The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00104

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
WJemSt
wnaiiaim
OF GREATER FORT JLAUDffftDALff
Ime 7 Number 5
Fort l.auderdale. Florida Friday. March 8, 1978
Price 35 Cents
bbaEban to Discuss
[Middle East Peace
M Eban's forthcoming
here on Sunday, April 23
Irker Playhouse under the
es of the Jewish Com-
Center "is rapidly
^g up as a sell-out event," it
ported earlier this week by
}oldstein, JCC executive
former Israel Foreign
it and Ambassador to the
States and United
is will appear here in
tion with the JCC's
klion of Israel's 30th an-
appearance will touch off
p-week series of events
[.)('(' auspices that will
fie on Sunday, May 7 in
Park. Chief among the
events will be an ap-
te that day by actor-folk
Theodore Bikel at 3 p.m. in
lorial Auditorium.
Is lecture will take place
ll'assover and was noted
istein as "particularly
hate to the Israel
ience Day theme of
|d freedom."
[in South Africa, Khan
rated at Cambridge Uni-
ifhere he specialized in,
' taught. Hebrew, Arabic
Han literature. His con-
nth political work in
in during World War
be went to Jerusalem as
fficer of Allied llead-
Ui the Jewish
LSK was to secure the
of Jewish volun-
special and dangerous
jr the Allied Forces in
[Fast and Furope. He
in Israel after the war.
lie service of the Jewish
[1946
a member of the
[which secured the vote
of the UN General Assembly in
favor of the establishment of
Israel.
In 1958, he returned to Israel
to become president of Israel's
center of scientific research the
Weizmann Institute. He also was
Abba Eban
elected to the Knesset as a
member of the Mapai Party.
Shortly afterwards he became
Minister of Education and
Culture in the Ben-Gurion
government. In the summer of
1963. when I.evi Fshkol became
I'rime Minister. Eban was named
Deputy Prime Minister. He was
named Foreign Minister in 1965.
WIDELY known as a scholar,
writer and lecturer. Eban has
written numerous works on Near
Fastern Affairs, including a
history of the Jews entitled My
People.
The subject of his lecture here
will be Prospects for Peace in
the Middle East: Fantasy or
Keality?"
Tickets may be purchased
through the Mail Order Depart-
ment of the JCC.
an Rights Document
is Israel, Praises Sadat
5PHPOLAKOFF human rights in 105
; IN GTON countries receiving U.S. aid
The State De- in some form gave Israel a
s second annual mixed review while issuing
Congress on Continued on Page 5
essman Burke Says Israel
;s Threats at Bargain Table
fcel's security can be and is being threatened at the
^k>n table as much as it is by military build-up of the
^rabs by the Soviets."
view was expressed by Congressman J. Herbert Hurke
rr to constituents dated Feb. 3 following his return from
i-nation Middle East study mission as a member of the
International Relations Committee.
THOUGH the news media has repeatedly portrayed
Prime Minister Menachem Begin as a hardliner, in my
the Arabs are the hardliners. On balance. Israel
Is for secure borders does not seem hardline at all and
hope and pray that peace can be worked out in the
East. I do not think that it is possible at this time."
ieclared.
fp Hurke. a Republican, visited Tunisia. Egypt. Saudi
| Jordan. Iran, Syria and Israel.
comment on a meeting with President Sadat was that
rptian leader feels the United States should put
ion Israel rather than act as a passive mediator."

1978 UJA Campaign Could
Double Last Year's Results
A barometric reading this week
of the 1978 UJA campaign
showed that area campaign after
area campaign was exceeding last
year's results by better than 40
percent, with some headed
toward nearly twice as much as
they raised in 1977.
Charles Locke, the UJA
general chairman, enumerated
the over-the-top drives as those
in Inverrary, Point of Americas,
the Gait Ocean Mile. Woodlands,
and the efforts area-wide by the
Women's Division and the
Attorneys Division.
LOCKE noted at the same
time that other areas were within
shooting distance" of being over
the top. with some reaching for
the 40 percent level of increase
over last year.
The general chairman noted in
particular that the campaign was
now running neck and neck with
last year's total result of
$1,830,000.
He said that he was looking
forward to making an announce-
ment at Passover time that this
year's UJA had not only broken
through the $2,000,000 barrier"
but that it was heading for an
all-time record high."
IN A comment aimed directly
at President Carter's intention to
sell late-model F-15 fighter planes
to Saudi Arabia and Egypt.
Locke declared:
"The president's plan to sell F
15 fighters to Egypt and Saudi
Arabia flies in the face of how a
lot of Americans feel about
Israel.
One sure sign of how they feel
is in the way they're responding
to the UJA. Here in Fort Lauder
dale, the response is getting to be
louder with each passing day.
' It would seem that Mr. Carter
and his advisers have turned a
deaf ear to it. The President
ought not to flout public opinion
on so sensitive an issue," Locke
said.
Theodore Bikel to Perform at 30th I.I.D.
Theodore Hikel, actor and folk
singer who also is chairman of the
national Governing Council of
the American Jewish Congress,
will take part in the Israel Inde-
pendence Day (IID) celebration
being arranged by the Jewish
Community Center.
Hikel will appear at a special
performance in the War Memori-
al Auditorium Sunday. May 7 at
3 p.m.
MRS. ANITA Perlman. pres
ident of the JCC. in making the
announcement of Hikel's partici-
pation in 111), said that his per-
formance would hi' one of songs
of peace and freedom."
Hikel. Abba Eban and other
personalities will be in Fort Lau-
derdale for the JCC's celebration
of Israel's 30th anniversary, ac-
cording to Mrs. Perlman. Tickets
for Hikel's performance are on
sale at the JCC or through its
mail order department.
Among Hikel's best-known
screen performances are The De-
fiant Ones. The African Queen.
///c Little Kidnappers. The Rus
sians Are Coming- The Russians
Theodore Bikel
Arc Coming; My Fair Lady. The
Enemy Helnir. I Want to Lire
and his most recent film. The Lit-
tle Ark.
BIKEL. WHO has starred in
virtually every top dramatic
show on television in the United
States as well as in England and
Canada, has repeatedly been no-
minated for Emmy awards. In
Fiddler on the Roof. Hikel's Tev-
ye was acclaimed by critics and
audiences who saw the national
company of "Fiddler" and was
hailed by the Hollywood Report-
er as "the most enchanting night
of theater that has ever been
awarded an audience."
. Hikel is also one of the world's
best-known folk singers. A
founder of the Newport Folk Fes-
tival, the multifaceted entertain-
er has appeared in concerts ev-
erywhere.
\n American citizen. Bikel
resides in Connecticut with his
wife and two young sons. Hikel is
known as an activist in the
reform wing of the Democratic
Party and has for many years
been active in the Civil Rights
movement.
HIGHLY active in the field
labor. Hikel is president ot
Actors Equity Association. In
addition, he is co-chairman of the
American Jewish Congress
Governing Council, the founder
of the AJCongress Arts chapter,
a member of the executive board
of the National Jewish Music
Council and a member of the
Hoard of Directors of the U.S.
Section of Amnesty Inter-
national.
Atherton Shuttle-No Wild Hopes
Held on Future Peace Prospects
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA
The Cabinet met in spe-
cial session this week to
discuss future peace pros-
pects and the issue of Is-
raeli settlements in the oc-
cupied Arab territories,
which appears to have the
ministers sharply divided.
Defense Minister Ezer
Weizman and several oth-
ers are known to be press-
ing hard for a freeze on all
new settlement activity as
long as the peacemaking
process with Egypt contin-
ues.
THEIR POSITION has bean
bolstered by recant U.S. pressure
on the settlements issue. But the
American condemnation of the
settlements has only reinforced
the position of the hard-liners,
headed by Minister of Agricul-
ture Ariel Sharon, who want to
push ahead with new settlement
activity regardless of the opinion
in Washington.
Meanwhile, political circles
here are less than optimistic that
U.S. Assistant Secretary of State
Alfred L. Atherton will score a
quick or easy breakthrough in his
efforts to secure Israeli and
Egyptian agreement on a joint
declaration of principles. Ather-
ton returned here late Monday to
resume his shuttle diplomacy be-
tween Jerusalem and Cairo and,
possibly, other Mideast capitals.
Resumption of the stalled
event, is committed by Prime
Minister Menachem Begins
peace plan to give the Palestini-
i "self-rule"
ISRAEL AGREES to the Pa
lestinians' "right to participate in
the determination of their own
future" The wording, as Israel
seas it, does not give them the
exclusive right, and Israel, in any
peace talks depends on finding a
formula for the basic elements of
a settlement acceptable to both
sides.
OUTSTANDING issues on
which Israel and Egypt remain
far apart are Palestinian self-de-
termination and the future of the
West Bank.
Observers here see no signs
that a shift by either side is im-
minent. Nor is it certain, by any
means, that King Hussein of Jor-
dan would join in the peace pro-
cess even if Israel and Egypt
agreed on a set of principles.
Atherton will go to Amman next
week to sound out Hussein on
that crucial question.
President Carter's formula,
enunciated at his Aswan meeting
with President Anwar Sadat of
Egypt last month, is the frame-
work in which Atherton will be
working during the next few
weeks.



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Women's Campaign Progress
NORTHEAST TW Case d*
Pars wi kt tk sees* of tW
Wssses* Drrsaoa CWa Lssts-
eoaon Fndav MerchlOatll 30
Darrl Mi
Ft
of
Mm Jewsh Pislnf w#l be
I hi jinii i|iia*n TkhetsfartW
GALT Worn
Fedsratas UA a
Manartfeu.
67 tneJetr-
01 tW Gak Ocean Mie bare as
nriid that land Brag Gem
Sathas Shi nij wj be tW t
A 1*7* IJA piedg*
; u>tW parti
ARE AW IDE TW Love and
Peace tWm* of tW cstywsJe Se-
13 at tW Inverrary Country CWb
lost by over200 i
tW Greater Fort Lander-
TW bates enjoyed
waa bond
Panto
niiii>ii 0
mirlof W
I**
tW Cased
MoWraid
tWn
of tW
.- Pi
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Masai
Ap-
Left to right art Skirtr,
Rudolph and Nnuur LeAo-
tcitz. chairmen of decorations.
spate of tW
1 of Jewish people at Eu-
rope and Israel Pbyls Chud-
now. vsre presneaa of edocatam.
told of local needs is Fort Las
derdale TW bxdss eaaoyed hnarh
by LAW
Tabie decorations were ptc-
tares taken by Sid Dorfsss dor
sag tW Fort Lsudeidah October
Mssion and sssalid oa a Me
\re One tbsse bv Henme Lev
v xz ana Sbarley Rudolph
Grenaz was overall
Aasstmg her were
Connie Abraham. Floss* Fisher
Be** Freeman Mm Gnunan. Ra
cWi Herbert Luihan Hnrh Rea
Kahaner Gloria Katz Lobs Las-
asaaaW ',
Phyllis Chudnou
heal needs.
sar Ed* Legum. Ger-
Hamet Perer Miriam Ring. Lan-
es xevart and Floret*
CAmrow
rXXYTTHYlENE
776-6272
HOWARD
|nses a
ACKACINC
1201 S E 45 STlltl
lZ-r LA jDES~iLf
EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR A
REAL ESTATE LICENSE
FOR SALESMAN OR BROKER
INCLUDING THE REQUIRED
EDUCATIONAL COURSE
IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY.
UQ Bert Rodgers Schook of Real Estate, Inc.
1919 Premier Row Orlando, Florida 32809
Local Classes Throughout Florida
CALL TOLL FREE 800-432-0320
In Orlando Call 305 855 5441
Skotrm at Feb 13 luncheon Heft to right
standing I art Lillian Tucher. financial
rtcorder. In mg L Geisser. Federation
executiie director. Mitchie Libros. general
campaign chairman. Jan Salit. Women's
Ln-.isiom director: Susan Segaul. vice chair-
mam of campaign Jean Barricini. and Mark
Drucker. campaign associate. Seated lie ft to
right I are Yolanaa Maurer. society columnist
for "Fort Lauderdale Meant;'' pauj
Borenstein. guest speaker; Sheila Grenitz,
chairman of the luncheon: and Karen Gould
Sational L'JA Women's Division.
Pie
send me information concerning:
Salesman License Course
- Broker License Course
NAMf __
AOOtESS
CITY _
2IPCODE
STATE
TELfPHONC
Maurice Meyer Extolled
For WECARE Work
Maurice Mever chairma
tW WECARE hospital visitors
committee was described here
this week as a man in the tradi
uoa of tW 36 righteous people
tW world in e\ er>
TW deaenpuon was by Rabbi
Leonard S Zofl. cW plain of the
Jewish Federation of Great*-r
Fort Lauderdale TW rabbi ex-
loDed Meyer as a wonderful
sss who devotes an enormous
amount of tune u- U F < VJU '
us program of visaing area ho*
pnais. training WECARE hospi
.a. vnitors. partaripating in th*-
Jewish Federations UJA fund
rasing campaign, and perl
ag mitzvoth of all kinds for the
of his neighbors and the
iy
MAC RICE Meyer -
ipeaki about his good deeds
rruuv othi. Rabbi Zoil declared
He b tW antaiote to that S
Florida disease that afflict -
many people here. tW disease
called I am retired don't both-
er me
Meyer, a former Chicagoan.
lives on tW Gah Ocean Mile
Woman Recalls
Meyer's Kindness
Rovi Faber. WECARE volun-
teer general chairman, received
the following letter after a visit
by Mr Meyer to a hospital
pauent
Dear Mrs-Faber
I RECENTLY had open heart
surgery and spent 14 days in
North Ridge General Hospital in
Fort Lauderdale Several days
after surgery. I had one of those
low'days.
I tried to tell those who were
concerned for my well-being. I
wasn't feeling sorry for myself
but rather was fully realizing how
wonderful everybody else was. I
was a tearful sight to behold My
pulse jumped to over 200.
Lucky for me 1 found that a
Maurice Meyer, one of your WE-
CARE participants, had left your
Visions of Love pamphlet. Be
Wve me. I read every word over
and over again Through reading
it again and again. I regained my
composure, settled down to get-
ting well and found tW peace of
sand I sorely Beaded I still read
it every word several times
aweek N aaae withheld
ws-y-n
.- *ife (iilda Kabbi Zoll also
had a word of praise for Mrs
Meyer a'-vrting that she helps
and encourages her husband in
his daily regimen of service to
oth
Persons interested in working
ith Meyer on the hospital visi-
tation program should call WE
C IRE c>rdinaior Myrna Kelt at
the Jew ish Federation office
Maurice Mever
For generations
a symbol of
Jewish tradition.
At Riverside, our reputation is based
upon our assurance of service that fulfills
the high standards evoked by Jewish
tradition.
It is for this reason Riverside is not
represented by any other funeral director
in Florida.
Today, each of Riverside's chapels
serving Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties isexclusivelya Riverside Chapel,
staffed only by Riverside people who
understand Jewish tradition and honor it.
And in that tradition we serve every
family, regardless of financial
circumstance.
SUNRISE
1171 Northwest 61st AvenueCSunse! Strip)584-6060
HOLLYWOOD
2230 Ho.ljrwood Boulevard/920 1010
No'th M.ami Beach.M.ami Beach Miami and
West Paim Beach
Five chapeii serving the New York Metropolitan area
QRiverside
Memor.aiChaD.Mnc Funeralolr.
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
as-ri


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UJA Campaign Progress
INVF.RRARY: Having passed ils nominal goal of a 40 per
,,,u increase ovei 1. i (fatal raault, the Inverrarj UJA is
ra\ t-ling, headlong towurd chairman Joe Kaplan s 1978 target of
,0.000 and in his considered opinion.'' he asserts we
have an excellent chance of making it
Donors in all of the higher categories who have yet to an-
nounce their \'MH gifts have been "earmarked tor solicitation vi-
sits" by selected members of the Inverrary UJA campaign com-
mittee, Kaplan made known. He said that March would see a
special effort on this, with a continuing major effort on securing
the gifts of all residents who have yet to make any contribution
al all
Kaplan expressed confidence that the twin-headed drive
would succeed. He also said he was planning an early campaign
committee meeting to evaluate the effort and to set a date for
ihe traditional Inverrary UJA Victory Party.
INTERNATIONAL VILLAGE: The Village clubhouse
was more filled than at any other time since UJA campaigns
siarted to take place here four years ago. This time over I 50 per-
niis turned out, with an estimate by Jack Sylvester, the Village
UJA chairman, that the number would certainly have been
higher considering that those who attended three earlier UJA
parties felt that they did not have to attend this one.
The large group that turned out Feb. 26 at 8 p.m. heard
I'aula Horenstein, public relations director of the Joint Distribu-
tion Committee in Paris, with a musical program provided by
Hebrew Day School teacher and guitarist Tiki Silverman and
Village personality Doc Hlanchard. a former opera singer.
Sylvester said that the total of gifts was the highest so far.
adding that the campaign would continue. Aaron Koenig is the
UJA honorary chairman.
POMPANO BEACH: Five UJA meetings running from
I eb 23 through March 12 with one held as early as Feb. 14
stand out on the campaign schedule. These are as follows:
Century-Plaza Apartments: This condominium held its
third annual UJA cocktail party Feb. 23, with Mrs. Kalph (Es-
ther! Cannon as chairman. Kabbi l^eonard S. /oil. the Federa-
tion chaplain, was the guest speaker. Some 36 men and women
attended, with a result that exceeded last year's.
Claridge-Renaisttance: These two condominium buildings
gave further expression to standing side by side with a UJA
brunch I'cb 26 attended by residents ol both. The more than 80
run and women heard from sociology Prof. Kugene Wiener of
il.ni.i I niverail) Wiener, an American, made aliyah to Israel
several years ago Harry I'ellman is chairman ol the Claridge
i I Valid Morria I Jebaon ia chairman of the Renaissance UJ \
The Kensington: This was the Kensington s third annual
I I \ cocktail party, with the chairmanship tins year held by
Charles Feldman Kabbi /ll was the speaker Members of the
campaign committee include Harry Kcrsohn. I.e..na Davidson.
Harry Kaplcau. Dr Philip l.ubar. Edward Maged Max Sanoff
,ind Marry J Trail The parly took place I'eb 28,
Island Club: The residents of this Federal Highway condo-
minium came together for a coffee hour Wedncsdav March 1 at
s p m in the Library of Temple Sholom. This was the complex's
third annual UJA meeting. Sanford Canarick is the UJA chair-
man
\l (ioklin. vice-president of Riverside Chapels and a board
member of both the Fort Uauderdale and Miami Jewish Federa-
tions, was the speaker.
Walerford Point: This building's third annual UJA party
will lake place Sunday. March 12 at* p.m. inlhecondo s recrea-
t ion mom. Jim Kline is the chairman.
The I'ompano Heach drive for 1978 got underway al Parlia-
ment Mouse Feb. 14 with :.r> men and women in attendance who
exceeded their giving last year and that of the year before. Sid-
ney Libra is Ihe chairman. The guests heard from Henry l^vy.
an \merican now living in Israel. (Continuedon Page 14)
.
::
Top British Zionist Dead at 79
LONDON (JTA) Jacob
Halevy. for many years a leading
figure in the World Jewish Con-
gress and in British Zionist
circles, died here at the age of 79.
Horn in Rishon le Zion. Halevy
was the youngest volunteer in the
Jewish Legion in World War I.
As a student in England, he
helped to found the Federation of
Zionist Students. He later made
his mark as a pioneer of modern
Hebrew education in Britain,
first with a school in Manchester
and then, for many years, as
founder and headmaster of
Wittingehame College, Sussex, a
public school which attempted to
synthesize Hebrew and Jewish
culture.
Halevy was a member of the
World Jewish Congress' World
Executive and chairman of its
British section. A leading
General Zionist, he was also a
chairman of the British Zionist
Federation.
Hawaiian Gardens Initiates Buddy System
When Rovi Faber. genera
chairman of the WECARE vo-
lunteer program, and Paul Zim-
merman, vice-chairman of WE-
CARE, attended a recent meet-
ing at Hawaiian Gardens of the
WECARE executive board of
men and women from Phase 4,
under the leadership of Claire Lu-
koff and Fran Strum, they were
graatad with the following poem
by Bobbe Hassman:
Heach out to me. let me know you
are tin re
I'lcasc reach out. let me knou
that you can'
Reach out to me, call me your
friend
hue is not lore, if il has an end.
'This poem is an index of how
people feel about participating in
WECARE program." Mrs. Fa-
ber said in response |
THE MEETING, which in-
cluded a report on the innovative
buddy system being initiated at
Hawaiian Gardens by the WE-
CARE volunteers living there,
and which could be instrumental
in starting it at other condos,
sought to emphasize the need for
companionship.
Contact Myrna Felt. WE-
CARE coordinator at Jewish
Federation, for more information.
WECARE executive board members who at-
tended meeting were (left to right) Elsie Ze-
gar. Belle Josias. Doris Gordon. Dorothy
Hoch, Frances Strum, Rose Rosenbloom,
Bobbe Hassman and Claire Lukoff.

SUPREME WINDOW SHADES
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SCALLOP.
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Shown are Heft to fight) Fran
merman and Claire Lukoff.
Strum. Root Faber, I'aul Aim-
SchoenbrunTo Speak at Dinner
David Schoenbrun, noted for
his radio and TV broadcasts,
books, articles and lectures, will
be guest speaker at the fourth
annual Woodlands Country Club
Community Israel Dinner of
State. Sunday evening, March 19
at the Woodlands Country Club.
The dinner will be at 7 p.m. pre-
ceded by a cocktail reception at 6.
Announcement of Schoen-
brun's appearance at the dinner
honoring Dr. Murray Elkins was
made by Edmund Entin, chair-
man of the Woodlands Country
Club Community Israel Bonds
Drive.
SCHOENBRUN has won ma-
jor awards in every medium of
communications including: the
Overseas Press Club Award for
best radio reporting from abroad:
best television reporting from
abroad: best book. As France
Goes; best magazine article of
the year and the Alfred I. Dupont
Award as best commentator of
the year.
Schoenbrun regularly covers
events in the Middle East and is
known to the leaders of Israel for
his dramatic reporting.
Planning A Trip?
COUNCIL'S NEW AND
EXCITING TRAVEL
PROGRAMS FOR 1978
EUROPE. ISRAEL CRUISES
NATIONAl COUMCIi
Of JEWISH WOMEN
Cfli
LIUIAM ZALKIM-73S S7SS
14 MCMSrONf- 715-2054
FOR PURCHASE & SALES INFORMATION ON
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
CALL BROWARD N0.1 -454-3057
BRAGER & COMPANY
12 East 80th STREET
NEW YORK. N.Y. 10021
SPECIALISTS IN ISRAELI STOCKS BONDS SINCE I960
Serving the needs
of the Jewish Community
in our 3 locations
ENORAH
Cfcapefe
Mark Weissman
Joseph Rubin
Broward County's first
Jewish Funeral directors
SUNRISE
6800 W Oakland Park Blvd Phone 739-6000
MARGATE
5915 Park Drive Phone 971-3330
DEERFIELD
441 S Federal Highway Phone 971-3330 IJ


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Peace with a Forked Tongue?
One must agree with L'JA General Chairman Charles
Locke that there is a glaring inconsistency to say the
least in President Carter's decision to sell the F-15
fighter plane to Saudi Arabia and Egypt.
Either the President isn't staying in touch with the
way American Jews feel about Israel and their response
to the UJA is a keen register of this or he would rather
ignore it for what he may perceive is the far greater reward
of satisfying or mollifying the Arab potentates.
BE THAT as it may. it still strikes us as inconsistent
and callous that the President of the United States speaks
and acts with a forked tongue mouthing peace at the
very same time that he wishes to sell deadly weapons to
nations that have been belligerents for thirty years.
How does one cope with such a man. and such a
policy?
In the President's eye. Anwar el Sadat is one of the
great peacemakers of our time the same Sadat who also
speaks out of both sides of his mouth! He promises no
more wars even as he pleads for late model weapons. He
talks of peace and terminates peace talks. He vows
friendship and keeps stoking the embers of hostility. How
does one cope with a chameleon?
YES. there is a way of coping.
If President Carter chooses to ignore the way
American Jews feel about Israel, we have reason to believe
that the Congress chooses to pay attention and that '
where the final decision will be made, anyway
We here in Fort Lauderdale. together with all other
American Jew., can contribute mightily to that decision
a decision by the House and Senate not to sell thr-<-
aircraft to the Arab- by intensifying our efforts in
behalf of the L'JA: by giving better than before and by
getting our fnends and neighbors to gi\\ all to the end of
BHIlring a knockout total result.
Shalom to Abba Eban
Abba Eban b coming to Port I^auderdale He'll l>e
\pnl 23 to speak at B p.m. in the Parker PlaybottM in
connection with the Israel Independence Da) Ul'Ogiai
and festivities being arranged bi the Jewish Community
(enter \\. -.>> to Mr Eban \\ -Lome and Shalom
Here, in the paragraphs that follow, is what Mr. Eban
is capable of saying with inteltigi ison, truth and
passion. The excerpt printed below is from the Fifth
Annual Louis \ Pincufl Lecture that the form, r Foreign
Minister delivered to the I J \ .mnual national con-
! r-nce this past December in New York We present it :
its brilliance and cogency and -u ol what to
expect from Mr Kban when he apeaks to us
1978: The Decisive Year
"The hour of Israel s opportunity and challenge is the
Jewish opportunity and challenge the hour is ri[H- for ..
dramatic assertion ot universal .Jewish solidarity.
The hour has come to put aside all previous < ..ncept-
of what we ow >ther 197- is going to be the
decisive year Let nobody withhold any element of hi-
concrete sUpjK,rt by reason of what went before or what
may come after
JL'ST AS in 194*. in 1967 and in 197:?. this great
Americ-n Jewish community experienced a dramatic-
surge of solidarity that went beyond all previous targets,
so it would be fitting if such a new surge of exaltation were
to sweep through all your communities now as well.
Let us reflect that we have done great things
together. The mark of imperfection is written on all human
achievement and it is written on Israel's performance as
well. But when everything is said and remembered, this is
an unusual enterprise.
We have not disappointed all your hopes. We have
restored our nation's pride. We have given the Jewish
people a new sense of its collective creativity.
"WE HAVE built a home and shelter in which our
particular legacy can be conserved and enlarged. We have
made some communication to mankind of vitality and
resilience, of social originality and recuperative power
Above everything else, we have fulfilled our human
vocation. We have rescued hundreds of thousands of our
kinsmen from the dark abyss of death and despair This is
a great and noble adventure, and the greatest nobility is in
the very fact of our persistence.
Here, after three thousand years, the Jewish people
still is. After all the massacres, the inquisitions, the
Holocausts, the expulsions and pogroms, here we still are.
We are not finished yet.

kmsl IIn111 11
OF&*EATEIFOUTLAyOtBDALf
Business Office 1 S Federal Hwy tSulle JOS Denis Fla 3100*
Telephone K*01S
KREU K SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET .MA M THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assiits.nl to Publisher
The Jpwisli Flajrtlian ONI Met Guarantee The Kaihrwth
Of The Mef c*aA*t* Advertised In lit Column,
Second Class Postage Paid at Danla. Fla -SSS4J0
Published Hi W.-esly
TIM Jewish FlarsSiMl has Sfc rSa the Jewish unify anal the Jewijh Weakly
SSawiWjr ef the Jewish Telegraphic Aeency Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. '
WfarhtwtsU feews Service. -Natienal Editenal Assaciatien. American Astaciatie* ef
EitatisJt- Jewish Newspapers, and the Ftends Press Atsaciatmm
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
asmest
(Lecal Araal One Yaar-W M Opt e Tewn Upon
Germany's Envoy: The New European
AMBASSADOR of the Fed-
era! Republic of Germany Berndt
von Staden wonders with a note
of irritation in his voice: "How
can we sear get rid of that awful
cLche?'
He means the ubiquitous photo
of two Bavarians in L*d*rho*+n
seated at wooden tables eating
HVusu'ursr s universal sign of
echt dfutsch
The Ambassador's note of
irritation is the only flaw in an
otherwise perfect picture of dip-
lomatic irmnquuity He listens
carefully He speaks softly. He
not pontificate. He is
impeccably.
Von Staden is the new
European.
I SUGGEST to him that,
perhaps with the exception of
Mindlin
points of global ideology
struggle are far beyond th*
bounds of their own continent -
perhaps even tar beyond
bounds of their own interest
the
With the exception of Franc*, ]
repeat. Europe is content not u>
have a hand in their ultimate
resolution. They have exchanged
military presence for economic
capability and seem quit,
with the new arrange.
France, the countries of Europe
since World War II are no longer
divided by intense nationalisms.
They recognize that the sources
of world power have shifted else-
where and that the future flash
pnn
popu's mssjenm
satisfied
ment.
Von Staden agrees, but with
some qualifications about
France. A former staff member of
the Commission of the European
Economic Community in
Brussels, he is in firm agreement
with EEC practices and
ciples.
HE PAYS reverential homage
toJean Monnet.architect of Euro-
pean integration based on the
concept of a Common Market. He
emphasizes Monnet s French
extraction.
Von Staden does not sen-
timentalize. European in-
tegration is high on the platform
of all democratic parties in the
nine member nations.'' he ob-
serves, adding that more than 70
ueiieul of Europe's peoples are
for it
\tt.r all." he explains,
integration and the Common
Market are in everyone
nomic interest Mutual trade in
Europe is eight times what it was
In lure the formation of El
go
THIS sriNMMi scoaosak
success I i-k him. this willing-
ness of [he European Economic
('ommunitx t" stand on the
sidelines of global invokement in
Vsia, \lrica. Latin America, the
Middle East all of it is predi-
cated on ultimate American
deterrent power, is it not '
Von 9tadaa Hgn-es. except to
indicate that m\olvement and
influence can he judged by other
than military standards
specifically
\nd Germany? Is Germany
Continued on Page 12
Properly, Not Righteously, Indignant
I am. like all of us. properly
indignant about President
Carters proposal to sell more
planes and other arms to Saudi
Arabia and Egypt Properly
indignant, but not righteously,
and I am sorry for that dif-
ference.
r
Edward
famous speech that won
the Democratic presi-
nomination in 1896.
Jennings Bryan made
that when one wears the
a righteous cause, one is
than all the hosts of
Friday. March 3. 1978
Volume 7
24 ADAK 1-5738
Number 5
In his
for him
dentiaJ
William
the point
armor of
stronger
error.
IF WE condemn Jimmy
Carter's reasoning in joining the
two Arab nations to the military
package planned for Israel, it is
with the indignation born of our
fear for the safety and future of
the Jewish State. Our cause
would be a righteous one only if
we recognized, additionally, that
the escalation of arms in the
Middle East, as well as in the rest
of the world, should bring on this
administration the condemnation
't deserves for continuing to
engage in the arms trade while it
mouths hypocritical pieties about
its evils.
It is difficult to take a
righteous stance in a world,
including Israel, which finds it
better business to ignore Isaiah's
admonition to turn swords into
plowshares, for that would
probably result in greater farm
surpluses. Selling arms is now a
substantial business for Israel,
and it matters not that the sales
are to Ethiopia, a nation also
being supplied by the Soviet
Union, or to South Africa, or to
South Africa and Chile, nations
condemned by those concerned
with human rights. We follow the
cynical view expressed by George
n
Bernard Shaw's munitions maker
in Major Barbara -
"THE government of your
country! I am the government of
your country you will do what
pays us. You will make war when
it suits us. and keep peace when
it doesn't. You will find that
trade requires certain measures
when we have decided on those
measures When I want anything
to keep my dividends up. you will
discover that my want is a
national need..."
It will be interesting to watch
the Congress on this matter, for
it does have veto power over the
State Departments (Carter)
package that is described in 1984
Orwellian terms as consistent
with peace objectives."
If you recall that justly famous
prophetic book by George Orwell,
the dictatorial regime changed
the meaning of words so that,
among others, what we knew as
"war" in 1984 was described as
"peace."
...FACT OF the matter, as the
H asAingfoii Post pointed out
last week. The U.S. policy of
arming both sides in the Mideast
with increasingly lethal weapons
has widened the potential area of
conflict by thousands of miles ."
In a resolution aimed at
stopping this, introduced in the
<> of RepreasnUUvea by
Congressman Cannon of
Missouri before the recess hist
weak, the entire sale would be
vetoed
(me day we could be watching
Israelis. Egyptians and Saudi
Arabians killing each other with
\merican weapons." the
Congressman said. That would
not. of course, be unusual, the
latest examples being Greek and
Turkey and India and Pakistan.
Or, as Shaw's protagonist makes
it plain on behalf of our military
industry-controlled government,
I will take an order from a good
man as cheerfully as from a bad
one ... I am not one of those men
who keep their morals and their
business in watertight com-
partments."
During his now-infamous pres-
idential campaign of hypocrisy.
Jimmy Carter made it plain that
the US could not be the world's
leading champion of peace at the
same time it was the world's
leading supplier of arms.
AS VICE PRESIDENT Wal-
ter Mondale said in a major
speech in that campaign:
America was once proud to call
itself the arsenal of democracy.
Hut recent Administrations have
tried to turn us into just an
arsenal. This record in pushing
arms sales is scandalous It has
been a practical failure and a
moral failure."
I am willing to be a pragmatist
about Israel where once I took a
righteous stand. In an address to
toe Jewish Historical Society of
England in 1914 Sir William
Osier commented that the quest
for righteousness is Oriental You
must recall Rudyard Kipling's
observation that "You'll never
plumb the Oriental mind. And
if you did, it isn't worth the toil'


mday.March3. 1978
The Jewish r'loridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
rages
U.S. Rights Report Raps Israel
Continued from Page 1
high marks to Egypt and
President Anwar Sadat.
The 426-page report, re-
quired by law and pub-
lished by the Senate For-
eign Relations Committee
and the House Interna-
tional Relations Commit-
tee, glossed over Saudi
Arabian customs of justice,
notes improvement in Syria
under President Hafez
Assad, observes that Leba-
non's government has thus
far been unable to reassert
its authority throughout
the country, and that Jor-
dan is "politically stable."
Communist countries, ex-
cept Yugoslavia, were not
reported on.
ISRAEL, within its national
borders, the report said, is "a full-
fledged parliamentary democracy
whose standards and admin-
istration of justice are com-
parable to those of the United
States and the other Western
democracies."
Continuing, the report, which
was released last Thursday,
stated: "Under the military
regime that governs the occupied
territories, certain of the normal
human rights guarantees that are
taken for granted in Israel proper
have been superseded on security
grounds. This dichotomy poses a
dilemma that will probably be
resolved only in the context of a
final peace settlement with their
neighbors."
The 10-page section on Israel,
double the space devoted to any
one of Israel's neighboring
countries, charged the Israelis
with abuses of Arab rights in
occupied territories.
ISRAEL'S tactics in those
areas, it said, include "the use of
extreme physical and psy-
chological pressures during inter-
rogation," using excessive force
to quell demonstrations, sear-
ching the homes of Arabs
without warrants, and expelling
Arab security suspects."
Following the report's
issuance, the Israel Embassy
issued a statement that said:
Obviously the report notes the
difference between those stan-
dards applied in Israel and those
which security consideration
force Israel to apply in the ter-
ritories under its control.
"Nevertheless, in spite of those
difficulties, the government and
the people of Israel are trying to
apply the highest standards and
their own perception of human
rights everywhere and to every-
body."
A STUDY shows the reports
are uneven in their presentations.
While the report on Israel does
not mention the terrorism, such
as bombings employed against
Israelis, the survey on Jordan
notes that faced with "internal
and external challenges, the
government has sometimes
resorted to detention without
trial."
The report on Egypt is in
highly optimistic terms. It
praises Sadat for relaxing police
state tactics. "Egyptians are
enjoying civil and political
freedoms to an unprecedented
degree," it says.
While newspaper reports and
Amnesty International state-
ments are included in the survey
on Israel, it concludes the Saudi
Arabia report with the sentence,
"To the best of our knowledge
the Saudi government has not
been asked to accept outside
independent investigations of
alleged human rights violations."
THE SAUDI report does not
mention Jews specifically but
said: "Visas for travel into Saudi
Arabia have at times been
refused by Saudi authorities on
the basis of religion but such
cases are now rare and limited to
atheists and persons the Saudis
consider to be a political or
religious threat to the Saudi
state."
The report on Egypt said:
"Since establishment of the State
of Israel, the Jewish population
in Egypt has declined from about
80,000 to about 1.200, mostly
elderly people. The Egyptian
government does not restrict
Jewish emigration and relations
between the Jewish community
and the government are good.
Egypt permits non-Israeli
citizens who are members of the
Jewish faith to travel freely in
Egypt."
Regarding Syria's Jews, the
Passover
At The Concord
The Concord Hotel Presents With Pride
His Excellency
Who has served as Foreign
Minister of the State of Israel,
Ambassador to the United
Nations, and to the United
States, President of the
Weitzman Institute and Best
Selling Author will speak
on Peace in the Middle East;
Saturday, April 22nd
at 3:00 P.M.
Cantor Herman Malamood
awMnl by the Con.ord Symphony Choir dimt-d
b\ Jonathan W will onVtatr at the Srdariin
and Srrvkm
Rabbi Dr. Stuart Rosenberg
will conduct a Program of ltunwail Seminar*
Rabbi Simon Cohen &
Rabbi Sohmon Saphier
Su|rve wTupuroua dietary adhervtxr
Jan Peeree
international OueratH. Concert and Recording Star in
a Special FloUdas Concert. Saturday. April 'JSKh
THE CONCORD HOTEL
H.K.I UMBSJIIm ,..r Trvl Aarri
Concord Towers East
m a towermg nuujroficenw <* new Cue* Acrommatation.
offering the ultimate in comfort, ronveiuence and r~
Call u for more information
report said: "Syria's Jewish
community, today numbering
some 5,300 persons, was sub-
jected to discriminatory govern-
mental restrictions and oc-
casional harassment throughout
the 1950s and 1960s.
THEIR religious affiliation
was prominently inscribed on
their Syrian identity documents,
they could seldom gain admit-
tance to Syrian universities, their
businesses were not granted
export-import licenses, their
right to 9ell or otherwise transfer
property was circumscribed, and
they were generally denied op-
portunities for government
employment.
"Since 1974 the U.S. has made
its concern known to the Syrian
government directly. From 1974
through 1976, some of the more
onerous restrictions were relaxed.
In a significant, positive step, the
government issued a series of
decrees in late 1976, and early
1977, intended to eliminate
virtually all officially sponsored
forms of discrimination against
Syria's Jewish community except
the prohibition against
emigrating freely. It will be
necessary to observe the imple-
mentation of these recent
relaxations over a period of time
before a final judgement can be
made as to their effectiveness."
Egypt's Air Force
Grounded, Expert Says
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Most of Egypt's 365 combat
aircraft are grounded because of a shortage of spare parts
and experts to maintain them, the Daily Telegraph
claims.
According to Clare Hollingworth, the paper's
respected Defense correspondent, the shortage also af-
fects missiles, warships, tanks and guns originally
purchased from the Russians. This lies behind President
Sadat's appeal to President Carter for the supply of 120
F15 and F16 fighters.
MEANWHILE, British Rolls Royce engineers are
servicing 80 Egyptian MIG 21 engines. Cairo has also
acquired some spare parts for its 90 aging MIG 17s from
China in exchange for a MIG 23 which the Chinese wanted
to inspect.
Miss Hollingsworth writes that the Egyptians would
be able to avail themselves of the facilities of a $670
million projected training installation, being discussed by
the Saudi Arabians and the Americans, if the Saudis
manage to pull off the deal.
%u'd stay frisky, too,
if your diet were this
well balanced.
It's easy for the family pet to eat right. You supply one good
food, a little attention, and that's about all he needs to keep his
tail wagging.
For you, it's not quite so simple. It takes a variety of foods;
no single one will do. It takes planning to get the right nutritional
balance every day. It takes careful selection to make sure you're
getting good foods. Only you can make it happen.
But it's worth the effort. Because you have to stay healthy
to feel good every day. And the healthier you stay, the lower your
costs will be in the long run for doctors and hospitals and other
health care.
So pay some attention to you. ____
Make sure you're feeding yourself as I.IHMHTIH
properly as you feed your dog. uSBhAaNmCEaKy

For tree booklet tbout nutrition *nd preventive health are send coupon to Nutrition.
Liberty N*tion*l Commumcttioni Dept Section 00. PO Bo* 2612. Birmingh*m. AL 35202
NAME
I
| ADDRESS
I
CITY
STATE
ZIP
1
I
I
I
I
I


Page 6
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater_Fort lauderdale
Friday, March 3. 197a,
J
12
Li
nc
th
ev
Abraham Slater to Be Honored By
Shomrim Israel Bonds Committee
The Shomrim of Florida will
join in paying tribute to Abra-
ham Slater, active in many areas
SLATER helped organize the
Sheridan Lakes Men's Club and
served as its president for two
terms and currently is first vice-
president. He has been financial
secretary of the Shomrim Society
of Florida for six years and is a
member of its board of directors.
Assisting Chairman Chikofsky
are Lionel Braverman, Morris
Cohen. Sy Denker. Larry Hol-
lander. Sidney Schwarz. Daniel
Seitman and Max Weiss. Sidney
Klein is publicity chairman.
Eddie Schaffer To chairman Receives Praise for Work
Entertain March 11 ^ Faber salute9 Sunny
Friedman. Youth Services chair-
man, for the splendid job she is
doing in coordinating teacher
aides who assist at the Hebrew
Day School and the Banyan
School la school for learning dis-
abilities), "said Faber.
Volunteers are needed for the
Sundial Workshop (Broward As-
sociation for Retarded Citizens)
and Pediatric Care Center. Any-
one interested in volunteering for
the WKCARE youth services
program can contact Sunny
Friedman or call Myrna Felt.
WF.CAKK coordinator, at Jewish
Federation.
of community life at
Lakes Condominium at a "Night
in Israel'' Wednesday. March 15
at 8 p.m. at the Washington Fed-
eral Savings Bank. Rooms A and
B. 167th St. and NE 6th Avenue.
North Miami Beach.
The event will be under the
auspices of the Shomrim of Flori-
da Israel Bonds Committee of
which Leon Chikofsky, president
of the Society, is chairman.
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Adel-
stein of Castle Condominiums
in Lauderhill celebrated their
54th wedding anniversary at
the Hebrew Congregation of
Lauderhill on Feb. 17. Dr. A.
Kaufman was guest speaker.
Community Calendar
MARCH 3
Brandeis New Books on Sale
MARCH 4
Brandeis Book Sale
Plantation Jewish Center Las Vegas Night
Temple Beth Israel Young Couples
MARCH 5
Temple Beth Israel Men's Club Breakfast
MARCH 7
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood Activity 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Adult Education Young at Heort USY School
Board
Plantation Jewish Center Sisterhood Bowling
MARCH I
Woodlands ORT, North Broward Chapter ORT Day noon
Plantation Jewish Center Sisterhood Moh-Jong Marathon
MARCH 10
NE UJA Key Lunch-Cafe de Pans
MARCH 11
Sabra Group Disco dancing and buffet
Plantation $1,000 Dinner
MARCH 12
Temple Emanu-EI Men's Club Breakfast
Woodlands North ORT Polynesian Night
Art Show Contact Joan Okun, WECARE and JCC. Jewish Federation
- 2-6 pm
MARCH 14
Temple Beth Israel Adult Education USY
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood Activity 10 a. m. -2 p. m.
MARCH 15
Sabra Group life membership luncheon
Plantation Jewish Congregation Sisterhood Card ond Mah- Jong
Party p m
MARCH 16
Temple Beth Israel Nursery Carnival Youth Commission
MARCH II
Reconstructions Synogogue Art Auction
Temple Sholom Sisterhood Purim Carnival
Eddie Schaffer
Eddie Schaffer. humorist and
entertainer, will headline the en-
tertainment program at the Tem-
ple Sholom Israel Dinner of State
honoring Dr. and Mrs Solomon
(.eld
The dinner will be held at the
temple on Saturday. March II at
7:30 p.m. The cocktail reception
at 6:30 will precede the dinner
DR. AND Mrs. Geld will be the
recipients of the City of Peace
Award at the annual dinner on
behalf of Israel Bonds. Prepara-
tions for the event are headed by
Rabbi Morris A. Skop. spiritual
leader of the temple: Nathan S.
Baum. chairman: Mr. and Mrs.
Oscar Sindell. Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Lichtman and Mr. and Mrs. Max
Levey, honorary chairmen: Mr.
and Mrs. Irwin Stenn and Mr.
and Mrs. Bruno Loehner. co-
chairmen: and Mrs Irene
Reidich. president, and Marvin
Stone, executive vice president
Frank Morgana Gets
Note of Thanks
A note of thanks has been giv
en to WECARE photographer
Frank Morgano from general
chairman Rovi Faber. who says
that he gives so generously of
his time and effort and never says
no when asked to take pictures
for the WECARE program."
FEEL LIKE A KING ^
APRU JO JO '' HOo.110.,.
DELUXE PROGRAMS IN
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For more information call: YOUR TRAVEL AGENT or
RESERVATIONS. 800-2 2 3-6700
INFORMATION. S3 2-54 41
ISRAEL AIRLINES
One-Man Art Show Set April 2
Under the direction of Anne
Schneller. a meeting was held to
discuss plans for the WECARE
one-man art show that will be
held April 2 from 1 to 5 p.m. at
the Drexel building with paint-
ings by Avi Okun. professional
artist. The public is invited.
For further information, con-
tact Myrna Feit. WECARE coor-
dinator, at the Jewish Federation
office.
23rd SUCCESSFUL YEAR
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for as little as H55."*
VAItHI ( Ml-II | 10(>,> i'
3-night cruise leaves every Friday,
4-night cruise leaves every Monday, from
Ft. Lauderdale, all year to Freeport/Nassau.
Cruise with us 3 nithts
to Nassau.
On any Friday the year round,
the moment you board the
Leonardo you'll know what makes
her an Italian masterpiece 5 pools
Gourmet meals Gracious service
Dock m Nassau tor two glorious
days o( tenms Golt Shopping
Deep-seatishmg AtParadise
Beach bask m the sun see tabu
lous shows and try your luck at the
Casino On your return voyage.
lust relax and enioy memories that
will last a lifetime
Cruise with us 4 nights
to Freeport /Nassau.
Every Monday the the great Leonardo leaves Ft
Lauderdale for Freeport and Nas
sau You II cruise in continental
luxury You'll swim m the bluest
waters You'll visit pastel villages
tropical beaches go bargain shop
pmg and deep sea dshing The
Leonardo is your floating resort
hotel and our Italian crew knows
how to pamper you
Itfe an Italian festival.
JfartMMfllMMf


Friday. March 3. 1978
The Jewish Floridian ofGreater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
Organizations News
HADASSAH
Hndassah announded that an
additional bus will be available
for the three-day, two-night trip
to Disney World on March 16.
Viola Katz is in charge of ar-
rangements.
At the March 28 general meet-
ing. Twiddlers on the Roof, edit-
ed by Hermina Leving, will be
presented. The choral music
group will be supervised by Rose
Rousso and Sydelle Kosak. Ruth
Friedland will play the piano.
The Shalom group of Hadas-
sah is presenting a musical eve-
ning featuring the Opus 111 Sing-
ers Tuesday. March 7 at 8 p.m. at
the Tamarac Jewish Center. For
ticket information contact Shir-
ley Klafter or Ksther Siegel.
The Shalom group will meet
Thursday, March 9 at noon at the
Tamarac Jewish Center.
A fashion show will be staged
by Suburban (Jal Fashions.
Jewish Music Month will be
the subject of the regular meeting
of Tamar Hadassah on March 13
at 12:30 p.m. in Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall.
(luesl soloist Toby Lowe will
offer a musical presentation. Also
included in the day's program
will be a talk by Klsie Amster on
(he evolvement of cantorial
music.
Tamar group is accepting res-
ervations for its Mother's Day
weekend at the Americana Hotel
In li.i! Harbour May 12-14. For
information and reservations
contact Freda I'eld. chairperson;
or Kose Katz.
The Armon group will hold its
monthly meeting on Monday.
March fi at 12:30 p.m. at Castle
Itccrealion Center in l.auderhill.
The Shoshana group of Somer-
set will entertain with a musical
Around the World With Sadie
Hki-.. directed by Hose Roaseo
md Huth Friedland at the piano.
The Heral group of Hadassah
of West Mroward. comprised of
Bermuda Club residents, will
meet Wednesday, March 8 at 1
p.m. at the Bermuda Club in Ta-
marac.
Members desirous of attending
the Eye Bank luncheon at the In-
verrary Country Club still have
time to qualify if all monies are
turned in immediately to Lillian
Lifton.
The program chairman is plan-
ning the presentation of a one-act
play from the stories of Sholom
Aleichem.
On Wednesday. March 8 at
12:30 p.m.. the Golda Meir group
of Hadassah will sponsor a des-
sert and card party for the benefit
of the Hadassah Israel Education
Service at the Social Center of
Palm-A ire.
On March 15 at 12:30 p.m., a
regular meeting will be held at
the Palm-A ire Social Center, fol-
lowed by a Purim Bazaar.
ON WEDNESDAY. March 29
at 12:30 p.m.. the group will hold
its annual donor luncheon at the
Sandalfoot Cove Country Club.
B*NAI B'RITH WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women Lakes
Chapter No. 1513 will hold its
regular meeting Wednesday,
March 8 at 12:30 p.m. in Lauder-
dale Lakes City Hall.
Hank Meyers, the guest
speaker, will talk on llillel.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
The North Broward Section.
National Council of Jewish
Women, will meet Wednesday.
March 15 at the Wilton Manors
Woman's Club at 12:30 p.m.
State Rep. Stephen Warner, a
consumer advocate, concerned
with halting rising costs of auto
insurance, public utilities and
health insurance, will be the
guest speaker.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S
COMMITTEE
Used books will go on sale at
the south end of the Lakes Mall,
441 and Oakland Park Boule-
vard, on Friday and Saturday.
March 8 and 4 from 10 a.m. to 10
p.m.. with proceeds to go to
Brandeis University's Library.
AMERICAN SOCIETY
OF RETIRED ATTORNEYS
The American Society of Re-
tired Attorneys will meet
Wednesday, March 8 at 1 p.m. in
Mailman Auditorium of Nova
University in Davie.
Dr. Peter di Paola will discuss
the Bakke case.
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER
The Men's Club of Margate
Jewish Center will present the
Winged Victory Singers Sunday,
April 2 at 8 p.m. Chief soloist is
Cantor Norman Brody of Temple
F.meth in Brookline, Mass. The
group is directed by Joe Bans.
Contact Herman Katz or the
office for tickets.
The group has planned a
Night at the Race Track"
Wednesday. March 29 at the
Pompano Race Track. Contact
Louis Auerbach. Herman Katz.
Sam (ilickman or the office for
tickets.
Al Golden Chosen Vice Chairman Of
Committee on College Youth, Faculty
Alfred Golden, a member of the
Board of Directors of both Great-
er Miami and Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Federations, has been
appointed national vice chairman
of the Committee on College
Youth and Faculty Programs by
Jerold Hoffberger, president of
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and Welfare Funds.
Golden, long an active commu-
nity leader, has been identified
with the growth of the Hillel pro-
grams in Florida. These pro-
grams involve approximately
20.000 Jewish students.
GOLDEN was the organizer of
the Florida State Hillel Commu-
nity Board. He was formerly a
national commissioner of the Hil-
lel Foundation of the United
States and currently vice chair-
man of the State Community
Board.
Golden's involvement in reli-
gious and secular activities also
includes his membership on the
Dade County Personnel Board,
and officer and director of three
temples in Dade. Hollywood and
Fort Lauderdale. He is currently
vice president of Riverside Me-
morial Chapels.
Alfred Golden
CONCERTO COMPETITION
Winners of the annual Concer-
to Competition will be presented
in concert with the Broward
Symphony Orchestra. Jimmy
Woodle. conductor, at the Brow-
ard Community College Central
Campus Gymnasium. Saturday.
March 4 at 8:15 p.m.
George Koth. concert pianist
and faculty member at the Uni-
versity of Miami School of Music,
will serve as judge.
AMERICAN FRIENDS
OF HEBREW UNIVERSITY
Century Village Chapter of
American F'riends of the Hebrew
University will hold an educa-
tional and organizational meeting
March 13 at 10:30 a.m. at the
Sheraton Inn. Palm Beach Lakes
Boulevard in West Palm Beach.
Morris Berlinsky. chairman,
announced that Samuel L. Ha-
ber. national associates chairman
of the American Friends of the
Hebrew University, would be the
guest speaker.
ARE YOU SERVING
YOUR FAMILY
A NERVOUS CHICKEN?
Falls Chicken is an
emotionally stable chicken. .
raised in fresh country air
free from urban stress
processed in The Catskills
(where else?)

Kosher Country Chicken
Available al your local Kosher meal counter.

Mote's makes everybody's favorites.
A favorite in Jewish homes for generations, Mott's gives you the
special taste of fresh-picked fruit...in your old favorites. And excit-
ing new ways.
Looks different. Tastes different. Mott's latest treat is Prune
Juice Blended With Prune Pulp. Smoothly blended prune pulp
makes this prune juice different and delicious, with a rich mellow
prune flavor. Try it. You'll like it, you'll like it.
Mott's Apple Juice, so brisk and refreshing. A favorite for after-
school snacks. A treat for the whole family.
Mott's Regular Apple Sauce is a dp-luscious dessert. And a great
side dish with meat or poultry.
For calorie-counters and special sugar-free diets, serve Mott's
Natural Style Apple Sauce. Chock full of nature's own sweetness,
no sugar added.
Super Mott's Prune Juice, a regular favorite! Gives you more
prune taste and more prune goodness than ordinary prune juice.
Really is super.
Keep plenty of Mott's on hand. They're instant people-pleasers.
K Certified Kosher


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. March.(. 1978
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Inverrary Second
They came and they gave. Jack Baker (right) was among the tvmdna't top
givers. Left to right: Mrs. Art Roth and husband; Mr. and Mrs. Bill Haas, and
Mrs. Jack Baker and husband.
Locke holds tin I
award to Harold Slater, right.
Rabbi Emanuel Schenk of Inverrary Heft), greets Charles Locke. Jacob Brodzki
and t ederatwn Vice President VicGruman.
Florence Strauss, chairman of the Inverrary woman committee, shown with
Harold Slater and lat right) Irving L (ivisser. executive director of the .l<
Federation.
Mike Bloom, president of the Inverrary B'nai B'rith lodge, and Mrs. Bloom
(right) share a laugh with Ida Schwartz, also of The Greens. Phase I.
Jerry Egan and Mrs. Egan (left); Harold Slater and Mrs. Slater (right)
Mr. and Mrs. Vic Gruman he's a Jewish Federation vice president
nounced the evening s top gift. They live at the Greens, Phase Two.
an-


Friday. March 3. 1978
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
iual UJA Dinner
L mure than 235 guests who turned out for Inverrary's 2nd annual UJA
limner Feb. 11 sent the campaign in the large complex not only over the
WOO.OOO mark but put it well over the goal of a 40 percent increase. Here is how
ooked that evening, with Yehuda Hellman of the Presidents Conference as
tthe guest speaker and Jerry Egan and Harold Slater as the guests of honor.
Jot Kaplan holds framed award that was presented to Jerry Egan.
Vierb Lazar (center) greets Harold Slater (left land Jerry Egan (right).
Htirold Slater, guest of honor and last year's UJA chairman in Inverrary,
'houm with this year's leadership team in Inverrary: Joe Kaplan, UJA
'hairrnan (left) and co-chairman Bob Taylor (right).
From left to right: UJA General Chairman Charles Locke: Inverrary UJA Co-
Chairman Bob Tayldr; International Village UJA Chairman .luck Svlrcster; j
Jewish Federation President Jacob Brodzki, and Yehuda Hellman, guest {
speaker.
Harold Slater (second from left) and Jerry Egan (second from right) are flanked
by Charles Locke (right), UJA general chairman, and Joe Kaplan (left),
Inverrary UJA chairman.
Jack Sylvester, chairman of Inverrary's International Village UJA (right), and
Aaron Koenig, honorary chairman (right), shown with guest speaker Yehuda
Hellman.
Federation Executive Director Irving Geisser helps Joe Kaplan read gift an-
nouncements by the guests.

I


Page 10
The Jewish Fhridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. March 3.1971J
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News Of the Jewish Community Center Cantata Planned in Honor of Purim
w __... .^.^. mi_______. Sunnv Lmnnmiin will l,<. .u
Adult Trips
Begin in March
Detailed information is now
available at the JCC office for the
following Adult Club sponsored
trips:
Disney World and Circus
World. March 13. 14, 15. Tour
includes two breakfasts, three
dinners, two admissions to
Disney World, admission to
Circus World and evening per-
formance of Can Can.
NEW ORLEANS. March 23
29. Tour includes five continental
breakfasts, one Creole buffet
luncheon on the cruise, four
dinners, two cocktails. Filling up
fast.
Key West, April 15-16. Two
days of complete relaxation.
St. Augustine and Cape
Canaveral. May 24-26.
ISRAEL, 21 days. May 29.
Leaves from Fort Lauderdale.
Youth Group
Announces Events
The JCC youth group, grades
six to eight, announced the
following events:
Tweens meet every Wednes-
day, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. t the JCC.
On March 8. there will be a
dessert night. On March 15.
kindergarten night will be
celebrated.
SPECIAL events include a
Shul-in on March 4. 5-8:30 p.m.
to 8 a.m. Cost is $2.50. A dance
will be held for a Saturday night
dance contest with a disc jockey
from 8 p.m. to midnight. Cost is
SI.25 for members and $2 for non-
members.
For further information call Irv
Bromberg.
Transactional Analysis
Class to Begin
Registration is now open for a
new class in advanced transac-
tional analysis at the JCC. Class
starts Monday. March 6 at 1
p.m.. under the direction of Clair
Tuthe of the Rroward Board of
Education.
Martha Moses To
OfferReviews
Martha Moses is set to offer
another six-week series of reviews
of current books. This program, a
community service sponsored by
Broward Community College,
beginning Tuesday, March 14.
from 9:30 a.m. to noon.
I.
Girls 8-18 will love being losers
ATCAMPSTANIEY
THE ORIGINAL N0N ME0ICAI
SUM DOWN LUXURY SUMMER
CAMP Nu rij' ,'1 rfgitnf, |usl fljys
Ol lun Dranuiicjll* successlul toi
oi 16 years Average aeigfit loss .''0
10 4b lbs Mfmiei follow up program
ACA APC accredited
SUff Rl 221 ACRE fACIllTKS 9 all
dreamer Tenms Courts Healed Poor-
. Private Golt Course and lake Slimnas,
lies Dance Cenier Disco t Game
Room Plus all spoils Supervision by
specialists
NCW FOR SUMMER 71 Certified
tenms Pro Automatic ball throwing
machine and instant video tape replay
lorettes dance workshop
Young iduir progijm 10 ->r Phone o< *"if
'O' special brochure
Pifjsf mciude age arm phone
Camp Stanley
Bo> *0t|, Hurley ville. N V l?77
(SU) 7Jt 0323 (7171 377 (430
5C555
Nutrition Program Yoga Classes To
Continues at JCC Begin March 17
The hot kosher luncheon pro-
gram for seniors 60 years of age
and over is offered daily at the
Jewish Community Center, Mon-
day through Friday.
Funded by the Federal govern-
ment under Title VII of the Older
Americans Act through the Local
Are* for Senior Citizens of Brow-
ard County, the program
provides a variety of activities in
addition to the nutritious kosher
meal.
PERSONS 60 and older
qualify if they meet any one of
several conditions. For additional
information call the JCC.
Yiddish Theater
Discussion Set
Sunny Landsman ot Tamarac,
known for her lectures at Brow-
ard Community College and
director of the JCC Yiddish
American Theatre group, will
present a "Renaissance of the
Yiddish Theatre" discussion at
the "Issues and Answers"
session. Sunday. March 5. at 10
a.m. in the Jewish Community
Center.
The program begins with a
breakfast of bagel, smear and
beverage.
Folk Dancing
On Wednesdays
Nat and Ida Wolf son will
have you in a spin and whirl on
Wednesdays from 2 to 4 p.m. at
the Jewish Community Center."
according to Helen Nathan. JCC
adult program director.
The folk dancing program is
open to singles and couples.
"You can enjoy peace of mind
and freedom from tensions and
anxieties through the slow
stretching movements of yoga
that tone up the body, improve
the circulation and aid in organ
functions." said Marty Feit. who
will offer another eight-week
course in yoga at the JCC. on
Fridays from 1:30-3 p.m., begin-
ning March 17.
This year the JCC will present
a Cantata in honor of Purim. The
program will be presented
Monday. March 20 at 1:30 p.m.
in Temple Beth Israel.
The Cantata is entitled A
Dream Fulfilled a story that
ranges from the creation of the
world to the proclamation of the
State of Israel.
THE CANTATA was written
by Cantor Renzor of Temple
Shalom. Pompano Beach. It will
be produced by Gertrude Bodner.
Children's Activities to Include
Boat Ride, Ice Skating, Theater
A boat ride on the Jungle
Queen and an afternoon of
planned activities at Holiday
Park (bring brown bag dairy
lunch, beverage provided) will
Martin Heller
Gives Performance
Martin F. Heller, retired elec-
tronics engineer who is a member
of the JCC's Adult Program, has
embarked on a second career H
has written musical compositions
for piano, instrument MMfsmblfM
and choir.
He recently wrote a string
quartet dedicated to (iolda Meir.
The first movement of the com-
position will be given its initial
performance by a student quartet
at Broward Community College.
North Campus on March 8. at
noon.
THE quartet is under the
direction of Prof Kmery Krdlee.
violinist of the Fort Lauderdale
Symphony, instructor at Brow-
ard Community College. North
Campus and scholarship chair-
man of the Broward Youth
Symphony.
take place Tuesday. March 21,
from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
A lunch at the park and an af-
ternoon of ice skating at Polar
Palace (bring brown bag dairy
lunch, beverage provided) will
take place Wednesday. March 22
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Bring
sweater, socks and mittens.
A MORNING of planned acti-
vities in the park and lunch, plus
an afternoon of live theater,
featuring The Emperor's New
Clothes performed by a profes-
sional theater group, is the pro-
gram for Thursday. March 23,
from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. (bring
brown bag dairy lunch, beverage
provided).
Drop off and pick up will be at
the JCC. Arrangements can be
madfl for working mothers.
The entire program is for chil-
dren in kindergarten through
fifth grade. For more information
and reservations call the JCC
Coronaries High
Among Non-Religious
TEL AVIV Heart attacks are twice as
frequent among non-religious Jews as among
their religious Jewish brethren, reveals an epi-
demilogical study undertaken by Tel Aviv Uni-
versity's Prof. Henry N. Neufeld, head of the
Heart Institute of Sheba Medical Center, an affil-
iate of TAU. and Tel Aviv University's Prof. Jack
Medalie.
The five-year study of 10,000 male civil ser-
vants and municipality employees, aged 40 and
over, divided them into categories of non-
religious, traditional, and religious, by the
subjects' own evaluation.
DURING THE period of research, 5.8 percent
of the non-religious suffered heart attacks, 3.7
percent of the traditional, and 2.9 percent of the
religious.
These findings held true irrespective of the
country or community of origin. The ratios for
European Jews were the same as those of Asian-
African Jews, despite the distinct differences in
life style and eating habits, which were thought to
afford Asian-African Jews special immunity to
heart disease.
A correlation was discovered between smoking
and the incidence of heart disease. Some 23.5
percent of the non-religious smoked more than
one pack of cigarettes dairy, whereas only 11.5
percent of the religious did.
REMOVE LINES and WRINKLES WITH
ACUPUNCTURE FACELIFT
by Qualified Chinese Acupuncturist
Look and Feel Younger
No Surqi
Free Consultation
Free Literature
Group Discussion on
Acupuncture
Daily 12 00-1 00 P M
Medical Problems Also Treated
Call: 485-7711
^ 2350 West Oakland Park Blvd.
^ Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

"srrr
4 JWHHW^W itpi
' ~ Sunny Landsman will be the con.
ductor and narrator. Mildred
Zlotkin will be the pianist.
Speaking parts will be played
by Anne Bachenheimer, Gertrude
Panem, Jennie Pabnen, Flair*
Rand and Augusta Rubenstein.
The musical parts will be by
Natalie Footnick. Lillian Hahn
Natalie Orkin, Charlotte Rosen I
zweig, Mollie Rudin and Sylvia
Weingarten
TICKETS can be purchased at
the JCC.
Camp Counselors
Needed for JCC
Applications are now being ac-
cepted for junior and senior coun-
selors and C.I.T. for the summer
of 1978.
All students going into ninth |
10th, 11th and 12th grades
college students who are interest
ed in working should con
Penny Rubin at the JCC.
Yiddish Players
Perform April 13
A date has been set for the 1
Jewish Community ('enters I
American-Yiddish players to perl
form The World of Sholem Al*i\
chem. The presentation consists!
of four one-act plays three ml
Fnglish and one in Yiddish, all I
under the direction of Sunny|
Landsman.
The date is Thursday. April n|
at 1:30 p.m. A few parts ares
available and the support
backstage people, costume
prompters, staging, etc.
needed.
PERFORMANCE will be hi
at Temple Beth Israel.


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Ldo> March 3. 1978
The.Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
Date Set for AJC Annual Dinner
I Joseph Kleiman, president of
Ihe Hroward County Chapter of
the American Jewish Committee,
lnnounced to the executive board
hat the annual dinner will take
We Sunday. April 9 at Pier 66.
tjise Goldman and Dorothy Fine
will co-chair the function.
Kleiman also gave an accolade
TVHotlineFor
Disabled to Air
Hotline for the Disabled, a
half hour television show, will be
tired on WKID-TV Channel 51.
Thursday evenings from 11 to
|l:30p.m.
Hotline for the Disabled'* is
an informal half-hour program
[hai will give disabled Hroward
[ountians and others the latest
^formation about the disabled
n a county, state and federal
ivel
JEANNIE Sanders, member
nf the Governor's Committee on
Employment of the Handi-
capped, and Dennis Maugere.
project director of Positive
Vet ion for a Midden Minority, of
Human Relations Division,
Kill host the weekly talk show.
Advisory Service On
"amps, Private Schools
Mrs Grace Stein, owner of Ad-
nscir> Service on Camps and Pri-
vate Schools, can be reached at
her llallandaleoffice.
[erman Mittelman
To Be Honored
to Harold Diamond, chairman of
the chapter's Foreign Affairs
Committee. Diamond is a retired
Air Force colonel, having served
during the Korean War as well as
World War II.
KLEIMAN also announced
that three summer seminars for
study of the Jewish Biblical
heritage by the American Jewish
Committee's Academy for Jewish
studies Without Walls will be
held July 10-14 at Brandeis in
Waltham. Mass.
Jewish Music
Program Set
Rabbi Samuel Silver of Cape
Coral, and his wife, Elaine, a
concert pianist, will present a
program, "Jewish Music is Not
Sad," at Temple Emanu-El, Fort
Lauderdale on Sunday morning,
March 12.
Their appearance is being
sponsored by the temple's Men's
Club. The following night, at 9.
Rabbi Silver will be the guest of
Alan Courtney on his talk show,
WINZ,910ontheAMdial. ,
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The annual Night in Israel"
linder the auspices of the Oriole
hardens Phase II Israel Bonds
I'ommittee will take place Sun-
f. March 5 at 8 p.m. intheOri-
(iardens Phase II Recreation
[all.
Herman Mittelman. who
kerved as president of the Oriole
hardens Condominium II Asso-
ciation in 1976-77. will be the re-
npient of the Israel Solidarity
|Award.
HEADING the committee are
Joseph Kpstein. chairman, and
Lillian W alder, co-chairman.
Songslress Rita Greene will en-
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LEO MIIVPLIK
Germany's Envoy: The New European
Continued from Page 4
also willing to rely on ultimate
American military deterrent
capability? Are there no move-
ments in Germany today dedi-
cated to reviving the old
nationalisms, the old military
cliques?
"TO REVIVE the old hos-
tilities, the old aggressions would
be unthinkable." he says, "when
you consider the horrors they
gave rise to in the past."
What of the possibility of a
Soviet drive westward? Would
that strengthen such movements
as there may be?
"Germany and the other
NATO countries have been
seeking to upgrade their
defensive capabilities within the
context of the Alliance," Von
Staden concedes, but one senses
that this has largely been symbo-
lic to demonstrate a more equit-
able partnership in the Alliance i
with the United States.
POLITELY, he does not say
Chat the upgrading primarily
involves the shouldering of a
greater share of the cost of main-
taining NATO than Europe did
in the past and that it has taken
place at the insistence of the
United States, which these days
shows signs of a growing eco-
nomic weariness in the slipping
dollar and an agonizingly un-
favorable balance of trade.
Then nothing has really
changed so far as the ultimate
American military role in Europe
is concerned?
Von Staden thinks quietly. He
rephrases what he has already
said: "We believe as strongly in
the NATO Alliance as we do in
European integration." He adds
with a smile, to concede the point
in my opening remark: "With the
exception of France, of course,
which does not participate in
NATO."
THEN WHAT of the
possibility of a Soviet drive west-
ward? Do Germans fear it?
"I always make an important
Berndt Von Staden
distinction between intentions
and capabilities," Von Staden
declares. "I do not insinuate that
the Soviets have any such in-
tentions. But I can't help seeing
their continuous military buildup
in Eastern Europe."
Does one conclude then, Mr.
Ambassador, that they have the
cabability?
"WE SHOULD not speculate.
The alternatives are these: to
reinforce our own defenses and to
pursue the negotiations toward
effective arms control. We are
doing both these things."
The possibility of a Soviet
drive westward. I say. raises the
question of East Germany. What
is the German view these days on
reunification?
"lam sure we will never give
up hope, and we will continue to
claim our right to self-determ-
ination, which is recognized
under the charter of the United
Nations."
DOES THE passing of years
and the Communist indoc-
trination in Kast Germany dim
the hope for reunification?
Inc. a ably, does East Germany
cease to share the hope for
unification in favor of a role as a
Marxist satellite within the
Soviet constellation?
'Indoctrination on the whole
does not help." Von Staden
replies. People do not change
their basic convictions. But no. in
answer to your question, we will
probably not be able to create a
new Germany. The reason is
simple: To talk about the par-
tition of Germany is to talk about
the partition of Europe itself
between two systems of govern-
ment democratic and
socialist."
The Ambassador's implication
is clear: How realistic is the pos-
sibility of a democratic reuni-
fication of Eastern and Western
Europe today?
INEVITABLY, our conversa-
tion moves toward Jews, Ger-
many, Israel, Nazism and the
Baader Meinhof terrorists. Dip-
lomacy turns toward entrechat
descendant upon egg-ends. The
ambassadorial effort is to demon-
strate that the change in topics of
conversation requires no equiva-
lent change in human emotion.
For more on this, next
week .
Someone
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Recuperation at home is often
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FORT LAUOERMLE 5M-4333
POMPNIO 711-4020
Israel Archie Bunker
Is Strapping Sabra
TEL AVIV "The Israeli Archie Bunker would sit in his
armchair and have answers for everything. He would know
more than Begin, Peres, and Dayan all rolled into one. and he
would dispense endless advice on the best way to run the
country to the consternation of his son-in-law. who in this
case would be a strapping, muscular, handsome Sabra." said
Norman Lear, creator of All in the Family, addressing a group
of film producers, directors, film students and fans at Tel Aviv
University here.
THE 55-YEAR-OLD Lear discussed his early difficulties
in challenging the myth that the average American television
viewer "had the mental capacity of a 12-year-old" and that the
most serious problem in life was whether "the wife had burned
the pot roast when her husband's boss was coming home to
dinner."
I^ear felt that an Archie Bunker-type series tailored to the
realities of Israeli life could be successful. "You have people
with talent and experience who. if they cooperated, could
launch such a project," he said.
Tel Aviv University runs the only Film and Television
Department in Israel. It presently has a graduate student
learning some of the tricks of the Hollywood trade working as
special assistant to Danny Arnold, executive producer of
Barney Miller and Fish. The student. Mark Brull, is slated to
return to the Film and Television Department to teach under-
graduates this year.
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STAFF INQUIRIES INVITE OaMINIMUM ACE If
Begin's Top Negotiator
Set for Bond Fete
The 1978 State of Israel
Bond drive celebrating the
30th anniversary of Israel's
statehood will have its
North American launching
on Thursday evening,
March 2 at 6:30 p.m. at the
Konover Hotel, Miami
Beach.
Kliahu Ben-Elissar, di-
rector-general of the Prime
Minister's Office in Israel,
and Israel's first negotiator
at the initial peace talks in
Cairo, will meet with Jew-
ish leaders from throughout
the United States and Ca-
nada to lay the groundwork
for the forthcoming trip to
the United States of Prime
Minister Menachem Begin
on March 12.
EVER SINCE the founding of
the Israel Bond Organization 27
years ago, Miami has been the
traditional scene of the inaugur-
ation of its annual campaign.
Ben-Elissar, a close friend of
Prime Minister Begin, who has
been called "Israel's No. 1 Civil
Servant." will be principal speak-
er at the Israel Bonds inaugural
dinner in Miami Beach, it was
announced by Sam Rothberg,
general chairman of the world-
wide Israel Bond Organization.
Begin will be coming to the
United States at the invitation of
President Carter for talks in
Washington. Ben-Elissar, a poli-
tical aide and close friend of
Prime Minister Begin, will be
making his first American ap-
pearance in Miami on March I.
Heading the South FfeJ
corps of patron-hosts for the,
augural dinner are Gary R.
son, Greater Miami camp,
chairman; Robert L. Sit
chairman of the host commitL
Isidore Wollowick, president
the Greater Miami Israel Ba
Prime Minister's Club; and '
ses Hornstein, president of"i_
Broward Prime Minister's Club!
BEN-ELISSAR. in addition!
leading the Israeli delegation|
Cairo to open the preliminary!
gotiations, also participated
the crucial summit meetings U
tween President Sadat and Priid
Minister Begin at Ismailia.
"Ben-Elissar is in a position |
relay the most current infornt
tion on what is happening
Rothberg noted.
Prior to his becoming directa,
general of the Prime Ministerl
office, Ben-Elissar spent
number of years as an underc
agent of the Israeli Secret
vice.
Prior to the dinner, members*
the South Florida Prime Mil
ter'a Club and Society of Tn
tees will greet Ben-Elissar at i
reception and will be pr
with their 1978 Prime MinisteJ
Club plaques and Ambassador!
Society certificates respectively 1
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VIEW FROM ABROAD
rms to Mideast Has $4.8 Billion
Price Tag for Arabs, Israel
From Combined Jewish
Telegraphic Agency Services
Astronomic E
Senior U.S. officials said this
,.ek that the cost of the aircraft
rmarked for Israel, Egypt and
(audi Arabia announced by Sec-
ary of State Cyrus Vance will
$4.8 billion. The price tag on
15 F-15 planes for Israel is
400 million, and the 75 F-16
|ghters was put at $1.5 billion.
The 60 F-15s for Saudi Arabia
vill cost S2.5 billion, and the 50
p-.is for Kgypt $400 million. The
iini.il. explained the higher cost
%r r'l;'is for Saudi Arabia be-
cause the Saudis are getting the
Uanes for the first time, and the
fnsi basis is thus higher.
The officials said that Kgypt
kill get 10 of its fighters in the
|hirci quarter of this year. Saudi
irabia and Israel will receive
Iheir I l">s in the third quartern!
|981, and Israel will receive the
His in the last quarter of 1981.
The Israelis now have about
Lit n| ihe 25 F-16s they had pre
Houslv ordered and will have re-
rived all 26 by the end of this
leai
The official! explained that
IKgypt requires the warplanm be-
I cause Libya has Soviet MIG-23S.
und Kgypt cannot fit spare parta
Cfrom the Soviet Union lor the So-
1 vie! aircraft it now has
Vance Statement
The decision to sell the aircraft
| in the three countries was an-
nounced by Secretary of State
\ ance in a press statement in
which he also explained the ra-
tionale behind the proposed sales
to each of the countries
lie said the Administration
will begin the official process ol
informing and consulting with
the Congress' next week, but the
formal notifications will not be
submitted until after the Faster
recess" next month in order to
give Congress an opportunity to
review fully the proposed sales."
Congress has veto power over the
transfer of U.S. weapons abroad.
Vance pointed out in his press
statement that the sale to Israel
of the sophisticated, twin-engine
F-15s, rated as the world's best
plane of its kind, is in addition to
25 F-15s previously sold to Israel.
The sales to the three countries
"will be consistent with the Pres-
ident's global arms transfer poli-
cy and will be within the dollar
value ceiling that he has estab-
lished," Vance said.
"All of these sales are directly
supportive of our overall objec-
tives in the Middle East," he ad-
ded. He said the aircraft will help
Israel, Kgypt and Saudi Arabia
"to meet their legitimate security
requirements, will not alter the
basic military balance in the re-
gion and will be consistent with
the overriding objective of a just
and lasting peace," Vance said.
Carter's Weary
predicted that Israel and Kgypt
will eventually reach an accord
despite the wide differences be-
tween them, but it will be an in-
terim agreement rather than an
overall settlement. Peres made
his remarks to the international
convention of the Labor Zionist
movement attended by 199 dele-
gates representing Israel and 18
other countries.
He did not refer to his two-hour
meeting with President Anwar
Sadat of Kgypt in Salzburg, Aus-
tria over the previous weekend.
However, Peres warned that
there was no chance to achieve
peace without interim agree-
ments. He said the policy adopt-
ed by the former Labor-led gov-
ernment which resulted in the
two interim agreements with
Kgypt in Sinai was still valid to-
day. This is so, according to Per-
Interim Accord
In Jerusalem, Shimon Peres,
leader of the Labor Alignment.
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es. because the problems between especially heavy burden because
Israel and Kgypt are not bilateral 't must negotiate with Israel and
but of a general Arab nature. at the same time face the Arab
rejectionist front which refuses to
He said Kgypt was under an negotiate with Israel.
Meanwhile. President Carter
has explained his belief that an
Israeli agreement to a statement
ol principles that he has outlined
is essential before Kgypt will sign
a separate agreement" with Is
rod and Kinn Hussein of Jordan
will enter negotiations for a set-
tlement.
*
While saying that we have
some hopes now that we will be
successful" towards agreement in
the Egyptian-Israeli negotia-
lions. Carter indicated weariness
in being the intermediary be-
tween Israel and the Arab states.
"It is very discouraging and
frustrating thing to be the inter-
mediary or the messenger boy
between a group of leaders in the
Middle Cast who won't even
speak to each other. And when
you carry a message from one tO
the other, the one who-receives it
doesn't like il and blames the ad-
verse message partially on the
messenger
Then when the reply gets
back there is always an allegation
that the United States didn't do
ii s best to get a favorable answer.
So it has U-en a very constructive
thing just to get that negotiation
(between Cairo and Jerusalem)
begun."
French Mirage jet over North Africa.
French Role in Helping Keep
Communism At Bay in Africa
How to safeguard the securit)
ol several weak but strategically
important \lrican states against
( dm mil nisi inspired aggression
ranked hi^h on the list of topics
at the recent meeting in I'aris be
I ween U.S. President Jimmy
Carter and his French counter-
part. \alcry (iiscard d'Kstaing.
Only two days before Carters
arrival, (iiscard had taken the
somewhat unusual step of public-
ly criticizing U.S. lack of under-
standing of African events" and
us reluctance to counteract the
political instability in certain
vital areas of the continent.
THE FRENCH leader can
claim to have combated the
Kremlin's recent political machi-
nations in Africa almost single-
handed while his Western allies,
notably the U.S. and Britain,
gave him little help.
l.ast June, the bold and urgent
use of French Air Force transport
planes in Zaire's Shaba province
almost certainly saved the Gov-
ernment of pro-Western Pres-
ident Mobutu Sese Seko from a
takeover. French Air Force
transports have also been ferry-
ing troops of the Chad govern-
ment to northern parts of the
country where President Felix
Malloum is facing a Libyan inva-
sion lone as well as a Libyan-
backed insurrection by relx-ls of
the Frolinat movement.
On the embattled I lorn of Afri-
ca, some 5.00Q French troops
have remained in Djibouti, pro-
viding the recently independent
Arab republic with a limited
though highly necessary defense
capacitv
BUT THE most controversial
involvement is northwestern Af-
rica, where French transport and
reconaissance aircraft and Jaguar
jet fighters have gone to the aid
of Mauritania, whose veteran
leader. President Moktar Ould
Daddah. is hard-pressed by the
Polisario Front, the Algerian-
back cd and Russian-equipped
guerilla movement fighting for
the independence ol the mineral-
rich former Spanish Sahara
Th* French aircratl are sta-
tioned at Dakar, the capital o!
Senegal, whose staunchly pro-
Western President Leopold
Senghor has already survived at
least two attempted coups d'etat
Jaguar lighters base recently
country by its more powerful
northern neighbor.
THERE AKF increasing re-
ports oi Mauritanians joining the
Polisario movement out ol fsarol
falling under Moroccan domina-
tion Mauritania's Foreign Min-
ister. I lamdi < iiikl Mouknass. has
gone on record with a statement
that his country was doing
everything in its power to reduce
gone into action against I'olisario
columns, dvcimaling at least two
of them after attacks on the rail-
way line between Mauritania's
northern mining center of Zouer-
aleand the coast.
Mrequel reconnaissance air-
craft are now overflying Mauri-
tania regularly, ostensibly to
protect French nationals working
in Mauritania against Polisario
attacks.
THE FRONT'S recent propa
ganda scoop, the hand-over of
eight kidnapped French hostages
to l \ Secretary General Ur.
Kurt Waldheim. was short lived
as reports came in that another
60-vehicle column of Polisario
guerillas had tallen victim to
French air attacks
Hut France is not the only
country involved in Mauritania's
bitter war against the rebels. Mo-
rocco recently sent yet another
battalion of 600 men to the cop-
per mining town of Akjoujt. some
150 kilometers north of the cap-
ital Nouakchott, thus bringing
its total troop strength on Mauri
tanian territory to 6.000.
Yet despite military necessity,
there is growing unease among
Mauritanians that the deploy-
ment of additional Moroccan
troops on their soil might lead to
an eventual takeover of their
its military dependence on Mo-
rocco and France because of the
continued policy of aggression
by Algeria and its mercenaries
The Moroccan government
played down the Polisario Front
threat Officials in Rabat stated
that recent kisses inflicted on the
Front had greatly reduced its
strike capability. It was not un-
likely that Algeria would soon
end its support for the
movement.
The Moroccans s|H-ak from a
position of strength. They have a
well-equipped army of some
60.000 men and a modern air
force whiih has recently received
another B0 Mirage jets from
France.
BUT THE threat of the Polisa
rio Front over Mauritania as well
as the Western Sahara remains
stronger than the fear of a Mo
roccan takeover of Mauritania.
Only a few weeks away from cru-
cial presidential elections, (iis
card will do his utmost to keep
relations between the two North
African states as amiable as pos-
sible.
His support of France's friends
in Africa is popular with the
French electorate but as he made
clear to his U.S. guests, a greater
U.S. involvement on the side of
Africa's still numerous pro-West-
ern governments is long overdue.


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PALM-AIRE: A tribute din-
ner to the late Harry I^evin at
Ptor 66 Feb. 12 that heard from
Yehuda Hellman. executive di-
rector of the Conference of Pres-
idents of Major American Jewish
Organizations, launched the 1978
UJA drive in Palm-Aire.
Karl Killer. Nat Gora. Abe
llersh. Al I.evis. Charles Ruben,
Harry Sacks and Sam Schwartz
served as chairmen of the event.
The tribute to Lavtn came with
the presentation of a burlap
sculpture entitled Tree of Life."
It was specially made by Roger
Bishop, who created the three-di-
mensional work through use of
natural burlap.
DONNA and Stuart Levin rep-
resented the Harry Levin family
and received the sculpture from
Rabbi Philip Labowitz of Temple
Beth Israel, who presented it on
behalf of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
The dinner meeting was
chaired by Nat Gora. one of the
Palm-Aire UJA chairmen who la-
ter announced that the commit-
tee is looking for 100 percent
UJA participation by Palm-Aire
residents.
CENTURY VILLAGE: Co-
Chairmen Evelyn Denner and
Harry A. Simons of the Century
Village UJA Breakfasts report
that four dates have been set for
the various sections of Century
Village.
On March 27 the areas of Farn-
ham. Richmond. Harwood, Up-
minster and Westbury will hear
guest speaker and honoree Fran-
ces Nusbaum.
On March 28, the areas of Isle-
wood. Lyndhurst. Markham.
Newport and Prescott will have
i- guest speaker Rabbi Leonard
S. /.oil There will be two honor-
ees: Julius Nadel and Bernard
Rapoporl
ON MARCH 29 the areas of
Kllesmere. Grantham. Keswick.
Natura and Oakridge will hear
Alfred Goldin. and honor Louis
Bernava.
On March 30 the areas of Ash-
by, Berkshire, Cambridge and
Durham will have George Berg-
man as the guest speaker and will
honor Al Fishman.
The Century Village Deer-
field Beach UJA general cam-
paign chairman is Max Dick-
stein. He is assisted by Bernard
I. Berne. Jean and Martin Rosen,
and Fvelyn Denner.
ABE ROSENBLATT is trea
surer. Augusta Mendell is secre-
tary, Frances Nusbaum is in
charge of public relations, and Al
Fishman of publicity. Ada Ser-
man and Winnie Winkelstein are
in charge of the Speakers
Bureau.
LAWYERS: The Attorneys
Division of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale held
its second annual dinner Feb. 19
at the Bahia Mar Hotel.
Brian J. Sherr. who is chair-
man of the 1978 Attorney's Divi-
sion, presided. Wolf Blitzer.
Washington correspondent of the
Jerusalem Post, was the guest
speaker. Sherr reported that dol-
lars raised to date from the attor-
neys art in excess of 40 percent of
From left to right are Brian ./.
Sherr and Wolf Blitzer.
last year's amount and that more
pledges and checks are promised.
Co-chairmen aiding Sherr are
Steven L. Josias. Michael H.
Krul. William H. Lefkowitz. Bar-
ry A. Mandelkorn and Raymond
M. Windsor. Also serving on the
committee are Harry Gulkin and
Michael J. Satz.
Scenes From
UJA Campaign
Progress
*
>
Shown above are members of the Palm-Aire UJA Campaign
Cabinet as they appeared at their UJA kick-off dinner. Seated
(left to right) are Charles Ruben and Sam Schwartz. Standing
(left to right) are Joseph Fink, Nat Gora, Al Levis and Harry
Sacks.
I
Left to right, Charles Locke, general campaign chairman ofth
Greater Fort Lauderdale UJA: Donna and Stuart Lt
representatives of the family of the late Harry Levin anil
recipients of the Tree of Life Sculpture, and Jacob Brodzki\
president of the Greater Fort Lauderdale Jewish Federation.
From left to right are Michael H. Krul.
Raymond M. Windsor. Brian ./ Sherr, Wolf
Blitzer. William H. Lefkowitz. Hurry A.
Mandelkorn and Steven L. Josias.
Shown is Rabbi Philip
Labowitz of Temple Beth
Israel who made the "Tree of
Life" presentation to Donna
and Stuart Levin at the Palm-
Air UJA kick-off dinner.
From left to right are Wolf
Blitzer and Irving L. Geisser.
HAWAIIAN GARDENS:
Moe and May Neifeld of Hawai-
ian Gardens Phase V will be ho-
nored at a UJA brunch on March
19at 10 a.m. in the clubhouse
They are the founders and and
he the first president of Temple
Ohel Bnai Raphael, named for
his father. The morning's enter-
tainment will be by Mac Robins,
comic. Chairman of the campaign
and president of Phase V is Har-
ry Rosenk rant/..
" Mm ^^^^1
I l I
From left to right are Harry Gulkin and wife Toni. and rVotfl
nlitzer.

Yehuda Hellman (center) with Joseph Fink (left) and Al Levis W, nght an Nat Go. master of ceremonies; Yehuda
committee members. "'"man, guest speaker, and Irving Geisser executive director
of the Jewish Federation nfC.r*,,.* p- t ^.A.rAnlm
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale.


treater tort Lauder

Intransigent' Jews Anger Vatican
VATICAN CITY The Vatican newspaper
Osseruatore Romano sharply criticized Italian
survivors of Nazi brutalities, "above all members
of the Jewish community," for refusing to forgive
Nazi war criminal Herbert Kappler who died in
the West German town of Soltau Feb. 9. Kappler,
70, was serving a life sentence for the wartime
reprisal slaving of 335 Italians. 70 of them Jews,
when he escaped from a Rome clinic last Aug. 15
and was smuggled out of Italy. He was being
treated for terminal cancer at the time.
In a front page editorial, the Vatican organ
accused the survivors of lack of "flexibility." It
referred to' Those who felt most directly joined to
the victims by blood or spiritual solidarity:
relatives, survivors, supporters of an atrociously
I trampled-on civil law and above all the members
of the Jewish community."
RIO DE JANEIRO B'nai B nth. ORT
and WIZO in Brazil have been placed on the Arab
boycott blacklist, according to Adolpho Bloch,
the publisher of a number of prestigious maga-
zines, including Manchete. the illustrated weekly
which hits worldwide circulation. In an article
published in Manchete. Bloch also expressed
alarm about the capitulation of a number of lead-
ing Brazilian firms to the boycott and noted at
tin same time that a number of important firms
in Brazil have been placed on the boycott list after
refusing to comply with the hoynx i regulations.
JOHANNESBURG The large* ever de-
legation from South Africa is attending the World
Zionist Congress in Jerusalem beginning Feb. 20.
Fort) delegatee and alternates are representing
all the South African Zionist patties The lion is headed by Julius Weinstein. chairman of
the South African Zionist Federation.
I NITED NATIONS An Israeli source
tnfirmed hate that Prof. Yehuda Blum, an ex-
itt on international law. will replace Imbaasa-
jdorChaini Herzog aa Israel s chief representative
I at the United Nations, rlsraog is scheduled to
cave his post this summer alter serving as am-
I liassiidor lor the last three years The Hi war-old
Blum was horn in Czechoslovakia and emigrated
> Israel in 1946
AMSTERDAM \ former Jewish employe
the Hutch Bmbass) in Prague, Hubert stein.
released from a prison in Czechoslovakia
ftei seven >ears. it was just learned. Stein
orked as an interpreter and translator at the
embassy until Jury, 1970, when be was attested
and sentenced to 12 years imprisonment for al-
| leged espionage Holland had repeatedly urged
I his release on humanitarian grounds During the
1950s Stein spent nine years in jail as a result of
theSlansky trial.
WASHINGTON Congressman J. Herbert
I Burke (R., 12th District, Fla I wrote to President
r expressing his opposition to the sale of
F&Ei to Egypt and Fl5s to Saudi Arabia.
Congressman Burke said with regard to the
I sale of F5Es to Egypt. "I find it highly disturbing
that you should choose this time to propose the
sale of highly sophisticated aircraft to Egypt.
[ There well may be good reason to make the sale at
future time when a peace settlement has been
achieved, but to make them prior to a peace set-
I tlement seems to me to preclude any kind of peace
at all."
Rep. J. Herbert Burke (R., 12th District,
Fla.) meets with Israel Prime Minister
Menachem Begin during the Prime Min-
ister's recent visit with President Carter in
Washington.
Dr. Arthur Levinson checks infant for
needed low-vision adjustments at Hadassah-
Hebrew University Medical Center
Jerusalem.
m
Dr. Albert Sloane, renowned Harvard
ophthalmologist, is "Godfather" to Low
Vision Clinic at the Center, where a new
semi-hard contact lens has recently been
developed.
TEL AVIV The discovery of poisoned or-
anges in Europe means Israel stands to lose $20
million to $30 million in citrus sales. MK Gad
Yaacobi. chairman of the Knesset's Economic
Committee, said here following a meeting with
Citrus Marketing Board officials. There is a con-
siderable reduction in orders for Israel citrus fruit
from Britain and West Germany, according to
Yaacobi. He said he will recommend that the gov-
ernment subsidize an advertisement and informa-
tion campaign to increase sales in Europe.
TEL AVIV A report charging that organ-
ized crime infests many areas of business and
commerce in Israel drew mixed reactions this
week.
The diamond trade objected furiously to alle-
gations that much of its transactions are illicit.
The Seamens' Union acknowledged that smugg-
ling was widespread and pledged cooperation
with the authorities to end it.
The report on organized crime was submitted
to the Cabinet by a special committee headed by
former State Atty. Erwin Shimron.
BONN Diether Posser. Justice Minister of
the German State of Northrhine Westphalia, and
chairman of the Coordinating Committee of State
Justice Ministers, has rejected a suggestion by
Federal Justice Minister Hans-Jochen Vogel that
tighter laws might be necessary to combat the in-
creasing spread of Nazi propaganda.
Posser said in a TV interview that tougher
measures should not be considered unless there
was "convincing evidence" that there were loop
holes in existing laws banning Nazi propaganda.
Meanwhile, police in West Berlin broke up a
meeting of the banned "NSDAP" (Nazi party).
Plantation Jewish Congregation
Activities Include Family Service
Plantation Jewish
Congregation will hold its
monthly family night service
Friday, March 3 at Seminole
Middle School. The second grade
classes of the religious school will
participate by singing traditional
songs and hymns.
All March birthdays will be
called to the pulpit to be honored
Men's Club Garage
Sale to Be Held
Sunday, March 5 from 10 a.m.
to 10 p.m. will be Temple Emanu-
El Men's Club's garage sale.
Selling space is still available.
For details contact David Siegel.
Milton Sperber or Sam Milt.
Temple Beth On-To
1 Open Nursery School
Temple Beth Orr's nursery
school will begin in the fall of
1978. Classes will be for three and
four-year-olds.
Temple Beth Israel
To Hold Art Auction
Temple Beth 1 srael will present
its annual art auction Sunday.
March 26 at the Temple on West
Oakland Park Boulevard.
A preview showing will be held
from 7 to 8 p.m.. with the auction
to follow. There is no admission
charge. Champagne punch will be
served.
and blessed by the rabbi. The
service will be led by Rabbi
Sheldon J. Harr and begins at 8
p.m.
YOUTH groups of the temple
will be attending the district con-
vention of SEFTY, on March 3
through 5 in Miami. Rabbi Han-
is district rabbinical adviser of
South SEFTY.
An adult education course
begins in March at the temple
and will be taught by Rabbi
Harr. The course being offered is
on basic Judaism. It will be held
Tuesdays at 8 p.m.
The Congregation announced
the opening of its nursery school
for 1978-79. Plans are now being
made for classes for three- and
four-year-olds to begin in Sep-
tember, 1978.
THE nursery school is open to
members and non-members of the
temple. The school will be held in
the building now under con-
struction at the temple site on
Peters Road between University
Drive and Pine Island Road.
Anyone with questions or
inquiries should contact the
temple office.
Religious
Sisterhood Announces Directory
Monte Carlo Night
A Purim Monte Carlo Night"
will be sponsored by Temple
Sholom Sisterhood at the Temple
Sholom Social Hall. Saturday.
March 18 starting at 8 p.m.
Bar Bat
AAitzvahs
ALAN BORNSTEIN
On Saturday. March 4 at 8:45
a.m.. Alan Bornstein. son of Mr.
and Mrs. Marvin Bornstein of
Plantation, will become a Bar
Mitzvah at Temple Beth Israel in
Sunrise.
HOWARD LASS
Howard Lass, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Sidney Lass, will celebrate
his Bar Mitzvah Saturday.
March 4 at 10:30 a.m. at Plan-
tation Jewish Congregation.
In honor of the occasion, the
family will sponsor the Oneg
Shabbat on Friday, March 3 and
the Kiddush following the Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday.
LORI SALSBURG
On Saturday, March 11 at
10:30 a.m.. Lori Salsburg will be
called to the Torah as s Bat
Mitzvah.
Mr. and Mrs. William
Salsburg, Lori's parents, will
sponsor the Oneg Shabbat
following the regular Shabbat
services on Friday, March 10.
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE 7100 W
Oakland Park Blvd Rabbi Philip A
Labowitz. Cantor Maurice Neu (42)
EMANU EL TEMPLE. 3425 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Reform Rabbi Joel
Goor Cantor Jerome Klemenf
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAU
DERHILL. 2041 NW 48th Ave.. Lau
III Conservative M.ix Kronish.
RECONSTRUCTIONS Synagogue,
7473 NW 4m St Steve Tischler.presi
dent
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER 9106
NW 57th St Conservative Rabbi Is
rael Zimmerman (44A)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
4171 Stirling Rd Orthodox Rabbi
Moshe Bomzer (52).
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Liberal Re
form. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr (64)
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Ave
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Jacob Renter (4V).
MARGATE
BETH HILLELCONGREGATION.7640
Margate Blvd. Conservative.
Joseph Berglas
Rabbi
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 4101
NW 9th St Conservative. Cantor Max
Gallub(*4B)
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151
Drive, Reform
Riverside
Rabbi Leonard Zoll.
DEERFIELD BEACH
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
BETH ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE Century
Village East. Conservative Rabbi
David Berent (42).
LAUDERDALE LAKES
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE
4351 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Modem Orthodox Congregation
Rabbi Saul D. Herman
SUNRISE
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER. INC. SD49
West Oakland Park Blvd. Con-
servative. Jack Pollnsky. president
Jack Marchant, Cantor.
CANDLEUGHTING
T,ME $
6:04
24 ADAR 1-5738'fc.
IEVITT
1911 Pemferefet RS.
Hellyweed. Fla.
H4-S497
Seamy Levin. P.O.
HISS W. OUteMwy.
NerMi Miami. Fla
M9-411S
.






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