The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00089

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. Auguats.iyn
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J. Herbert Burke Supports Sharansky
Congressman J. Herbert
Burke, Rep., of Broward's 12th
District, which includes Port
Lauderdale, took up the cause
recently of Soviet Jewish
dissident Anatoly Sharansky,
who has been charged by the
Soviet Secret Police with treason
and as being a CIA agent.
In a statement charging Soviet
violation of Sharansky's human
rights and a breach of the
Helsinki Accord on human
rights, Burke urged that the
Carter Administration not relax
its earlier "vigorous" stand on
such violations.
"LATELY," he declared, "it
appears the President is taking a
softer line. Undoubtedly, the
Soviets, recognizing the
President's softer approach, will
hasten to say that incarceration
of Sharansky has no connection
with human rights issues but
merely reflects Soviet internal
policy."
Congressman Burkes
stater- *, which was made on
June 1'.. rollows:
"The United States recently
participated in a conference at
Belgrade, Yugoslavia to establish
an agenda for a serious
discussion of the results of the
Helsinki Accords. The Helsinki
Accords were signed by
President Ford and Soviet
Premiere Brezhnev on Aug. 1,
1975. The thrust of the Accords
was to foster recognition of and
respect for fundamental human
rights in the Soviet Union and
Eastern Europe.
"MR. BREZHNEV stated in
the most solemn terms at
Helsinki and on several occasions
thereafter that he and his country
wanted to fulfill every jot and
title of what they had agreed to in
Helsinki. It is extremely ironic in
light of this lip service to human
rights that the Soviet Union
should imprison Anatoly
Sharansky' and charge him with
treason.
"The language of the Helsinki
Accords affirms that the par-
ticipating states will respect
human rights and fundamental
freedoms, including the freedom
of thought, conscience, religion or
belief of all without distinction as
to race, sex. language or religion,
and freedom to emigrate. The
Helsinki Accords further affirm
that the 35 participating nations
will promote and encourage the
effective exercise of civil,
political, economic, social,
cultural and other rights and
freedoms of which derive from
the essential human person and
are essential for his free
development.
"Mr. Anatoly Sharansky is a
Jewish citizen of the Soviet
Union. He applied for and was
refused an exit visa. On March
15, 1977, Mr. Sharansky was
arrested by the Soviet Security
Police, the KGB. He has been
held since then in custody by
Finding a nurse
used to be
frustrating,
complicated
and risky
Now it's easy
and reliable.
Now there's
Medical
Personnel
Pool.
th
!c
Soviet authorities. On June 3 it
was learned that the Soviet
government has formally charged
Sharansky with treason and has
accused him of being an agent of
the Central Intelligence Agency.
"THERE IS NO doubt that
"plenty of evidence" will be
adduced smearing the dissidents
and painting the United States as
engaged in subversion of Soviet
society and state. The corrupted,
the misguided, and the fearful
will offer outrageous testimony.
The inevitable verdict will
follow "guilty of treason," to be
punished by disappearance into
the fearful world of Soviet labor
camps or perhaps the even more
fearful Soviet mental hospitals.
"I am uncertain about the
Carter Administration's current
attitude about human rights in
the Soviet Union. I know that it
was most vigorous earlier, in-
cluding personal communication
with Sakha row Lately, however,
it appears the President is taking
a softer line. Undoubtedly the
Soviets, recognizing the
President's softer approach will
hasten to say that incarceration
of Sharansky has no connection
HMIIIIHMHIH
with human rights issues but
merely reflects Soviet internal
policy.
"Our reaction is important.
The present Belgrade discussions
on human rights under the
Helsinki Accords put us to our
mettle on this issue. There is no
question that if we intend to do
more than use rhetoric about
human rights, we must be firm.
We must keep faith with the
brave spirits including Anatoly
Sharansky who run fearsome risk
to further those rights.
"THERE ARE SO many in-
dividual and group concerns
about the denial of human rights
by the Soviet Union which will be
discussed violations of Basket
III of the Accordsthat I
hesitate to single out any person
or group for particular attention.
Yet every case like Anatoly
Sharansky is a painful example of
what the Accords were supposed
to accomplish and did not. Every
time we recall the brave peoples
who live under Soviet rule, denied
self-determination, we are clearly
reminded that there is a shameful
gap between Soviet law and
practice."
IIIIIIIIHimiMIIIIIMIIIIIHIWmilllllHHNMIIIIII
| Locke to Chair !
! Israel Mission
I =
Continued from Page 1
[ inclusive Mission cost. Locke described the cost as "the s
S lowest not only for travelwith departure from and i
j return to Fort Lauderdale International Airport; ac-1
| comodations in Israel's deluxe hotels; three meals a day; i
| visits to the Golan Heights, the West Bank, military!
| installations, kibbutzim, moshavim, immigrant reception
| centers and housing projects; JDC-Malben homes and I
E sheltered workshops for aged and handicapped im-1
j migrants; and briefings, meetings and festive occasions I
| by and with the leaders of the Israel Government. Jewish =
| Agency and Israel Defense Forces."
j THE FORT LAUDERDALE mission members will 1
| be guests of the Israel Government and the Jewish i
5 Agency. Among the special occasions will be a reception in I
| Jerusalem that the national UJA will give for the Mission =
| m honor of the tenth anniversary of the founding of the =
S tort Lauderdale Jewish Federation. Guests will include 1
= Pndinir larooli luronnnlill___f .1_________ =
= i, r -----il Tr .. v,s"'- wnoers win also =
S take part in celebrations of the tenth anniversary of
Jerusalem s reunification.
The Woodlands Mission effort is the most advanced i
| in the entire region. Working closely with Entin are I
Bernard Libros, chairman of the Woodlands UJA cam- I
| paign; Federation board members Robert Adler, Sam =
= Leber and I^eon Mpooincr ar>A n..;,i m.-h__ .. =
Country Club during luncheon periods July 25 through 31
The effort produced wha'. Entin termed "a lively and 5
?Z VTn9,\A ^^ 9etuP is Panned for the I
Inverrary Country Club.
AN ORIENTATION meeting for all in Fort I
Lauderdale-interested1 in going on the Mission will take i
SKl^,23' 9tartmg at 8 pm in ***-* |
MMHIIIIIIIIIHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIllllllllllllllllllllHminHHK
Broward Delegates Attend ORT Confab
MEDICAL PERSONNEL POOL
566-4333
Two-hundred delegates from
nine southern states representing
18,000 members of Women's
American ORT in District VI,
attended the semi-annual board
meeting at the Konover Hotel,
Miami Beach Aug. 2-3.
Mrs. Leonard Pechenik is
president and Mrs. David Roth-
farb, chairman of the executive
committee of District VI.
Delegates from the Broward
Region were Mrs. Herbert
Wormser, president; Mrs.
Samuel Press, executive com-
mittee chairman; Mrs. Lawrence
Chait, Mrs. William Sutter, Mrs
Bert Stein, Mrs. Saul Gold, Mrs.
Mike Yoebon, Mrs. Bernard
Goldman and Mrs. Ruth Leff.
Delegates from regions, area
councils, coordinating com-
mittees and chapter-at-large
attended seminars, workshops
and plenary sessions.
Condo Dsiux*, Hallandala, two
badrooma-baths, laroa living dining
room., kitchan. enclosed patio,
*; beautifully, completely fur
mined; swimming pool, club house
on*; close to everything; no
agent*. Phone 01,4*sile evenings.
IEVITT
memorial chapols
l*Jl Pembroke as.
Hollywood. Pla.
S24-OM7
Sonny Lavitl.F.D.
13*5 W. Dixit Hwy.
Norm Miami, Fla.
MV-411S
l-S-77
IBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBn,
I Am A Jew
By Lowell Zimmer
I am a Jew
. I 've walked the face of the earth for ages past,
I've been laughed at, taunted and called many names.
But I am a Jew, and each year I renew my faith in mankind.
I I am a Jew.
My blood has stained the European Ghetto walls,
I My tears have bleached the sands of the Sinai,
My brothers were butchered at the Olympics,
| But I am a Jew and each year I renew my faith in mankind.
I I am a Jew.
J I've been called a racist,
A money lender and a kike,
I've been tortured and harassed and murdered,
J But I am a Jew and each year I renew my faith in mankind.
" I am a Jew.
| And the world now knows I am here to stay,
I will not be shouted out... I will not be destroyed,
| I will not tolerate injustice,
_ For I am a Jew and each year I renew my faith in mankind.
_ Lowell Zimmer is the son of Lilly Zimmer of Lauderdale Lakes.
TB.BIBIBIB.BIBIB.BIBIBIBIII
When wc put
our name on
achapel,
it's exclusively a
Riverside chapel.
Unlike many other Jewish funeral
directors in Florida, Riverside is not
represented by any other organization.
Each Riverside Chapel serving Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach counties is
exclusively a Riverside Chapel, manned by
the largest Jewish staff avai table in the
State. They are people who understand
Jewish tradition and honor it. And in that
tradition we serve every family, regardless
of financial circumstance.
SUNRISE:
holxywooo^* 61St Avenue(Sunset Strip)584-6060
2230 Hollywood Boulevard/920-1010
Westhp^r8ieBa^hCh'Miami B"<*.M..mi *
FlVechapels servin the New York Metropolitan area.
iverside
Memorial Chapel. Inc./Funeral Directors
for generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
P-+$-n


[riday, August 5,1977
(WIIMIIBIIMIIIIMIIIi"B"""i^"""BHMi
Federation Executives
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
\
Page 3
congregation The Jewish Lifeline:
Attend CJF Institute 1 sets Activities Setting Priorities
BERKELEY, CALIF. Alternate Funding Resources for
lewish Communal Services, zero base and program budgeting,
kd internal Federation fiscal management, were highlighted in
fcrious sessions of the 1977 Intermediate Cities Executives
nstitute held in Berkeley (Calif.) July 10-14 under the auspices
[the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds.
Coordinated by the Department of Field Services of the
louncil. the Institute was attended by leaders of over 40
immunities and was led by Hy Hochberg, executive vice
fesident of the Jewish Community Council of Ottawa; Harold
(ohen, executive director of the Allied Jewish Federation of
enver; and Murray Schneier, executive director of the.
lederation of Jewish Agencies of Atlantic County.
SOL KOENIGSBERG, executive director of the Jewish
lederation of Greater Kansas City, called on Federation leaders
fully explore government funds, private philanthropic
tundations and endowment funds as additional revenue
burces. He also encouraged Federation executives to consult
FF's Washington Action Office regarding Federal funding
Lograms available to local communities, including but not
lited to Section 202 housing monies.
The Council of Jewish Federations is the Association of
lentral Community Organizations Federations, Welfare
lunds, Community Councils serving 800 Jewish com-
munities in North America. It aids these communities to
(ohilize maximum support for major overseas, national and
kii\ services involving financing, planning and operating
fealth, welfare, cultural, educational, community relations and
fher programs benefiting all residents.
Gardener Appointed Education
Vice Chairman for United Way
James J. Gardner, deputy
Superintendent of the Broward
County School Board has been
Ippointed vice chairman of the
Education Division for the 1977-
United Way campaign.
(ar-ilncr is organizing the annual
iind-raising drive among em-
ployees in the county's school
lystem.
Active with the United Way
Dr many years, Gardner is a
ormer member of its board of
proctors. He currently serves on
board of directors of the
^immunity Service Council and
a member of the Salvation
^rmy Advisory Board, United
'ay agencies.
('ardner is a member of the
|>ard of directors of the office of
conomic Opportunity of
Inward County and a member
the Advisory Board for the
:>ward County League of
Sunverrary ORT
wards Scholarship
[The Sunverrary Chapter of
[omen's American ORT
[esented its first annual
holarship of $25 on June 1 to
lines Lambert, outstanding
liorat Piper High School.
JAMES J. GARDNER
Women Voters. In 1972 he was
appointed to the Florida Board of
Regents where he will serve until
1981.
Lakes BBW Set Meet
B'nai B'rith Women Lakes
Chapter 1613 will hold their
Summer Event Get-Together on
Wednesday, Aug. 10 at 12:30
p.m. in the meeting hall at
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall. This
will be the beginning of the fund-
raising 1977-78 season. All mem-
bers and friends are invited. For
information contact Shirley
Cohen, Minna Granoff or Bobby
Kantor.
On Sunday, Aug. 7, Plantation
Jewish Congregation will hold a
new membership coffee.
Prospective members are invited
to attend and meet Rabbi Harr.
and his wife, Fern, and other
temple members.
Friday night, Aug. 5 will
feature children's family service
to be held at the Temple at 8 p.m.
All children with August bir-
thdays will be honored.
Under the direction of Rabbi
Harr, and his wife. Fern, and
other temple members.
Friday night, Aug. 5 will
feature children's family service
to be held at the Temple at 8 p.m.
All children with August bir-
thdays will be honored.
Under the direction of Rabbi
Harr there is a continuing Adult
Bat Mitzvah class at the temple
held every Wednesday morning.
Daily, the summer activity
program taked place at the
temple for pre-schoolers.
The Fall-Winter Bowling
league is open to interested
bowlers. Bowling will be on
Tuesday mornings. For in-
formation contact the Temple.
WAXY to Air
'Dateline Israel'
"Dateline Israel", a 15-minute
program produced by the Anti-
Defamation League (ADL) in
Israel, will be heard every other
Sunday from 6:45 7 a.m. on
WAXY Radio in Fort Lauder-
dale, according to Joel Reinstein,
a board member of the Jewish
Federation and the ADL.
The program will feature in-
terviews with some of Israel's
leading personalities and a
discussion of some of Israel's
current problems and lifestyles,
according to Miriam Archer,
public affairs director for WAXY.
Information on the actual
dates of the broadcast can be
obtained by contacting the radio
station.
We do business
the right way.
o
170 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 31311
Phone: 735 1330
.
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
PRESENTS:
HIGH HOLY DAY
Temple Emanu-EI Sanctuary
3245 W. OAKLAND PARK BLVD.
ROSH HASHANAHSERVICES,SEPT. 12, 13 & 14
YOMKIPPURSERVICES,SEPT.21&22
CONDUCTED BY RABBI HENRY L. SHWART7 AND CANTOR JEN0 FRIEDMAN
ALL SEATS $25 per person
MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS NOW1 CALL TEMPLE OFFICE 731 2310
REFORM SfffVCfS FOR MEMBIRSHIP WILL BE HELD AT PARKER PLAYHOUSE
ALL SERVICES UNDER PERSONAL DIRECTION OF RABBI I0EL. S. G00R
By LEON DULZIN
Treasurer, The Jewish Agency
For the Jewish people, our
Campaign is our Jewish
Lifeline... our means of tran-
slating compassion into ac-
tion. ..ideals into prac-
ticality ... vision into hope.
It is a definition of our shared
values and sense of community
which shapes our work. For what
is it that gives meaning to our
work in UJA and our Federations
but our distinctive peoplehood?
In a voluntary society such as
ours, our giving is an expression
of faithof conscienceand
action.
THIS YEAR, as we examine
our pledges for Campaign '77,
and convert those commitments
to cash, we are acting with the
knowledge that in Jerusalem
hard, cruel decision confront the
people of Israel.
The Jewish Agency con-
templates a 1977-78 budget of
$457 millionand unless
American Jewry produced
more the Agency might have to
borrow as much as $150 million
to even reach that level of barest
minimums
It's a responsibility that
weighs heavily on us! The ancient
precept "Thou Shalt Not Stand
Idly By"is a code for American
Jewish action. For as the people
of Israel have their
responsibilities to fulfill, we fully
understand ours. It is a challenge
we accept.
WHAT YOU in the American
Jewish Community do in terms
of campaign pledges and cash
commitments will help us
decide about services and
assistance in areas which are
basic to the strength of the
people of Israel.
#> Do we cut support of our
institutions of higher learning?
S Do we cut high school
scholarships or preschool
education?
Do we cut back on the
settlement of the Galilee and the
Arava?
Do we cut our capacity to
absorb more immigrants from
places in the world where we
already see increasing danger of
Jewish extinction?
You will help provide the
answers. I hope you will give us
the possibility of doing much
more.
The Lifeline continues to
expand... reflecting our in-
terdependence with the people of
Israel. On the eve of the Jewish
State's thirtieth vear. it is a
responsibility we carry proudly
-full of purpose-
lifeand promise which
we will indeed honor!
THE JEWISH AGENCY FOR ISRAEL
PROfOSEO BUDGET I977/7*
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
TEMPLE SHOLOM
132 SE 11 Ih Avenue, Pompo.no Beach, Fla.
RABBI MORRIS A SKOP CANTOR JACOB J. RENZER and CHOIR
ROSH HASHANAH
Mon. Sept. 12 7:00 p.m.
Tues Sept 13 9:00 a.m.
Wed. Sept 14 9:00 a.m.
K0L NIDRAY
Wed. Sept. 21 7:00 p.m.
Y0M KIPPUR DAY
ThuTS. Sept. 22 9:00 a.m.
RESERVATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPYED AY THE TEMPLE OFFICE
942-6410
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL REGISTRATION
Aug. 28th and 29th 10 to 12
Aug. 31st Sept. 1st 1 to 3
PRIMARY THRU CONFIRMATION
FULLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS
,..
Serving the needs
of the Jewish Community
in our 3 locations
^
ENORAH
Cfcapeds
Mark Weissman
Joseph Rubin
Broward County's first
Jewish Funeral Directors
SUNRISE
6800 W Oakland Park Blvd Phone 739-6000
MARGATE
5915 Park Drive Phone 971-3330
DEERFIELD
441 S Federal Highway Phone 971-3330


TW Jewish
ofGreater Fort
8.1177
Reverse Discrimination
T1a> caue avtxio reverse cbs maneae!
the City Colart Cnw for Dkmwchral Edocaooa m New
York has been succoaafaffly weejed and won
ot view that *ii disv~_T.aaan is bock aaaval
-v: |aaj Jaaj*ja^1iaaj a^rairjs: rvartx-i "
TV action reverses the school's rijtctioa of two
KadaMi, Kenneth Hapart and Ma hail SccyjTrrf.xr
wkw weat to court on behalf of thranoetves ami 19 others.
Tbey charfed that the Crater rejected them scatty because
they are what*.
TW Federal -ToMtharm Dtscmrt Court rohag daau hi
jc-cvi_*f. arsi Am :>* Asc-LVfta-Macc Leasr-je aj
prepare the case.
We roceajmae the anportaoce of (ma| oader-
coa*mmmf. reieciJetK* ":jiv i^rs -*t ^= aoaj
the jaors. they wouid ace be s the dxmdvaataged
pceatjon. acadaamc or uthmama. b whack thry Sad
serves today
Special
as weiL We are ax so
Our Particular Sensitivities
*e rareaiaae that Jews. irtawajrr a sarnxxy coua:
arrer -e*S daamry -ham wfimj mcaer as i aha ja~ 'i a
-x ^sooascafec a the same aai as .-car Baaorraes oc
tm pose retraces. Jews say aave ceosotasad a mi aati aoc
ecocvrrmiii'y iiioerpr-T-iejeec or
hot their Serve prxae has aiwoys
a=- Hence, "^aar aojoaaV Sarce atiaaaie aojhbaat the
Al xrsrs x iacmimii'c are -.'ooass. aad off
be refected TVat as the aofort of the Fedan
IHsc-ct vTcwc ramar a New York. Taac as the sapor*, x
Lesson to be Learned
W hwe au >wc .va^nexjuu 1st an. *"*' -ywy
so. ijr xwcing jcs ivr? -_ i 4T.-up x VjKZBBBaae
red^cee* reacaed by as laraam hwajhoer n tae Scuta Jhum
Sea .ii .*iaa
i aaoanad ar me x-uud^
:aac "7b* mta a j sm t
at*
WECARE Planning Gears Up
Israel Remake!
smmber of tat F
heard of da-actors, aad
Hasthoaiyof Pooiatiia
ACCORDING TO
Of
fawi fl be talactad from
to the store by
aaopper" who wffl
to a wiakaaj weO
aamarfced eon
THE STORE has beea
ad-
officers aad %aYw mmm Among
them wffl be Irwia Berbn. acting
ya undent of Ricbarda. Rebecca
Hodes. president of tat
Federations' Woaaeaa Divaaav
Mr*. Fabar. Irvine; L. Geiaaer.
executive director of the Jewak
Federation; I^adarhffl Mayor
Eugene Cippoloai; Broward
Coaaty Ciioimiiiinaii Jack
Mom: Ricbarda eke president*
Richard Baaile, HaD Freinberg,
Pbfflip H< iff hub and Toot
hforara. Barry Axkr. assistant
executive director of the Jews*
Federation: Roy Hamilton,
of Ricbarda Lacderhffl
that have
the Air 4
biak-
to Richards,
prom an
Sea Travel Agency
Qaaaa. Paddkwhaa
Qaaea. Ocaaa World. Dante'i
Reataoraat. Patrida Marphy. L,
dab lafairiaili Hikoe
Hotel ni ii ill lam. Ocean
Manor Hotel. Gob Casual.,
Reflections. Firm Federal
4 Loan. Gok Pharmacy,
af 8 earn armrn whack wffl be
Margate Oater Aias
WECARE Piwit
Tat Mmaarn Jewam Cenaw
mffl sat ta* *EC ARE Feaera-
at Racaarss
Sbare m Lammraaw
Nova U. Awards Honorary
Degree to Local Leaders
l*bW Ertmt Se t
Tie rtmraroa Jewssk
Coo | i
i i iiir i a lao-saaaamr xmcaaaai
ami ears aan? jo .Viaj lac 1. JO
is at tae Vcac Em'
Baal
aba
Fart T i ill lili
SABX> ac ftca w aw' role as
C\ffli Haaias6fflk Pla**
Mraibefskip Teapam
BOOTTZ. rexaaeat of the
dcym of doctor of commercial
sneaca- was ated for bis cos-
tribocjon m faaasbaaj aaember of
the Nova Unrwrsaty Board of
Treatees. his roar at the pi up
made m recent years Broward
County, as a coaaameaty pianner.
deveioper. aad daractor of the
Ioternatioaal Ceaac:'. of
Shopping Centers. Greater
HoUvwood Cbambm of Co
Bonk of
Holywood!
Tbachm
aaar ^ reeoaea
11 *efrwt at axsar sf aesaaaa
arrmmfCTcim. wan semi far m
mt--x oaz .minim a* caarsaa
Father's Grace
In Russia After 30-Year Search

JSxd 5.laicv^a-'
m bat at
*~*ist Fkri U ir
11 s.
BAT Productions to
Give Theatrical Revue


Ipriday, August 5,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
UJA Accepts Grant From Goldweber Foundation
PINE BLUFF,Ark.-In 1905,
Kir. and Mrs. Aaron Goldweber
I left their home in Russia, sailed
to the part of Galveston, and
Ifrom there went immediately to
IPine Bluff. The family left Russia
because of "pogroms." Mr.
jGoldweber remembered his
lexperience as a young men and
Iwhen he died, at the age of 93, he
left the bulk of his estate for "the
Irelief of oppressed peoples and to
provide sustenance and tran-
sportation to ine atate ot Israel
for such people."
On June 28, Leon H. Brach-
man, United Jewish Appeal
Southwest Regional Campaign
Cabinet chairman and Mitchell
Rasansky, Regional cash
chairman, both members of the
UJA Executive Committee,
accepted the first annual in-
stallment from the recently
established Goldweber Foun-
Sam Goldweber (center) and W. L. Little (left) representing the
Vational Bank of Commerce of Pine Bluff, the trustee of the
joldweber Foundation, presents the first check of the newly
Established foundation to Leon H. Brachman, United Jewish
Appeal Southwest Regional Campaign Cabinet chairman. The
presentation took place at the Pine Bluff airport as part of a
VJA Regional Operation Pony Express to pick up cash from
lommunities throughout the Southwest.
Sholom Sisterhood Sets Calendar
scheduled for the week of Oct. 9
and again the week of Feb. 14.
The Torah Fund Luncheon is
scheduled for Jan. 17. Sisterhood
Sabbath will be observed on
Friday night, Feb. 3 preceded by
a Sabbath Supper in the Tem-
ple's Social Hall.
The Temple Sholom Sisterhood
Df Pompano Beach, headed by
Csther Cannon, its president,
Announces the following rundown
f>f activities for the year.
In addition to regular mem-
ership meetings every third
Tuesday of each month, a paid-up
nembership gourmet luncheon is
cheduled for Oct. 18 featuring
lusical entertainment.
A box supper-dance is
Scheduled at the Temple's Social
lall Saturday, Nov. 12. The Dec.
> board meeting, coinciding with
.'Iwinukah, will include a special
bbservance.
Two rummage sales are
The annual Purim carnival is
set for Saturday, March 18, and
the Donor luncheon will be held
April 11 at the Lighthouse Point
Yacht Club. The community
Seder sponsored by the
Sisterhood will again be held at
Temple Sholom on Friday, April
21.________________________
y
talk Turkey
Summer
*.* i
t''t,
Now is a good
time for good t n^p,*,,
values on small
tender, young
turkeys, 6-9 Lbs.
A whole turkey can provide a full meal plus the
fixing* for turkey salad or sandwiches. Also
choose from the big variety of delicious Empire
Kosher turkey products, including Cooked Turkey
in Barbecue Sauce, Pan-Roasts, and ready-to-
serve Turkey Rolls and Slices.
KOSHER
Empire
POULTRY
The Most Trusted
Name in Kosher
Poultry and Foods
At quality Kosher Butcher Shops, Food Stores and Dellys.
For stores near you, please call nearest Distributor:
MENDELSONS', INC. 672-5800
dation at the Pine Bluff Airport.
The event was part of UJA's
"Operation Pony Express,"
picking up cash payments on
campaign pledges from com-
munities throughout the South-
west.
PRESENTING the check to
the UJA was Sam Goldweber,
the eldest son of Anna and Aaron
Goldweber, and W.L. Little,
representing the National Bank
of Commerce of Pine Bluff, the
foundation's trustee.
When the Goldwebers arrived
in Pine Bluff, Goldweber
established a tailoring business.
This was a family trade, the name
Goldweber evolving from "gold
weaver," a military uniform trade
the family had in Russia and,
before that, in Germany.
Mrs. Goldweber died in 1919.
Goldweber had the responsibility
of raising his two children, then
11-and 9-years-old, as well as
running his business. Business
success came to the master tailor,
the tailoring shop growing into a
clothing business for ladies
ready-to-wear, as well as a fur
store.
Goldweber remained active in
his business on a daily basis until
a month before his death.
Concerned throughout his life
about the plight of Jews in the
Soviet Union and Jewish
refugees everywhere, he was a
steadfast contributor to the
annual UJA campaigns.
Planning A Trip?
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^^W^r***
Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 5,1977
Lookstein to Lead UJA's Rabbinical Council
NEW YORK-Rabbi Joseph
H. Lookstein of New York City
has been elected chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal Rabbinical
Advisory Council (RACt. He
succeeds Rabbi Robert I. Kahnof
Houston. The announcement was
made by Rabbi Melvin I. Lib-
man. RAC director.
RAC was formed to encourage
greater representation and
participation of Jewish religious
leaders in UJA campaign effort;
on local, regional and national
levels. In addition, the Council
serves as an important resource
for UJA campaign activities.
including the National Shabbat.
slated for Jan. 6-7.
RABBI LOOKSTEIN has
been a spiritual leader of Congre-
gation Kehilath Jeshrun since his
ordination from the Rabbi Isaac
Elchanan Theological Seminary
of Yeshiva University in 1926. He
first served as assistant to his
father-in-law. Rabbi M Z
Margolies. and now is senior
rabbi. His son. Rabbi Haskel
Lookstein is also at Kehilath
Jeshrun and is a member of the
RAC. That three generations of
rabbis from one family have held
pulpits at a single congregation is
unique in American Jewish
historv.
be a "rabbis rabbi." the new
RAC chairman has served as
president of the Rabbinical
Council of America, the New-
York Board of Rabbis and the
Svnagogue Council of America.
During World War II. Rabbi
Lookstein was chairman of the
Commission of Jewish
Chaplaincy and was sent by the
Joint Chiefs of Staff to the
European and Mediterranean
theaters of action immediately
after the War
Succeeding the late Rabbi
Abba HilleJ Silver as chairman of
the Palestine Commission of the
American Jewish Conference, he
became, in that capacity, con-
sultant to the United States
delegation at the 1945 San
Francisco Conference which
established the United Nations.
That year. too. he traveled to
Latin America on behalf of the
Joint Distribution Committee to
raise funds for newly settled
Holocaust survivors. He
currently serves as a member of
JDC's Administrative Com-
mittee.
THE STRONGEST thread
running through Rabbi
Lookstein s career. tying
together his spiritual and
communal concerns, is Jewish
the World Council on Jewish
Education for five years and has
been Chancellor of Bar I Ian
University in Ramat Gan. Israel,
since its founding. He was the
founder and a principal of the
Hebrew Teachers Training
Schools for Girls, now part of
Yeshiva University. In 1935 he
founded the Ramaz School in
New York, the first progressive
Jewish Day School in the
country'. His son presently serves
as principal of the school, which
is named for Rabbi Margolies.
A prolific writer and also a
teacher. Rabbi Lookstein has
taught Homiletics and Practical
Rabbinics in the Graduate School
of Yeshiva University for over 40
years and at Stern Yeshiva
Colleges for some 30 years. He
serves as a commissioner of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations.
Harvard Prof. Named
To UJA Cabinet
Considered by his colleagues to education. He was chairman of
Rabbi Phillip Labouitz (seated) discusses plans for the High
Hobday services uith Rabbi Emanuel Schenk. RabbiSchenk is
rabbi emeritus of Beth Shalom People's Tempi* in Brooklyn,
N.Y., and has been the rabbi of Temple Beth IsraeFs auxiliary
senices for the past five years. This year he will be conducting
services at the Sunrise Musical Theatre. These High Holiday
services are sponsored by Temple Beth Israel and seats may be
reserved either at the Sunrise Musical Theatre box office or at
the Temple
NEW YORK Michael L.
Walzer. professor of Government
at Harvard University, has been
named chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal Faculty Advisory
Cabinet (FACl. The appointment
was made by UJA general chair-
man Leonard R. St relit z
The FAC is a group of some
200 Jewish academicians from
universities and colleges
throughout the country who seek
to stimulate the development of
programs on subjects of Jewish
concern in the campus com-
munity. In addition to en-
couraging their colleagues' par-
ticipation in local UJA-
Federation joint fund-raising
campaigns, the group works to
strengthen the relationship of
Jewish faculty and students.
Included in the FAC program is
an annual fact-finding mission to
Israel.
IN MAKING the appoint
ment. StreliU noted. "Leadership
of the FAC requires an individual
to hold an uncompromising com-
mitment to the advancement of
Jewish survival, both in theory
and practice. Prof. Walzer
typifies that commitment and I
expect that he will contribute
substantially to raising the levels
of awareness, activity and fund-
raiaing among his colleagues on
campuses throughout the
country
Prof Walzer has served as
chairman of the Council of Jewish
Philanthropies of Greater
Boston's faculty fund-raising
drive. He is on the board of
governors of Hebrew University
in Jerusalem and is a member of
the Institute for Jewish Policy
Planning and Research of the
Synagogue Council of America,
and the International Affairs
Committee of the American
Jewish Congreaa.
A 1956 graduate of Brandos
University. Prof. Walzer ~fiH
at Cambridge University under a
Fulbright Fellowship the
following year. He recawed his
PhD from Harvard in 1961 and
PALM AIRE
RESALES
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ISRAEL ~-
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sightseeing and escort c = cv m
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SOIL LASOLAS&VD
FT LAUDEROAtf
MICHAEL L. WALZER
served as assistant professor of
Political Science at Princeton
University from 1962-66 prior to
his appointment to the Harvard
faculty. In addition to his
teaching responsibilities. be
serves as chairman of the Com-
mittee on Degrees in Social
Studies.
Prof. Walzer s articles on
polaical science have appeared in
Dissent and Philosophy and
Pubhc Affairs He serves on their
editorial boards as well as on the
editorial board of Publtc Policy
He is the author of five books, the
most recent of which. Just and
Unjust Wars, is due to be pub-
lished this year________________
JOSEPH H. LOOKSTEIN
jHigh Holy Day
(Tickets On Sale!
High Holy Day tickets are now
available at Temple Beth Torah
in Tamarac Ftosh Hashonah
begins Monday. Sept. 12 and
Yom Kippur is Wednesday. Sept.
22.
A two-week Israel trip is being
sponsored by the temple. The trip
leaves Fort Lauderdale on Nov.
14 and returns Nov. 28. The trip
will include visits to Jerusalem,
Eilat. Masada and a kibbutz.
Contact the temple office for
more information.
Pioneer Women Form
Lauderdale Chapters
Grace Herskowitz.
organizational consultant for
Pioneer Women in North
Broward and Palm Beach
Counties, announces the for-
mation of a Pioneer Women Club
in Margate and is currently
organizing in the Lauderhill.
Lauderdale Lakes and Plantamn
areas. A membership tan will be
held on Tuesday. Aug. 23 at the
home of Mrs.' Irene Tritz in
Lauderdale Lakes Members and
other interested persons can
contact Mrs Trinu for in-
formation.
THOMAS SBREZA.MD
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING
OF HIS OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
DERMATOLOGY
ft DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY
at Oreaa Meascal Ceeter
Se*e 3*1 N Oeeaa Dr.
LaaaV-ay-tae-Sea. FLa
Ptraar 491-11(1
?MY PAY MORE?
? COAST'S VALFT
RAWING
LOCATED ENTRANCE
TO FT LAUDERDALE
HOLLYWOOD AIR
pO"T $1.50 PC* DAT
COAST
KNT-A-CAR
LOCATED ENTRANCE
TO FT LAUDERDALE
HOLLYWOOD AIRPORT
524-1138
Al LANG
AUTO RENTAL MC
HOLIDAY INN NORTH
4V00POWERLINERD
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776-4S80
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5100 N STATE RD .7
TAMARAC
739-4000
*mn STATE RD 7
LAUDERHILL

*Al LANG
AUTO tWTAl *C 4S5_0990
_____* Q'V'SON OF CONTINENTAL INC


trjday, August 5,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
^Happenings
iiMiiiMiiniiiiiie
The Two
Destination: Israel
The Kosher Meal Program \ r?aoeta ftf |
ByLYNNKOPELOWITZ
"Food for the Mind as Well as
Ihe Body" describes the newly
Instituted Free Kosher Meal
Program for Senior Citizens in
Fort Lauderdale. The program
noW in its second month, is
.iinded by the Federal Gover-
nment under the HEW Title VII
iProgram through the Area
Council on Aging, and is
Sponsored by the Jewish
Community Center of Fort
aiiderdale. The program is non-
sectarian and is open to any
erson aged 60 or over; reser-
vations may be made by
telephoning the Jewish Com-
|munity Center.
At the Castle Hill Elementary
fechool in Lauderhill (which was
offered by the City of Lauderhill
is a site)one of three kosher
bites in Broward Coun-
ty-approximately 160 fresh,
kosher meals are provided each
day, Monday through Friday.
Many senior citizens come by
bus. Transportation is available
|or disabled persons. *
, WILLIAM GOLDSTEIN and
Helen Nathan of the JCC Staff
krt responsible for organizing
this program. At the Castle Hill
Lite (the other sites are at the
ICC in Hollywood and Temple
Beth Orr in Coral Springs) the
program is managed by Mr. and
drs, Sam Perlis, both retired
Ittorneys from Boston. With the
help of other volunteers from the
lenior citizens' community, the
Perlises supervise delivery of the
meals from the caterer,
icheduling of programs and post-
heal clean-up duties.
Perhaps the most important
functions of the volunteers are
eing friends and listeners to the
people who come each day to
Jhare in the program.
The luncheon
neals nutritious, flavorful and
kttractively served are ob-
viously appreciated by the
Mderly. who are often on fixed
Incomes and feel the "pinch" of
nflation. But after speaking to
Ihe people gathered at Castle
and listening to their
lei-lings about the program, it is
llear that for them the food is
Inly part of the experience.
NOT MERELY is there
lonsensus but an almost
knanimous feeling that the
krngram gives companionshipa
Mace to feel acceptedthe op-
portunity to share opinions and
eelings with people of common
Ige and circumstances... to be
Jeurd. These are benefits that
annot be measured. Yet the
enefits are real, and palpable.
Many of the senior citizens are
vidowed, but even for those
JCC Singles Calendar
The new Singles Group at the JCC is the Singles, 26-40. While
he group is in its developmental stage, it still boasts many activities
Iready as follows:
ug. 4, 7:30 p.m. Planning meeting at Trudy's house, for members
only.
|Aug. 9, 7:46 p.m. Young and Active Singles will present its fifth
"Single Mingle"an occasion for making new acquaintances.
General and sensory awareness rap sessions are led by professional
facilitators. Wine and cheese to follow.
ug. 13, 7:30 pjn. Covered dish and Pool Party at Bay Colony, Fort
Lauderdale. Each guest must bring fully cooked food in covered
dish that will serve 4-6 persons (RSVP) before Aug. 6. Also bring a
bathing suit.
^ug. 14. 1:30 pjn. "Kids Day" at JCC-games, prizes and beloons.
All for kids... and grown-ups, too.
^ug. 24, 7:46 p.m. Backgammon Night at the Center. Doors will open
at 7:46 for instruction. Tournaments begin at 8:30. Prizes will be
awarded for intermediates and beginners. Refreshments will be
served.
fortunate enough to be with a
husband or wifehaving moved
to a new city now far from
children, grandchildren, and life-
long friendsthere can be the
chill of loneliness.
In the words of Sara Perlis:
"People need people. I relate
heart to heart. The warmth, love
and appreciation resounds back
to the volunteers. People need to
know that they are cared about,
wanted; 'it isn't charity, it is
kindness they need."
THE GROUPS enjoy movies,
informative lectures from
policemen, firemen and from
other community professionals.
There is also arts and crafts,
cardplaying, entertainment, folk
dancing and exercise. Nettye
Green, who is in charge of
programs at the Castle Hill site,
encourage people who have
special talents to perform or to
share their skills.
An Advisory Council at each
site also maintains open lines of
communication between the JCC
and participants in order to
receive ideas and suggestions, to
listen attentively, to give help
where it is needed and to try to
improve the quality of life for the
elderly here.
A social worker attends the
program on a weekly basis to
give extra help and information.
At Castle Hill, the Advisory
Council members are: Sam
Perlis, Sol Simon (also co-
manager of the site program),
Kitty Steingart (registration),
Nettye Green (who chairs the
Program Committee with Bernice
Ashley). Jean Griff, Viola
Melnick, and Frieda Katz. Sara
Perlis acts as assistant manager
of the site; Goldie Schwimmer is
supervisor of arts and crafts, and
Molly Baum assists in
registration. The program is
dependent on volunteers.
THE JCC INTENDS to
expand the program in the Fall in
order to reach more senior
citizens in Broward County. By
the numbers of people already
being served, the success of the
program is evident, but the
emotional "fringe benefits" make
the greatest difference in the lives
of the participants.
One elderly lady expressed it
best: "It's a blessing!"
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER HAS A
NEW PHONE
NUMBER
484-7676
JCC Program Planning Underway
The JCC is developing a "program brochure" which will
contain a listing of all current and projected programs for the
i Fall. Expected release of the brochure is prior to Labor Day.
(Committees now developing the projects are Special Events
Committee, Childrens and Teens Program, and Senior Adult
'rogram.
Israel
i
By AHARON MEGGED
A generation after the foun-
ding of Israel, 37 percent of the
adults have less than an eighth
grade education. About 14
percent have less than a fourth
grade education, and close to 8
percent have never been to
school.
The alarming fact is that these
figures are not based only on the
generation of immigrants which
came "en masse" to Israel from
the ghettos and caves of North
Africa and had to time to get an
education in the ma'abarot. The
problem here is "hereditary
ignorance" which, like certain
illnesses, is passed to succeeding
generations. We find parents and
children who cannot add a row of
figures or write a simple Hebrew
sentence!
WHY? Avraham Zivion, head
of Israel's Adult Education
Department, says: "In Israel,
about 37.8 percent of the women
and about 23 percent of the men
of African and Asian origin have
less than a fourth grade
education or its equivalent
...about 10-15 percent of the
new recruits in the armed forces
are practically illiterate, despite
having completed eight or ten
years of schooling; and there are
entire communities, particularly
in the development towns, poor
neighborhoods and immigrant
moshavim, where approximately
one-third of the population is
illiterate.
In the mid-1960s, groups of.
women soldiers and individuals
were sent to development areas
to teach the adults the rudiments
of reading, writing and arith-
metic.
The attempt failed and was
discontinued after two or three
years, because the young soldiers
were not adequately trained to
deal with such vast cultural
differences in mentality and
motivation. Nor did they have
necessary equipment, such as
suitable textbooks, special
teaching programs or organized
lesson plans, to solve the
illiteracy problems. Indeed, they
encountered the following
obstacles: apathy, lack of
qualified personnel willing to
teach adults, lack of suitable
teaching materials and chronic
shortage of funds."
HOWEVER, THERE are fa-
vorable statistics as well: Israel
has a large number of
academicians; more than 50,000
university students; world-
renowned scientific institutions;
immpressive achievements in
agriculture, industry, tech-
nology, research end
development; perhaps the
highest "per capita" rate of
books published and read; and
high cinema, theatre and concert
attendance. Not to mention the
number of people involved in the
creative arts, the resurrection of
the Hebrew language and
Hebrew education.
Cantor Sprey
To Aid Perlman
Cantor Irving Sprey has been
chosen to assist Cantor Charles
Perlman at High Holy Days
services at Congregation Beth
HiUel of Margate. For High Holy
Days services information,
contact the temple. When ex-
pansion on the temple is com-
pleted, it will accomodate 160
people.
Traveling With Children
By PEARL REINSTEIN
Last year when my friends
wished me a Bon Voyage to
Europe and Israel they said it
with their fingers crossed. Not
because I was going abroad, but
because my husband and I were
taking our two children aged
three and twenty months with us.
It turned out to be such a
marvelous trip that we brought
Lesli and Louis with us again this
summer. We spent one month in
Israel and it was our very best
vacation. No, I'm not a saint and
my children are not perfect. I
merely took the time to plan the
best way to travel and enjoy
iteven with children.
FIRST OF ALL its partially
psychological. You have to tell
yourself what a great vacation
it's going to be and then start
brainwashing your children on
how good they are, how they're
going to enjoy the long flight and
how much fun the hotels and new
sitters will be.
Next step is packing. One
suitcase for both children was
sufficient. A parka or light jacket
was needed (as Jerusalem is cold
at night) and a couple of tur-
tlenecks for evening. Basic
coordinated outfits were the best
bet and enough clothes so you
only need to wash once in four
days.
Each child should carry his or
her own travel bag filled with
coloring books, crayons,
sugarless gum, pretzels, dolls,
toys, blankets and books. Our
children used everything en route
and in Israel.
SINCE THERE are babies and
children in all countries, it only
seems logical that your children's
needs can be met almost
anywhere. Baby food and diapers
can be found in pharmacies in
every country. Disposable
diapers are expensive in most
countries and exorbitant in
Israel.
I reccommend bringing a
suitcase filled with disposal
diapers (4-5 dozen). On your
return trip you can fill it with
gifts and souvenirs. Last year I
ran out after the first week,
having only packed two dozen,
and used the Israeli form of
disposables a narrow pad
placed inside a square plastic
sheet you tie on each side as a
diaper. It worked, but I didn't
like it.
AIRLINES are usually very
accomodating to families,
especially El Al. They give
children books, games, crayons
and puzzles. The staff seems to
be more attentive, helpful and
understanding. They always
have extra pampers.
Arrangement for little porta-beds
can be made in advance with easy
hook-ups en-flight. The airlines
also seem to help you through
Em anu-El Services,
Brunches Scheduled
Sabbath Eve Services at
Temple Emanu-El, Fort
Lauderdale, will be held on
Friday, Aug. 6, starting at 8:16
p.m.
Temple Emanu-El invites non-
members to join the Temple
family at a prospective member
brunch to be held on two Sun-
days, Aug. 7 and Aug. 28 at the
Temple at 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Joel
S. Goor, spiritual leader, Cantor
Jerome Klements, officers and
board members will be present.
For additional information,
contact the Temple.
customs faster with children.
Toilet seat covers, wash and
dries, gum and either cookies,
'fruit or pretzels are essential
when traveling, in case they're
finished serving and they need a
little nosh or you need the toilet
articles for bathroom use.
Every hotel, especially your
four and five star hotels, have
portacribs and great babysitters
for the asking. You either get a
nice Jewish lady or a beautiful
young Sabra who will knock your
husband off his feet!
I THINK WHEN you travel
with little ones it's better to rent
a car. You're your own boss. You
can come and go as you please,
especially when you're bringing
strollers (umbrella type), you can
throw them in the back seat. By
the way, last year we brought a
booster seat that doubled as a car
seat for Louis who was twnety
months. It was great.
When your children are older,
buses are fine as they can cope
with the crowds. When they're
teens, tours are fine as they can
keep up with the rigors of a tour.
This year we had both of our
children in Kindergarten from
8:30-12:30 p.m. in Jerusalem.
The teacher spoke English as well
as Hebrew. The Israeli children
spoke no English. In the af-
ternoons they took their naps
back at the apartment we had
rented. Then we took them to
parks or to the Holyland Hotel to
swim. (We had a membership
there for the month) We took
them on all excursions to Ein
Gev, Qumran, Ein Gedi. Ein
Fascha, Sachre National Park,
etc. We did not take them
shopping except when buying
clothes for them.
IF YOU JUST remember to let
them have fun and also remember
that it's your vacation too,
everyone will enjov.
Religious Directory
FORT LAUDERDALE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE 7100
W
Oakland Park Blvd Rabbi Philip A
Labowiti Cantor Maurice Neu (42).
EMANU EL TEMPLE. 3425 W Oak
land Park Blvd Reform Rabbi Joel
Goor. Cantor Jerome K lement
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF
LAUDERHILL. 2048 NW 48th Ave..
Lauderhill. Conservative
president Ait>>' N.b.7
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER 9106
NW 57th St Conservative Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman (44A)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
4171 Stirling Rd Orothodox. Rabbi
MosheBomier (52).
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNA
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd Liberal Re
form. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr (64)
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM TEMPLE 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative Rabbi Morris A Skop.
Cantor Jacob Renzer (49)
MARGATE
BETH HILLELCONGREGATION. 7*40
Margate Blvd. Conservative. Cantor
Charles Perlman.
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 6101
NW 9th St. Conservative Cantor Max
Gllub(44B)
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH OR R. Riverside Drive.
Reform. (44).
NORTHWEST BROWARD SYNA
GOGUE 1041 W Sample Road.
DEERFIELD BEACH
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
BETH ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE. Cen-
tury Village East Conservative
Rabbi David Berent (62)
LmuOEROALE LAKES
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL
4351 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Modern Orthodox Congregation
Rabbi Saul D. Herman.
SUNRISE
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER, INC,
104* W. Oakland Park Blvd. Conser-
vative. President Abe Yurman.
Cantor Jack Merchant.


Parofi
rW :wuut Flermlimn jf Cl tort
Report of Begin. Meet
With Je Irish Lemders
Highlights of Begin's Peace Plan
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inu aar- aay aa l Laoaranii
:rv!ii .".immuwiun.
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iwvm aa inan unisaar? and
SUi I.maaar"' if aa -mipiiiirnif
auncr> I.i aa Tameaom if
aaaa araa n* rbur aiaaai
.".immuwKina. iaac Taataa
racwaan aa iarr.:e :imuanau
viil >a lmpcamu anu .wnciuuau.
?Ha aaaauai rf aani Tuanaa
m"H u rv :ih rn awaca u-nataw. I aaa
pun -i lwar Himu ran aiaiHa upi
m miiKUHmun n m itacm
rapax*aiwnt inu hjuhi aac,
awm inuuiu ih iwaca -^nataaa
mi-.v/wn tnwi inu Ba tuup-
mrrn{ rjiinir*HM. .'ur .tinfant B
;ihi :ii!' h. in aaami luuiur-t| in
:iiuriui:unui -aw vill imvij.
aai :in ihuui inu aaajana] aav
o lnnjf niimi :ii- rninai.:un H
i anal ii var inn n vur t.aiit a
amuioi i iwacn anl
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aa icvauil" tadana ul hj
immwujj n Dba -iaaanuti it paaca.
amen im iwing uacuaaau. fhw
imi ti-'amt- ii in" NHtcu BanV
o :m anat aai GDI natu ii anr
a wan urrnmiiiuu. ^wn -inna
:iv umuirui :iauaai, :nupuir
ii i iwa) maty n vnitri anl
laiurrmna. uau vita :ih lwip ii i
nan iiutcnau o aw wul-w awcy
ba iwrmunwm niunuiu*" mrwwn
Da xnuurrwa nvnii'uu. "tan
pmea u inptur aoout
lipKnnuiu: aauaaa. unt aam aaa
avn a MJiuuun or niiiinnaut-
riapiiir uriiu ic-imiinit :iauaaa.
anu nnwr aapuin nrmmmaa
uiuut ourrn, wmaumwa touut
iataarna, mum tpnatit- mniitanti
amaaTiuaj, aa 'bay nn t
aa^aily. tba >iujn .untnauung
a-ta I-ama.
1 anauoy oar
ehay amaotbt
r aanaaatioai
Arab
aaaaa x mtanaMe
a aaafagaJ ad-
xunataaaj at tha oaarxantaa of
iPLO.tha
am
*H) WB? WE my a
maty an nwan natiuv
crminamm it ba itata ii
Dw ataarminauun n iwrmuimm
Munuanaa. lipKnnaut -mauuna
Da cunumiL :tum, ituwaaii
nu vnan Da Ana ir na 'tiur
t1"'** .Vianmiaaaina aill im mi
Da xmuittuna anu na wttula it
Duaa ante naaiua mu nay aill 4no n ^^l^mm **"
oauuuft Dan. nan atanbar .^^^^ .^TaWnaanaa-*
.nwrnnce mil Oa laaamvanau. Waaajl ^o^nar a*
panaa raaitaa <*> onn- t aail ba ? J"*
i aineratoan:
of In
about zam oaanannnant of tat
amuifn nptamacx contacts wn
-jm faanaaaaaa rnataia That a
ma juhiiiry and t a inadn
"Jtt aataod uaat a <$aa anrnj
aa laaaraauains ar aa annntn
a aaodaa. It a a aal-oad
aataud abadt irmucit aboa
>fo aam -aauita. The ir-niai
tgmamanta tba caraa ii luatn
mi., auiianta. aata 9#oa an
.n-Taa. and with iC3t aa
tucumama rf 41 aat -lauoad
mptrrtaaaca. ua >tna it -nair a-
-scUfs t a icpuutDKt aac aoa
u-matca agiianiir 1 am
nuiBpaaaanie flap 'xrwants at
aannaannnnC of a full iaan
'Taaatara. Taauity-^ignt 'as
iiopaa ao aa are ata. Aai
nir-nif "2ut anarvaruntt >mo
awm amu fnur wars, m a 'try
-ngrntxaDia. naa. iat u *art aaa.
u. want w*. aria aa ten? af
iimuat a jmaaai 1 a aai inu aa
am iut tin auuuu latft
graan try tba pamas :tmuanai
aat an anal ntaniian a an
paaan
W mupni aa ma if *
utornauva paaadnlitiaa a an
men aixuu Cimmiawoa
attaaiiawu amugn lipHimaa 1
uiiaca n "aw -^Hoacnn
:apitaio. Vnu tbay aav at atao
n aar iiaiaa in 11 aajnuus a
any laniai aai. aa aw tacna
aill ba aaa by aa ara|
.'im.iaiiau.
TUB SKanV auauaaa
amahdity n aaaat a amaatnj
aoaanuty cadha. In- mW
. utad itataa Gova
luggaatau aaa amurmr' aw
>a ma a ?*aw Yam. n a*
aorda, an lataai naaapiuxra adl
an i.-ao aaaaaauan. ami *l
. nituu -jiatan iaJajliiin naagl
awir naad iffkan to rrng *l
wnao uaaiar Wa all
viiling u auept aaen natai*"l
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Tha Juvnrnnnm n *|
ajopua xtm mania u ana
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aaaa
agnau iy Oa
>>tu tbaa van
1 a a mniar'una. Day
aril aaaa ato tana. \ai Dare
"A ba a nriiidiiaat by ail tba
anaabar


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