The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00088

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
Richards' Day-Long Shopping Spree for WECARENears
Richards Department Store at
Uuderhill Mall on State Road 7
(Route 441) will stage a gala day-
long shopping spree Thursday,
Aug. 11 on bhalf of the Greater
Fort Lauderdale Jewish Feder-
ation and its year-old WECARE
reach-out program that serves
sick, senior, shut-in, blind and
other needy persona.
Founded to serve as the
volunteer arm of the Jewish
Federation, WECARE's rame is
an acronym for "With Energy,
Compassion and Responsible
Effort." Headed by Rovi Faber
general chairman, WECARE has
recruited over 415 men and
women who are organized into 19
service committees.
IRWIN BERLIN, acting pre*
ident of Richards, said that
Federation WECARE Day at
the store will be Richards' way of
paying our respects to the Jewish
Federation and its WECARE
unit because they're doing a
world of good in a world that's
always in short supply of that
commodity." He added:
"For the past year, the Jewish
Federation has been doing all in
its power to show that it cares. So
does Richards."
According to Berlin, Richards
will make the following con-
tributions to the WECARE-Jew-
ish Federation.
9 10 percent of all Aug. 11
sales in excess of that day's
normal anticipated receipts;
% One dollar for every ap-
proved Richards charge account
that is opened.
CUSTOMERS entering the
store Aug. 11 will be in line for a
total to date of 53 door prizes, 23
of them to be contributed by
Richards and the balance by mer-
chants, travel agencies, restau-
rants and entertainment enter-
prises throughout the Fort
Lauderdale area. Winners will be
selected at random by a
"Mystery Shopper" who will
escort the lucky customer to a
wishing well for dredging up an
unmarked envelope whose
contents will disclose the prize.
Richards itself has earmarked
$15,000 to publicize its Feder-
ation-WECARE day. The
shopping aspect will be aug-
mented by a number of special
events throughout the day.
American Red Cross will offer
free blood pressure tests while
the Broward Community Blood
Continued on Page 2
^Jewish Florid far
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 6- Number 15
Friday, July 22,1977
Price 35 Cents
Ten-Day Mission to Celebrate Double Anniversary
These were among the more than 25 lawyers, accountants and
Jewish community leaders who attended the recent meeting at
the Tower Clun where the Jewish Federation announced
establishment of the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies as an
'arm and adjunct of both the Federation and its UJA campaign.
From left are Norman Lipoff, chairman of the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
who addressed the group (He's also general chairman of
Miami's Combined Jewish Appeal and was named recently a
national chairman of the UJA); Jacob Brodzki, president of the
Fort Lauderdale Jewish Federation; Hyman Indowsky,
chairman of the new Foundation's Tax Committee and a
partner in the CPA firm of Peat, Marwick and Mitchell, and
\rthur Faber, chairman of the Foundation and a Fort
'Lauderdale life insurance underwriter.
CJF Endowment Growth
In 1976 Breaks Records
Jerusalem to be Site of Historic Meeting
A 10-day UJA Mission to Israel that will take place Oct. 16 to 26 under
sponsorship of the Jewish Federation was announced this week by
Federation president Jacob Brodzki, and UJA campaign General Chairman
Charles Locke. Their announcement brought immediate favorable responses
from all parts of greater Fort Lauderdale.
Within days following, both men also announced that some 50 persons
had either sent in $100 deposits per person or expressed an interest. They
said also that "many others will join the mission over the next several
weeks."
Six-Day War Commander
View* Reunified Jerusalem
Editor's Note: Members of the Fort Lauderdale UJA Mission to Israel
will take part in observances commemorating the tenth anniversary of
the reunification of Jerusalem. Here is a view of Jerusalem's recent
past, its present and its future as seen by the man who was the com-
manding general of the Israel Defense force that reunified the city
duringtheSix-DayWarof!967.
NEW YORK-Forty-seven
Jewish Federations in the United
States and Canada reported net
holdings of $223 million in en-
dowment funds in 1976, setting a
record in endowment fund
growth.
The 47 communities
responding to the annual survey
on the status of Federation
Endowment Funds compiled by
the Council of Jewish
Federations (CJF), showed total
receipts of approximately $44
million by their funds since 1975.
THE CJF SURVEY also notes
that the responding communities
allocated $20 million in grants
last year from their endowment
funds. The Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Federation is the latest to
establish an endowment program
through its recently formed
Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies.
Intermediate and small cities,
Continued on Page 2
His only
NEW YORK-"Time it
working against us. Within the
next ten years, Jerusalem has to
take on even more of a Jewish
character. We're aiming for a
Jewish population of 500,000 by
1987."
This is the view of Uzi
Narkiss, general of the Israel
Army who commanded the forces
during the Six-Day War that
reunified Jerusalem,
disappointment
in the ten years
since Jerusalem's
reunification, he
states, is that
more Jews have-1
n't settled in the
city, and that
more hasn't been
built to establish
a stronger Jew-f
ish presence
there. NARKISS
Brodzki' Vse Floridian as Opinion Forum'
A newspaper is not only "an in-
formation medium" but a "forum of
public opinion."
That's the view of Jacob Brodzki,
president of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale. Brodzki ex-
pressed these views this past week at a
meeting with a number of Fort
Lauderdale Jewish leaders and
Federation executives. He was especially
warm in commenting on The Jewish
Floridian.
"ITS A NEWSPAPER, that has
begun to give this community a good
sense of itself and a better understanding
of its needs on the one hand and of its
relationship to Jewry elsewhere. I know
personally of many throughout the area
who feel deprived when their paper does
not come, or come on time. That is often
not the paper's fault but a matter of
tardy mail delivery. In any case, it
underscores The Jewish Floridian's
rising place and esteem in the Fort
Lauderdale Jewish Community.
"At the same time, there are many
person who would like to 'talk back,' as it
were. I think that the editors of the paper
would welcome responsible expressions
of opinion from its readers. My own
advice is this: whether you agree or
disagree, take the time to drop a letter to
the editor. He'U be glad to get it; he'll
surely read it; he's more than likely to
publish it."
NARKISS IS now director-
general of the Aliyah Department
of the Jewish Agency, which
promotes immigration to Israel.
"In the last ten years," Nar-
kiss said, "Jerusalem has lost the
character of a provincial city. It's
now a big city in every sense of
the word a city with a special
meaning. It is truly a-capitol.
"It's not yet the economic
center of the country and
wonder it it ever will be, but I
think the real potential for Jeru-
salem lies in its possibility as a
center for super-sophisticated
industry and as the intellectual
hub of the country," Narkiss
declared, adding:
"JERUSALEM cannot exist
on an industrial base. We must
see that the city is a place where
universities and yeshivot can
flourish. By emphasizing Jeru-
salem as a place of higher lear-
ning, we can reinforce the spiri-
tual and holy image that the city
has all over the world."
Narkiss said that Jerusalem
has truly blossomed as a capital
Continued on Page 7
BRODZKI AND Locke
termed the warm response
given the mission "one of the
most heartening" accorded any
Federation project over the past
year. They said they were
especially pleased by this first
strong reception of the mission's
formation, "considering that all
who travel with it will be called
on to make a contribution to the
Federation's 1978 UJA cam-
paign."
In the case* of couples, they
explained, husbands will be
called on to make a pledge of at
least $1,200, with wives asked to
contribute $300 as a minimum.
Unattached mission members
will be expected to pledge $1,200,
at least. Pledging will take place
in Israel.
Brodzki and Locke gave this
further picture of the Mission's
standing and purpose:
# Each member of the
mission, they said, would be a
guest of the Israel Government,
the Jewish Agency and the Israel
Defense Forces.
The Mission will have a
close-up of Israel as no ordinary
tourist can hope to see it. Mission
members, traveling as a group in
air-conditioned buses, will be
escorted to and through the West
Bank and the Golan Heights; will
Continued on Page 2
New Year to be Observed
At Area Nursing Homes, Hospitals
Rabbi Leonard S. Zoll, director
of Chaplaincy of the Jewish
Federation, has announced that
the Days of Awe (Yamim
Noraim) of Rosh Hashanah and
Yom Kippur will be celebrated in
area nursing homes and hospitals
with worship services and sweet
gifts to symbolize the sweetness
of life and the New Year.
Assisting in these efforts will be
the WECARE volunteers of the
Jewish Federation.
Dr. Alvin Colin, a long-time
member of the Federation board
of directors, is the new chairman
of the Chaplaincy Committee.
Asserting that the chaplaincy
program has received many
accolades, he reported that a
number of new programs would
be announced shortly which
would expand chaplaincy ser-
vices to the community.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 22,1977
Detroit Woman to Lead Shopping Spree
UJA Young Women's Group
NEW YORK-The United
JewishAppeal has established a
Young Women's Leadership
JANE SHERMAN
Cabinet, designed to develop
leadership potential among
younger American -.'Jewish
women, General Chairman Leo-
nard R. Strelitz has announced.
Jane Sherman of Detroit, a mem-
ber of the UJA's National
Women's Division Board, has
been appointed chairman.
"American Jewish women
have taken a new direction
during the last decade," Strelitz
said. "While remaining dedicated
to traditional values, they are
oriented toward careers as well as
family life. They are highly
motivated to work for social
change and improvement both at
home and abroad. aryL.it js inv
portant to our community that
their energies be channeled into
the work of UJA and
federations."
RESPONDING TO her ap
pointment, Mrs. Sherman said:
"We envision a Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet that will offer
the emerging generation of
women increased opportunities to
play fuller and more independent
roles in American Jewish life. We
expect to take a broadly
educational approach, offering
training in the fund-raising
process, and dialogue and inquiry
CJE Growth
Continued from Page 1
the report continues, showed the
greatest percentage growth in
1976. Comparable data for 21
cities in these categories reveals a
net increase of 42 percent ii
endowment funds last year over
1975 totals.
Almost half of the 1976 total of
$223 million reported to CJF by
the 47 federated communities
consists of unrestricted funds.
OF THE GRANTS made from
endowment funds during 1976,
almost half went to the annual
Federation campaigns, and 39
percent went to various agencies
and institutions including (but
not limited to) agencies of the
Federations.
The Council of Jewish Federa-
tions is the association of central
community organizations
Federations, Welfare Funds,
Community Councils serving
800 Jewish communities in North
America. It aids these com-
munities to mobilize maximum
support for major overseas,
national and local services in-
volving financing, planning and
operating health, welfare, cul-
tural, educational, community
relations and other programs
benefiting all residents.
in the areas of Jewish values and
responsibilities."
The Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet will work in
close cooperation with the UJA's
Young Leadership Cabinet and
its Women's Division.
Recently appointed members
of the Steering Committee are
Vicki Agron, Englewood, Colo;
Linda Feinstone, New York City;
Karen Firestein, Wayne, N.J.;
Helaine Gould, Roslyn, N.Y.;
Robin Handelman, Evanston,
III.; Sharon M. Jacobs,
Williamsville, N.Y.; Jayne
Mackta, Morristown, N.J.;
Rigmor Offerman, Old Westbury,
N.Y.; Brina Reinstein, Tulsa,
Okla.; Roslyn Roth stein, Yar-
dley, Pa., and Jane Rubenstein,
Kansas City, Mo. Barbara P.
Faske, associate director of the
Young Leadership Cabinet, will
serve as director of the new
Cabinet.
MRS. SHERMAN has been a
national and communtiy leader in
young leadership and women's
division activities. A member of
the UJA National Women's
Division Board and National
Campaign Cabinet, she also
serves on the Council of Jewish
Federations and Welfare Funds
Leadership Development
Executive Committee.
From 1972-1974, she served as
Michigan State chariman of the
UJA Women's Division. In
Detroit, she is past chairman of
the Women's Division campaign
of the Jewish Welfare Federation
and currently serves on its Board
of Directors and as chairman of
its $500-and-Over Gifts Division.
She is also a member of the
Federation's Community Ser-
vices, Budgeting and Leadership
Development committees and the
Jewish Community Center Board
of Directors. In 1971, Mrs.
Sherman was awarded the Sylvia
Simon Greenberg Award for
Young Leadership.
Nears
Continued from Page 1
Center will offer free blood
typing. The Chosen Children, a
Fort Lauderdale choir, will offer a
program of songs. Richards will
gift wrap purchases of $5 and
over.
Businesses that have come
forward so far to join Richards in
saluting WECARE are Air & Sea
Travel Agency, which is con-
tributing three cruises, a trip to
Las Vegas and a weekend at Lido
Beach in Sarasota; Jungle
Queen, Paddlewheel Queen and
Ocean World, with tickets to
each; Dante, Patricia Murphy,
the Hilton Hotel and Le Club
Internationale restaurants, with
two dinners each, respectively;
the Regency Room at Ocean
Manor Hotel with cocktails and
dinner for two; gifts from Gait
Casuals, Reflections, First Fed-
eral Savings & Loan, Hilton
Hotel, and a prescription filled by
the Gait Pharmacy; a weekend at
Ramada Inn, and two tickets for
"Can-Can" at the Sunrise
Musical Theater.
Richards gave a "Launcheon-
Luncheon" at the end of June at
its Lauderhill Mall store to signal
opening of a six-week organizing
and promotional effort that will
culminate on WECARE Day
Aug. 11. With Berlin as host, the
guests included Jacob Brodzki,
president of the Jewish Feder-
ation; Mrs. Faber; Rebecca
Hodes, president of the Jewish
Federation's Women's Division;
Irving L. Geisser, executive
director of the Jewish Fed-
eration; Barry Axler, assistant
Federation executive director;
Richards vice presidents, Richard
Basile, Hall Freinberg, Phillip
Hoffman and Tony Moreira;
Lauderhill Mayor Eugene Cip-
poloni; Broward County Com-
missioner Jack Moss; Richards
personnel director Bob Butler;/
Roy Hamilton, manager of
Richards' Lauderhill Mall store;
and the presidents and other
representatives of major Jewish
organizations in North Broward.

FORT LAUDERDALE 776"6272
TAPES BUSINESS FORMS
CARTONS TAGS- LABELS
HANGERS BAGS BOXES
WIPES POLYETHYLENE
IROWARD
IAPER I
ACKAGING
INC
1201 NE 45th ST
FORT LAUDERDALE
FLORIDA 33334
TEMPLE BE1H ISR4EL PRESENTS
\*+>'{
HIGH
if*AlBT^
SERVICES
FOR THE FIRST TIME
eUNRISE^cw*^
*-*HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES
CONDUCTED BY CANTOR SEYMOUR SCHWARTZMAN
AND RABBI EMANUEL SCHENK
ROSH HASHANAH September 12. 13. 14
YOM KIPPUR September 21.22
Ticketi purchased before July 15 S22 50
(Alter July 15 S25.00I
special discounts for group purchases
for additional information and
reservations contact
Temple beth israel
7100 West Oakland Park Blvcl
Sunrise. Fiorul.. 33313
735 4010
SUNRISE MUSICAL THEATRE
741 8600
lAdtM.oiidi ConwtMHw winon monngnl h, irw TiiimjIii .v,n In i.,.iu 4\ irw
Inyemiy Counliy Clulwnd Sum .* IA PtuvIM Sri v.rM loi memhenhip
will be told ji Temple Beth IwmI I
All wiy.cet under ihe Direction o" FUWi. Phillip Ljbowii/ will be conducted
m ihe Con>eiye hjtMioii
F7-2?-77
Mission to Israel
Is Double Observance
Continued from Page 1
be taken to new development
towns, to a number of kibbutzim
and moshavim, to an airfield
"somewhere in Israel," to a
Mai ben center for aged and
infirm immigrants, to an im-
migrant reception center, to new
housing developments, and to
such other places and points of
interest that are the beneficiary
of funds raised through the UJA.
'"THE CHIEF point of many
of these visitsaside from those
to military installations," Brod-
zki and locke declared, "will be to
give the Fort Lauderdale mission
a chance to see how contributed
funds are spent in Israel and to
get a picture of the needs that
must be met this coming year for
the settlement and absorption of
both new and recent immigrants.
This will be a study mission in
every respect."
At that, the eye-witness in-
tensive visits and special
briefings will be interspersed
with a number of gala special
occasions, they said. The two
Federation leaders listed the
following:
1) The mission's visit to
Israel will mark the opening
of the Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Federation's tenth
anniversary year. "It is
fitting," both men said,
"that we should observe this
anniversary, and usher in
the beginning of our second
decade, on the soil of Israel.
As it is said, 'Jerusalem we
do not forget thee." After
all, we organized the
Federation 10 years ago
because we could not
forget."
2) The Mission's presence in
Israel will coincide with the
Tenth anniversary of the re-
unification of Jerusalem.
Appropriately, they noted,
the Mission's formed name
is "This Year in Jerusalem,
Every Year in Jerusalem"
3) In observance of both
these anniversaries, the Fort
Lauderdale mission will be
guests at a gala party to be
given in Jerusalem by the
national United Jewish
Appeal. Each member of the
Mission will come away with
a specially wrought
memento. On hand to halp
mark this double an-
niversary will be a number of
Israel's leading personalities
of this and former years.
ROUND-TRIP air travel per
personwith deluxe hotel ac-
comodations, three meals a day,
and all transportation includ-
edamounts to $750. Brodzki
and Locke termed this cost "not
only extraordinarily tow but un-
rivalled."
Inquiries concerning mem-
bership on the mission should be
directed to Brodzki, Locke or
Irving L. Geisser, the Jewish
Federation's executive director.
For generations
a symbol of
Jewish tradition.
At Riverside, our reputation is based
upon our assurance of service that fulfills
the high standards evoked by Jewish
tradition.
It is for this reason Riverside is not
represented by any other funeral director
in Florida.
Today, each of Riverside's chapels
serving Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties is exclusively a Riverside Chapel,
staffed only by Riverside people who
understand Jewish tradition and honor it.
And in that tradition we serve every
family, regardless of financial
circumstance.
SUNRISE:
1171 Northwest 61st Avenue(Sunset Strip) 584-6060
HOLLYWOOD:
2230 Hollywood Boulevard/920-1010
North Miami Beach,Miami Beach,Miami and
West Palm Beach.
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan area.
iverside
Memorial Charjel. Inc. / Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
F 77777
f 72J77


Friday, July 22,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
After Five Years, Temple Nears Completion
**1*
SANDY JACKOWITZ and CONGRESSMAN
J. HERBERT BURKE
I Jackowitz Represents JCC
\AtD.C Service Conference
The Jewish Community Center was represented at the
| seventy-ninth annual meeting of the National Conference of
| Jewish Communal Service by Sandy Jackowitz, the center's
s administrative assistant. The meeting took place last month in
jj Washington, D.C.
Ms. Jackowitz, in addition to attending sessions of the |
| meeting, met with Congressman J. Herbert Burke. In addition |
| to briefing Ms. Jackowitz on the state of pending legislation, the i
| Congressman personally escorted her on a tour of the capitol |
= building.
The conference theme was "Interdependence: Challenges =
| and Responsibilities Facing the American and World Jewish |
= Communities." More than 800 professionals representing the =
= full scope of Jewish communal work and activity took part in the =
| sessions, which heard, among others, from Hon. Philip M. =
| Klutznick, a former member of the U.S. delegation to the UN [
| General Assembly, and Israel Ambassador to the U.S., Simcha f
| Dinitz.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHiniNlllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIF
UJA Funds Utilized To
Resettle Immigrants
JERUSALEM-On the hills that border the
southern edge of Jerusalem stands a long, multi-terraced
structure.
This is the Gilo Absorption Center, which opened
officially on May 1 and has already welcomed its first
group of immigrant families men, women and children
brought to Israel with United Jewish Appeal funds and
being resettled with the help of funds from UJA.
CONSTRUCTED in four separate blocks with con-
necting corridors, the Gilo Absorption Center contains a
total of 100 apartments designed as temporary housing for
new immigrants to Israel.
Six families are already installed in this radically
designed, architecturally innovative structure which
evokes the enclosed old-world courtyards of Mea Shearim.
There are 52 two-room and 28 three-room apartments,
with the rest reserved for offices and service facilities.
Each apartment contains central heating and central gas
and kitchen facilities. Each family will be able to live much
as they would in their own home.
The opening of the new Jerusalem absorption center
is the fruit of a new concept in immigrant absorption in
Israel. The 46 families with children, 20 couples and 40
singles who are scheduled to come to the center within the
coming months will settle either within Gilo itself or
within the adjacent neighborhoods in Jerusalem.
LOCATION OF the Absorption Crater within the
community destined to absorb the newcomers will sub-
stantially ease the initial phase of absorption mtohfe in
Israel and avoid the discomfort and difficulties involved in
transferring from one city to another. In addition, new
olim will be able to avail themselves of the supermarket,
postal services, adjacent nurseries, health clinics. Schools
and synagogues in Gilo and will be within easy reach of
their potential job market, prospective homes and the
ntial municipal services.
Temple Beth Torah, also
known as the Tamarac Jewish
Center, which is now approaching
its fifth year of existence, will
dedicate its new building this fall
with the commencement of the
High Holiday services.
The organization of the
congregation began
inauspiciously in the living rooms
of the few Tamarac Jewish
pioneers. Membership now totals
533.
Sjnce the informal inception of
the Temple, due to the rapid
influx of Jews from the North
and corresponding increase in
Temple membership, the
congregation has occupied a
number of sites, each one larger
to accomodate the needs of the
growing nucleus of Jewish life.
Dedication to a cause has its
own rewards. In 1974, during the
High Holy Day services,
members were treated to the
' results of the first phase of the
product of their labors. Still
incomplete, it gave promise of
better things to come. And come
they will, before the end of the
summer completion has been
promised by the contractors.
Commencing Monday, Sept. 12
at 7:30 p.m. Rabbi Israel Zim-
merman will usher in Rosh
Hashanah, the Jewish New Year,
and 10 days later the Day of
Repentence, Yom Kippur in the
completed Temple.
The Tamarac Jewish Center is
the only Jewish house of worship
in Tamarac. It ministers to its
members 365 days a year; for
mourners, for the Orthodox daily
Minyan twice a day, for
celebrating joyous events at
Friday night services at Oneg
Shabbats, for Yizkor, Passover
seders, Sisterhood and Men's
Club members, for the Religious
School students and for Bar and
Bat Mitzvah celebrants.
The Temple also caters to local
organizationsHadassah and
B'nai B'rith as well as groups of
other religious persuasions.
Four administrations have
labored to complete the plans for
the Temple and now President
Morris Glicksman is at work
finalizing the project.
Oct. 9 at 1:30 p.m. has been set
as the tentative date for the
official dedication of the Temple.
Government officials, members
of the clergy and friends of Jewry
are expected to attend the event.
The Temple is also in the
process of raising funds to
finance the undertaking, under
the direction of the Gifts and
Honors Committee.
Innovative Courses Begin
At Hadassah College
The Hadassah Community
College in Jerusalem has recently
introduced courses in mini- and
micro-computers, according to
Esther Cannon, public relations
chairman of the North Broward
Chapter of Hadassah.
"Mini- and micro-computers
are the great technological break-
through of this decade," Mrs.
Cannon said. "The limit of these
fantastic computers is only
limited to one's imagination,"
she stated, adding:
"The courses are so
revolutionary that the school has
had to update teaching methods
and equipment as well as the
settings. The traditional class-
room is a thing of the past. For
this modern technology course,
the classroom is more like a
science fiction film."
The computer science depart-
ment presently is serving its
maximum capacity 60
students due to limited space.
The Hadassah Community
College is supported by Hadas-
sah Israel Education Services
(HIES). Additional facilities
depend upon fund availability.
At present, students attend
classes seven hours a day for two
years.
Mrs. Cannon also announced
that there will be a greater em-
phasis on fund-raising for HIES
NCJW Sets Tea
The Plantation Unit of the
National Council of Jewish
Women will hold a membership
tea on Tuesday, July 26, at 10
a.m. in Plantation.
NCJW works to further the
welfare of people through
education, social action, and
community service.
Pioneer Women Group
Formation Underway
Grace Herskowitz, organiza-
tional consultant for Pioneer
Women in North Broward and
Palm Beach Counties, has an-
nounced the formation of a
Pioneer Women Club in the city
of Margate and is currently or-
ganizing the Lauderhill, Lauder-
dale and Plantation areas.
Pioneer Women, in cooperation
with its sister organization,
No'amat in Israel, provides voca-
tional training, education end
social services for women, youth
and children in Israel. They aid in
the absorption of newcomers and
work toward raising the status
of women in Israel. Pioneer
Women is an authorized agency
of Youth Aliyah. In America they
promote Jewish education, spon-
sor youth groups and help foster
the preservation of civic rights
and liberties.
this year, especially due to the
greater influx of Russian youth
being integrated in the College.
Planning A Trip?
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Mon. Sept. 12 7:00p.m.
Tues. Sept. 13 9:00a.m.
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 22,1977
Editor's Corner
Begin's Dilemma
Prime Minister Menachem Begin will be in Washing-
ton July 19-20 for meetings with President Carter. In an
effort to find something hopeful to say about the meetings
even before they have been held, observers of the adminis-
tration scene suggest that the Prime Minister is, in the
end, a politician and that politicians have a way of saying
one thing and doing another when the chips are down.
This can be interpreted in only one way: that it is
anticipated that Begin will change his mind on the nego-
tiable status of the West Bank in particular and on the
occupied Arab territories in general.
We find it hard to see how Begin will be able to do
that to the dramatic degree that the Carter administration
is already on record as demanding and survive politically.
The Likud victory last May was predicated on two things:
A promise of social and economic change for the
country;
The understanding that Begin would stand firm
on the West Bank.
These considerations are of particular significance to
the least privileged of Israel's social strata, with special
emphasis on the Oriental Jewish community and on the
Orthodox community, both of whose voting strengths,
political analysts say, gave Begin his victory.
For the Prime Minister to betray the very people who
put him in office would be tantamount to political self-
destruction. Still, stranger things have happened in the
world of international affairs.
Until the Carter-Begin meetings are over, what we
can say at the moment is a word of greeting to the Prime
Minister and then see who are more predictable: the
pundits or the politicians.
Meaningless Statement
Rabbi Alexander Schindler, president of the Presi-
dent's Conference of Jewish Organizations, says that he is
"satisfied" with the meeting Conference leaders had with
President Carter last week.
The likelihood is that we still don't know precisely
what Carter said to the leaders or what the leaders said to
Carter. Still, we have some pretty good ideas, and putting
them together even with the most optimistic statements,
including Rabbi Schindler's own, on what went on at the
meeting, we find it hard to see how the COJO contingent
can be "satisfied."
There is little evidence to encourage us that President
Carter will change his mind about a "Palestinian home-
land." Neither Secretary of State Vance nor the Presi-
dent's National Security Adviser, Zbigniew Brzezinski, is
inclined to reverse the administration's policy either
more likely, they are the architects of the Carter
statements on the Middle East.
Reckoned in these terms, the Schindler assessment of
his meeting with the President, although optimistic, is
meaningless.
AJC's Announcement
The American Jewish Committee announcement that
it has closed its Argentine office in Buenos Aires because
of anti-Semitic pressures is a terrifying thing.
The fact is that the American Jewish community is a
chip off the old American block. All of us have much to
learn about Latin America. If we are guilty of ignorance, it
is for an obsessive reason our equally obsessive interest
in the affairs of the European continent and, in the case of
the Jewish community, of the Middle East, as well.
For some strange reason, Latin America manages to
evade our interest, and therefore our knowledge. This is
dangerous to the well-being of America as a nation.
The Amencan Jewish Committee announcement
emphasizes the growth of movements in Latin America
that should prove disquieting to democracy generally and
our own way of life here in the U.S. in particular. At least
for the American Jewish community, perhaps it will offer
some encouragement to get down to learning what is
happening in the hemisphere beneath us.
^ lewist FIchrlHr
OF GREATER FORTLAUDERDALE
Bualneta Office Suite 306-1318. Federal Hwy., Danla, Fla. 33004
Telephone 990-8018
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publlaher
The Jewish F loridianOoes Not Guaran tee T he Keshruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Second Claai Postage Paid at Dan la. Fla. -899430
Published Bl Weekly
The Jewish Floridian hat absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Sevan Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide Now* Service, National Editorial Association, American Association ot
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One YearS7.M. Out of Town Upon
Request.
7 AB 5737
Number 15
Anwar Sadat is No Moderate
ANWAR SADAT does not de-
serve the role of moderate in
which the West, particularly our
own State Department, is fond of
casting him.
Sadat's domestic policies say
more about the Egyptian leader
than does his terpsichory in
foreign affairs, where it is to his
advantage to pose as the great
Middle Eastern "healer."
It is in his domestic programs
that Egypt-watchers see the
reason for his alleged desire to
achieve peace between Israel and
the Arabs. Once this problem is
solved, they say, Sadat will turn
his full energies to establishing a
vibrant democratic Egypt.
The facts simply do not bear
out the proposition.
Mindlin
AT HOME, Sadat is taking on
an increasingly oppressive totali-
tarian stand which makes a
mockery of his "corrective
Socialist revolution." For
example, last month (June 6) in
Suez, Sadat appeared in an
address wearing the Supreme
Commander's uniform which he
has avoided in public since
shortly after the Yom Kippur
War.
There was method in his sar-
torial splendor. Rather than to
discuss social and economic
reform, which he is fond of doing
even when there is little hope in
Egypt's foreseeable future of
theory catching up with reality,
Sadat used the occasion to
threaten the country's political
system a system of which he is
one of the architects and cer-
tainly its most prominent
proponent.
All domestic opposition, he
labeled "a traitors' group
wearing the mantle of Abdul
Nasser" and "people who intro-
duce foreign materialistic ideas
that will merely sabotage our
country."
THE ATTACK on Nasser was
an attack on the leftists in
general, which surely is out-of-
keeping with the ideals of Sadat's
own ruling Arab Socialist Union
Party.
Furthermore, in his June 6
address, Sadat referred to the
"disturbances" last January and
charged that one of Egypt's three
legal parties was responsible for
fomenting them as a threat to his
own power as President.
A Sadat puppet, the Governor
of Port Said, promptly accused
the Tajmmu Party as the in-
stigators, particularly Khaled
Muhi al-Din. its leader.
THE SUEZ speech was merely
the culmination of earlier Sadat
activities to pear down Egypt's
democratization process for
which he is heralded abroad.
Fundamental to the pearing
down process is a recent law
regulating the activities of
political parties. The law, ap-
proved by the Peoples' Assemb-
Continued on Page 9
World of Hamaas Khaalis
Friday, July 22,1977
Volume 6
Two psychiatrists and Ameri-
can-based envoys from Egypt,
Iran, and Pakistan played
key roles in saving the lives of
scores of hostages held by
Hamaas Abdul Khaalis in
Washington in early March.
A skillfully-trained Israeli
rescue squad, directed by
Jonathan Netanyahu, who was
born in New York, brought more
than 100 hijacked hostages out of
Entebbe in July, 1976.
THE PSYCHIATRISTS, the
envoys from Islamic countries,
FBI agents, and Washington
police all escaped physical harm.
Jonathan Netanyahu, the hero of
Entebbe who had planned to
resume his studies at Harvard,
lost his life at the Uganda air-
port.
Two amazing rescues; two en-
tirely different locales; two
separate approaches for dealing
with armed madmen. Will a
world in dread of more hi-
jackings, more kidnappings at
gunpoint, learn from these
frightful experiences?
When we know that Idi Amin,
the Uganda dictator, still longs
for the day he can get revenge on
the Israelis who shattered his
defenses and pierced his pride, we
have reason to fear. When we
learn that Khaalis' wife continues
to talk of retribution, we realize
that few, if any, of the per-
petrators of the Washington
seizures have yet confronted the
true dimensions of their wanton
behavior.
FOR EACH new act of
violence seems to call for a fresh
search for rescue and solution to
the crisis created. Quoting from
the Koran may be the key
3NIIIHW1
Robert
opening the door in one instance.
This is the familiar "tea and
sympathy" approach. If it saves
lives, good. But the Entebbe
rescue could never have been
effected had not the military ruse
with necessary use of force been
employed.
Both operations serve as im-
portant case histories in the pain-
ful, endless hunt for ways to curb
violence and save the lives of the
innocent. Regrettably, we are in a
season of vicious behavior.
Short weeks ago, Frederick W.
Cowan, who fancied himself a
new Hitler and gloried in the
hateful trinkets of Nazism, ended
his brief career of madness by
killing himself. Soon thereafter,
Cory C. Moore threatened to
blow the police captain of
Warrensville Heights, Ohio, out
of existence as he demanded a
talk with President Carter.
AND NOW Atty. Gen. Griffin
Bell has been advised by a
Federal study committee that
unrest in American urban centers
may soon detonate new sparks of
ghetto violence.
For the Jewish community, the
recent Washington madness
holds special interest, an intellec-
tual fascination best understood
by children of martyrs constantly
cast in the role of scapegoats.
The Hanafi terrorist leader,
Hamaas Khaalis, chose the B'nai
B'rith building in Washington for
the roundup of most of the
hostages for reasons that only a
muddled mind could set forth. At
one stage of the siege, he said
that the B'nai B'rith building
was an appropriate target
because he and his fellow revolu-
tionaries wished to demonstrate
their support of anti-Israel ef-
forts.
In a second interview, he
brought forth the favorite
bromide of anti-Semites, that
"Jews in America control the
press and the courts." His third
reason for aiming his guns at
people in a Jewish agency: it was
the Jews, he asserted, who
backed the Black Muslims.
THIS LAST point must be
placed in the context of Khaalis'
central grievance: after Malcolm
X, the Black Muslim leader, was
assassinated in 1965, followers of
the slain Malcolm bided their
time and eventually stormed
headquarters of Khaalis' move-
ment, killing Khaalis' children
and his wife.
Therefore, any person or group
showing sympathy for the Black
Muslims had to pay Khaalis'
price. Anyone familiar with Black
Muslim literature knows well
that Jews, long excoriated in
Black Muslim journals, would be
the last to support such a
movement.
There was a time long ago
when those who swore by the
Koran showed an appreciation of
the Jewish faith. A mutual belief
in monotheism nurtured that
regard. But we are in new times
with political and religious reval-
ries bringing violence and with
violence, in turn, helping to fill
the mind of the Muslim leader,
Khaalis, with weird convictions.


Friday, July 22,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
'-
Page 5
Jewish Education in Europe On Upsurge
'There are today more pupils
in Jewish day schools in Western
Europe than at any time before or
since World War II," Stanley
Abramovitch, education director
of the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee declared
earlier this month in a report to
the JDC Religious-Cultural Com-
mittee. JDC is a constituent
agency and beneficiary of the
National UJA.
Adressing more than a dozen
religious leaders and Jewish
educators in the offices of the
JDC, Abramovitch added:
"Most day schools have a
waiting list. They could increase
their enrollment if they had more
space."
KEY ISSUES, he said, are the
need to improve and enlarge
education facilities, increase
funds for maintenance.and over-
come the critical shortage of
qualified Jewish educators.
In France, largest of the Jew-
ish communities in Western
Europe, Abramovitch reported
significant progress. About 7,000
children attend full-time Jewish
day schools. The Fonds Social
Juif Unifie, the Consistoire, Al-
liance Israelite Universelle, Ozar
Hatorah, Lubavitch and ORT are
expanding and improving their
programs, he said.
The upsurge in Jewish educa-
tion has penetrated wide sections
of the French leadership,
Abramovitch said. The FSJU
and the Jewish Agency have
agreed to set up a multi-million
dollar fund to double the enroll-
ment in Jewish day schools. A
number of new schools have been
opened by groups and by in-
dividuals from North Africa,
many of them with the aid of
Ozar Hatorah. These include new
schools in Nice and Marseilles,
yeshivas in Heggenheim and
Rancy. and yeshivas for univer-
sity students in Strasbourg and
Marseilles.
THE ALLIANCE has two
schools and teacher training
programs. ORT has a number of
vocational schools and is starting
a new program in Toulouse called
"Torah Umlacha," professional
training and Jewish education.
The Lubavitcher education
program has expanded the girls
Ischool outside Paris. The
Maimonides School in Paris has
launched a multi-million dollar
rebuilding project and other
schools are either remodeling,
rebuilding or erecting new
facilities.
Abramovitch reported that the
same heightened interest in
Jewish education was evident
throughout Western Europe.
Stockholm has a primary day-
school with 175 students, with
the graduates going on to
government secondary schools.
Copenhagen has the oldest
Jewish day school in Europe. Ten
years ago the Jewish community
of about 6,000 was worried about
the constant drop in enrollment,
Abramovitch said. "The enroll-
ment stands today at its highest
ever in the last twenty-five years,
390 children."
THE COMMUNITY has a
corps of teachers, all of them
Danish-born. So is his assistant
who was trained in Israel on a
Rothschild-Joint Distribution
Committee scholarship.
Two schools in Brussels have a
combined enrollment of 750
students and both are expanding
their premises to accommodate
still more. The schools in Ant-
werp are also expanding.
The primary school and
kindergarten in Amsterdam have
moved into a new building and a
secondary school is waiting for
its own new building to be com-
pleted.
IN SPAIN the cornerstone was
laid for a new school building in
Madrid. The Barcelona com-
munity operates a primary day
school in a rented building.
In Milan, Italy, there are about
1,000 pupils in the Jewish school,
of a Jewish population of 9,500.
Another 800 attend Jewish
schools in Rome, which has
15,000 Jews. The smaller com-
munities, Florence, Turin, Livor-
no and Genoa, still maintain
small day schools despite a
declining Jewish population and
a shortage of staff and funds.
Referring to Jewish education
in North Africa and the Middle
East, Abramovitch reported that
Jewish education was more than
holding its own. In Morocco he
said the Jewish schools had an
enrollment of close to 5,000
students in a stable population.
EVEN THOUGH the Jewish
population remains stable, he
said, the school population is
bound to decrease year by year as
the graduates of secondary
schools leave Morocco and there
are few Jewish births to replenish
the school population. There are
three school groups, all sup-
ported by the Joint Distribution
Committee, functioning in
Morocco; these are schools of the
Alliance Israelite Universelle,
Ozar Hatorah and the Lubavitch.
The primary school and kin-
dergarten in Amsterdam have
still has 800 children in Jewish
schools maintained mainly by the
Lubavitch.
In Iran the Jewish day schools
have a combined enrollment of
about 8,500 almost equally
divided among the Ozar Hatorah
schools, the schools of the Al-
liance Israelite Universelle, and
the Iraqi and community schools.
When the Iranian Government
nationalized the elementary
schools several years ago, it
guaranteed the status of private
schools. The Jewish schools have
thus maintained their autonomy.
REPORTING on Jewish edu-
cation for Russian transmigrants
in Rome, Abramovitch said that
the JDC / ORT has expanded the
program of English studies and
increased the time being devoted
to Jewish education. The JDC, in
cooperation with the Jewish
Agency, has opened a club for
lectures, films and discussions on
Jewish topics and has opened a
library with Russian language
books on Jewish topics.
Also, a full-time day school has
been proposed for children up to
the age of 17 in Ostia, outside
Rome. The curriculum will in-
clude English language instruc-
tion and a full program of Jewish
studies so that the children can
be in a school setting while their
families wait for as long as four to
six months until the various
emigration processes to the
United States and other coun-
tries are completed.
When the full-time Jewish day
school gets into full swing,
Abramovitch said, the JDC will
bring in a team of educators from
Israel who will be assisted bv
volunteer university students
from the United States.
The Joint Distribution Com-
mittee receives funds for
education, and for its health and
welfare programs mainly from
the United Jewish Appeal. These
include funds raised by the Fort
Lauderdale Jewish Federation's
UJA Campaign.
Soviet Jewry Book Now
Available in States
An 80-page booklet, The Jews of Russia; Their His-
tory in Maps and Photographs by Martin Gilbert, and
published by the National Council for Soviet Jewry of the
United Kingdom and Ireland, is now available in the
United States.
The comprehensive paperback, a collection of
photographs, many of which have never been published
before, and maps especially prepared for the volume, is
being distributed nationally by the National Conference
on Soviet Jewry (NCSJ).
UPON PUBLICATION, Gilbert said that, "The
story of Russian and Soviet Jewry is a troubled and tragic
one. It was, and remains, a story of suffering and achieve-
ment, of longing and fulfillment, of hope and disappoint-
ment... The daily life of several million people, often in
conditions of dire poverty or of intense dread, is its
repeated theme. Yet through it, the Jews of Russia
preserved their humanitarian instincts, their love of
learning, and their vision of a better world."
Books are available from the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry, New York.
(H'Mi l %.!,[* <-*(..0 CO
\kntage is solving
a lot of my problems
about smoking."
'You see, I really enjoy
smoking. To me, its a pleasure.
But it was no pleasure hearing
all the things being said against
high-tar cigarettes.
"Of course, I used to kid
myself a lot about giving up the
taste of my old high-tar cigarette
for one of those new low-tar
brands. But every one 1 tried
left my taste unsatisfied.
"Then someone offered
me a Vantage. Sure I'd read
about them. But 1 thought they
were like all the others. 1 was
wrong.
"Vantage was right. It satisfied
like my old brand. Yet it had nearly
half the tar.
"Its been
\ about a year
since I started
smoking
Vantage. And it
looks like I'm
going to be smoking
them for a long time
to come."
Bernard Schtwnfcld
Wtttcheaer. New York
P**
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
Regular, Menthol
and Vantage 100
FILTER: 10 mg. "W. 0.7 mg. mcoimt. MENTHOL. 11 mg. "iw". 0.7 mg.nicotm.
w.pttogwitii.FTC Ripon OEC. 76: FILTER 100s 11 mg.~ui".09 mg nicoWMn peicigarantby FTC mtthod.


'age 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 22,1977
IBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIHIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIaHBIaH"!"!"!"""1"1"1"1"1"1"1"1"!
President Carter on IsraelIn March, and Kow
Following are excepts from President Car-
ter's response to a question at a town
meeting in Clinton, Mass., March 16, 1977:
_ "I think one of the finest acts of the world
nations that has ever occurred was to estab-
_ lish the State of Israel. So the first prere-
quisite of a lasting peace is the recognition of
_ Israel by her neighbors; Israel's right to
exist; Israel's right to exist permanently; Is-
_ rael's right to exist in peace. That means
that over a period of months or years that
_ the borders between Israel and Syria, Israel
and Lebanon, Israel and Jordan, Israel and
. Egypt must be opened up to travel, to
tourism, to cultural exchange, to trade, so
that no matter who the leaders might be in
those countries the people themselves will
have formed a mutual understanding and
comprehension in a sense of a common
purpose to avoid the repetitious wars and
I death that have afflicted that region so long.
_ This is the first prerequisite of peace.
"The second one is very important and
very, very difficult: this is, the establish-
| ment of permanent borders for Israel. The
Arab countries say that Israel must with-
I draw to the pre-1967 borderlines. Israel says
that they must adjust those lines to some
| degree to insure their own security. That is a
matter to be negotiated between the Arab
I countries on the one side and Israel on the
S" other. But borders are still a matter of great
trouble and a matter of great difficulty, and
there are strong differences of opinion now.
iHIHIBIHIHIHIHIHIHIBI

I
i
"AND THE third ultimate requirement
for peace is to deal with the Palestinian
problem. The Palestinians claim up to this
moment that Israel has no rieht to be there,
that the land belongs to the Palestinians and
they have never yet given up their publicly
professed commitment to destroy Israel.
That has to be overcome.
"There has to be a homeland provided for
the Palestinian refugees who have suffered
for many, many years. And the exact way to
solve the Palestinian problem is one that
first of all addresses itself right now to the
Arab countries and then, secondly, to the
Arab countries negotiating with Israel...I
guess both sides have some doubt about us.
But we will have to act kind of as a catalyst
to bring about their ability to negotiate
successfully with one another..."
The New York Times, in an editorial com-
ment on June 29, declared, in part:
"THE TROUBLE now brewing between
Israel and the United States can be at-
tributed to a single, regrettable fact:
President Carter refused to quit while he was
ahead in the Middle East maneuvering.
"Goaded by applause and criticism, now
from Arabs, now from Israelis, and then
startled by a new and inexperienced Israeli
Government that was clearly determined to
take a harder line in negotiations, Mr. Carter
and his spokesmen kept explaining and
defining their vision of a peace until a lofty
IIBIHIBIBIBIHIHIHIHIH
IBI
set of principles could be misapprehended as
American terms for a settlement. No wonder
the Arab capitals are now cheering; the Is-
raelis are being crowded toward a "solution"
without a single responsible proposal or offer
from Egypt, Syria or Jordan. And no wonder
that Israel's fervent supporters in the United
States are shouting their alarm.
"Fortunately, there is still time before
Israel's new leader, Menachem Begin, visits
the President on July 18 to clear the air. Mr.
Carter needs to recapture the eloquent in-
vitation to peace he offered last March:
"(1) The Arab nations must recognize Is-
rael's right to exist in peace and commit
themselves to full and normal relations of
every kind.
"(2) The permanent borders of Israel must
be negotiated by the parties, with all the ter-
ritories occupied by Israel since the 1967 war
open to negotiation.
"(3) A homeland for Palestinian refugees
must be part of the settlement, with the issue
to be negotiated first among the Arab coun-
tries, who disagree about it, and finally put
to Israel.
"(4) The role of the United States will be to
spur the parties into negotiation with one
another.
"The American objective in the Middle
Est is not a 'settlement,' this year or ever; it
is a peace that can last and, peace or war,
a secure Israel."
IIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBI
UAHC Admits Affiliates
Plantation Jewish Congregation near Fort Lauderdale and
Coral Springs Hebrew Congregation of Coral Springs have been
officially admitted as the newest affiliates of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations, representative body of 740
Reform synagogues in the United States and Canada serving
1.25 million members.
Rabbi Phillip LabowiU and Cantor Maurice Neu with Temple Beth Israel's summer
service participants.
Youths to Direct Summer Services
ISRAEL op0rGNRAELETc0EUR
15 DAYS DELUXE TOUR plusi day cruise
LED BY DR. EMANUEL SCHENK 4*M>o
OCTOBER 17OCTOBER 31 DR. E. SCHENK
^fcl^fiQ FROM MIAMI based on double 733-1856
v 'wUJ occupancy plus $3 Int'l Tax:
INCLUDES:
AIR TRANSFERS DELUXE HOTELS MEALS
SIGHTSEEING AND ESCORT FROM MIAMI
TRANS OLYMPIA TOURS SHALOM TOURS
1800 S. Young Circle
Hollywood. Florida 33020
Hollywood 925-8220 Miami 944-4879
Religious services at Temple
ieth Israel will take a youthful
lirection this summer.
During the month of July and the
irst part of August, while Rabbi
'hillip Labowitz and Cantor
Maurice Neu are on vacation, the
emple's post Bar and Bat Mitz-
ah students will conduct services
n Friday nights and Saturday
nornings. Jules Shapiro, chair-
nan of the Ritual Committee, will
upervise the services.
ACCORDING to Rabbi Labowitz,
hese teenagers will require no
pedal training, because of the
comprehensive education they
-eceived during the preparation
or their Bar and Bat Mitzvahs.
"Our young people conduct
services at their own Bar or Bat
tfitzvah, and, prior to that, have
>articipated in the Junior
Congregation services," says
labbi Labowitz."We are pleased
hat they will have this opportunity
o utilize the excellent training our
Support Browards
Home Improvement Plan.
United Wdy
of Broward County
religious school offers," he adds, will return
Rabbi Labowitz and Cantor Neu Aug. 12.
from vacation on
I
330 Pairs of Eyeglasses
! Collected by WECARE
Eyes for the Needy, newest of the WECARE com- I
mittees, recently collected over 330 pairs of eyeglasses to -
be distributed to persons in need, Edith Morgano, the I
committee chairman announced.
The glasses were collected and prepared for mailing I
by members of William Kretchman Post 730 of the JWV "
Auxiliary. Mrs. Morgano stated that another such dis- I
tribution is scheduled for September. Persons wishing to -
donate glasses can leave them at the Federation Office
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DIRECT NYC PHONE: 212-563-3700
For Group Outings and Conferences call
(212) 563-3704. Ext. 172
FULL AMERICAN PLAN 3 MEALS DAILY
ar


F"*y. July 22,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
IBI !!! I !!! !!! !!! !!! I
Professors for Peace Call For
Mideast Talks-No Preconditions
.MM'
Je
n
r-
NEW YORK A prominent group of
academicians has called on President
Carter to encourage direct negotiations
between the Arab States and Israel but
not to prescribe the content or con-
ditions.
In a statement submitted to President
Carter by its National Chairman, Sey-
mour Martin Lipset of Stanford, Calif.,
American Professors for Peace in the
Middle East (APPME) expressed
concern that Arab actions do not reflect
their avowal of peaceful intentions.
ME, a campus-based organization,
vd the President to convince Arab
ders that they must validate their
declarations with suitable actions. Prof.
Lipset is professor of political science
and sociology at the Hoover Institution,
Stanford University.
THE APPME statement cited
measures taken by Arabs that do not
indicate true readiness to seek peace.
These actions include: "... the continued
attempts to isolate and condemn Israel
in the United Nations, even in those of
its agencies which are constitutionally
non-political, such as UNESCO and the
World Health Organization; the inten-
sification of the Arab economic boycott,
including secondary and tertiary boy-
cott, against Israel and against free
citizens of ther countries who choose to
do business with Israelis; the refusal to
enounce that part of the Covenant of the
alestine Liberation Organization which
calls for the ultimate total destruction of
the State of Israel; the continued at-
tempt to portray Zionism as racism; and
the refusal of Arab leaders to negotiate
directly with Israel, despite the con-
tinued willingness of Israel to participate
in such negotiations."
The professors applauded the Presi-
dent's desire to help reach a just and
'sting peace in the Middle Kast and his
insistence that any settlement "must
include concrete acts of normalization"
by the Arabs.
Peace depends on "readiness on the
part of the Arabs to recognize the
legitimacy of Israel and to live in peace
with her" and the "conduct of direct
negotiations between the parties,
without preconditions, in order that
those who must live with the terms of the
agreement develop them together, and
through that very process, demonstrate
the reality of peace," the APPME
statement declared.
THE PROFESSORS acknowledged
that negotiations would include "the
fixing of permanent borders which, it is
universally understood, will be different
from the present disengagement lines, as
well as all other issues concerning the
relationships between the parties to the
conflict."
The parties should not only refrain
from setting prior conditions for
negotiations, but they should "not be
expected to make concessions in advance
of the negotiations," the professors em-
phasized. They said the U.S. should
"refrain from suggesting the content
and or direction 'of negotiations which
would create the climate of such expec-
tations."
For negotiations to succeed, "both the
formulations of the agenda and its dis-
position must be the task of the parties
to the conflict, acting freely and with
good will," the professors concluded.
APPME consists of academicians
leaching in colleges and universities
throughout the United States. Its
purpose is to study and analyze the
social, economic and political realities of
the Arab-Israel conflict by drawing on
the intellectual and scholarly resources
of the academic community in its various
disciplines ih an effort to find solutions
to the conflict and to reach a just and
lasting peace in the region.
IBIHIBIBIBIBIBIBIIBIBIIBIIIBI"I"I"I"C
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Commander Talks About
Reunified 'Jerusalem
since 1967. "By reunifying the
city," he said, "we have been able
to establish a stronger political
presence here. Even though not
one foreign power recognizes
Jerusalem as the capital of Israel,
we will continue to be obstinate
and insist that this is where the
embassies belong." He con-
tinued:
"We are well aware of the
delicacy of the situation
regarding foreign countries and
their relations with the Arabs.
However, we are quite happy
that some countries, notably the
Netherlands and Switzerland
among the Europeans, and many
of the Asian countries maintain
their embassies in Jerusalem. It
is recognition, albeit not official,
of Jerusalem as the capital.
"THE LESSONS of the last
ten years have been tremendous
for Israel and the rest of the
world. We have learned that
Jews, Moslems, and Christians of
all denominations can live
together in peace, and we have
seen that the reunification has
meant an improved economic life
for all"
He said that the Israeli
government was conscious of dis-
content among Jerusalem's Arab
population, primarily because
they are now paying taxes
previously not levied by the Jor-
danians.
However, he added, full educa-
tion and health care are being
provided for the Arab residents
of the city, and that all people are
entitled to instruction according
to the tenets of their faiths.
THE ONLY demand of the Is-
raeli government, he said, is that
all school students study Hebrew
language and Israeli civics.
Under the Master Plan for the
citv which Narkiss voted for as a
member of the City Council of
Jerusalem, the 1987 population of
500,000 Jews in the city would be
complemented by 150,000 Arab
residents. About 100,000 Arabs
now live in East Jerusalem.
Is such long-term planning
justifiable in light of the unset-
tled international situation in the
Middle East?
"FORTY-EIGHT hours after
the battle for Jerusalem started,
we arrived at the Western Wall,"
Narkiss said. "Prom that
moment on, I was sure that no
force on earth would ever get us
out of Juersalem. No other part
of Israel and no other place
means so much to the Jewish
people as Jerusalem.
"Therefore, I did not think
only ten years ahead. As far as I
am concerned, we will never leave
this city, and no force will ever
oblige us to leave the place.
"The lessons of the ten years
since reunification have provided
the foundation of the future,"
Narkiss concluded.
"JERUSALEM has provided
a domain for the coexistence of
many different and diverse com-
munities. If nothing else, we have
learned that any solution to our
problems requires tolerance and
patience."
Armon Hadassah Sets
Summer Luncheon
The Armon Group of Hadas-
sah will hold their "Summer
Event Get-Together" luncheon
and card party on Monday, Aug.
1, at Castle Recreation Center at
noon.
Turkey
this Summer
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'I


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 22,1977
Area Hadassah Delegation Israel Bonds to Honor Begin
.<
Heading to N.Y. Confab
About 3,000 delegates,
representing 350,000 members
from over 1,550 chapters and
groups throughout the United
States and Puerto Rico, will meet
to discuss future plans, to honor
distinguished guests, and to hear
addresses by government leaders
and international authorities in
the fields of Hadassah activities.
HADASSAH maintains a
network of medical institutions in
Israel, stemming from the
Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center and Ullman
Building for Cancer and Allied
Diseases in Ein Kerim,
Jerusalem, and in the reopened
Hadassah University Hospital,
Mt. Scopus.
Delegates from the West
Broward Chapter of Hadassah
will be leaving to attend the
sixty-third annual national con-
vention of Hadassah, which will
be held on Aug. 21-24 at the New
York Hilton.
Attending the Convention will
be Pearl Goldenberg, president of
West Broward Chapter; Teddy
Krimsky, vice president; Ger-
trude Bodner, Zionist Affairs
chairman; Adeline Moll, Life
Membership chairman; Selma
Corn, president of Blyma Group;
Anna Silman, president of Rayus
Group; Lillian Pace, president of
Herzl Group; Belle Ehrlich, past
president, Herzl Group; Lillian
Garber, president of Orly Group;
Lillian Baker, past president of
Orly Group; Sylvia Siegel and
Betty Marcus of Rayus Group;
and Charlotte Reitman of Herzl
Group.
Sisterhood to Welcome Newcomers
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Orr of Coral Springs is planning
two membership coffees to
welcome new residents of the
area.
The first coffee will be held on
Wednesday, July 27 at 10:30
a.m., and the second will be held
on Monday, Aug. 8, at 8 p.m.
Sandy Zobar, Roz Feldman or
Leslie Johnson can be contacted
for further details and reser-
vations.
On Wednesday, Aug. 10 from
10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., the
Sisterhood will hold a card and
Mah Jong party and luncheon.
Dorothy Raffel or the Temple
office can provide reservations
information.
The next meeting of the
Temple Sisterhood will be held on
Sept. 6 at 8 p.m. at the Temple.
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin of Israel, who is scheduled
to arrive in the United States for
meetings with President Jimmy
Carter July 19 and 20, was to be
guest of honor at a national
dinner of welcome and tribute in
New York on Thursday evening,
July 21, under the auspices of the
Israel Bond Organization, it was
announced by Sam Rothberg, its
general chairman.
The Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith has revealed that
a former member of Hitler's elite
SS was seated in the West
Germany Parliament last week
and called the appointment "an
offensive and insensitive act of
deep concern."
According to Lawrence
Leshnik, director of ADL's Euro-
pean affairs department, Hans
Wissebach of Marburg, who
served in Hitler's personal SS
Division, Leibstandarte, and
even now maintains the SS affil-
iation, was named to the Bundes-
tag by the Christian Democratic
Union to replace Walter
Wallman, who was elected Mayor
of Frankfurt.
Nobel Prize Laureate Milton
Friedman, who recently accepted
a position as economic consultant
to the newly-formed government
of Israel's Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin, was awarded an
honorary doctorate from the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
at its July 4 convocation
ceremonies.
Among other Americans who
received honorary doctoral
degrees were Leonard Davis of
New York and Palm Beach.
Twenty-five years ago,
Hadassah installed the 12
stained-glass windows of Marc
Chagall, in which he depicted the
12 Tribes of Israel in the syna-
gogue of the Hadassah-Hebrew
University Medical Center at Ein
Karem, Jerusalem. Since then
hundreds of thousands of people
have traveled from all corners of
the world to marvel at them.
On the occasion of the artist's
90th birthday, Bernice S.
Tannenbaum, national president
of Hadassah, released a greeting
sent Chagall from Hadassah in
Jerusalem, ending with the
traditional, "May you continue
till 120."
Maj. Gen. (Res.) Amos Horey
has been unanimously elected to
a second four-year term as presi-
dent of the Technion-Israel Insti-
tute of Technology. The vote
took place at the final session of
the Institute's International
Board of Governors.
He congratulated the outgoing
Minister of Education, Aharon
Yadlin, "on his devoted efforts in
the field of higher education."
Plus 10'
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NCJW Unite Installs New Officers
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FULL SIGHTSEEING DAILY PROGRAMS
YOUNG ISRAEL TOURS
103 Park Ave New York NY 10017
In Florida call Mb bb.' 1JM or 651 3591

Be sure it's
The Plantation Unit of
National Council of Jewish
Women installed its officers for
the year 1977-78 at a recent lun-
cheon at the Rolling Hills Coun-
try Club.
The officers are Muriel Bloom,
Rose Alpert, Melva Klayman,
Judy Solomon, Barbara Mannis.
Fran Schopp, president; Nancy

Sholom Sisterhood
Plans Get-Together
New members and prospective
members are invited to the first
membership tea of the Summer,
sponsored by Temple Sholom
Sisterhood, Pompano Beach, to
be held on Tuesday, July 26, at 1
p.m.
Hostess of the tea will be Rhea
Lipson, at her home in Pompano.
Esther Cannon, president, will
greet the new members.
Chairman of the day will be
Membership Vice President
MollieGresser.
Sprey to Chant At
Beth Hillel in Fall
Congregation Beth Hillel of
Margate has retained Cantor Is-
rael Sprey to conduct its up-
coming High Holy Day services.
Sale of tickets for members is
held on Monday, Wednesday and
Friday from 9 to 11 a.m.
After Aug. 1, tickets will go on
sale to the general public. For
further information, contact the
synagogue.
Dr. Sabin to Address
Nova Commencement
The second 1977 com-
mencement ceremony of Nova
University will be held July 24 at
War Memorial Auditorium.
Speaker will be Dr. Albert B.
Sabin, distinguished research
professor of biomedicine at The
Medical College of the University
of South Carolina and developer
of live poliomyelitis vaccine. Dr.
Sabin's topic will be "Objectives
of High Education in Con-
temporary America."
Goldberg, Elaine Goldberg and
Shellie Bergman.
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*0

M


, July 22,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
CC Day Camp Activities Keep Campers on the Go
LYNN KOPELOWITZ
column will be a regular
[e in The Jewish Floridian in
\to inform readers of the
activites of the Jewish
\unity Center. Now in its
year, the Center is already
'over 10,000 persons.
it the spreading oak trees
jss the sunlit meadows of
irk flourishes Jewish Com-
Center Day Camp 1977.
the second session
begun, it is obvious from
thusiastic, smiling faces of
Jmpers that camp is a re-
;success!
fS AND GIRLS from all
ii' Greater Fort Lauderdale
[ages 5 to 12, are ex-
cing a stimulating, varied
f exercise, creativity and
lent. Guided by an
ic group of Counselors-in-
Hg (ages 14 to 16, Junior
Eelors (ages 16-18) and
[d Counselors (college
jnts, graduates and
ers), the campers par-
Ite in a multitude of ac-
es each day of the week.
ii' campers are grouped
riling to their ages, and at
lus times during the day
t may be mixed according to
interests; during Open
ce periods, the children enjoy
essing their ideas about
rite activities and projects.
the Arts and Crafts
Jion, for example, one might
a group of six-year-olds
rminedly pounding clay into
,'s or statues, while at an
cent table several pre-teen-
are involved in a wood-
ting project. All of the
Ders visit the Arts and Crafts
at least once each day to
., make pottery, draw, and
collages out of stones,
Ks. leaves, and other objects
i from Nature Trail hikes.
lie the end results of the art
fects are a source of pride the
pers' greatest enjoyment is
rly in the creating of them!
HLETICS, under the
tion of Larry Berkley, offer
exciting experiences for the
I and girls of every age group.
Softball, dramatics, cookouts, ceramics, singing and swimm
all day long.
Feeling part of a "team'- effort,
ing at the JCC Day camp keep campers' minds and bodies busy
learning a new game or sport:
these are sources of growth and
enjoyment for the campers.
Soccer, softball, basketball, and
gymnastics are favorites, along
tinftlin: on Sa6at
Continued from Page 4
Ihose freedoms it violates and
}s the Assembly as essen-
' a rubber stamp outfit, gives
s hand-chosen secretary
tal of the Arab Socialist
|n these unusual powers:
To demand the dissolution
party which threatens the
fundamental principles of
^SU: national unity, social
and the inevitability of
klism;
To require of new parties, in
lion to Egypt's three legal
that they win at least 20
fcates in the Peoples'
ibly.
piS IS a rather improbable
it when reckoned in terms
I fact that Sadat's attack on
Muhi al-Din was inspired
the Tajammu Party's
ttion of three in the
ibly.
It this signifies is Sadat's
sing determination to
It the rise of a multi-party
which would surely op-
and, more likely, as has
been suggested, to reduce
iber the current trium-
thus strengthening his
iron grip on the country:
m ASU, the Socialist
Party (official right-
and the Tajammu Party
il left-wing Unionist
isive Alignment), which
ilong-since committed to
8 growing yen for do-
Jppression does not stop
le has also taken out
le press.
LRCH, he launched an
Ruz al-Yusuf's editorial
wing organ in Egypt.
As per Sadat prescription, the
weekly is now run by Mursi al-
Shafi'i and Abdul Azis Khamis,
both ruling ASU puppets.
Al-Shafi'i is a former member
of the notorious Wafd, and
Khamis was charged in 1964 with
membership in a fascist
organization as was Sadat
himself at the time.
Other recent Sadat attacks on
the press of Egypt:
In February, the editor of
Al-Tali'ah, Lufti al-Khuli, was
dismissed, and Al-Tali'ah
suddenly showed up as a "scien-
with yoga, judo, karate, and
various outdoor games and races.
The Fine Arts Instructor,
Mona Korman, provides the
campers with unlimited creative
opportunities, expressed through
drama, modern dancing, and folk
dancing. One group often enter-
tains the others with an original
program or rendition; even the
youngest campers show a
creative flair!
Swimming, of course, remains
a favorite pastime. JCC Day
Camp provides a skilled in-
structor, and the groups enjoy
supervised swimming at various
periods all through the camp day,
in the T-Y Park lake. Nature
walks and hikes round out the
myriad of activities.
A TYPICAL camp day begins
at 10 a.m., when the buses arrive
at the park and the 85 campers
scurry to their "home-base"
groups for a beginning "Get It
Together" time. Then the groups
gather at the various camp areas,
according to the day's schedule,
and rotate throughout the day.
Lunchtime under the trees is a
pleasant time, with interaction
between all of the campers and
counselors. Campers bring their
own lunches (JCC provides juice)
Mondays through Thursdays,
and on Fridays everyone enjoys a
cook-out!
After lunch there is a "Quiet
Time," in which the younger
campers may rest or play sitting-
down games, and the older
campers may "rap." The after-
noon brings more choices, and
more athletics, games, creative
activities, hikes, swimming and
refreshments before departing.
ITS EASY TO see why all of
these children are having such a
terrific summer at camp: with a
beautiful and spacious setting,
skilled and enthusiastic coun-
selors, a broad, balanced pro-
gram, and a bunch of eager
campers, it can't miss!
The second session of Camp
began July 11 and the third
three-week session begins
Monday, Aug. 1. Each session,
including bus transportation, is
105. Call the JCC for further
information.
tific journal";
More recently, the Egyp finding di DAirSe
tian editor and journalist, J
Hasanein Heikal, has been ac-
cused of being a former agent for
the CIA;
On the occasion of the Jan.
14 "disturbances," it was leftist
journalists almost exclusively
who were arrested en masse and
accused of being the instigators
against Sadat's "corrective
Socialist revolution."
WHAT ALL these activities
have to do with correction,
Socialism or revolution is hard to
say. It depends, primarily, on
who is using the words. What, for
example, is democratic about the
Democratic People's Republic of
East Germany?
But the more important ques-
tion is this one: Is Sadat a
moderate? Only the hypocritical
minds populating the State
Department, Whatehall and the
Quai d'Orsay would think so.
Or else, like their hero, Sadat,
they too have a politically oppor-
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By Appointment
Only


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 22,1977
Rabbi Warshaw Named Director
Of Lauderdale Hebrew Day School
Rabbi Efraim Warshaw, a noted
Jewish educator, has been appointed
director of the Fort Lauderdale Hebrew
Day School. The school emphasizes
multi-age groupings, independent study,
and a learning center's approach, with a
kindergarten to sixth grade curriculum.
Libo Fineberg, president of the school,
noted that Rabbi Warshaw was the
unanimous choice of the board of
directors following a review of more than
100 applicants.
"WE ARE deeply impressed with our
new director's educational training, his
forward-thinking ideas, outreaching per-
sonality and enthusiasm," Fineberg
declared.
The new director holds a bachelor of
arts degree from the University of
Judaism in Los Angeles, which is the
West Coast branch of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America, and a
master's degree and Rabbinical Or-
dination from the Jewish Theological
Seminary in New York. The rabbi is now
completing doctoral studies in education
at New York University.
Rabbi Warshaw has written exten-
sively on education and youth themes.
Two books of his are being readied for
publication. His articles have appeared
in leading professional journals, in-
cluding Jewish Education and Syna-
gogue School. His major article to date
has been Jewish Education and Ecstasy,
in which he developed the idea of the
school as a model community.
THE HEBREW Day School is spon-
sored by a group of concerned parents
and is a beneficiary of the Jewish
Federation. Its kindergarten through
sixth grade curriculum is taught in an
innovative, open and success-oriented
environment.
Youngsters are involved for ap-
proximately two hours per day in the
study of Hebrew Language and Judaic
studies, the balance of the school day is
spent in language arts, math, science.
Rabbi Efraim Warshaw, new director of the
Hebrew Day School, studying Torah with
first-grader Howard Felson.
and social studies. The basic curriculum
is enriched with studies in art, drama,
dance and physical education.
Teachers at the Hebrew Day School
for the coming year will all be certified.
Each is selected for commitment to
educating the whole child and for proven
skills and professional training. Small
classes enable individual students to
progress at their own pace.
THE SCHOOL is open to all girls and
boys of the Jewish community of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
Weiss is Sunrise Center's New Rabbi
The Sunrise Jewish Center has
announced the appointment of
Rabbi Rudolph Weiss as its first
spiritual leader since its recent
dedication.
With a background of 31 years in
the rabbinate, Rabbi Weiss spent
many of his years training in
Tamarac Center Sets
Switzerland and Hungary, where
he was ordained, which also in-
cluded time for courses in
Philosophy and Psychology at the
University of Bucharest.
Shortly after his arrival in the
United States, he was selected to
serve in Carnegie, Pa., where he
served as rabbi for 16 years. He
later moved to Florida where he
served at Temple Sholom in
Pompano Beach, and since 1965 he
was a rabbi at the B'nai Israel
Congregation in Pensacola, Fla.
Rabbi Weiss still serves as a
Chaplain at three Air Corps bases
in the area. He will assume his
duties the second week in July.
Activities, Schedule Sunrise Oneg Shabbat To Mark
Bernsteins' Double Celebration
Regular services will be held at
the Temple Sanctuary on Friday,
July 22, at 8 pm. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman will officiate and a
Oneg Shabbat will follow.
Sabbath services will be con-
ducted Saturday at 9 am.
Minyan services are held daily at
8:30 am and 7:30 pm.
The Temple will sponsor a trip to
Israel, departing from Fort
Lauderdale on Nov. 14 and
returning Nov. 28. Highlights in-
clude visits to Jerusalem, Tel Aviv,
Eilat, and a Kibbutz. Contact
Adeline Moll or The Temple office
for information.
Tickets for the High Holy Day
services are on sale now. Roah
Hashanah (Jewish New Year)
commences at sundown on Mon-
day, Sept 12. Yom Kippur (Day of
Atonement) falls on Wednesday,
Sept. 22.
Mr. & Mrs. Sid Bernstein will
sponsor the Oneg Shabbat for
Friday, July 29 at the Sunrise
Jewish Center, to mark a double
celebration .One daughter recently
presented the Bernsteins with a
grandchild, while another
daughter was recently married.
Mr. & Mrs. Ted Port, friends of
the Bernsteins, will be co-hosts for
the evening.
Daily and evening services are
held regularly at the Center.
Services are also held on Friday
evenings usually followed by an
Oneg Shabbat and on Saturday
morning followed by a Kiddish.
Tickets for the High Holy Days
services, are now available to the
public, on Wednesdays, from 6:30
p.m. and on Sundays from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Services for the High Holy
Days, will be conducted by Rabbi
Rudolph Weiss and Cantor Jack
Marchant.
Letters to the Editor
Tour Turns Up Cousin, Birthplace
EDITOR: The Jewish Floridian,
The "thrill of a lifetime" is a
genuine definition of the highlight
in the Just completed tour of Betty
Weinstein of Oakland Estates In
Fort Lauderdale.
Born, and only a five-month
resident on the Island of Rhodes, it
was a scheduled stop on her Greek
bland cruise.
How beautiful it is to visit one's
so distant a birthplace. Now, add a
scheduled visit to a beautiful old
synagogue, where conversation
discloses that its Shamus (Sexton)
is her cousin. Now of course, her
happy escort took her to the house
wherein shw was born. And all this
after her 15-day tour of miraculous
Israel.
Truly, the thrill of one's lifetime!
MARTHA and LOU OCKEN
Lauderdale Lakes
Community Services Set For Fall
Reservations are now being
taken for Traditional Community
Services for the High Holy Days
of Rosh Hashonah and Yom Kip-
pur at Temple Emanu-El.
Services will be held in Temple
Emanu-El's Sanctuary, Fort
Lauderdale, and will be con-
ducted by Rabbi Henry L.
Shwartz and Cantor Jeno Fried-
man.
The community services enable
those unaffiliated with the
Temple to worship in the sanc-
tuary. For reservations or ad-
ditional information, contact
Morris Watkins. executive direc-
tor at the Temple office.
Reform service for membership
will be held at Parker Playhouse.
All services are under the per-
sonal direction of Rabbi Joel S.
Goor, spiritual leader of Temple
Emanu-El and Cantor Jerome
Klement.
Negev Pioneer Women Plan Summer
Negev Chapter of Pioneer
Women has begun its summer
schedule, according to Harriet
Green, president of the Pioneer
Women Council of South Florida.
The North Broward unit of
Pioneer Women, the Women's
Labor Zionist Organization of
America, has begun its annual
program of selling cards for the
Jewish New Year, and is plan-
ning a group tour to Las Vegas.
Boutique sales will be held
throughout July and August.
The Negev Chapter's final
summer luncheon and card party
will be held Wednesday, Aug. 24,
at noon in the Pompano Fashion
Square Community Room.
Reservations may be made by
contacting Stella Safeer or
Shirley Miller.
All proceeds will go to the
Child Rescue Fund operated by
Pioneer Women and its sister
organization, Na'amat, in Israel-
Pioneer Women has more than
640,000 paid members in the
United States, Canada, Israel
and nine other countries. .
Additional information on the1
organization may be obtained by
contacting Florence Sherman,
Rona Schimel or Betty Waga.
iiMiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.......nut
i e .Tzo'un' a SToup of Israeli Boy and Girl Scouts, I
5 recently visited and performed at the JCC Day Camp. Their
| musical performance was highlighted by singing and dancing. I
= T.n% scout8 also Jmed m th various camp activities and the I
JlA. campers put on a show for the Scouts.
llliailllMllltltlllMllllltMMIIII........MtllltllKMIMIIMIMIIIIIIIlllll.....Ill If 111 1111M11.........111II 11 n^iHM
JDL Denounced for Skokie
Sunrise Center Continues Programs
Thr Sunrise Jewish Center will
cor je its regular Friday
even T services at 8 p.m.
.od by an Oneg Shabat. A
lush *fll also follow the
alar Saturday morning
.-.ervices, beginning at 9 a.m. Jack
Marchant is the Center's Cantor.
n announcement concerning
th appointment of a Rabbi is
i upcoming.
The formation of a Men's Club
is now is progress.
A limited number of mem-
berships for the High Holy Days
are still available. Dave Rosof
can provide more information.
The Sunrise Jewish Center has
a Sisterhood with a membership
now approaching 600.
SKOKIE, 111. (JTA) A
leader of the Jewish community
here has denouced the Jewish
Defense League for stirring up
"the fears of our people" that
Nazis would eventually win their
court battle to march through
this heavily Jewish populated
suburb of Chicago.
Sol Goldstein, a board member
of the Jewish United Fund of
Metropolitan Chicago, was
referring to a statement to that
I effect by Rabbi Meir Kahane at a
JDL rally staged here Jury 4. The
rally was held despite the fact
that a threatened July 4 Nazi
march was called off in com-
pliance with a court injunction
obtained by the Village of Skokie
in support of its ordinances
barring the march.
KAHANE, founder of the mili-
tant organization, exhorted a
crowd estimated at 400 to "kill
Nazis now" and "every Jew a
.22." Frank Collin, leader of the
so-called National Socialist Party
of America, told the Chicago
Daily News that the JDL rally
"sets a marvelous precedent that
the Skokie ordinances are in-
valid" and that "the Jews played
directly into our hands."
The aim of the Jewish com-
munity was to reduce tension,
and for that reason the JUF's
Public Affairs Committee can-
celled what was to have been a
"patriotic American rally" at the
Meyer Kaplan Jewish Com-
munity Center Jury 4.
"We had cancelled a rally of
local Jewish residents of Skokie
purposely because such a rally
could only serve to enlarge the
fears of our people even though
the Nazi march had been aver-
ted," Goldstein said.
"TO HAVE the Jews of the
JDL stir up these same fears and
apprehensions for their own
purposes is unforgiveable By vu{a*"e naU where the march waev
their actions and by their alien- to ve ^BUn. Police helicopters
tions that the Nazis will wm in cru,wed overhead and uniformed
court the right to march in P^^thes pohce were out
in force to prevent violence.
Skokie, the JDL has come close
to accomplishing what the Nazis
themselves set out to do," he
said.
The JDL held its rally on the
parking lot of the JCC after being
refused permission to use the
building. About 40 JDLers who
came to Skokie from other cities
were disarmed by police of clubs,
baseball bats and metal pipes
they were carrying, apparently in
anticipation of a confrontation
with the Nazis.
But Skokie Village President
Albert J. Smith said their rally
was legal because it was held on
private property. He said the
Nazis could hold a similar rally if
they could obtain the use of
private property.
ALTHOUGH the Nazi march
was cancelled, several anti-Nazi
groups assembled outside the
village hall where the march


July 22,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
>cal Woman to Lead
andeis U. Women
t/THAM, Mass. A
ent Greater Miami civic
|>as been elected to a one-
a8 national president
Ldeis Uni-
ts Nation-!
fomen'sl
littee
Sidney!
hwartz of I
Irbour as-
[her office |
I the orga-
i's twen-
annualK
mce held SCHWARTZ
rat the Brandeis'campus.
WOMEN'S Committee
Irmed shortly before Bran-
ened in 1948 and today
Dre than 60,000 members
the country. The com-
| annually raises about II
in support of the Univer-
(ibraries, which today have
700,000 bound volumes.
[virtue of her office, Mrs.
tz will sit as a member of
diversity's Board of Trus-
5he has previously been a
President's Councilor
Fellow of the University.
ative of Chicago, Mrs. Sch-
graduated from the
sity of Illinois (B.A.
psychology) and served three
years as a medical social worker.
HER SERVICE to the Na-
tional Women's Committee and
to the University spans more
than 20 years, and she has held a
number of executive posts. She
was elected to the Honorary
National Board, twice served on
the National Nominating Com-
mittee and was the founding
president of the Southeast
Regional Chapter.
She is a former national vice
president, and Greater Miami
Chapter treasurer and president.
Her commitment as a volun-
teer worker stretches beyond the
academic environs to communal
and civic endeavors.
MRS. SCHWARTZ is a mem-
ber of the American Association
of University Women and a life
member of the Sisterhood of
Temple Beth Shalom, Mt. Sinai
Hospital Auxiliary and the
Douglas Gardens Jewish Home
for the Aged. She is a past cam-
paign chairman, Women's
Division, of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, and a trustee
of Surf-Bal-Ray Florida Public
Library.
A resident of Greater Miami
for the past 26 years, she lives
with her husband on Miami
Beach.
tig West German
ludget Heartening
lie West Germany wel-
[ President Carter's call at
hdon NATO conference for
)gthening of the alliance, it
clear that Bonn is not
Ito beef up its own armed
manpower to achieve this
\gious Directory
FORT LAUDERDALE
I ISRAEL TEMPLE 7100 W
)nd Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip A
vilz Cantor Maurice Neu (42).
EL TEMPLE. 3425 W Oak
Park Blvd Reform. Rabbi Joel
[Cantor Jerome Klement
:W CONGREGATION OF
>ERHILL, 2048 NW 48th Ave..
krhill. Conservative. Albeit Nebei
Pent.
(AC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
57th St. Conservative Rabbi
Zimmerman (44A).
ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
Bhrling Rd. Orothodox Rabbi
tBomzer (52).
ISTRUCTIONIST SYNA
rE,7473NW4thSt.
PLANTATION
)TION JEWISH CONGREGA
1400 S Nob Hill Rd. Liberal Re
7bbi Sheldon J. Harr (64).
POMPANO BEACH
TEMPLE 132 SE 11th Ave.
Ivative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
fJacob Renzer (49).
MARGATE
IlLLEL CONGREGATION 7640
)te Blvd. Conservative Cantor
jPeriman.
JTE JEWISH CENTER. 4101
i St. Conservative Cantor Max
K44B).
CORAL SPRINGS
: BETH ORR. Riversid* Drive.
(44).
'EST BROWARD SYNA
8041 W. Sample Road.
|DEERFIELDBEACH
COMMUNITY CENTER
ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE. Cen
Ullage East. Conservative.
David Berent (62).
MJDERDALE LAKES
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL
[est Oakland Park Doolevard
Orthodox Congregation
aulD Herman.
SUNRISE
'ISH CENTER, INC.,
Hand Park Blvd. Conser
isident Abe Yunnan,
irchant.
goal. Chancellor Helmut Schmidt
told a West German TV man
after the London meeting: "We
Germans have been doing enough
and we do not have to reproach
' ourselves. We are not entering a
new era of rearmament."
Bonn Defense Ministry
spokesmen since then have also
insisted that West German
armed forces will not be increased
above their present strength of
495.000 men, despite the NATO
ministers' agreement (May 17) to
try to raise defense budgets by
three percent a year.
"THIS TOTAL is based on a
newly-introduced, streamlined
structure for our services for
which defense budgets have been
planned until 1981." one said.
The defense budget for this year
is $1.37 billion, or 19 percent of
the total federal budget and 2.6
percent of the country's gross
national product. By 1980, it is
planned, defense spending will
total $14.5 billion.
"We have committed all our
money until then on a weapons
system procurement program
that will maintain our claim to
having the best-equipped
fighting force in Western Europe,
except for U.S. forces here," the
spokesman added.
In a sense, despite Schmidt's
rejection of a new German "re-
armament," this is what is to
happen to the three services in
qualitative terms by the early
1980s. An impressive arms
"shopping list" running into
billions of dollars will ensure that
West Germany goes a long way
toward meeting Carter's hopes
for a tougher front-line against
Warsaw pact forces.
THE ARMY has already
begun taking delivery of the first
of 420 "Gepard" anti-aircraft
tanks costing $2 million each,
plus 1,800 Leopard II tanks, a 50-
ton development of the 40-ton
Leopard I, at a total cost of $3
billion. The German navy is to be
equipped with six new frigates,
each to carry two anti-submarine
helicopters, that will be its future
backbone for defense of the North
Sea. These will cost a total of $1
billion.
AJCommittee Closes Argentine
Offices Following Many Threats
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The American Jewish Com-
mittee announced that it
has closed its Buenos Aires
office after 29 years because
of threats against its repre-
sentative and his family.
AJCommittee President
Richard Maass told a press
conference that the or-
ganization will not reopen
the office which serves all of
South America until it re-
ceives physical evidence,
not just verbal assurances,
that those who make anti-
Semitic and anti-American
threats will be found and
punished.
JACOBO KOVADLOFF, di-
rector of the AJCommittee's
Buenos Aires offices; his wife
Sonia; their daughter Georgina,
21; and son Ezechiel, 15, are now
in New York from where Kovad-
loff will temporarily run the
organization's South American
affairs.
Kovadloff did not attend the
press conference, and Maass
explained that this was because
he was still "shook up" after the
threats and because as a fifth
generation Argentinian he did
not want to be in the position of
attacking his country from
abroad. Maass said that the
United States government has
been asked to lodge a protest
with the Argentine government
against the threats to the
AJCommittee and American
property in Buenos Aires.
He noted that the U.S.
Embassy in Buenos Aires and
Consulate General in Rio de
Janeiro have been very helpful to
Kovadloff and his family.
MAAS CHARGED that
elements in the Argentine
government were behind the
threats to Kovadloff. David
Geller, the AJCommittee's Latin
American specialist, said that
Kovadloff believes that the
AJCommittee was singled out for
attack to embarrass President
Jorge Rafael Videla, who is con-
sidered a moderate, by right-wing
elements in the government.
As evidence of this, Maass
pointed out that one of the notes
threatening Kovadloff ended by
saying. "We do not want offices
of Yankees and Jews." The
AJCommittee president said that
while Videla and other officials of
his government have condemned
discrimination and racism, they
have not mentioned anti-
Semitism by name. He said the
AJCommittee believes the
government can find the persons
who threatened the Kovadloffs
and should punish them as an
example to others that such
threats will not be tolerated in
Argentina any longer.
In addition, Maass said the
government should completely
ban the publication of anti-
Semitic organs like the magazine
Cabildo instead of only con-
fiscating one issue as it did
recently and should punish the
generals and other government
officials who attended a recent
anniversary banquet for the
magazine.
THE THREATS against Ko-
vadloff started when an uniden-
tified telephone caller told Mrs.
Kovadloff June 20: "Tell your
husband that if he does not leave
the country, the same thing that
happened to Timerman will
happen to him." (Jacobo Timer-
man, a prominent Jewish
journalist and editor of the news-
paper La Opinion, is being held in
jail, linked to David Graiver, a
Jewish banker who died in a
plane crash last year, in an in-
vestigation of illegal economic
activities.)
(..im
Kovadloff did not attend the
press conference, and Maass
explained that this was be-
cause he was still "shook
up".
(((((IB
Kovadloff himself received a
note, hand delivered to the
doorman at his home June 21,
saying: "Traitor. You played a
double game too much. Go away
before it will be too late. We do
not want Yankee or Jewish of-
fices." The same afternoon the
AJCommittee office was called,
telling Kovadloff and his family
to leave the country.
A similar call was made to the
Kovadloff home later in the day.
Kovadloff then left for Brazil
June 22 where, according to
Maass, he thought he would stay
COMMUNITY
JULY 26
I Temple Beth Israel USY
temporarily. But as soon as he
left his wife and children began
receiving threats. On June 28,
Mrs. Kovadloff and the two
children left for the airport in a
U.S. Embassy car accompanied
by two American diplomatic
officials.
THE FAMILY'S belongings
were thoroughly searched at the
airport and a plainclothes official
crushed the lens of the glasses
belonging to Kovadloffs son.
The plane was delayed for a half-
hour due to the search.
Maass said that the AJCom-
mittee has operated in Argentina
as a service organization to the
Argentine Jewish community
and to improve relations between
Argentina and the United States.
He said it has never taken
political stand in the country
CALENDAR
AUGUST2
Plantation Jewish Congregation at West End
luncheon and card party noon.
AUGUST7
Temple Emanu-EI membership luncheon
I
U.S. Denies Considering
Air Base in Israel
WASHINGTON (JTA) Press reports that the
U.S. was considering setting up a naval or air base in Israel
were denied July 5 by White House Press Secretary Jody
Powell. "There is no truth to that report," he said. >>j
"We an> not considering asking for any naval base or
any other kind of military base in Israel." Earlier in the day
the State Department also rejected the reports as "sheer
speculation."
MEANWHILE, President Carter would prefer to see a
Middle East settlement negotiated "directly and bilater-
ally" between the Arab countries and Israel with "minimal
involvement" by the United States. Carter expressed this
view in a letter to Rep. Benjamin Rosenthal (D., N.Y.)
which was released here July 6.
"Nothing would please me more than to see this
procedure lead to success with minimal involvement by the
U.S.," the President wrote. "This may be the last oppor-
tunity for many years to bring the parties together multi-
lateral^ and without influence."
-----Salk, King Cited-----
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The nation's highest civilian
awards, the government's Medal
of Freedom, have been presented
by President Carter to Dr. Jonas
E. Salk and posthumously to the
Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. on
the occasion of the 201st anniver-
sary of American independence.
CARTER said of Dr. Salk, who
discovered the anti-polio vaccine,
that because of him "our country
is free from the cruel epidemic of
poliomyelitis that once struck
almost yearly."
The President also observed
that "because of his tireless
work, untold hundreds of
thousands who may have been
crippled are sound in body today.
These are Dr. Salk's true honors,
and there is no way to add to
them."
Of the late Dr. King, Carter
said he was "the conscience of his
generation," adding, "a Souther-
ner, a Black man, he gazed upon
the great wall of segregation and
saw the power of love could bring
it down."
IEVITT
memorial chapls
1*21 Pembroke Rd.
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524-8**7
Sonny Levitt, F.D.
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North Miami, Fla.
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JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 22,1977
Jewish Agency Adopts Big Budget
By TUVIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Jewish Agency's sixth
annual General Assembly ended
a week of deliberations here with
the adoption of a $467 million
budget for the next fiscal year
and affirmations of unswerving
support for Israel by world Jewry
regardless of which political
party happens to head its
government.
But two major issues that were
the subject of lenghthy debate by
the 600 delegates from 90
countries attending the
Assembly were not resolved.
THESE WERE imple-
mentation of the controversial
Horev commission report and the
problem of drop-outs Jewish
emigres from the Soviet Union
who opt to go to countries other
than Israel after reaching Vienna.
The Horev commission recom-
mended last year that the
Absorption Ministry and the
Jewish Agency's Aliya Depart-
ment be replaced by an indepen-
dent absorption authority
responsible directly to the Prime
Minister and headed by the
chairman of the Jewish Agency
and World Zionist Organization
Executives.
Those issues apparent ry will be
left to the 29th World Zionist
Congress scheduled to convene
here in February.
MEANWHILE, Israelis at-
tending the General Assembly
were heartened by the words of
Max Fisher of Detroit, chairman
of the Jewish Agency's Board of
Governors, who addressed the
closing session in the presence of
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin.
"All too often we cease to
wonder at the marvel of Israel's
existence," Fisher said. "We' political parties in Israel. "The immigrant need encounter red
forget the stress, the suffering Jewish Agency can no longer be tape and no immigrant need ex-
._J.i---------i-u n i w- periencefrustration."
Leon Dulzin, Jewish Agency
treasurer, observed in his budget
speech that fund-raising cam-
paigns at this time seem to be
unsatisfactory. "The problem is
that we have failed to get across
the basic message of Israel's
needs and their relationship to
Israel's ultimate security and
and the anguish.
His words reflected support
and understanding of Israel's
problems and were especially
reassuring when he turned to
Begin and declared, "Mr. Prime
Minister, go forward with
strength, with conviction and
with wisdom. And we will be with
you."
THIS ALLAYED fears that
widespread misgivings in Israel
and abroad over the hard-line
policies of the Begin government
might result in an erosion of
support for Israel in the
American Jewish and other
diaspora communities.
Pisher also addressed himself
to changes in the Jewish Agency
itself. He emphasized the need for
the Agency to be divorced from
an instrument of politics," he
said.
"Today the Jewish Agency
exists and touches every facet of
Jewish life in Israel and belongs
to the entire Jewish people. The
Agency must have a working
relationship with the new Israeli
government. It is only logical
but whoever is ruling must
recognize the Agency's new
character," he said.
WITH RESPECT to drop-
outs, Fisher told the Assembly
that "Something has gone wrong
with our approach to im-
migration and absorption." He
asked, "Why are Russian Jews
dropping out? Why are dissatis-
fied immigrants leaving? What is
there about the system that we
can correct?" He added that "No
development," he said.
He noted that at tiroes 0u
military peril, diaspora Jewr.'
responded with contributions two
and three times greater than tbi
peacetime levels.
"You are the leaders of yo
communities, the leaders of yo9
campaigns," Dulzin said. "Thii
then must be your common tatfc
To lead your communities to tha
full conviction that building
Israel requires as much of tbw
understanding and support
times of peace it can be called
peace as in times of war."
Arabs Who Charge Torture
Afraid of Arab Revenge
Burke Says Carter Favors
Series of 'Quick Openers'
Congressman J. Herbert
Burke, of the 12th District,
Florida, is telling constituents
that "I am concerned about
recent reports that the Carter
administration is on the verge of
doing irreparable damage to our
position in the Middle East and
putting one of our few good
friends in even more danger than
it already faces.
"I refer to the June 27 state-
ment by Hod ding Carter III of
the State Department, which
calls for Israel to relinquish its
territorial gains and the
protection these territories afford
to assist forward movement
toward a peace settlement in the
Middle East."
Burke notes that, "My un-
derstanding is that this complete
withdrawal would be a precon-
dition to negotiation and would
not bring any guarantee of
Israel's security. Small wonder
that the people of Israel recently
found it necessary to tum to a
government more willing to dig
in its heels and uphold its
rights."
Adds Burke: "President
Carter has tried 'quick-fix'
initiatives in the Panama Canal
negotiations, normalization of
relations with Cuba and Vietnam,
human rights and troop with-
drawals from Korea. If President
Nixon's specialty was the sur-
prising long pass, Jimmy Car-
ter's approach seems to be a
series of quick openers.''
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
Former Arab prisoners who
say they were tortured
during interrogation by
Israeli police do so because
they fear revenge by other
Arabs whom they have im-
plicated in terrorist ac-
tivities. But their claims of
confessing because of
torture are without foun-
dation.
This was stated in a
lengthy reply by the Israel
Embassy to an article in
the Sunday Times three
weeks ago accusing Israeli
security organs of systema-
tically using torture to
extract confessions from
suspected terrorists.
THE STATEMENT follows
inquiries in Israel into the cases
mentioned in the original Sunday
Times article. It deals with six
cases point by point claiming
that in no case is the allegation of
:-:-x-:x-:-:xW:wW::::::::::::::::::::::v:::|S:^
"Israeli prisons, the Embas-
sy added, are all open to in-
spection, and such inspec-
tions are carried out fre-
quently by judges, represen-
tatives of the Attorney Gen-\
eral and defense counsel, in\
eluding Tsemel and Langer."]
WftW
torture justified.
The Embassy stated: "Israeli
police and security have even]
reason to refrain from use oil
force. Such use of force is il
serious criminal offense, and
where cases of police brutality
have been found in the put,
police officers have been pro-
secutod, and it is Israel's policy
to do so in the future."
The Embassy pointed out that
Felicia Langer and Lea Tsemel
the two Jewish lawyers fre-
quently quoted in the original j
Sunday Times article, "make a
practice of claiming that every
client of theirs who makes a i
statement to the police does so |
underpressure."
IT'S BACK-TO-BASICS
WITH COLLAGEMAN"
What's more basic to your fall wardrobe than the sweater?
The classic look of cables and striping figure more
prominently than ever this year, and Collageman'"
makes its mark with two good-lookers in acrylic, sizes
S-XL. Tennis-striped V-neck pullover in cream with navy
and yellow, or almond with grey and cream, $21. Placket-
front pullover in cream with brown stripe, $20
Men's Sportswear, at all jm stores \
(1 fl fUULft
nni
lordani
Jmarsn
A unrt 0< A-U SlOlM


Full Text
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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 22,1977
Jewish Agency Adopts Big Budget
By TUVIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Jewish Agency's sixth
annual General Assembly ended
a week of deliberations here with
the adoption of a $467 million
budget for the next fiscal year
and affirmations of unswerving
support for Israel by world Jewry
regardless of which political
party happens to head its
government.
But two major issues that were
the subject of lenghthy debate by
the 600 delegates from 90
countries attending the
Assembly were not resolved.
THESE WERE imple-
mentation of the controversial
Ho rev commission report and the
problem of drop-outs Jewish
emigres from the Soviet Union
who opt to go to countries other
than Israel after reaching Vienna.
The Horev commission recom-
mended last year that the
Absorption Ministry and the
Jewish Agency's Aliya Depart-
ment be replaced by an indepen-
dent absorption authority
responsible directly to the Prime
Minister and headed by the
chairman of the Jewish Agency
and World Zionist Organization
Executives.
Those issues apparently will be
left to the 29th World Zionist
Congress scheduled to convene
here in February.
MEANWHILE, Israelis at-
tending the General Assembly
were heartened by the words of
Max Fisher of Detroit, chairman
of the Jewish Agency's Board of
Governors, who addressed the
closing session in the presence of
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin.
"All too often we cease to
wonder at the marvel of Israel's
existence," Fisher said. "We1 political parties in Israel. "The
forget the stress, the suffering Jewish Agency can no longer be
and the anguish."
His words reflected support
and understanding of Israel's
problems and were especially
reassuring when he turned to
Begin and declared, "Mr. Prime
Minister, go forward with
strength, with conviction and
with wisdom. And we will be with
you."
THIS ALLAYED fears that
widespread misgivings in Israel
and abroad over the hard-line
policies of the Begin government
might result in an erosion of
support for Israel in the
American Jewish and other
diaspora communities.
Pisher also addressed himself
to changes in the Jewish Agency
itself. He emphasized the need for
the Agency to be divorced from
an instrument of politics," he
said.
"Today the Jewish Agency
exists and touches every facet of
Jewish life in Israel and belongs
to the entire Jewish people. The
Agency must have a working
relationship with the new Israeli
government. It is only logical
but whoever is ruling must
recognize the Agency's new
character," he said.
WITH RESPECT to drop-
outs, Fisher told the Assembly
that "Something has gone wrong
with our approach to im-
migration and absorption." He
asked, "Why are Russian Jews
dropping out? Why are dissatis-
fied immigrants leaving? What is
there about the system that we
can correct?" He added that "No
immigrant need encounter red
tape and no immigrant need ex-
perience frustration."
Leon Dulzin, Jewish Agency
treasurer, observed in his budget
speech that fund-raising cam-
paigns at this time seem to be
unsatisfactory. "The problem is
that we have failed to get across
the basic message of Israel's
needs and their relationship to
Israel's ultimate security and
development," he said.
He noted that at times of.'
military peril, diaspora Jewry
responded with contributions two
and three times greater than the
peacetime levels.
"You are the leaders of yon,
communities, the leaders of you
campaigns," Dulzin said. "Tha
then must be your common task:
To lead your communities to the
full conviction that building
Israel requires as much of their
understanding and support m
times of peace it can be called
peace as in times of war."
Arabs Who Charge Torture
Afraid of Arab Revenge
Burke Says Carter Favors
Series of 'Quick Openers'
Congressman J. Herbert
Burke, of the 12th District,
Florida, is telling constituents
that "I am concerned about
recent reports that the Carter
administration is on the verge of
doing irreparable damage to our
position in the Middle East and
putting one of our few good
friends in even more danger Than
it already faces.
"I refer to the June 27 state-
ment by Hodding Carter III of
the State Department, which
calls for Israel to relinquish its
territorial gains and the
protection these territories afford
to assist forward movement
toward a peace settlement in the
Middle East."
Burke notes that, "My un-
derstanding is that this complete
withdrawal would be a precon-
dition to negotiation and would
not bring any guarantee of
Israel's security. Small wonder
that the people of Israel recently
found it necessary to turn to a
government more willing to dig
in its heels and uphold its
rights."
Adds Burke: "President
Carter has tried 'quick-fix'
initiatives in the Panama Canal
negotiations, normalization of
relations with Cuba and Vietnam,
human rights and troop with-
drawals from Korea. If President
Nixon's specialty was the sur-
prising long pass, Jimmy Car-
ter's approach seems to be a
series of quick openers."
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
Former Arab prisoners who
say they were tortured
during interrogation by
Israeli police do so because
they fear revenge by other
Arabs whom they have im-
plicated in terrorist ac-
tivities. But their claims of
confessing because of
torture are without foun-
dation.
This was stated in a
lengthy reply by the Israel
Embassy to an article in
the Sunday Times three
weeks ago accusing Israeli
"Israeli prisons, the Embas-
sy added, are all open to in-
spection, and such inspec-
tions are carried out fre-
quently by judges, represen-
tatives of the Attorney Gen-i
eral and defense counsel, m-|
eluding Tsemel and Langer."\
torture justified.
The Embassy stated: "Is
police and security have eve
reason to refrain from use
force Such use of force is
serious criminal offense, a _
where cases of police brutality
have been found in the past,!
police officers have been pro-l
security organs of systema- secuted, and it is Israel's policy!
tically usmg torture to
extract confessions from
suspected terrorists.
THE STATEMENT foUows
inquiries in Israel into the cases
mentioned in the original Sunday
Times article. It deals with six
cases point by point claiming
that in no case is the allegation of
to do so in the future'
The Embassy pointed out that!
Felicia Langer and Lea Tsemel, I
the two Jewish lawyers fre-
quently quoted in the original
Sunday Times article, "make a]
practice of claiming that every/
client of theirs who makes tl
statement to the police does so|
underpressure."
IT'S BACK-TO-BASICS
WITH COLLAGEMAN"
What's more basic to your fall wardrobe than the sweater?
The classic look of cables and striping figure more
prominently than ever this year, and Collageman*
makes its mark with two good-lookers in acrylic, sizes
S-XL. Tennis-striped V-neck pullover in cream with navy
and yellow, or almond with grey and cream, $21. Placket-
front pullover in cream with brown stripe, $20
Men's Sportswear, at all jm stores V
(Li MJUi!
prdarv
Jmar5h
A unit of AH*
JUL- -
rirrv