The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00090

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
Begin Says
West Bank
Action Legal
' JERUSALEM, (JTA) -
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
strongly defended his govern-
ment's decision to legalize three
Jewish settlements on the West
Bank. He expressed "deep
regret" and "deep disappoint-
ment" at the rebuke by Secretary
of State Cyrus Vance for the
action. He rejected Vance's
charge that Israel had acted in
violation of international law and
the Geneva Convention govern-
ing occupied territories.
Begin asserted that the Judaea
and Samaria regions were neither
occupied nor conquered territory,
that Jews had a perfect right to
settle there and that the decision
of the Ministerial Settlement
Committee was no more than a
routine action intended to
legalize a de facto situation. "No
injury or injustice will be caused
to a single Arab family," Begin
said.
THE PRIME Minister's
defense of his settlement policy
took up a large part of his report
to the Knesset on his recently
ended mission to Washington.
His remarks were followed by a
lively debate during which Labor
Alignment leader Shimon Peres
sharply criticized the govern-
ment's lack of flexibility. He
Continued on I Page 2
^JewisFi Florid fan
Volume 6Number 17
OF GREATER PORT LAUDERDALE
Friday, August 19,1977
Price 35 Cents
On Upholding Human Rights
By JACOB BRODSKI
President, Jewish Federation
Of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Two anniversaries this month
within a span of two days
brought to mind painful his-
torical associations between the
Stalinist murder of leading
Jewish intellectuals on Aug. 12,
1952, and the signing of the Hel-
sinki Final Act on Aug. 2, two
years ago.
It is plain that Brezhnev's sig-
nature to the Helsinki Accord
was a mere nodding of the head
to human rights by beautiful
words with few deeds. Com-
pliance on reunification of
families is a mockery, with
literally hundreds of mothers and
fathers separated from their chil-
dren, and husbands and wives
living lonely lives, with no an-
swer to their repeated requests to
the Kremlin for joining their
Women's Division Campaign Plans
Near Completion, Calendar Set
Streng Leads
Cash Drive
Planning for the upcoming
campaign of the Federation's
Women's Di-M
vision is near
completion. (
Marilyn Gould,
1977-78 Women's
I Division cam-
paign chairman, [
and her two vice]
chairmen, M it-
chic Libras and
I Sue Segaul, have been meeting
[weekly throughout the summer.
I They have set the campaign
calendar for the coming year,
have selected the majority of
their chairmen, and have
produced a chairman's and
worker's handbook. They are now
in the process of meeting in-
dividually with each of their
chairmen to review the goals and
plans for the upcoming cam-
paign.
Chairmen and vice chairmen
selected thus far are: $2,500
division, Ceila Goldfarb, Helen
Rubin and Helene Soref, chair-
Continued on Page 2
JACOB BRODSKI
loved ones in Israel.
FREEDOM of religion or the
rights of minority groups to
practice their culture and tradi-
tions, hallmarks of the Helsinki
Accord, remain empty promises
in the Soviet Union.
Last December (1976) when a
handful of Soviet Jewish ac-
tivists attempted to gather in a
cramped Moscow apartment for a
discussion of the pitiful condition
of Soviet Jewish culture, they
Continued on Page 7
A four-month cash col-
lection drive the first
such sustained effort in
Jewish Federation history
got underway here this
week, with John Streng,
treasurer of the Federation,
names chairman of the
drive by UJA general
chairman Charles Locke.
Mounting of the cash
drive came in response to
what Streng termed "two
clear and imperative
needs." The needs, he said,
are in Israel and in Fort
Lauderdale. He gave this
description of each area of
need:
There is a developing fiscal
crisis in Israel where the Jewish
Agency with its central
responsibility for the reception,
JOHN STRENG
resettlement and absorption of
immigrants faces the prospect
Continued on Page 2
Participant Reports On
*abn-Aire Dedicates Memorial Tree JA's Leaders Institute
Friends and family of Harry
evin gathered at Palm-Aire at
|0 a.m. on July 14 at the first
ee of the Pines for an unusual
nemorial service the dedica-
lon of a tree. The
is a Royal
Fonciana and the'
Ironze plaque q
mnted on a
Dulder at its
reads
|y, "This tree
planted in A,
emory of Harry WEk*
- 1977." LEVIN
1 k
[Participating in the ceremony
in behalf of the Levin family were
Harry's son and daughter-in-law
Stuart and Donna, his daughter
Andrea, and Shirley Levin's
mother and father, Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Cohen.
THE BRIEF service was led
by Marvin Orleans and Thor
Amlie in behalf of FPA Cor-
poration and the staff.
According to Amlie, "The
Royal Ponciana was chosen for
its beauty and the fact that it
normally blooms in May, the
month that Harry died. We feel
that a living memorial would be a
fitting tribute to this man who
was so full of life, who shared his
enthusiasm for living with so
many of us."
Levin was killed in Miami
when an automobile driven by a
drunk driver crashed into his
while he and Mrs. Levin were
returning to Palm-Aire. Mr.
Levin, a youthful and vigorous
man, had served as chairman of
the Jewish Federation's UJA
campaign in Palm-Aire and was
one of the Federation's key
leaders in planning and carrying
through subsequent Palm-Aire
Continued on Page 2
This July, Joseph J. Ca-
lig a member of the Jewish
Federation's
UJA campaign
staff visited
Israel as a guest
of the Jewish
Agency to attend
a four-week In-
stitute for Lead-
ership Develop-
ment. Calig was |
picked for his
outstanding
work as a cam-
paign profession-
CALIG
al. He has been with the Federa-
tion since 1975, with responsibi-
lities for the UJA campaign in
such areas as the Gait Ocean
Mile, Point of Americas, Palm-
Aire, Pompano Beach and Cen-
tury Village at Deerfield Beach.
A seasoned campaign profession-
al, he was with State of Israel
Bonds in Miami before coming to
Fort Lauderdale. Mr. Calig is a
graduate of Ohio University.
Here is his report of what he says
was "one of the best months I
ever spent in my life."
I am pleased to offer this
report of my four weeks of par-
Continued on Page 12
Lauderdale Mission Delegation Grows
Membership on the Federation's UJA
Mission to Israel has passed the 50
mark, and is still growing with approxi-
mately two months still to go before the
group takes off on Oct. 16 for an inten-
sive 10-day series of sightseeing visits,
briefings and gala special events all as
guests of the Israel Government.
Reservations accompanied by $100
per person deposits have come in from
Woodlands, Palm-Aire, the Northeast,
Plantation, the Gait and Point of
| Americas.
CHARLES LOCKE, the mission
j chairman, said "it looks like we're going
to have the largest Fort Lauderdale
group ever to visit Israel as an official
[Jewish Federation delegation."
The Mission will pause in Israel to
mark the Federation's tenth anniver-
sary. The event will be observed with a
party in Jerusalem, attended by leaders
of the Israel Government, past and
present, and by high officials of the Is-
rael Defense Forces and the Jewish
Agency.
Persons qualify for mission member-
ship who at a meeting in Israel will
make pledges to the 1978 UJA campaign
of a minimum of SI,200, with an ad-
ditional minimum pledge of $300 by the
spouse, or a minimum pledge of $1,200 if
one is unattached.
THE COST OF the mission itself is
$750 per person inclusive of round trip
air travel, deluxe hotel accomodations,
three meals a day and all sightseeing. A
$100 deposit per person is required in ad-
vance.
U S Jk
,< A
Ml*IOM .JAIIMAN
MISSION MISSIONARIES: This was the scene recently at
the Woodlands Country Club as UJA Mission chairman,
Charles Locke (left) fielded this top-flight group of Mission
leaders and workers to help recruit members for the forth-
coming Oct. 16-26 Federation visit to Israel. Shown with Locke
(left to right) are Edmund Entin, chairman of the UJA Mission
in Woodlands; Mitchie Libros, chairman of the Woodlands
Women's Division; Bernard Libros, chairman of the Wood-
lands UJA campaign, and Mrs. Jan Salit, UJA campaign as-
sociate. "We're really signing them up," Entin called out as
, this photo was taken.


Pag2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 19.
1977
I.
n:
South Florida Swimmers Star^l
At Maccabiah Games in Tel Aviv
Begin Says West Bank Action Legal
Settlement ommittee. refused t
United States teams came out
of the tenth Maccabiah games in
Tel Aviv as top medal winners,
with a total of 82 gold, 64 silver
and 46 bronze medals.
Israel came in second, with 60
gold medals, 70 silver and 60
bronze.
South Africa took third place
with 15 gold medals, 7 silver an<
8 bronze.
THE LIST in descending order
shows the following gold medals:
Holland, 12; France, 10; Canada.
8; Germany, 6; Australia, 5;
Great Britain, 3; Sweden and
Brazil, 2 each; Mexico, Italy,
Argentina, Austria and Greece, 1
Women
Plan New
Campaign
Continued from Page 1
men; Advance Gifts division,
Hildreth Levin, chairman, and
Pola Brodzki, vice chairman;
Gait, Joan Okun and Anne
Schneller, cochairmen; North-
east, Fran Smith, chairman, with
Nancy Odwak, vice chairman;
Palm-Aire, Lillian Hirsch, chair-
man; Plantation, Sandi Golden-
berg, chairman, with Seena Sloan
as vice chairman; Pompano
Beach. Frieda Eiseman. chair-
man; Woodlands, Gladys Daren,
chairman, and Luba Lassar and
Roz Entin, vice chairman.
THE PROPOSED Women's
Division calendar is as follows:
Monday, Oct. 10, joint meeting
with the boards of all Jewish
women's organizations of North
Broward featuring a speaker on
the Middle East: Wednesday.
Nov. 16, recognition luncheon
for last year's members of the
Benefactor Division; Monday,
Nov. 14, all-day Leadership
Training Session for members of
the Campaign Cabinet A
MUST; Monday. Nov. 28. all-
day Worker Training Session A
MUST; Monday. Dec. 12, $2,500
'ivision luncheon at the Tower
Jlub, with nationally recognized
Women's Division leader as
guest speaker: Wednesday. Dec.
14. Advance Gifts (minimum
contribution $1,000) at the home
of Irene Danker. Guest speaker
will be Max Dimont. author of
Jews. God and History and The
Indestructible Jews; Monday.
Tuesday, Wednesday, Jan. 16.
17, 18, Patron Division (mini-
mum contribution $365). An Is-
raeli personality will be here for
thee three days. These will be
area functions; Thursday, Feb. 2,
Campaign Cabinet meeting;
Wednesday, Feb. 15, Sabra
(Division (minimum contribution
$150). Details of this citywide
function will be announced;
Month of March, Key Division
functions to be held in all areas;
and on Thursday, May 11, the
annual meeting of the Women's
Division will be held.
Mrs. Gould stated that "With
this advanced planning and an
outstanding group of chairmen,
the Women's Division campaign
is off to a good start and will have
a very successful year." Persons
interested in participating in the
work of the Women's Division
are requested to contact the
Federation office. Rebecca Hodes
is president of the Women's
Division.
Memorial Tree
Continued from Page 1
UJA drives. His passing was
memorialized at the Jewish
Federation's May 27 annual
meeting that took''/ place in
Temple Beth Israel. Members of
the Federation board and guests
rose for a silent minute of tribute
Mr. Levin was to have been re-
elected to the Federation board of
directors when he was lulled.
each; Denmark won 2 silver
medals and the Virgin Islands, 1
bronze medal.
The United States basketball
team topped the Israel team 92-
91 before 7,000 spectators in the
Yad Eliahu sports palace.
Hilary Bergman of the Univer-
sity of Alabama and Wendy
Weinberg of Baltimore each won
their fourth individual gold
medals on the final day of the
swim events. Bergman beat the
favored Michael Saphir of Israel
in the 400 meter freestyle medley
with a new Maccabiah record
time of 4:39:31 minutes to better
the old record by 11 seconds.
STEVEN PomeranU of the
University of Miami turned out
to be the swim event's top crowd
pleaser with a win in the 100-
meter men's freestyle clocked at
53:58 seconds. He was followed
by four others who finished so
closely that it appeared to be a
deadheat. Included in this group
was Alan Fine, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Irwin Fine of Plantation,
who is about to enter his Junior
year at Princeton. He finished
fourth with a time of 54:17
seconds, or just under one second
behind Steve Pomerantz.
Continued from Page 1
warned that by refusing to con-
template any compromise on the
West Bank, the quest for a full
peace settlement with the Arabs
was probably doomed to failure.
Peres suggested that the govern-
ment seek further interim agree-
ments with individual Arab
states instead.
The Prime Minister sought to
justify and rationalize the grant
of legal status to the three West
Bank settlements which had been
established in defiance of the
previous Labor-led government.
The settlements are Ofra. Maale
Edumim and Elon Moreh, the
latter near the military base at
Kadum not far from the Arab
city of Nablus. Begin also in-
sisted that he had resolved with
Carter that their differences over
borders, the Palestinians and
other Jewish settlements "will
not bring about a split between
our countries."
Begin claimed that Jewish
Settlements on the West Bank
were not illegal because the
Knesset had passed an enabling
law in June 1967 permitting the
government, by administrative
ordinance, to apply Israeli law to
any part of the administered ter-
ritories. So far, that power has
been exercised only in East Jeru-
salem.
BEGIN claimed that Israel
was not
sense
an "occupier in
Streng Leads Cash Drive
Continued from Page 1
of having to borrow $150 million
to fulfill even the bare minimum
levels of assistance it set just one
year ago. (See the Aug. 5 issue of
The Jewish Floridian for a des-
cription of this situation by Leon
Dulzin, treasurer of the Jewish
Agency. "What you in the
American Jewish community do
in terms of campaign pledges
and cash," Dulzin wrote, "will
help us decide about services and
assistance in areas which are
basic to the strength of the
people of Israel.)
There is an equally dis-
tessing crisis that is developing
in financing Federation programs
this as a result of the tardiness
of contributors in redeeming their
pledges. "It is not that the funds
aren't on the books." Streng
stated. "Its that we need these
funds in hand to defray all the
costs that are involved in main-
taining our operations. Without
solvency, it's impossible to keep
operations at their current high
level and if the money doesn't
come in from those who have
pledged it, we shall have to cut
back all along the line. That
would affect the Jewish Com-
munity Center, the Jewish
Family Service, programs for the
elderly including the recently
instituted and popular Nutrition
Program the Chaplaincy
program programs for the
young, singles and so on."
STRENG NOTED that there
are still 325 unpaid pledges for
the years 1974, 1975 and 1976.
"Thousands of dollars are due on
these pledges," he said, "and
while we have been billing these
contributors each and every
month, the response has been
discouraging."
"How can people pledge and
not pay?" he asked.
"If we can get people to pay up
on their past pledges, we'll have
no trouble getting them to pay on
their current pledges," he
declared.
THE FEDERATION treas-
urer and cash chairman urged a
donors to the 1977 campaign who
had not yet sent in their checks
"to speed these to us." He noted
that this would be a particularly
good time to pay up, "just before
Rosh Hashanah."
"Let everyone start the new
year with all debts cleared from
conscience and personal ledger,"
he said. He was quick to point
out, however, that donors do
have until the end of the year to
pay up to qualify for a 1977
Federal tax deduction. "How-
ever." he added, "one can gel the
same deduction without
waiting."
Streng. who has been a Fort
Lauderdale resident since 1972,
spent nearly 35 years as a metal
lurgical engineer with the Inland
Steel Company. He is an en-
gineering graduate of the Massa-
chusetts Institute of Technology
(MIT) and holds a MBA from the
University of Chicago. Following
his retirement to Florida, he
became active as a member of the
Volunteer Action Center of the
United Way of Broward County.
The center recruits men and
women and assigns them to serve
in voluntary capacities with
social agencies.
Miami Rabbi, Experienced
Baal Tfllah, Torah Reader,
and Shofar Blower, Now
Available lor the Holy
Days. Call 940-1412
Cantor and Ba Al Koray
(Torah Reader) Available.
Write CD, c/o P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
the
of international law
D^e Jordan, which held the
West Bank until 1967 had
"legally annexed it in 1949 and
had itself violated international
law in 1967 by its aggression
against Israel. l^**
pointed out. however, that in the
United States' view, the 19b/
enabling act itself contravened
international law and the same
position was taken by the UN
Security Council at the time.
When MK Shulamit Aloni of
the Civil Rights Party inter-
jected from the floor that Israel s
Supreme Court has held that Is-
raeli authorities must observe
international law in the adminis-
tered territories, Begin retorted,
"I am not talking about law, I am
talking about substance."
Begin gave no hint as to
whether further Jewish settle-
ments were being planned at this
time. At a press conference,
Minister of Agriculture Ariel
Sharon who heads the Ministerial
confirm or deny" that pUn,
ew settlements would be
new
"delayed" following Begto'8
to Washington.
visit
THE PRIME Minister was en
thusiaatic in his praise of Rabbi
Alexander Schindler, chairman of
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Or
ganizations. He said thatSchind.
ler, a Reform rabbi had acted to
unite American Jews behind the
new Israeli government.
Begin also reported that he bad
rented appeals from the leaders
of Reform and Conservative
Judaism in the United States not
to amend the Law of Return to
bar recognition of conversions by
non-Orthodox rabbis. Begin said
he was personally and politically
committed to the amendment. He
said that the two groups would
send a delegation to Israel soon
to meet with all parties and seek
an agreed solution to their grit-
vances.
r,,.WwMmmmmMiim/tiiii/)iiiiiiiiMim
mrmr.
zzz
Eban Chides Media For
Inflating W. Bank Flap
WASHINGTON (JTA) Former Israel Foreign Minister
Abba Eban. responding at the National Press Club to questions
on Israel's legalization of three settlements on the West Bank
chided the media for "inflating" their significance. He said if he
had to list the 100 most important things in the current Israeli
situation, the settlements would not be among them. He said he
felt Presidetn Carter, who said they were an obstacle to peace,
does not think it will stop or even slow down the procedures for
negotiations.
11 r%.w.w.w.w^^^^^
FT. LAUD-lf77
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom. For
this reason we do not allow our name to be
represented by any other organization. Each
chapel is exclusively a Riverside Chapel.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a family of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
SUNRISE:
1171 Northwest 61st Avenue(Sunset Strip) 584-6060
HOLLYWOOD:
2230 Hollywood Boulevard/920-1010
North Miami Beach.M.ami Beach.Miami and
west Palm Beach
rive chapels serving the New York Metropolitan area
S3 Riverside
Memor.a.Chapel.inc/Funeral D.rectors
ror generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
rr. LAuo--i.n
rr. LAuo-.i.n


Friday. August 19,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
I AJCongress Outlines Energy Action Program I
, ig there such a thing aa a
I Jewish approach to energy? The
I American Jewish Congress has
Inroposed what it terms "an
lactwn program toward a national
I energy policy." As a reading of it
Ishows, it is far from being
I narrowly Jewish or ethnic.
That "high-priced oil is being
Ibought with sophisticated arms,"
the AJCongress warns, "has
Ibrought about not only an
"increasing flow of arms to the
Lrab nations of the Middle East"
Jbut i9 "enhancing the threat of
|war in that sensitive area." The
AJCongress proposed energy
program follows:
DURING THE last, mercifully
Ishort crisis, some Western
Inations were threatened by
bankruptcy, accompanied by an
Increase in political extremism.
developing nations were con-
jronted by famine induced by
shortages of petroleum-based
ertilizer and the need to curtail
Essential development programs.
ngendering social turmoil and
olitical instability. While the
American economy suffered less,
|t was widely recognized that
ven so rich a nation as ours
tould not long remain healthy in
world sorely beset by financial
thaos and political turmoil.
To meet this crisis, numerous
plans were advanced under the
eneral heading of "Project
^dependence." Goals were
stablished. Laws were proposed
nd widely discussed. Research
ograms were projected. Yet
Virtually nothing happened,
ome of the programs that were
nil iated under the impetus of the
risis were abandoned. With the
^sumption of oil shipments came
return to business-as-usual,
Kcept for the huge increase in
|>e cost of oil and oil products.
It is now clear that the usual
reluctance of governmental
bodies to make unpleasant and
possibly unpopular decisions has
triumphed once again. The whole
matter has been left to private
industry and the play of the
market place. But the promises of
private industry have proved
equally hollow. Development of
domestic oil resources and of
alternative sources of energy has
been branded unprofitable and
either abandoned or not even
seriously undertaken.
FOR THAT reason, if for no
other, the public sector must
assume responsibility to assure
that resources are made available
to meet our country's genuine
energy needs. It is government
that must develop a well-
considered energy program,
explain to the public why it is
needed and how it will work and
put it into effect.
To nullify the threat of another
oil squeeze, the United States
must act boldly and decisively to
reduce the consumption of im-
ported oil and to achieve energy
self-sufficiency as quickly as
possible. At stake in this effort is
not only our country's economic
health and that of our allies but
also the effectiveness of
American foreign policy. Efforts
to deal with the world energy
situation through concerted
international action can be made
credible, however, only by means
of a vigorous domestic energy
policy. And only then can there
be a reversal of the trend toward
bilateral arrangements in which
high-priced oil is bought with
sophisticated arms. These
transactions are already in-
creasing the flow of arms to the
Arab nations of the Middle East
and enhancing the threat of war
in that sensitive area.
A national energy policy for
America must include (1) a
wshowitz Takes AJCongress Post
|The American Jewish Con-
ss has announced the appoint-
fni of Nathan Z. Dershowitz as
ctor of its Commission on
v. Social Action and Urban
fairs. He will succeed Joseph
Robison who has retired but
ptl continue with the Congress
a part-time basis as director-
leritus.
ershowitz, a lawyer with ex-
rsive experience in both civil
criminal matters, is a
nber of the New York State
U.S. Supreme Court bars, as
\\ as a number of Federal court
THE NEW CLSA/UA direc-
! was on the staff of the Appel-
Division of the Legal Aid
^iety and practiced law with
:>ck & Stroock & Lavan and
Greenbaum, Wolff & Ernst
[New York. He has argued
eals before numerous appel-
I courts in New York and other
^s of the country.
Dershowitz is also a special
professor at the Hofstra Law
School where he recently taught a
course in Torts in Constitutional
Perspective.
Robison, who is retiring after
30 years with the Congress, was
recently appointed chairman of
the Committee on Religious
Liberty of the Section of In-
dividual Rights and Respon-
sibilities of the American Bar
Association.
In a statement hailing "30
years of distinguished service to
the cause of civil rights, civil
liberty and the security and dig-
nity of the Jewish people," Rabbi
Arthur Hertzberg, president of
the American Jewish Congress,
paid tribute to Robison for "his
extraordinary contributions to
the work of the American Jewish
Congress" and expressed "per-
sonal pleasure" that Robison
would remain with the organiza-
tion in an advisory capacity.
program of energy conservation
that would eliminate excessive
consumption of scarce resources
while maintaining economic
viability and (2) effectively
designed measures to increase
domestic oil production and to
develop alternative sources of
energy. Crucial to this effort is a
mandatory reporting system in I
which a single Federal agency
would make sure that the people
of the United States have ac-
curate, verifiable and current
information about current energy
supplies, energy reserves and
energy use.
IT CAN be expected that calls
for mandatory controls of any
kind will be countered by
suggestions for voluntary
restraints on the use of energy.
We urge rejection of this counsel
of futility. The inevitable effect of
any system of controls that relies
on voluntary compliance is that
those who comply will suffer
while those who do not will not.
It is no reflection on the
American public to point out that
few persons will choose to make
sacrifices that others are not
required to make and in fact are
not making.
The principle of equitable
sharing of the burden with
respect to reduced energy con-
sumption also demands that
special efforts be made to
mitigate the economic con-
sequences of energy conservation
when they fall disproportionately
on particular regions, industries
or groups of workers. Thus, if
some sections of the economy
suffer disproportionate economic
hardship as a result of energy
conservation measures, ways to
mitigate this unfair sharing of
the burden must be devised. Just
as programs have been created to
alleviate the unique economic
problems of Appalachia and
other regions involving tran-
sitions from one type of economic
activity to another, so can ways
be developed to cushion the
effects of energy conservation on
particular industries or sections
of the country and help them in
the short-term adjustments and
long-term transitions that may
be necessary.
With these guiding principles
of equity and compassion in
mind, we urge the following
measures:
1) A national program of
conservation to reduce
excessive and needless
consumption of oil. This
should include allocation and
rationing programs to assure
fair distribution of fuel and
heating oil, gas and gasoline
and other energy resources.
We oppose increased taxes
or other devices designed to
reduce consumption by
increasing costs to the
consumer. Imposing high
prices in order to limit access
to scarce commodities,
/'/" ..o
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
PRFSENTS
UK.II HOI i l>\>
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without some accompanying
mechanism that would make
adjustments for need and
ability to pay, would be
inequitable and would not
command the support of the
American people.
2) Retention and improved
enforcement of the highway
speed limits imposed during
the 1973-74 embargo.
3) Federal funding of basic
research into energy con-
servation technology in
building construction,
equipment design and in-
dustrial processing.
4) Tax credits or government
loans to encourage improved
insulation of existing
commercial buildings and
homes.
5) Imposition of graduated
taxes on automobiles based
on weight or horse-power to
stimulate production and
purchase of smaller vehicles
that use less gasoline.
6) Development and en-
forcement of Federal thermal
efficiency standards for all
new buildings.
7) Redesign of electricity
rates to discourage peak-
hour consumption and to
make rates higher rather
than lower as use increases.
8) Increased Federal aid to
mass transit systems in
urban and suburban areas
and subsidies to intercity
railroads.
9) Passage of a Truth-in-
Energy law which would
require automobiles and
appliances even homes
that are offered for sale to
list their average energy use
and operating costs. In this
way, purchasers could make
informed choices based on
the cost of fuel as a factor
in the overalll cost of operation.
10) Sharp restrictions on the
use of electricity for ad-
vertising and other external
displays.
11) Lower temperatures in
public and commercial
buildings not used by
children, the aged and the
sick.
THE ENERGY problem poses
a powerful challenge to our
country. We are confident,
however, that if the American
people are fully informed of the
dimensions of this emergency,
they will respond as they have in
the past to the crises of war and
civil strife.
This nation has the resources
and the ingenuity to do what
must be done. It needs only
vigorous leadership and a sense
of determination which has thus
far been lacking to translate the
rhetoric of Project Independence
into reality. We call on the
President and the United States
Congress to provide such
leadership. We call upon the
American community to make
this issue a priority item on its
agenda. The American Jewish
Congress will join in this national
effort.
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J>


Pags4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale_
Friday. Aimut lti
m
The Vance Shuttle
For question so serious ss peace, there seems to
be something amusing about Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance's trip to the Middle East
Secrecy has enshrouded every step of his way, except of
course for all the statements that have been pumped out
by the various Arab leaders Vance has been visiting.
Mainly, we get the impression that the secret, whatever
it may be, is therefore Vance's and, perhaps, Vance's alone
because there is really little he can say or do without
acquiescence on both sides of the Arab-Israeli impasse.
Possibly the most potent of events in the Vance shuttle
was President Sadst's suggestion that senior Arab and
Israeli officials meet in a pre-Geneva mini-conferencea
solid recommendation that the Israelis promptly
welcomed, but that Syria's President Assad just as
promptly bombed out of existence.
No less unintentially amusing was the lure this week of
PLO recognition on the right of Israel to exista bid on
the part of the Palestinians for a seat at a Geneva con-
ference whenever it will be called to order, providing UN
Res. 242 is rewritten to incorporate the quid pro quo
notion of Israeli acceptance of the right of existence for a
Palestinian homeland.
This fruitless exercise in diplomatic terpsichory has as
its purpose once again to brand the Israelis as non-
cooperative, particularly because Res. 242 is predicated on
a blanket Israeli withdrawal from all the 1967 occupied
territories.
What, then, does the Vance trip signify. In our view, it
is an exercise in possibilities. That is good in itself. But to
expect concrete results would be to fail to see the humor in
a serious world effort to achieve peace in the Middle East
at a price only Israel is expected to pay.
Meeting Emergencies
The American Jewish community has once again
demonstrated that when an emergency hits it is ready not
only to help its own members but the entire general
community. This was shown in the aftermath of the
looting and arson during the power blackout in New York
City and again in Johnstown, Pa., which was ravaged by a
flood.
In New York City, the organized Jewish community has
mobilized its efforts to help Jewish and non-Jewish
businessmen who were wiped out by the looting to get
government and other aid to get back into operations.
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York
and its various agencies are participating in this program
as are various other Jewish organizations.
In Johnstown, the Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds is trying to help the Jewish community
recover from the ravages of the flood.
Jewish leaders are active in the volunteer services in
Johnstown as they are in New York Cityand of course
throughout the United States.
Pattern of Violence
The bombing of s Chattanooga synagogue follows too
closely on the heels of the bombing in Rockville, Md., of
the home of Morris J. Amitay, executive director of the
American-Israel Public Affairs Committee.
All of this must be set against a backdrop of the
growing pugnaciousness of the American Nazi Party and
of the Hanafi Muslims, sentenced in Washington the other
week for their caper earlier this year in the nation's
capital, which included a takeover of the B'nai B'rith
Building.
At the trial, the Hanafis spoke openly of their war
against "racist Zionism" as being "divinely inspired."
Does all of this portend a national pattern? We hope
not, but some of the evidence suggests otherwise. We are
not speculating that there is an organized conspiracy
hereonly that the flow of national hatreds among the
disaffected seems to be running in the same direction
these days.
This demands a new vigilance on the part of the
American Jewish community, but somehow we get the
impression that our leadership has not yet begun to come
to grips with the awesome implications of the situation let
alone studied means of dealing with it.
Has Begin Split U.S. Jewry':
hnisl Ihii li u
OF GREATER FORT LAUOERDALE
Bualneaa Office Suite 30S-13SS. Federal Hwy., Donla, Fla S3004
Telephone 020-9018
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M THOMPSON
Editor and Publlaher Executive Editor AaHttant to PublUher
The Jewish Floridian Docs Not Guarantee The Kishruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Column*
Second Claai Poetage Paid at Dan la. Fla 8BM20
Publlahed Bl-Weekly
Tito Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate.
Worldwide Now* Service, National Editorial Association. American Association ol
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association
Leo
THE AMERICAN journalist,
Robert Kaplan, who has
emigrated to Israel drawa a bril-
liant analogy between the
American Jewish commuiutvand
the wealthy Jewa who preferred
to remain in affluent Babylonia
and finance the Second Jewish
Commonwealth from abroad
The fate of both is a matter of
ancient and sad history, and
Kaplan has us wondering
whether we should not take its
lesson to heart. He raises the
question because of the recent
Begin victory and the seemingly people are much more emotional.
Mindlin
divisive effect that it has had on
American Jewish opinion.
WHAT IS at issue here is not
so much the effect on American
Jewish opinion as on world
opinion generally and American
Gentile opinion specifically.
The hypocrisy of political,
social and economic forces at play
in the U.S. and elsewhere in the
West is well-documented, and the
negative reaction of at least this
country's rtalpolitik to the Begin
victory was predictable because
it ia in line with the hypocrisy
itself, if with nothing else.
What Kaplan is getting at is
that the American Jewish com-
munity is now gripped in a
growing fear of the rising tide of
Gentile realpotitik of Gentile
disapproval of Israeli policy. Ul-
timately, then, the question is to
what extent this growing fear will
compromise the Jewish com-
munity's determination to
support Israel "right or wrong."
WILL THE new Babylonia
flag in its financing of the Third
Jewish Commonwealth, too?
Kaplan doesn't really answer
the question, but raising it is
scary enough, mainly because
past history all too frequently
gives us rather precise clues
about future events and their dis-
position. In effect, Kaplan
doesn't have to answer the
question; the answer, at least of
sorts, is already there for anyone
to contemplate, if only he has the
guts to do it
Adopting this attitude, Kaplan
refers to a recent address in Los
Angeles by former U.S. Ambas-
sador to the United Nations John
Scali, who expressed his anxiety
about the direction that Israeli
policy is likely to take under
Begin.
HEBREW University Prof.
Shlomo Aronson, reports Kaplan,
reacted to the address in an
article in Ha'areU in which Aron-
son defined the American Jewish
community as being divided
"between ordinary people and
those who are close to politics or
intellectual life"
Wrote Aronaon: "The ordinary
without much expertise in the
Middle East conflict. Those close
to politics have a great fear of a
clash between Israeli positions
and the interests of the non-
Jewish environment... they know
that the ordinary people are
emotional and that the im-
migrant generation is hawkish."
The reason for the fear is that
"the ordinary folk of American
Jewry" are not only not expert.
They are, in fact, "novices in the
complex world of political trial
balloons regarding Middle East
peace negotiations."
THUS, the American Jewish
community could easily split in
two between "supporters and op-
ponents of Begin" over the "un-
known reaction of the non-Jewish
environment...with which no-
body has been accustomed to
grapple since the days of Eisen-
hower," presemably President
Eisenhower's resolution of the
1956 Suez-Sinai War in which he
unwittingly sold out British,
French and Israeli interest to the
first successful Russian invasion
of the Middle East in modern
times.
My own dissent from the Kap
lan-Aronson thesis lies in Aron-
son's definition of the con-
stituency of "ordinary people"
who are "emotional," "without
much expertise" and "novices."
Aronson characterizes them
sociologically as the "immigrant
generation" and "hawkish." This
generation, he declares, con-
stitutes "a quarter of American
Jews... (who)...are immigrants
from Eastern Europe. They came
to the U.S. often by accident
because it was the only country
that would issue them visas on
the eve of the Holocaust when the
British closed all doors to Pales-
tine."
Argues Aronson, and Kaplan
obviously agrees: "To them,
Judaism is not only a religion but
a living nationality. Israel ia not
a country to be supported by
them only when it is 'right.' "
IN ESSENCE, these are the
supporters of Begin, whose lack
of sophistication embarrasses
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the inUBactual and rjoUtieai"
presumably those who^T^
novices "in the complex worUj
political trial baUooi "
Tks sophlaticated, on the *.
trary, are "assimilated, ofte.
spathstic, materialistic in rZ?
tation snd American T
nationality. Per some.. JurW
is not s nationality but goaT
thing to be flaunted a fewtinai,
year for a fund-raiaing daa,
over 'a high-priced but rnediocn
meal.' They are "confused sad
bewikisred." ""
The trouble with this bifur-
ca.ion of the American Jewkh
community ia that, primarily, it
ia meddlesome. To begin with it
auggests thst committed
American Jewa, in order not to bt
assimilated, apathetic and
materialistic, must also not
regard themselves as American
in nationality, and that is a du>
gerous proposition. Erroneously
it conceives of Judaism aa i
nationality, which it is not. Whit
is worse, it flaunts the spectre of
dual allegiance unnecessarily.
SECOND, it ia elitist, an intel-
lectual view of American sociolo-
gical structure replete with all of
the intellectual's prejudices of the
non-intellectual of the
"emotional" and the "hawkish."
In this context, the term, or-
dinary people, doea more violence
to Kaplan and Aronson ai
theorizers than to the Kaplan
Aronson theory itself.
Third, in discussing the "im-
migrant generation," both men
blur the distinction between the
second generation issue of the
early twentieth century
migration from Eastern Europe,
who are still very much alive and
kicking today (I am myself i
member of it), and the second
generation issue of survivors of
the Holocaust.
Kaplan snd Aronaon errone-
ously refer to them aa if they wen
one snd the same. This com-
plicates matters because, if then
a truth to the Aronson thesii,
and I believe there is, that far
many American Jewa, Judaism
merely "something to be flaunted
a few times s year for a fund-
raising dinner," which second
generation is he talking about? In
the end, who are today's Baby
Ionia na?
FURTHERMORE, does either
of these second generations
include sny of those they charac
terixe ss ordinary people?" By
definition, the sffete, those who
practice an occasional gustatory
brand of Judaism, csn hardly be
"ordinary." And so, tit
"emotional," the "hawkish.
must surely be the zealots
religious defenders of Israel, such
aa Begin himself represents, to
whom neither Kaplan nor Aron-
son refers st all.
Is this yet another split in the
Jewish community?
All of which may sound very
academic, but it is not not
when you theorize on the future
downfall of Israel, set forth the
propositions of your theory tad
then fail to substantiate toe
propositions themselves
STILL, none of this detract!
from Kaplan's very original and
fascinating analogy providing
some corrections are made in t*
supporting propositions. "
American Jews sre akin to the
Jewa of ancient Babylonia, tlw
haa less to do with a growing few
to oppose U.S. foreign poW7
than with Jewish conviction
about a Jewish state.
Thia is s question few peopk
have ever examined aquarely. but
the truth is that, even hen,
history can provide us with some
very enlightening ^formation*
the basis of which to make far
more accurate predictions about
Israel's future than Kaplan and
Aronaon propose, or thsn most
us are to contemplate at to*
moment.


Friday, August 19,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
Page5
AJCommittee Loans Director to NYC
YMY/1,
NEW YORK (JTA) Aid
to small merchants, many of
them Jewish, whose businesses
were destroyed by the looting
during the July 13-14 blackout,
is moving ahead here. The
American Jewish Committee an-
nounced that Haakell Lazere,
director of its New York City
chapter is being loaned to the
City of New York to direct a
special project for helping the
merchants.
Lazare, a community relations
expert and specialist in dealing
with racial and ethnic tensions,
will serve as a volunteer director
of a program that will set up
Neighborhood Business Assis-
tance teams in 14 locations where
the looting was the heaviest. He
told a City Hall press conference
that the program will try "to
reach out to small merchants in
the area in which they operate,
and to expedite in every way
possible their return to normal
operations."
Lazare said the 14 centers,
which will begin July 25 to
operate for two weeks, will be
staffed by volunteer lawyers, ac-
countants, insurance specialists
and bank representatives "so
that a small businessman will be
able to get the assistance he
needs in one place at one time."
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra
under the baton of Zubin Mehta
performed Tchaikovsky and
Offenbach in an unlikely setting
July 22 before an audience un-
familiar with the works of
European composers but appre-
ciative nonetheless. The place
was the open fence in the Israeli
border village of Dovev and the
listeners were several hundred
south Lebanese school chil-
dren, border police, Christian
Phalangists wearing side arms,
Druze, Circassians, Israeli
settlers and Lebanese farmers.
It was a holiday for the Leba-
nese and a propaganda victory
for the Israelis through the
universal language of music.
Mehta, who visited the open fence
a week earlier, decided that it
would be an excellent spot for a
concert. His 100-member orches-
tra arrived in buses from Tel
f'SSS/////SS -.
few trees that offered meager
shade from the burning sun.
The Lebanese, who might have
expected Oriental tunes and a
belly dancer, were intrigued by
the violins, French horns and
bass drums. The percussion in-
According to the documents,
Truman delivered an angry note
to Israel on May 29, demanding
Israel withdraw from territories
captured during the 1948-49
fighting.
A "top secret" State Depart-
The Jewish Scene
At Home and Abroad
MMW?m
Aviv with their instruments and
sheet music. They set up on a
clearing near the border, under a
struments they have been using
for many months are machine
guns and mortars.
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Funeral services were held here
July 31 for Jacob Ben-Ami, one
of the best-known actors of the
Yiddish stage. He died Friday at
the age of 86. Ben-Ami, who per-
formed with equal skill in both
English and Yiddish, had a long-
distinguished career appearing in
plays by Yiddish, American,
British and Russian playwrights
on tours in Europe, South Africa,
South America and the United
States.
He was last seen on the stage
in 1972 in a production of "Yoshe
Kalb" staged at the theater on
Second Ave. and 12th St. on the
East Side where he had appeared
with Maurice Schwartz in 1918 in
what was then the Irving Place
Theater.
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
An angry President Truman
demanded Israeli withdrawal
from territories occupied during
Israel's War of Independence but
was rebuffed by the nascent
Jewish State, according to docu-
ments released by the State
Department in mid-July.
The documents, entitled "For-
eign Relations of the United
States, 1949," reinforce the view
that the 1949 State Department,
whose Near East Affairs Bureau
was dominated by Arabists, was
actively lobbying against Israel.
Previously classified diplomatic
notes, cables, and memoranda
also depict Truman as waffling in
his support for Israel.
Letters to the Editor
ment memorandum to Truman
called upon the United States to
adopt a hard line attitude toward
Israel in an attempt to pressure
her to return to the partition
lines. The memorandum sug-
gested "the following course of
action vis-a-vis Israel:
"(1) Immediate adoption of a
generally negative attitude
toward Israel. This would in-
clude: refusing Israeli requests
for United States assistance,
such as for the training of Israeli
officials in this country and the
sending of experts to Israel.
Maintenance of no more than a
correct attitude toward Israeli of-
ficials in this country and toward
American organizations in-
terested in promoting the cause
of Israel, and filing to support the
position of Israel in international
organizations.
"(2) Holding up allocation of
$49 million of a $100 million Ex-
port-Import Bank loan ear-
marked for Israel: and, (3) lifting
the tax-exempt status of the
United Jewish Appeal and other
American Jewish fund-raising or-
ganizations."
NEW YORK (JTA) Ap-
proximately one-third of the
Jewish residents in flood-ravaged
Johnstown, Pa., have either been
Finding a nurse
used to be
frustrating,
complicated
and risky.
Now it's easy
and reliable.
April 18,1977
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I have been receiving The
Jewish Floridian for some time.
However, in all of the editions
that I have read I have never
seen an in-depth article or column
on the "Yordim." I have heard
about these people but the first
time that I really saw a great deal
of exposure on them was on the
Mike Wallace "Sixty Minutes"
program recently.
Please tell me why your news-
paper which is always printing
pleas for donations to help Soviet
Jews and Israeli Jews does not
also print articles indicating how
many of the Israeli Jews are
leaving Israel, and why they are
leaving.
July 22,1977
It is now three months since
that letter was written and I still
nave not read anything at all in
The Jewish Floridian on this
subject. From information I have
gathered from friends, it seams
that about 300,000 native Israelis
have left the country which is
almost 10 percent of the popu-
lation. This would be equivalent
to 20 million Americans
emigrating elsewhere. In my
opinion, this mass exodus is
important enough to be discussed
and printed in a paper devoted
entirely to Jewish causes. The
omission of information on this
matter seems to be deliberate and
not merely an oversight.
Again, I wish to question the
total blackout of this news. In-
cidentally, if you do not per-
sonally or a member of your
executive staff reply to this
letter, I shall instruct my secre-
tary to throw your newspaper
into the trash can upon receipt. I
do not like "one-sided or biased
Now there's
Medical
Personnel
Pool.
displaced from their homes or
had their businesses damaged,
according to the Council of
Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds (CJF). No Jewish lives
were lost.
The death toll has risen to 59,
with up to 60 people still missing
as a result of the savage flooding
from the overflowing Conemaugh
River valley. As it continued to
rain. Civil Defense officials
warned of the possibility of more
flooding. Gov. Milton J. Shapp
has estimated total damage in
the area at $200 million. Over 25
Jewish businesses have sustained
severe structural damage and
loss of stock due to the mud and
water.
TEL AVIV (JTA) De-
fense Minister Ezer Weizmann
has instructed the military
government of the West Bank to
allow maximum autonomy to
local Arab authorities and to
treat them with patience and
understanding. He laid down his
policy at the annual meeting of
the military governors and their
aides. He was accompanied by
Chief of Staff Gen. Mordecaai
(faff.
Both officials said the Israeli
military should adopt a liberal
stance toward the Arab popu-
lation in the Judaea and Samaria
regions and that the Arab
mayors there should be allowed
to raise funds for their localities.
Weizmann stressed that it was
important for the Israeli authori-
ties to refrain as much as possible
from interfering in the daily lives
of the West Bank Arabs.
Weizmann also said that the
government will decide when and
where Jewish settlements will be
established in those territories,
adding that there would be no
more confusion on that question.
Gur observed that the task of the
military government was vital to
the security of Israel.
NEW YORK (JTA) A
six-member delegation of Reform
and Conservative rabbis and lay-
men who met with Israeli Prime
Minster Men ache m Begin here
urged him not to change the Law
of Return which recognizes con-
versions by non-Orthodox rabbis.
Begin reportedly said it was
his personal conviction that the
law should be changed to require
conversions only according to
halacha and his attitude was not
just a party or a coalition com-
mitment. Begin said, also, if he
could get enough support in the
Knesset for a change he will in-
troduce the necessary amend-
ment. (Spokesman for Conser-
vative Judaism replied that their
movement has always been
grounded in halacha and has
served as a major force in
Zionism. Begin said he was aware
of all that and conceded that the
delegation's request had merit.)
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SCHOOL OPENS ON SEPTEMBER 6. HegtStor Todayl
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Rabbi Ef ralm Warehaw, Director
unumpm


Pge6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 19,1977
Richards WECARE Day: A Shoppers Jamboree
Richards vice president for stores, Philip
Hoffman greets WECARE administrative
assistant Marie Parsons.
a.
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th
Ji
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ch
8:
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cl
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fc
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d
A
S
Jewish War Veterans were active throughout
the store signing up shoppers for Richards
charge accounts.
The milling crowds in Richards Department Store,
and the vast Lauderhill Mall parking lot packed solidly
with autos so that parking came at a premium, made it
seem like a last minute shopping day in December rather
than what it was Richards" gala WECARE Day for the
benefit of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
Everyone agreed that there hasn't been an August
shopping day like this in anyone's memory at least not
in Fort Lauderdale. Store executives and shoppers were
unanimous they hadn't seen anything like this except in
the period between Thanksgiving and Christmas. There
were crowds in front of the store just before it opened at 10
a.m. And the minute the doors opened, the sale tables -
with bargains galore (men's sports shirts marked down to
$3.99) were mobbed with shoppers. One shopper-spec-
tator beaming at the beehive of activity was the
pretty wife of Richards President Irwin Berlin. She was
delighted. So was Philip Hoffman, Richards vice president
of stores and a key figure in organizing the event. So was
Rovi Faber, general chairman of WECARE. So was Paul
Zimmerman, senior commander of the Jewish War
Veterans, and Bill Kling, commander of JWV Post 730,
whose troops were everywhere in evidence signing
shoppers up for Richards charge accounts.
The Jewish Federation will receive $1 from Richards
for every charge account that is approved. B'nai B'rith
Women were there in force, helping sign up shoppers, too.
A Red Cross contingent gave free blood pressure tests on
the second floor. And shoppers were entertained by the
sweet-singing Chosen Children choral group. All told,
there were some 50 door prizes, with final drawing set for
mid-evening. (Winners wUl be announced in the next issue
of The Jewish Floridian)
Fran Schiller of Richards, sales promotion director for
WECARE Day, said "it isn't a shopping spree, it's a jam-
boree." Richards will contribute 10 percent of the day's
receipts to the Jewish Federation over and above the
store's normal income for the day.
Mrs. Irwin Berlin (right) wife of the store's
president, greets WECARE general chair-
man Rovi Faber.
Fran Schiller (center), Richards' sales
promotion director for WECARE Day,
greets JWV Commander Bill Kling (right) of
Post 730 and Bill Gross, editor of JWVs
"News Carrier."
Shoppers huddle over bargain sales table
offering dress shirts.
Members of Chosen Children choral group
pause to show off why they're on hand.
Rabbi Efraim Warshaw of the Hebrew Day
School had an information table among
ladies dresses.
Margate B'nai B'rith Women (left to right)
Mitzi Ratner, Esther Magzen and Bea Gold-
flam were shoppers' guides.
Richards
salesman Robert Matz (right)
shows Theodore Fine of Hillsboro Beach and
others the way to best bargains.
Richards saleslady
rnnnter nr
^-.


.August 19.1977
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
The Fate of Jewish Culture in the USSR
ty-five years ago, ~..m
F*2 1952 24 leading
U'writers. actors and in-
S Government. This was the
te expression of btalin s
.^eradicate Jewish culture,
ij, the USSR. To this day.
ISoviet Union has failed to lift
death sentence the regime has
osed on Jewish culture.
|bEFORE THE DEMISE
, short time after the Declara-
Rights of the Peoples of
Russia, signed by Lenin in Nov.
1917, there were 11 daily Yiddish
newspapers and about 60 weekly
and monthly journals. There were
Jewish theaters, numerous flour-
ishing publishing houses,
printing dozens of Yiddish books
of all kinds annually, in issues
reaching millions of copies. There
was hardly a city without a
Jewish educational establish-
ment of one form or another and
Jewish culture and literary ac-
tivites flourished, although
within strictly prescribed Com-
munist Party rules.
es/SS//f/> ///"//"//< //////////////,//s//. IIiimaii Rights
Continued from Page 1
quickly and harshly dis
oday in the USSR, not one
ish school is in session this
country which 60 years ago
uced the highest level of
sh scholarship in hundreds
cademies and seminaries. For
e-and-one-half million Jews
is a death-like silence of
rjreds of closed synagogues,
destroyed Yiddish and
rew printing presses.
ECENTLY, more ominous
les of the Stalin period were
akened by allegations in h-
that some Jewish activists
emigration to Israel corn-
ed espionage and were linked
he American CIA. One of
, Anatoly Sharansky, has
held in prison since March 4
iut rights to an attorney.
Begun, in a Catch-22 skua-
has been sentenced to two
in exile in Magadan near
Arctic Circle for
"Parasitism" after not being
allowed to work when he applied
to emigrate.
The hopes that Americans had
for the Helsinki Accord two years
ago have been shattered. "To my
country," said President Ford
when signing the document in
1975, "human rights are not
cliches or empty phrases." Presi-
dent Carter has made human
rights the leitmotif of his ad-
ministration, but these themes
have not fallen on receptive ears
of the Soviet signers of the Hel-
sinki Accord.
The evaluation of the Helsinki
Accord currently being made in
Belgrade has not yet given us a
score chart of matching words
with deeds. But one thing is
certain: the promises that were
made two years ago in Helsinki
have not been fulfilled. The
spirits of those 24 murdered
writers, poets and intellectuals of
1952 hover over Liubianka Prison
calling for justice ... and their
memories still haunt us.
Hebrew U. Student is First To
Receive Memorial Scholarship
niel Sarig. a student at the
ew University's Dr. Joseph
bhwartz Graduate Program
jraining Community Center
|tors and Senior Personnel,
[been named as the first
lent of the annual Dr. Sch-
Memorial Scholarship
helps a Schwartz Program
nt from a development town
badvantaged neighborhood
}tinue his studies.
(Schwartz Program, named
fmory of the late director-
al of the Joint Distribution
nittee (JDC| in Europe, was
lished by JDC-Israel at the
iBaerwald School of Social
| and is under the joint aus-
f the School of Social Work
|the Hebrew University's
School of Education.
SARIG, 26, whose parents im-
migrated to Israel from Turkey,
was born and reared in Yahud.
He holds a BA degree in educa-
tional administration and super-
vision from Bar I Ian University.
In addition to its support of
the Community Centers, JDC-Is-
rael initiates, develops and sup-
ports, in cooperation with local
agencies, a wide range of health,
educational and social services
for the aged, the handicapped,
the chronically and mentally ill,
the disadvantage^ and the
training of professional person-
nel. JDC is a beneficiary of the
UJA Campaign of the Jewish
Federation here.
ianu-El Begins Membership Drive
uple Emanu-El of Greater
Lauderdale is opening a
ership drive according to
Bergman, membership
president. The first function
Md on Sunday, Aug. 7, at
Imple and a second member-
crunch will be held on Sun-
wg 18, at 10:30 a.m. at the
t>bi Joel S. Goor, spiritual
said. 'Should there be
lent registration in our
school, there will be a
in the Coral Ridge area
ear."
Jane Lawson Nursery
is now taking regis-
is for the 1977-78 achool
"he school opens on Thurs-
ept. 15, and offers full-day
and half-day classes. Threee- and
five-day arrangements can be
made with transportation
available. The school provides
Jewish background, as well as
creative play.
Rabbi Goor recently returned
from Israel where he led a con-
gregational group on a mission.
During the next few weeks, he
will be reporting to the congrega-
tion at Friday night services on
the highlights of the trip, par-
ticularly meetings with Israeli of-
ficials, and a visit to the Good
Fence.
Soon after Stalin came to
power a drive began to hinder
and dismantle Jewish cultural in-
stitutions. By the end of 1948.
the Teachers Institute in Kiev,
the last existing Jewish in-
stitution of higher learning in the
USSR, was closed. Shortly after-
wards a decree was issued that all
theaters in the USSR become
self-supporting, that is, "to
operate on an independent bud-
get." Only the theaters of
minority groups were eligible for
government support but the
authorities ruled that the Jewish
(Yiddish) State Theatre in Mos-
cow was not considered a
minority group theater and,
therefore, government subsidies
were withheld. Thus came an end
to the Jewish theater.
RESORT TO VIOLENCE
As an ominous start to an even
more brutal campaign against
Jewish life and culture, many
writers and poets disappeared
mysteriously or were put under
arrest. Editorial workers of the
newspaper Einigkeit (Unity) and
of the publishing house Ernes
(Truth) were also arrested. The
great Yiddish actor and acknow-
ledged leader of the Jewish com-
munity, Solomon Mikhoels, was
hired by the police to Minsk
under some pretext and found
almost decapitated by what was
reported as a mysterious "auto
accident."
In the winter of 1948-49. it is
estimated that over 431 Jewish
artists, writers and musicians
were arrested, most of whom died
in labor camps. But the fate of
the most prestigious Jewish
intellectuals was reserved for the
summer of 1952.
The "Jewish trial" began on
July 11. 1952, and lasted until
July 18. Among the 25 accused
were the leading poets and
writers David Bergelson, Itsik
Feffer, Peretz Markish: Benya-
mon Zuskin, and several
academics and physicians. The
accused were charged with being
lC'Rebels" (Buntovshchiki), who
wished by armed rebellion to
separate Crimea from the Soviet
Union and to establish their own
"Jewish bourgeois national
Zionist republic"; 2) agents of
"American Imperialism"; and
3) "Enemies of the USSR."
The "court," on July 18 pro-
nounced its verdict the death
penalty. Only one was sentenced
to a long prison term.
On Aug. 12, 1952, the execu-
tions were carried out in the
cellars of the Liubianka Prison in
Moscow.
JEWISH CULTURE TODAY
The essential elements of the
policies introduced by Stalin
have been retained virtually
Reserve Now for The
HIGH HOLY DAYS
and SUKKOTH
I OUR FAMILY FILM
{TIVAL CONTINUES. J
fes My Father Told !"
Wednesday, Aug. 31
8 p.m. At The
'ish Community Center
12999 NW 33 Avenue
We do business
the right way.
woo W. Oakland Park Blvd.
'Ft. Lauoardala. Fla. 33311
Phone 71S-13M
OAKLAND TOYOTA
intact by his successors. Short of
the terror of execution, Soviet
Government policies have con-
tinued to extinguish every trace
that remained from a once
flourishing Jewish literature and
culture. Despite the fact that the
USSR probably has propor-
tionately the largest population
of Jews in the world today whose
mother tongue is Yiddish
approximately 300,000 by the
last Soviet census the state of
Yiddish literature is pathetic.
The one token Yiddish monthly
magazine, Sovietish Heimland,
has a circulation of some 25,000,
but it is suspected that more than
half goes for overseas consump-
tion. Although perhaps over one
million Soviet Jews possess at
least some understanding or
speaking ability in Yiddish,
which is the officially recognized
mother tongue of the Soviet
Jewish nationality, only one
weekly newspaper of four sides is
printed in Birobijhan, the so-
called Jewish Autonomous
Region in Soviet Asia, which has
only 14,000 Jews living there.
The appearance of a handful of
books a year that are mostly re-
prints of classics written before
the turn of the century cannot be
mistaken for a real publication
program.
In 1971, Yosef Kerley, a Yid-
dish poet, petitioned to his
friends for help to emigrate to Is-
rael: "I am a Yiddish poet and as
such I am utterly superfluous in
the Soviet Union."
NOT ONE SCHOOL!
Not one Yiddish school or a
class has been permitted by the
government in the USSR for
thirty years. There are no schools
in any language anywhere in the
Soviet Union where Jewish chil-
dren or adults can learn some-
12 days A 11 nights
Sept 12 to Sept. 23
M95
par parson,
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Sept 12 to Sept. 15
snd Sept. 21 to Sept. 23
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Sept. 26 to Oct. 6
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thing of Jewish culture, history
or literature. The formal study of
Hebrew, the language of the
Jewish people since time im-
memorial, is not not permitted
although dozens of other ethnic
and nationality groups in the
USSR enjoy a wide network of
cultural and educational institu-
tions conducted in their own
national languages. A so-called
"Yeshiva" in Moscow consisting
of a handful of over-age students
has yet to graduate one rabbi al-
though it has existed for a dozen
years.
Although there has been an
awakened interest in Hebrew and
Jewish culture as a result of pride
in the establishment of the State
of Israel, the Six-Day War. Etc.,
the repeated attempts of the
refuseniks at legitimizing the
study of Hebrew have failed. Any
Jewish learning and culture is
perforce unofficial and exists only
in tiny clandestine groups who
meet in people's homes. These
groups often use the primitive
home-made texts and are under
continual surveillance and
harassment by the KGB (Soviet
Secret Police).
Even a minimal effort at cul-
ture such as an attempted sym-
posium by a small group of
refuseniks gathered in a cramped
Moscow apartment in December
of 1976 was frowned on by the
authorities and quickly curtailed
and dispersed by the Secret
Police. To cap the ignominious
position of Jews in Soviet
society, even the martyrdom of
Soviet Jews in World War II is
downgraded. Despite the fact
that Jews from Soviet territories
were the largest part of the six
million Jews annihilated,
references to the uniqueness of
Jewish suffering in the Holocaust
have been almost eliminated from
text books, official histories,
movies and even erased from
monuments at massacre sites.
Plus '0-
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(1-531-5771


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Landerdale
Friday, August 19,1977
I
c
c
i
S
c

United Way Campaign Takes Off...
The 1977-78 United Way cam-
paign has officially "taken off."
The chief executive officers of 12
selected organizations met at a
breakfast late last month and
accepted responsibility to be
"pilot campaigners."
The 12 organizations are con-
ducting their fund-raising drive
in advance of the general solici-
tation. The organizations are
American Express, Broward
County School Board, Century
Village East, City of Hallandale,
City of Lauderdale Lakes, City of
Plantation, Coral Ridge Proper-
ties, Florida Power & Light, Lord
Colony Enterprises, Inc., South
Florida State Hospital, Sensor-
matic Electronics and Hollywood
Memorial Hospital.
APPROXIMATELY 10,000
employees will be solicited during
the early campaign phase
The pilot campaigners, respon-
sible for setting momentum and
incentive for the September
drive, has set an objective of
$329,845. This represents a 90
percent increase over last year's
employee contributions of
173,969 by these same 12 or-
ganizations.
T. Edward Benton, vice chair-
man of the pilot campaign,
speaking at the breakfast, ex-
plained the three main reasons
tor the pilot campaigns:
First, "to set a winning atti-
tude and momentum for the rest
of the campaign." Second, "the
pilot serves to test the effective-
ness of campaign materials and
procedures." Third, "the p. ..
campaigns serve as a barometer
for the general campaign in that
it helps the staff and campaign
volunteers set realistic objectives
and projections for our ultimate
gel"
Also in attendance at the
breakfast were Philip N.
Cheaney, campaign chairman,
and Joseph N. Scott, associate
general chairman of the Pace-
setter Division.

.Three Local Men Take Charge
STACK
MOSS
EPSTEIN
Three prominent Broward.
Countians have been appointed
to lead 1977 United Way Cam-
paign here.
County Commissioner Jack L.
Moss, Sheriff Edward J. Stack
and President and Chief Execu-
tive Officer of the Greater Holly-
wood Chamber of Commerce,
Barry R. Epstein, have been
appointed vice chairmen of fund-
raising divisions for this year's
campaign.
MOSS, PAST president of
United Wav and a member of the
board of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, is vice
chairman of the Professional
Division. He will organize the
drive among attorneys, clergy,
accountants and investors.
Stack, recently elected for his
third term as sheriff, will serve as
Government Division vice
chairman.
Epstein, vice chairman of the
Organization Division, will or-
ganize the fund-raising drive
among civic organizations, as
well as the United Way agencies
themselves.
A UNITED Way volunteer for
many years, Epstein is also a
member of the American Cham-
ber of Commerce Executives and
the Florida Industrial Develop-
ment Council. In 1976 he was
elected chairman of the Broward
County Chamber of Commerce
Executives and president-elect of
the Florida Chamber of Com-
merce Executives.
Both Stack and Moss have also
been involved with United Way
for many years.
/////////'-//////////////////////////^^^^
Couple Endows Pre-Kindergarten Burke's Protest Restores
In Memory of Son, Holocaust Victim Round n EDA Grant Fund
fJ WASHINGTON Conirress- Round I and Round II oi thi
NEW YORK Robert
Michael Gurdus never had a
chance to live out his life. At the
age of four, he was one of a
million Jewish children murdered
during the Nazi Holocaust. Jacob
and Luba Gurdus of New York
recently hallowed their only son's
martyrdom by establishing a pre-
kindergarten school in his
memory in Netanya through the
Israel Education Fund of the
United Jewish Appeal.
"This school will live as a
monument for all children who
perished in the Holocaust,"
Gurdus said during ground-
breaking ceremonies in Netanya.
"In it will grow a new generation
of Jewish children to fill this
nation."
LOCATED ALONG the
Mediterranean Coast between Tel
Aviv and Haifa, Netanya has
received many waves of im-
migrants since Israel's founding
30 years ago. In keeping with the
Gurdus' wishes to contribute to a
school facility which would
nurture the lives of children of
Russian immigrants, the Robert
Michael Gurdus Pre-
Kindergarten School is being
built in the Kiryat Nordau
settlement area. Construction
will be completed this fall.
Thanking the benefactors,
Netanya Mayor Benzion Rubin
called the pre-kindergarten years
the most vital in the development
of an immigrant child in Israel.
"Today, more than ever, as the
people of Israel struggle for
survival and a better way of life,"
he ?aid. "our future and the
future of all Jewish people
depend on the effective education
of our children. We are deeply
moved by the generous action by
Mr. and Mrs. Gurdus in
establishing this living memorial
in Netanya. The Robert Michael
Gurdus Pre-Kindergarten School
will testify to the in-
destructibility of the Jewish
spirit."
Jacob Gurdus, a retired
businessman, is active in Jewish
and Zionist affair*. Dr. Luba
Gurdus is a painter whose works
have been exhibited in Israel and
other countries. An art historian
ss well, she works for the Frick
Art Reference Library of the
Frick Collection on New York's
Fifth Avenue. She is president of
the Netzer Foundation of New
York, a sister branch of the Haifa
association of parents of children
with emotional difficulties in
Israel.
THE ISRAEL Education
Fund has established more than
260 pre-kindergarten facilities
since 1964. Other IEF projects
include pre-kindergarten / nur-
series ; comprehensive, vocational
and agricultural high schools;
teachers seminaries; libraries;
community, youth and sports
centers and physical education
facilities.
Jacob and Luba Gaudus of New York fcenter) broke ground for
the Robert Michael Gurdus Pre-Kindergarten School in
Natanya in memory of their son, killed in the Holocaust at the
age of four. Their Israeli relatives, officials of the UJA Israel
Education Fund and residents of the city look on. "This is our
first school," "but not the last." The facility will be opened this
fall _____________
Nova Offers Saturday Program
Leading to Education Degree
Registration is open until Aug.
15 for the Nova University
program leading to a bachelor of
science degree in education.
Classes will start Aug. 20 and
run through Oct. 15, meeting
Saturdays for four hours in the
mornings or afternoons on the
Nova University campus.
Nine courses in the areas of
basic skills, methods of teaching
and administration will be of-
fered. Counselors are available
from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Registration is also underway
for courses leading to the B.S. in
education offered at Lake
Stevens Junior High School,
Miami (Opa Locks), by Nova
University in cooperation with
U.T.D.
If sufficient enrollment war-
rants, classes will also be held st
Coral Park Senior High, Miami.
Six courses in the areas of
basic skills, methods of teaching
and administration will be of-
fered.
Classes will start Aug. 20 and
run through Oct. 16, meeting
WASHINGTON Congress-
man J. Herbert Burke has re-
ceived word from the Economic
Development Administration
(EDA) that Round II funds
under the Local Public Works
Program have been restored to
the City of Fort Lauderdale. The
final planning target for Fort
Lauderdale is $5.57 million.
Congressman Burke received
word on July 14 that the plan-
ning target for Round II Fort
Lauderdale had been reduced
from $4.19 million to $1.59
million. The reason given by the
EDA was that the $2.6 million
received by Port Everglades
under Round I was chargeable to
the City of Fort Lauderdale. Con-
gressman Burke called Atlanta to
see what else was being charged
to Fort Lauderdale, since his
review of Round I funds did not
show any funds going into the
City. He discovered that $1.3
million for a handicapped center
in Hollywood built by the
Broward County School Board
was also being charged to Fort
Lauderdale.
BURKE made protests to Sec-
retary of Commerce Juanita
Kreps and EDA Administrator
Robert Hall which read in part:
"The City of Fort Lauderdale,
which is the largest population
center in Broward County, ap-
plied for grants under both
Round I and Round 11 ot this
law. It did not receive one cent
under Round I, and $1,587,000 is
an insult to a city of Fort Lauder-
dales' size."
The first reaction by EDA was
to charge both of the aforemen-
tioned projects against the plan-
ning target for the City of Holly-
wood, since both the $2.6 million
Foreign Trade Zone at P^
Everglades and the $1.3 mil Ik.
Center for the Handicapped are
"geographically located" in
Hollywood. Congressman Burke
argued this was unfair, since both
these facilities will serve all
South Florida. Then EDA
wanted to charge both against
Broward County's planning
target as the "governmental
body with jurisdiction." Burke
argued the County did not hf>y '
jurisdiction over either, since one
was administered by an elected
Port Authority, and the other by
an elected School Board.
Announcement of a final plan-
ning target for the City of Fort
Lauderdale in the amount of
$5,572,000 is an admission by
EDA that Fort Lauderdale was
wrongfully charged $3.9 million.
Congressman Burke also was ad-
vised that neither of the amounts
$2.6 million for Port Ever-
glades and $1.3 million for the
handicapped center would be
charged to any city in Broward or
to the County itself.
Rabbi Harr to Hold Community Service
Saturdays for four hours in the
mornings or afternoons.
Negev Chapter
Sets Calendar
Pioneer Women's North Brow-
ard unit, the Negev Chapter, will
hold a luncheon and card party
Wednesday, Aug. 24, at noon in
the Pompano Fashion Square
Community Room, 1 Pompano
Fashion Square, Pompano
Beach.
Reservations may be made by
contacting Estelle Ssfeer or
Shirley Miller.
All proceeds will go to the
Child Rescue Fund operated by
Pioneer Women and its sister or-
ganization, Na'amat, in Israel.
The chapter is selling cards for
the Jewish New Year. They may
be obtained by contacting Rona
Schimel or Hannah Levine.
A trip to Us Vegas is planned
for the chapter from Nov. 27
through Dec. 1. For further infor-
mation and reservations, contact
Rona Schimel.
A special community service
will be led by Rabbi Sheldon J.
Harr and assisted by Cantor Cor-
burn on Friday, Aug. 26, at 8
p.m. All members of Plantation
Jewish Congregation and in-
terested people are invited to
participate in a liberal reform
service.
Following the service will be an
Oneg Shabbat where Rabbi Harr
and temple members will be
available to answer questions on
temple programs and activities.
There will be religious school
open registration on Sunday,
Aug. 28, from 10 a.m. to noon, at
the temple building. Rabbi Harr
and the education committee will
be present to answer inquiries
concerning religious school. High
Holiday information can also be
obtained at that time.
Rabbi Alpert Returns To Reconstructionist
Rabbi Rebecca Alpert will re-
turn to the Reconstruction
Synagogue in West Broward for
High Holy Day services. The
Reconstruction services com-
bine tradition with modern con-
cepts and the entire congregation
participates in the program.
The theme of this year's Holy
Dsy service is called "The
American Jewish Experience -
Past, Present and Future." Six
programs will focus on the
Jewish people's existence since
u'J^^^yf' min* EngHab,
Hebrew, Yiddish and Russian.
The study period during Shab-
bat services on Friday. Aug. 26,
will be conducted by Alan Horo-
witz, and is called "An Archae-
ologists Digs Israel."
Little Synagogue
Plans Services
The Little Synagogue, a neo-
Hassidic house of worship, will
hold High Holy Day celebrations
st the fscilities of United Churcfi,
Fort Lauderdale, on Sept. 12, 8
p.m.; Sept. 13,10a.m.; Sept. 21,
8 p.m.; and Sept. 22,10 a.m. and
6 p.m.
BBBaa


at 19,1977
Tkt Jewish Fbridian of Oraattr Fort LautUrdala
Page 9
rusaiem's Jewish Population Hadassah Delegates Ready for Convention
Sported in Steady Decline
llUSALEM (JTA) The growth rate of the Jewish
Ln in Jerusalem is declining steadily despite govern-
jlicies aimed st increasing the number of Jews who live
Jpital.
sing and Construction Minister Gideon Patt, who
Jie city's new neighborhoods, projected a 2.3 percent
late this year. But he said a 3.7 percent rate is needed to
1 the present ratio of Jews to Arabs which is 73-27
j RATE has not been as high as 3.7 percent since 1973.
| his ministry would make every effort to raise it to that
also noted that in the last 10 years, the Housing
[built 14,800 flats in Jerusalem, 11,100 of them in new
hoods.
Sets Open House, Registration
The North Broward Chapter of
Hadassah will send a delegation
to the organization's 63rd annual
convention in New York at the
New York Hilton this Sunday,
Aug. 21.
The three-day convention,
scheduled to end on Aug. 24, will
include reports from Israel on
medical advances, immigrant
youth integration, vocational
education, new settlements and
an in-depth analysis of the
Middle East situation.
Israel's Ambassador to the
United Nations, Chaim Heroog,
and Hadassah Medical Organiza-
tion Director Dr. Kalman J.
Mann are elated to speak to the
gathering.
Women from North Broward
delegation will include Mrs.
Ralph E. Cannon, past president
of the chapter and currently vice
president of the Florida Region of
Hadassah; Chapter President
wmmmmmmmmmm^
m
Deny Israelis In Ethiopia

I tennis? Burned at the
bred with "Baretta?"
Irish Community Center
^all people from 5 to
ne to an open house on
ept. 11, from noon to 4
ay will be JCC Regis
for all new programs,
classes and special events for
1977-78.
Tickets for upcoming special
events will also be available for
purchase.
Entertainment for children will
be an added feature and refresh-
ments will be available.
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Government officials said here
that they "know nothing" of an
alleged presence of Israeli defense
experts in Ethiopia. No further
reaction or other comment could
be elicited.
The disclaimer was made in
connection with reports in recent
weeks that there was some Israeli
involvementalong with the
CC Officers, Board Selected
of community leaders
pled top positions as
ad board members of
bh Community Center
9, Jacob Brodzki, presi-
(ewish Federation, an
Bis week.
rbnan is the new JCC
Serving with her as
nen are Shirley Miller
' Kopelowitz.
embers are Dr. Jerome
[Brenner, David Gross,
dss, Hy Kaplan, Al
tin Lipnack, Suzanne
bjd Lee Phillips, Ben
on Schagrin, Abram
ndMikeWeinberg.
I board meets monthly
llicy and guide the
7 the many community
fd activites sponsored
Although only two
(the Fort Lauderdale
j serves over 10,000
r8 year will see many
1. social and educa-
ibed-Out
egants
ray On
\e Porch
IAN LIPSITZ
[nooga-ijtai-
mall synagogue was
an explosion of
origin last week,
| rummaged through
| Saturday morning
undamaged prayer
he two Torahs and
Phabbat services as
porch of the house
abi Meir Stimler of
om Synagogue told
Telegraphic Agency
interview in New
Bra there have told
It they believe the
caused by a bomb
i were found leading
lagogue to a motel
y
, local police and
investigating the
lie explosion have
confirm it was a
Itil they get the
iboratory tests.
larified an earlier
Steven Drysdale,
>r of the Chat-
fjewish Welfare
that suggested that
Lthe congregants at
evening Shabbat
saved because they
ague early, being
; of a minyan.
tional programs The JCC strives
constantly to meet the social,
cultural and educational needs of
the expanding Fort Lauderdale
Jewish population.
Persons wishing to volunteer
their services on any JCC project
should please call 484-7676.
known massive Cuban and Soviet
involvementin Ethiopia, which
finds itself locked in increasingly
grim struggles with Eritrean
separatist rebels and Somali
irregulars. According to an
American report several months
ago, Israeli planes occasionally
touch down at Addis Ababa, the
Ethiopian capital, and are taken
into closed hangars.
The Washington Post carried a
story a few days ago attributed
to U.S. sources, apparently
meaning intelligence sources,
alleging that a few dozen Israeli
secret servicemen have been in
Ethiopia training or advising
local forces in counter-
insurgency.
Mrs Sidney Oerber, who is
h netting the delegation along
with Mrs. Alfred Saxe, vice
feature Charlotte Jacobson, past
national president and chairman
president; Group Presidents,
Mrs Herman Druger. Mrs. Ben
Figelman, Blanche Herzlich,
Mrs. Philip Nieman, Mrs Sam
Rose and Mrs. Nat Sophin;
Group Chairmen, Mrs. Jack
Klein, Mrs. Max Rubinfeld, Mrs.
Marcus Nuabaum and Mrs.
Helen Eialer.
The Fort Lauderdale Chapter
of Hadaasah will also send a dele-
gation whose members include:
Josephine Newman, chapter
president; Priacilla Lippa, presi-
dent Armon Group; Mollie Win-
ston, president A viva Group;
Lillian Snider, president
L'Chavim Group; Esther Siegel,
president Shalom Group; Eythl
Zuckerman, past president
Shalom Group.
Mrs. Martin Rose, chapter
associates chairman, will lead a
group of Hadassah associates to
the convention. They will par-
ticipate in a "Men Only" event
on Tuesday, Aug. 23, which will
of the American Section World
Zionist Organization, and a
department chief of the Hadas-
sah Medical Organization from
Israel.
"LAZY LETTERS" BY TOWLE
SPELL LOVELY SILVER PENDANTS
Look letter-perfect in solid sterling initial medallions
by Towle. Contemporary, abstract-style
characters hang from a 15" chain for an
attractively novel look. Choose your favorite
letter and spread the word! $15
Silver, at all jm stores except lauderhill
It's so pleasant to shop with a jm credit card
prdao
Jmarsn
A omni dadeitnd *163rd ttrMt hodywood liwdsrh*! m- fort tauctefda*


10
Th* Jtu-ish Floridian of Ormttr Fort LaudwdaU
Friday, August 19,1977
P
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ii
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Fi
26
si
Israel's Day Care Program Taking Root
ISRAEL "Don't go." says
two-year-old Dani. pulling at
liana's sleeve, the day the sun
played hide-and-seek above the
Valley of Jezjeel. southeast of
Haifa. Dani wants liana, the
director of the Parent-Child Day
Care Program of the Taanach
Community Center, to stay here
in the brightly-decorated room
where colors, shapes and pictures
decorate the walls.
Although the cotton-and-
peanut-growing farmers in this
fertile valley (almost all of whom
came from Morocco) have been
tilling their fields since they
settled here in the mid-1960s,
day care programs were set up
only recently. There are now
three such programs sponsored
by the regional Community
Center of Taanach. catering to
some 600 families. These include
11 moshavim (smallholders'
settlements) which are spread
over some 15 miles, and are
served by the community center
in the area. The Parent-Child
Programs for Infants and
Toddlers are supported by the
Joint Distribution Committee in
Israel (JDC) with funds raised by-
Jewish Federations and Welfare
funds (including the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale) and allocated
through the United Jewish
Appeal.
"IT WAS A real fight at the
beginning." confides liana,
had to go into the houses and
spend hours convincing the
parents to send their children to
the Parent-Child Day Care
Program. Only six children were
brought to the center by parents
who did not have to be coaxed
That means that 90 percent of the
parents needed to be persuaded
to entrust their children to the
program.
liana, a 25-year-old Tel
Avivian of Iraqi origin, acquired
her skills at the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem where
she received a BA in Sociology
and Education That was in 1975.
That same year liana was
chosen to participate in the first
dees of the Dr. Joseph J. Sch-
waru Graduate Program for
Training Directors of Early
Childhood Programs for Children
and their Parents in Community
Centers. The Schwartz Program
waa created five years ago by the
American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee (JDC) in
Israel and the Israel Association
of Community Centers. It is
iointrv sponsored by the Paul
Basrwald School of Social Work
and the School of Education, of
the Hebrew University JDC
continue* to support the
Erogram. together with
SICEF. the Ministry of
Education, and the Israel
Association of Community
Center*.
-OUm BIGGEST prnhl in
Taanach. noted Dana, "was to
get the parents to realise the
importance of oar Parent-Child
day care program. Whan they
weaC out to work on the farms the
a toy never crossed the threshold.
Each day another parent, on a
rotation basis, remains at the
center to watch the staff work
with the children and. under the
supervision of the staff begin to
engage in learning activities
together with the children.
"ABOUT 60 percent of the
adults, mostly women, in five of
our villages are illiterate." says
Haim Sorrero. director of the
Taanach Community Center.
Haim is an example of the in-
digenous social worker who
returned to the place of his birth.
Born in Barak, he attended
elementary school there, high
school in nearby Afula. and
university in Jerusalem and in
Haifa where he graduated from
the School of Social Work.
Working out of a village office
comprising only himself and a
secretary. Haim is responsible for
the Center's social and cultural
activities of "his" farmers. There
are music groups and individual
instrument lessons. theatre
groups, sports teams io
basketball and soccer: there is a
mobile library of some 5.000
volumes which comes by once in
two weeks: there are hobby
groups like ceramics clubs, as
well as help in English and math
for schoolchildren.
"In Taanach we have a social
gap in microcosm, concludes
liana. People all started the
same way here. They received the
same number of acres, the same
houses, the same conditions for
work. But knowledge, education,
and ability vary. Today there are
social and economic gaps bet-
ween settlements like Barak and
Adirim. Through the Parent-
Child programs for infants and
toddlers, in the branches of the
Community Center, we can have
inter-community cooperation,
integration and growth."
JDC HAS stimulated and
supported the creation of twin
Parent-Child day-care centers in
cooperation with the Corporation
of Community Centers and the
Ministry of Welfare in other
parts of Israel. Five more are
being planned, most of them in
development towns. In addition
to its parent-child programs for
infants and toddlers in com-
munity centers. JDC-Israel also
supports other activities of
Community Centers in Israel and
initiates, develops and supports,
in cooperation with local
agencies, a wide range of health,
educational and social services
for the aged, the handicapped,
the chronically and mentally ill.
the disadvantaged. and the
training of professional per-
sonnel?
Israelis Deny Agents
Torture Prisoners
JERUSALEM (JTA) State
Attorney Gabriel Bach strongly
denied charges that Israeli
security agents deliberately
torture Arab political prisoners
under interrogation and assailed
a report to that effect published
recently in the Sunday Timts of
London. But Bach, addressing
foreign correspondents here,
admitted that "such things may
occasionally happen.''
He also disclosed that a dozen
Israeli soldiers would be brought
to trial shortly for alleged in-
volvement in the death of an
Marty Arab resident of Nablus.
Ahmed Dahloul. who was
arrested for rpimfinrirnaj in
March. 1976 in connection with
disturbances on the West Bank
He said the prosecution brief was
m preparation.
DAHLOUL DIED after he
was taken into custody for
allegedly inciting anti-Israel
riots. The cause of death was
initially listed as heart attack,
but investigations showed that
he had bean beaten to death.
Bach said that until now only the
officer in mmsaanri of the unit
had been triad.
He waa found guilty of
m***1*"fMT* and sentenced to
two yean in prison and stripped
of his Major's rank.
Getters, Goldmans
At Oneg Shabbat
Ca
Bsth Tore* wil bold
on Friday. Aag
Rabbi Israel
Oneg
Shabbat it bssag sponsored by
Mr and Mrs ~
the Bat
Mftxrah: and Mr and Mrs. Max
But subsequently, evidence
came to light invoking 12
soldiers. Bach said. He also
disclosed that his office was
preparing to prosecute six Arab
inmates of the Nablus jail who
allegedly "interrogated, tried"'
and severely beat four fellow
inmates to find out if they had
"cooperated" with police.
He showed newsmen photos of
one of the four exhibiting ex-
tensive bruises.
Hadassah to Meet
The Herzl Group of Hadassah
of West Broward will meet on
Wednesday. Sept. ?, at the Ber-
muda Club. Tamarac
Religious Directory
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. Tie* w.
Oakina Park Bivo RatO PMHp A
Lt>o
EMANU EL TEMPIE. M25 W OM
land Park Btvo Rrtrm Rabbi Jon
Goor Cantor Jerome Klemam
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAU
derhill. aa nw mm *t., lsw
dertall Conservative 1
*e TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER lft
NW S7W< St Conservative Raftbi is
raei Zimmerman 144A!
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
4171 Sfinavj Ro QrwMftWL Raftfti
-tfi)
RECONSTRUCTION!*! SYNA
GOGUE 7*73NWw.St
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
tion. an S. Nek MM R* Lftsrai Re
J Harriaal.
ANO BEACH
SMOLOM TEMPLE mSEIMAtt
1 A Skas
(41).
MARGATE
ftCTM H4LLEL CONGREGATION. *4f
MARGATE JEWISH
Hwtakst.
CENTER tm
CORAL SPRINGS
ETHORR R
US)
NORTHWEST BROW At O SYNA
OCERF IE LO BEACH
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
BETH ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE
IMS.
LAUDERDALE LAKES
TEMPLE ONEL SNA. RAPHAEL.
4S1
RawMSeafO
SUNRISE
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER
JCC AUTUMN CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Sunday Open HouseSept. 11, Registration Day for all
JCC Programs, children-teens-adults
New Year's Teen DanceSaturday, Oct. 18 p.m. to
midnight with "ScorploM-Llve Rock Band
The Nesher PuppetsIn "The Daughter of the King"
Sunday, Oct. 2, noon kinch-1:30 showtime for
children of all ages.
Florida Visits IsraelWith Shula and Ron Saturday,
Oct. 8,8 p.m.
An Evening with Chalm PotokSunday, Oct. 2^8 p.m.
Yaffa Yarkoni SingsSunday, Nov. 20 Matinee-2:30
p.m. Evening-8p.m.
For further information call the JCC at 484-7676.
A complete program book is now at the printers and
will be mailed soon. To get op the JCC mailing list, call
484-7676.
Cantor Perlman To Aid Sprey
The Beth Hillel Congregation
of Margate has retained Cantor
Margate Center Plans
Holy Days Services
The religious committee of the
Margate Jewish Center, headed
by Alfred Cohen has been
meeting every Wednesday to
plan High Holy Days services.
This year the services will be con-
ducted at the Center and at the
annex in David Park Auditorium.
Cantors Max Gallub. Sydney
Golembe. and Rabbi Dr. Geld will
I the services at both centers.
Israel Sprey to conduct High
Holy Day services. Cantor
Charles Perlman will assist in
these ceremonies.
An expansion program has
been completed and 150 addi-
tional people can be accom-
modated at services, for a total of
575.
Call the temple for ticket in-1
formation.
Lakes BBW Sets Meet
B'nai B'rith Women. Lakes
Chapter 1513. will meet on Tues-
day. Sept. 6, at Temple Ohel
B'nai Raphael, Lauderdale
Lakes.
Philistine City Yields Up
Great Archaeological Treasure
JERUSALEM-Remains
identified with Timnah. the
Philistine city where Samson
courted Delilah and slew a lion.
have been uncovered by ar-
chaeologists working in
collaboration with the Institute
of .Archaeology of the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem.
The team has just concluded
its first season of excavations at
Tel Baush. The tel. located in the
Sorek Valley, seven kilometers
west of Beth Shemesh. is the site
of the biblical city of Timnah
The expedition, sponsored by
an institutional consortium,
including New Orleans Baptist
Theological Seminary. MkieiB
sippi College and Louisiana
College, in collaboration with the
Hebrew University's Institute of
Archaeology, waa under the
direction of Dr George L. Keim.
expedition director, and Amihai
aiaaar. archasraogkal field direc-
tor. The four-wech project waa
conducted with a 40-member
staff and volunteer work force
from the United States and Is-
rael
THE EXCAVATIONS re-
vealed a Canaanite city which
waa destroyed by a tremendous
fire near the end of the late
Bronze Age (circa. 1200 BC> The
building remains of the
Canaanite city included a part of 4
a large public building and 1
defenseive city wall. Among the
finds were a Canaanite cylinder
seal, bronze tools and weapons,
and typical Canaanite pottery
vessels.
On the ruins of the Canaanite I
city, remains of Philistine oc-
cupation were discovered. Floors.
ovens, silos and typical Philistine |
pottery sherds were recovered.
The special finds included ii
Philistine conical stamp sea and I
clay moulded bull-head. This
occupation may be identified
with the Philistine city of
Timnah. well-known in the
Samson stories in the Book of |
Judge.
During the latter part of the I
Iron Age (the period of the
Israelite monarchy tenth to
seventh centuries BCE). a for-
tified city existed on the tat*. A
massive, four-meter wide city |
wall and the city gate were ex-
posed during the excavations-1
The city gate waa a large complex ;
about 16 meters square
ON BOTH sites of the wide I
central passage, three piers j
created guard rooms. The gate'
was destroyed and reconstructed
according to a modified pha
towards the end of the laxataw
pWTOu.
A well-protected raaap led U
the city gate along the eastern
slope of the taL The importance
of this border city between
Philistia and Judea is en>
phesiaedin the bsbbcal account of
its capture by the Philistine!
JEFFER
IEVITT
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Fta.
* Ltvtn. p.o.
tUBSW.OtataMwy.
NemiMeart.ma.
W*4JI
rmrSjBTI !! I
212/776-8100
947-11S5.*.>-.i~ -1
HtWllawH
mmwmcmn mxmmm
1 92S-2743 w
"V" teftsawHaea* .


1977
Lgmt 19,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pegell
Something peRveRtefc teout BIurbs fop nazTs memoips
.. the Secret Diaiiea By Albert Speer. New
York: Pocket Books: cl976, 1977 514 p., $2.50
. paperback.
THERE IS something perverted about the slick
nents on the cover of this paperback edition:
itional best seller!" "Beautifully spellbinding,"
Ijeeply moving," "fascinating,"' and "rich and
nplex."
These are the supplemental prison notes of Albert
Leer, Hitler's architect and wartime minister of ar-
foments. Spandau follows the 1970 publication of
Epeer's memoirs, Inside the Third Reich.
'The portrait of an ambitious and haughty man
merges from his memoirs and diaries. His social stutus
nd education separated him (or he felt) from the
loughnecks and common types of Hitler's inner circle.
beer has the nerve to say that he was not interested in
olitics. He was only an architect, an artist.
THIS IS how Leni Riefenstahl, Hitler's
photographer, defends the role she played in the Third
Reich. As in Reifenstahl's case, it becomes clear that
Bpeer's claim is not only an unacceptable excuse, but it
s also a lie.
At Nuremberg, Speer gallantly assumed a share of
_spon9ibility for the acts of Nazi Germany, garnishing
L sympathy and praise of duped liberals in this
Eountry. Yet in Spandau in 1964, he wrote, "Hitler
curded me my triumphs... but he also destroyed
everything for me."
Thus Speer shifted the burden of responsibility for
Susan
Panoff
Nazi crimes which he had assumed at Nuremberg, and
placed them squarely upon the shoulders of his beloved
Fuhrer.
IN ADDITION, since Nuremberg, Speer has
maintained his ignorance of the murder of six million
Jews. Several writers in the past ten years have
translated and cited evidence from Speer's records,
Himmler's speeches, and captured German documents
to disprove the architect's innocence.
Spandau indeed offers an unusual and insightful look
into the psychology of such an individual as Albert
Speer. But it must be remembered that Speer was a
self-serving exploiter of millions of human beings, a
man convicted of crimes against humanity, and sen-
tenced to twenty years in prison. Commercial avarice
must no' be permitted to sensationalize and roman-
ticize this man.
Torah and Flora By Louis I. Rabinowitz. New York:
Sanhedrin Prcu. 1977.167 p., $9.95.
DR. RABINOWITZ, former Chief Rabbi of South
Africa, deputy editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedia
Judaica, and now Deputy-Mayor of Jerusalem, has
selected essays from his weekly newspaper column of
the same name for inclusion in this volume.
Rabinowitz's column has appeared in the Jerusalem
Post for 12 years and in several Anglo-Jewish
newspapers as well.
The author has prepared this volume in response to a
large number of readers who wanted to see his material
made available in a more permanent form. Linked to
the weekly sidrah or Torah reading, the chapters of
Torah and Flora discuss the plants, flowers, trees, and
fruits of the Bible.
FOR EXAMPLE, the first chapter of the book which
covers the first six chapters of Genesis deals with the
fig. The next chapter, which covers the story of Noah,
discusses the olive leaf, which the dove brought back to
Noah after the Flood, and so on. Where applicable there
is a photograph, drawing or diagram to familiarize the
reader with the flora under study.
The author makes reference to different Biblical
translations to explain the significance of Hebrew
words for these fruits and plants. However trifling this
topic may seem to some readers, it is, in fact, a subject
of considerable impact on the enhancement of Biblical
text and on Israeli culture as well.

lese days, it Seems
>pe is BiQQeR
Wk By PETER HOBDAY
fou may not have noticed, but
rope's got bigger. On the first
July, the seven members of the
rnpean Free Trade Association
l the nine members of the
ropean Economic Community
"loved tariff and customs
C-Brier* and become the biggest
8. mv trade area in the world 300
^Blion people, bigger than the
rth American trading bloc of
)' S and Canada: bigger than
idH Soviet Union and its
is lines, and even bigger than
JjB^el any different? I don't, I
* say. but then I am a cynical
rver of these events from
- back. While the politicians
: and splutter on the world
4' about developments of this
r'H find that it makes very
V' difference to the man (sorry.
W'in> in the street-like you
t-Hme.
lmVT IT SHOULD. Think of
16 nations and 300 million
le, able to move their goods
services around with ease,
will be able to get tax-free
Tman sausage in Helsinki, and
an pasta like Mama used to
e in Blackburn, England.
a you there are one or two
e problemsyou see it pays
read the small print. The
blems are that even within the
munity of Nine, the Com-
sion has felt it necessary to
* attention to the fact that
e are still too many non-tariff
lers.
for example, customs for-
fties seem to be getting
Kher in some places when they
should be getting easier. And as
the economic problems of the
Community persist so govern-
ments, notably the French, will
insist on looking after their own
people, and letting the com-
munity spirit to hang.
You can't blame them, but
when the Commission was trying
to get the far eastern textiles
producers to hold back on some
of their imports, the French told
Brussels that they would not
wait very long.
I PHONED Commissioner
Etienne Davignon, who's con-
cerned with trade questions
about whether the French
government's attitude would
push the Commission into an
even harder line with the Asian
textile countries. Of course it
wouldn't, he assured. The
Commission, he told me, had a
mind of its own. Well that was
rather nice to hear since it seems
to me that the Commission has
been rather quiet of
lateespecially since Roy
Jenkins took it over.
My worry is that Europe keeps
on getting bigger and spreading
its wings in various directions,
but it still doesn't seem a very
effective body.
Oh sure.the heads of govern-
ment at their June Summit in
London put out a firm statement
on Israel, but I'm sure that Mr.
Begin was more worried by the
words from the State Depart-
ment in Washington about with-
drawing from the West Bank of
the Jordan and the Golan
Heights. In fact that was about
the only piece of actual news to
come out of that Summit. All the
83 ae


o*i. not tomorrow, ntvtr tvt Mr Pik Botha
:-:::
And the Germans are,
quite, rightly, beginning to
question whether we really
ought to entertain the idea
of inviting the Greeks, the
Spanish and the Portu-
guese to join. After all that
is only going to stretch the
already over-stretched
Commission even further.
m
rest was grousing from Herr Sch-
midt that he keeps on being
presented with a bigger and
bigger bill to keep the Com-
munity in being.
AND THE Germans are, quite
rightly, beginning to question
whether we really ought to en-
tertain the idea of inviting the
Greeks, the Spanish and the
Portuguese to join. After all that
is only going to stretch the
already over-stretched Com-
mission even further.
It's going to make the un-
workable institutional base of the
edifice even more unworkable.
One could, of course, use this as
an opportunity to reform those
institutions which were set up for
six nations, and now have to
work for nineand may soon
have to carry on as best they can
for 12.
Given the even greater
disparities between those ap-
plicants' economies and the
existing economic problems
within the Common Market, it's
going to take a major com-
mitment by all concerned to real
European unity for the market to
survive that enlargement. Now
curiously, despite all my rum-
blings about the poor old EEC, I
am still passionately devoted to
the idea of a United Europe.
I STILL want to see a strong
group of nation states, with
common interests acting to their
mutual advantage in a positive
fashion. I know that the world
has just been through a deep
recession-trie worst since the
1930s. You could argue. I
suppose, that the fact that the
Community survived that
recession more or less intact, and
at least as a Community, says
something for the institutional
wisdom of the founding fathers
when they penned the Treaty of
Rome.
All that might be true, but I'm
still confused by the attitudes of
the leaders, The British seem
split still between the anti-
Europeans and the Pro-
Europeans with the antis,
(despite the huge referendum in
favor of the nation's mem-
bership) trying to re-open the
question and get a new vote. The
French, as always, see no im-
pediment to pursuing the
greatness of France whether it is
in the interests of Europe or not.
The smaller nations are
bewildered and feel let down by
the attitudes of the bigger boys,
and as Herr Schmidt tries to keep
the whole thing afloat with
greater amounts of money.
Given his own at times
precarious political position, one
wonders who long he will con-
tinue to put his hand into his
pocket.
And that's not an end of it. The
fishing row over herring and
territorial limits is sim-
meringwith a Dutch skipper
being arrested in British waters.
The British and the Germans
seem unable to agree over the
citing of the JET nuclear project;
the common agricultural policy
rumbles on, unloved and yet
unable to be reformed without
occasioning a major row or an all
night sitting.
| THEN THERE'S the problem
of the Japanese who manage to
sell more and more to Europe
than we can sell them. But still
Brussels only manages a mild
riposte and gets very little
reaction from the men of the
rising yen. So why bother with
Europe? Why shouldn't we all go
our separate ways and let the
devil take the hindmost? Why
shouldn't we let our lives be ruled
by the United States of
Americabuy their products,
their planes, their culture and
narry a word about our own?
Partly because there is no need
for it to happen. What we want
from our leaders is a positive
commitment to getting Europe
moving again. Perhaps one is
expecting too much. Perhaps
they wUl only respond to
grassroots pressure. Let's hope
that the directly-elected
parliament will be the vehicle
that will drag the Community out
of the bog into which it seems to
have sunk, and get it back on the
road again.
EUROPE IS the biggest trade
and aid block in the world. It has
52 countries in Asia, the
Caribbean and the Pacific sen-
ding more than half their output
there. With the EFTA countries
it now accounts for 40 percent of
world tradethe biggest in all
the world.
Surely somehow and
somewhere we can get excited
again about the European dream.
But if I have to sit through
another two days of boring
summitry like the last effort, I
very much doubt whether we ever
shall.
To me Point international
The Citizen
mmmmMm*


Pg12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, Aujjusi
Participant Reports on JA's Leaders Institute
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Continued from Pag* 1
tidpation in the Institute for
Leadership Development con-
ducted during the month of July
by the Jewish Agency in Israel.
It was the sixth annual course
that was held for Jewish com-
munal fund-raisers and com-
munity organizers. The entire
course took place in Israel. There
were 21 participants from the
United States, Canada, England
and South Africa. We had 12
fund-raising sessions conducted
by professionally experienced
fund-raisers, with help from
specially invited lay leaders.
Besides fund-raising, there were
classes conducted by Jewish
intellectuals and university
professors, along with talks by
members of the Israel Defense
Forces.
We had a workshop in Jewish
identity conducted by Capt. Paul
Laster from the military center
for education. We received a
briefing on the "mood of the
country" by Freda Keet, a
member of Israel Radio. The
Hebrew University was
represented on the panel of dis-
cussants by Ze'ev Mankowitz,
who is an expert on the Holo-
caust and Israel, and their sig-
nificance for Jewish identity. In
between intense class lectures
and discussions, we were taken
on walking tours to get the
physical feel of the land. One
memorable highlight of these
walks was the one to greet the
Shabbat at the Western Wall,
where we mingled with
thousands of other Jews. We paid
a visit to Yad Vashem, the
memorial park to Jewish Mar-
tyrdom.
TO GAIN an insight into reli-
gion in Israel and the Yeshiva
world, we heard lectures by Dr.
Daniel Levine of the Jewish Heri-
tage Center and one course in-
cluded a study session on the
Talmud by Avraham Infeld of
the Ministry of Education. We
visited yeshivas and their
students to gain insights on a
first-hand basis. We were briefed
on the JDC-Israel and JDC-
worldwide by Dr. Arnulf Pins of
the Joint Distribution Com-
mittee.
On another tour, we visited the
Mevasseret Zion Absorption
Center and saw first-hand the
absorption process and how it
works. We sat in on Ulpan
classes, met and talked with new
immigrants. We were par-
ticipants in a program conducted
by professors of the Tel Aviv
University on Jewishnees, and
the non-orthodox Jew. The direc-
tor-general, S. J. Kreutner, spoke
to us of the goals and respon-
sibilities of the Keren Hayesod,
which is the worldwide fund-
raising arm of the Jewish
Agency.
An interesting talk was made
by Rabbi Zelig Chinitz of the
United Jewish Appeal, covering
the structure of the Jewish Agen-
cy and the distribution of funds.
We enjoyed a discussion with Dr.
Yosef Goell of the Hebrew
University on Israel's political
system. Unknown to us was the
fact that fund-raising campaigns
are held in Israel each year
campaigns similar to our own
Federation UJA and this was
explained to us by Dov Ben-Meyr
of the Labor Party (MAPAI).
AN ARMY spokesman accom-
panied us on a tour of the Gaza
Strip, where we visited a new
MUman, Stenn To
Head Committees
Esther Cannon, president of
Temple Sholom Sisterhood, has
announced the appointments of
two women to head committees
on social action and community
service.
Gertrude Millman, a past
president of Sisterhood, has
accepted chairmanship of the
social action committee, and
Rochelle Stenn will serve as
chairman of the community
service committee. Mrs. Stenn is
a past president of the Chai
Group of Hadassah and is a
soloist with the temple choir.
Both women will serve on the
board of directors of Sisterhood.
industrial zone and where we
walked through an old refugee
camp and a new rehabilitation
suburb. We were taken on a tour
of what Israel calls "problem
neighborhoods." These should
not be confused with problem
neighborhoods in the United
States. Although conditions were
crowded, the residents were well-
behaved. We made a trip to a
home for the aged in Rishon
L'Zion, where the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee is in charge.
We were also able to see the
JDC's Han Sheltered Workshop
and Rehabilitation Center, where
dignity and compassion are
shown to those less fortunate
than others. We were made aware
of the social gap within Israel by
Dr. Eliezer Jaffe of the Hebrew
University. Dr. Yosef Goell spoke
to us on Israel's Arab minority
V
Groundbreaking ceremonies were held for the new American
Savings' Lauderhill office located at 5681 W. Oakland Park
Blvd Taking part were (from left) Lauderhill Mayor Eugene
Cipolioni; Sister Trinita Flood, president of Barry College and a
member of American Savings' Board of Directors; Stephen
Goldstein, manager of the American Savings' Lauderhill office
and Morris N. Broad, president of the bank. The office
scheduled to be completed in late December.
and Israel's political situation
today. We toured two villages,
one predominently Jewish, the
famous village of Ma'alot, where
PLO terrorists murdered school
children. From there we visited
Tarshkha, which is a predomi-
nently Arab village and where we
got the view of the Arabs and
how they receive Israel.
With the military, we visited
the Golan Heights. We also saw
the "good fence policy" in action
at the Lebanese border and
received a good insight on Is-
rael's military defense. The Is-
raeli's helped the Lebanese
Christians in that long desperate
struggle.
Dr. Gideon Shimoni of the
Hebrew University talked to us
about "Zionism and its claim to
Eretz Israel." We visited the city
of Arad where we met Shelly
Shreter of the WUJS Institute
(World Union of Jewish
Students). His main desire was
for greater numbers
and visitors from th
States which he claimed i
more important than t|
we send over. We had a I
briefing on Masadi
Masada. Moahe Rivlii
director of the Jewish
talked to us about the
ship between Israel and I
pora. From the Hebrew]
sity, we heard about
economy and culture.
WE CAME away
wealth of knowledge froij
lecturers and military
was an experience I shall I
ber and value for a long [
come If I was good en merit the opportunity of I
ceptional experience, I an
ful. It has put new inc
new motivations and a wh
spirit into my work as a [
and champion of the
people at home and abij
Israel especially.
Doesirt it bother
you to pay
arec lease
when you can
i the same
ingsfoee?
At Holiday Springs we don't ha
a rec lease. What we do have is
of the greatest recreation and s<
programs anywhere. And it's a!
included in the price of your hod
A better place to spend youi
money. A busier place to spend
your time.
There's no limit to the fun you
can have, and the things you i
accomplish at Holiday Springs.
We surround an 18-hole cham-l
pionship golf course. And we hd\
acres and acres of parks and picnj
grounds, plus broad waterways fd
fresh water fishing.
At Holiday Springs you can pld
volleyball, shuffleboard. croquet,
horse shoes, or badminton. You ca
play a great bridge or canasta gar
in one of our card rooms. Or you
can have a party in one of our part j
rooms. You can expand your crcativ
abilities in our Arts and Crafts
Building. Or you can reduce your
waistline in our fully equipped
health spa.
We're even building an audi-
torium for community functions
shims with top name entertainment]
Ifs not too late.
There are ahead) over 500 hap
families that call Holiday Springs
home. But we still have a good
selection of beautiful apartments
available. One bedroom from
{ 18.990; two bedrooms from
$27,490. With financing currently
available at X' ;'i over 25 years
A Rec Lease? Who needs it.
When you can live at Holiday
Springs and get all the same won-
derful things (and probably even
more) for free.
Models and Sales Center open
daily from 9 to 5 at 3300 Holiday
Springs Blvd.. Margate. Phone
752-4200. From Dade, 944-3035.
(Take 1-95 or U.S. 441 to Sample
Road, go west to Holiday Springs
Boulevard.)
Holiday Springs
From $18,990 to $35^90.
Another fine community by Nationwide Building & Development, Ltd.
Florida's Last Great Buy
This is not intended as a full statement
about Holiday Springs For complete
details, please refer to the Prospectus and
related documents available to purchasers
Financing F.xample: I hcdroom/l bath
apartment that sells for $18,990. W
don n payment of $5,697 leaves a balance
of $13,293 |o be financed for 25 years
Term is HKI pawitents of $107 OOfor
principal and 8 V* interest APR: 8.949


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FILES


Augut 19,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
m
Page 11
Something peRveRtefc aBout BIurbs fOR naa's memoiRS
Albert Speer. New
6, 1977. 514 p.. $2.50
HB: the Secret Diaries B
York: Pocket Books: cl
paperback.
THERE IS something perverted about the slick
nments on the cover of this paperback edition:
itional best seller!" "Beautifully spellbinding,"
eeply moving," "fascinating,'' and "rich and
nplex "
These are the supplemental prison notes of Albert
Sneer Hitler's architect and wartime minister of ar-
aments. Spandau follows the 1970 publication of
s memoirs, Inside the Third Reich.
1 The portrait of an ambitious and haughty man
nerges from his memoirs and diaries. His social stutus
id education separated him (or he felt) from the
ughnecks and common types of Hitler's inner circle.
>eer has the nerve to say that he was not interested in
olitics. He was only an architect, an artist.
THIS IS how Leni Riefenstahl, Hitler's
photographer, defends the role she played in the Third
eich. As in Reifenstahl's case, it becomes clear that
eer's claim is not only an unacceptable excuse, but it
ilso a lie.
At Nuremberg, Speer gallantly assumed a share of
[responsibility for the acts of Nazi Germany, garnishing
sympathy and praise of duped liberals in this
ountry. Yet in Spandau in 1964, he wrote, "Hitler
accorded me my triumphs... but he also destroyed
leverythingforme."
Thus Speer shifted the burden of responsibility for
Susan
Panoff
Nazi crimes which he had assumed at Nuremberg, and
placed them squarely upon the shoulders of his beloved
Fuhrer.
IN ADDITION, since Nuremberg. Speer has
maintained his ignorance of the murder of six million
Jews. Several writers in the past ten years have
translated and cited evidence from Speer's records,
Himmler's speeches, and captured German documents
to disprove the architect's innocence.
Spandau indeed offers an unusual and insightful look
into the psychology of such an individual as Albert
Speer. But it must be remembered that Speer was a
self-serving exploiter of millions of human beings, a
man convicted of crimes against humanity, and sen-
tenced to twenty years in prison. Commercial avarice
must not be permitted to sensationalize and roman-
ticize this man.
Torah and Flora By Louis I. Rabinowitz. New York:
Sanhedrin Press. 1977.167 p., $9.96.
DR. RABINOWITZ, former Chief Rabbi of South
Africa, deputy editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedia
Judaica, and now Deputy-Mayor of Jerusalem, has
selected essays from his weekly newspaper column of
the same name for inclusion in this volume.
Rabinowitz's column has appeared in the Jerusalem
Post tor 12 years and in several Anglo-Jewish
newspapers as well.
The author has prepared this volume in response to a
large number of readers who wanted to see his material
made available in a more permanent form. Linked to
the weekly sidrah or Torah reading, the chapters of
Torah and Flora discuss the plants, flowers, trees, and
fruits of the Bible.
FOR EXAMPLE, the first chapter of the book which
covers the first six chapters of Genesis deals with the
fig. The next chapter, which covers the story of Noah,
discusses the olive leaf, which the dove brought back to
Noah after the Flood, and so on. Where applicable there
is a photograph, drawing or diagram to familiarize the
reader with the flora under study.
The author makes reference to different Biblical
translations to explain the significance of Hebrew
words for these fruits and plants. However trifling this
topic may seem to some readers, it is, in fact, a subject
of considerable impact on the enhancement of Biblical
text and on Israeli culture as well.

iese days, it Seems
>pe IS B1QQ6R
By PETER HOBDAY
lYou may not have noticed, but
[irope's got bigger. On the first
July, the seven members of the
|iropean Free Trade Association
the nine members of the
[iropean Economic Community
noved tariff and customs
mers and become the biggest
I trade area in the world 300
people, bigger than the
th American trading bloc of
(U.S. and Canada; bigger than
Soviet Union and its
tellites. and even bigger than
18 nations in OPEC, the oil
tel.
feel any different? I don't. I
say. but then I am a cynical
erver of these events from
back. While the politicians
and splutter on the world
about developments of this
f. I find that it makes very
l difference to the man (sorry.
ponl in the streetlike you
I me.
&UT IT SHOULD. Think of
l16 nations and 300 million
ple, able to move their goods
services around with ease.
will be able to get tax-free
rman sausage in Helsinki, and
flian pasta like Mama used to
in Blackburn, England.
rid you there are one or two
|le problemsyou see it pays
read the small print. The
is are that even within the
nmunity of Nine, the Com-
WOO has felt it necessary to
attention to the fact that
i are still too many non-tariff
iers
for example, customs for-
frties seem to be getting
[gher in some places when they
should be getting easier. And as
the economic problems of the
Community persist so govern-
ments, notably the French, will
insist on looking after their own
people, and letting the com-
munity spirit to hang.
You can't blame them, but
when the Commission was trying
to get the far eastern textiles
producers to hold back on some
of their imports, the French told
Brussels that they would not
wait very long.
I PHONED Commissioner
Etienne Davignon, who's con-
cerned with trade questions
about whether the French
government's attitude would
push the Commission into an
even harder line with the Asian
textile countries. Of course it
wouldn't, he assured. The
Commission, he told me, had a
mind of its own. Well that was
rather nice to hear since it seems
to me that the Commission has
been rather quiet of
late-especially since Roy
Jenkins took it over.
My worry is that Europe keeps
on getting bigger and spreading
its wings in various directions,
but it still doesn't seem a very
effective body.
Oh sure.the heads of govern-
ment at their June Summit in
London put out a firm statement
on Israel, but I'm sure that Mr.
Begin was more worried by the
words from the State Depart-
ment in Washington about with-
drawing from the West Bank of
the Jordan and the Golan
Heights. In fact that waa about
the only piece of actual news to
come out of that Summit. All the
1
'.-'.-
V.V.
x-x
v.v
m
And the Germans are,
quite, rightly, beginning to
question whether we really
ought to entertain the idea
of inviting the Greeks, the
Spanish and the Portu-
guese to join. After all that
is only going to stretch the
already over-stretched
Commission even further.
rest was grousing from Herr Sch-
midt that he keeps on being
presented with a bigger and
bigger bill to keep the Com-
munity in being.
AND THE Germans are, quite
rightly, beginning to question
whether we really ought to en-
tertain the idea of inviting the
Greeks, the Spanish and the
Portuguese to join. After all that
is only going to stretch the
already over-stretched Com-
mission even further.
It's going to make the un-
workable institutional base of the
edifice even more unworkable.
One could, of course, use this as
an opportunity to reform those
institutions which were set up for
six nations, and now have to
work for nineand may soon
have to carry on as best they can
for 12.
Given the even greater
disparities between those ap
plicants' economies and the
existing economic problems
within the Common Market, it's
going to take a major com-
mitment by all concerned to real
European unity for the market to
survive that enlargement. Now
curiously, despite all my rum-
blings about the poor old EEC, I
am still passionately devoted to
the idea of a United Europe.
I STILL want to see a strong
group of nation states, with
common interests acting to their
mutual advantage in a positive
fashion. I know that the world
has just been through a deep
recessionthe worst since the
1930s. You could argue. I
suppose, that the fact that the
Community survived that
receaoion more or less intact, and
TheCitiien ^^^^^^^^^^^
at least as a Community, says
something for the institutional
wisdom of the founding fathers
when they penned the Treaty of
Rome.
All that might be true, but I'm
still confused by the attitudes of
the leaders, The British seem
split still between the anti-
Europeans and the Pro-
Europeans with the antis.
(despite the huge referendum in
favor of the nation's mem-
bership) trying to re-open the
question and get a new vote. The
French, as always, see no im-
pediment to pursuing the
greatness of France whether it is
in the interests of Europe or not.
The smaller nations are
bewildered and feel let down by
the attitudes of the bigger boys,
and aa Herr Schmidt tries to keep
the whole thing afloat with
greater amounts of money.
Given his own at times
precarious political position, one
wonders who long he will con-
tinue to put his hand into his
pocket.
And that's not an end of it. The
fishing row over herring and
territorial limits is sim-
meringwith a Dutch skipper
being arrested in British waters.
The British and the Germans
seem unable to agree over the
citing of the JET nuclear project;
the common agricultural policy
rumbles on, unloved and yet
unable to be reformed without
occasioning a major row or an all
night sitting.
| THEN THERE'S the problem
of the Japanese who manage to
sell more and more to Europe
than we can sell them. But still
Brussels only manages a mild
riposte and gets very little
reaction from the men of the
rising yen. So why bother with
Europe? Why shouldn't we all go
our separate ways and let the
devil take the hindmost? Why
shouldn't we let our lives be ruled
by the United States of
Americabuy their products,
their planes, their culture and
narry a word about our own?
Partly because there is no need
for it to happen. What we want
from our leaders is a positive
commitment to getting Europe
moving again. Perhaps one is
expecting too much. Perhaps
they will only respond to
grassroots pressure. Let's hope
that the directly-elected
parliament will be the vehicle
that will drag the Community out
of the bog into which it seems to
have sunk, and get it back on the
road again.
EUROPE IS the biggest trade
and aid block in the world. It has
52 countries in Asia, the
Caribbean and the Pacific sen-
ding more than half their output
there. With the EFTA countries
it now accounts for 40 percent of
world tradethe biggest in all
the world.
Surely somehow and
somewhere we can get excited
again about the European dream.
But if I have to sit through
another two days of boring
summitry like the last effort, I
very much doubt whether we ever
shall.
To the Point International


Page 10
Tht Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 19,1977
I,.
Pi
2f
i
in
Israel's Day Care Program Taking Root
ISRAEL "Don't go," says
two-year-old Dmni. pulling at
liana's sleeve, the day the sun
played hide-and-seek above the
Valley of Jexjeel, southeast of
Haifa. Dani wants liana, the
director of the Parent-Child Day
Care Program of the Taanach
Community Center, to stay here
in the brightly-decorated room
where colors, shapes and pictures
decorate the walls.
Although the cotton-and-
peanut-growing farmers in this
fertile valley (almost all of whom
came from Morocco) have been
tilling their fields since they
settled here in the mid-1950's,
day care programs were set up
only recently. There are now
three such programs sponsored
by the regional Community
Center of Taanach, catering to
some 600 families. These include
11 moahavim (smallholders'
settlements) which are spread
over some 15 miles, and are
served by the community center
in the area. The Parent-Child
Programs for Infanta and
Toddlers are supported by the
Joint Distribution Committee in
Israel (JDC) with funds raised by
Jewish Federations and Welfare
funds (including the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale) and allocated
through the United Jewish
Appeal.
"IT WAS A real fight at the
beginning.'' confides liana. "I
had to go into the houses and
spend hours convincing the
parents to send their children to
the Parent-Child Day Care
Program. Only six children were
brought to the center by parents
who did not have to be coaxed.
That means that 90 percent of the
parents needed to be persuaded
to entrust their children to the
program."
liana, a 25 year-old Tel
Avivian of Iraqi origin, acquired
her skills at the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem where
she received a BA in Sociology
and Education. That was in 1975.
That same year liana was
chosen to participate in the first
class of the Dr. Joseph J. Sch-
wartz Graduate Program for
Training Directors of Early
Childhood Programs for Children
and their Parents in Community
Centers. The SchwarU Program
was created five years ago by the
American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee (JDC) in
Israel and the Israel Association
of Community Centers. It is
jointly sponsored by the Paul
Baerwald School of Social Work
and the School of Education, of
the Hebrew University. JDC
continuea to support the
Srogram, together with
NICEF, the Ministry of
Education, and the Israel
Association of Community
Centers.
"OUR BIGGEST problem in
Taanach,'' noted liana, "was to
gat the parents to realize the
importance of our Parent-Child
day care program. When they
went out to work on the farms the
nothers aaw nothing wrong in
Iring their infanta and toddlers
in the care of older children who
usually had to be absent from
school for this purpose, or even in
lea i ing the youngster alone in his
crib or play pen. Today we care
for 60 toddlers in our three
centers We plan to expend -this
asnrirc in the future.
Every morning at 7 ajn., 60
tiny boys and girls aged one and
s half to three arrive at the
Taanach Centers day care
programs in a convoy of big
damey-looking tractors, as often
as not driven by the mother. For
six hours every day, except the
SsirWt'y the toddlers romp
"mntg the miniature chairs* and
Istilii listen to stories, play with
puzzles and blocks, "ride''
trucks, "keep house," beat on
pots and cymbals in their own
"orchestra." as they develop
atial foundations for learning
Bass.
Many come from bouses where
a toy never crossed the threshold.
Each day another parent, on a
rotation basis, remains at the
center to watch the staff work
with the children and, under the
supervision of the staff begin to
engage in learning activities
together with the children.
"ABOUT 60 percent of the
adults, mostly women, in five of
our villages are illiterate." says
Hairo Sorrero, director of the
Taanach Community Center.
Haim is an example of the in-
digenous social worker who
returned to the place of his birth.
Born in Barak, he attended
elementary school there, high
school in nearby Afula, and
university in Jerusalem and in
Haifa where he graduated from
the School of Social Work.
Working out of a village office
comprising only himself and a
secretary. Haim is responsible for
the Center's social and cultural
activities of "his" farmers. There
are musk groups and individual
instrument lessons. theatre
groups, sports teams in
basketball and soccer; there is a
mobile library of some 5.000
volumes which comes by once in
two weeks; there are hobby
groups like ceramics clubs, as
well as help in English and math
for schoolchildren.
'In Taanach we have a social
gap in microcosm," concludes
liana. "People all started the
same way here. They received the
same number of acres, the same
houses, the same conditions for
work. But knowledge, education,
and ability vary. Today there are
social and economic gaps bet-
ween settlements like Barak and
Adirim. Through the Parent-
Child programs for infants and
toddlers, in the branches of the
Community Center, we can have
inter-community cooperation,
integration and growth."
JDC HAS stimulated and
supported the creation of twin
Parent-Child day-care centers in
cooperation with the Corporation
of Community Centers and the
Ministry of Welfare in other
parts of Israel. Five more are
being planned, most of them in
development towns. In addition
to its parent-child programs for
infants and toddlers in com-
munity centers, J DC-Israel also
supports other activities of
Community Centers in Israel and
initiates, develops and supports,
in cooperation with local
agencies, a wide range of health,
educational and social services
for the aged, the handicapped,
the chronically and mentally ill.
the disadvantaged, and the
training of professional per-
sonnel*
Israelis Deny Agents
Torture Prisoners
JERUSALEM (JTA) State
Attorney Gabriel Bach strongly
denied charges that Israeli
security agents deliberately
torture Arab political prisoners
under interrogation and assailed
a report to that effect published
recently in the Sunday Times of
London. But Bach, addressing
foreign correspondents here,
admitted that "such things may
occasionally happen."
He also disclosed that a dozen
Israeli soldiers would be brought
to trial shortly for alleged in-
volvement in the death of an
elderly Arab resident of Nablus.
Ahmed Dahloul. who waa
arrested for questioning in
March. 1976 in connection with
disturbances on the West Bank.
He said the prosecution brief was
in preparation.
DAHLOUL DIED after he
was taken into custody for
allegedly inciting ami-Israel
riots. The cause of death was
initially listed as heart attack,
but investigations showed that
he had been beaten to death.
Bach said that until now only the
officer in command of the unit
had been tried.
He was found guilty of
manslaughter and sentenced to
two years in prison and stripped
of his Major's rank.
Gefters, Goldmans
At Oneg Shabbat
The Tamarac Jewish Cen-
ter/Temple Beth Torah wil hold
regular services on Friday, Aug.
IS. at 8 p.m. with Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman iiffirialrng Oneg
Shabbat is being sponsored by
Mr. and Mrs. Saul Garter, whose
daughter. Deborah, is the Bat
Mitzvah; and Mr. and Mrs. Max
Goldman, in honor of their
grandson's Bar Mitzvah. Michael
Ficarro will be Bar Mitzvah
during the Saturday, Aug. IS,
services at 9 a jn.
Sisterhood will hold a lun-
cheon, card party and fashion
show on Wednesday. Sept 7. Call
Vivian Sommer for information.
High Holy Dsy services will be
held in the sanctuary heginwing
Sept. 12 Call the temple office for
information.
Reservations are still available
for the Israel trip sponsored by
the temple. The trip leaves Fort
Lauderdale on Nov. 14 and
returns Nov. 28. Call Adeline
Moll for information.
But subsequently, evidence
came to light involving 12
soldiers. Bach said. He also
disclosed that his office was
preparing to prosecute six Arab
inmates of the Nablus jail who
allegedly "interrogated, tried"
and severely beat four fellow
inmates to find out if they had
"cooperated" with police.
He showed newsmen photos of
one of the four exhibiting ex-
tensive bruises.
Hadassah to Meet
The Herzl Group of Hadassah
of West Broward will meet on
Wednesday. Sept. 7, at the Ber-
muda Club, Tamarac
Religious Directory
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W
Oakland Park Blvd Rabbi Philip A
Lebowiti Cantor Maurice Nu (42).
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 3425 W Oak
land Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Joel
Goor Cantor Jerome K lament.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAU-
OERHILL. 2041 NW 4tm Ave Leu
derhill. Conservative Isedore Rosen
?eld president
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 10
NW 57th St Conservative Rabbi I*
reel Zimmermen (44A).
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
4171 Stirling Rd. Orthodox RebM
Meant lomier (52).
SYNA
RECONSTRUCTIONS
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4fh St.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. NOb Hill Rd. Liber el Re
form. RaM Sheldon J. Harr (44)
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM TEMPLE 132 SE 11th Ave
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Jacob Renstr (4f)
MARGATE
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION 7440
Margate Blvd. Conservative Cantor
Charles Perl man
JCC AUTUMN CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Sunday Open HouseSept. 11, Registration Day for all
JCC Programs, chlldren-teens-adults
New Year's Teen DanceSaturday, Oct. 1,8 p.m. to
midnight with "Scorplo"-Llve Rock Band
The Nesher Puppets-ln "The Daughter of the King"
n lunch-1:30 showtime for"
Sunday, Oct. 2, noon
children of all ages.
Florida Visits Israel-With Shula and Ron Saturday,
Oct. 8,8 p.m.
An Evening with Chaim Potok Sunday, Oct. 23,8 p.m.
Yaffa Yarkoni SingsSunday, Nov. 20 Matinee-2:30
p.m. Evenlng-8p.m.
For further information call the JCC st 484-7676.
A complete program book is now at the printers and
will be mailed soon. To get on the JCC mailing list, call
484-7676.

Cantor Perlman To Aid Sprey
The Beth Hillel Congregation
of Margate has retained Cantor
Margate Center Plans
Holy Days Services
The religious committee of the
Margate Jewish Center, headed
by Alfred Cohen has been
meeting every Wednesday to
plan High Holy Days services.
This year the services will be con-
ducted at the Center and at the
annex in David Park Auditorium.
Cantors Max Gallub, Sydney
Golembe, and Rabbi Dr. Geld will
lead the services at both centers.
Israel Sprey to conduct High
Holy Day services. Cantor
Charles Perlman will assist in
these ceremonies.
An expansion program his
been completed and 150 addi-
tional people can be accom-
modated at services, for a total of
576.
Call the temple for ticket in-
formation.
Lakes BBW Sets Meet
B'nai B'rith Women. Lakes!
Chapter 1613, will meet on Tues-
day, Sept. 6, at Temple Ohel
B'nai Raphael, Lauderdale j
Lakes.
Philistine City Yields Up
Great Archaeological Treasure
JERUSALEM-Remains
identified with Timnah. the
Philistine city where Samson
courted Delilah and slew a lion,
have been uncovered by ar-
chaeologists working in
collaboration with the Institute
of Archaeology of the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem.
The team has just concluded
its first season of excavations at
Tel Batash. The tel. located in the
Sorek Valley, seven kilometers
west of Beth Shemesh. is the site
of the biblical city of Timnah.
The expedition, sponsored by
an institutional consortium,
including New Orleans Baptist
Theological Seminary, Missis-
sippi College and Louisiana
Collage, in collaboration with the
Hebrew University's Institute of
Archaeology, was under the
direction of Dr. George L. Kelm,
expedition director, and Amihai
Mazar. archaeological field direc-
tor. The four-week project was
conducted with a 40-member
staff and volunteer work force
from the United States and Is-
rael
THE EXCAVATIONS re-
vealed a Canaanite city which
was destroyed by a tremendous
fire near the end of the late
Bronze Age (circa. 1200 BC). The
building remains of the
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 4)01
NW Wh St. Comer vetlve Canlor Max
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH OUR. Riverside Drive
Reform. (44)
NORTHWEST BROWARD SYNA-
GOGUE. BM1W. Sample Read.
DEERFIELD BEACH
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
BETH ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE Century
village East. Conservative. Rabbi
Davkl Berent (43)
LAUDERDALELAKES
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL.
43S1 West Oakland Park Boulevard.
Modem Orthodox Congregation
Rabbi Saul D. Herman.
SUNRISE
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER. INC. BOW
West Oakland Park Blvd. Corner
vstlve. Rabbi Rudolph Welea Cantor
Jack Merchant
Canaanite city included a part ofi
a large public building and i
defenseive city wall. Among tht
finds were a Canaanite cylinder
seal, bronze tools and weapons,
and typical Canaanite pottery!
vessels.
On the ruins of the Canaanite |
city, remains of Philistine oc-
cupation were discovered. Floors, I
ovens, silos and typical Philistine |
pottery sherds were recovered.
The special finds included il
Philistine conical stamp sea and
clay moulded bull-head. Thai
occupation may be identified
with the Philistine city oil
Timnah, well-known in thai
Samson stones in the Book erf |
Judges.
During the latter part of the 1
Iron Age (the period of thai
Israelite monarchy tenth to I
seventh centuries BCE). a fcr-1
tified city existed on the sit*. AI
massive, four-meter wide city
wall and the city gate were ei-f
posed during the excavation! I
The city gate waa a large complex |
about 16 meters square
ON BOTH sites of the widt j
central paseags, three piart|
created guard rooms. The gate'
waa destroyed and reconstructed |
according to a modified pa]
towards the end of the Israels* j
period
A well-protected ramp led t
the city gate along the eastern
slope of the tel. The importance j
of this border city betwen J
Philistia and Juries is em-
phasized in the biblical account of
its capture by the Philistine!
JEFFER
IEVITT
int Poworoko Rd.
Hollywood. Fie
J144447
Sonny Levitt, a.D.
UM1W DlillMw,
Nertti Mleml. Fie
?44-411 J
ien m an.enut u. by
wtammmmi.mm.Kt
212/776-8100
MatSaVrf-OMMffJoflBM
947-1185 Re law lean
SOWMO rjMRTf IB3I ffMBMKf W
92&-2743**w~"
HUM MO) aWTf -SB 1 BUC M
1 -928-2743 m
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