The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00116

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
i*Jewish Florid far
Volume
7 Number 17
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, August 18,1978
Price 35 Cents
mouse Votes to Cut Off
\Economic Aid to Syria
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
I Tk. House of Representative*,
Lhich voted 280-183 to cut off
$90 million in economic aid for
Syria for its attacks on Christian
About 50 amendments to the
appropriations bill, that must be
considered before a final vote,
show no sign of specific reduc-
tions for those three countries,
although the possibility exists
Israelis Meet to Prepare For
Camp David Summit Talks
ON CAPITOL HILL
civilians in Lebanon, continued
U, debate its foreign aid
assiatance hill with little ex-
pectation that Israel, Egypt and
Jordan would be seriously af-
fected by the mood in Congress
to reduce expenditures.
that a proposed eight percent
reduction for the total, which
would affect them, may be
adopted.
THIS PROPOSAL has been
offered by Rep. Clarence Miller
Continued on Page 8
JERUSALEM (JTA> -
The Cabinet met to discuss
what was the beginning of a
series of intensive discussions
to plan for the Camp David
talks Sept. 5.
The meeting dealt with U.S.
National Security Council
member William Quandt s
report to Prime Minister
Menachem Begin on the talks
Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance had with Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat in
Alexandria last week. Quandt
was a member of Vance's
entourage which had met with
Israeli officials.
Holland's War Criminal
Probe Shows Few Missing
U.S. Legal Community Urged:
Act Against the Soviet's
Human Rights Violations
ByHENRIETTEBOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
Among the some 350 Nazi war
criminals listed in the Dutch
investigation register as missing,
only some 10 to 20 are Dutch
nationals. The others are Ger-
mans and Belgians. This was
stated by Prof. Benjamin Sijes of
The Netherlands State Institute
for War Documentation in a radio
| interview
In response to a question
whether the post-war de-
Nazification courts in The
Netherlands had failed, he ob-
served that, after all, these courts
had sentenced 66,000 persons or
one out of every 90 Dutch
nationals who were 20 years and
older at the time.
IN ANOTHER television
documentary it was pointed out
that for the past 20 years The
Netherlands Ministry of Justice
Continued on Page 8
Israeli Sees No Future For
Jews of Eastern Europe
By Barbie ZeUzer-Meyoahaa
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
I The Jewish communities of
[Eastern Europe have no future
pit* the Communist regimes'
I ittempt to improve their plight,
said Dr. Moshe Yaffe. president
Id the Israel Organization of
Synagogues, on his return from a
tour of Jewish East European
| communities.
Yaffe, who visited Czechoslo-
vakia. Hungary, Rumania and
(Poland, spoke at a press con-
ference in Jerusalem last Sunday.
MEETING with repreeen-
I Wives of the local and national
flvernments, including ministers
land different religious leaders,
Yaffe was told that they regarded
the Jews as part of the local
culture and not aa an in-
dependent entity in its own right.
"The most depressing
situation is in Poland, where
there exists only a miserable
remnant of Jewish communal
organization," said Yaffe. Only
after considerable efforts was he
permitted to visit the main syna-
gogue in Warsaw, which he found
to be in a deteriorating and aban-
doned state.
The Jewish community in Ru-
mania seems to be enjoying the
most organized communal life of
the communities in the Iron
Curtain bloc.
By Reena Sigman Friedman
NEW YORK (JTA) A
group of prominent lawyers has
called upon members of the
American legal community to
recognize and take action against
the gross violations of human
and legal rights taking place in
the Soviet Union.
In light of the recent trials of
Soviet Jewish dissidents, the
group, which included two past
presidents of the Bar Association
of the City of New York and
members of a recent delegation of
lawyers to the Soviet Union,
addressed a special session of the
American Bar Association
(ABA) convention at the Hilton
Hotel. The seminar was spon-
sored by the ABA's section on
Individual Rights and Respon-
sibilities and the New York Legal
Coalition for Soviet Jewry. The
Coalition is an affiliate of the
Greater New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry.
ROBERT McKAY, director of
the Program on Justice, Society
and the Individual at the Aspen
Institute of Humanistic Studies,
described his visit to the Soviet
Union last April at which time he
met with Soviet officials, dis-
sidents and Jewish "refuseniks."
Praising the extraordinary
faith of the dissidents in the
power of the law, he said, "It was
clear that our Russian friends
have no idea of what justice is.
They feel that if they could only
find the right Soviet law, they
would have protection against
the exercise of arbitrary
authority."
McKay had introduced the
resolution last Tuesday, which
was adopted unanimously by the
ABA House of Delegates, con-
demning Soviet harassment of
Jews and all other Soviet citizens
who "attempt to exercise their
basic human rights as guaran-
teed by international accords and
Soviet law."
The resolution also called upon
the ABA to establish a com-
mittee on human rights together
with its legal counterparts in the
USSR. The House of Delegates
vote was required to make the
resolution binding.
BEGIN DID NOT disclose
what had been discussed at
the Cabinet session except to
say that the Cabinet will, in
the next three weeks, examine
every document relevant to
the upcoming Camp David
talks where Begin, Sadat and
President Carter will meet
together for the first time.
The Prime Minister also did
not disclose the details of the
report given to him by Quandt.
He did say, however, that the
most important development is
that Sadat agreed to participate
in the summit. Begin said that
Quandt did not indicate whether
Vance will be coming to the
Middle East again prior to the
summit conference, nor is there
any indication of an Israeli-
Egyptian meeting prior to the
Camp David talks.
There had been some in-
dication last week that Vance
would return to the region within
two weeks to help the Egyptians
and Israelis prepare for the
summit.
Meanwhile, speaking on Israeli
television, Israel's Ambassador
to Washington, Simcha Dinitz,
said that the U.S. will not submit
a plan of its own during the Camp
David talks. He said be regards
the U.S. initiative as a renewal of
the momentum in the Mideast
peace negotiations and believes
the U.S. will do its utmost to help
Israel and Egypt come to an
agreement through face-to-face
Religious Leaders Support
The Foreign Aid Package
Theodore M^nn
Carter Will Err If Israel Pressed
To Make Concessions to Egyptians
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
2*R. Mann, newly
?* chairman of the Con-
Jjnce of Presidents of Major
*can Jewish Organize
Addressing a press con-
ference at the Conference
headquarters here, his first
since he assumed office July 1,
Mann charged President
Anwar Sadat of Egypt with
broke off the talks between the
two countries after the recent
foreign ministers' summit
meeting in Leads, England.
Mann said the proper role of the
United States in the Mideast
should be "to bring the parties
77 : declared that the Carter responsibility for the present together not to favor one side
^ministration
serious
Israel
will make "a
error" if it pressed
now to make con-
9 to Egypt in view of
betwee^!1?8* ta negotiations
impasse
the two countries.
deadlock in the Mideast peace
negotiations.
HE SAB) that President
Carter must insist now that
Egypt resume negotiations with
Israel, since it was Sadat who
over the other or impose its own
solution."
He also said that the consensus
among American Jewry, and
CsatktsedeaPsge7
NEW YORK (JTA) A
group of 30 national Jewish
and Christian religious leaders
who met last week for two and
a half hours at the White
House with President Carter
and top administration aides
to express their support for
the foreign aid package before
Congress were scheduled to
hold a similar meeting this
Thursday, according to Rabbi
Marc Tanenbaum, National
Interreligious Affaire director
of the American Jewish
Committee.
Similar meetings over the
next few weeks and months
are being planned, he added.
These meetings may also
include, in addition to Carter,
National Security Advisor
Zbigniew Brzezinski. In
addition, Jewish and Chris-
tian leaders are meeting
in New York to arrange
for conferences with majority
and minority leaders in both
Houses of Congress, Tanen-
baum said, to help assure tne
passage of a maximum foreign
aid bill
ACCORDING to Tanenbaum,
the meetings with Carter and top
administration officials con-
stitute an ongoing dialogue on
the issue of foreign aid and
human rights. He said that when
the President was asked if he was
willing to participate in such a
dialogue the nation's Chief Exec-
utive indicated that he was.
Tanenbaum noted that t.hf
dialogue may be the first of its
kind on a sustained basis bet-
ween administration officials and
religious leaders in the area of
foreign aid and human rights. It
is also unprecedented in that it
represents a broad based effort of
Roman Catholic, Protestant,
Evangelical Christian, Greek
Orthodox, Jewish and Black
religious leaders to support a
foreign aid package which in-
cludes $18.75 billion in economic
and military aid to israel.
The foreign aid appropriations
measure, which has already been
approved by the House and
Senate, with some variations,
must now be reconciled by a
House-Senate conference. The
measure for the fiscal year begin-
ning Oct. 1 may not be finsliied
until after Labor Day.


'no
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale^
Friday. Augmt 18. iOTg
El Al to Fly Out of Miami?
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The United States and Israel
have agreed on a new bilateral
civil aviation agreement that is
expected to result in greatly
expanded air service and lower
passenger fares between the two
countries.
A POTENTIAL stumbling
block the possibility of
Western European airlines
competing in fares with the U.S.
and Israel was resolved when
Israel and the U.S. agreed that a
third country's rate for flights
from the U.S. to Israel cannot be
lower than the matching rate for
U.S. and Israel services.
The agreement, announced at
the State Department after three
weeks of negotiations, replaces
the original 1950 US-Israel
arrangement and its amend-
ments. It will be signed early in
August after Israeli Ambassador
Simcha Dinitz. who headed thr
Israeli delegation in th
negotiations. returns i<>
Washington from the Middle
East talks in England and his
consultations afterward in
Jerusalem.
ACCORDING TO the State
Department, the agreement will
permit airlines of Israel and the
U.S. to operate any number of
charter flights between the two
countries. It also provides El Al.
Israel's national airline, with two
additional gateways into the U.S.
upon the signing of the
agreement and two others a year
after the agreement is in effect.
At present El Al operates only in
New York.
A U.S. spokesman said charter
flights will be available subject
only to conformity with the
charter rule of the country in
which they originate.''
Israel has agreed to lower air
fares by U.S. airlines subject only
to the limitation of a rejection by
the two governments and also
charter airflights from anywhere
in the U.S. to Israel.
Up to now either country could
block a new fare rate and charters
are limited from the U.S. to the
West Coast states of California.
Oregon and Washington.
It has been feared that
European airlines would chop
their fare to capture much of the
traffic.
An Israeli F.mbassy
spokesman welcomed the new
agreement as "very important"
and the most liberal the U.S.
has ever reached with another
country." He said "we are very
pleased to have reached it."
While TWA is now the only
American airline operating to
Israel, the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency was informed that
National Airlines will apply to fly
IX"-10 jumbo jets from Miami to
Tel Aviv via Amsterdam. The
new agreement allows for more
than one U.S. airline to operate to
Israel.
A SPOKESMAN for Sen
Charles Percy (R.. I1I.I who is
credited with being instrumental
School to Operate at New Temple
Plantation Jewish
Congregation nursery school,
under the direction of Rabbi
Sheldon J. Ha it. will operate this
year from the new temple
building at Peters Road near
University Drive in Plantation
Florence Reinstein is director
for early-childhood program.
There will be a five-day morning
program with lunch and after-
noon activities scheduled so
parents can leave children all
day.
Religious school registration
will be held at the temple on Nob
Hill Road. Sunday. Aug. 20 from
10 a.m. to noon.
in bringing about the new
agreement said that El Ala
choice for the first two gateways
will be Los Angeles and Chicago.
The next two to come late in the
summer of 1979 will be Miami
and Boston.
El Al will fly twice weekly
wide-bodied 74" jets between Tel
Aviv and Chicago and los
Angeles no later than April of
next year, the spokesman said.
The Chicago-Tel Aviv flights
will have an intermediate stop in
Montreal while the Los Angeles
service will have either Ixmdon or
Amsterdam as the intermediate
point The Boston-Tel Aviv
flights by 747s will be non-stop.
Miami's flight will originate in
Mexico City and proceed to Tel
Aviv via Lisbon. This will be a
once-weekly service
El AI will not be permitted to
fly passengers locally" between
Mexico City and Miami and
bet ween Los Angeles and
Montreal.
Student Rabbi To
Conduct Services
This Friday. Aug. 18 at 8:15
p.m.. Shabbat services at Recon-
structionist Synagogue in Plan-
tation will be led by Hava Pell, a
student rabbi at Recon-
structionist Rabbinical College in
Philadelphia.
The topic will be "Practical
Reconstructionism."
The synagogue will hold a
membership information tea on
Sunday, Aug. 27.
Applications for membership
and Torah school admission are
being accepted. Information is
available on High Holiday
tickets.
Women's League Sets
Progressive Dinner
Bona\enture chapter oi
Women- League tur Israel will
hold a progressive dinner -
Hawaiian I.uau Sunday. Aug
20 in the homes of Annette I.
Charlotte Goldstein, Lillian
Silitsky, Sylvia BeU, Sue Horo-
witz, and Ruth Sperber
Guests will attend in native
dress. There will be music and
dancing, and a best costume and
best hula contest. Ruth and
Milton Sperber are in charge of
reservations.
From left are workers at recent WECARE Richards Sales
Day, Esther Solomon, chairman, and Phyllis Richman and
Mildred Tell.
Religious School Is inter-
viewing teschert. seddur
Bar / Bat Mitzveh, Junior Con-
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JNF World Chairman On
Three Week Tour of U.S.
NEW YORK (JTAI Moshe Rivlin. world chairman of the
Ipwish National Fund, has srrived in the United States from Israel on
a three-week tour to discuss with friends and supporters of the JNF
specific projects and programs designed to implement the new five-
year plan recently adopted by the JNF.
Rivlin who will visit San Francisco. Seattle. Portland, Loj
\neeles San Diego. Denver, St. Louis. Minneapolis. Baltimore and
New York is in the U.S. in response to an invitation given by Rabbi
William Berkowitz. president of the JNF. when the two leaders
conferred recently in Israel.
THE FIVE-YEAR plan Rivlin will be discussing calls for the
preparation of the sites for 186 new settlements and the reclamation of
40.000 acres of wasteland for intensive agriculture. During the coming
years. 50.000 dunams will be drained and dams will be built to control
flood waters and reservoirs will be constructed to conserve large
amounts of water. In addition, the JNF will break through 2.000
kilometers <>t new roads and will plant new forests over an area of
150.000 dunams.
During his tour. Rivlin will also review the plans for the con-
struction of the Hubert H Humphrey Parkway in the American
Hicentennial Park. This joint American-Israel tribute to a champion of
I mei as announced jointly some days after the Senator's death last
January' bf Rivlin in Jerusalem and by Berkowitz in the U.S. Rivlin
will also discuss current JNF activities in Israel. Upon his return to
New York in mid August, he will participate in a two-day national
staff conference of JN F national and regional directors.
At the same time. Berkowitz and Rivlin will also hold discussion
dealing with the danger points and crises facing world Jewry, as well
as charting new paths JNF will follow in the next decade.
JNF has always been and will continue to be a mass of people-to-
people movement dedicated to the land of Israel. Yet in the days ahead
there is a greater need to broaden the base in the areas of Zionist
information and education, and to create personal contact between
.)vv. so as to reclaim and renew the Jewish soul as well as the Jewish
soil.'' Berkowitz said.
Wills Prepared $18.00
other Legal Services available, including. Divorces.
Adoptions. Incorporations. Real Estate Transactions.
Bruce J. Kirsch, Attorney
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Fri*y
August 18. lg?8
Th* Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
A Generation Later, They Can Relate
To Auschwitz, 4,000 Miles Away
BylRAB.COOPERMAN
OSWIECIM. Poland
45 miles
orr
the
3 northwest of Cracow
N-Tperh-P* 4.000 mdes and
. generation away from the
suburbs of Chicago.
But for a group of Jews who
vjjid here ptace the N-zu.
^called Auschw.U this
concentration camp caused the
^versation to focus on a
FES suburb called Skokie.
T& THE HATRED hu
been enacted largely in words and
threats.
From June 1940 to January
1945. in side-by-side con-
centration camps known as
Auschwitz-Birkenau. four million
humans were murdered by hate
half of them were Jews.
Auschwitz became the largest
Jewish cemetery in the world.
One visiting Jew. wandering
amid its decayed ovens, its
abandoned gas chambers, its
rows and rows of barracks that
all stretched across 25 square
miles of Polish countryside,
talked of his hometown. Skokie.
IN SKOKIE THERE are
about 7.000 survivors of camps
like Auschwitz They rebelled at
the threat made by Frank Collin
and the Nationalist Socialist
Party of America, a small band of
BBC Television Series to Explore
Religious Experiences of the World
The week of Sept. 17 marks the
beginning of the premiere of a 13-
week television series of one-hour
films titled The Long Starch,
which explores religious exper-
iences around the world.
Produced by the British
Broadcasting Company, the
series will air nationally over the
Public Broadcasting Service. The
film series is comparable to two
other BBC-TV series previously
seen over PBS, Sir Kenneth
Clark's Civilization, and
Bronowski's The Ascent of Man.
THE FILM ON Judaism, the
fifth in the series, is scheduled for
broadcast the week of Oct. 15.
Ron Eyre is host-narrator for the
entire series. The film searches
out answers to what it means to
bea Jew
Among those who provide
some insights are writer-educator
Flie Wiesel. Dr. Steven Katz.
associate professor of Religion at
Dartmouth College, and Rabbi
Him-has Peli, a sixth-generation
Orthodox rabbi in Jerusalem.
The Chosen People is both a
primer for the young student and
a philosophical adventure for the
informed viewer. The film delves
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into the Jewish experience as it
relates to the land, people and the
Torah of Israel It does not at-
tempt to explore the variety of
expressions of Jewish belief,
however, there is heavy visual
emphasis on Orthodox Judaism.
The series presents a cross-
section of the world's religions.
neo-Nazis, to march through the
streets of Skokie.
Hitler, too. started with little
marches, the man from Skokie
said.
He was with other represen-
tatives of a study mission to
Kurope for the United Jewish
Appeal
FOR HIM. AS for the others in
the group, the visit to Auschwitz
reinforced a determination to
oppose those who would goose
step in towns such as Skokie.
Auschwitz is a museum now.
established and maintained by
the Polish government. The one-
time theater of death is a still-life.
Tamar Hadassah To
Hold Dessert Party
Tamar Chapter of Hadassah
will hold a dessert and card
party, Thursday, Aug. 24 at
12:30 p.m. at Lauderdale Lakes
City HaU.
Edith Cohen and Ethel
Greenspan are in charge of
reservations.
More than 600,000 people come
to view it each year.
The exhibits are silent. There
are no screams, no cries, no
smells of filth or burning flesh.
But there are pictures, sculp-
tures, monuments and prayers
and tears left behind by some
visitors.
IN WHAT HAD been block 27
there is now a Museum of
History of Jewish Martyrs. It
commemorates the site where
thousands of Jews were im-
prisoned. But only briefly
because once they came to
Auschwitz-Birkenau they had a
life expectancy of no longer than
three mom hs.
There also are exhibits
honoring each of the 28
nationalities whose people were
*lain in the camp, with
inscriptions of the prisoners'
torture and death.
In 1942. Auschwitz contained
28,000 prisoners and Birkenau
housed as many as 100,000.
i WAS TOTALLY wiped out
by the experience ... to see
where the gas came out." a
woman from Dallas said.
I couldn't help thinking that
many who died here would have
been saved if Western nations
had been allowed to enter." a
man from Washington. D.C.,
said.
A young man from Cincinnati
said his visit had made him wish
he could confront the neo-Nazis
in Skokie.
THE COLLIN group now
plans to marclv not in Skokie.
but in Marquette Park in Chicago
on July 9.1
Now that I've seen this." a
man from Los Angeles said. I m
going to stand up and fight d I m
ever threatened."
Another American Jew, from
New York, described hia feelings
on walking from the guardhouse
at the main gate into Birkenau
about a mile into the camp, to the
"selection area" where prisoners
emerged from railroad boxcars.
Healthy ones were marched to
barracks. Others were marched
directly to the gas chambers.
"At the moment," the New
York man said. "I felt that I
touched the people who died; I
felt their deaths. "Before visiting
Auschwitz-Birkenau. the
Holocaust was mostly numbers
tome."
Philadelphia Inquirer
Philadelphia inquirer
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 18,1973
Moscow's 1980 Olympics
We are not surprised by the large number of sporting
enthusiasts who feel there is nothing wrong with holding
the 1980 Olympics in Moscow and who believe that it
would be unsportsmanlike to withdraw the event from one
of the world's capitals of human oppression.
Human rights, the sporting mind somehow manages
to dope out, are a political consideration and should have
nothing to do with the sports arena.
History would seem not to be on the side of the
sporting enthusiasts. The 1936 Olympics in Berlin served
as a propagandists stage to pacify growing world ap-
prehension at the cancer-like tendencies of the Nazi cause.
Adolf Hitler used the occasion to glorify his race of super-
men and to belittle those who saw through the tissue of his
lies.
In 1968, the Olympics in Mexico City became another
propagandistic stage: this time to fight the cause of the
various Black nations of Africa, in the middle of which, we
might add, some Black American athletes intruded them-
selves to the everlasting shame of their countrymen, with
slurs heaped upon their own country, fists raised in alien
salute reminding us of the days of the Italian Fascists,
and refusals to join in the singing of the American
national anthem.
It may not have been an Olympic event, but the first
International Women's Year Conference in Mexico City
after that was surely inspired by these goings-on to raise
the curtain on yet another shocker this time an IWY
resolution equating Zionism with racism.
A Hideous Memory
And who will ever forget the Olympics in Munich,
Germany, in 1972? Was not the slaughter of 11 Israeli
athletes an extra-curricular activity outside the domain of
a sporting event? Or had murder of Jews become a new
and exotic addendum to, say, the Decathlon?
What we find so hideous in this memory is the way in
which the sports aficionados at Munich also pulled their
"fair play" hokum in the argument to ward off cancel-
lation of the '72 Olympiad in memoriam to the Israelis.
The murder was, after all, a political thing, and what
did that have to do with the sports arena?
No Possible Explanation
Comes now Moscow, 1980, and once again we hear the
craven call of the dunce croaking in the land when, two
years before the event, it is already crystal clear just how
desperate Moscow is to clean the arena of all disturbances
before the mass arrival of the gullible tourists.
In the wake of the most recent dissident trials in the
Soviet Union, which underscore that country's hideous
and repeated violations of human rights guarantees as
stated in the Helsinki Final Act. surely the myth that
sports have nothing to do with politics must once and for
all rx- laid to rest.
How is it all possible that the sporting mind remains
dumb to the political implications of sporting events as
oppressor nations engage in them? Not even a Freudian
view of sports as a surrogate for war can explain the
compulsion.
Super
Sales Day
Proclaimed
Over 300 volunteers par-
ticipated in the 1978 VVECARE
Richards Day, which Sally
Fridovich, chairman, has termed
"extremely successful."
Thousands of shoppers milled
through the plaza to take ad-
vantage of items reduced in price
for the one day. There were
booths sponsored by the Jewish
Community Center, Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, Hebrew Day School,
Lauderhill Police and Fire De-
partment, Gateway Travel
Agency, as well as booths for
checking blood pressure and
blood type, and Tay Sachs
disease.
Performances were given by
the "Chosen Children" group,
"Century Village Choraleers,"
"Castleaires" and by syndicated
cartoonist Fred McCarthy. The
Fort Lauderdale Strikers made a
special appearance.
Murder Stories
Get Scrutinized
The afternoon literary study
group of West Broward chapter
of Brandeia University National
Women's Committee will discuss
three murder mysteries by author
Edgar Allen Poe, on Tuesday
Aug. 22 at 1 p.m. Study group
leader Linda Green will lead
analysis and discussion.
The meeting will be held at the
home of Mrs. Green in Plan-
tation.
Special Israel Mission
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
Mission Dates: Nov. 26-Dec. 6.
}
At the opening of WECARE Richards Super Sales Day wen
(left to right! Mrs. Bernard Libros, Women's Division chair-
man; Leo Goodman, Federation president; Sally Fridovich,
WECARE Day chairman; Dick Basile, Richards vice president
Face-to-Face Talks Resume
JERUSALEM (JTA) Former Prime Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin and Former Foreign Minister Abba Eban used the
opportunity of the last day of the Knesset summer session to
resume direct talks.
The two statesmen, whose relations have not been amiable
ever since Eban served as Foreign Minister and Rabin served as
Ambassador to Washington, were engaged in a busy con-
versation in the Knesset cafeteria. The two have reportedly
hardly exchanged a word ever since Rabin ignored Eban when
he formed his government in 1974.


Yiddish Paper
Drops Edition
NEW YORK (JTA| The
Jewish Daily Forward announced
in its Aug. 6 edition that as of
Aug. 14 it will publish five days a
week instead of six because of
economic reasons.
The Yiddish-languagi' news-
paper which now publishes
Sunday through Friday, will drop
its Monday edition The paper
has had financial diffkultiet bi
years and recently has appealed
to its readers lor aid.
The announcement in the Alia
fi edition was signed bj Maurice
F'etrushka. president" o( ;he
Forward, Harold Oatroff, aural
manager, and Simon \\
editor
Having A Party?
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can show you how to turn your
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' cJewish Floridian
OF GREATER FORTLAUDERDALE
Business Office! 38 S Federal Hwy Suite 20 llama Fla 3300)
Telephone BSD 8018
PREDK BHOCHET |l /a.NNK >H,>CHET
hdilur and Publisher Executive Editor
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kaihruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Second Class Postage Paid at Danla. Fla 42u
Published BIWeekly
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate
Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association, American Association oi
English Jewish Newspapers,and the Florida Press Association
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year S7 SO
Out o T*r '"oon Request
Friday, August 18.1978
Volume 7
15 AB 5738
Number 17
Ida Nudel Begins Serving Sentence
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Greater New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry has reported that
Ida Nudel has been sent to a
village near Tomsk. Siberia, to
serve her four-year sentence of
internal exile. She is working
there as an economist for the
state agricultural fund.
Nudel, "the guardian angel" of
the Soviet Jewry movement, was
charged with malicious hooligan-
ism for hanging a banner out of
her apartment window and for
demonstrating in Moscow.
Vladimir Slepal. also sentenced
to internal exile in June, has
arrived at his punitive placement
in Chita Oblast, in the far east
of the USSR, the Conference
reported.
The Conference also reported
that Ida Milgram has received a
letter from her son, Anatoly
Sharansky, most of which was
meant for his wife, A vital.
CONTEMPORARY HOUSE
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2 blocks N. ol Commercial BIwJ.
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90-6:30
Evanlngs by appointment
Stan Soffer, President


rAogutl8,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
enty-six Year Old Appointed As
toithwest U JA's Campaign Rep.
Rothschild, of Dalles
"l- joined the staff of
ftewlh Appeal as canv
representative m the
est region
.^ of Isidore Zismer,
J^f the Isidore Ziamer
^L Zionist Organization
*J,, Rothschild is a past
J^nan and currently a
"Tn New Dimensions, a
fofV Jewish Federation
Bter Dallas.
WANT TO MAKE the
communities in the
Lest region feel like a part
L national and international
communities,'' Rothschild states,
"and thereby have a more
fraternal sense, together with a
sense of greater strength."
An in-depth education of the
work and services of United
Jewish Appeal, and a substantial
increase in individual and
community pledges are other
personal goals of Rothschild's, he
says.
Rothschild was formerly an
assistant account executive for
Rose Saginaw Advertising, and
was a part-time announcer and
Interim Programming Director
for WRR-FM, radio in Dallas.
Prior to that, he was public
relations and promotion coor-
dinator for a community radio
station in Dallas.
IN 1974. Rothschild served as
office coordinator for the State
Legislative District Office for
Michigan State Legislator Perry
Bullard. In 1975, he was
assistant media coordinator for
the Austin mayoral campaign of
Jeff Friedman.
Rothschild earned a bachelor of
arts degree in political science
from the University of Michigan,
and did graduate work in com-
munications at the University of
Texas at Austin.
*v
I
I

'*3fl <3>^l
j j ^BL i mk
it ^^ .
ti **F
i i L ^ 4j^sJ
State of Israel
By BETTY KIMMEL
Israel, oh Israel, a desert full of sand,
For courage, great effort and the best of irrigation was made
into a fairyland.
The most exotic flowers,
Man-made waters, without the help of rain and without the help
of showers.
Through suffering and through pain
We, the Jews of America shall never let this effort be in vain.
Until you see it, it is hard to visualize,
A people doing so much and yet so small in size.
And now a little bit about the unbelievable Six-Day War.
Tiny little Israel, small as small can be,
For courage and heroism has been making history.
When Nasser decided to drive the Israelis into the sea,
He filled our hearts with terror,
He made an awful error.
He did not calculate until it was too late
That Israel, although small in numbers.
Alert little Israel never slumbers
And will always be a state.
In six days they showed the world what Israel can do.
And now all nations have learned to respect the Jew.
Even mighty Russia, if you please,
Could not get Israel down on her knees.
They fought with herculean power.
Tiny little Israel, the bravest nation of the hour.
Once more our hearts are burdened, our eyes filled with tears.
Our people have suffered throughout the years.
Dear God listen to our plea:
All we want is our homeland and to be free!
HrlSTEf,
'RKEftSl
Homemade
Authentic
Streudel
(Apple-Cheese)
1 Outreach Program of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale helped celebrate
f 47sf birthday of Joanne Wexler recently at her home in Tamarac. Miss Wexler has been a
\tim of muscular dystrophy since childhood. At the party are (from left) Beatrice Snyder,
iris. Hubert Wexler, Dorothy Kaye. Jeri Ulanoff, and (seated) Joanne Wexler. Outreach
wman Adele Jacobs arranged for the volunteers to take part in the celebration.
ibbiSchenk to Lead High Holiday Services
|ix (ohr. president of
Beth Israel, has an-
thal Rabbi Kmanuel
fnkwtll lead High Holy Day
H Inverrary Country
Nada'8 Specialties
3433 Griffin Rd. / Ft. Lauderdale, Ra. 33312
(306)961-5343

I erved a Brook-
congregation and now is
Rabbi Emeritus. He has con-
ducted services for Temple Beth
Israel for the past five years
Assisting Rabbi Schenk will be
Cantor Sol Schwartz who has
also been affiliated with Temple
Beth Israel over the past tew
irs.
The
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PageS
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Leuderdale
Frkiy.Augm
18.
Ancient Jewels Are Turned Into
Fashionable Look for Today's Lady'i
By SYBIL ZIMMERMAN
What would be your reaction if
you were to find some Bedouin
beads, a Persian pendant or a
Moroccan amulet? If you were
She haunts the bazaars in the Old
City of Jerusalem for pieces of
Bedouin silver, amber amulets or
actual old jewelry.
SHE THEN takes them back
WORLD OF ART
Sarah Einstein, formerly of New
York but in Israel since 1973, you
would be very excited.
Almost since her arrival, Sarah
has been collecting and acquiring
old pieces of jewelry and re-
designing them with a fashion-
able look which is attractive to
the woman of today.
SARAH'S jewelry is carried
primarily by Maskit and other
exclusive shops. Attached to
each piece is a silver or bronze
charm with her initials, a shin
and an aleph. as a mark of
distinction.
"Finding these materials is like
digging up a small part of the
history of the Jewish people.
These pieces were handmade by
craftsman as a labor of bve. They
could come from any part of the
Jewish world but they have all
found their way to Israel. That's
why they symbolize, to me per-
sonally, a kind of ingathering of
the exiles. When people buy these
pieces, even though they have
been reworked to fit more modern
styles, they are buying a small
part of the history of Israel."
Sarah makes earrings and
necklaces as well as pendants.
to her home, and. working with
her assortment of beads, chains
and other miscellaneous bits and
pieces, she slowly and laboriously
begins to create a new piece.
"I try to preserve their authen-
ticity by recreating the style and
period from which they originally
came. I give old jewelry a modem
look without taking away the
history. I also do research, and
consult books to make sure that
my designs are authentic."
When Sarah sells her jewelry
privately, she is able to give the
customer a card explaining the
history and origin of the pieces as

Arab Held on Suspicion Of
Setting Off Bomb in Market
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTAI Sulei
man Abu Ra'adan, 17, of Khan
Yunis. in the Gaza Strip, was
ordered held for 10 days by a Tel
Aviv magistrate on suspicion of
being the person who set off the
bomb in the Carmel Market here
last Thursday morning, which
killed one person and injured 50.
Sixteen of the injured were still
in the hospital Sunday, two of
them reported in critical con-
dition. Funeral services were held
Friday in Bat Yam for Meir
Rot man, 73, who died of the
injuries suffered in the blast.
A FEW hours after the blast,
the Israel Air Force attacked ter-
rorist bases in Lebanon north of
the Litani River. The chief target
was the Dahr el-Tutah base and
training camp, eight miles south
of Sidon. which Israeli sources
said is a springboard for terrorist
Someone
hospitalized?
Bring
them home
-tons.
Wengaraaun at how m oWan
and irtooem and
nome patient wttti a rugn'v
qualified RN. LPU. Aids o-
Mandant OuaNycaraaeftsty
566-4333
The Municipal Bond People'
HHalpert,
Oberot
and
Company
list C. Hallaadata Baecfc aiv*
SaMaaM
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HllltMiltliMIII
Fart l.iadardalt o;-fin
OadeCa.M*-UU
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Direction of
lare j Neteaew, V. Prat.
tPevtaL. Ceaibe. V. Prat.
attacks on Israel.
The base is completely made
up of terrorists and is isolated
from the civilian population.
Ra'adan, who worked in a
vegetable store in the Carmel
Market, was among 100 Arabs
who were picked up shortly after
the blast. All the others were
released after police used
chemical sniffers, whkh are able
to detect traces of exoloaivw* on a
person. Police said that Ra'adan
had traces of explosive material
on his hands.
THE YOUTH told Magistrate
Yehoshua Diamant that he was
working in the vegetable store
when he heard people shouting
and went out to see what was
happening. He said his employer
called him back and as he was
returning he was arrested. But
the magistrate said he received
two classified reports from the
police which said there waaprima
facie evidence that Ra'adan was
connected with the explosives.
Police said the bomb, which
was placed beneath an underwear
stand, was in a plastic bag. The
bomb itself was encased in a tin
can filled with a large amount of
metal scraps and nails which
increased the casualties and
destruction caused by the ex-
plosion.
By Friday morning the Carmel
Market looked as if nothing had
happened. However, it was more
crowded than usual since many
sightseers came to look at the
j scene of the destruction.
Sarah Einstein demonstrating one of her creations
We're Bock!
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COMPLETE MEN'S & LADIES
ALTERATIONS IN ADDITION TO
DRY CLEANING
Stop by to say Hello to "Shirley"
1978 ^v y 5739
templevemanu-el
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
high holy 6ay services
MAIN SERVICES: (REFORM)
PARKER PLAYHOUSE i
FT. LAUDERDALE
ROSH HASHANAH. OCT. 1,2
KOL NIDRE, VOM KIPPUR, OCT. 10,11
CONDUCTED BY:
RABBI; OR. SANPORD SHAPERO
and CANTOR JEROME KLEMENT
For All Seating &
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CALL: MR. MORRM WATKINS. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
TEMPLE EMANU-EL 731-2310 |
COMMUNITY SERVICES
TEMPLE EAAANU-EL
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3245 W. OAKLAND PARK BLVD.
ROSH HASHANAH. OCT. 1 2 3
KOL NIDRE. YOM KIPPUR. OCT. 10.11
CONDUCTED BY:
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CANTOR JENO FRIEDMAN
ALL SEATS
DONATION $25 per person
9 A.M. TO 5 P.M. MON.TOFRI. \ ZTT '*"'""'
3246 w. Oakland park blvd. AT TEMPLE EMANU-EL SANCTUARY
ALLSCRVICES UNDER PERSONAL DIRECTION Of RABBI: DR. SANFORD SHAPERO
far as she can tell. At one point,
she took a job selling jewelry in a
shop which carried her jewelry
and other genuine antique pieces
so she could learn how to choose
pieces of good quality and how to
distinguish between copies and
real antique pieces.
"ONCE IN a while you find
real old amulets, spice holders or
other very old pieces. But there
are lots of copies. After all. how
many original old things can
there be?"
What does Sarah do with the
pieces she finds? In one of the
examples she showed me. a dark
brown amber choker is mixed
with pale orange agate (hundreds
of years oldl and handmade
filigree silver Bedouin beads.
Hanging in the center is a ham-
mered silver Persian tube.
Sarah's most popular style is
one made of soft, delicate, thin
coral pieces mixed with Egyptian
hexis beads of turquoise and -
beige. In the center is usually a J
gold or silver filigree piece from
Persia or Yemen.
THE GREATEST problem
Sarah has is finding authentic
pieces. Fewer and fewer pieces
are finding their way to Israel.
Sometimes it is very painful to
sell a necklace which has a par-
ticular piece because you know
you might never find another
piece like it again."
One of the most interesting
pieces Sarah has found was a
copy of an amulet with Hebrew
letters engraved on it that i_
could read. "We discovered |
when someone was going ,
voyage, it was customary u>j
them an amulet for good
Often the craftsman cou_
read; all he knew was wordsf
the Bible. So he would
letters at random
meaning and engrave them i
the amulet." ivmii
CHINE S( PERSIAN CAUCASIAN
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3 TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
bbt Barnard Oo4d c,n|<>, ^ SchmMU
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FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND
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, TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
'100 West Oakland Park Blvd
Sunnsa. Florida, 33313


,A|B*18'
1978
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
fatikva Now Really Means Hope
Reading Method Gets Results
facilities
rate.
or the school dropout
-,*# Hebrew Press
i Israel
in j
vAo, A new method of
JJtioduced in the schools
Uertv stricken Hatikva
rE given excellent
i in the year
1977.
Ltisticsofthehducation
t of Tel Aviv Munici-
"fcr the 1976 77 school
wed that four percent of
/, pupils did not know
:ad and 22 percent were
-y good at reading. In
,Tel Aviv the percentage
entering second grade
We difficulties in reading
|16 percent.
while in the
llatikva quarter the percentage
was twice as high 32 percent.
Lack of progress in the later
grades is traceable largely to this
deficiency.
A GROUP of five teachers and
educators attacked the problem
vigorously during the past school
year, under the direction of
supervisor Yehuda Oren. Nira
Altalef. an adviser in the middle
grades, developed new teaching
methods in five first grade
classes in three schools in the
llatikva quarter and in Kfar
Shalem. Several new educational
techniques were used. Teacher
Yehuda Perach taught reading
one month and writing the next
aditional Moralists Are
riking With Counterblow
the 'Swinging Lifestyle'
ByTOMTUGEND
donChromcIv Syndicate
ornia
[swinging life of Southern
and the sexual
of its Hollywood
._ have fueled the fan-
i of generations of tabloid
n, but now the upstanding
is striking a counter-
[for traditional morality.
organization billed as
dwide K mounter" has
unced a Walk for Mar-
de during which the
I ranks of 1 .(XX) anticipated
rs will affirm their "belief
age and strong family
TRIE Los
fm. the parade
Angeles
will be
ned by a mariachi and other
i. and platoons representing
I'Cathnlir. Jewish Lutheran,
dist and F.piscopalian
have bean asked to
| around ihe banner. As the
promise the
all the marching
I will be in\ ited to join in a
renewal ol their wedding
silily. but unlikely, the
planner* were driven to
Religious
(Directory
LAUDERDALE LAKES
*HA\ RAPHAEL TEMPLE.
' "rest Oakland Park Boulevard.
.i. ^T0*" Congregation.
'fcuiD Herman
i pb J,EMPLE' MM w Oak-
IPark Biva Reform. Rabbi San
1 snapero Cantor Jerome
SUNRISE
BtaaVfb TEMPLE. 7100 W.
^"n Cantor Maurice Neu (42).
, Rdbbl Albert N. Troy -Jack
IEJ* CONGREGATION OF LAU
PHILL, !W1 NW h Ave., Law
""r conservative. Max Kronish,
*ent
??*5 JEWISH CENTER. 9104
"m si Conaervatlve. Rabbi l-
nimmerman_l44A).
K 'SRAEL OF HOLLYWOOO
I nJ: UDERDALE "< Stirling
orthodox Rabbi Moane Bomier
1 PLANTATION
RATION JEWISH CONGREGA
** S Nob HIM Rd Liberal
xaobi Sheldon J Harr (44).
"STRuctionist Synagogue.
n St Steve Tlachaer,
NW
POMPANO BEACH
T%rvMU2M '" SE ,Wh *"
C j^0Rabb' MorrltA. Shop.
"Jacob Renar (4)
MARGATE
rauUE,LCON WiL^ Conservative. Rabbi
**> Bergiat
PiVrE*ISH CENTER. 4101
n t Conatrvatlve. Rebbi Or
& cantor Max Gallub
>lc ^RAL SPRINGS
hBetfrm PRR' 7,S' '"'Ma
'rl? ">*'Leonard Zoll
P EaERF'ELD BEACH
!*, tVtH iSRAEL Century
" Conaervatlve. Rabbi
action by two sets of statistics
published in obscure journals.
One was a recent survey on the
marital status of the faculty and
staff at the University of
California. Los Angeles. To the
customary categories of
"married" and "single." the sur-
veyors were forced to add a third
category of "others" for 974
respondents. The cold statistics
unfortunately do not detail
whether the 974 are cohabiting in
old-fashioned sin with a member
of the opposit sex, have joined
communes.
THE inevitable Jewish angle is
supplied by Prof. Fred Massarik.
head of the National Jewish
Population Study, who reports
that among all American Jewish
families, eight percent of the
heads of households are single
parents. In close to half of these
households, the single parent is
19 years old or younger
To sexual traditionalists and
innovators alike, however, the
primary topic in Los Angel.-, ia
the skyrocketing lost of housing.
\n unusually impressive
example is a current advertise-
ment for Oakhurst Terrace in
Beverly Mills, which is offering
The Largest and Most
Luxurious Condominiums in the
World."
Apartments are for sale with
three to seven bedrooms, and
from 5,000 to 10,000 square feet
in size, and ceilings ranging up to
17 feet.
Wealthy Americans with a
likely scattering of Iranian, Arab
and Japanese tycoons can
snap up these bargains for
$750,000 to $1,650,000, allowing
them as the irresistible sales
slogan has it "to remain in the
lifestyle you are accustomed to.*'
Bar Mitzvah
ROBERT MAYROV1TZ
Robert MayroviU. son of Dr.
and Mrs. Harvey MayroviU, will
be called to the Torah aiabir
Mitzvah at Plantation Jewish
Congregation Temple Kol Ami
on Saturday. Aug. 19 at 10:30
a.m.
In honor of the occasion. Dr.
and Mrs. MayroviU will sponsor
the Oneg Shabbat following
regular Shabbat services Friday.
Aug. 18.
ALLISON ROTH
Allison Roth, daughter of
Mark and Kupie Roth, wdl
celebrate her Bat Mitrvah on
month by using printed letters,
the way a typesetter uses them in
a printing shop. Educator Zip-
porah Katz developed reading
through didactic games, which
emphasize the visual side of
reading; this technique was used
only with children who en-
countered serious difficulties and
had to be handled individually.
In the Amiel School in the
llatikva quarter children learned
to read well in four months, and
three-quarters of them were
reading fluently and enjoyed
reading not only in class, but also
at home with books from the
school library. The progress
made in reading helped the
children in all subjects, even
arithmetic.
The project was organized in
cooperation with the parents,
who were guided in using
children's books and didactic
games. The results were sur-
prisingly good. Out of 105
children in the five experimental
classes, 80 were reading fluently
even before Passover; the other
25 children mastered reading by
the end of the school year. More-
over, the children began to like
reading, and now they are often
the "pioneers" in their families
and prompt their parents to read.
YEHUDA ORON and Nira
Altalef are now hoping to intro-
duce their method into other
schools. They also intend to
continue working with their
pupils who are now in the second
grade, teaching them or-
thography and self-expression.
This will require training ad-
ditional teachers to join the
original five. It is not easy to find
experienced teachers who are
eager to teach first grade pupils.
This experimental project for
teaching reading and writing in
the first grade of the poorest
quarters of Tel Aviv will con-
siderably improve the effective-
ness of elementary school
education and will benefit Israeli
education in general.
Katamon A Key
To Project Renewal
IHAARETZ) The model for
the social policy of the Ministry
of Labor and Social Welfare is
Katamon, an immigrant quarter
in Jerusalem. It grew out of an
experiment begun two years ago.
At that time the present Absorp-
tion Minister. David Levy, was
still a Knesset member of the
Opposition.
This approach was based on
the history of research in Israel
on problems of poverty, which
demonstrated that the solution of
a single problem such as
housing does not extricate dis-
tressed families from the poverty
cycle. All problems must be
treated simultaneously. One
cannot, for example, separate
crowded conditions from
illiteracy and juvenile crime, or
income problems from day care
WITH THE limited budget at
their disposal, the people who
carried out this project con-
centrated on practical guidance
for Katamon residents. Thirteen
adults, for example, learned how
to make repairs in plumbing,
electricity, carpentry, etc. Eleven
Katamon women learned how to
plan their budgets and to save
expenses. Social workers per-
suaded many residents to buy
products wholesale before any
holiday and thereby save some
expenses.
Bit by bit, pockets of pride
began to form within the pockets
of poverty, and in some cases
initiative replaced apathy and
some residents became vocal
w here they had been silent.
When the short-term exper-
iment ended, the groundwork had
been laid for a bolder, sweeping,
more imaginative program which
would reach thousands rather
than handfuls and for which,
at least in cameo, some residents
of distressed neighborhoods were
encouraged and prepared to par-
ticipate actively.
THE TIME was right for
Project Renewal, and its outreach
to 160 "KaUmon8" throughout
Israel.
The Trial Goes On
(MAARIV) The names
change, the lies employ slightly
altered words, and the charges
vary a little but the trial of
Jew as Jew the "legal" attack
on all Jews goes on and on,
across boundaries, spanning
decades and even centuries.
Remember the Dreyfus Trial in
Paris at the end of the past
century? Sixty-five years ago the
Beiliss Trial, with its "blood
libel," shook the Jewish world,
and everybody was afraid that
the five million Jews in Russia
would pay for it. Both were even-
tually vindicated, but the Trial of
the Jew went on.
Sharansky's trial in Moscow
all too painfully reminded the
Jews of the world of the Doctors'
Trial during the Stalin era, and
revived the sense of threat
against millions of Russian Jews.
Betrayal of the father-land" was
the official charge against
Sharansky. "Betrayal of Man-
kind" would be more appropriate,
with the accuser standing as the
accused. The ultimate vin-
dication of the Jew on trial as
Jew will be the end, at last, of the
long, long trial.
'> TttflBr on.
With Bill King, Jewish War Veterans Post Commander are
Sally Fridovich (center), WECARE Day Chairman; and Lee
Shainman (right), special projects chairman.
Politician Resigns When Accused Of
Sentencing German Sailors to Death
BONN UTA) Hans
Fiblinger. one of West Ger-
many's most influential
politicians and a prime candidate
for the country's presidency, has
resigned as Prime Minister of the
State of Baden Wuertenberg.
Fiblinger had been accused of
having strictly applied the Nazi
criminal code by sentencing to
death young German sailors sus-
pected of wanting to surrender.
The 64-year-old conservative
politician told a press conference i
here that he had been "the
subject of character assas-
sination." H said irresponsible
elements had "smeared" his past
end thus forced him to resign.
Stuttgart Mayor, Manfred
Rommel, son of Third Reich
Marshal Erwin Rommel, is
generally
Fiblinger.
slated to succeed
BHBJpjjJBM I

CANDLELIGHTING
Carter Will Err if Israel Pressed To
Make Concessions to Egyptians
IEVITT
I.
tf!t Pem*re*e MS.
HeliyweeS. Fie
Senny Levin, P.O.
UJSIW. DiMieMwy
Nertti Miami. FU
944-41M
I
other segmenU of
society, is that Sadat has not
shown a commitment to continue
with negotiations and, therefore,
the Carter Administration must
urge the Egyptian leader to
resume the peace process.
But, Mann said, in response to
a question, that his feeling is that
the administration does not favor
any side in the Mideast and at
Saturday, Sept. 2 at 10:30 am. at present is playing the role of a
"wwkmT
Plantation Jewish Congregation
in the new building on Pet*
Road.
In honor of the occasion, the
family will sponsor the Oneg
Shabbat on Friday. Sept. 1.
mediator. He said that he an
ticipates that relations between
American Jewry and the ad-
ministration "will be good in
months to come, although he
noted he was aware that there
Continued from Pag* 1
American were some "negative" feelings
after the Mideast package plane
deal providing Egypt, Israel and
Saudi Arabia with American war
planes.
MANN recalled that in suc-
cessfully pressing for Con-
gressional approval of jet fighter'
sales to Egypt and Saudi Arabia
in May. Carter had argued that
sending arms to these two
countries would support the
forces of "moderation" in the
Middle East and promote the
cause of peace. "But the
assurance of American arms has
hardened the Egyptian and Saudi
position." Mann declared.
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
OMKTOftS
mil musxx m hows liny
1283 COM Y ISUN0 AM KlYN N Y
212/776-8100
DAM COUNTY 133SS W BW MWY
9*17-11 85 Rw Mm, ln# 10
BN0V4UW COUNTY 1921 PCMBROM RO
925-2743 *** n* jo
PAIM BtACM COUNTY w okiichom i at o
1-925-2743 RtvDfPWMiiw >o
Semen avaiatk com
munrnei m to* Ybfh and ihrouqnoui
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j


Page 8
TSSfSw
House Votes to Cut Off Aid
Continued from Page 1
(R., Ohio). Another proposal,
which would drop $584 million
from the International Develop-
ment Bank and the Inter-
American Development Bank,
proposed by Rep. Clarence Long
(D., Md), also is to be con-
sidered.
Money bills require two legis-
lative steps. The authorization
measure, adopted in the House
by 255-156, sets the ceilings and
policy on foreign aid. This pro-'
vides $785 million for Israel in
economic and military assistance.
4 II 1 I similar to those in the
authorization measure adopted
by the Senate last week also are
slated in the House measure for
Egypt, Syria and Jordan.
Both the authorization and
appropriation bills must be
reconciled by the House and
Senate and signed by the
President before they are law.
Thus the cutoff of Syria awaits
hurdles in the Senate and the
White House.
THE AMENDMENT to
suspend economic aid to Syria for
the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1
was introduced by Edward
Derwinski (R., 111.). In in-
troducing his amendment, the
lawmaker declared: "The
massacre and forced migration of
Christians in Lebanon is a moral
and legal shame that calls for
condemnation and action by the
United States and the world
community."
Opponents of the Derwinski
measure said the cut would move
Syria deeper into the Soviet orbit
and upset the Middle East
balance. Rep. David Obey (D.,
Wis.) said it would embarrass the
new U.S. Ambassador to Syria,
who was presenting his creden-
tials and damage U.S. attempts
at settlement negotiations. Syria
has steadfastly attacked Egypt
and has refused to consider nego-
tiations with Israel.
During the debate on the
Derwinski measure, Rep.
Jonathan Bingham (D., NY)
suggested cutting aid to Syria in
halT to $45 million. He thought
total aid elimination would be
"too drastic." Reflecting the
anger at Syria, the House
rejected the Bingham proposal
more than silence."
However, the Carter Adminis-
tration reacted to the over-
whelming vote against economic
aid to Syria by asserting that it
will continue to fight for U.f.
Holland's War Criminal
Shows Few Missing
AMERICAN SCENE
by a two-to-one margin, 78-38.
Bingham did not ask for a roll
call. In the end he voted for the
Derwinski measure. Stephen
Solarz (D., NY) voted against it.
EARLIER, BINGHAM
released a letter he and 43 other
House members had sent to
President Carter urging him to
speak out forcefully against the
Syrian onslaught. They urged the
President to work through the
United Nations or independently
to see that the "indiscriminate
shelling of Beirut stops." In their
letter to the President, the
Congressmen said that the
Administration's statements on
the Lebanon situation "have
been either excessively oblique or
marked by an extraordinary and
misplaced even-handedness."
The letter added: "In the
matter of the flagrant violations
of the rights of the Christian
Lebanese, there has been little
funding to the Damascus govern-
ment.
"THE ADMINISTRATION
continues to believe strongly that
there should be a security
assistance program for Syria,
State Department spokesman
Hodding Carter said. "As we
made clear in our presentation to
Congress, Syria plays an im-
portant role in the Middle hast
and the U.S. relationship with
Syria is an important part of our
policy toward the Middle East."
Carter said the Administration
would continue consultations
with Congress on the aid bill and
"urge that Congress appropriate
funds for this program." He
would not comment on the letter
sent to the President by the 44
House members.
has not conducted
policy regarding the in-
vcstigation of missing war
criminals and has only reacted to
tips received from others.
Prof. August D. Belinfante,
who is completing research on tha
Dutch de-Nazification after the
war. admitted that the more
lenient policy regarding former
Nazis coincided more or less with
the succession to the throne of
Queen Juliana in 1948.
Her mother, the late Queen
Wilhelmina who had ruled during
the German occupation of The
Netherlands when she was in
exile in London, had taken a very
strong stand against Nazis.
HER DAUGHTER, Queen
Juliana, had wanted to be more
merciful and in certain cases had
refused to sign death sentenoaa.
In particular, the Roman
Catholic Minister of Justice, the
late Anton Struycken, had ad-
vocated a policy of mercy. A total
of 145 death sentences had been
pronounced, of which only 40 had
been executed, mostly during the
CooUauad from Page 1
an active
firat years of the wirj
Meanwhile, tfc
Organization of _
Resistance Groups!
a meeting with Dutcl
Justice Jacob de
August 23 in order L
conduct more active!
regard to the search,
Dutch war criminals!
The organization
peed in this mau.
because by the end i
Germany will deck.
past the statute of I
w* suggest .'(1 tL
Justice Ministry m
wanted Dutch warl
West German auth
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