The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00066

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
I ^Jewish Florid fan
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 5 Number 19
Friday, September 17,1976
C Fred K. Shochet- Friday, Sept. 17,1*7* Three sections Price $2.00
A New Year Message From
jL Our President, Allan E. Boer
^5j '*" The American Jewish Community is celebrating great
* freedom in this Bicentennial year. Yet Jewish life con-
tinues to be threatened. For to us, a Bicentennial
celebration is more than an act of reverence, more than an
expression of appreciation it is a confrontation with our
heritage.
Women's Division Forms
New Volunteer Committee
"As life is action and passion,"
said Oliver Wendell Holmes, the
great American jurist, "it is
required of a man that he should
share the passion and action of
his time at peril of being judged
not to have lived."
1 lolmes's words are a code and
a creed which shape our work in
the Jewish Federation, which is
today, by every measure, the
central address for our com-
munity.
The UJA campaign run
through our Federation has
gone beyond the boundaries of
fund-raising, creating a new
consciousness, a new meaning, of
what being Jewish means in the
last quarter of the 20th century.
We have redefined giving to
Continued on Page 8- A
Local Leaders Return From
Prime Minister's Mission
Sen. Samuel L. Greenberg, incoming United Jewish
Appeal chairman for 1977, Albert G. Segal, chairman for
big gifts, and Irving L. Geisser, executive director of the
Jewish Federation, have returned from the Prime
Minister's Mission to Israel, where 260 leaders
representing 70 communities pledged a record-breaking
Are you interested in enriching
your life by volunteering your
services for tasks within the
Jewish community? If so, the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale has an answer for
you, according to Anita Perlman,
president of the Women's
Division, and Mimi Bederman,
vice president of community
relations. According to Rovi
Faber, chairman of the program,
the new service is called
W.E.C.A.R.E. With Energy,
Compassion and Responsible
Effort.
Mrs. Faber said the volunteers
will perform a variety of tasks
within the Jewish community,
including:
Clerical and office work at the
Jewish Federation office; for
example, when large community
mailings are sent out (four hours
of work entitles the volunteer to a
free lunch);
Transportation for the elderly
to and from programs to the
Jewish Community Center;
Visitation to nursing homes;
Services to shut-ins, and
much more.
Mrs. Faber said careful records
will be kept of the hours given by
each volunteer, and there will be
special awards and presentations
$21.4
million for the 1977 campaign 30 percent over
Continued on Page 12-A
PLO Office in Prague?
VIENNA (JTA> The Palestine Liberation
Organization will soon open an office in Prague,
Czechoslovakia, diplomats said here. "A high-ranking PLO
official is scheduled to attend the opening ceremony," the
diplomats added. Arab sources said this was an indication that
either PLO leader Yasir Arafat or the chief of its political
department, Farouk Kaddoumi, is scheduled to come to
'"'rague. The diplomats did not disclose the date of the opening
teremony.
T
Yugoslavia, Cuba Will Lead Drive
Against Israel at United Nations
By YITZHAK RABI
WASHINGTON (JTA) Chaim Herzog, Israel's
Ambassador to the United Nations, has indicated that
Yugoslavia and Cuba are going to lead the anti-Israel,
anti-Jewish offensive at the upcoming General
Assembly. He made this observation in an address to
the B'nai B'rith International Council here.
In his sharply worded
and comprehensive
analysis, Herzog also
dealt with the decline of
the UN, the Lebanese
crisis, the Palestine
Liberation Organization,
the relations between
Israel and South Africa,
v" international terrorism
and other major issues
relating to Israel and the
Jewish people.
"OVER THE past year (v*
have) been experiencing a major
anti-Semitic attack against our
people on the part of Yugoslavia,
Cuba and others," Herzog said.
"The Yugoslavs have made
some of the strongest possible
attacks on our people on the
United Nations front. On one
the fore and joining them in the
attack."
Herzog referred to the
Yugoslavian attack on Israel
during the Security Council
meeting over Israel's rescue
operation in Uganda.
BUT THE Israeli envoy said
that in the face of this anti-
Semitic offensive there is a
"silence" on the part of world
Jewry.
"If there is one aspect of these
deliberations which causes me
concern it is the fact that Jewish
communities throughout the
world, while being vaguely aware
of unpleasant developments in
the United Nations, do not
appreciate the fact that a major
international anti-Semitic attack
on the Jews is under way," he
declared.
"The silence of the Jewish
community is encouraging our
enemies who feel they can get
away with it."
CITING THE hostile attitude
of Cuba against Israel and the
Continued on Page 13- A
AMBASSADOR HERZOG
issue in the Security Council,
when only the Arabs and some
Moslem countries attacked us,
Yugoslavia insisted on coming to
Lebanese Ask Israel
For Military Assist
TEL AVIV (JTA) Villagers in southern
Lebanon have asked for the Israeli army's protection after
fighting off a terrorist attack on Ein Ebel village.
Four terrorists and three villagers were killed. A
fourth villager, a youth of 17, was wounded and brought
to the government hospital in Safad for treatment.
Ein Ebel, a Maronite The latter town is the site
Christian village, is located of an Israeli medical station
near the Israeli border five set up to treat sick and in-
kilometers north of Dovev. Continued on Page 7-A
at the end of the year. "There is
so much which we as volunteers
can do to improve the quality of
life within our Jewish com-
munity. I hope that you will
become part of our W.E.C. A.R.E.
program so that you can perform
the Mitzvah of giving and
receiving," she added.
Anyone wishing to participate
in the W.E.C.A.R.E. program is
urged to contact the Jewish
Federation office, 484-8200.
Castle Condo Plans
UJA Breakfast
Ben Dantzker, chairman, and
the committee of Castle Condo-
minium have announced that a
United Jewish Appeal breakfast,
sponsored by the Jewish
organizations, is scheduled for
Sept. 19 at 10:30 a.m. at the
Castle Recreation Center
Clubhouse.
All Castle Condominium and
homeowners are cordially invited.
The guest speaker is to be lec-
turer and author Dr. Howard
Adelson.
Soviets Nix
Exit Visas
For Families
Of Ilyinka
NEW YORK (JTA)
Moscow authorities have refused
to allow 80 families from the
Soviet village of Ilyinka to
emigrate to Israel on the grounds
that they are not really Jewish,
the Greater New York Conference
on Soviet Jewry has learned. The
families are descendants of
Russians who were converted to
Judaism several centuries ago.
Bronx Borough President
Robert Abrams, Conference
chairman, explained that the
authorities had earlier permitted
the emigration of eight families
from Ilyinka, which is located in
the Voronezh region 1,400 miles
from Moscow.
HOWEVER, in the past year,
109 invitations from relatives in
Israel have not been delivered.
In an effort to isolate the
villagers, Soviet activists
Vladimir Slepak and Anatoly
Sharansky were barred from
visiting the village earlier this
summer. The Ilyinka Jews are
forced to have their internal
passports stamped with a false
entry stating that they are
Russian nationals since they
have Russian surnames.
r-
^r
The Officers, Board of Directors
and Staff of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Wish You
A HAPPY, HEALTHY AND
PEACEFUL NEW YEAR



Pige2-A
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976?"5 *
- r
Hillel Day School Opens
With Record Enrollment
The Hillel Community Day Executive director Marshall
School opened the doors of its Baltuch said there is still limited
new multicomplex facility at space available in some classes.
19000 NE 25th Ave. on Sept. 1. All interested parents should call
welcoming over 300 students, the school.
Rabbi Alpert to Officiate AtReconstructionistServices
The Reconstructionist Syna-
gogue has announced that Rabbi
Rebecca Alpert will officiate at
High Holiday services this year.
Rabbi Alpert, who, with her
husband, was graduated from the
Reconstructionist Rabbinical
College last June, comes from
Brooklyn. She earned her under-
graduate degree at Barnard
College and completed her
Master's thesis at Temple
University in Philadelphia, where
she was a teaching assistant
while attending the Recon-
structionist Rabbinical College.
She has also studied at the
"Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
With additional applications
being received daily. Hillel ex-
pects the student body to reach
350 by the end of September.
In the culmination of a six-year
dream. Hillel Day School began
its si vnth yp^r in its own home
adjacent t<, the new Jewish Com-
munity Center Only one of the
four buildings is completed, but
in another two months the
finishing touches will be added to
the cafetorium. a combined
cafeteria nnd auditorium seating
-J(M) students for lunch and 800
people auditorium-style. Hot
kosher meals will be prepared
daily in the separate meat and
dairy kitchens.
The third building will house
the administrative offices, gift
shop, teachers' lounge, clinic and
additional classrooms. The fourth
building will hold science labs,
an and music rooms and a
physical education office. The
third and fourth buildings are
projected to be completed for the
opening of school in September.
1977. Land has been earmarked
for a fifth building, the future site
of the junior and senior high
departments.
HILLEL STARTED seven
years ago with 70 students in the
old Beth Shalom Synagogue in
Hollywood. After two years it
moved to a renovated North
Miami Beach motel, where
classes were held for the next four
years.
The new Hillel building has, in
addition to the classrooms, a
library, two learning centers and
a complete pre-school
playground.
An Early Childhood Education
Program beginning with the 2'/t-
year-olds is available, along with
elementary school (kindergarten
through sixth grade) and a junior
high program (to grade 91 with
departmentalized classes. The
latest and most modern lab
equipment for the science
program will be used along with a
new curriculum.
A reinforcement of the pen-
manship curriculum is under
way, as is the continuation of the
successful Lippincott Reading
Program, geared to the above-
average student, according to
Rabbi Albert Mayerfeld. prin-
cipal.
A fleet of 11 buses brings
students to school from Margate.
Tamarac, Fort Lauderdale,
Hollywood and Miami Lakes as
well as the North Miami Beach
area.
Florida JWV Auxiliaries Are
Honored at Convention
At the national convention of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewish
War Veterans in mid-August at the Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood, the
Department of Florida-Ladies Auxiliary was awarded trophies in
Americanism, child welfare, membership, organizing and senior
citizen: and citations for community relations, hospital, leadership.
legislation, programming, servicemen's service and aid to Israel.
Seventeen auxiliaries received blue honor roll ribbons for entering at
least seven of the ten programs, and twelve auxiliaries received white
membership retention ribbons.
NATIONAL OFFICERS and
chairmen were elected from the
Florida area. Past national
president Malvina V. Freeman of
Hollywood was reelected as
national judge advocate. PNP
Rose Schorr of llallandale and
past Department president
Lillian Sihoen of Lauderhill were
elected t the advisory board,
while I'M' Daisee V. Haberman
of Sarasota was elected to the
finance committee.
North Miami Beach residents
I'M' Freda Alexander was
apixiinted Women of the Year
chairman and PNP Marcia
Kozlow was appointed as
organizer chairman.
Belle Swartz, president of the
Department of Florida, with
Department advisory board com-
mittee members, will attend an
advisory board meeting on
Sunday, Sept. 12, at 11 a.m. at
the Margate home of past
department president Zelda
Weinstein, chairman.
NEW MATERIAL from the
convention will be incorporated
to be presented to members
Beth Hillel
Dedicating
New Temple
Congregation Beth Hillel of
Margate will dedicate its new
temple on Sunday, Sept. 19, at 11
a.m. Civic leaders and local
clergy will participate in the
ceremonies. The new phone
number is 974-9030, and the new
hours for daily prayers are 8:15
a.m. and 6 p.m.
A few tickets are still available
for the High Holy Days services.
Selichot services will be held
Saturday. Sept. 18, beginning at
11 p.m.
On Sept. 5 the Men's Club
launched its new season with a
successful breakfast and is
making plans for the year's
activities.
Rabbi Zoll Leads Auxiliary Services
On Sunday, Sept. 19. at 10
a.m. the temple will hold a
membership coffee. Unaffiliated
persons in the area are invited to
attend the open house and learn
of Conservative Temple Beth
Israel's full program, from Child
to Grandparent.
Registration is under way for
the religious school program.
Temple Beth Israel has an-
nounced that Rabbi Leonard Zoll,
the newly elected chaplain of the
Jewish Federation of Fort
Lauderdale, will conduct the
temple's auxiliary services at the
Inverrary Country Club, assisted
by Cantor David Golinkin. Rabbi
Zoll will also be in charge of a
Hebrew high school program to
be conducted at the temple.
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POTTERY O RELIGIOUS ARTICLES O STITCHERY
mASADA
ART 4 GIFT GALLERY
ISRAELI IMPORTS
The Shops at Oriole Estates
4202 North State Rood 7 (441)
Lauderdale Lakes, Florida
coffee & a nosh
complimentary
ART p GIFTS Q FASHIONS <* JEWELRY O BOOKS
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attending the Council of Ad-
ministration meeting on Sunday
morning. Oct. 24. at the Dutch
Inn Motel in Lake Huena Vista
near Orlando. PNP Hillie Kern, of
Miami Beach, was appointed as
Aid to Israel chairman, while
I'Dl' Irene Cboperman, also a
resident of Miami Beach, was
appointed as Veterans Service
Chairman.
Following the holidays, Rabbi
Alpert will begin a teaching
career at Rutgers University in
New Jersey.
People who have reserved High
Holiday tickets are reminded
that they must be picked up not
later than Sept. 23.
Rabbi Alpert will be the
congregation's guest at Sabbath
services this evening and
Saturday morning. <^'
The Reconstruct ionist Syna-
gogue Torah School began its
1976-77 session on Sept. 12. and
all classes up to seventh grade
are in operation. Grades 8 and up
Will begin classes in mid-October
7;
CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
*
7:19
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Why it has to be said.
The services we render reflect the traditions and practices of the Jewish
community. In this respect, we are accountable to the community and to each of its
members for the performance of our responsibilities in a manner consistent with its
expectations and the high standards evoked by Jewish Law and Custom.
Implicit inthisobligation is the responsibility to provide factual information in
order for the public to develop a better understandingof funeral service in terms of
the alternatives, prices and assistance we make avai (able, if the need should arise.
The explanation of our policies and services as listed below is one of the ways
we are tryingto fulfill our responsibility to thecommunity.
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We're trying to help provide a way for families to compare
funeral charges.
We quote our prices over the phone, without obligation.
We explain every funeral arrangement and itemize thecharges for each.
We give counsel on funeral pre-arrangement without charge.
We're trying to help make funeral arrangements less
complicated.
We provide a listing of all available funeral arrangements itemized by price.
We display caskets in all price ranges, with each price clearly indicated.
We offer need-orierrred counseling, answerall questions fully and assure each
family the time and privacy they require to reach a decision.
We do everything possible to see to the comfort and well-being
of each family.
We maintain our own spacious, comfortable facilities convenient to all
communities in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.
We try to be genuinely helpful, attentive to the needs and wishes of each
family in the spirit of Jewish tradition. In that tradition, we serve every family.regard-
less of financial circumstance.
We provide the expert services of the largest Jewish staff in South Florida.
We are available to families for assistance in every possible way after
the funeral.
We provide accommodations of special importance to Jewish
families.
We make available considerate,prompt and economical service in New York
and all other states.
We arrange burial in Israel within 24 hours.
We maintain Yahrzeit records for a family's use if needed.

^
Hnn?wnEr^^
HOLLYWOOD: 5801 Hollywood Boulevard/920-1010
North Miami Beach, Miami Beach and Miami
Five chapels serving the New York City Metropolitan area
Memorial Chapel,Inc./Funeral Directors
177*
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
A.Grossberg.L f 0
1-17-7*


J^Frid
Friday, September 17,1976
I'
The Jewish Fhritjian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3- A
Badass ah Groups Begin Season

Armon Group of Fort
Lauderdale Chapter will meet on
Tuesday, Oct. 5, at 12:30 at
Castle Recreation Hall in
Lauderhill. Members and
prospective members are invited
and refreshments will be served.
Highlight of the meeting is
(letting To Know Us," in-
troducing all officers and board
members, describing their ac-
tivities for the current season,
reparations will be made for the
nnual white elephant sale at
,auderhill Mall, Monday and
^lesday, Oct. 25 and 26, in
conjunction with other fund-
raising organizations.
Silman. Program vice president
Florence Krantz has arranged an
introduction of officers and
chairmen, to be followed by a
convention report and music.
Tamar Group of Fort Lauder-
dale Chapter held its first general
meeting of the season on Sept.
13. An original program, written
by program vice president Mrs.
Joseph Freed and program
chairman Mrs. Dalla Alpert, was
presented and new members were
introduced.
BB Women
Margate Chapter No. 1524 will
hold its opening meeting on
Tuesday, Sept. 21, at noon at the
David Park Teen Center. Guest
speaker will be Hank Myer,
chairman of the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Advisory Board of Brow-
ard and Palm Beach Counties.
The chapter held a luncheon
and card party at Gallagher's in
Pompano Fashion Square on
Aug. 31. It was chaired by fund-
raising vice president Mitzi
Ratner,
assisted by Ann Tobin
and Esther Magzen.
Tennis Chairman Named For Maccabiah Games
Aviva Group will hold its first
meeting of the season on
Monday, Sept. 20, at noon at the
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall.
Members and prospective
members are invited and Mrs.
Mollie Winston, president, will
preside over the program, which
includes a musical presented by
Dorothy Golin, "Welcome,
Members."
I
Chal Group of North Broward
Chapter held their opening
meeting of the season on Sept. 16
at the Pompano Community
Center. A film, "Hadassah In,"
as shown and a skit presented
members.
Basketball coach Nat Holman,
president of the United States
Committee Sports for Israel, has
appointed Stuart Winston as
Florida tennis chairman for the
July, 1977, Maccabiah Games in
Israel. Winston, who is president
of the Bell Paper Company of
Miami, was a basketball player at
CCNY under Holman.
As a Stadium Chair umpire,
Winston has umpired for four
years at the U.S. Open Tennis
Championships in Forest Hills,
N.Y., and at the Wimbledon
(England) matches. He is also a
judge with the Miami Beach
Boxing Commission and has
judged four world championship
bouts. Winston is umpiring at
the current Forest Hills matches
in New York, which began on
Sept. 1 and will end on Sept. 12.
Men and women of any age
interested in working on the
Maccabiah Games tennis com-
mittee or in qualifying for play on
the U.S. team should contact
Winston.
Gilah Group of Inverrary has
announced that meetings will be
held in the upper room of the
Environ Culture Center on
Inverrary Blvd. Installation of
officers is set for Wednesday,
Sept. 22, at 12:30 p.m., with
president Josephine Newman of
Fort Lauderdale Chapter as
installing officer. Regular
meetings are scheduled for Oct.
20, Nov. 17 and Dec. 15, all at
12:30 p.m. New Year cards are
available from Eve Katz, who will
also accept orders for trees.
f7 J 5737
-ternpLe emanu el
OF GREATER FORT LAUDEROALE
Ray us Group will meet on
iept. 28 at 12:30 p.m. at the
+ ?2&marac Jewish Center under the
^leadership of president Anna

hKjh holy toy seuviccs
MAIN SERVICES: (reform) COMMUNITY SERVICES
PARKER PLAYHOUSE
FT. LAUDERDALE
ROSH HASHANAH, SEPT. 24, 25
KOL MORE, VOM KIPPUR OCT. 3, 4
CONDUCTED BY:
RABBI JOEL S. GOOR AND
CANTOR JEROME KLEMENT
FOR ALL SEATING ft
MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION
CALL: Mr. Mm* Waft**, EmcuKw Ota**
TEMPLE EMAMU-EL 731-2310
9 AM. to 5 P.M. MON. to FRI.
3245 W. OAKLAND PARK BLVD.
AU SjmMCSS WW PtMOMAL
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
SANCTUARY
3245 W. OAKLAND PARK BLVD.
ROSH HASHANAH, SEPT. 24, 25, 26
KOL MORE. YON KIPPUR OCT. 3, 4
CONDUCTED BY:
RABBI HENRY L. SHWARTZ
AND CANTOR PHILUP BAUM
AU. SCATS
DONATION $29 *
AT TEMPLE EMANU-EL
SANCTUARY
C
-non Of RABBV MB. A OOOA
MORRIS CERULLO ]ircsents
Monument to Freedom
For nine months, less than a thousand Jews
withstood 5,000 troops of the Roman Tenth Legion.
In the end, they chose death rather than slavery.
yOSSI yADIN Star or the Goloen
GMm Awal-*tai* film "# Mr fafter ToW
M," as the Zealot leader, *** Sen raJr.
Oftl LEVY Ir* I *a*0f Mate* Scree*,
at Havlw Silva, General oe the Tenth legion.
trtim-mti'
yiGAELYAOIN
The Director ot the ttesada
Archaeological 7"
Ixgcihtion wp ,
preeenU recently lf-*A
discovered artifact*. MHMM
BE SUM TO WATCH THK NATtON-WIDC, HUMf-TIMI T.V. SHOAL THIS MONTH.
C^^ IOCAI LISTINGS KM TtMf AND CHANNO.
Candlelight Selichot Service
Ushers in Holy Dags at Emanu-El
The Selichot service, which
ushers in the High Holy Days
period with penitential prayers
and songs, will be held at Temple
Emanu-El on Saturday, Sept. 18,
starting at 11 p.m., conducted by
Rabbi Joel S. Goor, the temple's
spiritual leader, and Cantor
Jerome Klement.
Beginning at 9:30 that
evening, the Sisterhood will be
hostesses at a social reception.
Children are especially invited to
attend with their parents, and
prospective members are invited
as well.
THIS YEAR, for the first
time, Temple Emanu-El will hold
community High Holy Days
services in the temple sanctuary,
with Rabbi Henry Shwartz and
Cantor Philip Baum officiating.
The community services will
enable those unaffiliated with
Temple Emanu-El to worship in
the sanctuary.
Seats are available at a $25 per
person donation for the entire
community services, which will
be held on Rosh Hashanah, Sept.
24, 25 and 26, and Yom Kippur,
Oct. 3 and 4. Reservations can be
made through the temple office,
731-2310.
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
TEMPLE SHOLOM
132 SE 11 th Avenue, Pompano Beach, Flo.
RABBI MORRIS A SKOP CANTOR JACOB J RENZER and CHOIR
ROSH HASHANAH
Fri. Sept. 24 7:00 p.m.
Sol. Sept 25 9:00a.m.
Sun. Sept. 26 9:00o.m.

KM NIDRAY
Sun. Oct. 3 7:00 p.m.
YOM KIPPUR DAY
Mon Oct 4 9-00a.m.
\ RESERVATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED AY YHE TEMPLE OFFICE
942-6410

RELIGIOUS SCHOOL REGISTRATION
Aug. 30th and 31st lOto 12
Sept. Island 2nd 1 to3
Primary thru Confirmation
FULLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS
Temple BenflsRRct
Fort Lauderdale's Conservative Temple
day seRvices
ROSH HASHANAH, SEPT. 25 24
KOL NIDRE, YOM KIPPUR, OCT. 3 A 4
MMH SERVICE: TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
TIM W. Oakland Pk. Blvd.
Conducted bv Rabbi Phillip A. Labowltz and Cantor Maurice A. Neu with choir j
mum somces: inverrary country club
3S40 Inverrary Blvd.
Services conducted bv a prominent Rabbi and Cantor David Golinkin
CAMELOT HALL 2052 M.W. 49th Awe.
Conducted bv Rabbi Emanuel Schenk
And Cantor Sol J. Schwartz
TJc*at avaMaft* at Camtlat Hall from n-tt am. 1-3 am
FOR ALL TICKET INFORMATION CALL:
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
73544t HOURS: AM 5 PM
TIM W. Oakland Pk. Blvd.. Sunrise
DONATION: INVERRARY COUNTRY CLUB $25.40
CAM*LOT HALL 525.00
All Services Under Personal Direction Of Rabbi Phillip Labowltz
^
Serving the needs
of the Jewish Community
in our 3 locations
ENORAH
CfcapeCs
Mark Weissman
Joseph Rubin
Broward County's first
Jewish Funeral Directors
DEERFIELD
441 S. Federal Highway Phone 971-3330
MARGATE
5915 Park Drive Phone 971-3330
SUNRISE
6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd Phone 739-6000



.Page 4-A
The Jewish Flaridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976
Most Audacious Feat
THE YEAR 5736 was a vintage one for Israel and world'
Jewry. It was a year, as many Israelis noted, when the Yom
Kippur War "came to an end." In one fell swoop, the
feelings of depression, worthlessness, self-recrimination,
despair and isolation engendered by the 1973 war and
culminating in the infamous United Nations General*
Assembly resolution equating Zionism with racism came to
an end.
The audacious and unparalleled feat of rescuing more
than 100 hostages at Entebbe Airport in Uganda won world
acclaim and restored a level of confidence and exuberance to
the people of Israel and world Jewry not felt since the
victory of the Six-Day-War.
THE DIPLOMATIC fortunes of Israel and the Jewish
people were further enhanced when the UN Security
Council, forced by African states to debate the legality of
Israel's rescue mission, failed to adopt a resolution con-
demning the Jewish State.
Two other major developments also helped buoy the
spirit ot Israel and world Jewry: the ongoing civil war in
Lebanon left the Palestine Liberation Organization in
political shambles and exposed it, as never before, as a
group bent on destroying a society.
It revealed the practical consequences of their theoretical
declarations for a "democratic secular state." The war also
served to cement friendly relations between Lebanese
farmers and villagers and Israelis who traded with each
other through the "good fence" along the Lebanese border.
BUT IN a more vital sense, and in terms of the year
ahead, all this was merely frosting on the cake. While
Israel's world image was enhanced, the deep-going
problems that threatened to rend its social fabric
unemployment, economic stagnation, inflation, the social
gap, and the festering situation on the West Bank
remain unresolved.
Those who speak of the pre-Entebbe and post-Entebbe
period, as though these are two distinct and separate stages
or epochs in Israel's history, are creating an illusion in order
to better repress a painful ongoing reality.
Entebbe cannot become an end-in-itself; it cannot
become a substitute for a genuine foreign policy striving
toward peace in the Middle East nor a substitute for a
domestic policy seeking to solve the social and economic
problems; it cannot become a shibboleth for future Israeli
and diaspora generations viewing historic problems
through the prism of a heroic deed; and it certainly should
not be used as an escape hatch from pressing reality.
ENTEBBE was one chapter, albeit a glorious one, in
Israel's ongoing fight against terrorism. It was not the
whole book.
Both the rescue mission and the newly developed
relations between Israelis and Lebanese along the "good
fence" reveal the organizing capacity and humanitarian ism
of Israel.
The Entebbe rescue mission also revealed that all
segments of Israel's society can unite in a common effort
when required, and that the bickering between warring
factions can be put aside.
THE ENERGIES, resourcefulness and daring that made
Entebbe possible must be harnessed to solve social and
economic problems in Israel and between Israel and its
neighbors. The Jewish State showed the world during this
past year that it is not a foreign body in the politic of the
Mideast but a viable and vital social organism.
The year 5737 can very well be the year for Israel to be "a
light unto the nation."
Israel's Right to Ties
Many Jews in Israel, the United States and elsewhere
were disturbed by Vorster's visit even though he has
also visited several Black capitals and by reports that
Israel may sell missile boats to South Africa.
But no one should question Israel's right to have com-
mercial relations with that country, as with any other
country especially a nation where there is a large and
vigorous Jewish community least of all countries who
are also trading with South Africa.
Would U.S. Fight for Israel?
THE
eJewisJh Floridxan
OF GREATER FORTLAUDERDALE
OFFICE and PLANT 120N.E. BthSt.. Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone 373-4608
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT l-87We08
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O. Box01-2973, Miami, Florida33101
FREDK.SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCKET
Executive Editor
SELMA M. THOMPSON
Assistant to Publisher
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth;
Of The Merchandise Advertised in Its Columns
Published Bl-Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Miami, Fla.
All P.O. 3579 returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 01-2973. Miami. Fla. 33101
<0 Fred K. Shoe net- Friday, Sept. 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association of
English Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One YearMOO. Out of Town Upon
Request.
BRITISH journalist Henry
Fairlie, who lives and works in
the U.S., reports that he has been
asking many Americans the
following question:
"Would you fight to save
Israel? Would you fight for me
for Britain? For West Germany?
For Europe?''
Fairlie says that he gets an-
swers, all right, but they are
"confused and even truculent"
answers.
WHAT HE has in mind is that
America emerged out of World
War II "with a generous impulse
to do good," but that this
generous national mood "was
viciously distorted by the
HI
MNNMIMIIIIIHIIIIIlUt
Mindlin
campaign of Joe McCarthy," who
"ravaged the State Department,
so that it is still now barely
recovered."
Fairlie suggests that the major
issue of the coming presidential
election must be "a profound
desire to recover a posture in the
world, deliberate and sustained,
which is again confident and
generous."
The word recover is the key
issue here, for Fairlie believes we
have lost it, and the only way to
get it back is through the
recreation of a deliberate, con-
fident and sustained foreign
policy.
NOR, argues the British
journalist, is foreign policy
something that is conducted
"without the assent of the
people," by which he means to be
critical of the "German," the
Kissingerian attitude, that
"people are not interested in for-
eign policy: in particular that
they do not vote for it."
On the contrary, foreign policy
daily influences people's lives
just as much as, say, inflation or
unemployment. People are "from
day to day aware of just how
deeply it does touch them."
For this reason, Fairlie senses
in America today a feeling "not
so much of having been 'pushed
around' long enough, but that
without a deliberate and steady
American presence in the world it
is a dangerous place in which to
live."
THAT IS why Fairlie sees a
mood among Americans to re-
capture the sense of mission
which seized us after World War
II.
Understood in these terms, it
becomes clear why both political
parties and both presidential
candidates will be stressing
foreign policy between now and
Election Day.
THE REPUBLICANS will be
emphasizing are already em-
phasizing Jimmy Carter's
alleged ignorance in this field and
that one should vote for
President Ford because, it is also
Continued on Page 13-A
Shevin Sets Record Straight
Friday, September 17, 1976
Volume 5
22ELUL5736
Number 19
It's more common the other
way around for those engaged in
prosecuting, but this time it
appears that I did Attorney
General Robert Shevin an in-
justice.
Following up on a news item in
the Miami Herald last week, I
wrote to him that "I want to
recommend to you the recent
ruling by Miami Beach Detective
Brian Gardner: 'There's no way
I'm going to shoot to kill over
property. When it's property and
nobody's in danger you can
always get the guy later.' And in
a conclusion that one might have
hoped for from our chief legal
officer: 'You have to decide
what's fair retribution.' '
FURTHERMORE, I wrote,
"Like the 'Shoot Your Neighbor'
bill passed by the last Florida
legislature, your blanket en-
dorsement of trigger-happy cops
gives sanction to the mindless-
ness which characterizes those
responsible for law enforcement
from the beat to the bench,
with an assist by all but a
handful of our legislators. If it's
blood they are after, I would be
pleased to provide a list of the
real criminals in our society who
continue to rip off the poor, the
old, the incompetent. Let's be
really sensible about the punish-
ment to fit the crime."
From Tallahassee, Bob Shevin
called to let me know that I had
been misled by the Herald piece
which indicated that a recent
ruling by him would have
justified the Miami Beach cop
shooting to kill, rather than, as
he did and stated aiming at
a fugitive's legs because "A
human life is a human life. Why
throw it away?"
THE OPINION he gave was
more in line with Detective Gard-
ner's action than the Herald
story would indicate and
knowing Bob Shevin I would
believe that.
Cohen
I do disagree with him,
however, in his stand on capital
punishment and it was that, I
suppose, which led to my hasty
letter. I also recently lent my
name to a newly-formed
organization, Florida Citizens
Against the Death Penalty,
which is seeking, among other
things, to have Gov. Askew and
the Cabinet stay the executions
now scheduled for Florida's
convicted first degree killers as a
result of Shevin's successful
defense of our law before the
Supreme Court.
THE CLIMATE of violence in
this country and in the world
has created a reaction that
adopts violence as the response;
all legal, of course.
In seeking to enlist some old
tried and true bleeding hearts in
my newest cause I have been
surprised and, yes, shocked at
the number of deserters from the
cause. Not for everyone, perhaps,
but for assassins, for terrorists,
for indiscriminate bombers,
death is the only resort.
But the Supreme Court's
ruling, if understood, doesn't
permit that kind of dis-
crimination but the establish-
ment of other kinds of guidelines.
Thus, as former Supreme Court
Justice Arthur Goldberg has
written recently, here in Florida
and elsewhere, we face "the
specter of mass executions
after a moratorium of almost 10
years (that) threatens to
brutalize further a nation already
saturated with war, riot and
crime."
ARTHUR GOLDBERG, when
he was on the Court, dissented
from the death sentence as cruel
and unusual punishment and still
holds that view.
"The deliberate, in-
stitutionalized taking of human
life by the state is the greatest
conceivable degradation to the
dignity of the human per-
sonality," he has written.
How much ve have been
brutalized may be indicated by
the recent furor created when it
became known that the De-
Cartment of Offender Re-
abilitation was planning to
develop a counseling program to
prepare those sentenced to death
to their fate.
Such programs have taken
hold in recent years as therapy
for the terminally ill or, even, as
courses to prepare psy-
chologically the public generally
to the subject of death.
THERE WAS so much ad-
verse criticism of this attempt at
a humane approach that it never
got past the planning stage.
(In all fairness, it should be
known that anti-capital punish-
ment groups also expressed op-
position on the grounds that it
gave sanction to the finality of
the death sentence while tnere
was still a glimmer of hope of
commuting the sentences.)
Obviously there are no simple
answers and on this issue I sit in
judgment only on myself,
although I confess that in the
reaction to what I believed to be
the Shevin ruling I exercised also
the right to judge another. That's
a risk that a man in politics
always takes and why it is im-
portant to get the record
straight.

**~
)


r
Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5-
He Starves to Protest Oppression
Young Families Get Incentive To Join Temple
f


LOS ANGELES -
(JTA) The steady
erosion of personal freedom
and deprivation of in-
dividual rights will evoke
different responses from
human beings.
For Dr. Benor Gurfel, 43,
internationally known
econometric ian now in the
midst of a hunger strike in
^protest of the Soviet
government's policies of re-
pression against Jews who
have applied for exit visas
to Israel, his refusal to take
food represents deep
feelings of anguish and
frustration.
THE KAFKA-like maze of
bureaucracy in which Gurfel and
his family have been enmeshed
over the past four years since
they first applied foi emigration
to Israel was related by Alvin H.
Gilens, associate national cam-
paign director and Western
Region director of the United
Jewish Appeal, who has just
returned from a 12-day survey of
conditions being faced by Soviet
Jewish "refuseniks," those
, denied exit visas to Israel.
Gurfel, who works in a plastics
complex in Tallin, the capital city
of Estonia prior to being ab-
sorbed by the Soviet Union after
World War II, co-authored a
scientific paper for the Econo-
metric Society of Europe in
collaboration with Dr. Ilya
Zlobinsky, formerly of Kiev, who
was allowed to emigrate to Israel.
The excellence of their work
gained an invitation to both for
the presentation of their paper
before the conference of the
society in Helsinki which con-
cluded Aug. 30.
ALTHOUGH Helsinki is 60
miles from Tallin, and the official
B'naiB'rith
Kurt Lauderdale Lodge No.
1438 has announced an opening
meeting on Wednesday. Sept. 22,
at H p.m. at Holiday Inn North. A
film on Israel will be shown,
followed by a question-and-
answer period. Wives and friends
are invited.
MEDICAL
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conference program lists Gurfel
as a participant, the Soviet
government denied him the
right to participate on the basis
that he had not received a formal
written invitation.
It is obvious, Gilens pointed
out, that the record of continuous
harassment of Gurfel and his
family be Soviet authorities pre-
vented him from ever receiving
the invitation. He cited the fact
that every time Gurfel has ap-
plied for an exit visa he has been
refused because of possessing
"secrets."
The alleged "secrets," Gilens
observed, are available in
numerous scientific journals
which circulate freely throughout
the world. Compounding the
plight of Gurfel's family, which
includes his wife, Soroti, 40, a
physicist, and son, Eliezer, 17,
7
^--
Someone
hospitalized?
Bring
them home
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Recuperation at home is often
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less costly. We can help the in-
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566-4333
MEDICAL PERSONNEL
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who will complete high school in
the near future, is that time is
running out for them. Eliezer will
apply for an exit visa on his own
prior to his 18th birthday.
IF IT is denied, he must serve
in the Soviet armed forces. If this
happens, it will all but eliminate
the chances for the Gurfel family
to emigrate to Israel.
Gurfel's hunger strike coin-
cided with the dates of the
conference in Helsinki. Yet, it
was much more than that, Gilens
observed. It represents the
tragedy of the individual who
chooses to live as a Jew in a
nation which for centuries has
imposed every form of repression
and persecution upon the Jewish
people.
Gerald Kadzivill. president of
Temple Emanu-EI, announced at
a recent board meeting the
formation of a new group, the
Young Family Associates of
Temple Emanu-EI.
The purpose of this major sub-
division is to make available to
young families an opportunity to
join an established congregation
to meet their needs. As a special
financial incentive, the board
voted a graduated dues scale,
which realizes the financial
situation of people under 35.
Their dues will be far below the
standard dues.
Dr. Richard Geronemus,
chairman of the Young Family
Associates, indicated that Rabbi
Joel S. Goor, spiritual leader of
the congregation, will formulate
plans for the group. He said.
"With programs specifically
designed to meet the needs of
these families and an excellent
religious and Hebrew school
program, we expect to have one
of the most active and en-
thusiastic such groups in South
Florida."
QJou a/i6 limited to a new expewewie at tk
MR. FABULOUS
LAUNDRY
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CUSTOM FEATHER PILLOWS MADE TO ORDER
PERSONAL SERVICE ON DRY CLEANING
MINOR REPAIRS & ALTERATIONS
2200NE21ST "Jw$f likt Nomt"
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ABRAHAM L. PRICE. D.O.. PA.
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS OFFICE
FOR
GENERAL FAMILY PRACTICE
AT
OAKLAND PLAZA FAMILY MEDICAL CENTER
OAKLAND PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
SUITE 220
4690 OAKLAND PARK BOULEVARD
LAUDERDALE LAKES. FLORIDA 33313
TILEPHONI:
(305) 48S.S440
OFFICE HOUR*
V APPOINTMENT
devoted to healthier years.
Florida Medical Center Complex
5000 West Oakland Park Boulevard Lauderdale Lakes, Florida
OPPOSITE
OAKLAND PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
AND
PUMPERNIK'S RESTAURANT
OF WEST BROWARD
Artist's rendition of Florida Medical Center as if will appear when completed. The complex will include: [I] existing five-story, 290-bed
Florida Medical Center Hospital, [2] four-story, 110-bed Hearf and Cancer Pavilion currently under construction, [3] two-story Dialysis
Pavilion. [4) four-story, 300-bed Extended Care and Medical Research Facility, [5] existing North Medico/ Office Building, [6] fosf
Medical Office Building, [7] Centra/ Medical Office Building, [8] South Medical Office Building, [9] parking garage and [ 10] total energy
plant. [II] Oakland Plaza Shopping Center. [ 12} Pumpernik's Restaurant-West Broward.
SPECIAL HEALTH CARE SERVICES
GENERAL INFORMATION
Private and semi-private rooms
Professionally decorated
Individual telephones
Individual nurses call signals
Guests and staff dining room
Auxiliary program
Dietary services
Nuclear medicine
Gift shop
Coffee shop
Computer Information Center
Color Television-Hospital Cinema
Pharmacy-unit dose system
Doctor's lounge
Medical Library
Auditorium
Emergency Pavilion-24 hour service
Cardiac Catherization Laboratory
Coronary Care Unit
Intensive Care Unit
Cardiac Stress Lab
Surgery 7 surgical suites
Respiratory Therapy
Pulmonary Testing
Special X-ray Procedure Rooms
Blood Bank
Physical Therapy
Intermediate Coronary Telemetry
Open Heart Surgery
Automated Clinical Laboratory
Cancer Detection Pavilion
Xerography
Computerized Axial Tomography
Mammography
Acute & Chronic Dialysis
Florida Medical Center is c 290 bed acute care facility expanding to 400 beds. It is one
facet of the new Florida Medical Center, designed to fill the need for an all-
encompassing medical facility in south Florida.
The Medical Center occupies 20 acres with an adjacent 10-acre medical plaza. In
addition to the hospital, there are two 30,000-square-foot medical office buildings.
Other facilities include a cancer pavilion, heart pavilion, coronary and pulmonary
rehabilitation center and a kidney dialysis unit.
Maxwell Dauer, Ph.D., President


Pge6-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
*-'
Friday, September 17,197tf f f
Trio Kidnapped in Buenos Aires
NEW YORK (JTA) spheric Affairs has con-
The Council on Hemi- finned reports that the son
Katz in Runoff For Judgeship
Sherman D. Katz, candidate
for Broward County Circuit
Court Judge, in the Sept. 7
primary qualified for a run-off,
which is set for Sept. 28. A
Hollywood resident for 15 years,
he was a partner in a Davie law
firm until 1974, when he semi-
retired. He has been a consultant
to other attorneys since then.
Katz is a member of the
American, Broward, Florida and
Pennsylvania Bar Associations
and has been admitted to practice
before the U.S. Supreme Court.
He received a Bachelors from the
University of Pittsburgh and his
J.D. from George Washington
University Law School, where he
was on the Law Review and
received the Lawyer Co-op
Publishing Co. Award.
He has served as an attorney
for the Central Broward, Bolles
(Hendry) and Bailey Drainage
Districts, as a municpal judge in
Cooper City and substitute Town
Attorney for Davie. He is a
member of the Broward County
Bar Grievance Committee and an
arbitrator for the American
Arbitration Association, as well
as of the American Trial Lawyers
Association and academy of
Florida Trial Lawyers.
In addition to his law practice,
Katz has had extensive business
experience, including being a
founder and vice chairman of the
board of Sterling National Bank
of David. Katz has said he
believes that "the responsibility
of a judgeship is the highest
honor that can be given to a
lawyer ..."
and daughter of Juan
G elm an, a leading Jewish
Argentine poet and
journalist, were abducted
Aug. 24 from their apart-
ments in Buenos Aires,
along with the son's preg-
nant young wife, Mar is.
The six armed men who
staged the kidnappings
were believed to be mem-
bers of a right-wing death
squad. Laurence R. Birns,
director of the COHA, said
Gelman had left his
daughter, Nora Eva, 19,
and his son, Marcelo Ariel,
20, behind in Argentina
when he was forced to flee
Argentina last year after
receiving a death threat
from an extreme right-wing
organization called the
AAA.
AT THE time of the ab-
duction, the kidnappers told the
poet-journalist's wife that the
kidnapping was an act of reprisal
against her husband who is now
in exile in Europe. He has been
denouncing the excesses of the
new Argentine military regime
and its chronic violations of the
human rights of its population,
Birns said.
Gelman, 46, is considered one
of Argentina's most highly-
regarded modernist poets who
characteristically writes stanzas
emphasizing political motifs. He
had been editor of 'L'Opinion, an
independent liberal daily. Among
his published works of poetry are
"Relaciones" (1973) and "Violin
y Otras Cuestrines" (1956).
Birns said that, since the ab-
duction, COHA has been making
every effort to communicate the
"extreme gravity" of the ab-
duction to the Argentine govern-
ment and the necessity for its
authorities to immediately seek
the release of the latest victims of
the collapse of law and order in
Argentina.
BIRNS SAID COHA has
made efforts to be in touch with
he 'State Department, the Or-
ganization of American States,
the Argentine Embassy in
Washington and major Jewish
agencies in efforts to free the
three members of the Gelman
family before it is too late.
"We are absolutely certain
that the three young Gelmans are
entirely apolitical," Birns said/
adding that the abductions had
taken place against a backdrop of
rising acts of neo-Nazism and
acts against prominent Jewish
families in Argentina.
HE SAID Morton Rosenthal,
director of the Latin American
Affairs Department of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith and a board member of
COHA, had acted to express the
ADL's extreme concern over the
situation in Argentina in general
and the Gelman case in par-
ticular.
El
In the year
5737
National Airlines
wishes you
a very Happy
New Year.
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r
7
k
Friday, September 17,1976
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
In your Fort Lauderdale issue
of Aug. 20, 1976, we read with
interest Ms. Panoff's review of
Rose Kushner's book, "Breast
Cancer." While most of the
points raised in the review are
very worthwhile and valid, we
would like to take strong issue
with several.
We, too, agree that choosing a
doctor is very important to
achieve quality medical care,
especially when it involves
^urgery. However, her choice of
oncologist is misleading. A
medical oncologist is a doctor of
internal medicine specializing in
cancer and primarily in treat-
ments using chemotherapeutic
agents, or drug therapy, for
cancer. He also directs patients
to radiation therapy and surgery.
Medical oncologists, by and
large, have very little contact
with or experience in dealing with
breast lumps.
IN THIS country breast
surgery is the specialty of general
surgeons. No other doctors are so
trained or qualified to diagnose
breast lumps, whether benign or
malignant. While there are a few
general surgeons who do
specialize only in cancer, their
^umbers are indeed very small,
such as one or two in South
Florida and maybe three or four
in the entire city of New York, for
example.
The thousands of women each
day or week with breast lumps or
(he thousands each year with
breast cancer would not be able
lo find a doctor if they confined
(heir efforts only to cancer
specialists or cancer centers in
(his country.
Most women do not know if
their lumps are cancer or not; for
that matter, most doctors do not
know.
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page7-A
Emanu-El
Sets Film Series
Temple Emanu-El has
scheduled a series of three classic
films of Jewish significance to be
presented at the temple. The
films are "The Garden of the
Finzi Continis," 1972 Academy
Award Best Foreign Film, on
Sunday, Oct. 17, at 8 p.m.; "The
Sorrow and the Pity," an epic
about Nazi collaboration and
resistance, on Sunday, Oct. 31, at
8 p.m.; and on Sunday, Nov. 21,
"Hester Street," a moving story
of the Lower East Side
generation.
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"Let Thy Words Be Brief
Koheleth (Ecclesiastes)
General surgeons who see
hundreds and thousands of
patients with breast lumps
annually do know how to dif-
ferentiate between benign and
malignant lumps. Physical
examinations, x-ray
examinations, such as mam-
mograms, needle aspirations of
cysts and finally biopsies are the
methods used.
Using Ms. Kushner's
suggestion would cut off and
delay the detection of cancer and
treatment needlessly to
thousands who now get prompt,
personal and very up-to-date and
highly qualified treatment from
many well-trained and ex-
perienced general surgeons
throughout this country.
MEDICAL oncologists
specialize primarily in the
treatment of advanced breast
cancer and in supplementary
chemotherapy of primary breast
cancer. Most patients going to
medical centers are treated by
residents with the supervision of
professors.
To address the issue of other
options in treatment of breast
cancer, Ms. Kushner alludes to
other alternatives, such as partial
mastectomy, x-ray and
chemotherapy. All these
treatments are useful under
specific indications, but they are
not necessarily options to be
chosen by patients as if shopping
for various brands of a com-
mercial product. These options
may be chosen by doctors who
take into consideration the
patient, her condition generally
and the size, location, extent and
type of breast cancer.
Under the presently acceptable
treatment by most experts on
breast cancer in this country, the
treatment of primary breast
cancer involves total mastectomy
and removal of lymph nodes.
Anything less leaves the patient
with a risk of not removing all the
cancer.
IN THE last eight to ten years
most experienced and up-to-date
surgeons agree that modified
radical mastectomy is now as
effective and far less debilitating
and better cosmetically than the
standard radical mastectomy
formerly used (that is, leaving
the large chest wall muscle in the
arm in place rather than
removing it).
Less than total mastectomy is
under present knowledge an
experimental operation as yet
unproven in long-term cures and
used only in highly selected cases
and by those surgeons engaged in
clinical research with the per-
mission of their patients. Most
cancer centers in this country
tend to be more than less radical
in their treatment of breast
cancer.
The one-step biopsy-
mastectomy method is neither
blind nor is it less desirable. But
most surgeons will agree to
biopsy-only operations; in recent
years, however, it has been my
experience with this procedure
that if the biopsy proves malig-
nant, the patients are usually
sorry that they did not allow the
surgeon to go ahead with the
mastectomy during the first
operation rather than undergo
two surgeries.
Ms. Kushner's statement and
Ms. Panoff's review are very mis-
leading on these issues and,
further, may undermine the
adjustments and the confidence
of many hundreds of mastectomy
patients successfully treated and
facing treatment with newly dis-
covered breast lumps.
Lastly, we commend Ms.
Kushner's comments on the psy-
chological adjustments and the
practical help she provides for
breast cancer patients.
Arthur I. Segaul. M.D., FACS
President,
Broward Surgical Society
A. A. Goodman, M.D., FACS
Alan C.oldenberg, M.D.. FACS
Members of the
Executive Committee,
Hroward Surgical Society
Lebanese Villagers Ask Israel
For Protection from Terrorists
Continued from Page 1 -A
jured Lebanese who cross
the border because they are
unable to obtain medical
attention in their own war-
torn country.
THE TERRORIST attack on
Ein Ebel was believed to have
been a reprisal for the local
villagers' growing contacts with
'srael for medical purposes and
trade.
According to the account of the
wounded youth, the terrorists
opend fire when their armored car
was stopped at a roadblock
outside Ein Ebel and the
villagers asked for identification.
Three villagers were fatally
wounded in the first volley but
others, organized in a local
militia, gunned down the
terrorists.
The wounded were taken to the
border fence at Dovev, ap-
parently in the hope that they
could be saved. They were pro-
nounced dead and transferred to
an Israeli morgue. The bodies
were returned to Lebanon. A
Maronite priest conducted
services at the border fence.
MEANWHILE, the Israeli
army was put on alert following
reports that terrorists were
planning further reprisal attacks
on villages in southern Lebanon.
The shooting was the second
terrorist incident in two days.
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Page8-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976
*
this yeaa in Jerusalem
If Tishe B'av has come, can Rosh Hashanah be far
behind? This year the High Holy Days begin on
Friday, Sept. 24, not too far ahead of us. This is a
good time to begin thinking ahead about the holiday
season and all which that portends.
Let us also consider how to make this year dif-
ferent from others. One way is to plan for a historic
adventure a trip to Israel in the fall of 1976. There
are more packaged tours available now than ever
before. There are UJA missions, academic missions,
Jewish agency tours, various alumni trips, and stays
sponsored by B'nai B'rith and Hadassah. Costs will
never be less and the meaning of the trip will never
be greater.
Despite the glow of friendship generated by the
Entebbe rescue mission, there is still a great deal of
friendlessness experienced by Israel. The people of
Israel need to experience the presence of Americans
in their towns, villages, kibbutzim as well as in their
cities. Chaim Vinitsky of UJA has said, "Our aim in
1976 is to bring Americans to the Israelis and the
Israelis to them: to know each other, to love each
other, to continue what our parents started and our
grandparents dreamed."
TO VOW TO GO to Israel this year as part of a
New Year's pilgrimage is a double blessing. It
blesses us who go and those we visit. It blesses us
first, because we would be carrying out Biblical
admonition to "go up to Jerusalem," as we are in-
structed to do during each of our three pilgrims'
festivals.
Second, there is no joy like that which flows from
seeing the beauties of Israel, its archaeological sites,
concert halls, museums, book stores, universities
and landscape. Where else can the determined
traveler swim in one day in three seas, if he wishes:
the Red, the Dead and the Med.?
Finally, the Israelis are the most fiercely taxed
people in the world. Their balance of payments is
chaotic. Our tourism to their country is equivalent to
an export for them and in this way of tremendous
help economically.
As we look ahead toward the coming Yom Tovim,
let us try to plan to savor the pleasures of Israel with
our bodies as well as in our minds and souls.
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Beth Israel'
Has Family Plan
Temple Beth Israel has an-
nounced a new approach in its
Total Family service, according
to Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz, who
will provide direction for the
service. It is scheduled for the
first Friday in each month,
beginning Sept. 10, from 8 to 9
p.m. and children will actually
participate in the service in
sing-alongs, for example. There
will be no sermons or formal
talks.
The temple is also offering an
alternate student-oriented
program on Saturday mornings
the Young People's Con-
gregation. Beth Israel students
will receive class credit for at-
tendance at any Shabbat ser-
vices, including Young People's
Congregation and Total Family
services.
Women's ORT
Coral Ridge Chapter will hold
its first meeting of the year on
Wednesday, Sept. 22, at noon at
the Wilton Manors Women's
Club. A social hour with refresh-
ments will precede the business
portion, which will include a
presentation by the Bermuda
Club Choral Group conducted by
Bea Zeidman.
For additional information,
contact Mrs. M. Nowick,
membership vice president.
Margate Artist \ New Year
Gives Painting to
Yad Vashem
Arrangements have been
completed between Margate
artist Jack Ornstein and the Yad
Vashem Martyrs and Heroes
Remembrance Authority in
Jerusalem for an oil painting by
Ornstein, "The Warsaw Ghetto,"
to be presented to and kept in the
Yad Vashem collection.
During a tour of Israel the
artist and his wife visited Yad
Vashem and, upon returning to
the United States, wrote to the
Yad Vashem authorities to offer
the painting as a gift. It was
accepted and will be shipped soon
to Jerusalem.
Plantation Women
Plan Vourmet'Evening
Sisterhood of Plantation Jew-
ish Congregation will have a
wine-and-cheese-tasting party at
its first meeting of the fall
season, Monday, Sept. 20, at 8
p.m. The food and drink are being
donated by Paul Freiser of
Grapevine Wine and Cheese.
There are still a few openings
in the bowling league. For in-
formation call 792-0800. And
reserve Saturday, Oct. 16, for
Sisterhood's get-acquainted
square dance.
Message
Continued from Page 1-A
UJA. Today, UJA giving is a
chosen responsibility a form of
self-taxation a mitzvah,
evoking the noblest aspects of
Jewish tradition.
THROUGH OUR Federation
we have become stronger, more
united, our people more con-
cerned and our leadership more
determined. But a growing com-
munity requires strength. And
fund-raising is the nourishment
of the strength.
Moral support for Israel is no
longer enough. Political activity
is not enough. Despair cannot be
a substitute for action. Our
mandate as Jews requires that we
must be concerned with the
totality of Jewish needs, here and
in Israel.
And that demands the highest
priority for fund-raising. In
America, our ultimate Jewish
expression requires giving. For
giving h.-is become a
manifestation of Jewish con-
science, of Jewish obligation.

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; v^| Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish FJoridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page9-A
Our Crow6
By Roz flemmq
Free Ida Nudel
Area Temples, Hadassah Appeal to Kremlin
.-%.

*.*'
And how are you feeling now
that the kids are back in
school???? Doesn't it seem as if
the "official" year begins on their
first day back and ends on their
lastday????
Bernie Sakren. under the
supervision of B'nai B'rith
Community Volunteer Services
Committee of Broward-Palm
Beach Council, took a very
talented troupe of singers,
musicians to Fort Lauderdale
Center for the Blind on Aug. 17
to entertain the folks there. The
troupe included Artie Mayer, a
former radio vocalist; Phoebe
Niegelow, a recipient of services
from the Center; Jean Tan-
nenbaum, concert pianist;
George Crair, English baritone;
Jack Sclime, self-taught ragtime
pianist; Monte Blanc, per-
cussionist; and Estelle
Levingston, dancer and novelty
guitarist.
Bernie Sakren was M.C. with
gags and bits of humor that were
well received by the blind
audience. The happiness that was
generated was well worth the
effort, all the performers agreed.
Hy Sirota and Bob Hoffman of
the Council were also present. .
Nice to hear of our neighbors
doing so much good and
thanks to Bernie for his welcome
letter.
Plantation Unit, National
Council of Jewish Women, will be
host to Susan Lebow Weinberg, a
Fort Lauderdale attorney, at
their next meeting, Sept. 27 at
9:30 a.m. at the Welleby Club
House in Sunrise. Ms. Weinberg
is secretary of the board of
directors of the Legal Aid Ser-
vices of Broward County, vice
president of the Broward County
National Organization of
Women, on the Legal Aid Com-
mittee of the Broward County
Bar and teacher of a course on
"Women and the Law" at BCC.
She is quite a lady and it
promises to be quite a meeting
. she will discuss the Equal
Rights Amendment!
BEST WISHES for a speedy
recovery to Joseph Sager and
Mrs. Sarah Drucker also
hope Susi Glass is feeling much,
much better was in an auto
accident ... we all hope to see
her up and about real soon!
Hey! How about Ellen Mishkin
. she has reached the semi-
finals in Florida Clay Court
Championship! We hope to be
able to announce that she has
gone all the way!
A very, very special Happy
Birthday wish to a very, very
special man Jules Shapiro
... he celebrated his 70th birth-
day Aug. 27. He and Leanore
are two of the nicest people you
will ever meet.
If you have some spare time
. please pay attention: the
Florida Medical Center Social
Services is appealing for
volunteers to transport patients
who are receiving dialysis
treatments to and from the
hospital weekday mornings.
Please call Mrs. Honey Friedman
at 735-6000, ext. 4301, in the a.m.
and 721-0879 in the p.m. for
details.
TWO BOOKS on my reading
list for you this month: "The
Yom Kippur War" written by the
Insight Team of the London
Sunday Times and published by
Doubleday very interesting
. and a lot of facts we the
public were not informed of .
the fact that the Israeli govern-
ment knew of the intended war
but was not allowed to act first
. .Did you know that? Or why
they had to wait? Be sure to
read this book.
Also read the brand-new
paperback of "90 Minutes at
Entebbe" by William Stevenson
and put out by Bantam Books
. only $1.95 ... I don't know
how they got it out so soon after
the raid but read it!
Okay, folks, now that the
family is settled into a routine
. you'll have time to write me:
Roz Fleming, 84C Oleander Dr.,
Plantation 33317.
Margate JC
Sets Services
Seats for the High Holy Days
are still available at Margate
Jewish Center. The office is open
Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m., and the office manager,
Mrs. Lillian Guy, will be there to
provide information and tickets.
Mrs. Guy will also assist those
who wish to make motel reser-
vations for the holiday period.
Selicoth services are scheduled
for Saturday, Sept. 18, at 11:30
p.m. Rosh Hashanah evening
services will be on Friday, Sept.
24, at 7:30 and Saturday, Sept.
25, at 7. Daytime services are
scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 25,
and Sunday, Sept. 26, at 8:30
a.m.
Several area temples, together
with the North Broward-South
Palm Beach Chapter of
Hadassah, are coordinating an
effort to secure freedom from
Russia for Ida Nudel, 45-year-old
economist and "guardian angel"
of Soviet Jewish prisoners.
Registration Open
At Em an u-El
Nursery School
The Jane Lawson Nursery
School of Temple Emanu-El is
taking registrations for the 1976-
77 school year. Full-day, half-day
and three- and five-day arrange-
ments can be made, and tran-
sportation is available.
The nursery school provides
each youngster with the Jewish
background he will need in life.
Fun times include learning to get
along with others, sharing,
creative and dramatic play,
singing, playing instruments,
finger plays, outdoor guided play
and waiting your turn all
geared to help the child in his
interaction with his peers.
The weekly perceptual and
academic programs are designed
to develop skills to do the tasks
they will encounter now and in
their future education. There is
an Oneg Shabbat each Friday
morning, with all of the classes
meeting together for singing and
learning of Jewish prayers, led by
Rabbi Joel S. Goor, spiritual
leader of the temple.
For further information, call
Phyllis Simring at the temple
office. 731-2310.
* >>
Have
a happy
and healthy
5737.
_RICAN SAVINGS
& Loan Association o* Florida
Shepard Broad, Chairman of the Board
Morris N. Broad, President
17 convenient offices to serve you in South Florida.
In Dade phone 673-5566, In Broward phone 462-0294.
According to Betty (Mrs.
Sidney) Gerber, president of the
Chapter, letters from Hadassah
members are being rushed to
Leonid Brezhnev and Alexei
Kosygin at the Kremlin, asking
that they allow Mrs. Nudel to
leave Russia.
BECAUSE SHE has
requested an exit visa, Ida Nudel
is being subjected to constant
harassment, interrogations and
beatings, and is about to be
sentenced to prison or a mental
hospital. Her strength fading,
she will survive neither. For five
years she has been struggling to
be allowed to leave Russia for
Israel, where her husband and a
sister live.
To call attention to her plight,
the week of Sept. 12-18 has been
declared "Ida Nudel Week" and
during the Friday evening
services Sept. 17 all cooperating
area temples will urge her release.
The temples and their rabbis
are Temple Sholom, Pompano
Beach, Morris Skop: Beth El,
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS/
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
Boca Raton, Norman Mendel;
Beth Israel, Century Village,
David Berent; B'nai Torah, Boca
Raton, Nathan Zelizer; and
Delray Hebrew Congregation,
Mr. Sidney Gerber.
Esther (Mrs. Ralph) Cannon
is coordinating the effort in this
area on behalf of the South
Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry. Anyone who wants to
help in this cause can get further
information from her.
Planning A Trip?
COUNCIL'S NEW AND
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*,


Page 10-A
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976

-
Anti-Semitism In Latin America
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
NEW YORK (JTA) A
growing number of Jewish com-
munal officials in this country,
particularly those keeping track
of developments in Latin
America as they affect the Jewish
communities there, are ex-
pressing concern, in private if not
yet in public, over what they
consider to be a dangerous and
self-defeating trend in some of
the Jewish communities south of
the border.
Jewish organizational repre-
sentatives in a number of Latin
American cri'-tries maintain
silence about individual Jews
who are under fire from local re-
gimes for criticizing repressive
measures and the abrogation of
civil liberties and when an in-
dividual Jew is singled out by the
regime a" a dissident and is
persecuted or arrested for his
views.
MANY OF these dissidents are
well-known intellectuals who are
held in high esteem by their col-
leagues in their own country and
abroad for both their con-
tributions to academic and ar-
tistic life and for their principled
stands on behalf of social justice.
American Jewish experts on
Latin American affairs see this
situation as being especially
prevalent in Argentina, Brazil
and Chile, where the Jewish com-
munities are caught in the crunch
of social and political unrest and
upheavals ana strive to develop a
course of activity that will permit
the communal institutions to
function under the most adverse
conditions.
The silence regarding dissident
Jews is not necessarily a result of
indifference to the plight of the
individual: rather, it is an effort
born of anxiety to keep the com-
munity -as a whole free of
dissident taint and thereby free
from indiscriminate persecution
and reprisals.
NEVERTHELESS, American
Jewish officials point out, this
approach is fraught with disaster
in the long run for the community
as a whole.
They underscore the fact that
the term dissident in Latin
America is defined very loosely to
act as a general dragnet for any
and all critics.
Furthermore, they note, while
dissidents who happen to be
Jewish are not singled out as
Jews, the propaganda mills of the
regimes and their "unofficial"
death squads seek to implant in
the minds of the public that there
is a link between dissident and
Jew.
THIS, they say, is a short step
from the twisted logic that all
Jews are dissidents and all dis-
sidents are Jews. This is how
Hitler began. Furthermore,
American Jewish experts on
Latin America say, when
Catholics or Protestants are
singled out as dissidents and
persecuted or arrested, there are
civil liberties defense groups
which publicly come to their aid.
What is disturbing to the
American Jewish spokesmen is
that a number of Jewish com-
munal leaders in Latin America
shun the dissident Jew and in
many cases decline to defend
them in public.
There appears to be a ten-
dency, it is noted, for some Latin
American Jewish officials to
define the Jewishness of the
dissidents not according to
halacha but on the basis of how a
specific Jew is viewed politically
by the local regime.
IF THE regime contends that
a person who happens to be
Jewish is a dissident by virtue of
his or her opposition to the
regime, some of the Jewish
leaders and many in the com-
munity accept the admonition of
the regime that the person in-
volved is not being singled out as
a Jew but merely as a dissident.
They then go a step farther and
insist that the persecution, ab-
duction or imprisonment of this
person is "not a Jewish issue."
This is further implemented by
the insistence on the part of the
local Jewish officials that this
person is, of course, "not really
Jewish." To buttress this con-
tention, they cite the lack of any
connection on the part of the
dissident to any communal or-
ganization and the fact that he or
she never really spoke out or
acted in public as a Jew.
WHAT FOLLOWS, having
accepted the decision of the local
regime as to who is a dissident
and who is a Jew, is that the
dissident Jews who disappear or
are arrested cease to be the
concern of the official Jewish
community; their plight and that
of their families is minimized or
even ignored and not given any
publicity that would help focus
the attention of world Jewry on
this situation.
The dissident becomes almost
a non-person within the official
Jewish community. Whatever
news does emerge about the fate
of this individual is due to news
stories filed by correspondents
writing for newspapers and
periodicals abroad or reports
monitored by American Jewish
organizations with "Latin
American desks."
THE TRAGEDY, it is pointed
out, aside from the personal
element, is that there may be
more Jews in these countries who
are missing abducted, tor-
tured, imprisoned or killed
without anyone abroad knowing
about it until it is too late to do
anything to save this person
because of the silence of the
Jewish community.
American Jewish experts in
Latin American affairs cite such
cases as that of Vladimir Herzog,
the Brazilian journalist who was
found dead in his jail cell after
being taken to military head-
quarters for questioning on his
alleged involvement in a political
movement the Brazilian govern-
ment considered illegal: the dis-
MIETTE KORDA
BURNSTEIN
wishes everyone a Very
Happy and Prosperous
New Year
___________________________________________________pd. pol. adv.j
appearance in Chile of David
Silberman, who was a high of-
ficial in the government of
Salvador Allende. and of Diana
Aaron. Luis Guendelman and
Juan Carlos Perelman; the
abduction and disappearance in
Argentina of family members of
Juan Gleman, a well-known poet
and journalist who himself was
forced to flee to Rome last year
after receiving threats from right-
wing death squads: and the dis-
appearance of Raymundo Glazer,
an Argentine film maker.
IN THE CASE of Herzog.
some 8,000 persons of all faiths
attended an ecumenical memorial
service in Sao Paulo last
November. His death in October
sparked massive indignation and
demonstrations by university
faculty and students, journalists,
intellectualls and members of the
Christian clergy.
But the Jewish community
leadership maintained an official
silence, when one of the spokes-
men was asked about this, he
replied that it was "not a Jewish
issue."
The leadership also declined to
participate officially in the ecu-
menical memorial service. In fact,
Rabbi Henry Sobel, who did
participate, was rebuked by
many Jewish leaders. But Sobel,
at the service, cried out for
human rights for all people
everywhere and cautioned that
Jews cannot remain silent in the
face of oppression.
THE IRONY, it is pointed out,
is that some of these dissidents
were in the past, under different
circumstances, touted by the
same Jewish communities which
now ignore them as examples of
Jewish contributors to their
countries' social, economic and
intellectual life.
The crassest example of the
double standard they are "our
Jews" when the regime in power
is not hostile to socially pro-
gressive ideas but "not our
Jews" when the regime is hostile
was provided Dy a leading
figure in the Chilean Jewish
community.
When this writer was in Chile
three years ago he introduced
him to many ofthe leaders in the
Allende government who were
Jewish. He underlined, in his
introductions, that each one was
a well-known Jew before
becoming part of the Allende ad-
ministration and cited their con-
nections with communal
organizations.
SOME EIGHT months later,
three months after Allende's
government was deposed by the
military junta, this same in-
dividual was in New York. He
was asked what happened to
some of the Jewish officials
whose whereabouts were at that
time unknown.
"Why do you ask?" he said.
"Because their whereabouts are a
matter of great concern to the
Jewish community in this
country," he was told. "Why
should it be?" he responded.
"They weren't really Jews. They
were Communists." Asked why
he had introduced them as Jews
eight months earlier, he merely
shrugged his shoulders.
What makes the situation
fraught with disaster, it is
pointed out, is that once the
government or the death squads
decide to abduct or kill dissidents
who happen to be Jews it is a
short step for this to spill over
into general anti-Jewish activity.
A Healthy & Happy New Year
To Our Jewish Customers & Friends
Broward Band Instruments
1316 NE 4th Avenue 565-3797
A Very Happy New Year
To The Entire Jewish Community
Rule Pool
Custom Swimming Pool Designs
with the exclusive daily self-vacuuming process
Serving Hollywood to Fort Pierce
Phone: 491-4400
5780 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale
ELECT
SHERMAN A.
KATZ
BROWARD COUNTY
CIRCUIT COURT
GROUP
JUDGE
Admitted to Bar of State off Florida- 1958
Admitted to Bar of State of Pennsylvania- 1956
Admitted to Bar of United States Supreme Court- 1964
Member of American Bar Association
Bachelor of Arts in Economics, University of
Pittsburgh-1949
Juris Doctor, Law School, George Washington University
1955, Law Review
SERVED AS:
Attoriey Central Broward Drainage
District
Attorney Bollts Drainage District -
Henry County
Attorney Bailey Drainage District
Municipal Judge. Cooper City
Member Bar Greivance Committee -
Broward County
Arbitrator American Arbitration
Association
1976
TO MAINTAIN
IMPARTIAL
INDEPENDENCE
NO
CAMPAIGN
CONTRIBUTIONS
ARE BEING
ACCEPTED.
On
S
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P
T.
28
QUALIFIED BY TRAINING
EXPERIENCE AND SERVICI
DURING 20 YEARS AS A TRIAL
LAWYER
SHOMRAI AWARD
Jewish Federation
Of South Broward
Hmim mi Vka-Oaln-a *4 rha ftaar*
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-
"L


Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
Pagell-A
Jewish Community Center
BILL GOLDSTEIN, Mffor GLORIA K ATX, Editor HARRIET PERER, Coeditor
2999 N.W. 33rd Avenue, Port Lauderdaie Phone: 484-8300
At a recent board meeting of the newly formed Adult Jewish Community Club were (seated, from
left) Sandy Jackowitz, Murray Gompers, Sol Brenner, Viola Melnick, Larry Feigenbaum and
(standing, from left) Barney Muldofsky, Irving Benowitz, Israel Kaplan, Mitch Colman, Manny
Eckstein, Matty Kaufman and Henry Kahn. The group has 75 members and the first project
planned is a picnic on Sept. 22,10:30 am. at T-Y Park in Hollywood.
A packed house applauded one of the finest Israeli songstresses
seen in many a year. Zmira Henn (left) sang during a "Florida
Visits Israel" program brought to the Jewish Center by the
Israel Government Tourist Office and El Al Airlines. The
program included a lecture by Dr. E. Efrat from the University
of Tel Aviv. With Ms. Henn is Jacob Brodzki, JCC chairman
and Federation vice president.
I
JCC Schedule of Classes
* onPagel4-A
1
Theater Series
For Children
An enthusiastic group of active
and concerned women are
planning a Children's Cultural
Series for the 1976-77 year in Fort
Lauderdaie. After a successful
first year, during which over 750
children attended three Cultural
Series performances, the com-
mittee has decided to expand the
series.
The basic objective is to help
refine the tastes of children to
include live theater. Most
children acquire their likes and
dislikes early, and unless they are
exposed to high-quality forms of
entertainment and culture now,
they will be denied the op-
portunity to learn artistic ap-
preciation.
Shalom Singles
The group for the 45-plus
singles meets every Thursday
night for an evening of games,
singing and relaxation. People
Meeting People is the theme.
Group activities are planned each
month. There will be a special
meeting of paid-up members on
Sept. 30.
Those wishing to join this
active group should call the JCC,
484-8200. and ask for Helen.
Our sincerest thanks to Hilda
Robbins, one of the founders of
Shalom Singles. She is again in
the travel business as a sales
representative. Good luck, Hilda!
The Jewish Community Center;
Proudly presents...
i
yOfX;SjtUj7lC.6DfifX- O !3Rfl_L 1976 PftllJ
I
i
i
Direct from Israel, a program that brings the spirit of Israel to America.
I Songs, dances, folk-dancingl It's superb/
At War Memorial Auditorium of Fort Lauderdaie
Ion Tuesday Evening, November 16, 1976, at 8 P.M.; Donation: $3, $4,
ISunday November 21. 1976, Matinee 2:30P.M.; Donation: $2 $3, $4 |
(Tickets available at auditorium box office, or at Jewish Federation ot-
[Greater Fort Lauderdaie, 2999 NW 33rd Ave. |
For Reservation & Information -
Call: 484-8200
At a recent planning meeting for the Children's Cultural Series were (seated, from left) Nancy
Weiser, Suzanne Mellin, program associate Sandy Jackowitz and (standing, from left) Barbara
Glasser, Fran Smith, Harriet Perer, Susan Sachs, Fran Vernick and Phyllis Bareth.
Yiddish Theatre
Needs You!
The new Yiddish Theatre of
Fort Lauderdaie is calling all
Yiddishists who want to be
associated with Yiddish theater
to promote Yiddish culture.
Needed and wanted are actors
and actresses, singers, dancers,
comedians, musicians, specialty
acts and other theater personnel.
The plan is to prepare, rehearse
and present Yiddish artists in
shows, plays, and musicals.
The group meets each Wed-
nesday at 7:30 p.m. at the Jewish
Community Center. Wear
comfortable clothes. Bring a pad,
pencil and talent.
For more information, call
Lorna "Tsirel" Tomkin, 525-
9843, or the Jewish Community
Center, 484-8200.
(Bar Mitzvahl
LOUIS FELDMAN
Dr. and Mrs. Mark Feldman's
son, Louis, will become a Bar
Mitzvah on Sept. 18 during
morning services at the Recon-
structionist Synagogue.


1 '

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procran aponaored by toe JCJ Teen troixwu


Page 12-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976
A Brother Remembers
Remarks by Binyamin Netanyahu during the 1977
UJA Prime Minister's Mission, Aug. 30,1976
When I was asked to speak here tonight, I thought that I
should tell you some of the things that I believe my brother,
Jonathan, would have said here had he been with us tonight.
Rut perhaps to understand better what he might have said, I
should first make clear his attitude toward the Entebbe
Operation, which is now known as Operation Jonathan.
From the moment the military option was considered,
Jonathan supported the idea with alacrity and enthusiasm, for
he believed the operation was essential, as well as feasible.
He begun U> plan carefully meticulously, as was his custom
the action of the rescue force which he was to command. But
throughout the planning and preparations and rehearsals, he
never lost sight of two things:
A. He was fully aware of the tremendous risks involved, not
only to his own force and to the entire mission, but also to the
State of Israel as a whole.
B. He firmly believed in the capacity of our forces to over-
come these risks and emerge victorious.
THIS WAS NOT a blind belief. I want you to realize, but a
reasoned, studied conviction. Yoni believed in our capacity to
meet that challenge because, in his judgment, that capacity was
based on a unique combination of daring and wisdom, total
readiness for self-sacrifice and total determination to channel all
our resources toward achieving an absolutely vital goal.
These were the factors in which Yoni believed, and on these he
based his assessment.
A year ago, in a farewell address to the tank battalion he had
commanded in the Golan Heights, Yoni said among other
things, the following words: "I believe, with all my heart, in our
ability to carry out any mission that will be entrusted to us. And
I believe in Israel, and in the feeling of responsibility that ac-
companies every man fighting for the fate of his country."
It was with this spirit, this conviction, that Yoni imbued his
comrades and his soldiers, not onlv in the preparation for the
Entebbe Operation, but also throughout his 11 years of service
in the Army of Israel. Yet something else must be added in this
connection, which is very important. That unshaking taith ot
Yoni was not merely a result of his observations at our present
condition. It was also a result of his observation and un-
derstanding of the entire course of Jewish history.
Let me read to you a passage from a letter he wrote to a friend
a girl friend several months ago, on the eve of Passover.
". Tomorrow is Pesach," he wrote. "To me, Pesach has
always been the most wonderful of all our holidays. It is an
ancient festival of freedom dating back thousands of years.
"When I sail back over the sea of our history, I go through
long years of suffering, of oppression, of massacres, of ghettos,
of degradation, of humiliation many years which in a
historical perspective seem devoid of any ray of light. But this is
not so. For the fact that the idea of freedom remained, that the
hope persisted, that the flame of liberty has continued to burn
through the observance of this ancient holiday is to me
testimony to the eternity of the striving for freedom and the idea
of freedom in Israel."
HE GOES ON, saying that, and I quote, "In exploring our
past we meet other periods of calm, of freedom, of a people
working its land, living the life of the people of the Book. Then,
too, Passover was celebrated with the same ardor, for freedom is
precious and its remembrance long."
Following that, Yoni reminisces on the wonderful Passover
celebrations he had in his childhood, and then he says:
"Last year, I celebrated the Seder with my soldiers in a big
tent near a heavily bombarded hill in the Syrian Bulge, and this
too was a wonderful Seder of a special kind."
Sen. Samuel L. Greenberg (left), Albert G Segal and Irving L.
Geisser heard a military briefing by Defense Minister Shimon
Peres at the Central Army Command Post.
And he finished the passage with the following words:
"My yearnings for the past blend with my longing for you.
And because of you I find myself in my past, and I find the time
and the desire to reminisce in order to share my life with you.
Yet, by the past, I refer not only to my personal past, but to the
manner in which I see myself as an integral part, as a link in the
chain of Israel's struggle for survival and independence."
THIS, THEN, was the source of Yoni's inspiration: the
realization that he represented a heritage and a destiny, a
testament of a hundred generations of his people, who fought for
the liberty and dignity of man.
For three millennia our people have struggled against the
onslaught of the greatest empires the world has known, all
seeking passage and control of the strategic crossroads which is
our land.
Already to the Roman historians, this unceasing struggle
against these conquerors appeared inexpUcable and wondrous.
What they failed to comprehend is the moral force of a nation,
however small, united by an ideal of freedom, refusing sub-
jugation and prepared to pit itself against adversity. And so,
against this stream of empires, against these incredible odds,
our ancestors held fast and fought back, clinging to this soil for
18 centuries and then, after losing it, striving to regain it for
another 12.
History was not lavish in offering the Jewish people op-
portunit'es to achieve this aim. It is only in the modern period,
in the past century, that such an opportunity presented itself,
and the Jewish people seized upon it and performed the miracle
of return and redemption that we see around us.
But the struggle, as we know, is far from complete. Israel is
besieged by powerful enemies, new empires and totalitarian
forces that seek to extinguish the flame of freedom that is
burning here seek again to uproot us from our land which we
regained and rebuilt with tremendous sacrifice.
How can we withstand this concerted assault? How shall we
face these overwhelming odds?
To Yoni, the answer was clear. He remembered the Mac-
cabees.
Then, even more than now, a small, tiny people, unequipped
and heavily outnumbered, was facing the onslaught of the
enormous Greek-Syrian empire.
The struggle was long and bitter and costly, but Israel
emerged victorious. For then, as now, Israel was fighting not
only for her life, but for an ideal: spiritual, religious, and
national freedom.
Then, as now, the significance of that struggle was such that
it affected the course, perception and ideals of the whole civilized
world.
For Yoni believed that Israel is fighting for principles that
must be cherished by free men everywhere, and that her struggle
for her ideals will finally galvanize the Free World, move it from
its present complacency to a state of firm and active opposition
to the barbarism, oppression and tyranny that threaten to
engulf mankind.
ENTEBBE IS a symbol, a symbol of one mind. What hap-
pened there only reflects the larger design which our enemies
have for us. They seek to place the whole of Israel, indeed the
whole of the Jewish people, in the state of the helpless hostages
of Entebbe. They seek to impose upon us conditions of surrender
and degradation and enslavement.
But Operation Jonathan is a symbol of another kind.
It tells us that free men, if they are willing to fight, if they are
ready to employ their courage and wisdom, and channel all of
their resources into a concerted and determined action, can
overcome ruthless evil, however dreadful and threatening.
I think these are some of the things that Yoni would have
liked to say to you tonight, when you, representatives of the
Jewish people, deliberate and consider plans to fortify the State
of Israel.
Local
Leaders
Continued from Page 1-A
their 1976 gifts.
"The spirit of Entebbe was
pervasive," said Sen. Greenberg.
"You could feel, sense and see its
impact. Entebbe has restored
confidence that with courage and
determination, the impossible is
attainable if leadership will
lead. It's significant of the rising
maturity of American Jewry that
leadership can respond without
crises, and give for human needs
with joy."
In Israel the community
leaders met with Israel's Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and
other key Israeli officials. Segal
quoted Rabin, who said "We are
partners in the greatest
humanitarian experiment known
to man. And history will show
that this partnership between the
Jews of America and the people
of Israel was successful and
meaningful because of the degree
of our commitment and
dedication to a common goal."
Meeting with Defense Minister
Shimon Peres and Chief of Staff
Gen. Mordechai Gur, the UJA
participants heard not of military
tactics, but of Jewish motivation
and the value of life. "The
significance of Entebbe is sum-
marized in two words which have
special meaning to all people,
especially Jews freedom and
selection." said Gen. Gur.
Binyamin Netanyahu, younger
brother of Jonathan Netanyahu,
the hero of Entebbe slain during
the rescue, told the UJA Mission.
"Entebbe tells us that free men.
if they are willing to fight, if ihey
are ready to employ their courage
and wisdom, and channel all of
their resources into a concerted
and determined action, can
overcome ruthless evil, however
dreadful and threatening."
The emotion of the Prime
Minister's Mission was summed
up by one participant who
declared, "I was in Auschwitz,
and no one came to save me. That
is the meaning of Entebbe and
why my giving is an expression
of love."
Sen. Greenberg at
Lebanese border.
the
i
Irving Bernstein (left), UJA executive vice chairman, and UJA
chairman Lautenberg listened to an address by Prime Minister Segal is greeted by Joseph Almogi, chairman of the Jewish
Yitzhak Rabin during the Prime Minister's Mission Agency, as Frank Lautenberg, national UJA chairman, looks
vanguard for "This Year in Jerusalem.'' on-


iday, September 17,1976

The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13-A
,EO M IN DM A'
He Wonders Would U.S. Fight for Israel?
Continued from Page 4-A
Jleged, he is long since tried and
sted in State Department busi-
kss. (If one carries this
fgument to its logical con-
ision, the incumbent should
vays win, and pretty soon there
juld be no need for two parties,
'for two candidates, or indeed
elections at all.)
The Democrats will be em-
Ihasizing their criticism of the
iixon-Ford rule and the
(German attitude" in Henry
Kissinger "that a democracy can
conduct its foreign policy without
the assent of the people."
MY OWN feeling here is that if
President Ford wins, Dr. Kis-
singer goes. But nothing else will
go with him certainly not the
secrecy.
On the other hand, if Gov.
Carter wins, and President Ford
goes, nothing else will go with
him either, including the secrecy.
This is, I know, a Procrustean
dilemma, and the best we can
hope for is a narrow-margin
Austrians May
Buy Kfir Fighter
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Austrian delegation headed by
efense Minister Karl Ferdinand
Ion Luetgendorf arrived here to
jvestigate the possibility of
Religious
Directory
FORTLAUDERDALE
|TH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 71M W.
jkland Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
abowitz. Cantor Maurice Neu (42)
DANU-EL TEMPLE. 3245 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi
Del S. Goor. Cantor Jerome Klemenf
Ml.
I\ARAC JEWISH CENTER. tlOt
(IW S7th St. Conservative. Rabbi
krael Zimmerman (4A).
KING ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
1171 Stirhnq Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
RosheBomzer(52).
PLANTATION
kNTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
ION. 400 S Nob Hill Rd. Liberal Re
|rm. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr (Ml
:ONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
>GUE.7473NW4thSt. (6*1.
******
POMPANO BEACH
)LOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Ave.
onservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
lantor Jacob Renier (4).
MARGATE
TH HILLEL CONGREGATION. 7440
pargate Blvd. Conservative. Cantor
harles Perlman
|RGATE JEWISH CENTER. 6101
?th St. Conservative. Cantor
lxGallub(44B).
*******
CORALSPRINGS
OR TEMPLE. 3721 NW 100th
Relorm. Rabbi Max Weitz (44).
>rm. Rabbi Max Weitz (44).
(44)
******
DEERFIELD BEACH
IISH COMMUNITY CENTER-
|TH ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE.
ntury Village East. Conservative.
bbi David Berent (62).
buying 25 Israel-made "Kfir" jet
interceptors for the Austrian air
force.
The delegation, greeted at Ben
Gurion Airport by Defense
Minister Shimon Peres, includes
six members of the Austrian
Parliament and three senior
officers of the Austrian air force.
AUSTRIAN test pilots have
flown the Kfir and are apparently
satisfied with its performance.
But sources here said it was
unlikely that a transaction would
be completed during the
delegation's visit.
The general feeling, however, is
that Austria will eventually
conclude a deal despite strong
political pressure against it.
The Viennese newspaper, Die
Presse, noted last week that "a
big disadvantage lies in the
political field" because "the
country where the Kfir is pro-
duced is situated in the Middle
East conflict area."
THE PAPER added that "We
have to take care of the Arab
markets too, and who can
guarantee the shipment of spare
parts in case of a new outbreak of
war in the Middle East?"
A major factor in favor of the
purchase is the low price of the
Kfir in comparison to similar
aircraft produced in other
countries.
The Kfir, the first combat
plane designed and produced in
Israel, is priced at $4.5 million
per plane compared to $6 million
for the French-made Mirage F-
1C.
ONLY THE less sophisticated
American Northrop F-5 "Tiger"
is cheaper, Austrian sources have
pointed out.
According to Die Presse, Israel
is willing to negotiate a multi-
million dollar bargain with the
Austrian state-owned Stell
Industry in exchange for the
plane deal.
victory for either party a
statement by the American
(people that neither candidate has
been given a mandate to turn
imperial overnight, although the
growing horror in the American
democratic process is that a
narrow-margin victory doesn't
stop the imperiousness at all. It
didn't stop it in John Kennedy in
1960, or in Richard Nixon in
1968.
INDEED, Gerald Ford's
appointment in 1974, which was
neither a mandate nor a narrow-
margin victory, but a temporary
constitutional stop-gap following
the resignation of both the
President and the Vice President,
| hasn't stopped Ford from turning
I imperious, too.
The American presidency be-
comes increasingly officious,
increasingly autocratic, in-
, creasingly monarchic with the
passing years.
Not only does the office give
the presidency limousines, chauf-
feurs, private planes, unlimited
travel, all with personal arsenals
on the hoof.
But in choosing our new kings,
we choose his family, as well. We
elect a queen, princes, princesses,
all with chauffeurs, planes,
travel, personal arsenals of their
own.
NONE OF this nonsensical,
nauseous byplay can appeal in
the least to a thinking voter who
will, for example, want to hear
what Gerald Ford has to say in
the next two months or so, not
what Betty Ford has to say while
Jerry hides in the White House
out of the way of any possible
gaffes.
Still, that is how the public
relations hucksters have already
orchestrated it, and I hear no
objections from anyone not
even from the thinking voter.
Under these carnival circum-
stances, including the coming
corny carny debates, what can we
expect from the candidates them-
selves in terms of a serious dis-
cussion of foreign policy or of
serious foreign policy commit-
STARcVDAVID
memorial gardens
7701 Bailev Road. Timarec. Florid* (305) 721-4112
ANNOUNCES
PRE HIGH HOLY DAY MEMORIAL SERVICE
fFICIATING: D' Morton Melavaky. Rabbi
Temple Beth Shalom
Preeideni. Broward Board of Rabbia
Cantor Irving Gold
Temple Beth Shalom
Sunday September 19.1978
10-30 A.M. Promptly
STAR OF DAVID MEMORIAL GARDENS
7701 Bacley Road. Tamarac. Florida
kCE:
We are proud to serve the Jewish Community
on this occat ion. and wish you peace. |oy.
and O'eat happiness
It would give us a great deal of pleasure to
have you share this Memorial Service with
us If you can, please coll 721 4112
ments, with sufficient par-
ticipation by the people in
shaping these commitments,
should they be elected?
WHEN FAIRLIE speaks of
America's desire to recover a
deliberate and sustained posture
in the world, one which is both
confident and generous, mainly I
think he does so because, as an
Englishman, he hopes for this.
As an Englishman, he recalls
"that in the years after 1945,
amidst the ruins and despair of
Europe, it was not just the ac-
tions of an American government
to which we looked across the
Atlantic with hope and gratitude,
but the impulses of the American
people who seemed to us great
and good."
Fairlie thus hopes for an
American renaissance in these
terms because, if not us, then
who? The Russians? The
Chinese? The Arabs?
Well, along with Fairlie, many
Americans may be hoping for
this renaissance in themselves,
too.
BUT I reported at the very
beginning that Fairlie also ob-
served confused and truculent
answers to his question put to
Americans whether they would
be willing to fight to sustain the
nation's principles as defined by
our foreign policy.
If confusion and truculence
prevail, then odds are that
Americans are not willing to fight
not for their principles or
anyone else's principles at this
time.
Indeed, their confusion and
their truculence are a response to
their general awareness that
whomever they elect, it will come
to the same thing that the
election process is a mere charade
having no political significance
but the pomp and circumstance
of the new imperial presidency.
I PERHAPS THAT is why,
'these days, they applaud Susan
Ford, or choose up sides of ap-
plause for Betty Ford vs. Nancy
Reagan. It is their agony, their
cynicism, their hysterical humor
hiding them from the agony and
'the cynicism all at once
that their political life is a
lie.
Fairlie, along with so many
other Americans, prays devoutly
that this is not true that the
individual American's vote does
make a difference, that foreign
policy is meaningful to him, and
that he it willing to pay the price
of personal sacrifice for goodness
and generosity in the same way
that he paid the price in World
War II.
But the odds are that in the
end Henry Kissinger is right,
that America is henceforward
consigned to a second place in
world affairs because America
has shifted from an offensive
power to a defensive one.
IF HE is right, it suggests that
these prayers can never be an-
swered until this fundamental
change in us shifts back to
national willingness to assume
the offensive in the cause of
goodness once again.
What are the possibilites? In
the international sphere, we have
become merchants of death,
salesmen for our war wares,
bloated bourgeois willing to sell
our enemies the weapons to be
used against us in our own
ultimate destruction.
We may not like being "pushed
around" anymore, but ap-
parently we prefer arms profits to
leadership in morality.
IF THE world has become a
dangerous place in which to live,
because as Fairlie says, we have
given up our greatness and our
goodness, it is due less to our
declining commitment to these
qualities than to our direct
contribution to the danger
through the pursuit of corporate
gain.
Can we return to our
finest hour to the vision
Fairlie still holds of us from
the past and for the future
when we did fight for
Britain and for Europe?
Would we fight for them
again? Would we fight to
save Israel?
For more on that, another
time .
Anti-Israel Drive at UNations
Continued from Page 1-A
Jewish people Herzog asked:
"how can Jews here or elsewhere
ignore the extreme hostile at-
titude of the Cubans to Israel and
the Jewish people as reflected in
the United Nations?" Charging
that the United Nations is the
"main center of anti-Semitism in
the world" today, Herzog ac-
cused the UN of being in effect an
obstacle to any peaceful solution
in the Mideast.
"The United Nations is
gradually being turned by a small
group of despots into the war-
mongering center of the world,"
Herzog declared.
He pointed an accusing finger
at the UN General Assembly,
stating: "The Assembly, by
allowing itself to be dominated
by a group of intransigent ex-
tremists, whose declared purpose
is to fight against any move
toward peace, is encouraging
dissent instead of accord, in-
transigence instead of com-
promise ... By allowing small
groups of irresponsible ex-
tremists to dictate to the UN, the
tragedy of the Mideast conflict is
being prolonged."
WITH THE UN ignoring
entirely the tragedy in Lebanon,
and instead being preoccupied
with condemning Israel, the
UN's silence, Herzog said, "is as
shattering as is that of the
Christian chruch's which, gagged
by expediency, contemplates in
shameful silence as their flock is
threatened with extinction."
"THE REASON is that the
African countries are aware that
the Arab initiative in this matter
spells doom for their Decade for
Action Against Racism and
Racial Discrimination," Herzog
explained.
Herzog was skeptical on any
UN action against terrorism this
year. "Indeed," he said, "how
can one not be skeptical when
from the first of September the
representative of Libya will
occupy the Presidency of the
Security Council" and at the
PLO has been proposed for
observer status at the Inter-
national Atomic Energy Agency.
During his long address,
Herzog did not spare criticism of
the Western members of the UN.
"The fact that the Western
countries who know the
allegations (against Israel) to be
untrue, abstain on major issues,
is yet a further example of a
tendency to cowardly and craven
capitulations on the part of the
West to expediency.
"An ominous and fearsome
process is overtaking the world
and we are all silent. For how
long?" Herzog asked, calling on
the Jewish people "to stand up as
a proud people which has given to
the world the sublime principles
and traditions which are being
trampled underfoot in the United
Nations today."
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Pagel4-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976

JCC Schedule of Classes
Here is a bandy schedule of our ongoing "classes" you may
register for.
Programs began this week. For the full range of activities,
please call 484-8200 and ask for the Program Booklet.
MONDAY
Children's after-school program in
Plantation (Grades 1-5) 3:15-5 p.m.
Women's physical education 1:30-2:30 p.m.
Yiddish class 10 a.m.-noon
International cooking 1-3 p.m.
Luncheon and card party
(1st and 3rd Mondays) noon-2:45 p.m.
Children's arts and crafts (Grades K-5)
JCC Building, 3:15-5 p.m.
Bridge class 10 a.m.-noon
TUESDAY
Children's after-school program
in Sunrise (Grades 1-5) 3:15-5 p.m.
Jean Scene Lounge open to
all "tweens" (11-13) 7-9 p.m.
Folk, round and square dancing:
beginners, ll:15a.m.-12:30 p.m.;
intermediate, 2:45-4 p.m.; advanced, 1-2:15 p.m.
Ulpan class (beginners conversational Hebrew) -
10*11:80 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
Children's after-school program in
Pompano(Grades 1-5) 3:30-5:30 p.m.
Women's slimnastics class 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Parapsychology class 10 a.m.-noon
Adult crafts workshpp 1-2:30 p.m.
THURSDAY
Children's after-school program in
Plantation (Grades 1-5) 3:15--5 p.m.
Shalom Sociables club nite (Singles 45+) 7:30-10 p.m.
Ballroom dancing 2:30-4 p.m.
Adult Jewish Community Club (2nd Thursday) 1-2:30
p.m.
Teen art workshop
Temple Sholom in Pompano and
Temple Beth Israel in Sunrise, 7-9 p.m.
Teen cultural encounter Coral Springs, 7-9 p.m.
FRIDAY
Women's dance exercise workshop 9:30-10:30 a.m.
SUNDAY
Karate class (teens, adults) 7-8 p.m.
Yoga class (teens, adults) 8-9:30 p.m.
Men's Athletic Club 9 a.m.-noon
(women contact Larry Berkley)
Teen Jean Scene Lounge 6:30-9 p.m.
Dayan Tried
To See Arafat
By TUVIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Former Defense
Minister Moshe Dayan
reveals in his new auto-
biography that in 1968 he
tried to arrange a meeting
with Palestine Liberation
Organization chief Yasir
Arafat and Egyptian Presi-
dent Gamal Nasser, but
failed.
Details of his auto-
biography, published this
week in Hebrew and
English, were presented on
Israel television by Dan
Raviv, a reporter, who had
read the galleys of the
book. He said he found
political and military in-
formation which was never
before published.
DAYAN RELATES that he
made an attempt to arrange a
meeting between himself and
Nasser, to find out if the
Egyptian President was ready to
make an agreement with Israel.
In 1968, in his efforts to meel
with Arafat, Dayan was prepared
to release from prison a
Palestinian terrorist and send
him as an emissary to Arafat in
order to arrange the meeting.
In his book, Dayan writes that
the prisoner refused to be set free
for this purpose. However, the
poet, Fadua Touckan, agreed to
make an effort to arrange the
meeting wii h Dayan, but she did
not succeed
IN OTHFH revelations, Dayan
states that he late David Elazar,
who comm. led the army during
the Yom K i pur War, was not his
candidate t Chief of Staff.
Dayan aJ 0 writes that there
were "b;s disagreements"
between El ir and himself aftei
the first tv- days of the war.
Dayan said he could not share
Elazar's op< nism and main-
i he Israeli army
able to stop the
m crossing the
tained tha
would not
Egyptian:
SuezCana:
DURING THE past few days,
Dayan seems to have embarked
on a "cornel.ack" course. '
The "comeback" also appears
to have been timed for the
momentary appearance of a new
daily, "Hayom Haze" (This
Day), of which Dayan is chief
editor.
Synagogue
Inaugural
MarredBy
Quarrels
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
The inauguration of The Hague
Liberal Synagogue in the 250-
year-old building of the former
Portuguese Synagogue has
already been marred by internal
quarrels, misunderstandings and
squabbles.
The synagogue was in-
augurated Sept. 2 and on Sept. 3
there was a formal celebration
attended by Queen Juliana to
mark the 250th anniversary of
the building which has been
restored and brought back to its
former glory.
THE CITY'b Orthodox Chief
Rabbi Menahem Fink announced
that he would not attend the
ceremonies to protest the fact
that they would not be conducted
according to the Orthodox rite.
A number of Dutch Sephardic
Jews openly deplore the lack of
good taste" in housing a Liberal
congregation in what was the
spiritual home of a community
which perished in the con-
centration camps of World War
II.
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See your travel agent or Costa Line
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A Costa Tour Package



[Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 15-A
With the Candidates: a
CARTER
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
ATLANTA [Democratic Presidential can-
didate Jimmy Carter told a group
jf 70 Jewish community leaders
that any settlement of the
'alestinian question must
recognize that the Israelis did
jot cause the Palestinian
problem."
His assertion drew enthusiastic
ipplause from the Jewish leaders
vho had attended an all-day
[briefing by Carter and members
[of his campaign staff at the
Atlanta American Motor Hotel.
I The former Georgia Governor
was scheduled to meet with the
New York Board of Rabbis later
at the Fifth Avenue Synagogue
in New York City.
CARTER TOLD the Jewish
group, most of whom are ex-
pected to campaign for him in
their local areas, that his support
of Israel was 'undeviating, un-
equivocal.*' He said he would
support "whatever military and
.economic aid that is necessary to
I let Israel defend itself."
He said a Middle East peace
requires the Arab states to
eCOgnize Israel's right to exist
knd must leave Israel with secure
|nd defensible boundaries. "One
If the things that has aggravated
IIhe Mideast situation," Carter
Isaid, is the uncertainty lately
(about where our nation stands
[that makes the leaders of Israel
and the people of Israel uneasy
and that builds up false hopes in
those countries that are probing
[for weaknesses in Israel or weak-
ness in our commitment to
[Israel.
Holy Days At
Temple Sholom
Friday. Sept. 24, at 7 p.m.
marks the beginning of the High
Holy Days. Kabbi Morris A.
[Skop. Cantor Jacob .1. Renzer
and Temple Sholom Choir will
conduct the sacred ritual at the
| Pompano Reach temple
Saturday and Sunday services
begin at 9 a.m. with a special
ceremony of sounding the Shofar
scheduled for Sunday.
Special children's services will
be led on Saturday and Sunday
I at 10 a.m. in the chapel by Elie
I Skop and Randy Konigsburg.
The annual midnight Selichot
lalert begins at 11 p.m. on
Saturday, with a social get
[together tor old and new
nembersand guests.
Religious School has begun in
paily Hebrew school and Sunday
primary school.
The temple's Men's Club meets
Ton the first Thursday of each
I month.
DURING THE question and
answer period which was not
limited to Jewish issues, Carter
said he understands the issues
that concern Jewish voters
because he receives sound in-
formation on them from his staff.
He noted that many of his staff
members are Jews.
Friedman Urges
Arms Sales Stop
Charlie Friedman, candidate
for Congress in the 12th District,
has urged Congress to stop the
.proposed shipment of arms to
Saudi Arabia, particularly the
12,000 air-to-air Sidewinder
missiiles.
Facing a run-off election on
Sept. 28, Friedman cited the fact
that Congress has the provisions
to halt arms shipments in excess
of 125 million.
"We have historic
documentation that these arms
are funneled into the con-
frontation countries: Egypt.
Syria and Jordan." he said.
FRIEDMAN IS not alone in
bis opposition to the proposed
sale: in a rare show of solidarity.
the American press has also
opposed it. In its Aug. 1 edition
The Norfolk Virginian-Pilot asks.
"Is it not a monstrous irony .
thai the foremost arms merchant.
peddling lethal hardware to
democrats and despots alike, is
the United States?"
Friedman has been in touch
with Democratic Congressional
leaders and has requested, when
plected, to be placed on the
International Relations Com-
mittee, where he would be able to
monitor any transactions af-
fecting the balance of power in
the Middle Fast.
^ ^
IBIBIBIHIHIBIHIBIHIHIBIBIHIHIHIHIHIHIHIHLJ
ISRAEL MUST LIVE!
Charlie Friedman Understands.
Charlie Friedman understands
because he has lived
Israel, worked in Israel
and supported Israel.
The United States Congress
needs CHARLIE FRIEDMAN to
stand behind the needs of Israel.
Please vote #1 September 28th to elect
CHARLIE FRIEDMAN to United States Congress. Pi.
liBiHiHiaiaiaiBiaiHiaiBiBiaiB'B>"'Bi>iaiBn

.Silliam E. "Bert" Abell has
been appointed president and
\lected a director of the City
National Bank of Lauderhill.
South Florida resident since
\944, Abell has been
ssociated with the City
itional Bank Group for 13
irs.
miami
JM WISHES YOU A NEW YEAR
FILLED WITH PEACE AND CONTENTMENT
We hope the coming months will be filled whh many
shining moments, including the warmth of new friendships and
the joy of old ties with those you love and surmounting
them all, the happiness of dreams come true.
. dMnd 163rd ttrMt. hollywood fort ItudfdaK pompano wit palm boach orlando marrrtt iatond ahamontt H*"W


Pagel6-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976 N
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*ti
=*=
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==
*
SOUND
THE GREAT SHOE\R
FOR FREEDOM
V
h
t
E
E
fa
?
S
E
oi
t
n
d
D
We Are One
JEWISH FEDERATION OF CREATER FT. LAUDERDALE
, Flo. 33311
iti
H M H M M
M.
0;
^


Jewish Floridian
of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976 Section B
^Pfcejudice is a cuAse to wM u>e <^ews oag tffl subjected. 91ieAe a*e ex-
ceptions. .9 know |bH tfrit, lout it is sttH easie/t Joa a earned to go tkwqk
the eye oj a needfle tdan jo/i a ^ew to enteft into most executive suites."
!
>.
PROCLAIM LIBERTY. Abraham Kohn, an Illinois Jew, gave this American flag to President Abraham Lincoln. Its
Biblical inscription from Joshua 1:9 gave words of hope to a young nation during difficult days. "Be strong and of good
courage. Do not be afraid. Do not fear. For the Lord your God is with you in all that you undertake."
f
i\

duneRican Bicentennial: the messiah is Just
&ROun6 the CowieRBut theses
Something Still hol6mq him Up
By JACOB R. MARCUS
Director, American Jewish Archives
Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion
OURS IS the greatest Jewry the world has ever
known. There are almost 6,000,000 Jews in this
country and 10,000 societies. This means that
every man and woman here may hope some day to
become president, at least of a Jewish
organization. We are not newcomers; we are as
old as America herself.
When Columbus touched land in October, 1492,
the first man over the side was probably the
Jewish interpreter Luis de Torres; in the 1640's,
when Miles Standish and John Alden were still
alive, a Jewish merchant walked the streets of
Boston. When we recall that under the British no
Jew could hold public office we will understand
why our fathers became patriots in 1775. They
were not free.
In 1782, a Virginia congressman went to Front
Street in Philadelphia to borrow some hard cash
from a Jew there. The Continental currency in
that delegate's pocket was not worth a con-
tinental. That Jew helped keep that Virginian in
office; and in that same decade that congressman
became the chief architect of a constitution which
made it possible for Jews to become American
citizens. The Jew was Haym Salomon; the
congressman was James Madison.
AFTER THE German Republic of 1848 col-
lapsed, the Bavarian, Lazarus Straus, brought his
three sons to this land. The boys rented a con-
cession in R. H. Macy & Company, and when
they needed money for expansion the bank gave
them all they asked because of the integrity of
their father.
"WeU," said John A. Stewart, the president of
the United States Trust Company, "if the old
man is still in the firm he is good for anything to
which he wiD put his name." And while Lazarus'
sons, Isidor and Nathan, were building R. H.
Macy into the greatest department store in the
world, the Russian czars were tolerating the
massacre of thousands of Jewish men, women and
children.
Over 2,000,000 East European refugees
eventually found an asylum in this the land of
unlimited opportunity. Among them was a Polish
lad named Louis J. Horowitz, only 17 when he
arrived. By the time he was 35, he was the
president of what was probably the most
prestigious construction company in the United
States, and it is said that he more than any
other man was responsible for the high-rise
skyline of the great metropolis of Ne v York.
In 1761, a French Jew had been sentenced to
death for eating a cracker, a consecrated wafer, in
a Catholic church. On October 14, 1975, a mass
was said at St. Patrick's in New York for the
singer Richard Tucker, an Orthodox Jew of East
European parentage. The eulogy was delivered by
Father Hesburgh of Notre Dame, an honorary
alumnus of the Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion.
FORGIVE ME, if I imply that the Messiah is
just around the corner. If he is, something is still
holding him up. We have many problems. For
example the Federations of Jewish Charities,
through their support of some of our schools, are
in a position to influence the conduct of Jewish
religious institutions.
These secularist ic federations have entered into
a field where sooner or later they will confront our
religious leaders. Again, Jewish all-day schools
are receiving support from the welfare funds and
we must decide whether an increased knowledge
of Hebrew is compensation for a self-imposed
cultural segregation.
Next, a completely free press is the palladium
of our rights as members of the Jewish com-
munity, yet because the Jewish newspapers in our
large cities are often under Federation control we
must ask ourselves whether it is possible to have
a Jewish press that feels free to criticize. Also
and this is vital there is today no overall truly
representative Jewish organization in the United
States that can speak for the Jewish people in an
hour of crisis.
WE FACE religious indifference, an alarming
intermarriage rate, assimilation. About 10
percent of American Jewry lives at the poverty
level; the money given by congregations to
support the Hebrew Union College and the Union
of American Hebrew Congregations, the oldest
nationwide Jewish religious institutions in the
United States, amounts to about one percent of
the funds American Jewry sends abroad.
Our unhappiness with anti-Semitic statements
of some Black militants should not blind us to
the fact that Negroes are a downtrodden people.
Prejudice is a curse to which we Jews are still
subjected. There are exceptions, I know full well,
but it is still easier for a camel to go through the
eye of a needle than for a Jew to enter into most
executive suites.
One may well ask: Is our State Department not
circumscribing our options as we fight to
emancipate three million Jews in Russia and to
guarantee the survival of three million more in the
ancient land of Israel?
YET DESPITE these problems, there is much
to make us happy in this Bicentennial year.
Though few in number, we have nevertheless
survived. Numbers are not important. Would you
be as numerous as the Chinese? Is that your goal?
During the Middle Ages, there were only two or
three million Jews in all the world, yet there has
never been an age when Jews were more loyal.
We are proud of our quality as a cultured com-
munity. Beginning in the 1840's, we came to these
shores as German and Slavic villagers, im-
poverished, without political rights; today, we
enjoy unprecedented cultural, economic, and
political opportunities in this the greatest empire
the world has ever known.
It was a German immigrant to these shores
who perfected the first practic. microphone and
another from the German-Polisi. border who was
the first American to receive a Nobel Prize in the
sciences. Today, about 80 percent of all American
Jewish young men and women go to college, and
Continued on Page 2-B
1


Page2-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fprt Laud*r4ali\
Friday, September 17,1976
messi&h AROunfc CopneR But Something Is holding him Up
Continued from Page IB
although we are less than 3 percent of the
population, 15 to 20 percent of all American Nobel
laureates in the physical sciences are Jews.
DESPITE THE impoverished among us we are
an affluent people. In 1729 the first published
budget of the only Jewish organization in British
North America was less than $900. Today the
gross national product of all Jewish associations,
institutions, and societies is $1,500,000,000.
A generation ago Julius Rosenwald through his
matching grants helped establish over 4,000
Negro institutions. In my opinion he did more for
the Blacks than any other white man in this
country. At this moment there are over 300
colleges offering courses in Hebraic and Judaic
studies; there is a Jewish library in almost every
synagogue; there is a four-branched liberal
seminary uniting Reform Jews all the way from
Los Angeles to Jerusalem.
Practically every one of the hundreds of con-
gregations in the Union teaches Hebrew. Oscar
Straus once said that Hebraic mortar cemented
the foundations of American democracy, but
equally important for us is the fact that the
Hebrew language cements Jews all over the
world, creating an indissoluble whole more eternal
than the everlasting granite hills.
WE HAVE finally effected a harmonization of
the best in Judaism and Western culture.
Through the arts and sciences which we embrace
we have become an elite group. Here in this land
alone every ten years we publish 1,000 Jewish
scholarly works which illuminate our history,
literature, and religion. We are liberals, for our
laymen and our rabbis preach the gospel of the
fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man.
There is but one God and but one humanity.
We have emancipated oursleves from the dead
hand of authority. We believe in the right of every
individual to live with his conscience and to
accept in Judaism only that which will enable him
to be a free person living on the highest ethical
plane.
We do not await the coming of a personal
Messiah, but we do look forward to the advent of
a Messianic Age where men will act justly, love
mercy, and walk humbly with their God. We
accept the findings of science and somewhat
belatedly, to be sure affirm the equality of
women. We are proud of the fact that when our
College opened in October, 1875, one of the
students admitted to that first class was a girl.
LET US REJOICE. We have gone far since
September, 1775, when the officers of the Jewish
congregation in New York City met for the last
time as second-class British subjects; we have
gone far since August, 1776, when most members
of that congregation went into exile as Americans
Continued on Page 10 -B
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Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page'S-B
MARK TWAIN had a mes-
sage of welcome and promise for
the struggling masses of Jewish
immigrants who had passed
through Ellis Island at the turn
of the 20th century.
"If statistics are right, Jews
constitute one percent of the
human race," the great author
wrote "Properly, the Jew
ought hardly to be heard of .
(Yet) He is as prominent on the
planet as any other people. His
contributions to the world's list
of great names in literature,
science, art, music, finance,
medicine and abstruse learning
are out of proportion to the
weakness of his numbers."
These words were based on
Twain's knowledge of what Jew-
ish people had achieved in many
different lands during two
millennia of worldwide Diaspora,
and especially in the new land of
America, dating from Aug. 22,
1654, when the first known Jew-
ish settler landed in New Am-
sterdam (then Dutch), later New
York (British).
THE SETTLER was Jacob
Barsimson, a native of Holland.
He was followed in September by
23 other Jews who came by way
of Brazil. Barsimson was soon
recognized as the Jewish com-
munity leader. They had their
problems.
Under Governor Peter Stuy-
vesant, the New Amsterdam
Jews enjoyed practically no
citizenship rights. They could not
engage in retail trade or practice
a handicraft, for instance. They
could not hold a public post or
serve militia duty, practice "their
religion in a synagogue or
gathering."
Yet their tax bills were dis-
proportionately high. And when
they first petitioned for the right
to purchase a burial plot, the re-
quest was denied on the ground
that "as yet there was no need."
Some Bicentennial thoughts:
ContRiBUtions
of famous Jews
THROUGH the perseverance
and determination of such pio-
neers as Jacob Barsimson, Asher
Levy, Abraham deLucena, Jacob
Cohen Henricques, Salvador
Dandrada, Joseph d'Acosta and
David Frera, full citizenship
rights were in due course won for
the Jews of New Amsterdam,
rights which were continued
Continued on Page 4-B
Jacob Barsimson, first known
Jewish settler in America, wins
concessions for Jews from Peter
Stuyvesant, governor of New
Amsterdam.
May You Be Blessed With
Good Health & Peace
In The Years To Come *-
Sherwood Park
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Delray Beach 33444
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tuppy g pRospepous
new year*
Strachan Shipping
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PORT EVERGLADES
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FORT LAUDERDALE 33316
A hearty greeting to all our
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joyous New Year Holydays
Bon's Cabinetry
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Greetings
To you, friends, and neighbors, whom wo have boon
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best wishes for the New Year.
Twin County Class
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HAPPY
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1050 OLD DIXIE HIGHWAY
LAKE PARK 33403 848-1594


P*ge4-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976
Bicentennial thoughts
Continued from Page 3-B
when the British wrested the
colony from the Dutch in August,
1664, and renamed it New York.
It must never be forgotten that
this tiny group of Jews laid the
foundation of what was to be-
come here in the United States,
the largest Jewish community
under one flag, the strongest and
freest in the 2,000 years that this
people has been dispersed all over
the earth
At that time there were some
300 Jews in all of North America.
During the next 122 years until
1776 their number had grown
eight or nine times to perhaps
2,700 in all 13 colonies with or-
ganized Jewish communities in
New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, North and South Carolina
and Georgia.
The Jewish increase was small,
of course, compared with the 80-
rear
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lation. But like the exiles to
Babylon in 586 BCE, the Jewish
Americans from the very begin-
ning made great contributions to
their new homeland, of which
only a limited number can be pro-
filed here.
FRANCIS SALVADOR was
killed on Aug. 1, 1776, in one of
the earliest encounters following
the Declaration of Independence
on July 4. The site was near his
plantation along the Keowee
River in South Carolina.
With a little army of 330 men,
Salvador was defending the fron-
tier settlers against a British-
incited attack by Cherokee In-
dians. He was the first Jew to die
in the Revolution.
Son of a wealthy London
family (born 1747), Salvador
sickened of the life of a "dandy"
and in 1773 sailed for the colony
of South Carolina. Landing at
Charleston, he purchased a back-
woods plantation and settled
down to frontier life. His mettle
was quickly recognized by his
neighbors who elected him their
delegate to the first South
Carolina Provincial Congress.
Serving in Charleston, Sal-
vador earned the friendship and
esteem of such eminent colonials
as Edward Rutledge, Patrick
Calhoun, and Edward Pinkney
who later uttered the imperish-
able words: "Millions for defense
but not one cent for tribute!"
AMONG SALVADOR'S
honors were: commissioned to
sign and stamp the State's new
currency, financial advisor to the
Assembly, participated in re-
organizing the courts and selec-
tion of magistrates, advisor to
the Assembly election
procedures, participated in draft-
ing the State Constitution.
Francis Salvador was just 29
years old when he died. Yet his
brief life gave abundant nourish-
ment to his beloved South Caro-
lina and to the roots of the
nation-to-be.
MORDECAI SHEFTAL was
!
J\few fyem ^bee/mm
Palm Greens, a Yusem Property,
Extends Best Wishes
For a Peaceful and Happy Rosh Hashanah

4
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A Country Club Community
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>l


Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater. Fort Lauderdale
PageS-B
known to the British as "a very
great rebel," an epithet he cher-
ished. For Sheftal, a leading resi-
dent of Savannah, was most
prominent in the Revolutionary
movement in Georgia (born
Poland 1740, died Philadelphia
1785).
As in other colonies, the people
were of course divided into anti-
and pro-British camps, and
Sheftal was one who went heart
and soul for Independence.
His devotion and talents were
recognized when, in 1777, he was
named Commissioner General of
Purchase and Issues to the
Militia of Georgia.
He often advanced personal
funds for vitally needed pro-
visions. In the following year his
command was extended by the
American General Robert Howe
to the Conntinental troops of
both Georgia and South Carolina.
BUT BEFORE confirmation
could be made by the Congress in
Philadelphia, Sheftal was cap-
tured when Savannah was taken
by the British. He was treated
very badly for several months in
a prison ship, then in a Savannah
garrison, whence he managed to
escape. He was recaptured but
later given his freedom in an ex-
change of American and British
prisoners.
Sheftal went to Philadelphia
where he engaged in the patriotic
venture of "legalized piracy," by
selling shares in a privateering
vessel. Joining with other
privateers, Sheftal played havoc
with British commerce, acts of
war that pressured English busi-
nessmen to favor the end of
hostilities.
Visitors to Savannah today
may view the old Jewish
cemetery on Broughton Street
donated by Mordecai Sheftal in
17.73, now a historic landmark
since 1850.
SHEFTAL SHEFTAL, son of
Mordecai, was born in 1762. At
age 15, he was captured along
with his father when the British
took Savannah in the War of In-
dependence; both were later freed
in an exchange of prisoners.
At age 18, young Sheftal was
so experienced and mature that
his father entrusted him to seek
repayments of funds advanced
the new U.S. Government. The
man he talked to was Alexander
Hamilton, the first Secretary of
the Treasury. Hamilton listened
respectfully but could do
nothing, for the treasury was
quite empty.
But perhaps Hamilton did do
something for the impressive
young man in another way. For
shortly thereafter, the powerful
Board of War commissioned him
as Flag Master of the "Carolina
Packet," the sloop that carried
money and provisions for Amer-
ican prisoners in Charleston.
After the British were de-
feated, Sheftal studied law,
Continued on Page 6-B
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Page 6-B
The Jewish Flbridian of Greater Fort bauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976

i
Bicentennial thoughts
Continued from Page 5-B
became distinguished in his pro-
fession and in the public esteem.
He was made honorary president
of the Georgia Historical Society.
In 1819 when James Monroe
visited Savannah, Sheftal Sheftal
was among the prominent citi-
zens selected by the mayor to
dine with the President of the
United States.
AARON LOPEZ was a power
in Newport in the years just pre-
ceding the Revolution, when that
port city was described as a ship-
ping center that "New York can
never hope to rival ..." One of
the core reasons for this was
Rhode Island's great religious
liberalism which attracted a sub-
stantial community of well-
educated and able Jews, the most
affluent in the colonies.
Aaron Lopez was outstanding
among them (born Portugal 1731,
died Newport. 1782).
He ^vas described by Ezra
Styles, Christian pastor and
president of Yale, as "a merchant
of first eminence; for honor and
extent of commerce probably
surpassed by no merchant in
America."
Newport's shipping industry
was most important to young
America's growing strength and
power that finally enabled it to
revolt; a_nd_ Aaron Lopez was, in
the vortex. He is said to have
owned, in whole or in part, 30
transoceanic ships and over 100
coastal vessels.
LOPEZ WAS also recognized
as a promoter of- friendly
relations between the Faiths. He
was respected by Christians and
Jews alike and no ship ever left
his dock on either's Sabbath,
Sunday or Saturday. Lopez per-
sonally laid the cornerstone of
Newport Synagogue, also known
as Touro, now a Federal Shrine.
In strong sympathy with
Revolutionary patriots, he fled
Newport when the British at-
tacked. Although Newport was
ruined in the war, he did attempt
to return when peace was won,
but was killed in an accident on
the way. Newport locals can still
point out to you the place called
Lopez dock.
TOURO FAMILY of Newport:
The oldest existing synagogue
building in North America
memorializes the Touro Family
the father Isaac, the sons
Abraham and Judah. It stands in
Newport, Rhode Island, and
houses the Jeshuat Israel
Congregation.
Touro Synagogue was ded-
icated as a National Historic
Shrine on Aug. 31, 1947, by the
National Park Service of the U.S.
Dept. of Interior. A bronze tablet
*
Aaron Lopez owned one of Americas largest merchant fleets, a
major factor in the Colonies' ability to revolt.
is inscribed with a few highlights
of the sanctuary's history:
". it was dedicated on Dec.
2, 1763. Here 1781-84 the Rhode
Island General Assembly met,
and during Washington's visit to
Newport in 1781, a town meeting
was held here. The State Su-
preme Court held sessions here at
that period ... in 1790 George
Washington wrote that .
happily the government of the
United States gives to
bigotry no sanction, to per-
secution no assistance."
ISAAC TOURO was the first
hazzan and spiritual leader of the
new synagogue. Born in Holland
circa 1737, he came to America in
1760, lived in New York, then
Boston, and came to Newport
when its new Sephardic syna-
gogue was opened. Among his
many friends was Ezra Stiles,
president of Yale, whose diary
noted considerable data about
Touro's life.
In 1773, Isaac married Reyna
Hays, sister of Moses Michael
Hays, the wealthy and socially
prominent Bostonian. Their two
sons, Judah and Abraham were
born in 1775 and 1777. When the
Revolution forced the closing of
the synagogue in 1780, Isaac
took his family to New York,
later to Kingston, Jamaica,
where he died in 1784.
His widow and sons returned
to Boston where their affluent
uncle saw to their education and
training in commerce.
ABRAHAM TOURO pros-
pered and, true to the Touro
tradition in Newport, was
generous in charitable gifts.
Abraham left a large part of his
fortune for the upkeep of sites of
Jewish significance in that city.
One specific bequest, for ex-
ample, was $10,000 to the State
of Rhode Island for the upkeep of
the synagogue where his father
officiated, and $5,000 for the re-
construction of the street leading
from there to the cemetery.
Abraham died in 1822 at the
young age of 45. Had he lived as
long as his brother, his charities
would have been far greater.
JUDAH TOURO lived to the
ripe old age of 79 and became the
first Jew in America to achieve
the status of great philan-
thropist. Example: In 1839, Bos-
tonian blueblood Amos Laurence
offered to contribute half the
$20,000 cost of a monument that
would memorialize the Battle of
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* 1_
Friday. September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort bauderdale
Page 7-B
\
,
Bunker Hill. No one responded
and the project seemed doomed.
One day a letter came from far
away New Orleans, containing a
check for $10,000, signed by
Judah Touro.
"Who was this man Touro?"
they asked in Boston. On
checking him out, Judah was
found to be a merchant and
philanthropist of the "first emi-
nence." He had gone from Boston
at age 23 to New Orleans to seek
his fortune, where he arrived in
1802, penniless.
But the times were fortuitous.
The Louisiana Purchase, Ely
Whitney's cotton gin and rice
crops from the delta country
brought sustained and expanding
prosperity to New Orleans, and
to one of its most astute mer-
chants, Judah Touro.
IN THE War of 1812, Touro
joined Gen. Andrew Jackson in
the historic defense of New Or-
leans. He was seriously wounded
and during a long convalescence,
decided to share his wealth as he
made it. Touro grew richer and
richer and his gifts multiplied.
When a church, for instance,
fell deeply in debt and bank-
ruptcy, Touro bought it for
$20,000 and returned it to the
congregation. He founded the
great hospital in that city which
bears his name. He helped build
synagogues and built a home for
orphan boys. And he founded the
first free library in New Orleans.
After his death, every existing
synagogue, every Hebrew school,
0
r
every hospital and relief society
in America Jewish, Christian
and nonsectarian shared in his
fortune. Included were gifts of
175,000 for the Synagogue and
cemetery in Newport, and
*13,000 to the city for a park and
library. ______
HAYM SALOMON was a
fervent patriot whose love of
liberty and business acumen
combined to make him the
financial hero in the War of In-
dependence. Born in Poland in
1740, he was forced to flee that
country in 1772, due to his fight
for freedom, along with Pulaski
and Kosciusko who became mili-
tary heroes of the Revolution.
Salomon prospered from the
very start in America, doing
business with wealthy loyalists
while joining the Sons of Liberty,
a group of revolutionary patriots.
He was twice arrested by the
British but managed to escape
execution both times, finally
fleeing to Philadelphia.
SALOMON'S reputation for
honesty and skill in trade, es-
pecially foreign, attracted Robert
Morris, then Superintendent of
Finance, who called on him for
help in raising money to wage the
war, and later to save the
emerging nation from financial
collapse. Morris' diary indicates
some 75 transactions were made
by the two men between August,
1781 and April, 1784.
As President Calvin Coolidge
said of Haym Salomon: "He ne-
gotiated for Robert Morris all the
loans raised in France and Hol-
land, pledged his personal faith
and fortune for enormous
amounts, and personally ad-
vanced large sums to such men as
James Madison, Thomas Jeffer-
son, Baron Steuben, Gen. St.
Clair and many other patriot
leaders who testified that without
his aid they could not have car-
ried on the cause."
MICHAEL HAHN was the
first Jew in America to become
the governor of a state. Born in
Bavaria, Germany, in 1830,
Harm's parents brought him to
America in his infancy, settling
for a time in New York, then
permanently in New Orleans.
After graduation from Lou-
isiana University Law School, he
campaigned for the presidential
nomination of Stephen Douglas;
he spoke against secession and
decried slavery.
After the capture of New
Orleans by the North in 1862,
Hahn took the oath of allegiance
to the United States, sub-
sequently ran for and was elected
to the U.S. Congress. Later he
bought and published the news-
paper True Delta in which he
supported the emancipation of
slaves and Abraham Lincoln.
ON FEB. 22, 1864, he was
elected governor of Louisiana,
but resigned that office on March
5, 1865, after being elected to the
U.S. Senate. Hahn retired to his
plantation in St. Charles Parish
in 1871 where he founded the vil-
I lage of Hahnville.
There he ran for and was
elected to the Louisiana Legis-
lature, serving from 1872-1876,
and as speaker in 1875.
His next office was Register of
Voters (1876), then Superinten-
dent of the U.S. Mint in New Or-
leans, and then judge of the 26th
District. Hahn was elected to the
U.S. Congress as a Republican in
1884, serving to his death in
1886.
ABIGAIL MINIS was a rev-
olutionary patriot and a colonial
matriarch of classical pro-
portions. Born in England in
1711, Abigail at age 22 left the
security of London to pioneer in
the new colony of Georgia, which
was settled in 1733. She came
with her husband, Abraham, and
two daughters.
The name of ABRAHAM
MINIS is on the first real estate
deed recorded in Georgia. Within
a year, Abigail gave birth to
Phillip, the first European child
born in Georgia. Abraham died in
1757 leaving his estate and busi-
ness to the capable Abigail, who
increased the inheritance mani-
fold during her long and fruitful
life.
In 1779, the American high
command decided to recapture
Savannah from the British. Gen.
Lincoln selected Phillip Minis
and Levi Sheftal to help the ex-
pedition. After the attack was
launched, supplies were sorely
needed and the commanders ap-
plied to Abigail for provisions.
Mordecai Sheftal,
"a very great rebel."
THE KEEN old business-
woman knew the Continental
Army to be a poor credit risk, but
her beloved state and the cause of
independence came first. She
"delivered the goods" without
hesitation. The retaking of
Savannah failed.
Abigail, whose loyalty to the
British was suspect, was never-
theless permitted to leave for
Charleston, S.C, with her five
daughters and many possessions.
PHILLIP MINIS, acted as
Pay Master and Commissary
General of the Continental Army
in 1776. He personally advanced
$11,000 for supplies to Virginia
and North Carolina troops. He
later served as President of Mik-
vah Israel and as City Warden of
Savannah.
BENJAMIN NONES lived in
Continued on Page 8-B
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Page 8-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976
Bicentennial thoughts
Continued from Page 7-B
Bordeaux, France, at the time the
American colonies were seething
against the repressive British.
"Liberty, independence, rights of
man created equal ."
these were heady words for the
idealistic Nones, heard from
across the ocean.
He was deeply impressed and
influenced by the example of
young Lafayette who had out-
fitted his own ship in Bordeaux
for sailing to the aid of the revo-
lutionaries. Nones followed and
soon after landing in America,
found himself in uniform.
HE FOUGHT in nearly all the
battles of the Carolina cam-
paigns, including the sieges of
Charleston and Savannah. His
behavior in action, his bravery
and gallant conduct were of-
ficially recognized and in due
course he was rewarded with the'
rank of Major.
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Legend has it that Nones com-
manded a battalion of 400 men,
fancifully called the "Hebrew
Legion" either because of its
leader or its large number of Jew-
ish enlistments. Other legends
have the major as serving on the
staffs of Generals Washington,
Lafayette, DeKalb and Pulaski.
After Yorktown and the end of
the war, Maj. Nones settled in
Philadelphia where he became
active in Masonry and Jewish
communal affairs. He served as
president of Congregation Mik-
vah Israel before and after the
turn of the 19th century; and was
official interpreter of French and
Spanish for the Board of Health
for the U.S. Government.
COL. SOLOMON BUSH
reached the highest rank of all
Jewish officers in the Continental
Army. His first duty in the War
of Independence was Deputy Ad-
jutant General of the Pennsyl-
vania State Militia.
Fighting near Brandywine,
Bush received a near-fatal
wound. He survived but was cap-
tured when Philadelphia was
taken by the British. He was
later freed in a prisoner exchange
and applied for rations and pay.
The Supreme Executive Com-
mittee studied his record and
cited him for a distinguished and
brilliant career, especially during
the winter of 1776 "when the ser-
vice was critical and hazardous."
AFTER THE WAR, unable to
connect with a government job,
and probably seeking medical aid
for his wound that never quite
healed, Bush journeyed to Eng-
land where he again was able to
serve his country. The British
were still smarting under defeat,
and were pursuing a policy which
led to the War of 1812, seizing
and searching American boats
and conscripting their sailors into
the Royal Navy.
At the time, no U.S. consul or
ambassador was present to inter-
vene, so Col. Bush took it upon
himself to act on behalf of his fel-
low Americans. He reported his
efforts to President Washington
whose answer contained warm
commendations for the Colonel's
successful interventions.
On his return to America, Bush
applied for the office of Post-
master General, recently vacated
by Timothy Pickering who had
been promoted to Secretary of
*
^
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It is supported by funds raised
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Mordecai M. Noah, many claims to fame.
Jlay theyear ahead
be the best,
a year of happiness and peace,
of good health and
good fortune.
i
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Friday, September 17,197
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page9-B
4

i
'9
7
Jl,
War. He was the first Jew known
to be considered for Cabinet rank.
I f he failed to reach this office, his
unhealed wound must have
played a role since it did hasten
his death, probably in 1796.
HAYMAN LEVY, patriot,
militiaman, merchant, Indian
trader and fur dealer, was born in
1721 in Hannover, Germany. He
followed his Hannoverian King
George to England. From there
he went to the Colonies.
Loyal to the British until the
Revolution, Levy supported
them in the French and Indian
Wars, by outfitting privateering
ships to prey on the enemy in
Lake Champ lain, an action that
led to his bankruptcy.
But Hay man's energy and
abilities soon brought success
again a number of buildings on
Beaver Street in New York City
which housed the most extensive
fur business of the day. But again
misfortune struck; fire reduced
his holdings to ashes.
BUT BY now the Revolution
was in full blast and the Con-
tinental Congress of 1776,
respecting Levy's patriotic rep-
utation and trade skills,
authorized him to collect various
supplies for the army.
As the war worsened against
the Americans, Levy fled to
Philadelphia, where he swore al-
legiance to Pennsylvania, and
joined the military as a private,
although in his late fifties.
He was also active in Jewish
communal affairs. Levy was
elected Parness, or president, of
his synagogue but had to decline
because of his war-related ac-
tivities.
After the war, Hayman Levy,
his family and other Jews re-
turned to New York where in a
joint letter to DeWitt Clinton, re-
minded the governor that "the
ancient congregation of Israelites
lately returned from exile ... is
small when compared with other
religious societies yet none
has manifested a more zealous
attachment to the sacred cause of
America in the late war with
Great Britain."
MORDECAI Manuel Noah
was a man whose life was dom-
inated by twin passions
patriotism to the young republic
and loyalty to Judaism. His
claims to fame are in the fields of
diplomacy, journalism, play-
wrighting, literature, politics,
education, medical care and
Utopian Zionism
Noah, whose father fought in
the Revolution, was bom in 1785
in Philadelphia, then the nation's
capital, where such men as
Washington and Franklin were
familiar faces on the streets.
AT AGE 26, his forceful
editorials in a Charleston, S.C.,
newspaper advocating war (of
1812) with England, won him ap-
pointment as U.S. Consul to
Tunis. Returning to New York in
1815, Noah engaged in jour-
nalism and politics.
He published and edited sev-
eral newspapers, was a prolific
writer of popular plays and
literature, and was better known
in his day than Poe.
In politics, successively he held
the office of sheriff, court of
appeals judge, N.Y. Port sur-
veyer; and was a major in the
N.Y. military.
True to his heritage, Noah
supported education and medical
care, being a founder of New
York University, and projecting
the idea of a Jewish hospital
which was ultimately realized in
Mount Sinai Hospital after his
death. In later years, he lecture
and wrote on the need for a Jew-
ish settlement in Palestine, an-
ticipating the ideas of Leo
Pensker and Theodore Herzl.
CAPT. MORDECAI Myers,
born in Newport in 1776, never
tired of relating the thrill of his
life watching Gen. Washington
take the oath as first president of
the U.S.A. Patriot and solid
citizen, Myers was largely self-
educated, rising to success in
military and political pursuits on
his own.
His "feel" for soldiering made
its first contact with reality when
he joined a company under Col.
John Marshall, later the Chief
Justice of the U.S. Supreme
Court. This was in Richmond,
Virginia, where he had gone to
try storekeeping after not faring
too well in New York.
AGAIN business success
eluded him and Myers returned
to New York, this time to find a
happy outlet for his energies in
politics.
He became a member of
Tammany in the early days when
the "Wigwam" was a progressive
society. He was active in de-
feating and breaking the
stranglehold of the Federalists on
New York, and the nation.
At the same time, Myers in-
creased his military competence
by joining Capt. Swarthwort's
artillery company, and studying
military tactics for two years. As
the War of 1812 approached,
Myers was made a captain in the
U.S. Infantry and called into
service.
CAPT. MYERS saw action in
the Northern theater, preparing
for the invasion of Canada. He
led his troops in a bloody battle
at Chrysler's farm. The Amer-
icans claimed victory after the
British withdrew at sundown.
Murderous fire had killed many
of Myers' men, and he himself
was among the many wounded.
In later years, Myers rep-
resented a district in the New
York State Assembly and after
that, moved to Schenectady
where he served as its first Jew-
ish mayor, and died in 1871 at
Continued on Page 1 IB
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PagelO-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
-_____ '_____ i ____U__----------------------- _
Friday, September 17,197
Best Wishes for a
A Happy Rosh Hashanah
TRANS-CO
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iiiiiiii......niiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.........iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiffi
messiah AROunfc
iiimi.......iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii
But he'shefoup
imiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiimimiimiu
Continued from Page 2-B
rather than live under British rule. Rejoice that as 2
Reformers you are part of the greatest religious 55
revolution in Judaism since your prophetic fore- ~
bears broke with their pagan Israelitish co-
religionists 2,500 years ago.
Today, after 125 years of American Jewish Re- S
form, our interpretation of Judaism has become
the largest liberal religious movement in the 3
world. Our followers are found in every continent
of the seven seas for the sun never sets on a Re- 2
form Jew. ~
As we face a new century we face new S
challenges. Our work has just begun. Most people
in the world of today, the world of 1976, live under ZZ
dictators, under political tyranny. Our history
has taught us that we can survive only where we
are free free culturally, economically, po-
litically, religiously.
But this never-ending fight for liberty, learn-
ing, enlightenment is not our job alone; it is the
job of every man and woman, black and white,
Jew and Gentile. It is the task, the challenge of 5
every American to realize that all of us have been
chosen in righteousness to be a light to the whole
world.
We are all called upon to help usher in that
moment when all mankind, erect, unflinching, un- 55
daunted, shall enter God's mansion at the top of 55
the mountain where every human being may live
at peace with none to make him afraid.
FREEDOM:
A Jewish immigrant learns to
write the most precious word in
his vocabulary.

=n 1111111111.......111111111111.....11111111111111111111111 f?
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Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fo
erdale
Pagell-B
Bicentennial thoughts
Continued from Page 9-B
age 95.
ISAAC MOSES was a patriot
land merchant who pledged his
I life and fortune in the fight for
[Independence. Born in op-
pressive Germany about 1742, he
came to New York at age 22,
vhere he married the daughter of
trader and community leader,
layman Levy.
Prospering in New York when
the British struck in 1776, he left
vith his family without hesita-
tion, choosing the cause of free-
dom over his business and
properties. In Philadelphia,
doses was soon on the way to
success again.
THUS AT age 39, owner of
ships and at the time father of 6
children (in a marriage blessed
rith 10 in 21 years), Moses joined
the Pennsylvania militia. In
serving the Continental Con-
ess, he put all his vessels on the
ligh seas to prey on British com-
erce, in highly damaging acts of
var against the enemy and in
obtaining valuable supplies for
the hard pressed Americans.
During the darkest period of
the War, Isaac Moses pledged
1000 pounds to help organize a
lank to establish credits, pur-
Chase sorely needed food,
Rebecca Gratz wedded her
destiny to less fortunate
fellow Jews.
clothing and communication for
Washington's army. Robert
Morris, the great Revolutionary
financier, held a partnership in
several of Isaac's ships and wrote
of Moses in his diary ". my
friend of austere culture and true
knowledge."
Isaac Moses carried well the
duties of Judaism.
HE LED in acquiring the
ground on which the first syna-
gogue building in Pennsylvania
was erected.
Returning to New York after
the war, he became a trustee of
the synagogue of Congregation
Shearith Israel and on four dif-
ferent occasions was elected
Parnas.
REBECCA GRATZ was one of
the most beautiful and gracious
women of her time who devoted
her life to charitable causes, and
to her friends, both famous and
common. Born to wealth and
high position in Philadelphia in
1781, the decisive year of the
Revolutionary War, Rebecca
lived to see the Union restored
after Lee's surrender at
Appomattox.
Among her friends was Wash-
ington Irving who, on a visit with
Sir Walter Scott in England, told
the great author of how Rebecca,
at the peril of her own life, had
nursed Irving's fiancee, the 18-
year-old Matilda Hoffman, dying
from tuberculosis. Scott, never
knowing Jews and indulging in
the prejudices of the day, was
struck with the compassionate
Rebecca and the high esteem in
which Philadelphia held the
Gratz family. Scott immortalized
her as the lovely and faithful Re-
becca in his celebrated novel,
"Ivanhoe."
A DEVOUT Jew, Rebecca
Gratz unfortunately fell in love
with a man not of her faith,
Samuel Ewing, son of Dr. John
Ewing, noted clergyman and
Provost of the University of
Pennsylvania. Instead of mar-
riage she wedded her life to the
service of fellow Jews less for-
Continued on Page 13-B
Happy New Year
rjrran rata m*
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DEERFIELO BEACH 33441
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Best Wishes
For A
Happy Holiday
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JUPITER 33458
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A Happy
Rosh Hashanah
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May the Sound of the Shofar
be a reminder of our well wishes
to you and yours
for a New Year of many blessings
Thor Enterprises Inc.
Makers of the Finest Handcrafted Anas Rugs
4500 OAK CIRCLE BOCA RATON 33431
>


Page 12-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976
A Happy Rosh Hashanah
FLORIO'S
RESTAURANT & PIZZA
360 INDIANTOWN ROAD
JUPITER 33458
746-4342
Lloyd's Commissary
Finest Selection of Groceries
STATE ROAD 7 (441)
ROUTE 1 BOX 256
DELRAY BEACH 33444
732-8966
PROCLAIM LIBERTY THROUGHOUT THE LAND
~1
Jlay theyear ahead
be the best,
a year 0/happiness and peace,
of good health and
good [ortune.
The Staff of University Sunoco Extend Best Wishes
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For a Peaceful and Happy Rosh Hashanah...
University Sunoco
Engine Tune-Ups... Air Conditioning... Front End & Wheel Alignment
Complete Line of Sunoco Products... Expert Workmanship
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The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
Pagel3-B
Bicentennial thoughts
iiiiiiiiniiifi.........i......iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini
Vandalia during the War of 1812,
he fathered a law that would
secure his name in history, the
law that abolished flogging in the
Navy. This fact is inscribed on
his tombstone in Cypress Hills
Cemetery, New York City.
Continued from Page 11-B
tunate than she.
Among her charities and the
Jewish organizations which she
helped to found and worked in
were: the Philadelphia Orphans'
Home, the Female Hebrew
Benevolent Society, the Jewish
Foster Home and also the
Hebrew Sunday School Society
of Philadelphia.
FOR MANY years she was
concerned with the religious
training of all Jewish children
including those of her own syna-
gogue. Under her direction, the
first Jewish Sunday School in the
U.S. opened in 1838.
Rebecca Gratz was acclaimed
as one of the noblest women in
the world, when laid to rest in
Mikvah Israel Cemetery in Phila-
delphia in 1869 at the age of 88.
URIAH P. LEVY, famed
naval hero, served his country
wfh great distinction from the
V.ar of 1812 to his final year,
1862. Through sheer hard work
and brilliance, he climbed from
sailing master to Commodore,
then the Navy's highest rank, the
equal today of rising from chief
I petty officer to Admiral.
Levy was one of the first naval
officers to recognize men for their
ability, and not classing them by
1 ethnic roots or social standing.
When commander of the U.S.S.
BEFORE THE Naval
Academy came into existence,
Commodore Levy wrote and pub-
lished the "Manual of Rules for
Men of War," the first printed
guidebook for young officers'
duties aboard ship, a work that
ran into three editions, up to and
including the "new age of
steam."
A devoted admirer of Thomas
Jefferson, Levy on a visit to Paris
paid his respects to the aging La-
fayette who was saddened to hear
that the great Jefferson had died
penniless and wondered what had
happened to beautiful Monticello.
Levy didn't know. But not for
long. He found the mansion and
grounds suffering from years of
neglect and decay. He purchased
Monticello on May 20, 1836, and
labored to restore and preserve it
for unborn generations.
URIAH LEVY was a religious
man, belonging to two syna-
gogues. He was the first pres-
ident of the Washington Hebrew
Congregation, and a member of
Shearith Israel Congregation in
New York (the oldest existing in
the U.S. today).
In World War II, the destroyer
USS Levy was named in his
memory. Thus, it was only
natural that the first permanent
Jewish Chapel ever to be built by
the U.S. armed forces should also
honor his memory.
You are warmly invited to visit
the Commodore Levy Chapel,
near the main gate of the historic
Naval Station in Norfolk, Va.
CAPTAIN LEVI MYERS
HARBY fought in the War of
1812, on the side of Texas in her
struggle for independence in
1835-36, on the side of the South
in whose cause he believed.
Born in 1793 in Charleston,
S.C., center of the largest and
best integrated community in
American Jewry, Harby set his
heart on a naval career and en-
listed as a midshipman in 1807.
His vessel was captured in the
War of 1812.
Imprisoned at notorious Dart-
moor in England, he escaped
after 18 months.
AT THE conclusion of this
war, Commodore Decatur was
dispensed with a fleet to do a
final mopping-up job on the Bar-
bery Pirates. It appears that
Harby commanded one of the
fleet's vessels.
He resigned his commission on
December 4, 1827, yet seems to
have been in the Seminole War
in Florida. There is also historical
evidence that Harby was a
Continued on Page 14-B
Best Wishes to the Jewish
Community in South Florida
at the Holiday Season
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Page 14-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,197t,
Bicentennial thoughts
111111111111111111111111 11111 111111111111111111111
Continued from Page 13-B
volunteer in Bolivia's struggle for
independence from Mexico.
Harby joined in the conflict
with a number of American
volunteers. Evidently, he
retained the goodwill of his Navy
superiors, since he was later com-
missioned as a Captain in the
U.S. Marine Service.
HE WAS 68 when the War Be-
tween the States broke out, too
old to serve. But the Confederacy
had great need of his 52 years of
experience.
He was given command of the
boat Neptune, and distinguished
himself at the Battle of
Galveston.
DAVID CAMDEN De Leon,
the son of a doctor, was born in
South Carolina and followed his
father's profession, graduating
with the degree of M.D. from the
University of Pennsylvania in
1836.
When the Mexican War began
in 1845, David served under
General Zachary Taylor. In a
furious battle with Mexico's
Santa Anna at Chapullepec, all
the American officers were killed
or wounded. To keep the U.S.
troops from panic and rioting,
DeLeon without military train-
ing, took command. He turned
imminent defeat into victory,
earned the nickname "Fighting
Doctor," and a thank you
citation from Congress.
WHEN CIVIL strife tore the
nation apart, DeLeon dis-
approved of secession but had to
decide between remaining in the
army that would fight the South,
or resign and follow his state. In
anguish, he chose the South and
served it at the highest medical
level; he was assigned by Con-
federate President Davis to
organize the medical department
of the Southern army.
DeLeon served for a time as
Surgeon General; serving also in
the field, in hospitals, and in
various capacities. At war's end,
he migrated to Mexico where he
lived in nostalgic sorrow for the
old South he loved and the ideal
of "one nation indivisible" as
symbolized by the Stars and
Stripes.
DeLeon returned to the U.S.A.
upon the personal invitation of
his former colleague in the
Mexican War, General Ulysses S.
Grant, now the most eminent
personality in the Union. He
settled in New Mexico, where he
practiced medicine and wrote
highly lucid articles which were
widely read in the most respected
and leading medical journals.
MAJOR ALFRED Mordecai
was born in Warrentown, North
Carolina in 1804. He was ad-
mitted to West Point at age 15
and graduated first in his class in
1823. His initial assignment was
assistant professor at the U.S.
Military Academy.
In the immediate years follow-
ing he was assistant engineer in
the construction of two forts in
Virginia, served as assistant to
the Chief Engineer of the U.S.
Army, appointed assistant in-
spector of arsenals, and com-
mander of the Washington ar-
senal.
MORDECAI WAS raised to
the rank of Major for meritorious
service in the line of duty during
the Mexican War, 1845-1847.
Following the war, the Major was
assigned to go deep into Mexico
to adjust claims for losses suf-
fered by Mexicans as a result of
war. On his recommendations,
the U.S. paid reparations of
$500,000.
When the Crimean War broke
out in 1854, Major Mordecai was
sent over as a U.S. observer with
Captain George B. McClellan
who later became one of Lincoln's
top generals in the Civil War.
IT IS SAID that Mordecai was
received by Czar Nicholas I in a
private conference. The Major's
observations were published by
order of Congress.
The War Between the States
in 1861 created a crisis of con-
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0
I
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The Entire Banking Staff
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First Bank
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checking accounts...
savings accounts...
afullseRviceBank
1799 West Oakland Blvd.
Oakland Park33310
485-1600


.Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale

PageI5-B
>i\(V
iajor Alfred Mordecai graduated first in his class from West
^oint in 1823.
cience for Mordecai, tearing him
Etween his love for North
irolina, his distaste for
ession, his loyalty to the army
his country. Deep-seated
elings for the "South" of his
th and youth prevailed and
pded his military career.
Mordecai resigned his commis-
sion and retired from the U.S.
army at the age of 67, choosing
not to fight on either side.
It is apparent that Maj. Alfred
Mordecai's devotion to con-
science cost him a far higher
place in American history.
ATiTHE outbreak of war, he
was one of the best qualified
military professionals. Trained
on a par with Grant and Lee, he
could have won distinction on
either side, and might have been
known to future generations
along with such as Generals
Phillip Sheridan, Stonewall
Jackson, William Sherman and
Joseph Johnson. Indeed his son,
Alfred Jr., less sensitive to his
southern heritage, did join the
northern forces in 1861 and died a
general in 1920.
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j
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Pagel6-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976 j
Greetings To The Jewish Community
at Rosh Hashanah
Pan American
Grocery
Complete Line
American & Latin Products
1105 N. Dixie Hwy.
West Palm Beach 33401
832-9488
\i\ii,|iiyi,A"i,i"i,,rij
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at Rosh Hashanah
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Inc.
566 N.E. 42nd Court
Oakland Park 33334
565-9951
Greetings at Rosh Hashanah
Bob's Standard Service
5850 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach 33409
686-9723
Rosh Hashanah Greetings
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500 No. Ansin Blvd.
Hallandale 33009
922-7823
ROSH HASHANAH GREETINGS
BRO-DADE INC.
279 S.W. 33rd COURT
FT. LAUDERDALE 33316
525-6336
Rosh Hashanah Greetings
Romar & Son
Hardware Inc.
9910 S.W. 14th St.
Boca Raton 33432
392-1091
Rosh Hashanah Greetings
ED EDWARDS
Insurance Agency
VARIOUS INSURANCE
40 E. Atlantic Ave.
Delray Beach 33444
272-1191
ROSH HASHANAH
Quality Parts Inc.
American & Foreign Car Parts
302 N. Old Dixie Hwy.
Jupiter 33458
746-3445
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701 SO. LOXAHATCHEE DRIVE
JUPITER 33458
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Quality Photo
2389 Wilton Drive
Ft. Lauderdale 33305
564-8801
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Art Center
Workshop
1401 N. Federal Hwy.
Ft. Lauderdale 33304
565-5951
A Happy New Year
Arrow
Printing Co.
Letterpress & Offset Printing
1400 S. DIXIE HWY.
POMPANO BEACH 33060
946-3113
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710 S. Swinton Ave.
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30 S.E. 1st Street
Boca Raton 33432
395-5200



The broad open plaza at the Western Wall in Jerusalem is the city's most popular synagogue.
Each Friday and Saturday hundreds of worshippers gather at The Wall. During the Jewish
holidays, many American tourists join the throng, swelling its numbers into the thousands.
may you Be inscRrce6 or a Q006 yeaR,
>
By FREDERICK LACHMAN
Why, on the first night of Rosh
Hashonah, which this year occurs
on Sept. 25, is it customary to
greet one's friend with: "May
you be inscribed for a good
year"?
The wish, "May you be in-
scribed," refers to the "Book of
Life" which, according to the
Talmud, is opened on Rosh
Hashonah.
The "Book of Life" is supposed
to be a heavenly book in which
the names of righteous are in-
scribed, the Encyclopaedia
Judaica says.
THE EXPRESSION. "Book
of Life," appears only once in the
Bible, in Psalms 69:29 (28): "Let
them be blotted out of the book of
the living; let them not be en-
rolled among the righteous," but
a close parallel is found in Isaiah
4:3 which speaks of a list of those
"written" (meaning "destined")
for life in Jerusalem.
The erasure of a sinner's name
from such a register is equivalent
to death. For example, when
Moses pleads: "Yet now, if Thou
wilt forgive their sin; and if not,
blot me, I pray Thee, out of Thy
book which Thou has written.
And the Lord said to Moses:
Whosoever hath sinned against
Me, him I will blot out of My
book." (Exodus 32:32-33)
THERE ARE several ref-
erences to heavenly ledgers in the
Talmud. In the Mishnah (Avot
13:17), Rabbi Akiva speaks of the
heavenly ledger; the Talmud also
states: "Three books are opened
in heaven on Rosh Hashonah, one
for the thoroughly wicked, one
for the thoroughly righteous, and
one for the intermediate.
The thoroughly righteous are
forthwith inscribed in the Book of
Life, and thoroughly wicked in
the Book of Death, while the fate
of the intermediate is suspended
until the Day of Atonement. If
they deserve well, they are in-
scribed in the Book of Life, if
they do not deserve well, they are
inscribed in the Book of Death."
The basic idea of a Book of Life
did not start with Judaism, but
can be traced to Mesopotamia,
where gods were believed to pos-
sess tablets recording the deeds
and destiny of man.
The idea of a Book of Life also
finds expression in the liturgy
and piyyutim (lyrical com-
positions intended to embellish
an obligatory prayer or any other
religious ceremony) of the High
Holidays. The "Amidah" or
"Shemoney Esreh" is one notable
example as is the moving prayer
"U-Netanneh Tokef."


K
Page2-C
1
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,15
yom kippuR: act of pimif ication
' By FREDERICK LACHMAN
The Day of Atonement, Yom
Ha-kippurim, which this year
falls on Oct. 4, is a holy day of
fasting on which man must
purify himself. As the Bible
states: "For on this day shall
atonement be made for you, to
cleanse you; from all your sins
shall ye be clean before the
Lord" (lev. 16:30).
Repentance is a prerequisite
for divine forgiveness. God will
not pardon a man uncon-
ditionally but waits for him to
repent, the Encyclpaedia Judaica
declares.
IN REPENTANCE man must
experience genuine remorse for
the wrong he has committed and
then convert his penitential
energy into positive acts. Man
has been endowed by God with
the power of "turning."
He can turn from evil to the
good, and the very act of turning
will activate God's concern and
lead to forgiveness.
In the religion of ancient
Israel, in contrast to that of its
neighbors, sacrificial rituals are
not by themselves purifying, the
Encyclopaedia Judaica states.
Serve Pineapple Beef Balls for your Rosh Hashanah'
dinner this holiday season. The recipe uses Planters Peanut
Oil which is kosher.
Celebrate Rosh Hashanah
With Pineapple Beef Balls
The festival of Rosh Hashanah will begin Sept. 25 this
year. It is different from most Jewish holidays because its
observance is public rather than domestic. Except for a
festive meal at home on the eve of Rosh Hashanah, the
activity takes place in the synagogue where the service is
long and elaborate.
There are few food restrictions during this time of
profound religious observance and menus tend to be festive.
Suggested here is Pineapple Beef Balls, a delicious main
course for the Rosh Hashanah meal.
Flavorful meatballs are browned in peanut oil, then
cooked in a sweet and sour sauce with pineapple and green
pepper. The recipe uses Planters Peanut Oil which is the
favorite choice among Jewish cooks.
They prefer peanut oil because of its light, delicate
flavor. Planters Peanut Oil is the all-purpose cooking salad
oil that is acceptable in Jewish kitchens any time of year
because it is kosher and pareve.
PINEAPPLE BEEF BALLS
l1. pounds ground chuck
'/ cup grated onion
1 cup fine bread crumbs
1 egg, beaten
2 tablespoons water
2 teaspoons salt
' teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons Planters Peanut Oil
1 can (8:l oz) pineapple
tidbits, undrained
'/: cup vinegar
Vi cup sugar
3 tablespoons cornstarch
'/z cup diced green pepper
Combine meat, onion, bread crumbs, beaten egg,
water, salt and pepper. Mix well and form into about 30
balls. Brown in Planters Peanut Oil. Meanwhile, to prepare
the sauce, combine undrained pineapple tidbits, vinegar,
sugar and cornstarch in small saucepan. Cook over medium
heat until mixture thickens and begins to boil. Add I
pineapple mixture to the meatballs along with diced green j
pepper. Cook another 5 minutes. Serves six.
While the required ritual is
carried out by the priest, its
desired end, forgiveness, is
granted solely by God. Another
limitation placed upon sacrificial
means of obtaining forgiveness is
that it can only apply to in-
advertent errors.
BLATANT CONTEMPT of
God cannot be expiated by
sacrifice or any other means.
Moreover, contrition and com-
passion are vital elements of all
rituals of forgiveness. It is not
enough to hope and pray for
pardon: man must humble him-
self, acknowledge his wrong and
resolve to depart from sin. At the
same time, remorse must be
translated into concrete deeds.
Divine forgiveness, however
extensive, only encompasses
those sins which man commits
directly against God; those in
which injury is caused to one's
fellow man, are not forgiven until
the injured party has himself for-
given the perpetrator.
Hence the custom of seeking
forgiveness from those one may
have wronged on the eve of the
Day of Atonement and the one
sinned against is duty bound to
forgive.
ATONEMENT against one's
fellow man is only accomplished
if the sin concerned did not in-
volve suffering or material injury
to a second party. If it did, full
restitution must be made to the
wronged party.
The idea of repentance played a
central role in the life of the Jew
in the post-medieval period ,
inforced by both the penitenti
liturgy and the rituals of
High Holidays.
External stress, pogroms, an
expulsions turned the Jew in
himself and led him to ask fa
giveness of God for the
which he assumed were at t\
root of his suffering.
MESSIANIC MOVEMEN1
gave further incentive to
turning' to God.
he 12th article of the prayJX
ti Ma'amin," "I believe,"

The
"Ani
pressing belief in the coming'J
the Messiah, became the Ma
tyrs' Hymn during the N
Holocaust, when it was sung to(
haunting melody by those ahoi
to be put to death.
New Tax Revolt;
Arab War on Tap?
iackanderso
WASHINGTON It was a
tax revolt that led to the birth of
our nation 200 years ago. And in
this our Bicentennial year,
millions of Americans are ready
to revolt again over taxes.
They are tired of taxes that
keep going up while government
services go down. Taxation at all
levels had jumped 65 per cent in
the past six years.
They are tired of tax laws that
have become too complex to
understand. It takes 6,000 pages
of fine print to list all the rules
and regulations. Two out of every
five taxpayers require
professional help to figure out
what they owe. So on top of the
tax burden, they have to pay ac-
countants' and attorneys' fees.
AMERICANS are also tired of
unfair taxes. The rich usually pay
less than their fair share. At least
3,000 affluent Americans, with
annual incomes over $50,000,
have been paying no federal
income taxes at all.
The people are tired of paying
the taxes of big corporations.
Most oil companies, for example,
pay only a fraction of the cor-
porate tax rate.
A dozen
This time, it's Kgypt and Libya
that are preparing t'j go to war.
The animosity between
Egypt's Anwar Sadat and Lib-
ya's Muammar Qaddafi has
reached the inflammation point.
The two Arab leaders distrust
and despise one another.
Qaddafi is a madcap ruler who
has been using his oil boodle to
underwrite terrorists.
Intelligence sources charge that
Libyan diplomats have used their
diplomatic pouches to smuggle
weapons to terrorists.
QADDAFI IS believed to be
behind recent terrorist attacks
upon Egypt. Trains have been
attacked, buildings have been
bombed. An attempt was made
to hijack an Egyptian plane.
Sadat has responded, accord-
ing to intelligence reports, by
bolstering his military forces on
the Libyan border. The Libyans
also are preparing their armed
forces for war.
Xr
tely no
major co
ress
aws.
The showdown could come, t
intelligence reports predict, I
October. The situation, in ti
words of one analyst, is "genii
out of hand."
Intelligence sources predJ
that, if war comes, the Egyptian
probably will be victorious. TI.
are battle-tested, with experieij
in both aerial and tank warta: jC
BOUNTIFUL Bureamr,.,
President Ford has complaint!
that the federal govt>rnmei|
harasses honest businessmen,
has charged that more thai
100,000 federal bureaucrats
engaged in regulation.
The Congressional Budget
fice has double-checked tl
President's figures. The bud*
office found only 84,000 bure
crats regulating business. Thafl
still too many. There's too mi
red tape, too many forms to
out.
But the 84,000 bureauci
regulate thousands of industrial
And most of the regulators anj
policing health, safety and
sumer violations.
But the government agendJL
with the most regulators is tlHJF
Agriculture Department. So it'i
the farmers, not the businest
men, who put up with the mos
regulation.
rations
iy
corporate tax. Yet they have been
ringing up substantial earnings.
Other taxpayers, of course, must
make up the taxes that these cor-
porations don't pay.
THIS YEAR, Congr
promised to reform the tax la
First the House, and then the
Senate ground out page after
page of tax changes. Between
them, they have now produced
more than 2,200 pages.
But as fast as one tax benefit
was taken away from the rich,
two new benefits were added. The
legislation came to be known as
the Christmas Tree bill.
It got its name from the
goodies that the lobbyists hung
on its branches as it progressed
toward a final vote.
It started through the legis-
lative mill innocently enough as a
tax reform measure. But by the
time it cleared the Senate floor, it
was loaded down with amend-
ments.
IN THE dark ages, serfs
labored nine months for their own
needs. During the remaining
three months of each year, they
produced profits for their
masters.
Today, the average American
works more than four months oi
each year to earn enough to pay
his taxes.
And each year, the tax bite
deepens, the anti-government
mood sharpens and tax
resistance grows. Just like 200
years ago.
ARAB WAR? Intelligence re-
ports warn that war may erupt in
the Middle East in a matter of
weeks. Fighting is not expected
between the Arabs av-d Israelis.
Broward Region
Women's American ORT
To The Entire Jewish Community
Best Wishes for the New Year
West Broward Chapter
Hadassah
Including
Blyma, Herzl, Orly and Rayus Groups wish all its
members & Friends A Happy New Year.
Pres. Pearl Goldenberg
4
awn MHJ njvS
May The New Year Bring
Peace And Happiness
LYOIM'S AUTOBQOY INC.
Paint Cr Body Shop..
24 Hour Wrecker Service..
Free Estimates
1107 Old Dixie, Lake Park 33403
________842-3450_______J
*


Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page3-C
yfi '-;
.
Israel Bonds Office Announces
William Littman Named
Board of Governors Head
William Littman, South Brow-
ard Israel Bonds chairman, has
been named chairman of the
board of governors of Israel \
Bonds of the entire county. The |
appointment was announced this
week by Milton M. Parson,
executive director of the South
Florida Israel Bond
Organization.
As South Broward Israel
Bonds chairman for the past
three years, Littman has been
responsible for increasing the sale
of Israel Bonds in South Broward
to record levels. In announcing
Littman's new appointment,
Parson said, "Mr. Littman's
dynamic leadership will un-
doubtedly be reflected in in-
creased Israel Bond sales
throughout Broward County
with widened support from every
segment of the community."
Parson added that "Although
Robert M. Hermann, who served
as Israel Bonds chairman for
Israel Bonds Provide
Urgently Needed Funds
North Broward, has relinquished
the chairmanship due to the
pressure of a new business in
which he has just embarked, he
will continue to spark the North
WILLIAM LITTMAN
Broward Israel Bond effort in a
position of leadership to be
announced shortly. Under his
chairmanship, the Israel Bond
achievements of the Fort
Lauderdale area have received
national attention."
LITTMAN HAS BEEN an
active leader in Jewish com-
munity affairs as well as in the
campaign to further the economic
development of Israel.
A dental industry executive in
New York, Littman has retired
and now lives in Hollywood. He
is on the executive committee of
the Anti-Defamation League of
South Florida, the executive
board of the B'nai B'rith
Foundation and the board of
trustees of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward. President of
the Hemispheres B'nai B'rith,
he is a member of the executive
committee of the American
Friends of the Hebrew University
in Hollywood.
Hechtkopf Named Chairman
Of Inverrary Bonds Dinner
Sol Hechtkopf, who has
provided leadership for many
national and South Florida
causes, has been named chairman
of the Inverrary Country Club
dinner-dance and show to be held
under the auspices of B'nai B'rith
Lodge No. 3002, on Saturday
evening, Dec. 4, at Pier 66.
In making the announcement,
Milton M. Parson, executive
director of the South Florida
Israel Bond Organization, ex-
pressed gratification that
Hechtkopf had accepted the
chairmanship of the dinner-dance
at which Harold Slater will be
honored. Said Parson, "With
Hechtkopf as chairman and
Slater as the honoree, this year's
Inverrary Country Club event
will be a highlight of the South
Florida Israel Bond activities.
Sol Hechtkopf brings to this
undertaking a wealth of ex-
perience in leadership and a
record of noteworthy
achievements in many areas of
community life."
Hechtkopf is president and a
founder of the Inverrary B'nai
B'rith Lodge and is president-
elect of the Palm Beach Council,
as well as a member of the board
of governors of B'nai B'rith
District No. 5. He is also District
Israel chairman and was a
national cochairman of Israel
Bonds and a member of the
National Soldiers Welfare Com-
mittee for Israel.
A past president of the Port
Chester, N.Y., Lodge of B'nai
B'rith, he was a delegate to the
triennial conventions in Israel in
1959, 1965 and 1974. Until 1975,
he served for 7 years as a member
of the cabinet on Israel affairs on
the International Council of B'nai
B'rith.
By Robert M. Hermann
Israel Bond Chairman,
North Broward County
Since the Yom Kippur War.
Israel has been waging an
economic battle for survival, a
battle calling for total
mobilization of her people and
resources, a battle that could
erode her financial stability and
stifle her freedom. Because of the
unprecedented needs, Israel
cannot win if left to her own
resources and her own sacrifices.
The Israelis are making
sacrifices. Their taxes are among
the highest in the world,
amounting to about 70 percent of
individual income. The govern-
ment has been forced to cut back
on health, education and other
social services. The rate of in-
flation, which has dropped from a
year ago, is expected to be
around 23 percent this year.
Prices of bread, dairy products
and public transportation have
increased sharply during the past
year.
Israel is in urgent need of
increased income from the sale of
Israel Bonds to provide the
resources to expand industrial
production of exports in order
to reduce the $4 billion gap in the
country's balance of payments,
SOL HECHTKOPF
Hechtkopf has received many
honors and awards from B'nai
B'rith, the Israel Bond Or-
ganization and the government of
Israel for his service and con-
tributions to Israel.
ROBERT M. HERMANN
which is chiefly the result of an
unprecedented defense budget of
more than $3.5 billion.
Our participation in the Israel
Bond effort is needed to furnish
the indispensable development
funds for production of more
exports, for creation of more jobs
for new immigrants from Soviet
Russia and other nations, and for
stepped-up exploration for oil and
development of other sources of
energy.
Drexler Heading Bonds
High Holidays Campaign

Joseph Drexler, a memberof
the Prime Minister's Club of
Israel, has been named chairman
of the area's special campaign on
behalf of Israel Bonds High
Holidays effort for the second
consecutive year, it was an-
nounced by Gary R. Gerson,
Israel Bonds Dade County
chairman.
Drexler has earned national
recognition for leadership on
behalf of many causes and in-
stitutions. A Master Builder of
Yeshiva University, he is a
Science Fellow of Belfer School of
Science of Yeshiva University
and a member of the board of
overseers of the Jewish
Theological Seminary.
In South Florida he is active in
the Sunny Isles B'nai B'rith
Lodge and is a former president
of Temple B'nai Zion, in addition
to serving on the board of
governors of the South Florida
Israel Bond Organization.
NEARLY 50 synagogues and
temples in the South Florida area
have scheduled Israel Bond High
Holiday appeals, Drexler
disclosed, joining more than
1,000 synagogues throughout the
United States and Canada which
annually participate in this ef-
fort.
Traditionally, South Florida
congregations and their rabbis
have made the High Holidays,
Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur, the occasion for special
involvement in activity on behalf
of the Israel Bond campaign. The
beginning of the Jewish year
5737 will be observed on
Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 25
and 26. The Yom Kippur ob-
servance will take place on
Monday, Oct. 4.
Pointing out that Israel is
faced with some of the most
serious economic problems in her
history, Drexler underscored the
fact that the government recently
was compelled to reduce its
current budget by up to IL2
billion, thus requiring further
cuts in defense, social services,
housing and economic
development.
Of this total, he reported that
the development budget, which
depends to a great extent on the
proceeds from the sale of Israel
Bonds, had to be reduced by
IL210 million. He said this would
JOSEPH DREXLER
result in further limiting funds
available for the expansion of
agriculture, industry, com-
munications and the exploitation
of new energy sources, which are
vital to the economic growth of
the country.
DREXLER NOTED that the
people of Israel are burdened
with a defense budget of un-
precedented proportions, heavy
taxes and an unusually high rate
lof inflation and that the difficult
economic situation has caused
severe hardship and imposed
conditions of austerity on large
segments of the population.
He observed that Israel relies
more on Israel Bonds than ever
before to help offset unavoidable
cuts in the development budget
and called on all friends of Israel
"to participate in the Bond
program during the High
Holidays and throughout the
New Year as a means of
preventing a serious setback to
Israel's economic development
program, which is a vital source
of strength in the search for
peace."
Noting that the Israel Bond
drive in South Florida con-
gregations holds the key to
overall success of the campaign,
he stated that "we must do our
utmost in the synagogues during
the High Holidays to demon-
strate the solidarity of every
member of the Jewish com-
munity with the people of Israel
, in the difficult year ahead."


Page4-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976
'next yeaR in JeRusaienV: mo6epn]ewish poatRaits
"NEXT YEAR in Jerusalem-
echoes the centuries-old dream of
a people who have earnestly
desired peace, freedom, and ful-
fillment. This century has sen
perhaps more upheaval, both
tragic and jubilant, for Jews than
any other. It was witness to the
movement of Jews from the
ghettos into the mainstream
of Western culture.
Then, in the wake of enlighten-
ment that saw the ideas of Marx,
Freud, and Einstein restructure
thj foundations of modern man.
came the darkness of the Holo-
caust that destroyed millions of
Jewish lives.
THE ESTABLISHMENT of
the State of Israel has become a
beacon of hope to all Jews,
especially to those still oppressed
and persecuted, but even now the
dream of peace is tenuous.
Yet, the contributions of this
minority to every aspect of cul-
ture have been more pervasive in
this century than in any other.
GREETINGS AT ROSH HASHANAH
ECONOMY
CHEMICALS
Box 1197 State Farmers Market
Ft. Pierce 33450
461-6159
Douglas Villiers invited a group
of authors, critics, and com-
mentators on Jewish life to write
a series of articles on why they
thought this was so, and about
what interested them particularly
about the Jew in this century.
These essays, numbering 21,
appear for the first time in Next
Year in Jerusalem: Portraits of
the Jew in the Twentieth Cen-
tury, edited by Douglas Villiers,
which Viking published on March
24, 1976 (A Studio Book. 352
pages, 292 illustrations, $35).
THE CONTRIBUTORS are
easily recognizable as leaders in
their professions and intellectual
fields; their essays critical,
philosophical. lighthearted,
personal, nostalgic, and lyrical
are as fascinating and diverse as
their subject matter.
The late Richard Crossman on
"The Creation of Israel." Isaac
Bashevis Singer on "Yiddish, the
Language of Exile." George
Steiner on "Some Meta-
Rabbis,' Walter Laqueur on
"The Revolutionaries. Arthur
Koestler on "The Vital Choice."
Isaiah Berlin in reply to Koestler.
Michael Horovitz on "Judaism,
the Mid-Century, and Me." Leo
Rosten on "The Schnorrer: Piety
and Paradox," Stephen Aris on
"The Businessman," Harry
Golden on "New York Business,"
Nicholas Faith on "The Roth-
schilds," Philip French on "The
Show-Business Entrepreneur,"
Ronald Sanders on "The Ameri-
can Popular Song," Albert Gold-
man on "Laughtermakers,"
Chaim Bermant on "The Jewish
Vice." Edward Lucie-Smith on
CLA UDE LE VI-STRA USS
Anthropologist born in
Belgium in 1908. He studied
in France and taught there
until his death fost summer.
"The Artist" and on "Savant and
Salesman," David Daiches on
"Babel and Bellow," Rudolf
Peierls on "Twentieth-Century
Physics," Peter Stadlen on "The
Composers," Yehudi Menuhin on
"The Violinist," Elie Wiesel on
"Remembrance of Jerusalem."
And there is more.
THESE ARTICLES are en-
hanced by nearly 300 illustra-
tions, 37 of them in color pri-
marily photographs, but also
paintings, cartoons, and draw-
ings that depict events (historical
and familial), places, and people.
Personalities fill the pages: the
musicians (Rubinstein, Walter,
Sills), the artists (Modigliani,
Rothko, Shahn), the athletes
(Spitz, Luckman, Koufax), the
comedians (Gingold, Chaplin,
Bruce), the writers IProust.
Parker, Pasternak), the Broad-
way composers (Lerner and
Loewe, Hammerstein, Weill), the
playwrights (Pinter, Simon,
Kaufman), the entertainers
(Newley, Dylan, Streisand), the
scientists (Salk, Einstein,
Chomsky), the political leaders
(Blum, Meir, Kissinger), the
business entrepreneurs (Sarnoff,
Levitt, Helena Rubinstein), the
movie moguls (Goldwyn, Zukor,
Mayer), the movie stars (Muni,
Kirk Douglas, the Marx
brothers).
THESE ARE but a few of the
names familiar to us all. The
VIPs are here, but so are the
people the soldiers, farmers,
bankers, shopkeepers, and
gamblers. The photographers
(among them Robert Capa, Al-
fred Eisenstaedt, Jill Krementz)
and the illustrators (Al Hirshfeld,
David Levine) make this much
more than a picture gallery by
bringing to each personality and
occasion their own insight and
sense of excitement.
This book a collection of
words and pictures portrays
the Jews: their problems, their
contributions, their hopes. The
fascinating and colorful variety
of its pages makes Next Year in
Jerusalem" without question the
gift book for this New Year
and the years to come.
Best Wishes for a Peaceful and Happy Rosh Hashanah
Waseon Construction, Inc
b
tl
E
E
U
w
E
S
D
oi
u
a
di
D
of Florida
General Contractors
7544 Lake Worth Road
Lake Worth 33463
968-9100


Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page5-C
Qo6 Cpeateo Beasts of e&Rth (or J eRusalem zoo
Gazing out at the Jerusalem Hills this Biblical Zoo elephant is perhaps daydreaming of the times
when exotic animals roamed freely. The zoo now contains over 500 animals, including a complete
collection of the some 120 animals mentioned in the Bible.
Holiday Greetings
The Wood Ledge
3010 E. Commercial Blvd.
GOOD HEALTH AND HAPPINESS AT THE
NEW YEAR
Lilt Jeanne Boutique
717 East Las Olas Boulevard
Good Health & Happiness for the New Year
Felix Ecker Jewelers
606 E. Las Olas Blvd. 462-8292
New Year Blessings!
Swan Lund-Realtor-Telephone 565-7746
Swan Homes
& Investments Inc.
1607 N.E. 25th Street, Ft. Lauderdale 33305
By GRACE GIRSCH
WHEN GOD created the beast
of the earth, the fowl of the air,
the fish of the 9ea and every
creeping thing, He must have
foreseen their role in Zoo Zion-
ism. At least that's how Prof.
Aharon Shulov, founder and cur-
rent chairman of the Jerusalem
Biblical Zoo, sees it.
Certainly, the history of the
Biblical Zoo is enmeshed with the
turbulent past of Jerusalem it-
self. Today zoo animals remind
their 300,000 onlookers each year,
not only of the ancient fauna of
Eretz Israel, as mentioned in the
Bible and Talmudic literature,
but also of the city's more recent
history.
ONE ZOO sign punctured with
shrapnel during the Six Day War
is a mute reminder of 110 animal
casualties.
In 1939, with the donation of
15 English pounds and a monitor
lizard, Prof. Shulov, then a young
Russian immigrant, established
his animal life corner. Envision-
ing its role in Zionism as a
"neutral meeting ground for
people of all cultures and creeds"
the Zoo thus began unpreten-
tiously in a laundry courtyard of
the former Hadassah Hospital
near the center of Jerusalem.
Later situated near Mandel-
baum Gate on the perimeter of
Jewish Jerusalem, animals came
under heavy sniper fire during
the beginning of the War of In-
dependence.
Relocated in 1947 to Mount
Scopus, the 122 animals were
Happy New Year To Our Jewish Customers
Friend
Laury Lee Electric
5115 S.W. 64th Street Phone 791-3490
Holiday Greetings to Our Customers and Friends
Mahnke's Prosthetic-
Orthotics, Inc.
1915 N.E. 45th Street Suite 108110
Good Health and Happiness to Our
Jewish Friends and Customers
Ed Stricklin
UNIVERSITY
HEARING AID SERVICE
6507 Sunset Strip Phone 484-3240
Happiness to the Jewish Community at New Year's
Ralph's Cleaners
897 N.E. 62nd St. (Next to Li'l General)
Cash & Carry ?hone 771-1785
Holiday Greetings to Our
Jewish Customers and Friends
Nijolis Resort Wear
3352 N. Ocean Blvd.
* =
New Year Greetings
General Radio &
Sound Co.
4340 N.E. 11th Ave. 564-6322
>
Have A Good New Year
H. & J. Radiator
734 N.W. 7th Ave.
New Year Greetings
Harley's Shoes
4220 N.W. 12th St.
ROSH HASHANAH GREETINGS
Canada Dry
Bottling Co.
Of Florida Inc.
1649 Avenue L Riviera Beach 33404
842-4673
ROSH HASHANAH GREETINGS
Earl Wallace
Ford Inc.
700 N. Federal Hwy.
Delray Beach 33444
427-6900
Greetings from Leta Pearlstein
Leta's One Of A Kind
Custom Dressmaking, original creations in
daytime, evening or lounge wear apparel
930 N.E. 20th Ave. 764-6568
ROSH HASHANAH GREETINGS
Aino's Interiors
3883 10th Ave. N
Lake Worth 33460
965-3317
A Happy and Healthy New Year
To All Our Customers
Hanauer, Stern & Co,
2740 E. Oakland Park Blvd. 564-9666
TAX FREE MUNICIPAL BONDS
Holiday Greetings To Our Jewish Customers
And Friends
Aztec Glass
& Mirror Co.
4256 Peters Rd. 584-8540
A Happy New Year To All. .
South Florida
Leasing & Rentals
200 E. Sunrise Boulevard
Phone 764-5992
Health & Happiness To
The Jewish Community
Lord's Jewelers
1918 E. Sunrise Boulevard
In Gateway Shopping Center
Highest Prices Paid for Your Precious Jewelry
Phone Jack Mintzer-764-6750_______
Happy New Year
Ross Nelson
Carpeting
1436 E. Atlantic Blvd.
Pompano Beach 33060
781-7870
GREETINGS AT
ROSH HASHANNAH
Reliance
Auto Body
238 S. Dixie Hwy. E
Pompano Beach 33060
782-0343
Best Wishes on
Rosh Hashanah
Mr. Riley V. Sims
2000 Presidential Way
Apt. 204
West Palm Beach 33401


Page6-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
a City Rose Out oC6estRuction
Continued from Preceding Pagej
for the Yeshivat Hakotel were
drawn up.
Yeshivat Porat Yosef, the most
famous of Torah study in-
stitutions of the S^ohardi com-
munity the world over, com-
pletely destroyed by the Jor-
danians, was to be rebuilt to
answer the needs for spiritual
leaders of the community in
Israel and the Diaspora.
The Government of Israel gave
the Deputy Prime Minister, Yigal
Allon, at his wish, his official
residence in a new suite in the Old
City. Another leading per-
sonality, the State Comptroller,
Dr. I. E. Nebenzahl, acquired
from the Government a piece of
land and erected a magnificent
house for himself and his family,
and then the wheels were set in
motion.
HUNDREDS OF applications
for housing in the Old City were
coming in and the Master Plan
for some 600 newly built or com-
pletely renovated residences
could be drawn up. Some 150
families already live there now
and the remainder will come
within the next five years.
Four synagogues, hundreds of
years old Eliyahu Ha'navi's
and Rabbi Yohanan Ben Zakai's
amongst them, were mag-
nificently restored. In the early
days of liberation the then
Sephardi Chief Rabbi, Yitzhak
Nissim, moved the Rabbinical
High Court, of which he was the
President, to the Old City, and a
new house will be constructed for
this central institution.
A supermarket has been
opened, an art exhibition and
gallery is being operated, Bar
Han University is conducting
cultural activities, and re8e"2
work from a branch in the Old
City, and the Hebrew Writers
Association carries out a rich
program of cultural activities for
youth and adults from Jerusalem
and the rest of the country. Nor is
this all. .
YET, what must be considered
the most challenging and the
most delicate object for planning
has not yet found an agreed solu-
tion the Western Wall and its
environs. The scenery has
changed radically since the Wall
area was freed from all the ugly
and historically worthless bufid-
Friday, September 17,1976
ings that crowded in on the Wall
and made it accessible only by a
narrow lane of a few yards. The
Wall now stands as the con-
clusion of a wide open space.
We know that some 14 tiers of
huge Herodian stones are still
' buried underground. What is to
be done with all this restoring
the Wall to its former majestic
height by a complete return to
the Herodian days, certainly a
revolutionary solution, or to find
some other way to give the Wall
its proper setting as the holiest
monument of the Jewish people,
reminding us all of the great past,
and beckoning to what we believe
will be an even greater future.
I
Best Wishes for a Peaceful and
Happy Rosh Hashanah
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\


Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page7-C
. '
*
By ERIC MOONMAN
LONDON British Jewry
has grumbled its way through
the past 30 years at the apparent
failure of community
organizations in this country to
reflect adequately the needs and
ideas of the community they
serve. Not all the 410,000 Jews in
Britain know what they want.
Some have even drifted away
from their religion, never to
return, while the involvement of
others in community activities is
only a token one.
But there is still a substantial
number of Jews who want to see
a more organized, more co-
ordinated structure for com-
munity decision-making,- and
who want to see the Jewish com-
munity in Britain making a real
contribution in support of Israel.
FOR TOO long we have lived
from one crisis to the next, which
has meant that we have failed to
analyze the how and why of
decision-making. Successive
generations in this century have
challenged the Jewish estab-
lishment for a time and whilst
some then worked within the
system, many were discouraged
and were lost to the community.
A number of us believe that
there is now a greater desire for
change in the diaspora than at
any time in this century. If we are
to exploit this desire, then we
must learn to understand,
identify and encourage the young
(and this means all up to 40) to
share in the decision-making
processes. We cannot and
must not repulse it.
It is against this background
that the Solidarity with Israel
I Year was launched. Following the
United Nations resolution
equating Zionism with racism,
the Israeli Prime Minister's
Jerusalem Conference gave us
ment to help Israel. Solidarity
with Israel means two things in
particular: first, it means making
more effective use of our
resources, and secondly, it means
recognizing and advancing the
process of change in our com-
Si
munal and Zionist organizations.
ON BOTH counts, we have
begun to work more readily and
more willingly together. The need
to break down organizational
barriers and to reduce the power
of the "machers" is not confined
to Britain. My knowledge, ex-
perience and love for the United
States demand that I stress that
unless the organizations of
American Jewry and the
"machers" within them adopt a
set of priorities which are
relevant to contemporary needs
and encourage a broader degree
of participation with their
members, we shall witness a
crisis of confidence which will
undermine their good intentions
and the very services provided.
On the question of making
better use of manpower and ideas
the solidarity conference was
very practical. For example, we
have launched a number of
critical projects.
Let me just mention one. The
Israel Products Consumer
Association has nearly 1,000
members already. It enables
the opportunity to get closer
together.
AS A RESULT, the nine
representatives from Britain
decided to maintain the momen-
tum of that conference and to
continue to work together. The
result of this cooperation is a
campaign which has made a
remarkable impact, quite unique
anywhere in the world.
As a follow-up to the
Jerusalem Conference, the
British community held its own
Solidarity with Israel Conference
earlier this year, and for the
British community it has reaped
the same benefit as the parent
conference did for those delegates
who attended the original.
The delegates to the London
Conference left with new
determination to work together
and with even greater commit-
A Happy, Healthy and
Prosperous New Tear
the past yeap
In QReat BRitam
members to obtain discounts on
Israeli products and travel, free
vouchers, samples of new food
products, and a where-to-buy
booklet. Eventually I PC A will
become a pressure group,
dedicated to raising the sales of
Israel's consumer exports in the
United Kingdom and through its
combined purchasing power, a
critical influence in encouraging
more retail outlets.
Eric Moonman, a Labor
MP, is chairman of the
Zionist Federation of
Great Britain and
Ireland.
OTHER proposals included
commitment to work in public
relations, education and tourism.
The key to success in all these
schemes is to become less ob-
sessed with our organizational
differences and to bring down the
walls which separate one
organization from another as the
result of the work done in the last
50 years.
Only if we become more con-
cerned with content than with
organization can we hope to win
over to active commitment and a
share in our decision-making the
young people on whom our future
hopes rest. The Solidarity with
Israel Year has laid the foun-
dations for this work.
UNITED
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Accounts Insured up to (40,000 by the
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i Best Wishes from Don Williams
For a Peaceful and Happy Rosh Hashanah
lAtlanticrederalSavings
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BELLE GLADE 33430
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Page8-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976


how a holy City 6uq Itself Out of Oestcuction
By JOSEF GOLDSCHMIDT
Deputy Mayor of Jerusalem
WHEN ISRAELI soldiers
rushed to the Kotel Hama'aravi
(Western Wall) on June 7, 1967,
they found the old stones lying in
the tiers as of old. The emotions
of those youngsters, many of
whom had never seen the Wall
before, were those of finding an
old friend, lost long ago and
missed ever since.
But when they walked up the
steep hill to the Jewish Quarter of
the Old City, a very different pic-
ture awaited them. Destruction
everywhere, heaps of rubbish,
where world-famous synagogues,
like the Hurva, had stood. No
sign of the tens and tens of Torah
scrolls that have served tens of
synagogues, nothing of their hal-
lowed interior equipment.
Wherever residential buildings
had been usable after the war, the
Arab population of the Old City
had taken possession.
Yet a few landmarks had with-
stood the savage onslaught of the
Jordanian army. Notable
amongst them, part of the Batei
Mahse, an example of a 19th cen-
tury housing project built around
a central square known then as
the Deutsche Platz because
the whole project had been spon-
sored by the German-Dutch
organization for the poor of Eretz
Yisrael.
THE SCENE that unfolded
itself could have inspired another
Tish'a B'av a day of weeping
and mourning for what had been
lost. But the Israeli of 1967
reacted differently. Within 24
hours, literally, the head of the
Netiv Meir Yeshiva (Bnei Akiva)
in Jerusalem, Rav Arieh Bineh,
had recruited a group of his
senior students, a number of
camp beds and the most neces-
sary books and established in the
ruins of Batei Mahse. a new Bnei
Akiva Yeshiva Yeshivat
Hakotel.
This was the spontaneous
answer of this generation of the
builders of the new Israel to the
challenge of destruction: no
weeping, no mourning, but to
build for a new, better, stronger,
more beautiful life on the old
Holy ground.
This was to be the keynote for
the attitude of the Israeli Gov-
ernment, of the Jerusalem
Municipality and of the Jewish
Nation to the challenge of Jor-
danian vandalism: Rebuilding!
THE GOVERNMENT soon
took matters in hand by invest-
ing the authority for rebuilding
the Jewish Quarter in a pres-
tigious ministerial committee
headed by the Prime Minister.
This committee was to ensure
proper planning and procedure
and, no less, to protect the in-
terests of the Arab invaders, or
let us call them Arab squatters,
of Jewish houses.
The whole of the Jewish Quar-
ter was expropriated and a gov-
ernment company was founded to
deal with the planning of the re-
building of the Quarter, the re-
settling of Arab residents who
had no title to live there and with
the claims for compensation to
owners of property.
At first the going was hard and
there were few families who could
afford the large investment
needed for making a new home
for themselves in the Old City,
strong and compelling as was the
lure and the charm of a life in
sight of the Temple Mount, being
a daily witness to the pilgrimage
of thousands and tens of
thousands to the Wailing Wall.
THE COMPANY for the re-
building of the Jewish Quarter
set about making its own plans
with the aim of giving back to
Jerusalem and the whole Jewish
nation, a new Jewish Quarter in
place of the old, fuller of life and
more attractive than the old one
had been. In the wake of Rav
Bineh's courageous action, plans
for a magnificent new building
Continued on Following Page
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.V
Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
PagefcC
central to Zoo Zionism, says Dr.
Shulov, a professor of zoology at
the Hebrew University.
For example, the Nubian Ibex
(wild goat) dwindling to only a
few pairs by 1948 has been in-
creased to around 800; and the
biblical Fallow Deer disappearing
from Israel during the 20th
century will soon be reintroduced
to the Negev and Jordan Valley.
As another element of 7/)o
Zionism the Cameroun Sheep has
been successfully bred at the Zoo
and sent to numerous moshavim
and kibbutzim as livestock.
IF PRESERVING the ani-
mal life of Israel conjures up
images of a modern-day Noah,
that vision may soon be reality.
Plans are well under way, with
rabbinical consultation, to
replicate the original Ark on Zoo
consequently besieged for three
years. By 1950 only 18 of the
animals were still alive, and these
only because Prof. Shulov and
keepers crawled by night under
fire to feed them.
An armoured UN convoy fi-
nally transported these few sur-
vivors to the present location in
Shneller Woods, Jerusalem.
THE ZOO now contains over
500 animals, including a complete
collection of the some 120
animals mentioned in the Bible.
Reintroducing extinct or near-
extinct biblical species to Israel is
grounds. The project will be com-
pleted according to biblical
specifications by volunteer car-
penters and a donation from the
Jewish National Fund.
Enhancing the Zoo's biblical
emphasis, a second special
exhibit will represent the
prophecy in Isaiah 11:6, "The
wolf also shall dwell with the
"Can the Ethiopian change his skin or the leopard his spots?" asks Jeremiah 13:23. This
Jerusalem Biblical Zoo Sabra doesn't seem in the mood to change anything. The zoo breeds
leopards and tigers for exchange programs with other zoos.
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PagelO-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976
Qo6 CReate6 Beasts of eacth foa Jepusalem zoo
It's the least
expensive Fiat we make.
But you'd never know
biy looking at it.
lamb, and the leopard shall lie
down with the kid ." Wolf
cubs and lambs have been raised
together and will soon occupy the
same compound.
Prof. Shulov switches easily
from biblical verse to tales of
adventure, when referring to the
Zoo. His modern sagas vie with
Jewish animal lore of earlier cen-
turies where ravens talk, and
lions sing and frogs have magic
wisdom.
He tells of the 1941 escapades
of runaway vultures discovered
atop the British police head-
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quarters. fPheMqne WO vultures
are now the last survivors of the
Mount Scopus collection.)
Next he lapses enthusiastically
into an account of the rescue of
near-extinct Persian Gazelles
from menageries for sheiks aban-
doned in Jericho following the
Six Day War.
INDEED HIS renditions rival
the fascination of earlier animal
lore. One age-old classic of the
140 animal tales preserved in the
Jewish Folktale Archives relates:
An old father, whose days were
numbered, called his son and said
to him: "My son, fulfill this last
request: After my death go, day
after day, to the seashore and
cast two loaves of bread upon the
water." The young man follows
his father's wish, and for his
kindness to the animals of the sea
is rewarded with the gift of
understanding animal language.
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Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laud irdale
Page 11C
ma
puckish Cohen Bespeaks tone op his heRO yuw
Arthur A. Cohen. A HERO IN HIS TIME. New
York: Random House, 278 pp. $8.95.
ARTHUR COHEN is a versatile writer. He has
edited books on Jewish philosophy; written the text of
A People Apart, an outstanding pictorial volume on
Hasidism; and penned several novels, last year's
contribution being the notable In the Days of Simon
Stern.
Cohen's puckish expression on the book jacket
bespeaks the tone of the hero of this book, Yuri
Maximovich, a minor Soviet Jewish poet. Yuri
describes himself as a "nonentity" and explains why:
"Poets have no responsibility to do anything but tell
the truth and take the consequences."
OUR HERO sheepishly admits that he is afraid of
the consequences in his motherland witness he has
not published in 15 years.
His complacency is suddenly challenged by the
Soviet government, which has chosen him to attend a
conference in the infamous city which epitomizes
Susan
panopf
Western capitalistic society: New York City. Things
are not as simple as they seem.
The indignity to which Yuri is asked to submit is
"doing a piece of work" for the KGB. He must deliver a
secret message hidden in the text of a sterile, coded
poem which he must read in public along with and as if
it is his own. This is a test of conscience versus sur-
vival.
COHEN INFORMS his readers about the stifling
way of life in the Soviet Union. A friend of Yuri's
speaks to this point when he comments on how lucky
Westerners are. We have the luxury of concerning
ourselves with the quality of life: air, overcrowding,
traffic.
But Russians still live with life and death issues on
a daily basis. He continues: "How extraordinary to live
in a country (the USSR) where one knows with cer-
tainty that he has done his very best if he gets
punished."
The conclusion is both happy and sad. But so is the
entire novel. With its fascinating cast of characters, A
Hero in His Time is both a scathing indictment of the
Soviet system, and the compassionate story of one
man's rise from obscurity to heroism .
A SECOND of Bernard Malamud's works has
recently been reissued. Pictures of Fidelman, originally
published in 1969, is now out in a 192-page paperback
version by Pocket Books ($1.75). Pictures chronicles
the antics of American Arthur Fidelman through his
extraordinary stay in Italy.
He goes from garret to garret meeting a variety of
thieves, rascals and lovers. A totally engaging novel.
evepythinq
Is Up
To date
Joseph
poUkoff
AMONG THE few things not up to date in Kansas City is that
30-some-odd-year-old song the national media kept repeating
during the Republican convention days in mid-August to the
annoyance of the city's usually placid inhabitants. The song of
course, from the Broadway musical "Oklahoma!" is "Every-
thing's up-to-date in Kansas City." Another thing that nettled the
inhabitants was the continuing incorrect reference, mainly by
Easterners, to Kansas City as "the queen of the cow towns."
In education, commerce, urban development and interest in
what is happening in the country and the world, Kansas City is
assuredly up-to-date. And so is its Jewish community of 25,000
whose members include some of the most civic-minded activists in
the area's million inhabitants along the Missiouri-Kansas border.
ALTHOUGH ONLY a handful compared with some of the
agglomerations of Jewish citizens in other metropolitan areas,
Jewish Kansas Citians proudly point to their Menorah Medical
Center which they founded in 1931 and recently expanded at a cost
of $17 million to enlarge its hospital facilities to 450 beds.
The Center has three training schools, a speech and hearing
department, and offers home medical services. FBI Director
Clarence Kelley considers it his "home hospital." For the several
surgical operations he required since becoming FBI chief, he came
to Menorah Hospital.
THE HEBREW ACADEMY of Greater Kansas City a day
school with 180 students in its 12 grades and kindergarten was
founded in 1920 and gradually developed over the decades. Last
February it graduated its first senior high school class. Its
president is Hyman Brand, a leader in the United Synagogue of
America who also is a founder of Brand & Puritz, garment
manufacturers.
The Kansas City Jewish Chronicle was founded in 1920. Under
co-partners, Stanley Rose, publisher, and Milton Firestone, editor,
the paper circulates throughout Western Missouri and Eastern
Kansas.
LIKE MANY other communities, Kansas City has an active
and excellently run Jewish Community Center. It has seven
synagogues three Orthodox, three Reform and one Con-
servative. Its 15 rabbis include the principal and some teachers of
the Hebrew Academy.
Much of the credit for the fact Kansas City was host to the
Republican convention has been given to Richard L. Berkley, the
mayor pro tern and a member of the City Council. Telling about
how the GOP selected the site for its most dramatic convention, the
Kansas City Times said Berkley, Arthur Asel and Georgianne
Hedges organized 2,800 volunteers and labored for a year to win the
convention for their city.
ASEL AND BERKLEY were chairman and co-chairman
respectively of the city's convention steering committee. Later,
Berkley was treasurer of the host corporation and then became its
president as the size and busine 's of the organization grew.
"Berkley, called a 'stabilizing influence,' has been the one
everybody relied on to get the details handled and the follow-
through on the day-to-day commitments and situations, the
Times reported. Berkley, whose father, Eugene Berkowitz, founded
the envelope manufacturing company that now is one of the
country's largest in the field, received in 1974 the Hebrew
Academy's first civic service award.
ANOTHER KANSAS Citian prominently identified with the
convention is Henry W. Bloch, president of the Kansas City
Chamber of Commerce. Under his aegis, reporters and others
among the 25,000 that descended on Kansas City for the GUP
doings received a valuable booklet that welcomed them with im-
portant details of the convention and the slogan Kansas City is
"tomorrow's hope for the American City Today!
Bloch is chairman of the board of H & R Block Inc., the income
tax preparation service company.
In Jewish annals, perhaps the best known Jewish'Kansas
Citian is the late Eddie Jacobson. He was a partner of Harry
?STan in a^berdashery in downtown Kansas C^hey.ent
into business together after Truman came back f!"^Wjl
which he served as an artillery captain. Jacobson '^ted *h
giving the future President, whose memory is revered.mroIs^'
Such of his deep understanding of why Jews everywhere want
Israel to be a reality forever.
the41976Committee' robrt
Of the John BmcheRs seqai
IT IS now a little better than six years since the
faithful of the John Birch Society and like-minded
superpatriots formed "The 1976 Committee."
Their purpose was "to inspire, promote, and
guide political action which will help to restore,
maintain, and strengthen our Republic."
According to the grand design of this small but
determined band, who were sure then that high
treason, imported communism, more taxes, and
an international conspiracy were going to do the
country in by Bicentennial time, two of the
greatest patriots in the land had to be drafted to
head a red-white-and-blue ticket for the national
election of 1976. Who made up that stalwart
twosome? Ezra Taft Benson and Sen. Strom
Thurmond.
TO THE best of our knowledge, "The 1976
Committee" ticket is still out to lunch while the
candidates of the bona fide Republican and
Democratic parties are muscling up for the
November showdown. And in their bumptious
and haphazard way, plain, everyday Americans
millions and millions of them have managed
to survive and bring up their kids and enjoy the
blessings that the Constitution and this nation's
tremendous moral, spiritual and material
resources continue to grant them.
Best of all, despite the wildeyed fears of the
1976 Committeemen and despite misgivings that
gentle people had about the over-
commercialization of our Bicentennial, historians
will record that the glorious celebration has in-
tensified our love of nation and made us proud of
much that has gone on here for 200 years.
MUSIC FROM revolutionary days, bright
costumes, reenactment of battles fought for
liberty, original playlets, imaginative use of
television, spectacular firework displays, visits
from foreign dignitaries, and the parade of Tall
Ships bringing the greetings of many lands all
added up to a robust celebration.
Interlaced with the concerts, the marching and
the pageantry was the reminder to all who would
watch and listen that immigrants from more than
150 nations had come to American shores,
enriching the Republic with diverse cultural
strengths. The icing on the Bicentennial cake was
this widespread education about the gifts of
energy, ingenuity, skill and talent brought by
newcomers.
AMERICA PROVED itself willing to accept
and learn from the people's Bicentennial Com-
mittee, that spirited band of individualists
determined to point up national faults and
promises unfulfilled. And savoring the good
things flowing from the celebration, most of us
were even able to forget and forgive the creation
and hawking of plastic garbage, raunchy
souvenirs.
In such a gigantic undertaking, flaws were
inevitable. Rowdyism came in the form of
bombings at Plymouth Rock and the sudden and
frightening reappearance of letter bombs.
Another disappointment was, of course, the
failure of many celebrants to comprehend the true
meaning of the Bicentennial, that we were
honoring the memory of hardy radicals who dared
to defy the edicts of kings; men and women who
beheld the miraculous spark of liberty Jefferson
had kindled and fanned the tiny flames with such
courage and determination that the entire world
found inspiration in freedom's new light.
david
Schwaatz
Sai6Sheto6instein:
is there'plain QeometBy?
PAULINE CHOTZINOFF, who has just
passed away, had music all about her. She was
the sister of Jascha Heifetz, the violinist; the wife
of the music critic, Samuel Chotzinoff; and she,
herself, was a good enough pianist to evoke the
praise of Toscanini.
Once she found herself sitting beside Einstein
and to make conversation she said she had heard
he was interested in arithmetic. Einstein asked
her if she was interested in mathematics. "Well,"
she said, she "had studied geometry."
"Plane geometry?" asked Einstein.
"Is there fancy geometry too?" she asked.
HER HUSBAND, Samuel Chotzinoff, was
probably the best known music critic in America.
Later musical director of the National Broad-
casting Company, his first fame came to him as
music critic of the New York World.
The World was an exceptional paper. Its
editorial page was regarded as the best in the
country, and its staff had many star writers of
national fame. For the last word in wit, people
turned every morning to The Conning Tower,
edited by Franklin P. Adams.
Adams was more commonly known by his
initials F.P.A. As he wrote of himself: "For the
purpose of record in history's book / Iwas born in
Illinois, county of Cook."
He was noted for his terse style. He served in
World War I and he wrote of that: "I didn't fight,
I didn't shoot / But O General, how I did salute!"
HE WAS Jewish, but as far as I know never
identified himself with any Jewish cause.
Originally he had been an insurance salesman.
People become writers for various reasons. Some
have deep thoughts they wish to convey. Some
turn to writing because the overhead is small. If
you want to start a store, you need stock, goods.
To become a writer all you need is a pencil and
paper.
F.P.A. became a writer because he liked straw-
berries. He had gone to the home of George Ade, a
popular writer of that day to sell him an insurance
policy, and found him eating strawberries. It was
winter. Imagine a man rich enough to have straw-
berries for breakfast in winter. On the spot he
decided to become a writer.
THE DAYS of the New York World were the
days of Fiorello La Guardia. He was no bigger
than the present Mayor of New York City. Abe
Beame. When Queen Elizabeth recently visited
New York, Mayor Beame is said to have ex-
pressed the hope that the Queen would be able to
hear him, Elizabeth being a good bit teller than
Beame.
HE WAS half Italian and half Jewish. He could
speak Yiddish. He didn't like the Nazis, of course,
but when a delegation of Nazis came to New York
he gave them protection with Jewish police. As
Mayor of New York, when the city faced finer. .
problems, he lowered his own salary.


Page 12-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 17,1976
T
New Year Greetings To All
Pic "N" Frame
2908 E. Commercial Blvd.
"do it yourself" picture framing
Do it yourself and save approximately 50 per cent
PHONE 491-0777
May all of our Jewish customers
and friends have a very Happy New Year
ADELE SHERMAN
Southern Formal
1311 Las Olas Boulevard
A Happy New Year To All. .
Gross Pointe
Furniture Shops
Over 62 years
Ft. Lauderdale Showroom
524 N.E. 6th Avenue 523-3232
A Very Happy New Year to
Our Jewish Customers and Friends
Cleo de Mott
& Associates
REAL ESTATE
4040 Gait Ocean Drive
565-4831
We wish
all our friends
a happy^Vnnd healthy
Hew/ \Year
SUPREME AUTO BODY
COMPLETE AUTO BODY SERVICE
...TOWING
1781 N.W. 1st COURT
BOCA RATON 33432
TELEPHONE 395-1722
Happiness at New Year
Alden House
Nursing Home
1800 East Oakland Park Blvd.
NEW YEAR GREETINGS
Miss Martha
3306 N.E. 32nd. St. 3324 N.E. 32nd. St.
Happy New Year to our Jewish Friends
And Customers
Callahan
PLUMBING & HEATING CONTRACTORS
4444 N.E. 8th Ave. 772-2911 772-2911
Mr. Frank O'Brien and His Staff
Extend Best Wishes To All
Jewish Families in the State For A
Peaceful and Happy New Year
a
OK SERVICE CENTER
GOODYEAR DEALER...
Complete Automotive Service
702 McNAB ROAD
POMPANO BEACH 33060
PHONE 781-0990


Full Text
Friday, September 17,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
MARK TWAIN had a mes-
sage of welcome and promise for
the struggling masses of Jewish
immigrants who had passed
through Ellis Island at the turn
of the 20th century.
"If statistics are right, Jews
constitute one percent of the
human race," the great author
wrote "Properly, the Jew
ought hardly to be heard of .
(Yet) He is as prominent on the
planet as any other people. His
contributions to the world's list
of great names in literature,
science, art, music, finance,
medicine and abstruse learning
are out of proportion to the
weakness of his numbers."
These words were based on
Twain's knowledge of what Jew-
ish people had achieved in many
different lands during two
millennia of worldwide Diaspora,
and especially in the new land of
America, dating from Aug. 22,
1654, when the first known Jew-
Page 3-B
ish settler landed in New Am-
sterdam (then Dutch), later New
York (British).
THE SETTLER was Jacob
Barsimson, a native of Holland.
He was followed in September by
23 other Jews who came by way
of Brazil. Barsimson was soon
recognized as the Jewish com-
munity leader. They had their
problems.
Under Governor Peter Stuy-
vesant, the New Amsterdam
Jews enjoyed practically no
citizenship rights. They could not
engage in retail trade or practice
a handicraft, for instance. They
could not hold a public post or
serve militia duty, practice "their
religion in a synagogue or
gathering."
Yet their tax bills were dis-
proportionately high. And when
they first petitioned for the right
to purchase a burial plot, the re-
quest was denied on the ground
that "as yet there was no need."
Some Bicentennial thoughts:
ContRiButions
of famous Jews
THROUGH the perseverance
and determination of such pio-
neers as Jacob Barsimson, Asher
Levy, Abraham deLucena, Jacob
Cohen Henricques, Salvador
Dandrada, Joseph d'Acosta and
David Frera, full citizenship
rights were in due course won for
the Jews of New Amsterdam,
rights which were continued
Continued on Page 4-B
Jacob Barsimson, first known
Jewish settler in America, wins
concessions for Jews from Peter
Stuyvesant, governor of New
Amsterdam.
May You Be Blessed With
Good Health & Peace
In The Years To Come
Sherwood Park
Golf Club Inc.
14857 Forest Road
Delray Beach 33444
278-3716
Doug's Auto &
Truck Paris
NEW& USED
2070Powerline Road
Pompano Beach 33060
972-8440
sincepe
Best
wishes
fOR A
happy & pRospepous
new yeaR
Strachan Shipping
Company
PORT EVERGLADES
P.O. BOX 13131
FORT LAUDERDALE 33316
*
A hearty greeting to all our
customers and friends on these
joyous New Year Holydays
Bon's Cabinetry
And Custom Mica
Furnituro Inc.
Expert Workmanship...
Furniture & Cabinets
1273 Old Dixie Highway
Lake Park 33403
844-6685
Greetings
To you, friendi, and neighbors, whom we have been
privileged to larva, wa extend our greetings nd
bat w'uhei for the Naw Yaar.

Twin County Glass
Glass of All Description
6101 MIRAMAR PARKWAY
MIRAMAR 33023 962-5008
HAPPY
Kepler's
Custom Clubs and Repair
1050 OLD DIXIE HIGHWAY
LAKE PARK 33403 848-1594


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Pge3-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fprt Laud*rdale\
Friday, September 17,197s
messiAh ARouno CoRnec But Something is holoinq him Up'
Continued from Page IB
although we are less than 3 percent of the
population, 15 to 20 percent of all American Nobel
laureates in the physical sciences are Jews.
DESPITE THE impoverished among us we are
an affluent people. In 1729 the first published
budget of the only Jewish organization in British
North America was less than $900. Today the
gross national product of all Jewish associations,
institutions, and societies is $1,500,000,000.
A generation ago Julius Rosenwald through his
matching grants helped establish over 4,000
Negro institutions. In my opinion he did more for
the Blacks than any other white man in this
country. At this moment there are over 300
colleges offering courses in Hebraic and Judaic
studies; there is a Jewish library in almost every
synagogue; there is a four-branched liberal
seminary uniting Reform Jews all the way from
Los Angeles to Jerusalem.
Practically every one of the hundreds of con-
gregations in the Union teaches Hebrew. Oscar
Straus once said that Hebraic mortar cemented
the foundations of American democracy, but
equally important for us is the fact that the
Hebrew language cements Jews all over the
world, creating an indissoluble whole more eternal
than the everlasting granite hills.
WE HAVE finally effected a harmonization of
the best in Judaism and Western culture.
Through the arts and sciences which we embrace
we have become an elite group. Here in this land
alone every ten years we publish 1,000 Jewish
scholarly works which illuminate our history,
literature, and religion. We are liberals, for our
laymen and our rabbis preach the gospel of the
fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man.
There is but one God and but one humanity.
We have emancipated oursleves from the dead
hand of authority. We believe in the right of every
individual to live with his conscience and to
accept in Judaism only that which will enable him
to be a free person living on the highest ethical
plane.
We do not await the coming of a personal
Messiah, but we do look forward to the advent of
a Messianic Age where men will act justly, love
mercy, and walk humbly with their God. We
accept the findings of science and somewhat
belatedly, to be sure affirm the equality of
women. We are proud of the fact that when our
College opened in October, 1875, one of the
students admitted to that first class was a girl.
LET US REJOICE. We have gone far since
September, 1775, when the officers of the Jewish
congregation in New York City met for the last
time as second-class British subjects; we have
gone far since August, 1776, when most members
of that congregation went into exile as Americans
Continued on Page 10 -B


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~-r