeral chapel, according to
Alfred Golden, executive vice
preside it of Riverside of Florida.
The Vest Broward chapel will
be loo. ed at Commercial Boule-
vard, just west of NW 66th
Terrace near University Drive,
and will have a seating capacity
of nearly 300 persons. It was
designed by award-winning Coral
Spring-^ architect Morris Simon,
and is scheduled for completion
later this year.
The new Tamarac facility has
been designed to satisfy every
aspect of the Jewish funeral
tradition, and the Orthodox
ritual, when requested, will be
strictly observed, according to
Arthur Grossberg, F.D., vice
president in charge of Riverside's
Broward operations. He added
that the new chapel will have a
mikveh for the ritual washing of
the dead.
Staffing the new Riverside
chapel will be Mark Davis, L.E.,
who will be assisted by Gross-
berg; Leo Hack, vice president
What the Pope Really Said
ROME (JTA) When Msgr. Hilarion
Capucci made a bravado declaration in an interview
after his Papal audience May 8 to the effect that the
Pope, "who fought in his country (Poland) against
the Nazis," had "understood" Capucci's "problem,"
he omitted the Pope's reply in their private audience.
ACCORDING TO reliable sources, when
Capucci told Pope John Paul II, "I defended my
people just as you did yours in Poland," the Pope
raised his finger at him and said, "In Poland we
defended morality without engaging in politics
whereas you engaged in politics without taking
morality into account."
While there has been "no comment" by the
Vat can on Capucci's statements, informed sources
reveal he is being watched very closely because of the
Vatican's honor in holding to its agreement with
Israel at the time of Capucci's release in 1977.
and religious adviser; and Ken-
neth Kay, F.D., vice president in
charge of Dade operations.
This will be the eighth funeral
service location operated in Flor-
ida by Riverside Memorial
Chapels, the largest and one of
the oldest Jewish funeral firms in
the nation, founded in New York
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Holid.., Inn- W. Palm Beach
6255 Oeechobee
Tues., June5-3:00p.m.
Holiday Inn Pompano Beach
1350 S. Ocean Blvd.
Wed., June 6-3:00 p.m.
Holiday Inn Miami Baach
22nd at Collins Ave.
Fri., June8-3:00 p.m.
Holiday Inn Coral Gablea
2051 LeJeune
Tues., e"une 12 3:00 p.m.
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POMPANO BEACH 428-?fi?P.
Summit Bank of Tamarac has made a substantial investment in State
of Israel Bonds, which will he used to boost the economic development
of the Jewish State, and especially for neu ton ns and industry in
Israers Negev. Presenting the purchase check to Edmund Entin,
Broward County chairman of special bank purchases. art> (from left I *
Glenn B. Meyers, Summit Bank vice president, and John R. Morris.
Summit Bank president. This newest purchase brings the bank into
the "Century Club" category.
Israel Hospital Opens
Lauderdale Office
Shaare Zedek Hospital of Jeru-
salem has announced the opening
of a mid-Florida regional office in
Fort Lauderdale, according lo an
announcement by Sidney L
Olson, regional vice president.
Henry Tuchman has been named
to head the operation which will
be located at 3101 North Federal
Highway.
Tuchman. formerly Quebec
director of the Jewish National
Fund and the Israel Honds
Organization, is a graduate of
New York University.
Shaare Zedek. Jerusalem's 102-
year old hospital is completing
the construction of its new 500-
bed facility in Bayit Vegan, a
suburb of Jerusalem. The new
Medical Center was dedicated
last November and will be open
for patients this year. The $50
million. 10-huilding complex
incorporates the latest in medical
technology. It replaces a 75-year-
old structure which is located in
l lie heart of the city.
Almost. 100 Floridians and
members of the Southeast Region
of the American Committee for
Shaare Zedek attended the^
dedication ceremonies. Several
facilities at the new center have
been made possible by members
of the region.
The American Committee for
Shaare Zedek Hospital in Jeru-
salem maintains offices in Miami.
New York and in the principal
cities of the United States and in
most F.uropean countries.
New Kosher Food Firm Opens
Quality Food Systems, a new
kosher food company, has opened
in the South Florida community
to help fill the need for strictly
kosher prepared foods. Owners
are Michael Pecora and Michael
Selig.
Pecora specializes in marketing
and sales. He said Signature
Catering is the firm's trade name
for full service social catering.
Naturally Kosher Brand Pre-
pared Foods offers pre-plated and
pre-portioned dinners to
hospitals, nursing homes, ships
and supermarkets. Naturally
Kosher also specializes in making
party platters and catering to
offices and condos.
Selig, a chef, added, "Most of
our products are available with
no salt added to meet the needs of
low salt diets."
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
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New York, NY 10017
(212)759-1310
corporation Ton Free (8oo> 221-4338


ay, June 8,1979
^^^^^^T^TttH nta~t*r Port iMuulerdale
The Jewish Fhridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale

Page 15
Synagogue news tea Min SUNRISE
JEWISH CENTER
f)n Saturday morning, June
Men's Club of the Sunrise
Lish Center will sponsor the
Hush following the services,
[by Rabbi Albert N. Troy and
htor Jack Marchant.
Ir. and Mrs. Max Breittholz
sponsor the kiddush
lurday morning, June 30, at
| Sunrise Jewish Center. This
dush is in honor of their 50th
^ding anniversary.
,he Oneg Shabbath following
lay night services, at the
Irise Jewish Center on June
will be given by Mr. and Mrs.
Lard Altner. in honor of the
Incoming marriage of their
I, Martin Leonard Altman.
lunrise Jewish Center
lerhood will hold its meeting
Jnesday, June 20, at the
[pie at 11:30 a.m. A mini-
ch will be available.
Dsmetician Barbara Camins
lecture on skin care and
jty and make-up techniques,
will use top name brands and
:ial literature for her
Bonstration.
Wednesday. June 27,
[irise Jewish Center Sisterhood
, hold a luncheon and card
jty at the temple. Tickets can
Obtained through Sisterhood.
PLANTATION
JEWISH CONGREGATION
On June 8 there will be a
regular Friday night service at
8:15 p.m. June 15 Cantor Nat
Corburn will conduct and lead the
Friday night service.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
On Monday, June 4, the
Sisterhood of Beth Orr in Coral
Springs presented the final
program in its series on "How to
Survive and Be Happy in South
Florida Life Can Be Beautiful
in South Florida, Testimony of
Four Women."
Guest speakers were Helen
Tache, city commissioner;
Martha Moses, co-director of
Temple Beth Orr nursery school
and lecturer: Shirley Berman,
housewife and medical secretary.
Informal small group discussions
among audience members
followed.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
SYNAGOGUE
The Reconstructionist
Synagogue, Plantation, will
honor its Torah School graduates
at the 8 p.m. Friday service.
These are the young people who
have completed their studies
through the seventh grade of
Torah School and are ready to
continue on to Judaica High
School. Hank Pitt, synagogue
president, and Mrs. Phyllis
Chudnow, education director, will
preside at the services
Capital Punishment Needs to be Studied
To Anti-Semitism
Soviets Introduce
the China Factor
\SHINGTON The Soviet
(ion has given a "potentially
I edge" to its virulent
t: Zionism by adding the
Factor." Dr. William
ley, a specialist on Soviet
kir-- charges,
|n a report to B'nai B'rith
rnational, Dr. (Corey, the
knization's dint-tor of inter-
lidiial policy research, declares
It the coupling of the
bmlin's "unceasing anti-
Dist propaganda assault,
Ich incorporates every anti-
nitic canard," with its media
Bcks against China "only
J>ens the anxiety of a Soviet
fish community."
*)R. KOREY says the "China
fctbr" was introduced in 1971
Vladimir Begun, the Soviet
lion's Julius Streicher. Writing
I the Minsk journal, Belarus,
eun cited U.S. Secretary of
fcte Henry Kissinger's contacts
|h Chinese Communist Party
der Mao Tse-tung and warned
f they were being made under
banner of the "six-cornered
kr of David."
Someone
hospitalized?
Bring
them home
- to us.
Recuperation at home is often
Master and smoother and
less cosily We can help the in-
home patient with a highly
qualified RN. LPN. Aide or
I Attendant QuaMy care is easily
| arranged
5664333
Because of the publication's
relative obscurity, the "China
Factor" did not gain much
prominence until this year, Dr,
Korey says Since January, the
China Factor' has been in-
cessantly repeated and has
become a central element of the
Soviets anti-Zionist campaign."
he asserts
The opening shot was fired by
rasa on Jan. 8. In an English-
language radio broadcast, Tass
declared that China was
preparing to establish diplomatic
relations with Israel, an act
which would demonstrate
"Maoist double-dealing in the
Arab East."
IN AN Arab-language broad-
cast the same day, Radio Moscow
reported that "Peking supports
Israel's demands for annexing
the West Bank, Gaza and the
Golan Heights."
Two weeks later, Dr. Korey
says, the Ukrainian Communist
Youth organ, Komsomolskoye
znamia, claimed that China and
Zionism were intimately linked
by two forces "inherent" in their
ideologies: racism and
domination.
The publication quoted
Chinese Deputy Premier Kong
Piao as having -aid. "What the
Chinese and the Jewish people
have in common is the fact that
their love for their country is
stronger than that of any other
people" and contended that this
constituted "open racism.
Peking was also accused of
"nurturing plans for world
hegemony" while Israel was
charged with "trying to dictate
its will to the neighboring
countries," Dr. Korey reports.
THE SOVIET publication-said
that because the Chinese were
trying to establish close ties with
the United States an issue
placed on the agenda of the U.S.
Congress it was inevitable
that Peking would seek "to
assure for itself the support of the
" lohhv."
Continued from Page 4
capital punishment once made
sense when society affirmed its
belief in the existence of God
institutionally and handed men
who committed heinous crimes
against His divine laws over to
the higher heavenly authorities
to dole out the punishment
because it was His laws that had
been transgressed, not man's,
and the social order was simply
too puny to judge the trans-
gresser. In executing him, it was
not in fact murdering him, only
facilitating the act of meeting his
maker.
Today, argues Camus, when
men are either cynical about the
existence of God or else outright
disbelievers, it is sheer hypocrisy
to usurp the Divine role of
ultimate judgment, for how can
Divine law in fact be Divine when
men no longer affirm the doctrine
of divinity? Execution is hence no
longer a passive role of
facilitating the transgresser's
judgment at the hand of God. It
is a pure act of murder committed
by one man (the state) against
another man.
The transgresser is merely, in
the Camusian view, eliminated
from a social order which pur-
ports to be striving toward per-
fection and will not tolerate
anomalies (criminals) among its
numbers. He is hurled from the
would-be earthly paradise like a
rotten apple from a barrel which
would otherwise also become
infected with the spirit of
transgression.
THIS IS what Spenkelink had
in mind when in his open letter he
referred to execution as an in-
strument of "discrimination .
economic and racial." For who
are the "rotten apples" among us
if not those whom we dis-
criminate against?
The proof of this lies in the
inequity of our penal system at
the hands of which the rich pass
over and through it; the poor
ithose we do not like) are the
main tenants on Death Row.
What is Camus' solution?
Every man has a right to make
"amends" for crimes he has com-
mitted. Execution deprives him
of that right. When Spenkelink
talked about what he learned in
prison, and how much he read, he
was saying that he had made
amends: and one is meant to
believe that he would never have
committed murder in the first
place if he knew what became his
intellectual legacy in prison.
IN THIS, he echoes Camus'
Maquis fighter doomed to
execution by a French under-
ground court during World War
II for betraying his comrades to
the Nazis. Interviewed shortly
before his death, he declared that,
while in prison, he had the oppor-
tunity for the first time in his life
to read the Bible.
And then, says the Maquis
Bghter, if he had read the Bible
long before then, nothing could
have seduced him into betraying
the Maquis. In effect, in prison he
learned to make amends for his
crime.
Understood in these terms,
"Reflections on the Guillotine" is
a complex brief against capital
punishment, which Spenkelink
virtually paraphrased in his open
letter. Like the doomed Maquis
fighter, he too learned to make
amends.
EQUALLY COMPLEX were
Spenkelink's purported last
words: "Man is what he chooses
to be. He chooses that for
himself." In these words is
embodied the fundamental
principle of existential freedom in
the philosophy of Jean-Paul
Sartre.
Here, Sartre argues that
"existence precedes essence,"
meaning that it is senseless to
inquire into a purported human
purpose on earth. That is a meta-
physical question which does not
lend itself to empirical answers.
Rather, we begin with the
given that we exist. This is
empirically demonstrable, and it
requires no argument. Beyond
that is the "essence" of man
his capacity to choose what he
will become. In effect, man is his
own personal God: he has the
power to create himself in his own
image. That, concludes Sartre, is
what it means to be free man's
right to choose his own destiny
which is the meaning precisely
of Spenkelink's last words.
I SAID beforehand that these
philosophical precepts embodied
in Spenkelink's final com-
munications with the outside
world do not square with the
brutal murder he committed
that they are neither the sen-
timents of a murder nor, indeed,
his words.
. ..t ....,,,.. a puraueis to
Camus and Sartre certainly bear
this out, and so the logical
conclusion would seem to be that
Spenkelink was not in fact the
author of his final com-
munications. For obvious
reasons, perhaps his Gainesville
attorney, Susan Cary, wrote
them for him. Or former U.S.
Attorney General Ramsey Clark
did, who worked so hard
in Spenkelink's defense in
Washington.
But we can not discount the
possibility that Spenkelink did
indeed write them himself, which
would mean that Camus is
Correct: man has the right to
make amends, or at least to say
that he has. And that execution
denies him this right.
IN THE end then, capital
punishment is, as I said in the
beginning, a cause and not a case,
going beyond the hysterical face
of a vigil-keeper in Starke, or
even the numb and impassive
visage of Carol Myers.
Spenkelink's execution must
now make us knowledgeable in
the nuances of capital punish-
ment as Spenkelink himself may
well have become when the
hooded monolithic state took his
tooth for a tooth.
Otherwise a man has been
destroyed only in retribution.
] Religious
I Directory
LAUDERDALE LAKES
! OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE
43SI West Oakland Park Boulevard.
i Modern Orthodox Congregation
' Rabbi Saul O. Herman.
EMANU EL TEMPLE. 3425 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi San-
ford M. snapero Cantor Jerome
element
SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu(42).
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER. INC. 804
West Oakland Park Blvd. Conser
vative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy. Cantor
Jack Marchant, and Hv-.Solot_presi
dent.
HfcBREW CONGREGATION OF LAU
DERHILL. 2041 NW 4th Ave., Leu
derhill. Conservative Max Kronith,
president.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER 9106
NW 57th St Conservative. Rabbi Is
reel Zimmerman_144A).
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 4171 Stirling
Rd Orthodox Rabbi Moshe Bomier
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Liberal
Reform Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr (64).
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE
7473 NW 4th St. Hank Pitt, president.
POMPANO BEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Jacob Renzer (4f).
MARGATE
BETH HILLELCONGREGATION. 7*40
Margate Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Joseph Bergles
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 4101
NW etti St. Conservative Rabbi Dr
Solomon Geld. Cantor Max Oallub
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 21S1 Riverside
Drive. Reform. Rabbi Leonard Zoll.
DEERFIELO BEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL.at Century
Village East. Conservative. Rabbi
Oavid Berent <*3).
BOCA RATON
TEMPLE BETH BL, 333 J*l
Avenue. Boca Raton. Rabbi Merle S..
Singer.
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Pi
Page 16
The Jewish Floridiqn of Greater Fort LauderdaU
Friday, June 8
1979
P
R
u
R
R
a
e.
J
J
Who cares?
You don't know Reba.. .or Yacov.. .or Yacl.. .or Nissim.. .or Sara.
Yet they and many others like them look to you: the elderly, the
troubled, the disadvantaged here and overseas.. .thousands of new
immigrants from crisis areas.. .300,000 still trying to get into the
mainstream of creative life in Israel.
i
F
B
la
fu
A
P
b.
VI
T
ai
ol
d.
S
ai
la
All those numbers. All those faceless people.
Does it really matter if the people of Israel are unable to
absorb new immigrants from distressed areas? Won't they
manage somehow?
Does it matter what happens to youngsters cut off from society
because there's not enough money to guide thein and help them?
Won't they grow up anyway?
And what does your gift matter to the aged and the young in
remnant Jewish communities scattered through Eastern Europe,
Asia and Africa? Won't time tell their story?
You Icnou; it matters. It matters in their lives... and inside you. Your
sense of who you are depends on your being part of the Jewish
lifeline reaching around the corner and around the world to the
Rebas, the Yacovs, the Yaels, the Nissims, the Saras.
Make your pledge today to the 1979 campaign. Renew yourself as
you renew Jewish life everywhere.
i
Who cares?
We do. You
l
SupJZ!!'e, GrJ?tor Fort Lauderd*l Jewish Federation's
1979 United Jewish Appeal/Israel Emergency Fund
2999 N.W. 33rd Ave lwrf., f
am**~. ****** **. Florida 33311
. 484-8200
1979
Renewal at Home and Overseas


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