The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00071

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
^Jewisti Meridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 5- Number 24-
Friday, November 26,1976
C F red K Shochet Friday, November U, 17*
Price 25 cents
4Jewish Continuity' Theme of CJFWF Assembly
PHILADELPHIA Mem
bers of the Jewish Federation's
delegation took part in the four-
day sessions of the Council of
Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds (CJFWF), joining with
the more than 2,000 other dele-
gates in workshop, seminar and
formal meetings that addressed
themselves to "the challenges of
Jewish continuity and the crucial
role of leadership in meeting
them."
The Fort Lauderdale dele-
gation was headed by Anita
Perlman, president of the Feder-
ation's Women's Division.
Other members included
Irving L. Geisser and Barry
Axler, the executive director and
assistant executive director of
the Federation, respectively.
Among the notables who
addressed the delegates were
Israel Ambassador to the UN
Chaim Herzog; Dr. Robert
Gordis, Bible scholar; and Jerold
C. Hoffberger, president of the
CJFWF.
Dr. Gordis, in delivering the
Herbert R. Abeles Memorial
address, described America as
"the world's last best hope for
freedom and justice" and the
"greatest bulwark for the life and
liberty of the Jewish people,"
calling at the same time for the
building of a "voluntary com-
munity dedicated to an organic
view of Judaism to arrest the
decay of the Jewish heritage" in
the future. He told the delegates
that American Jews must give
top priority to Jewish education
and to encouraging Jewish
couples to have larger families.
"Jewish loyalty," he said, "far
from being narrow and limited, is
the royal highway of service to
humanity" achieved through
Jewish education at every age
level."
Urging his audience to be
concerned about the present
Continued on Page 12
WECARE Program Expands
CJFWF Delegates Unanimously
Protest US Vote Against Israel
PHILADELPHIA The
Fort Lauderdale delegation to the
45th General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations
and Welfare Funds joined the
2.000 other delegates in a protest
to President Ford that took issue
with this country's UN Security
Council vote rebuking Israel's
supervision of the so-called Arab
territories, including East
Jerusalem.
A copy of the statement was
sent to President-elect Jimmy
Carter.
"This United States vote
appears to be completely con-
trary to the repeated affirmations
in the United Nations during the
past year by the United States
government of its unshakeable
commitment to the security of
Israel," the protest read.
At the same time, the dele-
gates adopted a resolution noting
that "no Arab regime or move-
ment has as yet formally recog-
nized the legitimacy of Israel as
an independent Jewish State,"
adding that this "refusal remains
the crucial impediment to any
movement toward a settlement."
The U.S. and Canada were
urged in the resolution "to con-
tinue to provide strong and con-
sistent diplomatic support for
Israel both in international
forums and in its dealings with
other nations in the Middle
East."
The full text of the protest to
President Ford and President-
elect Carter, and the resolution,
follows:
The President of the
United States
The White House
Washington, D.C.
Dear Mr. President:
At the 45th General Assembly
of the Council of Jewish Feder-
ations and Welfare Funds
meeting today in Philadelphia,
more than 2,000 persons from
over 200 Jewish Federations,
which comprise over 95 percent of
the Jewish population of the
United States, expressed their
deep disappointment and concern
with the vote of the United
States at the United Nations Se-
curity Council yesterday which
deplored the State of Israel's
supervision of the administered
territories and East Jerusalem.
This United States vote ap-
I pears to be completely contrary
\to the repeated affirmations in
\the United Nations during the
\past year by the United States
\Oovernment of its unshakeable
\commitment to the security of
1 Israel
We now look to you for further
assurances that this vote in the
United Nations Security Council
represents no change in the
United States Government's
strong support of the State of
Israel and that the United States
will continue to exercise strong
leadership in the forums of the
United Nations in support of the
security of the State of Israel.
We attach herewith a copy of
the resolution passed un-
animously by the delegates to
this 45th General Assembly ex-
pressing our strong views on
"efforts toward peace" in the
Middle East and the need for
strong support for the State of
Israel.
Signed:
Jerold C. Hoffberger
President, CJFWF
The text of the resolution:
The national interests of the
United States and Canada are
served by the commitment to
Israels security. It is grounded
in a deep sense of moral
obligation and affinity with a
sister democracy, the sole free
nation in the Middle East and the
only dependable ally amidst the
volatile struggle for dominance in
the Arab world
No Arab regime or movement
has as yet formally recognized
the legitimacy of Israel, as an
independent Jewish State. That
refusal remains the crucial im-
pediment to any movement
toward a settlement.
Israel recognizes that the reso-
Continued on Page 12
Rovi Faber, chairperson of
WECARE Volunteer Program of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, has announced
the formation of the Veterans'
Affairs Committee under the
chairmanship of Harry May.
This committee, under May,
who has been active in veterans'
problems, will assist veterans in
various ways.
Anyone interested in joining
this Committee or with a problem,
may contact May at the Fedjjjr-
ation office. 5*
Marie Parsons, chairperson of
the WECARE Clerical Com-
mittee, has sent Dorothy Hur-
witz and Mildred Schwartz as
teacher aides to assist Moshe
Zwang, principal of the Hebrew
Day School of Fort Lauderdale
on a five-day week schedule,
mornings and afternoons. Marie
helps out at the Federation office
three mornings a week.
WECARE has enlisted the
assistance of the Sisterhood and
Men's Club of Temple Emanu-El.
Ida Goldman and Harry
Haimowitz are the repre-
sentatives of these groups to
WECARE.
Mrs. Faber has also announced
that Philip Hoffman of Temple
Emanu-El has been appointed
chairman of Youth Services, to
aid and assist young people and
to encourage them to engage in
volunteer projects.
WECARE has established the
WECARE Mitzvah Fund to
underwrite various projects.
A Thank You Luncheon was
recently tendered by the Plan-
tation Nursing Home to the
many volunteers who assist
there. WECARE Castle Gardens
Sabbath Service Chaplaincy
assistants who attended and
received a special citation were
Augusta Bregman, Helen Cooper
(Cochairperson), Gert Golden-
berg, Gussie Is man, Ruth Kay,
Mary Kantrowitz, Ruth Karron,
Rose Metz, Sylvia Mulhauser,
Terry Sclare, Lillian Schoen
(chairperson), Ethel Blitzer and
Helen Appel. Rabbi Leonard S.
Continued on Page 12
r
i
Major Gifts Dinner
j To Launch Campaign*
Assembly Raps Israel
For S. Africa Ties
The 1977 Federation / UJ A
campaign was poised for another
long step forward this week with
announcement by its general
chairman, Sen. Samuel L. Green-
berg, that a major gifts dinner
will take place Thursday, Dec. 9.
The dinner, the first such
major event of the 1977 campaign
calendar, will be held in the
Inverrary Country Club and the
minimum contribution. Sen.
Greenberg announced, will be
$5,000. He said that he an-
ticipated many contributions
would exceed the minimum.
Albert G. Segal, advance gifts
chairman, will preside.
Former Israel Ambassador to
Canada Col. Dov Sinai will be the
principal speaker. The soldier-
diplomat is now vice president of
the United Jewish Appeal's
Israel Education Fund.
Prior to his appointment to the
Education Fund, Col. Sinai was
special representative of the
Prime Minister's Office, and
before that was in the Israel
Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem.
A one-time Israel Consul
General in South Africa and later
his country's ambassador to
Canada, Col. Sinai served in 1967
and 1968 as a member of the
Israel delegation to the UN
General Assembly. He began his
military career as a member of
the pre-State Haganah, fought in
Israel's War of Liberation, and
rose to become military spokes-

COL. DOV SINAI
man of the Israel Defense Forces
and director of Public Affairs in
the Ministry of Defense.
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The General Assembly has
adopted a resolution condemning
"the continuing and increasing
collaboration by Israel with the
South African racist regime."
The vote was 91-20 with 28
abstentions. Israel did not
participate in the vote on that
resolution or on any of the nine
other resolutions dealing with
apartheid as a protest against the
"selective and dishonest process"
of singling out Israel's relations
with the Pretoria government.
THE 20 COUNTRIES that
voted against the anti-Israel
resolution Were: Australia,
Austria, Belgium, Canada, Den-
mark, France, Guatemala, Hon-
duras, Iceland, Ireland, Italy,
Luxembourg, The Netherlands,
New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nor-
way, Sweden, United Kingdom,
United States, and West Ger-
ADL Appoints Joseph
NEW YORK The Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has elected a new national
chairman. He is Burton M.
Joseph of Minneapolis, Minn.
The national human relations
agency's seventh national chair-
man since it was founded in 1913
"to end discrimination against
Jews and to secure equal treat-
ment for all citizens," replaces
Seymour Graubard, a New York
attorney, who has completed his
six-year term of office.
THE ELECTION, by proc-
lamation, was held at the opening
session of ADL's 63rd annual
meeting. Some 300 League
leaders from all sections of the
country were in New York to
attend three days of policy-
making sessions at the Waldorf
Astoria Hotel. They then went to
Israel for week-long meetings
there.
The opening session also
featured reports by Graubard
and Benjamin R. Epstein, ADL's
national director, on the current
situation of American Jews.
many.
The Arab-inspired resolution
was the culmination of repeat*-1
Arab attacks on Israel during the
debate on apartheid which began
on Oct. 26.
Israel's Ambassador to the
UN, Chaim Herzog, said in a
statement to the General As-
sembly before the voting that
Israel would not participate in
the voting on any of the 10 apart-
heid resolutions.
HE SAID this was because the
debate "has been turned into an
anti-Israel issue, ignoring as it
does the major moral problem of
apartheid which should be exer-
cising this body, because those
who prepared the resolution
against Israel (the Arabs) are
guilty of crimes of which they
accuse others; because what we
are called upon to participate in is
a monstrous act of deceit and a
cynical vote based on inter-
national hypocrisy and un-
scrupulous falsehood."
Herzog accused the Arabs of
turning the debate on apartheid
into a debate on the Middle East.
He said the Arabs have not the
slightest interest in advancing
the struggle against racial dis-
crimination in the world and that
by their anti-Israel drive, they
prejudice "any prospect to
achieving consensus on what is
close to the hearts of the
Africans." Herzog reiterated that
the Arab states have economic
ties with South Africa. He named
Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iraq and
others.
J


Page2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 26,1975
Robinson, Guest of Honor
At UJA/IEF Functions
Sol Robinson, president of the
Bermuda Club Management
Council, Inc., and a civic, media
and Jewish community leader,
will be the guest of honor at both
an advance gifts meeting and a
UJA IEF Chanukah Ob-
servance and Rally to be held
during December at the Bermuda
Club condominium complex.
Bernard Simms. chairman of
the Bermuda Club's
Federation UJA campaign, an-
nounced that an advance gifts
meeting, with Robinson as guest
of honor, will take place Tuesday.
Dec. 7. with the observance and
rally on Wednesday evening.
Dec. 22. in the club's auditorium.
Adolph Weisser has been
named chairman of advance gifts
and will preside at the Dec. 7
advance gifts meeting, which will
be a cocktail party. Sol Salles is
serving as advance gifts co-
chairman.
Members of the advance gifts
committee which is still in
formation include Leo Dube.
George Dresner. Morris Dorf,
Phil Gold, Lenny Geylin, Harvey
Ehrlich. Paul Katz, Max
Lehraupt. Iz Landsman. Joe and
Ethel Matz. Jack Rosner,
Herman Solnit and Hi Shulman.
Sen. Samuel L. Greenberg,
general chairman of the Fort
Lauderdale Federation UJA
campaign, and Leo Goodman,
campaign cochairman. will take
part in the tribute to Robinson.
Robinson has been twice
decorated by Presidents of the
United States. He was awarded
the Medal of Merit by President
Woodrow Wilson in 1918 as a
youth who sold more Liberty
Bonds than any other American
youngster and he received the
same medal from President
Truman in 1946 for his volunteer
services to the United States
during World War II.
Robinson was part owner, a
vice president and the general
manager of radio station WLAD
in Dan bury, Conn., and the
owner and operator of radio
station WBRY in Waterbury,
Conn. He has written several
SOL ROBINSON
books on the communications
industry.
He has also served in the New
York City and federal govern-
ments, starting out before World
War II in the New York City De-
partment of Welfare. After the
war, he served with the U.S.
Senate Banking Commission. He
has also served as a member of
the Management Committee of
the President's Industry Ad-
visory Council arid with a host of
voluntary civic, philanthropic,
health, youth, religious and com-
munity service organizations.
Robinson is a member of the
board of governors of District
No. 1 of B'nai B'rith and a
member of its national com-
mission of Community and Vet-
erans Service. He was the first
president of a Theodor Herzl
youth group and in the late
1940s, as the national UJA was
going into high gear helped
create "C-Day," or Cash Day. for
the nationwide campaign.
Gerda Weiss man Klein, a
survivor of the Nazi death camps
and author, will be among the
principal speakers at the Ber-
muda Club's UJA Chanukah Ob-
servance and Rally on Dec. 22.
Sylvia Beckman:
Reflections on Involvement
Contributing time, energy ana
talent is the type of commitment
Sylvia Beckman has known all
her life.
She calls it giving in her own
"quiet fashion."
"I've always been involved,"
says the soft-spoken yet assertive
widow, whose recent efforts
mainly have been directed to
Temple Beth Israel at Century
Village, where she has been
instrumental in its growth.
"Putting myself into a
biographical format is rather dif-
ficult." Sylvia explains with a
warm smile. "My story seems to
be temple-oriented, delineated by
the many holidays and programs
I've been involved with, from
ticket sales for the High Holidays
preparing thousands of
latkes (potato pancakes) for
Chanukah ... to planning a
Purim play."
But sitting in her temple office
gesturing to an artist's ren-
dering for the proposed new shul,
then to people outside her door
she simply says, "This is my life.
But there are constant inter-
ruptions." as she stops to in-
struct a Sisterhood member on
the cost of jewelry for a fund-
raising project.
Born in Lakewood, N.J., she
was one of four children.
Traditionally, this was a time
when girls in a family didn't go to
college." she says, "but my
parents encouraged all of us to
get all the education we could.
"They moved to New York so
we could attend college They
worked hard to give us that ad-
vantage." Sylvia says re-
flectively.
"It was rough," she recalls
six long years working days, then
dashing to New York University
in the evening for classes.
"But every night my mother
would be waiting at home with a
midnight dinner ready for us and
to talk to my brothers and myself
about our day."
Armed with a degree in ac-
counting, she joined the Norcross
Greeting Card company as an
office clerk.
A poem which appeared in J
V the Nov. 12 edition of The y
\ Jewish Floridian of Greater (
Fort Lauderdale, "A Day in )
) November." was written by *
\ Dr. Albert E. Kaufman. i
Recently honored at Hawaiian Gardens Phase V were Mr. and
Mrs. Rubin Epstein, who were the recipients of the Israel ,
Solidarity Award at a Night in Israel held under the auspices of I
the Hawaiian Gardens V Israel Bonds Committee. Chairman of\
t, o. annual event was Sidney Goldfarb. p tmw.
Resnikoff
To Receive
Koah Award
Israel Resnikoff, Fort Lauder-
dale community leader, will be
the recipient of the Israel Koah
Award at the Margate Jewish
Center-Israel Bond Reception on
Sunday, Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m. at the
Margate Jewish Center.
Emil Cohen, vocalist and
humorist, will provide en-
tertainment.
Resnikoff, president of the
Margate Jewish Center, is the
past president of the Men's Club
of Temple Beth El, Utica, N.Y.
He is a member of the
executive board of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale and of the Israel
Bond Organization of North
Broward.
Resnikoff is also active in B'nai
B'rith, the Zionist Organization
of America, the American Jewish
Congress and Odd Fellows.
In 1973, 1974 and 1975,
Resnikoff was chairman of the
Israel Bond Committee of the
Margate Jewish Center.
rw-u-jt
SYLVIA BECKMAN
"Women weren't liberated
then. A woman accountant
wasn't encouraged to do field
work because of traveling and
being away from her family," she
explains.
"In my case," she continues,
"it was the unusual situation of
an office clerk rising to comp-
troller for a billion-dollar
organization."
Married in 1938, she became a
Brooklynite for two years, later
moving to Mount Vernon, N.Y.,
where she and her husband raised
their son and daughter.
There Sylvia's energies were
redirected from the day-to-day,
nine-to-five office routine to civic
projects and committees in-
cluding president of the Southern
Westchester chapter of Brandeis
Women, Hadassah, the city's
hospital and high school and her
temple.
When Israel was moving
toward statehood, Sylvia and her
husband, an active fund-raiser
and a catalyst for numerous
appeals on Israel's behalf, often
were guests in the Presidential
Cottage at Unser Camp a
Zionist retreat in upstate New
York meeting many influential
Israelis such as Golda Meir and
Abba Eban.
Her second love was helping
found Kinnereth Day School
where students from nursery to
sixth grade were taught Hebrew
as their basic language.
Her efforts for Israel and her
work with the school were recog-
nized by Mrs. Meir, who honored
Sylvia by attending a special
dinner on the school's behalf at
the Waldorf Astoria Hotel.
Moving to Century Village two
years ago, her motivation and
pioneering spirit hardly were
curtailed.
"This is a small, growing
community," she says. "I've seen
people here I haven't seen in 35
years. Much of the history of ray
life seems to be repeating itself in
these newly formed organizations
and seeing my energies and
efforts bring worthwhile projects
to fruition.
"This keeps me young," she
adds.
"I also brought my daughter's
parents to live at Century Vil-
lage. Louis and Rose Silbersher.
"And although there's been
some sadness since Louis didn't
live to see many of our dreams for
the synagogue evolve, there have
been many joys," Sylvia says.
"The synagogue's been the focal
point."
As Sylvia looks around the
temple to the memorial plaque
she donated in her husband's
memory and to the eternal light
she gave for last year's High
Holidays, she speaks of less
tangible rewards.
"We're answering many needs
of the people here in Century
Village and I've found a great
deal of purpose, joy and
satisfaction."
We're trying
to help make
funeral
arrangements
less complicated.
We providea listing of all available
funeral arrangements, itemized by price.
We display caskets in all price
ranges, with each price clearly indicated.
We give need-oriented counseling,
answer all questionsfully and assure
each fami ly the time and privacy they
require to reach a decision.
SUNRISE:
1171 Northwest 61st Avenue(Sunset Strip)
584-6060
HOLLYWOOD:
2230 Hollywood Boulevard/920-1010
Other Hollywood location 5801 Hollywood Boulevard
North Miami Beach, Miami Beach and Miami.
Five chapels serving the New York City Metropolitan area.
Efiiverside
Memorial Chapel. ir>c / Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
*-ll-*74.


Friday, November 26,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
lPi
age 3

Our Crowd
By Roz fleminq
Some Random Notes: I went
to see Murder By Death ... it
was murder ... by boredom! I
couldn't believe it. After all, the
film was written by Neil Simon,
my hereo, and had every name
star you can think of but I
almost fell asleep. Then I decided
to try my luck with The Ritz. The
Ritz is tacky, tawdry, tasteless,
AND, you laugh every minute! I
don't know what this goes to
prove. but there you have it.
While almost everybody else
was watching Gone With The
Wind on TV a few weeks ago, my
set was tuned to ABC and an ex-
cellent film 21 Hours to
Munich. There were minor flaws
(I could never quite accept
William Holden as a German,
and I think we should have
learned a little more about the
character of the Israeli hostages)
but it kept my attention riveted
to the screen.
There were many times I found
myself weeping as I relived the
tragic incident, but the only time
the hairs on my arms stood up
was when the Arab leader ad-
mitted that his mother was a
Jew! Which would make him
Jewish too, no? What could have
happened to such a family that
three sons would decide to not
only abandon the faith of their
mother but become its enemy!
What must that mother think of
every day for the rest of her life?
If the film is shown again ... be
sure and see it if you missed it
this time.
Citing "abuses in the funeral
industry" and a desire to conduct
burials according to strict Jewish
law and tradition, Rabbi Arnold
Goodman of the Adath Jeshurun
Synagogue in Minneapolis,
Minn., has announced plans for
the synagogue to handle deaths
completely on its own.
. The funerals, which will be
handled from beginning to end by
the members of the synagogue,
will be free! Rabbi Goodman said
members of the Chevra Kavod
Hornet Society to Honor the
Dead will handle the body
from death to burial, building an
oak coffin, sewing the natural
cotton shroud, counseling the
family and providing a limousine
for the funeral. The family must
pay only for the plot and opening
and closing of the grave. I tell
you this because when I saw this
information in the paper I
thought it was a wonderful idea
and thought I'd pass it on to you.
What do you think?
Mazel Tov to Mr. and Mrs.
Jacob Folic on the birth of their
beautiful son
I told you last time that I
missed a trip to Israel; it was the
UJA Mission "This Year In
Jerusalem," and from everything
I've heard it was an over-
whelming success.
Over 3,000 American Jews,
including many from our com-
munity, attended and were met
with such an outpouring of love
from their Israeli brothers and
sisters, that they truly realized
that "WE ARE ONE!" I only
hope there will be more such
missions and that more of us
will have a chance to go and show
our solidarity with Israel.
Happy Thanksgiving! Make it
a Jewish holiday, stuff your
turkey with potato latkes. No?
Could it hurt? (just kidding .
just kidding.
t
Libo Fineberg (left), past president of the Hebrew Day School,
presents an award to Mr. and Mrs. Alfred deBeer at the recent
Hebrew Day School dinner. Over 160 persons attended the
dinner and saw the deBeers receive an oil painting, the original
of which hangs in the Tel Aviv museum. The Hebrew Day
School is in part funded by the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. ______ .
"" Or. John 5. Sanders & Staff
INTERNATIONAL MARRIAGE CONSULTANTS
OF SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA
Seek American Jewish Wives for
Australian Jewish Gentlemen
Interviews may now be scheduled in your area in Nov. and Dec.
Through the facilities of:
INTERSTATE PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
IPS of JACKSONVILLE, INC.
3986 BLVD. CTR. DR., JAX, FLA. 32207
(904)398-8380
Authorized agents for Dr. John S. Sanders & Staff in U.S.A.
Here is a current list of a few Australian clients:
Company Manager 25, Australian Army Officer 28, Doctor of
Medicine (Research Scientist) 28, Rancher 29, Agriculturist (own
practice in animal husbandry) 29, Geologist 32, Business Proprietor
32, Operations Manager 33, Qualified Accountant and Company
Secretary 33, Government Economist 34, Construction Contractor 34,
Company Director 35, Company Director and Investor 39, Qualified
Company Secretary 39, Rancher 41, Chartered Accountant (own
practice) 44.
All of the above gentlemen have excellent incomes, own their own
homes, cars, etc. and are of impeccable character. They represent
only a small cross-section of our Australian male clientele.
American ladies of good background, with responsible life style
who are interested in marriage with an Australian gentlement, are
invited to contact IPS OF JAX, INC., to arrange an appointment for a
private and strictly confidential interview with one of our senior
consult6nts. .___________________.
RABBI LEON KRONISH
Kronish to Confer
Award on Slater
The Eleanor Roosevelt
Humanitarian Award will be pre-
sented to Fort Lauderdale civic
and Jewish community leader
Harold Slater by Dr. Leon
Kronish, national campaign co-
chairman of Israel Bonds.
The award will be conferred
upon Slater at the Inverrary
Country Club dinner-dance and
show to be held Saturday
evening, Dec. 4, at Pier 66, under
the auspices of the B'nai B'rith
Lodge No. 3002, it was an-
nounced by Sol Hechtkopf, din-
ner chairman, and Milton M.
Parson, executive director of the
South Florida Israel Bond
Organization.
The dinner dance at 7:30 p.m.
will be preceded by a cocktail
reception at 7, Hechtkopf an-
nounced.
Rabbi Kronish, spiritual leader
of Temple Beth Sholom, Miami
Beach, has traveled extensively
throughout the nation on behalf
of Israel Bonds and the United
Jewish Appeal. He is national
chairman of the Israel Bonds
Rabbinic Cabinet, national chair-
man of the board of the American
Israel Histadrut Foundation and
national vice president of the
American Jewish Congress.
The Eleanor Roosevelt Hu-
manitarian Award, which will be
presented to Slater by Rabbi
Kronish, was created by the
worldwide Israel Bond Organ-
ization to give recognition to
selected individuals who "best
exemplify the ideals and achieve-
ments of the late Eleantor Roose-
velt on behalf of humanity and
the State of Israel," according to
Parson.
An active member of the B'nai
B'rith Inverrary Lodge No. 3002,
Slater is a founder of the
Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem
and of the Einstein College of
Medicine. He is treasurer of the
Inverrary Golf Club, as well as
president of the Men's and
Women's Social Club of Greens
of Inverrary.
Among previous recipients of
the Eleanor Roosevelt Human-
itarian Award are John S.
Knight, publisher of the Miami
Herald, Dr. Henry King Stan-
ford, president of the University
of Miami, and former Supreme
Court Justice William O.
Douglas.
Dinner Chairman Sol
Hechtkopf is president of the
Inverrary B'nai B'rith Lodge and
a member of the board of gover-
nors of B'nai B'rith District No.
5.
IEVITT
memorial chapls
1W1 PtmbrokoRd
Hollywood, Flo.
524-00*7
Sonny Levitt, f.d.
1US W.DIxloHwy.
North Mloml, Flo.
^
iGolda Meir's Sister To
Speak at Breakfast
The sister of former Israel
Prime Minister Golda Meir will
be the principal speaker Sunday
morning, Dec. 5, in Temple Beth
Torah-Tamarac Jewish Center at
a community breakfast for the
United Jewish Appeal / Israel
Emergency Fund (UJA / IEF).
Clara M. Stern of Bridgeport,
Conn., younger sister of Mrs.
Meir, will address an expected
500 persons including a number
of prominent Tamarac and Fort
Lauderdale Jewish and civic
leaders.
The breakfast is set for 10 a.m.
Benjamin Bernstein, president
of Temple Beth Torah, will be the
guest of honor. Bernstein will be
cited for "outstanding service to
the Tamarac Jewish community
through his presidency of the
synagogue."
Former New York State Sen.
Samuel L. Greenberg, general
chairman of the Federation's
UJA /IEF drive, will make a
presentation to Bernstein.
George Morantz, who is active
in a number of civic and Jewish
community enterprises, among
them the Tamarac Civic Theater,
is chairman of the Tamarac UJA
campaign.
Morantz will preside and Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman will deliver
the invocation.
Mrs. Stern is a frequent visitor
to Israel and has a close relation-
ship with her sister and many of
Israel's ranking leaders among
her friends as well. Her long
association with Israel's cause
and its leaders has given her a
knowledge of the Jewish State's
problems and needs.
For many years, Mrs. Stern
was the executive director of the
United Jewish Council of Bridge-
port, an organization cor-
responding to the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale in its program and activities
of social and family service, com-
munity relations, sponsorship of
educational and cultural projects,
ind the mounting of annual fund
campaigns in behalf of the United
Jewish Appeal including support
rf its own comprehensive com-
nunity work.
Mrs. Stern helped create
Connecticut's anti-poverty
program and was instrumental in
the establishment of the State
Human Relations Commission
which has been responsible for
sponsoring legislation outlawing
discrimination in employment,
housing and public accom-
modations.
Bernstein, in his tenure as
president of Temple Beth Torah,
which is known also as the
Tamarac Jewish Center a Con-
servative synagogue has been
a key figure in the enlargement of
the building site at NW 57 th
Street/* and 88th Avenue.
Finishing touches are now being
put on the new sanctuary, which
will more than double the syna-
gogue's capacity.
Bernstein, retired, served for
22 years as a staff officer of the
Amalgamated Laundry Workers
Joint Board affiliated with the
Amalgamated Clothing Workers
of America, AFL-CIO. He retired
in June, 1971, arriving in South
Florida that year and settling in
Tamarac. He is a member of the
Blue Star Lodge of B'nai B'rith.
Planning A Trip?
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'4


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 26,1976
Some Telling Points
President Jerold C. Hoffberger made some telling
points before the 2,000 delegates to the 45th General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds meeting in Philadelphia last week. Among
them:
t Maintaining and nourishing Jewish cultural identiy;
Providing more meaningful involvement for young
people;
Reaching the "unaffiliated" segments of U.S. Jewry;
Maintaining moral pressure on the federal govern-
ment relating to matters of unemployment and national
health care;
Continuing moral pressure on the issues of Israel and
Soviet Jewry.
Not a single one of these items needs amplification In
our view, they are self-explanatory and dovetail perfectly
with the philanthropic, cultural, societal and overseas
programs of Jewish Federations across the nation.
.. .Except for this Missing One
This is no cavil. We wish, however, that some reference
were made by Hoffberger to American Jewish religious
needs.
As it is, his program suggests that the American Jewish
experience is ethnic without being spiritual, as well.
It does seem to us that those of our religious leaders are
absolutely right who. in every spectrum of Jewish faith,
from Orthodox to Reform, repeatedly warn us that the
spiritual attrition in Jewish ranks is one of the greatest
dangers to Jewish survival.
Mr. Hoffberger's overview of contemporary Jewish
needs is an excellent one except for this one oversight.
But it is a major oversight.
Easy to Explain
Kristallnacht (the Night of the Broken Glass) is an
occurrence in the wrathful history of German Nazism that
still strikes terror in the hearts of Jews long after the
event itself. Nov. 9. 1938. when at least 30.000 Jews were
arrested, 815 shops were destroyed, and 29 warehouses
and 171 dwellings set on fire.
Primarily, the Nazis ravaged 191 synagogues and
totally demolished 76 more throughout Germany.
On the 38th anniversary of that event last week, the
Nazi flag flew over Frankfurt on the smokestack of a
power station.
Posters appeared throughout the city, seemingly from
nowhere.
The point is they were signed by the National Socialist
German Workers Party, Lincoln, Nebraska. U.S.A.
Any wonder we're having trouble getting the gover-
nment to do something about deporting former Nazi
criminals, like Valerian Trifa, who now live in luxurious
ease in the United States?
The Same Boner
In his remarks on Martin Agronsky's Public Broad-
casting program about the need for the survival of Israel,
Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld pulled a boner.
But the boner was not entirely his.
Agronsky suggested that U.S. support of Israel is "a
burden that we accepted ... in terms of our national
interest,'' to which the Secretary of Defense responded:
"Exactly."
If that doesn't sound like a page torn out of the primer
of Chief of the Chiefs of Staff Gen. George Brown, then we
don't know what does.
Prior to the election. President Ford went to con-
siderable lengths to "explain" the Brown booboo about
Israel as a burden in his April 12 interview with political
cartoonist-writer Ranaan Lurie. The President's com-
ments were not only an apology for Gen. Brown.
More important, they were a refutation of what Brown
had said. Apparently, Rumsfeld hadn't heard.
THE
Jewish Floridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Suite 208 126 S. Federal Hwy., Danla, Fla 33004
r^v-SV^E^^EI^JlL-1" NE 6th *- 'K^1"1' "> MI32 Phone *
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O. Box 01-2973. Miami, Florida 33101
1 373-4608
FREDK 8HOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHETT
Executive Editor
SELM* M THOMPSON
Assistant to Publisher
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashrutr
Of The Merchandise Advertised in its Columns
Published Bl-Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Dania.fcria.
All P.O 3679 returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 01-2973, Miami. Fla. 88101,
O Fred K.Shochet Friday, November U, l7t
The Jewish Floridian hit ikorbtd Mm Jewish Unity and Mm Jewish Weakly
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association of
English Jewish Newspapers, and the F tor Ida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Yearss.oo. out of Town U|
Reejwest.
WASHINGTON Jimmy
Carter will soon begin his presi-
dential briefings. The most
sobering will be on nuclear war.
Carter will be given the best
estimate that U.S. intelligence
can produce. He'll be told that
nuclear war is unlikely. But the
world isn't as safe as its masses
may think.
The President-elect will be
warned that a breakdown in
relations between Russia and
China could lead to nuclear war-
fare. The Russians might decide
to strike before China builds up a
nuclear counterforce.
CARTER WILL also be told
that nuclear weapons may appear
in the Middle East, in the event
of a prolonged Arab-Israeli war.
The Israelis already have nuclear
warheads and the Egyptians are
developing them.
In the past, the President was
&
Foreign Policy
Briefings for Carter
shadowed wherever he went by a
warrant officer, who was ready to
spring instantly to his side with a
sum black case. This was called
"The Football." It contained the
world's most secret codes and
battleplans, which only the Pres-
ident coukl use to order a nuclear
attack.
The omnipresent warrant
officer is now considered overly
dramatic. Instead, the locked
black case is kept in the custody
of the President's military aides.
INDUSTtySPOHESHrV.
*jm>
-sty rules
fngulalion
dgainst
HieArab
boycott we bad
for our business
They no longer are required to
remain at his side. The present
rule is that they must never be
more than five minutes away
from him.
THE FOOTBALL also has a
new nickname. Now it's called
simply "the black briefcase."
Carter will be told that he may
get as little as 15 to 18 minutes'
warning of a nuclear attack. He
will then open the locked brief-
case and follow the coded
procedures.
If the terrible order should ever
come, it would be flashed to a
central command post 45 feet
underground near Omaha, Neb.
Coded instructions are ready in a
red box to send B-52 bombers
and intercontinental missiles
thundering into action.
EVEN BEFORE the Pres-
ident's signal, the military would
be following one of five "def-
cons." That's short for defense
conditions. They're numbered
one through five, with "defcon
one" the most urgent alert.
The President and the military
could also shift their command
centers to a number of fortified
alternate centers. The exact
number and equipment are
extremely secret.
But we can tell you this much:
One is located about 70 miles
northwest of Washington near
Fort Richie, Md. It has steel
blast-proof doors and the world's
most sophisticated com-
munications system.
THREE MAMMOTH planes
are also standing by to lift the
President above the nuclear de-
struction. Each plane is also a
self-contained command center.
Continued on Page 9
Hasidic Refusal Warning to Us
Friday, Nov. 26,1976
Volume 5
4 KISLEV 5737
Number 24
I am never certain if it's life
that imitates art, or art imitates
nature, but I know I read it first
in Philip Roth's short story, EU,
the Fanatic, several decades ago.
Eli Peck was talking to Leo
Tzuref, the Director of the
Yeshiva of Woddenton, N.Y.:
"You understood?" Eli said.
"It's not hard."
"It's a matter of zoning ."
and when Tzuref did not answer,
but only drummed his fingers on
his lips, Eli said, "We didn't
make the laws ."
THEY GO on to discuss the
fact that it isn't possible for
Tzuref to have a school in a resi-
dential district, while Tzuref
makes the point that it is a school
where children learn the Talmud.
Eli reiterates that they are being
taught and the response is, "The
Talmud. That's illegal?"
And so it goes until Tzuref
ends the dialogue by stating,
"We stay." And that's the way it
was.
And that's the way it is in
Monroe, N.Y., where 20 years
later the Satmarer Hasidim have
outlasted the people and govern-
ment of that town and have won
the right to incorporate 340 acres
as a self-governing village.
THEY HAVE until the end of
this month to file their plans with
a Federal judge, but based on
their record, the deadline will
mean as little as zoning laws or
other conduct accepted as proper
in the secular world.
The group of 500 Jews from the
Williamsburg section of
Brooklyn live in 25 houses and 80
garden apartments in a sub-
section development of Monroe
where they had moved their "big
Edward
Cohen
families with big problems," in
the words of their Rebbe, to
escape from the slums of New
York.
And, he added, there was no
welcome for them from their non-
Hasidic neighbors, many of them
Jews. "Lack of heart" he called
it.
On the other side was the law,
if not neighborliness. At the
heart of the dispute is the zoning
law's definition of a single family
home as a "single housekeeping
unit."
INVESTIGATION showed
that many of the houses were
converted into separate apart-
ments, the basements of apart-
ment houses used as schools and
syngogues.
"This has never been a battle
between neighborhoods, com-
munities and sociological
groups," says the town attorney.
"It's a battle over zoning."
Not so, saith the Satmarers, an
ultra-Orthodox sect which has
attacked the State of Israel's
policies in advertisements. Their
family units are large and closely
knit, they say.
A "FAMILY" includes not
only mother, father and children
but could also mean a married
son and his family, or a married
daughter and her family.
Anyone acquainted with the
breeding propensities of Hasidim
can understand what a threat
they represent to those who also
made their escape from the city,
earlier, to get away from the
slums and the over-crowded
ghettos.
AS THE Philip Roth story
rolls on (it's in the collection
titled Goodbye, Columbus), one
realizes that it's to be a futile
battle for those seeking to protect
their property and, for the Jews
who have moved to mythical
Woodenton, N.Y., their new-
found "comfort and beauty" and
serene living among the Gentiles.
In desperation, Eli Peck
suggests a compromise that will
have the town overlook the
zoning violations if Yeshivah
activities are confined to the
Yeshivah grounds, and
"Yeshivah personnel (will be)
welcomed in the streets and
stores of Woodenton provided
they are attired in clothing
usually associated with American
life in the 20th century." The
story ends with Peck having a
breakdown.
My experience with Hasidim is
quite limited and quite recent. I
am not surprised with their
victory in Monroe, N.Y., for
whether Satmarer or Lubavitcher
the belief that they alone have
the law, that in their business
dealings they are answerable only
to the Rebbe and not to those
with whom they deal, appears to
be a common denominator.
IT GOES beyond apparent
chutzpah. Whatever the merits of
this most recent example of
Hasidic refusal to be part of our
society, it is a warning of things
to come which we shall ignore at
some peril to Jewish life here and
in Israel.

HBBejjajajaejjojji


Friday. November 26,1976
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pages
Rabin's Advisor, Nesher To BvFedration women's Division
Teach Leadership Workshop Campaign Training Sessions Set
Lily Nesher, special adviser to
Israeli Prime Minister Rabin, will
be the special guest trainer at the
Leadership Training Workshop
of the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, according to
Rebecca Hodes, general cam-
paign chairman.
The session will take place on
Monday, Nov. 29, 9:30 a.m. to
2:30 pm. at the Jewish
Federation office.
The work-
shop is de-
signed to give
the leadership
in the Wo-
men's Divi-
sion campaign
a greater in-
depth aware-
ness of the
needs of the
campaign as
well as the
skills required NESHER
to translate these needs to the
women of our community. The
workshop is open only to
members of the Campaign
Cabinet, Womens' Division
Board, and Advance Gifts
Division.
Lily Nesher, a former member
of the Israeli Foreign Ministry,
was born and educated in
Bessarabia. She fled to the Soviet
Union in 1941 when Hitler in-
vaded that city and later studied
languages and history at the
University of Uralsk.
In 1946 Mrs. Nesher said she
decided that her fate lay with the
survivors of Hitler's Holocaust
so she joined the underground
and left the Soviet Union
illegally. When she arrived in
Germany she participated in the
organization of the Jewish Dis-
placed Persons in the U.S. Zone
of Germany.
When Mrs. Nesher arrived in
Israel in 1948, hostilities were
beginning and she volunteered to
join the army, where she served
as a Lieutenant in charge of the
absorption of newcomers to the
newly born State.
Mrs. Nesher joined the Israeli
Foreign Ministry at the ter-
mination of her army service. She
had several governmental
missions abroad, among them
three missions to the Soviet
Union, the last just before the
Yom Kippur War.
'>
Louella Shapiro Will Address
Annual Haassah Luncheon Dec. 8
Louella Shapiro, area major
gifts chairman for the National
Board of Hadassah, will update
the progress of Hadassah's
medical program of research,
healing and teaching in Israel, for
members and guests attending
the annual luncheon given by the
North Broward Chapter of
Hadassah at the Inverrary
Country Club, Wednesday, Dec.
8. according to chapter president,
Betty Gerber.
In addition to this portrayal of
the Hadassah Medical Organ-
ization, Fran Sindell, vice pres-
ident and luncheon chairman, has
announced an entertainment
program.
Marion Roy, song stylist, who
has performed in New York, and
for the past seven years in clubs
throughout South Florida, will
present a program of songs.
The luncheon will also mark
Hadassah's sixty-fifth birthday,
and Esther Cannon, vice pres-
ident of the Florida Region of
Hadassah, will offer a tribute on
this occasion.
Mrs. Shapiro has just returned
from her eighteenth trip to Israel
where she and her husband were
honored during the Double Dedi-
cation Tour, for the establish-
ment of the Shapiro Cancer Re-
search Fund, housed in the new
Ullman Building in Jerusalem.
A winner of many awards,
Mrs. Shapiro, of Miami Beach, is
LOUELLA SHAPIRO
completing her twentieth year of
service on the National Board
and will be joining the Honorary
Council.
She was twice selected as
Woman of the Year in her
hometown, Atlanta, Ga., where
she was active in the American
Red Cross, Cancer Society, Girl
Scout Council, and the League of
Women Voters.
Invocation at the luncheon will
be offered by Sylvia Thaler, co-
president of the Aviva Group,
and the benediction at the close
will be made by Regina Neiman,
president of the Chapter's newest
group, Scopus.
Tickets for this event are avail-
able from the HMO chairman of
each group.
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The Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale will hold a city-
wide worker training meeting on
Friday, Dec. 3, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. at the Jewish Federation
office, according to Rebecca
Hodes, general campaign chair-
man of the Women's Division.
Mrs. Hodes announced that
Marilyn Smith, past president of
the Miami Jewish Federation's
Women's Division, will be the
guest trainer.
Over 200 women from all of the
major areas are expected to
attend the meeting and receive a
briefing on the needs of the cam-
paign and learn the necessary
skills required to have a suc-
cessful campaign. All questions
and problems concerning ef-
fective campaigning will be
answered.
Anyone interested in attending
this session and working in the
1977 Women's Division cam-
paign may contact the Jewish
Federation office.
Anita Perlman is president of
the Women's Division; Rebecca
Hodes is general campaign chair-
man; and Marilyn Gould, Sue
Segaul and Terri Baer are
members of the campaign
executive committee.
Synagogue To Welcome Rabbis
Members and guests of the Re-
constructionist Synagogue will
celebrate Thanksgiving and
Shabbat evening services on
Friday, Nov. 26 at 8 p.m.
Joining them in the Sanctuary,
in the Mark IV Building, Plan-
tation, will be a student from the
Reconstructionist Rabbinical
College who will participate in
conducting services and making
a presentation during the study
session.
On Dec. 3, the synagogue
will welcome an honorary
member, Lavy Becker, Rabbi
Emeritus of the Reconstruction-
ist Synagogue of Montreal.
Rabbi Becker serves on the
World Executive of the World
Jewish Congress and is the
honorary consultant of Inter-
Community Affairs. In that role
he has been responsible for
contact between the Jewish Com-
munity in Cuba and the World
Jewish Congress.
He is also involved in the
Jewish Teachers Seminary and
the Zionist Organization of
Canada.
Louis Koch, vice president of
the Sunrise Jewish Center and
a leader on behalf of many
community services, will be
the recipient of the Israel Sol-
idarity Award at a Night in
Israel under the auspices of
the Sunrise Lakes Phase II
Israel Bond committee on
Wednesday, Dec. 8, 8 p.m. at
the Sunrise Lakes Phase II
Club House.
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 26,1976
JCC Begins Second Year
By BILL GOLDSTEIN,
JCC Director
The first year of programming
at the JCC is over and it appears
by all standards that our pro-
grams have been well received.
We share great pride in our
young institution and have
pledged to continue to plan
creative, enjoyable activities for
the community.
Our first phase of operation
completed, we look toward the
future and expansion of services.
We have begun to offer ac-
tivities for the entire family. Pre-
school, elementary age, teens,
adults, and senior adults. We
have gained good experience and
are beginning to know what our
community expects of us.
We have attracted a pro-
fessional staff who is developing
programs within the context of a
difficult facility. We are now
planning a review of all our pro-
grams, and the leaders of our
Greater Fort Lauderdale Jewish
community will shortly develop a
"master plan" for the growth of
our institution to meet the
changing needs of the com-
munity.
Our purposes and objectives
Jewish Comm
W*, rert Lalei
EINf Director
2999 H.W. 33rd A van
BILL GOLDSTEIN
continue to be to bring Jews
together to become involved with
Jewish life in our community. We
have the staff and facilities for
participation in educational,
recreational, social and cultural
activities. We urge you to join us.
We now face the task of
implementing the next phase of
our work. The task is great and
demanding; but the goals are
attainable and rewarding.
For your children, your com-
munity and yourselves, join us in
building our Jewish Community
Center.
Multi-Media Production
To be Sponsored by JCC
"Here Is Israel," a multi-media
musical production, will be pre-
sented at Temple Beth Israel on
Saturday, Dec. 18 at 8 p.m. under
the sponsorship of the Jewish
Community Center as part of a
coast-to-coast tour.
"Peace" is the theme of this
year's production. Children's
poetry set to music against a
background of colorful drawings
on the subject of peace will be a
highlight.
The production has been
specially prepared for audiences
in this country with the partici-
pation of Israeli performers.
Fifteen singers, musicians and
stage technicians make up the
company which represents a
cross-section of Israel Kibbutz
members, city dwellers, im-
migrants and Sabras, Army
officers and civilians. Special
scenery and film sequences blend
with the songs.
Tickets are on sale at JCC.
"Here is Israel" comes to Fort Lauderdale Saturday, Dec. 18 at
9 p.m.
JCCClub Announces
Upcoming Events
The Adult Jewish Community
Club has set its next event for
Nov. 30.
The club, with a membership of
almost 400, has planned to attend
the Sea Ranch Dinner Theater.
Other upcoming plans include
a Chanukah Celebration and
December meeting, an ice show in
January and a week-long trip to
New Orleans in February.
Officers and board members
include Sol Brenner, president;
Mitchell Colman, vice president;
Barney Moldofsky, treasurer;
Viola Melnick, secretary; Shirley
Shinkin, trip coordinator: Larry
Feigenbaum, program chairman:
Murray Gompers, lecture series
chairman; Sarah Benowitz, hos-
pitality chairman; Freda Feld,
newsletter; Henry Kahn. Sun-
shine Committee chairman; Hy
Kaplan, publicity chairman; and
Oscar Goldstein, Speaker's
Bureau chairman.
Athletic Director Larry Berkley teaches the Friday morningdanct
attended by 25 women. The class is followed by refreshments and t
W\ 9 J
1 M M
L- T B^P
il^ J 1
Attention Co lieg
The Jewish Community Center i
including a Coffee House Mixer
ring, for college students in the Gr|
and for students coming home for th
Hates arc Dae. 20 and 27 at Br30p|
For information and to submi
contacted, call Ira Rlumcnthnl ;ii
wir
Sandy Jackowitz, JCC Program Supervisor, recently presented
Lil and Sol Brenner with the Outstanding Service Award. The
couple has taught classes, lectured and entertained groups in
the year since the JCC has opened.
Every Tuesday evening from 7:15 to 9:15p.m., sixth, seventh,
and eighth graders socialize, dance and play ping-pong at the
Tween Lounge. Pictured above are some tweens showing their
arts and crafts work. The class is taught by andy Brandt.
* Photo and Movie Clubi
If you are interested in a Teen Movie Club or Camera Club to
learn and practice making art films, documentaries, and art
photography, call Ira or Helen at the JCC.
AU- P6P0ftJM4*/ce Hf; *T f=T iA\)0e*S)M
Ticwtts (, taut. o. 4 ; *l* "ffl
nd*r.
..
Shooting pool at the JCC Tween Center are Brian Antonoff,
Ivan Antonoff and Kim Fields.
A*0 **'
'V
PLEASE Sewo m .
________Tickers < 4(>- EM
h JfWKH CoMMd/VlTY CfNTSfi
miniiiiiiniiiuu


jy, November 26,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
I
nity Center
Editor HARRIET PIRER, Coed if or
erdalo Phone 1484-8200
g iance-exercise program
ts and begins at 10 a. m.
lege Students
planning social activities,
h entertainment and dan-
adr Fort Lauderdale area,
winter vacation.
os of students to be
484-8200.
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cntuT
JCC Dancers Appear At Holiday Park Show
The "Around the World"
Dancers of the JCC of Lauderdale
Lakes, led by Bea and Phil
Statnick, represented the Center
at the recent Holiday Park Prom-
enade.
The group performed six
dances, three from Israel and one
each from Scotland, Poland and
Greece.
The Beginners class in folk,
square, round and fun dancing
will be held on Tuesdays from
11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. as soon
as the class is filled.
BEA and PHIL STATNICK
New Classes Begin
Three Ulpanim (conversational Hebrew), instructor
Rachel Keller; ESP (para-psychology), instructor Ethne
Chesterman; Folk Dance, instructors Bea and Phil
Statnick: Adult Art. instructor Celia Freed.
Call JCC for registration and information.
JCC Chanukah Party
JCC will hold its second annual Chanukah Party on
Thursday. Dec. 16 at 1 p.m. at Temple Emanu-El. There
will be a candle-lighting ceremony officiated by Rabbi
Goor. a one-act play presented by the Yiddish Theatre
Group, a sing-along, latkes and gifts for everyone. Tickets
can be purchased at the JCC.
JCC art specialist Sandy Brandt instructs Scott Gumora, Scott
Surokoff and Andy Cohen at a recent Tween Workshop.
New Pre-School Gets
Underway at JCC
The new Pre-School Group,
taught by Arline Kline, Sandy
Brandt, and Debbie Heller, is
held on Monday and Friday from
10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and Wed-
nesday from 1 to 3 p.m. A child
may attend all three or any
combination.
The children are presently
involved with crafts, art, dance,
singing, Jewish cultural projects
and music.
PLEASE HELP US!
JCC needs an adding
machine, a typewriter and
card tables. If you have any of
these items in usable condition
and would like to donate them
to the JCC, please call Helen
at the office.
Kids Korner
The first semester of the 1976-
1977 JCC After-School Enrich-
ment Program for kindergarten
through fifth grade will soon be
coming to an end. The final
session will take place the week of
Dec. 13.
The second semester will begin
the week of Jan. 10 and continue
through May. A new program
and format is being prepared.
Nova Elementary Students: A
program at Tropical Elementary
School in Plantation from 4 to
5:30 p.m. is planned.
Especially for Children Cul-
tural Series: Nov. 26 is "Rip Van
Winkle," a contemporary
musical.
Ruth Foreman's adaptation of
the classic updates Rip's sleep
from 1876 to 1976. After falling
asleep in the year 1876, Rip
awakens at the foothills of the
Catskills in Liberty, N.Y., to find
the modern world. Andy Yel-
vington, a nightclub entertainer,
plays Rip.
On Dec. 29 is "Red Shoes,"
Feb. 27 "Alice in Wonderland -
Updated," and on April 6 is Ivan
Kivitt's Merry-Go-Round Play-
house.
Winter Wonderland Day
Camp: A Camp program is being
offered to kindergarten through
fifth grade children on Tuesday,
Dec. 21, Wednesday, Dec. 22 and
Thursday, Dec. 23. Three full
days from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. are
planned with special crafts, ath-
letic projects, Hebrew singing,
film presentations, trips to Port
Everglades and to an orange
grove.
Vacation Trip Program: Three
trips will be held on Monday,
Dec 27 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, Dec. 28, 9 a.m. to 4
p.m., and Wednesday, Dec. 29
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The first trip will be ice skating
and then to T-Y Park for lunch.
The Science Museum of Palm
Beach and Children's Zoo will
host a group on Tuesday and
Holiday Park for sports and
games and then "Red Shoes" at
the Children's Theater is sched-
uled for Wednesday.
Teen Topics
TWEEN CENTER
Tuesdays from 7:15-9:15 p.m. Dancing, arts and crafts,
yoga, table-top games, and preparations for a dramatic
performance.
JEAN SCENE LOUNGES
Sunday evenings, Dec. 5 and Dec. 19, for ages 14-17.
Live music, dancing, refreshments.
TEEN ART WORKSHOP
Every Thursday from 7-9 p.m. Macrame, tie-dying,
jewelry making and ceramics.
Teens interested in gymnastics, guitar classes, feminine
awareness, exercise and jogging class, or mode-n dance,
call Ira or Helen at the JCC.
Some of the 60 tweens at the Tween Center at the JCC.
(Sl**'6T>~)
'Sunny Landsman, Yiddish'
Theatre director, holds a
Chanukah menorah in tribute
to the upcoming play.
ffnai B'rith Youth AZABBG executive board meets at JCC to plan future activites.


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 26,1976
Women's Division Campaign Cabinet*
.1
Marilyn Gould (left), first vice chairman of the 1977 Federation
Women's Division Campaign; Anita Perlman, president of the
Women's Division; and Rebecca Hodes, general campaign
chairman at a recent Campaign Cabinet meeting.
Elsie Samet (left), cochairman of Point of Americas Federation
Women's Division Campaign; Shirley Rudolph, cochairman
Woodlands; and Mitchie Libros, chairman Woodlands.
Campaign Cabinet members Helen Lidsky (seated from left),
chairman Inverrary; Lillian Hirsch, cochairman Palm-Aire;
Gail Capp (standing left), chairman Sabra Division; Ruth
Portes, chairman Palm-Aire; and Edith Lipson, cochairman
Palm-Aire.
Mimi Bederman (left), cochairman of Northeast; Ruth Pine,
chairman Northeast; and Eleanor Shapiro, cochairman Point of
Americas, at Campaign Cabinet meeting.
Day School Students Visit Nursing Home


Campaign Cabinet members Hildreth Levin (seated from left),
chairman Gait; Ann Schneller, cochairman Gait; (standing left)
Pola Brodzki, cochairman Advanced Gifts; and Rosa Adler,
chairman Advanced Gifts, pose for picture at recent meeting.

._, bpotm.....T0*mmtmmm*mm i.....
The five-, six- and seven-year-
old children of the Hebrew Day
School of Fort Lauderdale visited
the Place for Living Nursing
Home recently and presented a
program of Hebrew songs to the
residents.
Some of the songs were prayers
set to music, Chassidic songs,
Sabbath songs and modern
Israeli songs. These songs were
learned as part of the children's
Judaic program at the Day
School.
Mrs. Tikva SuVerman, a
teacher at the Hebrew Day
School of Fort Lauderdale, ac-
companied the children on the
guitar.
With the children were their
teachers, some parents and the
director of the school.
Rabbi Leonard Zoll. director of
chaplaincy of the Jewish Feder-
ation of Fort Lauderdale who
USY Sete Reunion
The 25th Anniversary Reunion
Celebration for USY will be held
on Thursday, Dec. 30, at Temple
Beth Shalom, Hollywood, at 7:30
p.m.
The event will feature
cocktails, a catered reception,
music and a chance to see old
friends.
Julie Silverman in Broward
County and Tom Mann in Dade
County are reservations chair-
people.
attends to the spiritual needs of
the residents, conducted a
Sabbath service in which the
children participated.
Moshe Zwang, director of the
school, noted that the school's
doors are always open to visitors.
We do business
the right way.
1700 W.Oakland Park Blvd.,
Ft. Lauderdale, Fit. 33311
Phone: 7351330
OAKLAND TOYOTA
Emanu-El
Activities
Rabbi Leonard S. Zoll, director
of education and chaplain of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, will be the
guest speaker at Sabbath Eve
Services on Nov. 26, at Temple
Emanu-El, Fort Lauderdale,
starting at 8:15 p.m.
On Nov. 28 Rabbi Joel S. Goor,
spiritual leader of Temple
Emanu-El, will appear on The
Still Small Voice, Channel 7 at 10
a.m.
be
/ay
The Sisterhood of Temple
Emanu-El will hold its annual
Chanukah Sale at the temple on
Sunday, Dec. 5 and Sunday, Dec.
12 from 9 a.m. to noon.
The Judaica Shop will be
stocked with menorahs, dreidels,
gelt, toys, coloring books,
Chanukah decorations and
streamers, jewelry and gifts
appropriate for the holiday
season.
The Evening Sisterhood of
Temple Emanu-El has scheduled
their next meeting for Tuesday,
Dec. 14, in the temple all-purpose
room, starting at 7:30 p.m.
Susan Lebow Weinberg, a
lawyer and vice president of
NOW (National Organization of
Women), will be the guest
speaker and her topic is "Women
In Today's World."
Future programs and projects
will be discussed breifly. Refresh-
ments will be served.
The Sisterhood of Temple
Emanu-El has scheduled its
Sixth Annual Antiques Show and
Sale for Dec. 7, 8 and 9, at the
temple auditorium.
Hours of the sale will be
Tuesday and Wednesday from 11
a.m. to 10 p.m. and Thursday
from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thirty dealers from various
areas of the country will be on
hand with a wide array of an-
tiques and collectibles, ranging
from china and glass to silver,
jewlry and furniture.
Home-cooked food will be
served for luncheons, dinners or
snacks prepared by Sisterhood
members.
Someone
hospitalized?
Bring
them home
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Recuperation at home is often
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November 26,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
Carter Foreign
Policy Briefing
Continued from Page 4
President could run the
atry and the war from
[of these planes.
Lt the bottom line is the
laity estimate. The latest es-
le, Carter will be told, is that
fuclear attack will kill 130
[ion to 135 million Americans.
these figures don't take into
jiunt the people who would fail
lurvive in the stone-age, radio-
Tve chaos following the war.
lEER'S FOLLY: Twenty
Iths ago, Duane Freer took
bontrols of a DC-3 aircraft in
ais, Pa. He had never flown
But he wanted to chalk up
flight time. So he urged the
to turn the controls over to
He pilot could hardly refuse
ne Freer. He was regional di-
ir of the Federal Aviation
Ministration, in charge of en-
ig air safety in the East.
ie DC-3, with Freer at the
rols. crashed on take-off.
fvn people were hurt, four
;>usly. The plane was
oyed.
IE OFFICIAL report on the
^ent said the occupants were
The crash could have
caused a fire, which would
killed most of them. The
also charged that the crash
kbly occurred because of
s inexperience.
What did the Federal Aviation
Administration do with Freer?
He was transferred to Washin-
ton. Associates describe it as a
promotion.
He is now a policymaker,
helping to set future safety stan-
dards for the aviation industry.
OTHER CANDIDATES: The
voters in the Washington, D.C.,
metropolitan area are among the
most politically astute in the
nation. But even many of them
were apathetic about Carter and
Ford.
So numerous voters sub-
stituted write-in candidates. One
voter chose Dracula's father as
. president and Dracula's son as
vice president.
Another wanted to give the top
job to Captain Kangaroo and he
picked Oswald the Rabbit as his
man for the vice presidency.
PILE OF PAPER: Americans
have sensed for some time that
they are being buried under an
avalanche of paper from the
federal government.
But it's still startling to hear
the actual facts and figures.
According to a confidential
White House study, Uncle Sam
spends $20 billion a year to push
paper. Government agencies
print 10 billion sheets of paper a
year.
Stack it all up and you would
have a mountain with a volume of
4.25 million cubic feet.
Council of Europe Adopts
uti-Terror Convention
I PARIS (JTA) The representatives of the foreign
Esters of the Council of Europe" member states un-
inusly adopted a European convention against terrorism.
| representatives, meeting in Strasbourg, approved a test
hoarding 'political motivations" as an excuse for terrorist
land calling upon all signatories of the convention to ex-
|te or locally try terrorists.
HE CONVENTION, presented by West Germany, needs
latification of the governments of three member states to
po law. The convention describes in great detail terrorist
ind provides for police and judicial cooperation among the
)er states to prevent them.
Everything
About IT* Is
Choice!
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Labor Party Plans Campaign
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
group of Labor Party intel-
lectuals, writers and
academicians met at Kibbutz
Beth Hashita over the weekend
for a discussion of means to
reverse what they consider the
party's alarming deterioration
and the alienation of its leader-
ship from the rank and file.
With national elections just
about a year away, the meeting
was taken seriously by political
circles within the Labor Party,
some of whom viewed the
gathering as an incipient revolt.
PARTICIPANTS agreed to
work for change within the Labor
movement. But they warned the
party leadership that "our votes
are not in your pocket. We may
abstain."
They also called for a mass
meeting of leaders of the various
Labor-sponsored settlement and
kibbutz movements and local
workers' committee heads to
discuss the party's future and to
restore its former strength and
positive image.
Their assessment of the Labor
Party's present condition was
best summed up in the slogan of
the meeting, "Things can't go on
like this."
THE MEETING waa at-
tended, among others, by Nahum
Sarig, a veteran kibbutz .leader
and officer in the Security Ser-
vices; writers Chaim Ghoury, S.
Izhar and Chanoch Bartov;
journalists Azarya Alon and
Nathan Shaham, and Prof.
Abraham Wachman.
They called for election reforms
that would make elected officials
more accountable to the elec-
torate, an end to the internal rifts
that have demoralized the party
and undermined its integrity, and
an end to the condition in which
the party leadership is totally
detached from its constituency.
Some of the speakers ex-
pressed doubts that any
meaningful changes can be
brought about. Others charged
that the situation within Israel's
governing party is responsible for
continuing labor strife and for the
rising incidence of fraud and cor-
ruption on the part of high of-
ficials.
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'/
Paf* 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 26,1976
I
=*.
Medical Center Adds Cancer Wing Hadassah Chapter Temple Men's Club Elects Officers
Maxl ISets Next Meeting
Upon completion, the 100,000-
sqiiare-foot addition to the
Florida Medical Center will house
the cancer treatment, cardio-
vascular and cardiopulmonary
rehabilitation centers.
The cancer treatment center
will contain two six-million volt
linear accelerators and one 18-
million volt accelerator, which are
capable of providing small
radiation beams for highly
localized exposure to malignant
tissues.
According to Dr.
Dauer, Florida Medical Center
president, the three treatment
rooms housing the accelerators
will employ a new design con-
cept: Large windows will over-
look a garden with subtropical
flowers and plants.
"We feel it is extremely im-
portant to provide a setting
which will make the patient as
physically and emotionally com-
fotable as possible during the
treatment period," Dr. Dauer
said.
Sunrise Center Sets Meeting For Dec.2
Fort Lauderdale Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its monthly
meeting on Monday, Dec. 6, at
Castle Recreation Center,
Lauderhill, at 12:30 p.m.
Bea Gaynor, program chair-
man, has arranged for "The
Cypress Chasettes" from
Cypress Chase "Condo A" to
entertain with Israel dances.
Also, at this meeting, a
discussion on the significance of
Chanukah will take place.
At a recent meeting the Men's
Club of Temple Sholom of Pom-
pano Beach elected officers. The
new officers are as follows:
Peter Osman, president: Harry
Mendelsohn, vice president; Dr.
Milton Isaacson, secretary and
Sidney Harris, treasurer.
Board of directors are Nathan
Baum, Maurice Gan, Ben
Greaser, Leonard Kinker, Stanley
Rubel, Joseph Shore, Marvin
Stone and Harry Treu.
Sam Weidenfeld is Program
Committee chairman and Social
Committee Chairmen are Saul
The Sunrise Jewish Center will'
hold its next meeting on
Thursday, Dec. 2 at 1 p.m. at the
Gold Key Recreation Center.
Officers will be elected for 1977
and a progress report on the
status of the proposed temple will
be given.
Men's Club Elects Officers
Hadassah Group Plans Brunch for Members
Temple Shalom's Vestry Room,
Pompano Beach.
The
A paid-up membership brunch
for Golda Meir Group of the
North Broward Chapter of
Hadassah will be held on
Wednesday, Dec. 15 at 11 a.m. in
The newly organized Men's
Club of Temple Sholom held its
first election recently and Peter
Osman was elected president and
Harvey Mendelson was elected
vice president.
The next men's club meeting, a
dinner meeting, will be held at
the temple on Thursday, Dec. 2,
at 8 p.m.
A pre-holiday bazaar will be
held at the temple from Dec. 11 to
Dec. 13.
program will feature
Esther Richman and her Israeli
dancers.
Herzl Hadassah Setsi League for Israel
Meeting Agenda
ORT Sets Art Auction Day School Offers
The Sunverrary Chapter of
Women's American ORT
(Organization for Rehabilitation
through Training) will present an
Art Auction on Saturday, Nov.
The Herzl Group of Hadassah,'
West Broward, will hold its next
meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 8 at
1 p.m. at the Tamarac Jewish
Center.
Sol Robinson will discuss the
coming holiday of Chanukah.
On Dec. 13, the group will hold
a paid-up membership luncheon
at Temple Beth Israel, Lauder-
dale Lakes.
Shalom Singles Plan^
Picnic in Boca Raton
The Shalom Singles of the
Jewish Community Center, Fort
Lauderdale, will have a picnic on
Dec. 5 at the Spanish River Park
in Boca Raton.
The group meets every
Thursday evening at 8 o'clock at
theJCC.
Betty Di Giacomo is vice
president of the club.
Lauderdale Bonds
Events Slated
The Israel Solidarity Award i
will be presented to the Unit
Owners Association of Sunrise
Lakes Phase HI at a Night in
Israel, Tuesday evening, Nov. 30,
at 8 o'clock, under the auspices of
the South Florida Israel Bond
Organization.
Emil Cohen, American Jewish
folk humorist, will be the guest
entertainer at the event which
will take place at Temple Beth
Israel.
Chairman Harry Leibowitz has
announced that two buses will be
provided for free transportation
to and from Temple Beth Israel
starting at 7 p.m. on the night of
the event. One bus will leave from
Satellite 1 and one from Satellite
2 on a continuous basis. The last
trip will leave for the temple at
7:45 p.m. from each place. At the
end of the evening, the buses will
provide return transportation.
Tribute to the heroes of
Entebbe will be paid by residents
of Century Village at a Night in
Israel, Monday, Dec 6 at 7:30
p.m., in the Administration
Building Temple.
The event will be held under
the auspices of the Century Vil-
lage Israel Bonds Committee,
with Irving R. Friedman as
chairman.
Friedman announced that the
program will be headed by
humorist Emil Cohen, who has
visited Israel a number of times
and conferred with Israeli leaders
on his moat recent visit there.
_, TT ,j mm ,. 27 at the International Village
10 LlOla Meeting Club House of Inverrary at 7:30
p.m.
The Women's League for
Israel, Margate Chapter, will
hold its regular meeting at the
Congregation Beth Hillel on
Tuesday, Nov. 30 at 12:30 p.m.
New members *|re welcome.
Refreshments will be served.
Speakers, Shows
The Hebrew Day School of
Fort Lauderdale will provide
speakers plus a sound and light
show to interested organizations.
Contact Moshe Zwang at the
Hebrew Day School.
Sholom USY Begins Membership
Drive, Plans Car Wash
Kadimah Hadassah
Sets HMO Benefit
Kadimah Chapter of Hadas-
sah, Century Village, is planning
a Hadassah Medical Or-
ganization (HMO) luncheon at
Inverrary Country Club on Dec.
8.
All proceeds go to HMO.
Kadimah will hold a general
meeting and Chanukah cele-
bration on Dec. 20.
The United Synagogue Youth
of Temple Sholom in Pompano
has begun a membership drive.
The group is made up of boys
and girls ages 13 to 18, from
Junior through Senior High
School.
The group has professional
leadership for guidance.
The USY of Temple Sholom
will be holding a car wash at the
Exxon Gas Station on U.S. 1 and
Atlantic Boulevard on Sunday,
Nov. 28, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Steinberg and Barry'
The next meeting of the Men's
Club will be held on Thursday
evening, Dec. 2 at 8 p.m. The
lecture will be "The Jewish
Attitude Toward Se "
Workmen's Circle
Plans Next Meet
The next monthly meeting of
Branch No. 1046 of the Work-
men's Circle of Greater Lauder-
dale will take place on Wed- *
nesday, Dec. 1 at 7:30 p.m. atth*
Roark Recreation Center. 'her
The program will feature
Irving Tabachnikoff discussing
the "History of Yiddish" and a
Chanukah celebration with Bea
Eisenstat.
The Broward-Palm Beach
Workmen's Circle reunion lun-
cheon and dance will be held at
the Reef Restaurant on Saturday,
Dec. 4 at 11:30 a.m.
NCJW to Open
Thrift Shop Dec. 6
The Plantation Unit of the
National Council of Jewish
Women, will open a Thrift Shop
during the week of Dec. 6
through Dec. 10.
It will be located in Jacarandi y^Tl
Plaza, on West Sunrise
Boulevard, and the hours will be
10 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily.
The shop will feature new and
used merchandise including a
special plant and children's
boutique.
B'naiB*rith Women To View Movie Dec. 8
A meeting of the B'nai B'rith
Women Lakes Chapter No. 1513
will be held on Wednesday after-
noon, Dec. 8, at 1 p.m. at City
Hall in Lauderdale Lakes.
A film entitled "Rendezvous
for Freedom" will be shown. It
concerns the migration from
Europe to America for freedom.
Members may bring friends.
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has very original architecture.
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1
riday, November 26,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
Demonstrators Protest
800 Nazi Supporters
[BONN (JTA) About 300 demonstrators marches
\ough Mannheim to protest a rally of about 800 Nazi sup-
rters, many of whom wore black shirts and Nazi insignias.
L pro-Nazi group handed out literature praising Hitler and
Ler Nazi leaders and claiming that it was a myth that the
Izis were responsible for the extermination of six million
ra.
lefore the rally began, police confiscated a stone memorial
scribed "Glory to Our Dead War Heroes." They also seized a
eath for Col. Joachim Peiper, a convicted Nazi war criminal
sumed to have died in a fire at his home in a French village
[July.
(HE MANNHEIM City Council had banned the rally, but
Karlsruhe Court had approved the meeting provided the
jie memorial was not unveiled.
[he unveiling had been planned by the tiny ultra-rightist
[man People's Union Party, whose leader, Gerhard Frei,
I, "Other countries can honor their fighting heroes. Why
twe?"
[e charged that France had asked the German government
in the demonstration.
^EANWHILE, West Berlin police said they seized a bust of
er and a machinegun in a raid on an apartment where 13
Lie were planning to set up a neo-Nazi party.
Mice said the group planned to establish a West Berlin
Ich of the outlawed National Socialist German Workers
b'-
Madrid Jews are Threatened
By 'Sixth Commando' Order
[PARIS Several members of Madrid's Jewish community have
Ived death threats from an extremist group calling itself "The
If Hitler Sixth Commando of the New Order," according to reports
ring here. While a Jewish spokesman for Madrid's 3,000-member
Ish community declined to reveal the names of those who received
threats or how many, the newspaper El Pais in that city said that
pst four Jews and several non-Jews were targets.
Israel, EEC in Talks
For Industrial Cooperation
IRUSALEM (JTA) Dr. Moshe Mandelbaum, di-
)r of the Ministry of Commerce and Industry, left for
ssels to continue talks with the EEC over a series of
sements with Israel.
phe talks were interrupted 10 days ago, after the proposals
^e by the representatives of the market could not have been
)ted by Israel.
Jews Rapped for Angering Reds
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Nahum Goldmann,
president of the World
Jewish Congress, has criti-
cized American Jewry for
antagonizing the Soviet
Union over the Jewish emi-
gration issue.
He said that he agreed
with Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger that
the adoption of the Jack-
son-Vanik Amendment
caused the present decrease
in Jewish emigration from
the USSR.
GOLDMANN'S remarks were
made in response to questions
from Rabbi William Berkowitz
during the Dialogue '76 lecture
series at Manhattan's Congre-
gation B'nai Jeshurun.
The WJC leader said that the
Jews in the United States should
continue their propaganda for the
right of Jewish emigration from
the Soviet Union as well as for
Jewish cultural, educational and
religious rights within the USSR.
But Goldmann stressed that he
opposed such "extreme"
methods as comparing the Soviet
Union to Hitler's Germany,
picketing and violence against
Soviet diplomats. He said that
the Soviet Union is still one of the
three major powers in the world
and Jews must maintain dip-
lomatic relations with it.
GOLDMANN said he was also
concerned that American Jewry
stressed its public role too much
while not concentrating on its
religious, cultural and
educational life, which he said
was essential for Jewish survival.
He said in this connection that
he had always been concerned
that the leadership of American
Jewry was dominated by the
wealthy.
He said that American Jewish
intellectuals feel they cannot
participate in the Jewish leader-
ship because they cannot afford
the necessary financial con-
tributions.
ASKED ABOUT the Middle
East, Goldmann said that now
was the most opportune time for
the United States to seek to bring
about a final peace settlement
Nazis Mark'Crystal Night' j Bar
BONN (JTA) A Nazi flag flew briefly over Frankfurt
Nov. 9, the 38th anniversary of Crystal Night when Nazi mobs
went on an anti-Jewish rampage. Frankfurt police said that
unidentified persons raised the flag on the smokestack of a
power station where Nazi literature was found pasted to the
door at the base of the 150-foot-high tower.
Nazi posters were also found glued on ticket vending
machines, lampposts and walls in other parts of Frankfurt.
They said: "We are here again. Red Front perish. Don't buy
from Jews." The posters were signed National Socialist Ger-
man Workers Party, Foreign Organization, Box 6414, Lincoln,
Nebraska. U.S A.
POLICE ARE investigating the incident. Following the
incident, Heinz Galinski, chairman of the Berlin Jewish com-
munity, speaking at a meeting of the European Council of
Jewish Communities, which was conducting a memorial service
to commemorate Crystal Night, demanded that the govern-
ment clamp down on neo-Nazi provocations.
"The government and the democratic parties should
concern themselves more seriously and basically than hitherto
with the provocative activities of the neo-Nazi circles."
Mitzvah!
CAREY STANGER
Carey, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Lewis Stanger, will be called to
the Torah on the occasion of his
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, Nov.
27 at Temple Sholom, Pompano
Beach.
LAWRENCE LUBONNE
Lawrence, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Terry H. Lubonne, will be called
to the Torah on the occasion of
his Bar Mitzvah on Saturday,
Nov. 27 at 9 a.m. at the Margate
Jewish Center.
The celebrant's teacher, Cantor
Max Gallub, will officiate.
After the service, Mr. and Mrs.
Lubonne will sponsor the Kid-
dush in Lawrence's honor.
iNDLELIGHTING
TIME
5:11
KISLEV-5737
*
figious Directory
-OUTLAUDERDALE
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
kland Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
iti. Cantor Maurice Neu (42).
fcNU-EL TEMPLE, 342$ W. Oak-
Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Joel
Cantor Jerome Klement.
IW CONGREGATION OF
JtRHILL, 2041 NW 4th Avt.,
III. Conservative. Irvinf
, president.
JEWISH CENTER. 910*
St. Conservative. Rabbi
immerman (44A).
ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
|rling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
timer (52).
SYNA-
tUCTIONIST
73 NW 4th St.
PLANTATION
>N JEWISH CONGREGA-
i s. Nob Hill Rd. Liberal Re-
i Sheldon J.Harr(M).
IMPANO BEACH
1MPLE. 132 SE 11th Ave.
live. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
sbRenier (4)
MARGATE
.LEL CONGREGATION.
ite Blvd. Conservative,
rd Golembe and Charles
[JEWISH CENTER. *I01
[Conservative. Cantor Max
I).
tALSPRINGS
EMPLE. 3721 NW 100th
Rabbi Max weiti (44).
(FIELD BEACH
IMUNITY CENTER -
tAEL SYNAGOGUE.
e East. Conservative.
I Be rent (42).
community
oojenoor
NOV. 26
Childrens Cultural Series
JCC 1 p.m.
NOV. 27
Tennis Party
Plantation Jewish Congregation
NOV. 28
Men's Club Show at
Temple Beth Israel
Anna Maria Alberghetti
Tay-Sachs Testing Program
DEC. 4
Sisterhood of Temple Sholom
Chanukah Party
Hebrew Day School
Art Auction 8 p.m.
DEC. 5
Temple Beth Israel Men's Club
Show Jan Murray 7:30 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El Chanukah Sale
9 a.m.- 11:30 a.m.
Temple Sholom
Jewish National Fund 7 p.m.
Plantation National Council of
Jewish Women mini-thrift shop
6 p.m. 10 p.m.
DEC. 7
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood Antique
Show Dec. 7 and 9, 10 a.m. 9:30 p.m
Palm-Aire Ladies Golf Tournament
Dinner and Fashion show,
men and women evening.
Women's American ORT
Broward chapter School building
luncheon at Bahia Mar.
GRANDPARENTS
Are you worried about where to take your grandchildren
over vacation? Your problems are solved! See JCC page
for ideas.
SYNOPSIS OF TNE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Toledot
"And his father Isaac said unto him: 'Come near now, and
kiss me, my son' And he smelted the smell of his
raiment, and blessed him" (Gen. 27.26-27).
Toledot Like Sarah, Rebekah at first was barren. After
Isaac prayed to God on her behalf, she bore twin boys
Esau and Jacob. Esau grew up a hunter, Jacob an upright
dweller in tents. One day, Esau returned from the field
very hungry, and disdainfully sold his "elder son" birth-
right to Jacob for a pot of lentil soup. Isaac was old and
blind and likely to die soon. He called Esau and instructed
him to prepare Isaac's favorite dishes, that he might bless
him before his death. However, Rebekah, who favored
Jacob for his superior merits, arranged for Jacob to secure
his father's coveted blessing instead of his elder brother.
Fearing Esau's revenge, and anxious lest Jacob marry a
Canaanite woman, his mother sent him to her brother
Laban, who lived in Paddan-Aram. Before leaving, Jacob
received Isaac's blessing, the continuation of God's
original blessing to Abraham: that he and his seed would
inherit the land of Canaan. Isaac bade Jacob marry one of
his uncle Laban's daughters.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage/' edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamir, SI 5, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 7S Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. I003i. Joseph Schlang is president ol the society
distributing the volume.


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
FrkJay, November 26,197
I
c
Rabbi Kahane to Zionists: Develop Activist Program
ror vaub _. ..__.____- + iL .. ---- __ ._______ #i _____t*.A Aomnrratic JXttiBt be eliminated, t ho .
NEW YORK (JTA> -
Rabbi Meir Kahane, founder of
the Jewish Defense League, told
members of the Religious Zion-
ists of America to develop an
activist program, change the
organization's leadership and
seek to create a bloc with the
United Zionist Revisionists and
possibly with the Zionist Organ-
ization of America.
Addressing a large crowd of
what a JDL spokesman identified
as RZA members. Kahane urged
them to revitalize the RZA "so
that it can become the glory that
its founders meant it to be."
THE JDL leader had an-
nounced last month the begin-
ning of a new strategy" for his
organization to "inflitrate" major
Jewish establishment groups in
the U.S. to "take these groups
over ideologically."
His first move in that direction
was to seek membership in the
RZA as a follow-up to his joining
the National Religious Party in
Israel to Call Up
Thousands of Reservists
In Defense Exercise
TEL AVIV (JTA) Thousands of Reserve soldiers will
be called up in the near future in an exercise to test the time it
takes to concentrate men and vehicles in case of a defense
emergency.
Defense Minister Simon Peres said recently that there will be
a number of such exercises, all of them being announced in
advance so as not to alarm the public.
THE CALL-UP will be announced through codes on radio,
television and leaflets dropped by planes over large cities and
settlements. Reservists will report to meeting points or directly
to their units.
Vehicles owners called up will drive their vehicVs to a special
yard from where it will be sent to special units.
The exercise is expected to take about 18 hours and the
public has been asked to help Reserve soldiers reach their units.
MEANWHILE, this week has been declared Civil Air
Defense Week and schools will conduct exercises in evacuating
students from classrooms into air raid shelters.
Israel now has shelters for about 80 percent of the
population.
Jewish Continuity
tunity which causes deep concern
for the preservation of Judaism
and the Jewish people." as evi-
denced by intermarriage, de-
fections from Jewish ranks into
the established churches of
Christendom and the esoteric
religious cults of today.
Continued from Page 1
generation as well as their grand-
children. Dr. Gordis said that
"our example of learning and
practicing Jewish values will win
the loyalty of the best of our
youth and will guarantee the
Jewish future" thereby demon-
strating that "being a Jew is the
least difficult way of being truly
human.
"Organic Judaism the
meshing of Jewish religion,
culture and people hood, must be
the goal of every Jew who
regards himself loyal to his
people." he said.
He appealed for a Jewish
population growth with three
or four children in Jewish families
to preserve the Jewish group,
noting that the Jewish people has
already made its contribution,
through the Holocaust, to zero
population growth.
Dr. Gordis praised the role of
Federations and Welfare Funds
in North America in preserving
Jewish life and values, noting
that CJF Assembly delegates
were gravely concerned with the
viability of the Jewish heritage in
this Bicentennial year.
Today's American Jewish
community, he continued, is the
end product of Sephardic.
German and East European im-
migration over the centurie*. and .
post-Nazi Holocaust survivors,
envisioning for itself a goal of
"integration without absorption,
acculturation without
assimilation."
The scholar described Amer-
ican Jewry as the "most free,
most affluent and best organized
Jewish community" anywhere in
history.
"Yet." he emphasized, "it is
precisely the sunshine of
American freedom and oppor-
He cited the emergence of the
"modem Jew" highly literate
and informed in all cultural and
contemporary affairs except his
own heritage. For him he said,
Judaism is a fossilized relic of the
past.
Organic Judaism, he con-
cluded, is the key to preserving
Jewish identity, embracing three
main elements: loyalty to the
Jewish people, involvement in
Jewish culture and a personal
commitment to Jewish religious
and ethical values.
The Herbert R. Abeles Mem-
orial Address, established in 1961
in memory of Mr. Abeles. who
served as CJF president from
1955 through 1959. is given each
year at the CJF General As-
sembly on a subject of "funda-
mental concern to Jewish com-
munity organizations in North
America."
The Council of Jewish Fed-
erations and Welfare Funds is the
association of central community
organizations Federations.
Welfare Funds. Community
Councils serving 800 Jewish
communities in the United States
and Canada. It aids these com-
munities to mobilize maximum
support for the UJA and other
overseas agencies, as well as for
major national and local services
involving financing, planning
and operating health, welfare,
cultural, educational, community
relations, and other programs
benefiting all residents.
Israel. The RZA,
refused to accept him.
Kahane. as he did last week,
rapped the RZA.
"What are they afraid of?" he
said at the meeting. Is it a crime
to criticize the RZA leadership
for having allowed the movement
to go down hill for 20 years, for
losing membership, power and
ideological content?"
KAHANE pledged to work
within the RZA through "peace-
must be eliminated, the
cational curriculum in i8riei]
schools must be revamped t
include Jewish values, the NRp
must end its practice
however, i ful, accepted democratic
methods" to change the ideology
and leadership.
He said he would eventually
xxsEssessrS -us--*
source").
According to the 10-point
program of Lamakor, which was
distributed at the meeting, Aliya
is a religious obligation incum-
bent on every Jew, and
pressure on Israel
must be countered, priorities!
must be reordered in Jewish Fed !
erations to meet the needs of I
Jewish poor and yeshivot, d
Jewish youth within RZA must]
be given a greater policy-making
role.
Israel's Labor Troubles Mount
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel's 44,000 civil ser-
vants are demanding that
they receive within two
weeks the same IL 350 raise
being given civil aviation
workers, or they will im-
pose work sanctions, in-
cluding slow-downs and
strikes.
But the government and
the Histadrut were having
second thoughts about
signing the agreement with
the civil aviation workers
because it has started an
avalanche of similar
demands.
TRANSPORTATION Min-
ister Gad Yaacobi defended
the agreement with the civil
aviation workers because pro-
ductivity at Ben Gurion Airport
increased some 20 percent last
year.
But in addition to the demand
for the IL 350 increase by civil
servants, similar demands are
being made by Customs officials.
Tax Bureau employees and
others.
All this comes as the go slow
strike by 2.500 hospital
physicians continues, and the
strike by salaried engineers
caused a halt in the water supply
for several hours in Rebobot.
Sixteen engineers, who work
for the Israel Electric Corp.. were
ordered back to work in an at-
tempt to prevent a cutoff in the
nation's electricity.
Back to work orders are also
expected to be issued to
engineers in the water, com-
munications and electronic in-
dustries.
THE SMALLEST strike is by
the nation's six harbor pilots who
have effectively closed down
Israel's three ports with the
result that the government has to
pay waiting damages to ship
owners.
Among others on strike are
2,500 social workers. 550 X-ray
technicians. 150 district attor-
neys, 3,000 postal technicians
who man telephones and the tele-
graph, and workers in the Assis
canned food and juice plant and
the Dead Sea workers, both of
which have closed down following
sanctions by employees.
The deteriorating labor re-
lations throughout the country is
a source of great conern to both
the Histadrut and the ruling!
Labor Party. "
HISTADRUT Secretary Gen
era! Yeruham Meshel met with
Premier Yitzhak Rabin, and
Rabin agreed to appear before
hundreds of Histadrut and Labor
Council leaders.
They refused to clear any plane
piloted by Cohen. But they
accepted an apology from him,
and Cohen is back behind the
controls of an El Al jumbo jet.
Meanwhile, one conflict has
ended that between El Al
maintenance workers and El Al
Capt. Uri Cohen. The workers
said they were insulted by Coned
who said that the maintenance
workers were amateurs.
Yariv Warns Arabs Are
On Move Once Again
NEW YORK (JTA) Gen.
(Res.) Aharon Yariv. director of
the Institute of Strategic Studies
at Tel Aviv University and
former intelligence chief of
Israel's armed forces, warned
here that the Arab states were
making "extensive efforts to
maximise their military options
against Israel" to force it "to
accept an Arab solution to the
Mideast conflict."
Addressing a press conference.
Yariv said. "If there is a stale-
mate we can expect war." He did
not say when this might occur
but stressed that "Israel will not
be blackmailed into endangering
its own existence even if
threatened by war."
YARIV CITED as evidence
of the Arab war threat the fact
that "the Egyptians and Syrians
have renewed their joint com-
mand and have appointed
CJFWF Delegates
Continued from Page 1
lution of the problem of the
Palestinian Arabs is one of the
conditions of a true Arab-Israel
peace. It has offered repeatedly
to make substantial con-
tributions toward such a
resolution within a general
settlement.
We urge the United States and
Canada to continue to provide
strong and consistent diplomatic
support for Israel both in inter-
national forums and in its
dealings with other nations in the
Middle East, in order to achieve
recognition, reconciliation and a
lasting peace settlement, arrived
at by meaningful negotiations
including face-to-face meetings.
We laud the repeated re-
affirmation during the past year
by the President of the United
States, the Secretary of State and
the United States Ambassador to
the United Nations, joined by
members of Congress, of
America's unshakable com-
mitment to the security of Israel,
reinforced by the Administration
and Congress with economic
military grants and credits to
Israel Further, we note the
positive developments which
have taken place in the last year
such as the implementation of the
Sinai agreement and the "good
fence" at the Lebanese border.
We look to the President Elect
of the United States and the
recently appointed Secretary of
State for External Affairs of
Canada to carry out vigorously
and promptly the measures that
will support IsraePs security and
speed the achievement of peace in
the Middle East.
| WECARE
Continued from Page 1
Zoll. chaplain of the Jewish
Federation, also attended and
received a special citation for the
Jewish Federation.
A WECARE committee for
Chanukah Gifts under Mrs. Skol-
nick is assembling gifts for dis-
tribution to nursing homes.
Included will be hand-made
booties and afghans. as well as
small items to be packaged with
home-made Chanukah cookies on
Tuesday. Dec. 14 at 9:30 a.m. at
Federation. Deadline for receipt
of gifts will be Monday. Dec. 13
at the Federation office.
Mrs. Faber indicated that the
expansion of WECARE Volun-
teers has proceeded quickly,
however, more volunteers are
always needed for visits to hos-
pitals, nursing homes, and for
home visits. To join anv of these
committees, call WECARE at
the Federation office.
Egyptian Minister of War. Gen.
Mohammed Gamazy. as head of
the joint Egyptian-Syrian com-
mand. This is the same command
that prepared the 1973 Yom
Kippur War." Yariv said.
Further evidence, he said, are
the "negotiations in process for
the resumption of full relations
between Egypt and Libya whidi
will have the consequence of
placing the arsenal of Soviet
weaponry (in Libya's hands I it
the disposal of Egypt."
Yariv said. "This mtxi-
mization of the military option
will be used to pressure the world
in an attempt to force Israel to
accept the Arab solution to the
Mideast conflict."
HE ADDED that "Israel is
fully prepared to negotiate u
overall settlement including con-
siderable territorial concessions
on the clear, unmistakeable and
unqualified condition of full, real
and durable peace."
Yariv headed the Israeli
military team that negotiated the
first cease-fire agreement with
Egypt after the Yom Kippur
War. He served briefly later as
Minister of Information in the
Cabinet of Premie Yitzhak
Rabin.
Orthodox Meet
In New York
NEW YORK An in-depth
analysis of social, economic, nad
community challenges to the
American Orthodox synagogue
will be one of the primary themes
of the upcoming 78th anniversary
Bicentennial convention of the ,
Union of Orthodox Jewish Con-
gregations of America, according
to a joint statement released by
UOJCA President Harold M-
Jacobs and Convention Chair-
man Michael C. Wimpfbeimer
The five-day event, which will
take place at L'Enfant Plaza
Hotel Washington. DC on
Thanksgiving ruatnnd Nov. 24
to 28. will bring together the out-
standing lay foadciri of Orthodox
synagogues" throughout the con-
tinent to meat and consult with
some of the moat prominent
Torah minds and administrators
in the world.
1
I


Full Text
Friday, November 26,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
(Page;
.
I
Our Crow6
By Roz fleminq
Some Random Notes: I went
to see Murder By Death ... it
was murder ... by boredom! I
couldn't believe it. After all, the
film was written by Neil Simon,
mv hereo, and had every name
star you can think of but I
almost fell asleep. Then I decided
to try my luck with TheRitz. The
Ritz is tacky, tawdry, tasteless,
AND, you laugh every minute! I
don't know what this goes to
prove. but there you have it.
While almost everybody else
was watching Gone With The
Wind on TV a few weeks ago, my
set was tuned to ABC and an ex-
cellent film 21 Hours to
Munich. There were minor flaws
(I could never quite accept
William Holden as a German,
and I think we should have
learned a little more about the
character of the Israeli hostages)
but it kept my attention riveted
to the screen.
There were many times I found
myself weeping as I relived the
tragic incident, but the only time
the hairs on my arms stood up
was when the Arab leader ad-
mitted that his mother was a
Jew! Which would make him
Jewish too, no? What could have
happened to such a family that
three sons would decide to not
only abandon the faith of their
mother but become its enemy!
What must that mother think of
every day for the rest of her life?
If the film is shown again ... be
sure and see it if you missed it
this time.
Citing "abuses in the funeral
industry" and a desire to conduct
burials according to strict Jewish
law and tradition, Rabbi Arnold
Goodman of the Adath Jeshurun
Synagogue in Minneapolis,
Minn., has announced plans for
the synagogue to handle deaths
completely on its own.
. The funerals, which will be
handled from beginning to end by
the members of the synagogue,
will be free! Rabbi Goodman said
members of the Chevra Kavod
Harriet Society to Honor the
Dead will handle the body
from death to burial, building an
oak coffin, sewing the natural
cotton shroud, counseling the
family and providing a limousine
for the funeral. The family must
pay only for the plot and opening
and closing of the grave. I tell
you this because when I saw this
information in the paper I
thought it was a wonderful idea
and thought I'd pass it on to you.
What do you think?
Mazel Tov to Mr. and Mrs.
Jacob Folic on the birth of their
beautiful son.
I told you last time that I
missed a trip to Israel; it was the
UJA Mission "This Year In
Jerusalem," and from everything
I've heard it was an over-
whelming success.
Over 3,000 American Jews,
including many from our com-
munity, attended and were met
with such an outpouring of love
from their Israeli brothers and
sisters, that they truly realized
that "WE ARE ONE!" I only
hope there will be more such
missions and that more of us
will have a chance to go and show
our solidarity with Israel.
Happy Thanksgiving! Make it
a Jewish holiday, stuff your
turkey with potato latkes. No?
Could it hurt? (just kidding .
just kidding.
Libo Fineberg (left), past president of the Hebrew Day School,
presents an award to Mr. and Mrs. Alfred deBeer at the recent
Hebrew Day School dinner. Over 160 persons attended the
dinner and saw the deBeers receive an oil painting, the original
of which hangs in the Tel Aviv museum. The Hebrew Day
School is in part funded by the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
Dr. John S. Sanders & Stoff
INTERNATIONAL MARRIAGE CONSULTANTS
OF SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA
Stele American Jewish Wins for
Australian Jewish Gentlemen
Interviews may now be scheduled in your area in Nov. and Dec.
.NTERSTAir^ROFBSIOMALlfRVICES
IPS of JACKSONVILLE, INC.
3986 BLVD. CTR. DR.. JAX, FLA. 32207
(904) 398-8380
Authorized agents for Dr. John S. Sanders & Staff in U.S.A.
Here is a current list of a few Australian clients:
Company Manager 25, Australian Army Officer 28, Doctor of
Medicine (Research Scientist) 28, Rancher 29, Agriculturist (own
practice in animal husbandry) 29, Geologist 32, Business Proprietor
32, Operations Manager 33, Qualified Accountant and Company
Secretary 33, Government Economist 34, Construction Contractor 34,
Company Director 35, Company Director and Invester 39, Qualified
Company Secretary 39, Rancher 41, Chartered Accountant (own
practice) 44.
All of the above gentlemen have excellent incomes, own their own
homes, cars, etc. and are of impeccable character. They represent
only a small cross-section of our Australian male clientele.
American ladies of good background, with responsible life style
who are interested in marriage with an Australian gentlemen!, are
invited to contact IPS OF JAX, INC., to orrange an appointment for a
private and strictly confidential interview with one of our senior
.consu hints. ____________ ,
RABBI LEON KRONISH
Kronish to Confer
Award on Slater
The Eleanor Roosevelt
Humanitarian Award will be pre-
sented to Fort Lauderdale civic
and Jewish community leader
Harold Slater by Dr. Leon
Kronish, national campaign co-
chairman of Israel Bonds.
The award will be conferred
upon Slater at the Inverrary
Country Club dinner-dance and
show to be held Saturday
evening, Dec. 4, at Pier 66, under
the auspices of the B'nai B'rith
Lodge No. 3002, it was an-
nounced by Sol Hechtkopf, din-
ner chairman, and Milton M.
Parson, executive director of the
South Florida Israel Bond
Organization.
The dinner dance at 7:30 p.m.
will be preceded by a cocktail
reception at 7, Hechtkopf an-
nounced.
Rabbi Kronish, spiritual leader
of Temple Beth Sholom, Miami
Beach, has traveled extensively
throughout the nation on behalf
of Israel Bonds and the United
Jewish Appeal. He is national
chairman of the Israel Bonds
Rabbinic Cabinet, national chair-
man of the board of the American
Israel Histadrut Foundation and
national vice president of the
American Jewish Congress.
The Eleanor Roosevelt Hu-
manitarian Award, which will be
presented to Slater by Rabbi
Kronish, was created by the
worldwide Israel Bond Organ-
ization to give recognition to
selected individuals who "best
exemplify the ideals and achieve-
ments of the late Eleantor Roose-
velt on behalf of humanity and
the State of Israel," according to
Parson.
An active member of the B'nai
B'rith Inverrary Lodge No. 3002,
Slater is a founder of the
Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem
and of the Einstein College of
Medicine. He is treasurer of the
Inverrary Golf Club, as well as
president of the Men's and
Women's Social Club of Greens
of Inverrary.
Among previous recipients of
the Eleanor Roosevelt Human-
itarian Award are John S.
Knight, publisher of the Miami
Herald, Dr. Henry King Stan-
ford, president of the University
of Miami, and former Supreme
Court Justice William O.
Douglas.
Dinner Chairman Sol
Hechtkopf is president of the
Inverrary B'nai B'rith Lodge and
a member of the board of gover-
nors of B'nai B'rith District No.
5.
IIVITT
memorial chapels
11 PtmbroktRd.
Hollywood, Fie.
524-Mt7
Sonny Levitt, P.O.
13M5W. DIxltHwy.
North Miami, Fl.
4M3IS
rr
iGolda Meir's Sister To
Speak at Breakfast
The sister of former Israel
Prime Minister Golda Meir will
be the principal speaker Sunday
morning, Dec. 5, in Temple Beth
Torah-Tamarac Jewish Center at
a community breakfast for the
United Jewish Appeal / Israel
Emergency Fund (UJA / IEF).
Clara M. Stern of Bridgeport,
Conn., younger sister of Mrs.
Meir, will address an expected
500 persons including a number
of prominent Tamarac and Fort
Lauderdale Jewish and civic
leaders.
The breakfast is set for 10 a. m.
Benjamin Bernstein, president
of Temple Beth Torah, will be the
guest of honor. Bernstein will be
cited for "outstanding service to
the Tamarac Jewish community
through his presidency of the
synagogue."
Former New York State Sen.
Samuel L. Greenberg, general
chairman of the Federation's
UJA /IEF drive, will make a
presentation to Bernstein.
George Morantz, who is active
in a number of civic and Jewish
community enterprises, among
them the Tamarac Civic Theater,
is chairman of the Tamarac UJA
campaign.
Morantz will preside and Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman will deliver
the invocation.
Mrs. Stern is a frequent visitor
to Israel and has a close relation-
ship with her sister and many of
Israel's ranking leaders among
her friends as well. Her long
association with Israel's cause
and its leaders has given her a
knowledge of the Jewish State's
problems and needs.
For many years, Mrs. Stern
was the executive director of the
United Jewish Council of Bridge-
port, an organization cor-
responding to the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale in its program and activities
of social and family service, com-
nunity relations, sponsorship of
ducational and cultural projects,
ind the mounting of annual fund
campaigns in behalf of the United
Jewish Appeal including support
>f its own comprehensive com-
nunity work.
Mrs. Stern helped create
Connecticut's anti-poverty
program and was instrumental in
the establishment of the State
Human Relations Commission
whkh has been responsible for
sponsoring legislation outlawing
discrimination in employment,
housing and public accom-
modations.
Bernstein, in his tenure as
president of Temple Beth Torah,
which is known also as the
Tamarac Jewish Center a Con-
servative synagogue has been
a key figure in the enlargement of
the building site at NW 57th
Street/' and 88th Avenue.
Finishing touches are now being
put on the new sanctuary, which
will more than double the syna-
gogue's capacity.
Bernstein, retired, served for
22 years as a staff officer of the
Amalgamated Laundry Workers
Joint Board affiliated with the
Amalgamated Clothing Workers
of America, AFL-CIO. He retired
in June, 1971, arriving in South
Florida that year and settling in
Tamarac. He is a member of the
Blue Star Lodge of B'nai B'rith.
Planning A Trip?
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6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Phone 739-6000


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 26,197(
=*. 1976
Medical Center Adds Cancer Wing
Upon completion, the 100,000-
square-foot addition to the
Florida Medical Center will house
the cancer treatment, cardio-
vascular and cardiopulmonary
rehabilitation centers.
The cancer treatment center
will contain two six-million volt
linear accelerators and one 18-
million volt accelerator, which are
capable of providing small
radiation beams for highly
localized exposure to malignant
tissues.
According to Dr. Maxwell
Dauer, Florida Medical Center
president, the three treatment
rooms housing the accelerators
will employ a new design con-
cept: Large windows will over-
look a garden with subtropical
flowers and plants.
"We feel it is extremely im-
portant to provide a setting
which will make the patient as
physically and emotionally com-
fotable as possible during the
treatment period," Dr. Dauer
said.
Hadassah Chapter Temple Men's Club Elects Officers
At a recent meeting the Men's Steinberg and Barry Wax.
Club of Temple Sholom of Pom-
pano Beach elected officers. The
new officers are as follows:
ISets Next Meeting
Sunrise Center Sets Meeting For Dec.2
The Sunrise Jewish Center will'
hold its next meeting on
Thursday, Dec. 2 at 1 p.m. at the
Gold Key Recreation Center.
Hadassah Group Plans Brunch for Members .
Temple Shalom's Vestry Room,
Pompano Beach.
The program will feature
Esther Richman and her Israeli
dancers.
League for Israel
To Hold Meeting
The Women's League for
Israel, Margate Chapter, will
hold its regular meeting at the
Congregation Beth Hillel on
Tuesday, Nov. 30 at 12:30 p.m.
New members *%ie welcome.
Refreshments will be served.
Kadimah Hadassah
Sets HMO Benefit
Kadimah Chapter of Hadas-
sah, Century Village, is planning
a Hadassah Medical Or-
ganization (HMO) luncheon at
Inverrary Country Chib on Dec.
8.
All proceeds go to HMO.
Kadimah will hold a general
meeting and Chanukah cele-
bration on Dec. 20.
A paid-up membership brunch
for Golda Meir Group of the
North Broward Chapter of
Hadassah will be held on
Wednesday, Dec. 15 at 11 a.m. in
Herzl Hadassah Sets I
Meeting Agenda
The Herzl Group of Hadassah,
West Broward, will hold its next
meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 8 at
1 p.m. at the Tamarac Jewish
Center.
Sol Robinson will discuss the
coming holiday of Chanukah.
On Dec. 13, the group will hold
a paid-up membership luncheon
at Temple Beth Israel, Lauder-
dale Lakes.
Shalom Singles Plan^
Picnic in Boca Raton
The Shalom Singles of the
Jewish Community Center, Fort
Lauderdale, will have a picnic on
Dec. 5 at the Spanish River Park
in Boca Raton.
The group meets every
Thursday evening at 8 o'clock at
theJCC.
Betty Di Giacomo is vice
president of the club.
Lauderdale Bonds
Events Slated
The Israel Solidarity Award
will be presented to the Unit
Owners Association of Sunrise
Lakes Phase III at a Night in
Israel, Tuesday evening, Nov. 30,
at 8 o'clock, under the auspices of
the South Florida Israel Bond
Organization.
Emil Cohen, American Jewish
folk humorist, will be the guest
entertainer at the event which
will take place at Temple Beth
Israel.
Chairman Harry Leibowitz has
announced that two buses will be
provided for free transportation
to and from Temple Beth Israel
starting at 7 p.m. on the night of
the event. One bus will leave from
Satellite 1 and one from Satellite
2 on a continuous basis. The last
trip will leave for the temple at
7:45 p.m. from each place. At the
end of the evening, the buses will
provide return transportation.
Elderly Women
Ml Share Her Apt.
New elevator bldg., beautiful
view, with woman who will
prepare meals 5-days week in
exchange for free room & board.
Del ray Beach T-499-1140
IAUie Ruben
we're not
But we have
the most
Glorious
Clothes
Exquisite Fashions
1325 Pompano Pkwy.
V. Mile South Palm Aire
Tribute to the heroes of
Entebbe will be paid by residents
of Century Village at a Night in
Israel, Monday, Dec 6 at 7:30
p.m., in the Administration
BuildingTemple.
The event will be held under
the auspices of the Century Vil-
lage Israel Bonds Committee,
with Irving R. Friedman as
chairman.
Friedman announced that the
program will be headed by
humorist Emil Cohen, who has
visited Israel a number of times
and conferred with Israeli leaders
on his most recent visit there.
AMD-ISRAEL
EXCHANGE OF LEASES
Four bedrooms, two baths, living
room, large kitchen, 2 floors
furnished villa. Owner wants
immediate exchange of leases
(six months or one year) for house
in Broward county. Sale or trade
of similar property will be con-
sidered. Situated between
Beersheba and Jerusalem with
excellent climate year around,
has very original architecture.
Call anytime
305-583 6 7 99
PAUL ELIE
REAL ESTATE
4330 West Broward Blvd.
Ptantation, Florida 33317
Fort Lauderdale Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its monthly
meeting on Monday, Dec. 6, at
Castle Recreation Center,
Lauderhill, at 12:30 p.m.
Bee Gaynor, program chair-
man, has arranged for "The
Cypress Chasettes" from
Cypress Chase "Condo A" to
entertain with Israel dances.
Also, at this meeting, a
discussion on the significance of
Chanukah will take place.
Peter Osman, president; Harry
Mendelsohn, vice president; Dr.
The next meeting of the Men's
Club will be held on Thursday
evening, Dec. 2 at 8 p.m. The
lecture will be "The Jewish
Attitude Toward S** "
Officers will be elected for 1977
and a progress report on the
status of the proposed temple will
be given.
Men's Club Elects Officers
The newly organized Men's
Club of Temple Sholom held its
first election recently and Peter
Osman was elected president and
Harvey Mendelson was elected
vice president.
The next men's club meeting, a
ORT Sets Art Auction
The Sunverrary Chapter of
Women's American ORT
(Organization for Rehabilitation
through Training) will present an
Art Auction on Saturday, Nov.
27 at the International Village
Club House of Inverrary at 7:30
p.m.
Milton Isaacson, secretary and H^rAmi/l'S CVTCle
Sidney Harris, treasurer. ww v' *"
Board of directors are Nathan />/#/! ffCXt Meet
The next monthly meeting of
Branch No. 1046 of the Work-
men's Circle of Greater Lauder-
dale will take place on Wed-.,
nesday, Dec. 1 at 7:30 p.m. at th-
Roark Recreation Center.
The program will feature
Irving Tabachnikoff discussing
the "History of Yiddish" and a
Chanukah celebration with Bea
Eisenstat.
The Broward-Palm Beach
Workmen's Circle reunion lun-
cheon and dance will be held at
the Reef Restaurant on Saturday,
Dec. 4 at 11:30 a.m.
Baum, Maurice Gan, Ben
Gresser, Leonard Kinker, Stanley
Rubel, Joseph Shore, Marvin
Stone and Harry Treu.
Sam Weidenfeld is Program
Committee chairman and Social
Committee Chairmen are Saul
dinner meeting, will be held at
the temple on Thursday, Dec. 2,
at 8 p.m.
A pre-holiday bazaar will be
held at the temple from Dec. 11 to
Dec. 13.
Day School Offers
Speakers, Shows
The Hebrew Day School of
Fort Lauderdale will provide
speakers plus a sound and light
show to interested organizations.
Contact Moshe Zwang at the
Hebrew Day School.
Sholom USY Begins Membership
Drive, Plans Car Wash
The United Synagogue Youth
of Temple Sholom in Pompano
has begun a membership drive.
The group is made up of boys
and girls ages 13 to 18, from
Junior through Senior High
School. *
The group has professional
leadership for guidance.
The USY of Temple Sholom
will be holding a car wash at the
Exxon Gas Station on U.S. 1 and
Atlantic Boulevard on Sunday,
Nov. 28, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
B'nai B*rith Women To View Movie Dec. 8
NCJW to Open
Thrift Shop Dec. 6
The Plantation Unit of the
National Council of Jewish
Women, will open a Thrift Shop
during the week of Dec. 6
through Dec. 10. *
It will be located in Jacaranda '
Plaza, on West Sunrise ,'
Boulevard, and the hours will be
10 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily.
The shop will feature new and
used merchandise including a
special plant and children's
boutique.
A meeting of the B'nai B'rith
Women Lakes Chapter No. 1513
will be held on Wednesday after-
noon, Dec. 8, at 1 p.m. at City
Hall in Lauderdale Lakes.
A film entitled "Rendezvous
for Freedom" will be shown. It
concerns the migration from
Europe to America for freedom.
Members may bring friends.
SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR
Capable school administrator for
large, modern Congregation in
Florida. All phases of
education. .Must have ability,
willingness and experience. State
salary acceptable. Position open
during 1977. S.A., Box 012973,
Miami 33101
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More public space per passenger
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Sparkling entertainment
Selected land tours
Gourmet Cuisine
Fly Free/Cruise Easy program
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 26,1976
Some Telling Points
President Jerold C. Hoffberger made some telling
points before the 2,000 delegates to the 45th General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds meeting in Philadelphia last week. Among
them:
Maintaining and nourishing Jewish cultural identiy;
Providing more meaningful involvement for young
people;
t Reaching the "unaffiliated" segments of U.S. Jewry;
Maintaining moral pressure on the federal govern-
ment relating to matters of unemployment and national
health care;
Continuing moral pressure on the issues of Israel and
Soviet Jewry.
Not a single one of these items needs amplification. In
our view, they are self-explanatory and dovetail perfectly
with the philanthropic, cultural, societal and overseas
programs of Jewish Federations across the nation.
.. .Except for this Missing One
This is no cavil. We wish, however, that some reference
were made by Hoffberger to American Jewish religious
needs.
As it is, his program suggests that the American Jewish
experience is ethnic without being spiritual, as well.
It does seem to us that those of our religious leaders are
absolutely right who, in every spectrum of Jewish faith,
from Orthodox to Reform, repeatedly warn us that the
spiritual attrition in Jewish ranks is one of the greatest
dangers to Jewish survival.
Mr. Hoffberger's overview of contemporary Jewish
needs is an excellent one except for this one oversight.
But it is a major oversight.
Easy to Explain
Kristallnacht (the Night of the Broken Glass) is an
occurrence in the wrathful history of German Nazism that
still strikes terror in the hearts of Jews long after the
event itself, Nov. 9, 1938, when at least 30.000 Jews were
arrested. 815 shops were destroyed, and 29 warehouses
and 171 dwellings set on fire.
Primarily, the Nazis ravaged 191 synagogues and
totally demolished 76 more throughout Germany.
On the 38th anniversary of that event last week, the
Nazi flag flew over Frankfurt on the smokestack of a
power station.
Posters appeared throughout the city, seemingly from
nowhere.
The point is they were signed by the National Socialist
German Workers Party, Lincoln, Nebraska. U.S.A.
Any wonder we're having trouble getting the gover-
nment to do something about deporting former Nazi
criminals, like Valerian Trifa, who now live in luxurious
ease in the United States?
The Same Boner
In his remarks on Martin Agronsky's Public Broad-
casting program about the need for the survival of Israel,
Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld pulled a boner.
But the boner was not entirely his.
Agronsky suggested that U.S. support of Israel is "a
burden that we accepted ... in terms of our national
interest," to which the Secretary of Defense responded:
"Exactly."
If that doesn't sound like a page torn out of the primer
of Chief of the Chiefs of Staff Gen. George Brown, then we
don't know what does.
Prior to the election, President Ford went to con-
siderable lengths to "explain" the Brown booboo about
Israel as a burden in his April 12 interview with political
cartoonist-writer Ranaan Lurie. The President's com-
ments were not only an apology for Gen. Brown.
More important, they were a refutation of what Brown
had said. Apparently, Rumsfeld hadn't heard.
THE
?Jewish Floridian'
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Suite 206 128 S. Federal Hwy., Danla. Fla. 33004
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT 120 NE 6th St.. Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone 373-4605
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1-373-4605
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O. Box 01-2973, Miami. Florida33101
FRED K. SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
8ELM* M. THOMPSON
Assistant to Publliher
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashrutc
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl-Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Dania, Fla
All P.O 3678 returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Floridian. P.O. Box 0H-287S, Miami, Fla. 38101,
O Fred K. Shochet Friday, November 28,1*78',
The Jewish Floridian has morbad the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Sevan Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association of
English Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Prow Association.
WASHINGTON Jimmy
Carter will soon begin his presi-
dential briefings. The most
sobering will be on nuclear war.
Carter will be given the best
estimate that U.S. intelligence
can produce. He'll be told that
nuclear war is unlikely. But the
world isn't as safe as its masses
may think.
The President-elect will be
warned that a breakdown in
relations between Russia and
China could lead to nuclear war-
fare. The Russians might decide
to strike before China builds up a
nuclear counterforce.
CARTER WILL also be told
that nuclear weapons may appear
in the Middle East, in the event
of a prolonged Arab-Israeli war.
The Israelis already have nuclear
warheads and the Egyptians are
developing them.
In the past, the President was
M
Foreign Policy
Briefings for
shadowed wherever he went by a
warrant officer, who was ready to
spring instantly to his side with a
slim black case. This was called
"The Football." It contained the
world's most secret codes and
battleplans, which only the Pres-
ident could use to order a nuclear
attack.
The omnipresent warrant
officer is now considered overly
dramatic. Instead, the locked
black case is kept in the custody
of the President's military aides.
oni
They no longer are required to
remain at his side. The present
rule is that they must never be
more than five minutes away
from him.
THE FOOTBALL also has a
new nickname. Now it's called
simply "the black briefcase."
Carter will be told that he may
get as little as 15 to 18 minutes'
warning of a nuclear attack. He
will then open the locked brief-
case and follow the coded
procedures.
If the terrible order should ever
come, it would be flashed to a
central command post 45 feet
underground near Omaha, Neb.
Coded instructions are ready in a
red box to send B-52 bombers
and intercontinental missiles
thundering into action.
EVEN BEFORE the Pres-
ident's signal, the military would
be following one of five "def-
cons." That's short for defense
conditions. They're numbered
one through five, with "defcon
one" the most urgent alert.
The President and the military
could also shift their command
centers to a number of fortified
alternate centers. The exact
number and equipment are
extremely secret.
But we can tell you this much:
One is located about 70 miles
northwest of Washington near
Fort Richie, Md. It has steel
blast-proof doors and the world's
most sophisticated com-
munications system.
THREE MAMMOTH planes
are also standing by to lift the
President above the nuclear de-
struction. Each plane is also a
self-contained command center.
Continued on Page 9
Hasidic Refusal Warning to Us
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year
Regweat.
88.88. Out of Town Ut
Friday, Nov. 26,1976
Volume 5
4 KISLEV 5737
Number 24
I am never certain if it's life
that imitates art, or art imitates
nature, but I know I read it first
in Philip Roth's short story, Eli,
the Fanatic, several decades ago.
Eli Peck was talking to Leo
Tzuref, the Director of the
Yeshiva of Woddenton. N.Y.:
"You understood?" Eli said.
"It's not hard."
"It's a matter of zoning ."
and when Tzuref did not answer,
but only drummed his fingers on
his lips, Eli said, "We didn't
make the laws ."
THEY GO on to discuss the
fact that it isn't possible for
Tzuref to have a school in a resi-
dential district, while Tzuref
makes the point that it is a school
where children learn the Talmud.
Eli reiterates that they are being
taught and the response is, "The
Talmud. That's illegal?"
And so it goes until Tzuref
ends the dialogue by stating,
"We stay." And that's the way it
was.
And that's the way it is in
Monroe, N.Y., where 20 years
later the Satmarer Hasidim have
outlasted the people and govern-
ment of that town and have won
the right to incorporate 340 acres
as a self-governing village.
THEY HAVE until the end of
this month to hie their plans with
a Federal judge, but based on
their record, the deadline will
mean as little as zoning laws or
other conduct accepted as proper
in the secular world.
The group of 500 Jews from the
Williamsburg section of
Brooklyn live in 25 houses and 80
garden apartments in a sub-
section development of Monroe
where they had moved their "big
| Edward |
X X
I Cohen |
families with big problems," in
the words of their Rebbe, to
escape from the slums of New
York.
And, he added, there was no
welcome for them from their non-
Hasidic neighbors, many of them
Jews. "Lack of heart" he called
it.
On the other side was the law,
if not neighborliness. At the
heart of the dispute is the zoning
law's definition of a single family
home as a "single housekeeping
unit."
INVESTIGATION showed
that many of the houses were
converted into separate apart-
ments, the basements of apart-
ment houses used as schools and
syngogues.
"This has never been a battle
between neighborhoods, com-
munities and sociological
groups," says the town attorney.
"It's a battle over zoning."
Not so, saith the Satmarers, an
ultra-Orthodox sect which has
attacked the State of Israel's
policies in advertisements. Their
family units are large and closely
knit, they say.
A "FAMILY" includes not
only mother, father and children,
but could also mean a married
son and his family, or a married
(laughter and her family.
Anyone acquainted with the
breeding propensities of Hasidim
can understand what a threat
they represent to those who also
made their escape from the city,
earlier, to get away from the
slums and the over-crowded
ghettos.
AS THE Philip Roth story
rolls on (it's in the collection
titled Goodbye, Columbus), one
realizes that it's to be a futife
battle for those seeking to protect
their property and, for the Jews
who have moved to mythical
Woodenton, N.Y., their new-
found "comfort and beauty" and
serene living among the Gentiles.
In desperation, Eli Peck
suggests a compromise that will
have the town overlook the
zoning violations if Yeshivah
activities are confined to the
Yeshivah grounds, and
"Yeshivah personnel (will be)
welcomed in the streets and
stores of Woodenton provided
they are attired in clothing
usually associated with American
life in the 20th century." The
story ends with Peck having a
breakdown.
My experience with Hasidim is
quite limited and quite recent. I
am not surprised with their
victory in Monroe, N.Y., for
whether Satmarer or Lubavitcher
the belief that they alone have
the law, that in their business
dealings they are answerable only
to the Rebbe and not to those
with whom they deal, appears to
be a common denominator.
IT GOES beyond apparent
chutzpah. Whatever the merits of
this most recent example of
Hasidic refusal to be part of our
society, it is a warning of things
to come which we shall ignore at
some peril to Jewish life here and
in Israel.
-vajwrwr j.v---------' -


Pe 2
The Jewish Fioridian of Greater Fort LouderdmU
Fricky, November 26.
1976
Robinson, Guest of Honor
At UJA/IEF Functions
Sol Robinson, president of the
Bermuda Club Management
Council. Inc.. and a civic, media
and Jewish community leader.
will be the guest of honor at both
an advance gifts meeting and a
UJA IEF Chanukah Ob-
servance and Rally to be held
during December at the Bermuda
Club condominium complex.
Bernard Simms. chairman of
the Bermuda Club's
Federation UJA campaign, an-
nounced that an advance gifts
meeting, with Robinson as guest
of honor, will take place Tuesday.
Dec T, with the observance and
rally on Wednesday evening.
Dec. 22. in the club's auditorium.
Adolph Weisser has been
named chairman of advance gifts
and will preside at the Dec. 7
advance gifts meeting, which will
be a cocktail party Sol SaDes is
serving as advance gifts co-
chairman.
Members of the advance gifts
committee which is still in
format-on include Leo Dube.
George Dresner. Morris Dorf.
Phil Gold. Lennv Gevlin. Harvey
Ehrlich. Paul Katz. Max
Lehraupt. \z Landsman. Joe and
Ethel Matz. Jack Rosner.
Herman Solnit and Hi Shulman.
Sen. Samuel L. Greenberg.
general chairman of the Fort
Lauderdale Federation UJA
campaign, and Leo Goodman,
campaign cochairman. will take
part in the tribute to Robinson.
Robinson has been twice
decorated by Presidents of the
United States. He was awarded
the Medal of Merit by President
Woodrow Wilson in 1918 as a
youth who sold more Liberty
Bonds than any other American
youngster and he received the
same medal from President
Truman in 1946 for his volunteer
services to the United States
during World War II.
Robinson was part owner, a
vice president and the general
manager of radio station WLAD
in Danbury, Conn., and the
owner and operator of radio
station WBRY in Waterbury,
Conn. He has written several
SOL ROBINSON
books on the communications
industry.
He has also served in the New
York City and federal govern-
ments, starting out before World
War II in the New York City De-
partment of Welfare. After the
war. he served with the U.S.
Senate Banking Commission. He
has also served as a member of
the Management Committee of
the President's Industry Ad-
visory Council arid with a host of
voluntary civic, philanthropic,
health, youth, religious and com-
munity service organizations.
Robinson is a member of the
board of governors of District
No. 1 of B'nai B'rith and a
member of its national com-
mission of Community and Vet-
erans Service. He was the first
president of a Theodor Herzl
youth group and in the late
1940s, as the national UJA was
going into high gear helped
create "C-Day." or Cash Day, for
the nationwide campaign.
Gerda Weissman Klein, a
survivor of the Nazi death camps
and author, will be among the
principal speakers at the Ber-
muda Club's UJA Chanukah Ob-
servance and Rallv on Dec. 22.
Recently honored at Hawaiian Gardens Phase V were Mr. and
Mrs. Rubin Epstein, who were the recipients of the Israel
Solidarity Award at a Night in Israel held under the auspices of
the Hawaiian Gardens V Israel Bonds Committee. Chairman of
t, annual event was Sidney Goldfarb. fn a* h
Sylvia Beckman:
Reflections on Involvement
Contributing time, energy ana
talent is the type of commitment
Sylvia Beckman has known all
her life
She calls it giving in her own
"quiet fashion."
"I've always been involved."
says the soft-spoken yet assertive
widow, whose recent efforts
mainly have been directed to
Temple Beth Israel at Century
Village, where she has been
instrumental in its growth.
"Putting myself into a
biographical format is rather dif-
ficult.'' Sylvia explains with a
warm smile. "My story seems to
be temple-oriented, delineated by
the many holidays and programs
I've been involved with, from
ticket sales for the High Holidays
preparing thousands of
latkes I potato pancakes) for
Chanukah ... to planning a
Purim play."
But sitting in her temple office
gesturing to an artist's ren-
dering for the proposed new shul.
then to people outside her door
she simply says. "This is my Ufc.
But there are constant inter-
ruptions." as she stops to in-
struct a Sisterhood member on
the cost of jewelry for a fund-
raising project.
Born in Lakewood, N.J.. she
was one of four children.
Traditionally, this was a time
when girls in a family didn't go to
college." she says, "but my
parents encouraged all of us to
get all the education we could.
"They moved to New York so
we could attend college They
worked hard to give us that ad-
vantage." Sylvia says re-
flectively.
"It was rough." she recalls
six long years working days, then
dashing to New York University
in the evening for classes.
"But every night my mother
would be waiting at home with a
midnight dinner ready for us and
to talk to my brothers and myself
about our day."
Armed with a degree in ac-
counting, she joined the Norcross
Greeting Card company as an
office clerk.
A poem which appeared in $
the Nov. 12 edition of The \
Jewish Fioridian of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. "A Day in 3
November.-' was written by )
Dr. Albert E. Kaufman.
Resnikoff
To Receive
Koah Award
Israel Resnikoff. Fort Lauder-
dale community leader, will be
the recipient of the Israel Koah
Award at the Margate Jewish
Center-Israel Bond Reception on
Sunday. Dec. 5. 7:30 p.m. at the
Margate Jewish Center.
Emil Cohen, vocalist and
humorist, will provide
tertainment.
en-
Reanikoff, president of the
Margate Jewish Center, is the
past president of the Men's Club
of Temple Beth El Utica, N. Y.
He is a member of the
executive board of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale and of the Israel
Bond Organization of North
B reward.
Resnikoff is also active in B'nai
B'rith, the Zionist Organization
of America, the American Jewish
Congress and Odd Fellows.
In 1973. 1974 and 1975,
Resnikoff was chairman of the
Israel Bond Committee of the
Margate Jewish Center.
F-ll.-74
SYLVIA BECKMAN
Women weren't liberated
then. A woman accountant
wasn't encouraged to do field
work because of traveling and
being away from her family," she
explains.
"In my case," she continues,
"it was the unusual situation of
an office clerk rising to comp-
troller for a billion-dollar
organization."
Married in 1938. she became a
Brooklynite for two years, later
moving to Mount Vemon. N.Y..
where she and her husband raised
their son and daughter.
There Sylvia's energies were
redirected from the day-to-day.
nine-to-five office routine to civic
projects and committees in-
cluding president of the Southern
Westchester chapter of Brandeis
Women. Hadassah. the city's
hospital and high school and her
temple.
When Israel was moving
toward statehood. Sylvia and her
husband, an active fund-raiser
and a catalyst for numerous
appeals on Israel's behalf, often
were guests in the Presidential
Cottage at Unser Camp a
Zionist retreat in upstate New
York meeting many influential
Israelis such as Golda Meir and
Abba Eban.
Her second love was helping
found Kinnereth Day School
where students from nursery to
sixth grade were taught Hebrew
as their basic language.
Her efforts for Israel and her
work with the school were recog-
nized by Mrs. Meir. who honored
Sylvia by attending a special
dinner on the school's behalf at
the Waldorf Astoria Hotel.
Moving to Century Village two
years ago, her motivation and
pioneering spirit hardly were
curtailed.
"This is a small, growing
community," she says. "I've seen
people here I haven't seen in 35
years. Much of the history of my
life seems to be repeating itself in
these newly formed organizations
and seeing my energies and
efforts bring worthwhile projects
to fruition.
"This keeps me young." she
adds.
"I also brought my daughter's
parents to live at Century Vil-
lage. Louis and Rose Silbersher
"And although there's been
some sadness since Louis didn't
live to see many of our dreams for
the synagogue evolve, there have
been many joys." Sylvia says.
"The synagogue's been the focal
point."
As Sylvia looks around the
temple to the memorial plaque
she donated in her husband's
memory and to the eternal light
she gave for last year's High
Holidays, she speaks of less
tangible rewards.
"We're answering many needs
of the people here in Century
Village and I've found a great
deal of purpose, joy and
satisfaction."
We're trying
tohelpmake
funeral
arrangements
less complicated.
We providea listing of all available
funeral arrangements, itemized by price.
We display caskets in all price
ranges, with each price clearly indicated.
We give need-oriented counseling,
answer all questions fuIly and assure
each family the time and privacy they
require to reach a decision.
SUNRISE:
1171 Northwest 61st Avenue(Sunset Strip)
584-6060
HOLLYWOOD:
2230 Hollywood Boulevard/920-1010
Other Hollywood location 5801 Hollywood Boulevard
North Miami Beach, Miami Beach and Miami.
jhapels serving the New York City Metropolitan area.
Riverside
Memorial Chapel. i"c / Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
I
F-ll-HH.
.


November 26,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
Carter Foreign
Policy Briefing
Continued from Page 4
President could run the
Ltry and the war from
5f these planes.
fut the bottom line is the
jalty estimate. The latest es-
kte, Carter will be told, is that
iciear attack will kill 130
an to 135 million Americans.
I these figures don't take into
jnt the people who would fail
Vrvive in the stone-age, radio-
le chaos following the war.
SER'S FOLLY: Twenty
\hs ago, Duane Freer took
mtrols of a DC-3 aircraft in
|is. Pa. He had never flown
Jut he wanted to chalk up
I flight time. So he urged the
I to turn the controls over to
pilot could hardly refuse
Freer. He was regional di-
of the Federal Aviation
listration, in charge of en-
; air safety in the East.
DC-3, with Freer at the
sis, crashed on take-off.
fen people were hurt, four
lbly. The plane was
yed. '
OFFICIAL report on the
it said the occupants were
The crash could have
caused a fire, which would
lulled most of them. The
also charged that the crash
|ly occurred because of
i inexperience.
What did the Federal Aviation
Administration do with Freer?
He was transferred to Washin-
ton. Associates describe it as a
promotion.
He is now a policymaker,
helping to set future safety stan-
dards for the aviation industry.
OTHER CANDIDATES: The
voters in the Washington, D.C.,
metropolitan area are among the
most politically astute in the
nation. But even many of them
were apathetic about Carter and
Ford.
So numerous voters sub-
stituted write-in candidates. One
voter chose Dracula's father as
president and Dracula's son as
vice president.
Another wanted to give the top
job to Captain Kangaroo and he
picked Oswald the Rabbit as his
man for the vice presidency.
PILE OF PAPER: Americans
have sensed for some time that
they are being buried under an
avalanche of paper from the
federal government.
But it's still startling to hear
the actual facts and figures.
According to a confidential
White House study, Uncle Sam
spends $20 billion a year to push
paper. Government agencies
print 10 billion sheets of paper a
year.
Stack it all up and you would
have a mountain with a volume of
4.25 million cubic feet.
>uncil of Europe Adopts
uti-Terror Convention
*ARIS (JTA) The representatives of the foreign
sters of the Council of Europe" member states un-
lusly adopted a European convention against terrorism.
Ipresentatives, meeting in Strasbourg, approved a test
jrding "political motivations" as an excuse for terrorist
pd calling upon all signatories of the convention to ex-
|or locally try terrorists.
IE CONVENTION, presented by West Germany, needs
[fication of the governments of three member states to
law. The convention describes in great detail terrorist
provides for police and judicial cooperation among the
states to prevent them.
Everything
About Us Is
Choice!
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Labor Party Plans Campaign
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
group of Labor Party intel-
lectuals, writers and
academicians met at Kibbutz
Beth Hashita over the weekend
for a discussion of means to
reverse what they consider the
party's alarming deterioration
and the alienation of its leader-
ship from the rank and file.
With national elections just
about a year away, the meeting
was taken seriously by political
circles within the Labor Party,
some of whom viewed the
gathering as an incipient revolt.
PARTICIPANTS agreed to
work for change within the Labor
movement. But they warned the
party leadership that "our votes
are not in your pocket. We may
abstain."
They also called for a mass
meeting of leaders of the various
Labor-sponsored settlement and
kibbutz movements and local
workers' committee heads to
discuss the party's future and to
restore its former strength and
positive image.
Their assessment of the Labor
Party's present condition was
best summed up in the slogan of
the meeting, "Things can't go on
like this."
THE MEETING was at-
tended, among others, by Nahum
Sarig, a veteran kibbutz,leader
and officer in the Security Ser-
vices; writers Chalm Ghoury, S.
Izhar and Chanoch Bartov;
journalists Azarya Alon and
Nathan Shaham, and Prof.
Abraham Wachman.
They called for election reforms
that would make elected officials
more accountable to the elec-
torate, an end to the internal rifts
that have demoralized the party
and undermined its integrity, and
an end to the condition in which
the party leadership is totally
detached from its constituency.
Some of the speakers ex-
pressed doubts that any
meaningful changes can be
brought about. Others charged
that the situation within Israel's
governing party is responsible for
continuing labor strife and for the
rising incidence of fraud and cor-
ruption on the part of high of-
ficials.
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 26,1976

JCC Begins Second Year
By BILL GOLDSTEIN,
JCC Director
The first year of programming
at the JCC is over and it appears
by all standards that our pro-
grams have been well received.
We share great pride in our
young institution and have
pledged to continue to plan
creative, enjoyable activities for
the community.
Our first phase of operation
completed, we look toward the
future and expansion of services.
We have begun to offer ac-
tivities for the entire family. Pre-
school, elementary age, teens,
adults, and senior adults. We
have gained good experience and
are beginning to know what our
community expects of us.
We have attracted a pro-
fessional staff who is developing
programs within the context of a
difficult facility. We are now
planning a review of all our pro-
grams, and the leaders of our
Greater Fort Lauderdale Jewish
community will shortly develop a
"master plan" for the growth of
our institution to meet the
changing needs of the com-
munity.
Our purposes and objectives
Jewish Comm
BILL OLDSTIIN, Director
2999
BILL GOLDSTEIN
continue to be to bring Jews
together to become involved with
Jewish life in our community. We
have the staff and facilities for
participation in educational,
recreational, social and cultural
activities. We urge you to join us.
We now face the task of
implementing the next phase of
our work. The task is great and
demanding; but the goals are
attainable and rewarding.
For your children, your com-
munity and yourselves, join us in
building our Jewish Community
Center.
Multi-Media Production
To be Sponsored by JCC
JCCClub Announces
Upcoming Events
The Adult Jewish Community
Club has set its next event for
Nov. 30.
The club, with a membership of
almost 400, has planned to attend
the Sea Ranch Dinner Theater.
Other upcoming plans include
a Chanukah Celebration and
December meeting, an ice show in
January and a week-long trip to
New Orleans in February.
Officers and board members
include Sol Brenner, president;
Mitchell Colman, vice president;
Barney Moldofsky, treasurer;
Viola Melnick, secretary; Shirley
Shinkin, trip coordinator; Larry
Feigenbaum, program chairman;
Murray Gompers, lecture series
chairman; Sarah Benowitz, hos-
pitality chairman; Freda Feld,
newsletter; Henry Kahn, Sun-
shine Committee chairman: Hy
Kaplan, publicity chairman; and
Oscar Goldstein, Speaker's
Bureau chairman.
"Here Is Israel," a multi-media
musical production, will be pre-
sented at Temple Beth Israel on
Saturday, Dec. 18 at 8 p.m. under
the sponsorship of the Jewish
Community Center as part of a
coast-to-coast tour.
"Peace" is the theme of this
year's production. Children's
poetry set to music against a
background of colorful drawings
on the subject of peace will be a
highlight.
The production has been
specially prepared for audiences
in this country with the partici-
pation of Israeli performers.
Fifteen singers, musicians and
stage technicians make up the
company which represents a
cross-section of Israel Kibbutz
members, city dwellers, im-
migrants and Sabras, Army
officers and civilians. Special
scenery and film sequences blend
with the songs.
Tickets are on sale at JCC.
Athletic Director Larry Berkley teaches the Friday morning kt
attended by 25 women. The class is followed by refreshmentsnAbei
Attention Collide
The Jewish Community Center
including a Coffee House Mixer
cing. for college students in the
and for students coming home for
Dates are Dec. 20 and 27 al x 30|
Pot information and to subrW
Contacted,call Ira Blumenthalat t
Sandy Jackowitz, JCC Program Supervisor, recently presented
Lil and Sol Brenner with the Outstanding Service Award. The
couple has taught classes, lectured and entertained groups in
the year since the JCC has opened.
"Here is Israel" comes to Fort Lauderdale Saturday, Dec. 18 at
8 p.m.
Every Tuesday evening from 7:15 to 9.15p.m., sixth, seventh
and eighth graders socialize, dance and play ping-pong at the
lween Lounge. Pictured above are some tweens showing their
arts and crafts work. The class is taught by andy Brandt
* Photo and Movie CIudj
Jj.J ^reSted S a Teen ,Mov,e C,ub or Cam Club to
learn and practice making art films, documentaries and art
photography, call Ira or Holen at the JCC
Shooting pool at the JCC Tween Center are Brian Antonoff,
<5van Antonoff and Kim Fields.
. Alt. P*FofcA4A/ce* MfU At FTUMJCtt^ Is- "
ritUT.
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Lay, November 26,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
itity Center
Editor HARRIET PIRER, Co editor
mirdnle Phone: 484-8200
kde Students
tinning social activities,
h entertainment and dan-
Gn ir Fort Lauderdale area,
lii a inter vacation.
,...
I
of students to be
184-8200.
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JCC Dancers Appear At Holiday Park Show
The "Around the World"
Dancers of the JCC of Lauderdale
Lakes, led by Bea and Phil
Statnick, represented the Center
at the recent Holiday Park Prom-
enade.
The group performed six
dances, three from Israel and one
each from Scotland, Poland and
Greece.
The Beginners class in folk,
square, round and fun dancing
will be held on Tuesdays from
11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. as soon
as the class is filled.
BEA and PHIL STATNICK
New Classes Begin
Three Ulpanim (conversational Hebrew), instructor
Rachel Keller; ESP (para-psychology), instructor Ethne
Chesterman: Folk Dance, instructors Bea and Phil
Statnick: Adult Art, instructor Celia Freed.
Call JCC for registration and information.
JCC Chanukah Party
JCC will hold its second annual Chanukah Party on
Thursday. Dec. 16 at 1 p.m. at Temple Emanu-El. There
will be a candle-lighting ceremony officiated by Rabbi
Goor, a one-act play presented by the Yiddish Theatre
Group, a sing-along, latkes and gifts for everyone. Tickets
can be purchased at the JCC.
JCC art specialist Sandy Brandt instructs Scott Gumora, Scott
Surokoff and Andy Cohen at a recent Tween Workshop.
New Pre-School Gets
Underway at JCC
The new Pre-School Group,
taught by Arline Kline, Sandy
Brandt, and Debbie Heller, is
held on Monday and Friday from
10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and Wed-
nesday from 1 to 3 p.m. A child
may attend all three or any
combination.
The children are presently
involved with crafts, art, dance,
singing, Jewish cultural projects
and music.
PLEASE HELP US!
JCC needs an adding
machine, a typewriter and
card tables. If you have any of
these items in usable condition
and would like to donate them
to the JCC. please call Helen
at the office.
Kids Korner
The first semester of the 1976-
1977 JCC After-School Enrich-
ment Program for kindergarten
through fifth grade will soon be
coming to an end. The final
session will take place the week of
Dec. 13.
The second semester will begin
the week of Jan. 10 and continue
through May. A new program
and format is being prepared.
Nova Elementary Students: A
program at Tropical Elementary
School in Plantation from 4 to
5:30 p.m. is planned.
Especially for Children Cul-
tural Series: Nov. 26 is "Rip Van
Winkle," a contemporary
musical.
Ruth Foreman's adaptation of
the classic updates Rip's sleep
from 1876 to 1976. After falling
asleep in the year 1876, Rip
awakens at the foothills of the
Cat skills in Liberty, N.Y., to find
the modern world. Andy Yel-
vington, a nightclub entertainer,
plays Rip.
On Dec. 29 is "Red Shoes,"
Feb. 27 "Alice in Wonderland
Updated," and on April 6 is Ivan
Kivitt's Merry-Go-Round Play-
house.
Winter Wonderland Day
Camp: A Camp program is being
offered to kindergarten through
fifth grade children on Tuesday,
Dec. 21, Wednesday, Dec. 22 and
Thursday, Dec. 23. Three full
days from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. are
planned with special crafts, ath-
letic projects, Hebrew singing,
film presentations, trips to Port
Everglades and to an orange
grove.
Vacation Trip Program: Three
trips will be held on Monday,
Dec. 27 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, Dec. 28, 9 a.m. to 4
p.m., and Wednesday, Dec. 29
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The first trip will be ice skating
and then to T-Y Park for lunch.
The Science Museum of Palm
Beach and Children's Zoo will
host a group on Tuesday and
Holiday Park for sports and
games and then "Red Shoes" at
the Children's Theater is sched-
uled for Wednesday.
Teen Topics
TWEEN CENTER
Tuesdays from 7:15-9:15 p.m. Dancing, arts and crafts,
yoga, table-top games, and preparations for a dramatic
performance.
JEAN SCENE LOUNGES
Sunday evenings, Dec. 5 and Dec. 19, for ages 14-17.
Live music, dancing, refreshments.
TEEN ART WORKSHOP
Every Thursday from 7-9 p.m. Macrame, tie-dying,
jewelry making and ceramics.
Teens interested in gymnastics, guitar classes, feminine
awareness, exercise and jogging class, or mode~n dance,
call Ira or Helen at the JCC.
Some of the 601weens at the Tween Center at the JCC.
7i
' Sunny Landsman, Yiddish
Theatre director, holds a
Chanukah menorah in tribute
to the upcoming play.
B'nai B'rith Youth AZABBG executive board meets at JCC to plan future activites.


It
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Port Louderdole
Friday, November 26
IS
' '

- *
Rabbi Kahane to Zionists: Develop Activist Program
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Rabbi Meir Kahane. founder of
the Jewish Defense League, told
members of the Rehgious Zion-
ists of America to develop aa
activist program, ***g the
organization's leadership and
seek to create a bloc with the
United Zionist Revisionists and
possibly with the Zionist Organ-
ization of America.
Addressing a large crowd of
what a JDL spokesman identified
as RZA members. Kahane urged
them to revitalize the RZA "so
that it can become the glory that
its founders meant it to be."
THE JDL leader bad an-
nounced hut month the begin-
ning of a new "strategy" for his
organization to "infiltrate" major
Jewish establishment groups in
the U.S. to "take these groups
over ideologically."
His first move in that direction
waa to seek membership in the
RZA as a follow-up to his joining
the National Religious Party in
Israel to Call Up
Thousands of Reservists
In Defense Exercise
TEL AVIV (JTA I Thousands of Reserve soldiers will
be called up in the near future in an exercise to test the time it
takes to concentrate men and vehicles in case of a defense
emergency.
Defense Minister Simon Peres said recently that there will be
a number of such exercises, all of them being announced in
advance so as not to alarm the public.
THE CALL-UP will be announced through codes on radio,
television and leaflets dropped by planes over large cities and
settlements. Reservists will report to meeting points or directly
to their units.
Vehicles owners called up will drive their vehicVs to a special
yard from where it will be sent to special units.
The exercise is expected to take about 18 hours and the
public has been asked to help Reserve soldiers reach their units.
MEANWHILE, this week has been declared Civil Air
Defense Week and schools will conduct exercises in evacuating
students from classrooms into air raid shelters.
Israel now has shelters for about 80 percent of the
population.
Jewish Continuity
Continued from Page 1
generation as well as their grand-
children, Dr. Gordis said that
"our example of learning and
practicing Jewish values will win
the loyalty of the best of our
youth and will guarantee the
Jewish future" thereby demon-
strating that "being a Jew is the
least difficult way of being truly
human.
"Organic Judaism the
meshing of Jewish religion,
culture and peoplebood. must be
the goal of every Jew who
regards himself loyal to his
people," he said.
He appealed for a Jewish
population growth with three
or four children in Jewish families
to preserve the Jewish group,
noting that the Jewish people has
already made its contribution,
through the Holocaust, to zero
population growth.
Dr. Gordis praised the role of
Federations and Welfare Funds
in North America in preserving
Jewish life and values, noting
that CJF Assembly delegates
were gravely concerned with the
viability of the Jewish heritage in
this Bicentennial year.
Today's American Jewish
community, he continued, is the
end product of Sephardic,
German and East European im-
migration over the centurim, and .
post-Nazi Holocaust survivors,
envisioning for itself a goal of
"integration without absorption,
acculturation without
limitation."
The scholar described Amer-
ican Jewry as the "most free,
most affluent and best organized
Jewish community" anywhere in
history.
"Yet," he emphasized, "it is
precisely the sunshine of
American freedom and oppor-
tunity which causes deep concern
for the preservation of Judaism
and the Jewish people," as evi-
denced by intermarriage, de-
fections from Jewish ranks into
the established churches of
Christendom and the esoteric
religious cults of today.
He cited the emergence of the
"modern Jew" highly literate
and informed in all cultural and
contemporary affairs except his
own heritage. For him, he said,
Judaism is a fossilized relic of the
past.
Organic Judaism, he con-
cluded, is the key to preserving
Jewish identity, embracing three
main elements: loyalty to the
Jewish people, involvement in
Jewish culture and a personal
commitment to Jewish religious
and ethical values.
The Herbert R. Abeles Mem-
orial Address, established in 1961
in memory of Mr. Abeles, who
served as CJF president from
1955 through 1959, is given each
year at the CJF General As-
sembly on a subject of "funda-
mental concern to Jewish com-
munity organizations in North
America."
The Council of Jewish Fed-
erations and Welfare Funds is the
association of central community
organizations Federations,
Welfare Funds, Community
Councils serving 800 Jewish
communities in the United States
and Canada. It aids these com-
munities to mobilize maximum
support for the UJA and other
overseas agencies, as well as for
major national and local services
involving financing, planning
and operating health, welfare,
cultural, educational, community
relations, and other programs
benefiting all residents.
The RZA.
refused to accept him.
Kahane as he did
rapped the RZA.
"What are they afraid of?
said at the mming "Is it a
to criticize the RZA
for having allowed the
to go down hill for 20 years, for
losing membership, power and
ideological content'*'
KAHANE pledged to
within the RZA through
fml. accepted democratic
methods to change the ideology
and leadership.
He said he would eventually
farm a group within RZA similar
to that in the parent body of NRP
to be known as Lamakor ("to the
source").
According to the 10-point
program of Lamakor, which was
distributed at the meeting, Ahya
m a rehgious obligation incum-
bent on every Jew, and
must be eliminated, the
cathmal curriculum in \%
schools must be revamped
include Jewish values, the
must end its practice
registering non-Jews as Jews,
threat of U.S. pressure on Is
must be countered, pru.
must be reordered in Jewish I
erations to meat the needs]
Jewish poor and yeshivot,
Jewish youth within RZA
be given a greater policy r
role.
Israels Labor Troubles Mount
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel's 44,000 civil ser-
vants are demanding that
they receive within two
weeks the same IL 350 raise
being given civil aviation
workers, or they will im-
pose work sanctions, in-
cluding slow-downs and
strikes.
But the government and
the Histadrut were having
second thoughts about
signing the agreement with
the civil aviation workers
because it has started an
avalanche of similar
demands.
TRANSPORTATION Min-
ister Gad Yaacobi defended
the agreement with the civil
aviation workers because pro-
ductivity at Ben Gurion Airport
increased some 20 percent last
year.
But in addition to the demano
for the IL 350 increase by civil
servants, similar demands are
being made by Customs officials.
Tax Bureau employees and
others.
AD this comes as the go slow
strike by 2,500 hospital
physicians continues, and the
strike by salaried engineers
caused a halt in the water supply
for several hours in Rebobot.
Sixteen engineers, who work
for the Israel Electric Corp., were
ordered back to work in an at-
tempt to prevent a cutoff in the
nation's electricity.
Back to work orders are also
expected to be issued to
engineers in the water, com-
munications and electronic in-
dustries.
THE SMALLEST strike is by
the nation's six harbor pilots who
have effectively closed down
Israel's three ports with the
result that the government has to
pay waiting damages to ship
Among others on strike are
2.500 socml workers. 550 X-ray
technicians. 150 district attor-
neys. 3.000 postal technicians
who man telephones and the tele-
graph, and wuikeis in the Assis
canned food and juice plant and
the Dead Sea workers, both of
which have closed down following
sanctions by employees.
The deteriorating labor re-
lations throughout the country is
a source of great conern to both
the Histadrut and the
Labor Party.
HISTADRUT Secretary
eral Yeruham Meshel met
Premier Yitzhak Rabin,
Rabin agreed to appear
hundreds of Histadrut and ]
Council leaders.
They refused to clear any pi
piloted by Cohen. But
accepted an apology from
and Cohen is back behind!
controls of an El Al jumbo jet|
Meanwhile, one conflict
ended that between Ell
maintenance workers and El
Capt. Uri Cohen. The worl
said they were insulted by Co
who said that the maintena
workers were amateurs.
Yariv Warns Arabs Are
On Move Once Again
NEW YORK Gen
(Res.) Aharon Yariv, director of
the Institute of Strategic Studies
at Tel Aviv University and
former intelligence chief of
Israel's armed forces, warned
here that the Arab states were
making "extensive efforts to
maximize their military options
against Israel" to force it "to
accept an Arab solution to the
Mideast conflict."
Addressing a press conference,
Yariv said, "If there is a stale-
mate we can expect war." He did
not say when this might occur
but stressed that "Israel will not
be blackmailed into endangering
its own existence even if
threatened by war."
YARIV CITED as "evidence"
of the Arab war threat the fact
that "the Egyptians and Syrians
have renewed their joint com-
mand and have appointed
CJFWF Delegates
Continued from Page 1
lution of the problem of the
Palestinian Arabs is one of the
conditions of a true Arab-Israel
peace. It has offered repeatedly
to make substantial con-
tributions toward such a
resolution within a general
settlement.
We urge the United States and
Canada to continue to provide
strong and consistent diplomatic
support for Israel both in inter-
national forums and in its
dealings with other nations in the
Middle East, in order to achieve
recognition, reconciliation and a
lasting peace settlement, arrived
at by meaningful negotiations
including face-to-face meetings.
We laud the repeated re-
affirmation during the past year
by the President of the United
States, the Secretary of State and
the United States Ambassador to
the United Nations, joined by
members of Congress, of
America's unshakable com-
mitment to the security of Israel,
reinforced by the Administration
and Congress with economic
military grants and credits to
Israel Further, we note the
positive developments which
have taken place in the last year
such as the implementation of the
Sinai agreement and the "good
fence" at the Lebanese border.
We look to the President-Elect
of the United States and the
recently appointed Secretary of
State for External Affairs of
Canada to carry out vigorously
and promptly the measures that
will support Israel's security and
speed the achievement of peace in
the Middle East.
| WECARE |
Continued from Page 1
ZoU. chaplain of the Jewish
Federation, also attended and
received a special citation for the
Jewish Federation.
A WECARE committee for
Chanukah Gifts under Mrs. Skol-
nick is assembling gifts for dis-
tribution to nursing homes.
Included will be hand-made
booties and afghans, as well as
small items to be packaged with
home-made Chanukah cookies on
Tuesday, Dec. 14 at 9:30 a.m. at
Federation. Deadline for receipt
of gifts will be Monday, Dec. 13
at the Federation office.
Mrs. Faber indicated that the
expansion of WECARE Volun-
teers has proceeded quickly,
however, more volunteers are
always needed for visits to hos-
pitals, nursing homes, and for
home visits. To join any of these
committees, call WECARE at
the Federation office.
Egyptian Minister of War,
Mohammed Gamazy. as headl
the joint Egyptian-Syrian co
mand. This is the same comr
that prepared the 1973
Kippur War." Yariv said.
Further evidence, he said,
the "negotiations in process
the resumption of full relatk
between Egypt and Libya whi
will have the consequence
placing the arsenal of
weaponry (in Libya's hands I
the disposal of Egypt."
Yariv said, "This
mization of the military optic
will be used to pressure the worl
in an attempt to force Israel
accept the Arab solution to th
M ideast conflict."
HE ADDED that "Israel
fully prepared to negotiate
overall settlement including con-l
siderable territorial concession*I
on the dear, unmistakeable and I
unqualified condition of full. real|
and durable peace."
Yariv headed the Israeli"
military team that negotiated the
first cease-fire agreement with
Egypt after the Yom Kippur
War. He served briefly later u
Minister of Information in the
Cabinet of Premier Yitzhak
Rabin.
Orthodox Meet
In New York
NEW YORK An in-depth
analysis of social, economic, nad
community challenges to the
American Orthodox synagogue
will be one of the primary theme*
of the upcoming 78th anniversary
Bicentennial convention of the
Union of Orthodox Jewish Con-
gregations of America, according
to a joint statement released by
UOJCA President Harold M
Jacobs and Convention Chair-
man Michael C. Wannfhahner.
The five-day event, which will
take place at L'Enfant Plaza
Hotel, Washington, DC, on
Thanksgiving weekend, Nov. 24
to 28, will bring together the out-
standing lay leaders of Orthodox
synagogues throughout the con-
tinent to meet and consult with
some of the most prominent
Torah minds and administrators
m the world.
-iV. .' '
. ... .... v V.


-*-'.;
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, Noveml
Women's Division Campaign Cabinet
Marilyn Gould (left), first vice chairman of the 1977 Federation
Women's Division Campaign; Anita Perlman, president of the
Women's Division; and Rebecca Hodes, general campaign
chairman at a recent Campaign Cabinet meeting.
Elsie Samet (left), cochairman of Point of Americas Federation
Women's Division Campaign; Shirley Rudolph, cochairman
Woodlands; and Mitchie Libros, chairman Woodlands.
Campaign Cabinet members Helen Lidsky (seated from left),
chairman Inverrary; Lillian Hirsch, cochairman Palm-Aire;
Gail Capp (standing left), chairman Sabra Division; Ruth
Portes, chairman Palm-Aire; and Edith Lipson, cochairman
Palm-Aire.

Mimi Rederman (left), cochairman of Northeast; Ruth Pine,
chairman Northeast; and Eleanor Shapiro, cochairman Point of
Americas, at Campaign Cabinet meeting.
Day School Students Visit Nursing Home
Campaign Cabinet members Hildreth Levin (seated from left),
chairman Gait; Ann Schneller, cochairman Gait; (standing left)
Pola Brodzki, cochairman Advanced Gifts; and Rosa Adler,
chairman Advanced Gifts, pose for picture at recent meeting.


MMMMV.V.'.'.*.- -..'- ..
The five-, six- and seven-year-
old children of the Hebrew Day
School of Fort Lauderdale visited
the Place for Living Nursing
Home recently and presented a
program of Hebrew songs to the
residents.
Some of the songs were prayers
set to music, Chassidic songs,
Sabbath songs and modern
Israeli songs. These songs were
learned as part of the children's
Judaic program at the Day
School.
Mrs. Tikva Silverman, a
teacher at the Hebrew Day
School of Fort Lauderdale, ac-
companied the children on the
guitar.
With the children were their
teachers, some parents and the
director of the school.
Rabbi Leonard Zoll, director of
chaplaincy of the Jewish Feder-
ation of Fort Lauderdale who
USY Sets Reunion
The 25th Anniversary Reunion
Celebration for USY will be held
on Thursday, Dec. 30, at Temple
Beth Shalom, Hollywood, at 7:30
p.m.
The event will feature
cocktails, a catered reception,
music and a chance to see old
friends.
Julie Silverman in Broward
County and Tom Mann in Dade
County are reservations chair-
people.
-
l *.. # ,.. ?...V.-.V.V'.v.'.'.'.\
attends to the spiritual needs of
the residents, conducted a
Sabbath service in which the
children participated.
Moshe Zwang, director of the
school, noted that the school's
doors are always open to visitors.
We do business
the right way.
1700 W.Oakland Park Blvd.,
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33311
Phone: 7351330
OAKLAND TOYOTA
Emanu-El
Activities
Rabbi Leonard S. Zoll, director
of education and chaplain of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, will be the
guest speaker at Sabbath Eve
Services on Nov. 26, at Temple
Emanu-El, Fort Lauderdale,
starting at 8:15 p.m.
On Nov. 28 Rabbi Joel S. GooifK
spiritual leader of Temple^
Emanu-El, will appear on The'r
Still Small Voice, Channel 7 at 10
a.m.
The Sisterhood of Temple
Emanu-El will hold its annual
Chanukah Sale at the temple on
Sunday, Dec. 5 and Sunday, Dec.
12 from 9 a.m. to noon.
The Judaica Shop will be
stocked with menorahs, dreidels,
gelt, toys, coloring books,
Chanukah decorations and
streamers, jewelry and gifts
appropriate for the holiday
season.
The Evening Sisterhood of
Temple Emanu-El has scheduled
their next meeting for Tuesday,
Dec. 14, in the temple all-purpose
room, starting at 7:30 p.m.
Susan Lebow Weinberg, a
lawyer and vice president of
NOW (National Organization of
Women), will be the guest"
speaker and her topic is "Women
In Today's World."
Future programs and projects
will be discussed breifly. Refresh-
ments will be served.
The Sisterhood of Temple
Emanu-El has scheduled its
Sixth Annual Antiques Show and
Sale for Dec. 7, 8 and 9, at the
temple auditorium.
Hours of the sale will be
Tuesday and Wednesday from 11
a.m. to 10 p.m. and Thursday
from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thirty dealers from various
areas of the country will be on
hand with a wide array of an-
tiques and collectibles, ranging
from china and glass to silver,
jewlry and furniture.
Home-cooked food will be
served for luncheons, dinners or
snacks prepared by Sisterhood
members.
Someone
hospitalized?
Bring
them home
- to us.
Recuperation at home is often
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^Jewish flcridliai n
OF Gftf A Tffft FORT LA UDEftQALE
Volume5 -Number24
Friday, November 26,1976
C Fred K Shocrwt Friday, November U, i7*
Price 25 cents
4Jewish Continuity' Theme of CJFWF Assembly
PHILADELPHIA Mem-
bers of the Jewish Federation's
delegation took part in the four-
day sessions of the Council of
Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds (CJFWF), joining with
the more than 2,000 other dele-
gates in workshop, seminar and
formal meetings that addressed
themselves to "the challenges of
Jewish continuity and the crucial
role of leadership in meeting
them."
The Fort Lauderdale dele-
gation was headed by Anita
Perlman, president of the Feder-
ation's Women's Division.
Other members included
Irving L. Geisser and Barry
Axler, the executive director and
assistant executive director of
the Federation, respectively.
Among the notables who
addressed the delegates were
Israel Ambassador to the UN
Chaim Herzog; Dr. Robert
Gordis, Bible scholar; and Jerold
C. Hoffberger, president of the
CJFWF.
Dr. Gordis, in delivering the
Herbert R. Abeles Memorial
address, described America as
"the world's last best hope for
freedom and justice" and the
"greatest bulwark for the life and
liberty of the Jewish people,"
calling at the same time for the
building of a "voluntary com-
munity dedicated to an organic
view of Judaism to arrest the
decay of the Jewish heritage" in
the future. He told the delegates
that American Jews must give
top priority to Jewish education
and to encouraging Jewish
couples to have larger families.
"Jewish loyalty," he said, "far
from being narrow and limited, is
the royal highway of service to
humanity" achieved through
Jewish education at every age
level."
Urging his audience to be
concerned about the present
Continued on Page 12
WECARE Program Expands
CJFWF Delegates Unanimously
Protest US Vote Against Israel
PHILADELPHIA The
Fort Lauderdale delegation to the
45th General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations
and Welfare Funds joined the
2,000 other delegates in a protest
to President Ford that took issue
with this country's UN Security
Council vote rebuking Israel's
supervision of the so-called Arab
territories, including East
Jerusalem.
A copy of the statement was
sent to President-elect Jimmy
Carter.
This United States vote
appears to be completely con-
trary to the repeated affirmations
in the United Nations during the
past year by the United States
government of its unshakeable
commitment to the security of
I srael," the protest read.
At the same time, the dele-
gates adopted a resolution noting
that "no Arab regime or move-
ment has as yet formally recog-
nized the legitimacy of Israel as
an independent Jewish State,"
adding that this "refusal remains
the crucial impediment to any
movement toward a settlement."
The U.S. and Canada were
urged in the resolution "to con-
tinue to provide strong and con-
sistent diplomatic support for
Israel both in international
forums and in its dealings with
other nations in the Middle
East."
The full text of the protest to
President Ford and President-
elect Carter, and the resolution,
follows:
The President of the
United States
The White House
Washington, D.C.
Dear Mr. President:
At the 45th General Assembly
of the Council of Jewish Feder-
ations and Welfare Funds
meeting today in Philadelphia,
more than 2,000 persons from
over 200 Jewish Federations,
which comprise over 95 percent of
the Jewish population of the
United States, expressed their
deep disappointment and concern
with the vote of the United
States at the United Nations Se-
curity Council yesterday which
deplored the State of Israel's
.supervision of the administered
territories and East Jerusalem.
This United States vote ap-
pears to be completely contrary
to the repeated affirmations in
the United Nations during the
past year by the United States
Government of its unshakeable
commitment to the security of
Israel
We now look to you for further
assurances that this vote in the
United Nations Security Council
represents no change in the
United States Government's
strong support of the State of
Israel and that the United States
will continue to exercise strong
leadership in the forums of the
United Nations in support of the
security of the State of Israel.
We attach herewith a copy of
the resolution passed un-
animously by the delegates to
this 45th General Assembly ex-
pressing our strong views on
"efforts toward peace" in the
Middle East and the need for
strong support for the State of
Israel.
Signed:
Jerold C Hoffberger
President, CJFWF
The text of the resolution:
The national interests of the
United States and Canada are
served by the commitment to
Israels security. It is grounded
in a deep sense of moral
obligation and affinity with a
sister democracy, the sole free
nation in the Middle East and the
only dependable ally amidst the
volatile struggle for dominance in
the Arab world
No Arab regime or movement
has as yet formally recognized
the legitimacy of Israel as an
independent Jewish State. That
refusal remains the crucial im-
pediment to any movement
toward a settlement.
Israel recognizes that the reso-
Continued on Page 12
Rovi Faber, chairperson of
WECARE Volunteer Program of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, has announced
the formation of the Veterans'
Affairs Committee under the
chairmanship of Harry May.
This committee, under May,
who has been active in veterans'
problems, will assist veterans in
various ways.
Anyone interested in joining
this Committee or with a problem,
may contact May at the Fedjf-
ation office. T.
Marie Parsons, chairperson of
the WECARE Clerical Com-
mittee, has sent Dorothy Hur-
witz and Mildred Schwartz as
teacher aides to assist Moshe
Zwang, principal of the Hebrew
Day School of Fort Lauderdale
on a five-day week schedule,
mornings and afternoons. Marie
helps out at the Federation office
three mornings a week.
WECARE has enlisted the
assistance of the Sisterhood and
Men's Club of Temple Emanu-El.
Ida Goldman and Harry
Haimowitz are the repre-
sentatives of these groups to
WECARE.
Mrs. Faber has also announced
that Philip Hoffman of Temple
Emanu-El has been appointed
chairman of Youth Services, to
aid and assist young people and
to encourage them to engage in
volunteer projects.
WECARE has established the
WECARE Mitzvah Fund to
underwrite various projects.
A Thank Yoa Luncheon was
recently tendered by the Plan-
tation Nursing Home to the
many volunteers who assist
there. WECARE Castle Gardens
Sabbath Service Chaplaincy
assistants who attended and
received a special citation were
Augusta Bregman, Helen Cooper
(Cochairperson), Gert Golden-
berg, Gussie Isman, Ruth Kay,
Mary Kantrowitz, Ruth Karron,
Rose Metz, Sylvia Mulhauser,
Terry Sclare, Lillian Schoen
(chairperson), Ethel Blitzer and
Helen Appel. Rabbi Leonard S.
Continued on Page 12
j
i
Major Gifts Dinner
i To Launch Campaign
Assembly Raps Israel
For S. Africa Ties
The 1977 Federation / UJA
campaign was poised for another
long step forward this week with
announcement by its general
chairman, Sen. Samuel L. Green-
berg, that a major gifts dinner
will take place Thursday, Dec. 9.
The dinner, the first such
major event of the 1977 campaign
calendar, will be held in the
Inverrary Country Club and the
minimum contribution, Sen.
Greenberg announced, will be
$5,000. He said that he an-
ticipated many contributions
would exceed the minimum.
Albert G. Segal, advance gifts
chairman, will preside.
Former Israel Ambassador to
Canada Col. Dov Sinai will be the
principal speaker. The soldier-
diplomat is now vice president of
the United Jewish Appeal's
Israel Education Fund.
Prior to his appointment to the
Education Fund, Col. Sinai was
special representative of the
Prime Minister's Office, and
before that was in the Israel
Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem.
A one-time Israel Consul
General in South Africa and later
his country's ambassador to
Canada, Col. Sinai served in 1967
and 1968 as a member of the
Israel delegation to the UN
General Assembly. He began his
military career as a member of
the pre-State Haganah, fought in
Israel's War of Liberation, and
rose to become military spokes-
COL. DOV SINAI
man of the Israel Defense Forces
and director of Public Affairs in
the Ministry of Defense.
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS The General Assembly has
adopted a resolution condemning
"the continuing and increasing
collaboration by Israel with the
South African racist regime."
The vote was 91-20 with 28
abstentions. Israel did not
participate in the vote on that
resolution or on any of the nine
other resolutions dealing with
apartheid as a protest against the
"selective and dishonest process"
of singling out Israel's relations
with the Pretoria government.
THE 20 COUNTRIES that
voted against the anti-Israel
resolution Were: Australia,
Austria, Belgium, Canada, Den-
mark, France, Guatemala, Hon-
duras, Iceland, Ireland, Italy,
Luxembourg, The Netherlands,
New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nor-
way, Sweden, United Kingdom,
United States, and West Ger-
ADL Appoints Joseph
NEW YORK The Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has elected a new national
chairman. He is Burton M.
Joseph of Minneapolis, Minn.
The national human relations
agency's seventh national chair-
man since it was founded in 1913
"to end discrimination against
Jews and to secure equal treat-
ment for all citizens," replaces
Seymour Graubard, a New York
attorney, who has completed his
six-year term of office.
THE ELECTION, by proc-
lamation, was held at the opening
session of ADL's 63rd annual
meeting. Some 300 League
leaders from all sections of the
country were in New York to
attend three days of policy-
making sessions at the Waldorf
Astoria Hotel. They then went to
Israel for week-long meetings
there.
The opening session also
featured reports by Graubard
and Benjamin R. Epstein, ADL's
national director, on the current
situation of American Jews.
many.
The Arab-inspired resolution
was the culmination of repeate'1
Arab attacks on Israel during the
debate on apartheid which began
on Oct. 26.
Israel's Ambassador to the
UN, Chaim Herzog, said in a
statement to the General As-
sembly before the voting that
Israel would not participate in
the voting on any of the 10 apart-
heid resolutions.
HE SAID this was because the
debate "has been turned into an
anti-Israel issue, ignoring as it
does the major moral problem of
apartheid which should be exer-
cising this body, because those
who prepared the resolution
against Israel (the Arabs) are
guilty of crimes of which they
accuse others: because what we
are called upon to participate in is
a monstrous act of deceit and a
cynical vote based on inter-
national hypocrisy and un-
scrupulous falsehood."
Herzog accused the Arabs of
turning the debate on apartheid
into a debate on the Middle East.
He said the Arabs have not the
slightest interest in advancing
the struggle against racial dis-
crimination in the world and that
by their anti-Israel drive, they
prejudice "any prospect to
achieving consensus on what is
close to the hearts of the
Africans." Herzog reiterated that
the Arab states have economic
ties with South Africa. He named
Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iraq and
others.


fi November 26, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
I Demonstrators Protest
800 Nazi Supporters
_)NN (JTA) About 300 demonstrators march.
[ugh Mannheim to protest a rally of about 800 Nazi sup-
ers, many of whom wore black shirts and Nazi insignias.
[pro-Nazi group handed out literature praising Hitler and
Nazi leaders and claiming that it was a myth that the
Is were responsible for the extermination of six million
}efore the rally began, police confiscated a stone memorial
ribed "Glory to Our Dead War Heroes." They also seized a
ith for Col. Joachim Peiper, a convicted Nazi war criminal
kmed to have died in a fire at his home in a French village
fuly.
IE MANNHEIM City Council had banned the rally, but
[arlsruhe Court had approved the meeting provided the
i memorial was not unveiled.
unveiling had been planned by the tiny ultra-rightist
^an People's Union Party, whose leader, Gerhard Frei,
"Other countries can honor their fighting heroes. Why
I we?"
charged that France had asked the German government
the demonstration.
IANWHILE, West Berlin police said they seized a bust of
and a machinegun in a raid on an apartment where 13
were planning to set up a neo-Nazi party.
lice said the group planned to establish a West Berlin
fch of the outlawed National Socialist German Workers
Madrid Jews are Threatened
By 'Sixth Commando' Order
JARIS Several members of Madrid's Jewish community have
led death threats from an extremist group calling itself "The
JHitler Sixth Commando of the New Order," according to reports
fng here. While a Jewish spokesman for Madrid's 3,000-member
community declined to reveal the names of those who received
treats or how many, the newspaper El Pais in that city said that
)t four Jews and several non-Jews were targets.
Israel, EEC in Talks
For Industrial Cooperation
tUSALEM (JTA) Dr. Moshe Mandelbaum, di-
of the Ministry of Commerce and Industry, left for
feels to continue talks with the EEC over a series of
foments with Israel.
talks were interrupted 10 days ago, after the proposals
[by the representatives of the market could not have been
ed by Israel.
Jews Rapped for Angering Reds
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Nahum Goldmann,
president of the World
Jewish Congress, has criti-
cized American Jewry for
antagonizing the Soviet
Union over the Jewish emi-
gration issue.
He said that he agreed
with Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger that
the adoption of the Jack-
son-Vanik Amendment
caused the present decrease
in Jewish emigration from
the USSR.
GOLDMANN'S remarks were
made in response to questions
from Rabbi William Berkowitz
during the Dialogue 76 lecture
series at Manhattan's Congre-
gation B'nai Jeshurun.
The WJC leader said that the
Jews in the United States should
continue their propaganda for the
right of Jewish emigration from
the Soviet Union as well as for
Jewish cultural, educational and
religious rights within the USSR.
But Goldmann stressed that he
opposed such "extreme"
methods as comparing the Soviet
Union to Hitler's Germany,
picketing and violence against
Soviet diplomats. He said that
the Soviet Union is still one of the
three major powers in the world
and Jews must maintain dip-
lomatic relations with it.
Nazis Mark 'Crystal Night'
BONN (JTA) A Nazi flag flew briefly over Frankfurt
Nov. 9, the 38th anniversary of Crystal Night when Nazi mobs
went on an anti-Jewish rampage. Frankfurt police said that
unidentified persons raised the flag on the smokestack of a
power station where Nazi literature was found pasted to the
door at the base of the 150-foot-high tower.
Nazi posters were also found glued on ticket vending
machines, lampposts and walls in other parts of Frankfurt.
They said: "We are here again. Red Front perish. Don't buy
from Jews." The posters were signed National Socialist Ger-
man Workers Party, Foreign Organization, Box 6414, Lincoln,
Nebraska. U.S A.
POLICE ARE investigating the incident. Following the
incident, Heinz Galinski, chairman of the Berlin Jewish com-
munity, speaking at a meeting of the European Council of
Jewish Communities, which was conducting a memorial service
to commemorate Crystal Night, demanded that the govern-
ment clamp down on neo-Nazi provocations.
"The government and the democratic parties should
concern themselves more seriously and basically than hitherto
with the provocative activities of the neo-Nazi circles."
GOLDMANN said he was also
concerned that American Jewry
stressed its public role too much
while not concentrating on its
religious, cultural and
educational life, which he said
was essential for Jewish survival.
He said in this connection that
he had always been concerned
that the leadership of American
Jewry was dominated by the
wealthy.
He said that American Jewish
intellectuals feel they cannot
participate in the Jewish leader-
ship because they cannot afford
the necessary financial con-
tributions.
ASKED ABOUT the Middle
East, Goldmann said that now
was the most opportune time for
the United States to seek to bring
about a final peace settlement.
j Bar ;
Mitzvah'
CAREY STANGER
Carey, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Lewis Stanger, will be called to
the Torah on the occasion of his
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, Nov.
27 at Temple Sholom, Pompano
Beach.
LAWRENCE LUBONNE
Lawrence, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Terry H. Lubonne, will be called
to the Torah on the occasion of
his Bar Mitzvah on Saturday,
Nov. 27 at 9 a.m. at the Margate
Jewish Center.
The celebrant's teacher, Cantor
Max Gallub, will officiate.
After the service, Mr. and Mrs.
Lubonne will sponsor the Kid-
dush in Lawrence's honor.
INDLELIGHTING
TIME
5:11
iKISLEV-5737
*
wgious Directory
FORTLAUDERDALE
tRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
I Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
iti. Cantor Maurice Neu (42).
I-EL TEMPLE, 3425 W. Oak
tark Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Joel
Cantor Jerome Klement
CONGREGATION OF
1HILL, 2041 NW 41th Ave.,
Conservative. Irving
isident.
JEWISH CENTER. 910*
St. Conservative. Rabbi
merman (44A). .
tAEL OF HOLLYWOOD,
ling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
User (SO.
SYNA-
ICTIONIST
NWffllll.
LANTATION
JEWISH CONGREGA
. Nob Hill Rd. Liberal Re-
Sheldon J. Harr (44).
3MPANO BEACH
TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Avt.
tve. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
bRenzer (4).
MARGATE
LEL CONGREGATION.
Me Blvd. Conservative.
Golembe and Charles
JEWISH CENTER. 4101
Conservative. Cantor Max
tAL SPRINGS
[MPLE. 3721 NW 100th
Rabbi Max weiti (44).
MELD BEACH
AUNITY CENTER
kEL SYNAGOGUE.
e East. Conservative.
irent (42)
community
NOV. 26
Childrens Cultural Series
JCC 1 p.m.
NOV. 27
Tennis Party
Plantation Jewish Congregation
NOV. 28
Men's Club Show at
Temple Beth Israel
Anna Maria Alberghetti
Tay-Sachs Testing Program
DEC. 4
Sisterhood of Temple Sholom
Chanukah Party
Hebrew Day School
Art Auction 8 p.m.
DEC. 5
Temple Beth Israel Men's Club
Show Jan Murray 7:30 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El Chanukah Sale
9 a.m.- 11:30 a.m.
Temple Sholom
Jewish National Fund 7 p.m.
Plantation National Council of
Jewish Women mini-thrift shop
6 p.m. 10 p.m.
DEC. 7
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood Antique
Show Dec. 7 and 9, 10 a.m. 9:30 p.m
Palm-Aire Ladies Golf Tournament
Dinner and Fashion show,
men and women evening.
Women's American ORT
Broward chapter School building
luncheon at Bahia Mar.

GRANDPARENTS
Are you worried about where to take your grandchildren
over vacation? Your problems are solved! See JCC page
for ideas.
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Toledot
"And his father Isaac said unto him: 'Come near now, and
kiss me, my son' And he smelted the smell of his
raiment, and blessed him" (Gen. 27.26-27).
Toledot Like Sarah, Rebekah at first was barren. After
Isaac prayed to God on her behalf, she bore twin boys
Esau and Jacob. Esau grew up a hunter, Jacob an upright
dweller in tents. One day, Esau returned from the field
very hungry, and disdainfully sold his "elder son" birth-
right to Jacob for a pot of lentil soup. Isaac was old and
blind and likely to die soon. He called Esau and instructed
him to prepare Isaac's favorite dishes, that he might bless
him before his death. However, Rebekah, who favored
Jacob for his superior merits, arranged for Jacob to secure
his father's coveted blessing instead of his elder brother.
Fearing Esau's revenge, und anxious lest Jacob marry a
Canaanite woman, his mother sent him to her brother
Laban, who lived in Paddan-Aram. Before leaving, Jacob
received Isaac's blessing, the continuation of God's
original blessing to Abraham: that he and his seed would
inherit the land of Canaan. Isaac bade Jacob marry one of
his uncle Laban's daughters.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
Tsamir, SIS, published by ShengoM. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.


Friday, November 26,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
>age5
Rabin's Advisor, Nesher To
Teach Leadership Workshop
-
By Federation Women's Division
Campaign Training Sessions Set
Lily Nesher, special adviser to
Israeli Prime Minister Rabin, will
be the special guest trainer at the
Leadership Training Workshop
of the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, according to
Rebecca Hodes, general cam-
paign chairman.
The session will take place on
Monday, Nov. 29, 9:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. at the Jewish
Federation office.
The work-
shop is de-
signed to give
the leadership
in the Wo-
men's Divi-
sion campaign
a greater in-
depth aware-
ness of the
needs of the
as
the
skills required NESHER
to translate these needs to the
women of our community. The
workshop is open only to
members of the Campaign
Cabinet, Womens' Division
Board, and Advance Gifts
Division.
campaign
well as
Lily Nesher, a former member
of the Israeli Foreign Ministry,
was born and educated in
Bessarabia. She fled to the Soviet
Union in 1941 when Hitler in-
vaded that city and later studied
languages and history at the
University of Uralsk.
In 1946 Mrs. Nesher said she
decided that her fate lay with the
survivors of Hitler's Holocaust
so she joined the underground
and left the Soviet Union
illegally. When she arrived in
Germany she participated in the
organization of the Jewish Dis-
placed Persons in the U.S. Zone
of Germany.
When Mrs. Nesher arrived in
Israel in 1948, hostilities were
beginning and she volunteered to
join the army, where she served
as a Lieutenant in charge of the
absorption of newcomers to the
newly born State.
Mrs. Nesher joined the Israeli
Foreign Ministry at the ter-
mination of her army service. She
had several governmental
missions abroad, among them
three missions to the Soviet
Union, the last just before the
Yom Kippur War.
The Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdcle will hold a city-
wide worker training meeting on
Friday, Dec. 3, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. at the Jewish Federation
office, according to Rebecca
Hodes, general campaign chair-
man of the Women's Division.
Mrs. Hodes announced that
Marilyn Smith, past president of
the Miami Jewish Federation's
Women's Division, will be the
guest trainer.
Louella Shapiro Will Address
Annual Haassah Luncheon Dec. 8
i
Louella Shapiro, area major
gifts chairman for the National
Board of Hadassah, will update
the progress of Hadassah's
medical program of research,
healing and teaching in Israel, for
members and guests attending
the annual luncheon given by the
North Broward Chapter of
Hadassah at the Inverrary
Country Club, Wednesday, Dec.
8. according to chapter president,
Betty Gerber.
In addition to this portrayal of
the Hadassah Medical Organ-
ization, Fran Sindell, vice pres-
ident and luncheon chairman, has
announced an entertainment
program.
Marion Roy, song stylist, who
has performed in New York, and
for the past seven years in clubs
throughout South Florida, will
present a program of songs.
The luncheon will also mark
Hadassah's sixty-fifth birthday,
and Esther Cannon, vice pres-
ident of the Florida Region of
Hadassah, will offer a tribute on
this occasion.
Mrs. Shapiro has just returned
from her eighteenth trip to Israel
where she and her husband were
honored during the Double Dedi-
cation Tour, for the establish-
ment of the Shapiro Cancer Re-
search Fund, housed in the new
Ullman Building in Jerusalem.
A winner of many awards,
Mrs. Shapiro, of Miami Beach, is
LOUELLA SHAPIRO
completing her twentieth year of
service on the National Board
and will be joining the Honorary
Council.
She was twice selected as
Woman of the Year in her
hometown, Atlanta, Ga., where
she was active in the American
Red Cross, Cancer Society, Girl
Scout Council, and the League of
Women Voters.
Invocation at the luncheon will
be offered by Sylvia Thaler, co-
president of the Aviva Group,
and the benediction at the close
will be made by Regina Neiman,
president of the Chapter's newest
group, Scopus.
Tickets for this event are avail-
able from the HMO chairman of
each group.
Shalom Winter Tour
To Israel 1977
Ft. Lauderdale- Ft. lauderdale
led fry Doctor Morion Molavsky
11 FANTASTIC DAYS 6877
Jan. 24 eb. p^ ^^ doub|e occupancy
$1057
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15 GLORIOUS DAYS
Jan. 24-Feb. 7
Includes super hotels, Israeli breakfast, transfers. I-I"..! hofcl.lt
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SHALOM TOURS-TRANS OLTMPIA TOUtS
1800 So. Yeung Circle, Hollywood, Fla.
HOLLYWOOD
925-8220
920-9202
MIAMI
944-4879
Over 200 women from all of the
major areas are expected to
attend the meeting and receive a
briefing on the needs of the cam-
paign and learn the necessary
skills required to have a suc-
cessful campaign. All questions
and problems concerning ef-
fective campaigning will be
answered.
Anyone interested in attending
this session and working in the
1977 Women's Division cam-
paign may contact the Jewish
Federation office.
Anita Perlman is president of
the Women's Division; Rebecca
Hodes is general campaign chair-
man; and Marilyn Gould, Sue
Segaul and Terri Baer are
members of the campaign
executive committee.
Synagogue To Welcome Rabbis
Members and guests of the Re-
constructionist Synagogue will
celebrate Thanksgiving and
Shabbat evening services on
Friday, Nov. 26 at 8 p.m.
Joining them in the Sanctuary,
in the Mark IV Building, Plan-
tation, will be a student from the
Reconstructionist Rabbinical
College who will participate in
conducting services and making
a presentation during the study
session.
On Dec. 3, the synagogue
will welcome an honorary
member, Lavy Becker, Rabbi
Emeritus of the Reconstruction-
ist Synagogue of Montreal.
Louis Koch, vice president of
the Sunrise Jewish Center and
a leader on behalf of many
community services, will be
the recipient of the Israel Sol-
idarity Award at a Night in
Israel under the auspices of
the Sunrise Lakes Phase II
Israel Bond committee on
Wednesday, Dec. 8, 8 p.m. at
the Sunrise Lakes Phase II
Club House.
Single Ladies & Men
Make New Friends
Lowest Rates
Call Toll Free
Julie's
Dating Service
1-800-432-5024
Rabbi Becker serves on the
World Executive of the World
Jewish Congress and is the
honorary consultant of Inter-
Community Affairs. In that role
he has been responsible for
contact between the Jewish Com-
munity in Cuba and the World
Jewish Congress.
He is also involved in the
Jewish Teachers Seminary and
the Zionist Organization of
Canada.
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