The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00062

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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wJewish floridian
Volume 5 Number 15
OFORtATWRFORTLAUMBBAic
Friday, July 23, 1976
O Fred K. ShocketFriday, July 23,lf7
Price 25 cents
1
Extra Gifts Honor British in 'Correct' Applause
Israeli Rescue

Greater Fort Lauderdale area
residents have made additional
contributions to the Federation's
UJA campaign in honor of the
successful Israeli rescue, ac-
cording to Barry Axler, assistant
director of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
One such person, Judy
Goodman, recorder of the Points
of America Women's Division
campaign, said, "Even though I
personally cannot go to Israel to
fight. I wanted to show my
support in a manner that would
be meaningful to me and my
family and to the Israelis. My
contribution insures that Israel
will always be strong enough to
protect her citizens and Jews
very where."
All the contributors expressed
great sorrow at the death of four
of the hostages and one of the
Israeli commandos. Col.
Yehonatan Netanyahu. Axler
noted that both names of the
Israeli mean the same. "And God
gave us a gift."
Axler is encouraging persons
who are inspired by the actions of
these residents and who wish to
express their support for Israel
by mailing additional UJA
contributions to the Jewish
Federation office. 2999 NW 33rd
Ave., Lauderdale Lakes. 33311.
He urged all those who have not
as yet made their 1976 pledges to
the Jewish Federation-UJA
Campaign to do so at once so that
"Israel will not only live but
continue to live and be strong
forever."
Fate Unknown
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA)
Prime Minister James Cal-
laghan issued a statement
here saying he was very
pleased at the outcome of
the Air France hijacking
affair. But his statement did
not take the form of a mes-
sage to Israel which was
seen here as a demonstra-
tion that the British Labor
government did not want to
anger Ugandan President Idi
Amin and his Arab support-
ers.
The government's attitude
was in sharp contrast to the
reaction in the country at
large and in Parliament
Britain Expresses 'Grave
Concern' for Dora Bloch
LONDON (JTA) The
British government has ex-
pressed "grave concern" over
the unknown fate of Mrs. Dora
Bloch. one of the hostages on
the hijacked Air France jet.
who disappeared under suspi-
cious circumstances from Mula-
f^gao Hospital in Kampala. Ugan-
da, over the last weekend
* Edward Rowlands, Minister
of State at the Foreign Office,
told Parliament July 7 that
urgent inquiries made through
the British acting High Com-
missioner in Uganda have fail-
ed to elicit information from
Uganda authorities as to the
whereabouts of the 74-year-old
woman who is a British subject
and also a citizen of Israel
where she resides.
SERIOUS concern was ex-
Dressed in Israel July 8 that
Mrs. Bloch may have been
harmed. Foreign Dress reports
Dicked up by Israeli newspapers
said she was dragged from the
hospital screaming by four "se-
curity men on Idi Amin's orders
Sunday night," the night after
Israeli commandos succeeded in
I liberating most of the hostages
field at Entebbe Aimort.
Israeli diplomats have ap-
pealed to the International Red
Cross in Geneva to intervene

*t
orial
Casey Greene, a member of
the board of directors of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale and a tireless
worker for the UJA and Israel
Bonds, died on July 9 at
Mount Sinai Medical Center in
M iami.
Greene, who was 68, had
come to Inverrary two years
ago from Lido Beach in his
native New York, where he
4ad taken an active part in the
founding of Long Beach
Memorial Hospital.
He is survived by his wife,
Sylvia; a daughter and son-in-
law, Madeline and David; and
a granddaughter, Jacquelyn.
but the IRC reportedly declined
to act unless requested to do
so by the British and French
governments as well. Chief Rab-
bi Shlomo Goren sent urgent
appeals to the Pope, to the
World Council of Churches in
Geneva, to UN Secretary Gen-
eral Kurt Waldheim and to
President Ford. Official circles
in Jerusalem said privately that
the chances of Mrs. Bloch be-
ing found alive were slim. How-
ever, some suggested that Ugan-
dan President Idi Amin may be
holding her with the intent of
extracting some humiliating
gesture from Israel in exchange
for her safety.
MRS. BLOCH, accompanied
by one of her sons, economist
Ilan Hartuv, was enroute to
New York to attend the wed-
ding of another son when the
Air France "air bus" was hi-
jacked shortly after leaving
Athens airport June 27. She was
taken to the Ugandan hospital
from Entebbe Airport when she
choked on food supplied the
hostages after the landing. Her
son was among the 102 hostages
rescued by Israeli forces July 3.
Rowlands told Parliament that
Mrs. Bloch was visited at the
hospital by a British official on
July 1. The official was told by
two Ugandan plainclothesmen
that she would be transferred
to the Imperial Hotel in Kam-
pala.
When he returned to the hos-
pital an hour later with food
for Mrs. Bloch, the official was
not allowed through the main
gate, Rowlands reported. Since
then the acting British High
Commissioner in Kampala has
been trying to contact Mrs.
Bloch through every channel,
including a search bv Ugandan
police.
BUT THE Ugandan author-
ities now say they have no
knowledge of her whereabouts
and that Uganda ceased to be
responsible for the hostages
after the Israeli rescue opera-
tion at Entebbe. "The situation
clearly gives cause for grave
concern." Rowlands said. He
said High Commissioner James
Henessv returned July 8 to
Kampala with instructions to re-
port i'nTicdiat',lv his findings
in the matter. Rowlands stated
that Britain could not accept
Uganda's claim that it had no
knowledge of Mrs. Bloch.
In Jerusalem. Hartuv. who
had acted as translator when
Amin addressed the Israeli
hostages before the rescue took
place, annealed to the Ugandan
leader to release his mother.
"On behulf of her children and
her grandchildren, we beg von
to release Dora Rloch and send
her back to her family," Hartuv
stated in a cable to Amin.
Meanwhile, according to a re-
port from Nairobi, a Ugandan
official asked about Mrs. Bloch's
whereabouts, said: "Don't ask
us, ask Israel."
Bust of Golda Presented
WASHINGTON rJTA) A larger than life stone
bust of Golda Meir has been given to the Ohr Kodesh Con-
gregation in Chevy Chase, Md., by the sculptress, Bernice
Marker, in honor of her father, Benjamin Marker. The
sculptress worked nearly a year on the bust. Mrs. Meir, in
a letter to Rabbi Tzvi Porath of the congregation, said she
was impressed with the work. Ms. Marker is making an-
other bust for presentation to Mrs. Meir through the Israel
Embassy.
where MP Phillip Goodhart
described the rescue as "one
of the greatest military ex-
ploits of all time" and "a
very substantial v i c to r y
against international terror-
ism for everybody."
MEMBERS of Parliament
have moved a motion urging the
government "to congratulate
the government of Israel on
brilliantly and bravely con-
founding an act of air piracy,
to condemn President Amin for
aiding and arming international
terrorists, and to combat terror-
ism both at home and abroad
with equal vigor and determi-
nation."
Labor MP Greville Janner urg-
ed the government to take ac-
tion against Uganda for its al-
leged collusion with the terror-
ists.
In the Jewish community,
there was rejoicing and thanks-
giving in sharp contrast with
the prayers of intercession read
in synagogues.
Jewish youth movements held
a big celebration in a park in
northwest London, attended by
a representative of the Israel
Embassy.
SPEAKING on the BBC. Is-
rael Ambassador Gideon Rafael
said he was "proud of the preci-
sion" of the Israel armed forces
operation. It was Israel's reply
to Amin's suggestion that time
was running out and that Is-
rael had to do something, he
stated. Said Hammani, the PLO's
man in London, refused to
soeak to the BBC.
Dr. Immanuel Jakobovits,
Britain's Chief Rabbi, described
the rescue as "one of the most
memorable episodes of our long,
blood-stained history." when he
made a special appearance Sun-
day at the Board of Deputies
of British Jews.
In an atmosphere of relief
and exultation, the Chief Rabbi
told communal leaders that "in
our synagogues we wept and
pleaded with God for his inter-
vention and succor, now we
have witnessed a great salva-
tion."
LORD FISHER, president of
the Board, described the news
of the rescue as a "tremendous
moment" and announced that
telegrams of congratulations
and affecjionate good wishes
were being sent to Israeli Presi-
dent Eohraim Katzir and Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin.
Dr. S. Levenberg, Board vice
president, asked where were
the UN. its Secretary General,
and the Securitv Pouncil while
the hostages were being held in
Uganda. The world stood aside,
as it did during the Holocaust,
he said.
My View
Aren't You Proud To Be Jewish Tbday?
Will You Be Proud Tomorrow?
By Barry Axler
Assistant Director,
Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale
We are all filled with pride over
the historic rescue by the Israelis
of the hostages held captive by
the PLO and Ugandan troops.
However, in the midst of our
pride, we can learn several im-
portant lessons from this in-
cident.
First and foremost, we saw
again that in the eyes of the
hijackers and the world it made
no difference whether the
hostages were French, American
or Israeli they were Jews.
Everyone else was allowed to
leave it was the Jewish
hostages who were kept behind.
Whether we recognize it or not,
whether we accept it or not, our
destinies and lives as Jews are
intertwined, one with the other.
We, as a people, are and will
always be one. When a Jew cries
in Jerusalem, we all cry; when a
Jew goes hungry in Fort
Lauderdale, we all go hungry;
when a Jew dies in Uganda, part
of us dies as well.
We are responsible for each
other and must act in ways to
demonstrate and carry out that
responsibility.
THE SECOND THING I have
discovered is that, filled with
pride and respect, people wish to
demonstrate their support for
Israel. How does one show this
support in a meaningful manner?
The answer to this question of
support and the way to
demonstrate our responsibility
for each other are one and the
same a meaningful con-
tribution to the Jewish
Federation-United Jewish
Appeal campaign.
Through this contribution, you
make certain that Israel is strong
enough to continue to stand up to
terrorism throughout the world.
Through this contribution, you
make certain that world Jewry,
and specifically American Jewry,
is strong enough to continue its
support of Israel and Jewish life
abroad. Through your con-
tribution, you make certain that
scores of young Jews will
demonstrate their support for
Israel and Judaism in the years
to come.
You're proud to be Jewish
today. Will you be proud to be
Jewish tomorrow, when Israel
turns to us for help?
It's one thing to say we are
moved by this heroic incident
it's another actually to do
something which gives meaning
to our pride.
I urge you to take pride in
being Jewish by continuing to
support our campaign.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 23, 1976
Vice Mayor Named Vice Chairman
Fort Lauderdale Vice Mayor
Virginia S. Young has been
named vice chairman for the
residential division of the 1976-77
United Way campaign.
Announcing her appointment,
campaign chairman S. Kelly
Jordan said that "the choice of
Vice Mayor Young to head the
annual United Way fund-raising
drive among area residents is
appropriate considering that she
is a lifetime resident of Broward
County as well as one of the most
distinguished."
Vice Mayor Young has served
on the United Way board of
directors and is active in several
United Way agencies. She is
president of the Broward League
of Cities, second vice president of
VICE MAYOR YOUNG
the Florida Municipal League,
vice chairman of Human
Resources for the National
League of Cities and chairman of
the South Florida Regional
Planning Council.
United Way has also an-
nounced that its communications
director, Marietta M. Benevento,
has been recognized as an
Accredited Public Relations
Professional by the 38-year-old
Florida Public Relations
Association.
She qualified for accreditation,
and gained the right to use
"APRP" after her name, by
completing a comprehensive
examination.
Among the 650 members of the
Florida group, only 34 have won
the APRP designation.
Hadassah Nursery Dedicated
The first building ever erected
by an Israeli employer especially
for pre-kindergarteners of the
working mothers on the staff was
dedicated at Hadassah-Hebrew
University Medical Center at Ein
Karem, Jerusalem, in June.
Funds for the building were
donated by Aleen and Lawrence
Schacht of South Orange, N.J.
Aleen Schacht, a national vice
president of Hadassah, was for
many years Big Gifts chairman.
Lawrence Schacht is a past
president of the American
Technion Society, a UJA and
State of Israel Bonds leader, and
a substantial investor in Israel.
At the dedication ceremony
were the Schachts' son, Michael,
also of South Orange, and their
daughter, Mrs. Barbara Mar-
shall, with her three children,
Robert, Claudia and Alexandra,
of Livingston, N.J. Nieces and
nephews Mr. and Mrs. Richard
Schreiber of Hewlett Bay Park,
L.I., Mr. and Mrs. Leon Bing of
Palm-Aire, and Mr. and Mrs.
Lloyd Tarlin of Brookline, Mass.,
attended as did the Schachts'
friends Robin Wilson and Mrs.
Jenny Pierce.
MRS. LOLA KRAMARSKY,
a former national president of
Hadassah, presided at the
ceremony, and Mrs. Rose
Matzkin, national president of
Hadassah, and Jerusalem Mayor
Teddy Kollek paid tribute to the
Schachts.
Mrs. Charlotte Jacobson,
chairman of the Jewish Agency
in the United States, and Mrs.
Faye Schenk, president of the
American Zionist Federation,
both former national presidents
of lladassh. and other Hadassah
national leaders, members of the
Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center staff, including
the director-general. Prof.
Kalman .1. Mann, and friends
from the Hadassah family in
Israel were also present.
Mrs. Zohar Palti, director of
the Women's Employment Unit
of the Israel Ministry of Labor,
said she hoped that the Hadassah
example would be emulated by
other employers. Some firms
have allocated space for im-
provised day nurseries, but the
Schacht Day Nursery is the first
building planned and erected by a
large employer to enable women
to work and not worry about
their children.
Sixty percent of Hadassah's
2,(XX) workers are women. Mrs.
Henia Heiman-Elkind, director of
Hadassah's Nursing Services,
said that the country was suf-
fering from a desperate shortage
of nurses, while many qualified
nurses had forsaken the
profession after marriage. She
believes the new facility will
induce these women to return to
service.
The Schacht Day Nursery
contains four classrooms for 120
children below age five. Designed
Ft. Laud. 7-2J-7*
Community
Calendar
MONDAY, JULY 26
National Council of Jewish Women, Plantation Unit, board
meeting 9:30 a.m.
Reconstructionist Synagogue education meeting Temple
Sholom
B'nai B'rith general meeting
TUESDAY, JULY 27
B'nai B'rith Hillel Advisory Board, Broward-Palm Beach
Counties regular meeting 9:45 a.m.
Hadassah Shoshana Group regular meeting 12:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 28
Tamarac Jewish Center Sisterhood general meeting
Temple Sholom adult education
Woman's American ORT, Coral Ridge, general meeting
THURSDAY, JULY 29
National Council of Jewish Women, Plantation Unit, Jewish
study group
MONDAY, AUGUST 2
Hadassah Armon Group regular meeting 12:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 3
JCC, Grades 1-5, "Jungle Queen" trip
Temple Sholom Sisterhood board meeting 10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 4
Brandeis University National Women's Committee board
meeting
B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 2940, Hawaiian Gardens, regional
meeting
Tamarac Jewish Center Sisterhood mini lunch and cards
Temple Sholom adult education 8 p.m.
Temple Sholom B'nai B'rith Council 8 p.m.
Aleen and Lawrence Schacht (left! of South Orange, N.J.
donated funds for the building of the Hadassah Day Nursery
for working mothers in Jerusalem. At the dedication with them
were Mrs. Rose E. Matzkin, national president of Hadassah,
and Mrs. Lola Kramarsky, Hadassah national board member.
by architects Dan, Rafael and
Amon Ben-Dor, it stands at the
entrance to the Hadassah Ein
Karem campus. The architects
chose as their model the
hexagons used by bees in their
hives.
Amon Ben-Dor explains that
"The system of hexagons does
away with the need for corridors;
we have only one small corridor
leading to the kitchen. We have
cut down the extent of the outer
walls and we have reduced the
ratio of wall space to floor. You
move from one area to another
without needing to go through a
passage. Great flexibility is
possible."
Every room is multipurpose
and can be used for playing,
sleeping, eating and teaching.
Furniture and equipment have
been specially designed to fit the
multipurpose concept. The
playground equipment was
donated by Mr. and Mrs.
Schachts nieces and nephews
who attended the ceremony.
Lawrence Schacht noted that
"Next June, we shall be
dedicating the Aleen Schacht
Auditorium in the Hadassah
Mount Scopus Hospital. I invite
all of you here today to gather
again in Jerusalem to celebrate
the event."
Ron Mishkin has been
reelected president of Temple
Beth Israel for the second year.
Also elected were Max Cohn,
executive vice president: Martin
Public Defender
To Address
Margate Men
On Sunday. Aug. 1, at 9:30
a.m. the Men's Club oi the
Margate Jewish Center will hold
its monthly breakfast-business
meeting.
Warren S. Olds, Public
Defender of Broward County, will
speak on the criminal justice
system, many aspects of which
touch the average citizen.
This is a chance for you to
secure the latest information on
such topics as capital punish-
ment, juvenile crime and cures,
parole and probation.
A question-and-answer period
will follow at which Olds will be
assisted by his aide, Tom Walsh,
and by Irving Rothman.
Lipnack, membership vice
president: Bernard Oshinsky,
budget vice president: Harvey
Bloom, financial secretary: and
Jules Shapiro, treasurer.
Mishkin pledged to expand his
Involvement project, which has
been aimed at getting all temple
members involved in various
temple activities.
-jk
.,
I
THURSDAY, AUGUST 5
National Council of Jewish Women, Plantation Unit, Jewish
study group
,t
or generations
symbol of
For
a
Jewish tradition.
Beth IsraelReelects Mishkin
At Riverside, our reputation is based
upon our assuranceof service that fulfills
the high standards evoked by Jewish
tradition.
It is for this reason Riverside is not
represented by any other funeral director
in Florida.
Today, each of Riverside's six chapels
serving Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties isexclusively a Riverside Chapel,
staffed only by Riverside people who
understand Jewish tradition and honor it.
And in that tradition we serve every
family, regardless of financial
circumstance.
.* >
RON MISHKIN
Ft. Laud. 7-23-7*
SUNRISE:
1171 Northwest 61st Avenue (Sunset Strip) 584-6060
HOLLYWOOD.
5801 Hollywood Boulevard'920 1010
North Miami Beach. Miami Beach and Miami.
Five chapels serving the New York City Metropolitan area.
EJRiverside
Memorial Chaof i inc /Fitoeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
A Grossberg. L F D
Ft. Laud. 7-23-7*


Friday, July 23, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
t
Friedman Enters Congressional Race Beth Hillel Moving
Citing a need for integrity and elderly; and accountability and economic and social oriorities." ^^
To Larger Quarters
Citing a need for integrity
morality in government, Charlie
Friedman of Hollywood this week
officially entered the race for the
U.S. House of Representatives,
12th Congressional District.
accountability and
in government and
A Democrat, Friedman hied
his qualifying papers and
declared: "There are four key
issues on the minds of the voters
during this election year: the
economy and the problems of
unemployment and inflation:
quality health care for all
Americans at a cost they can
afford: national programs to
meet the special needs of the
elderly;
morality
politics."
Friedman, who is a dentist,
has also stated his views on
several other critical social
issues. He believes strongly in
protection of civil liberties of all
Americans; support of Israel;
condominium and consumer
protection legislation; tax reform
and reduction of waste in
government.
"The basic challenge of
meeting the nation's domestic
needs, such as low-cost housing
and better health care, can be
met by redirecting our military,
economic and social priorities,"
said the candidate. "Our
resources must be used to meet
human needs."
Charlie Friedman won his
party's nomination for the 12th
District Congressional seat in
1974. He is a member of the
Broward County Democratic
Executive Committee and its
task forces on aging and
education, the South Broward
Democratic Club, Temple Solel
and the Jewish Welfare
Federation. Friedman and his
wife, Sandra, have three
children, Debbie, Bernard and
Jennifer.
Sherman Katz Announces
Candidacy for Judjeship
Aug. 17 is the first anniversary
of the dedication of the
synagogue, and on that date we
expect to move into our new and
larger quarters.
Our new staff of officers,
headed by Murray Hauser as
president, is determined not to
disappoint the founders. He has
appointed various committees to
keep up the progress of our
synagogue.
In our new location we will be
able to accommodate more than
twice as many people as we can
now.
We are ready to serve our
community for the High Holy
Days. Sale of seats is available
Sunday to Friday, 9 to 11 a.m.
and 5:30 to 7 p.m.
We also wish to remind the
community that we have a very
active Sisterhood and Men's
Club. For information on the
Congregation call 974-2928; for
Sisterhood, 971-9395; for Men's
Club, 971-5693.
'Guts and Brains'Behind Raid
Sherman A. Katz has an-
nounced his candidacy for the
office of Judge of the Circuit
Court, 17th Judicial Circuit, in
and for Broward County,
Florida.
A resident of the City of
Hollywood since 1961, Katz was
a partner in the law firm of
Koenig and Katz of Davie,
Florida, until 1974, when he
semi-retired; since that time he
has acted as a consultant to other
attorneys. In his 20-year legal
career he has specialized in trial
and appellate practice.
Included in his experience was
the drafting and obtaining of
charters from the state
legislature for the Bailey
Drainage District and Central
Broward Drainage District in
Broward County, and a Circuit
Court charter for the Holies
Drainage District in Hendry
County, all of which he then
served as counsel. In other public
capacities he served as Municipal
Judge for Cooper City, substitute
Town Attorney for Davie, and
arbitrator for the American
Arbitration Association.
Katz has announced that he
will not accept any campaign
contributions and will finance his
campaign from his personal
funds and act as his own cam-
paign committee. He stated that
in this way, "if elected, I am
indebted to no special interests
and the public can be assured of
my impartiality and adherence to
the principle of a judge avoiding
even the appearance of im-
propriety."
Born in Uniontown, Pa., the
48- year- old candidate graduated
from the University of Pitts-
burgh in 1948 with a Bachelor's
** degree in economics. After-
college Katz served in the army
and during his two-year service
rose to the rank of Sgt. First
Class with the X Corps in Korea
and was awarded the Bronze
Star. During his service, Katz
decided to enter law school and in
1955 received a Juris Doctor
degree from George Washington
University, Washington, D.C.,
where he was an editor of the law
review.
Katz has been admitted to
practice before the Courts of
Florida and Pennsylvania and in
the United States Supreme Court
and is a member of the American
#Har Association, American Trial
' Lawyers Association, Broward
County Trial Lawyers
Association, and Academy of
Florida Trial Lawyers. He hs
recommended said memberships
as invaluable aids to the lawyer
actively engaged in trial practice.
In addition to his law practice,
Katz has had extensive business
experience, including being a
founder and vice chairman of the
board of Sterling National Bank
of Davie.
SHERMAN A. KATZ
Katz said he believes that the
responsibility of a judgeship is
the highest honor that can be
given to a lawyer, and that if
elected, he would use both his
legal and business backgrounds
in the efficient administration of
his court.
Sunrise JC Has
Holy Day Tickets
Tickets for High Holy Day
services at Sunrise Jewish Center
are available daily except Friday,
7 to 9 p.m., in the Sunrise Lakes
Phase II lobby.
Services will be conducted by
Rabbi Morris Kobrinetz and
Cantor Jack Marchant. Bal-
Scharis services will be led by
Irving Rappaport.
The next regular meeting is
scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 5,
at the Gold Key Recreation
Center at 1 p.m. For further
information on membership, call
Al Kiliszek at 741-6234. For
ticket information, call Aaron
Grossman at 741-1678.
UNITED NATIONS"A com-
bination of guts and brains that
has seldom if ever been sur-
passed."
That is how U.S. Ambassador
to the United Nations William
Scranton described the Israeli
raid on Entebbe here Monday.
SCRANTON continued to sup-
port the raid at the same time
that he demanded that the UN
Security Council "do every-
thing within its power to insure
against a recurrence of this
brutal, callous and senseless in-
ternational crime of hijacking
the crime which gave rise
to the Israeli action."
Scranton was joined by Great
Britain in introducing a draft
resolution condemning the hi-
jacking and urging means of
"assuring the safety and reli-
ability of international civil
aviation."
But the resolution ran smack
up against a resolution of the
Third World-Arab-Communist
bloc that condemns "Israel's
flagrant violation of Uganda's
sovereignty" and demands that
Israel pay compensation to
Uganda for the raid.
ACCORDING TO officials
here, the likelihood is that both
resolutions will end in defeat.
MEDICAL
EQUIPMENT POOL, INC
Scranton told the United Na-
tions that the Entebbe raid
"necessarily involved a tempor-
ary breach of the territorial in-
tegrity of Uganda. However.
:h'.'ie is a well-established right
to use limited force for the pro-
tection of one's own nationals
from an imminent threat of in-
jury or death in a situation
where the state in whose terri-
tory they are located either is
unwilling or unable to protect
them."
In Scranton's address, the
UN Ambassador declared that
Uganda had failed to act to
free the hostages. "In fact,
there is substantial evidence
that the government of Uganda
cooperated with and aided the
hijackers," he declared.
He said that "to my Arab and
African friends, I say here and
now there may have been mix-
ed pictures concerning some of
the questions that have con-
fronted the Security Council in
the immediate past, but to my
mind there is no doubt on this
one. Not one iota.
"UNDER such circumstances,
the government of Israel invok-
ed one of the most remarkable
rescue missions in history. It
electrified millions everywhere,
of
and I confess I was one
them."
Mikhail Kharlamov, repre-
sentative of the Soviet Union,
declared that "No reasons
which were brought in here
could justify the fact that a
small state was aggressed by Is-
rael."
CANDLEUGHTING
TIME
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Phone: 735 1330
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ENORAH
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Mark Weissman
Joseph Rubin
Broward County's first
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DEERFIELD
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MARGATE
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SUNRISE
6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd Phone 739-6000


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 23, 1978
Our Crow6
By Roz fleminq
Thought you would enjoy
reading a letter I received from
Esther Cannon, immediate past
president of the North Broward
Chapter of Hadassah.
"Our Chapter was in-
strumental in getting a Camp Tel
Yehudah scholarship for 16-year-
old Norma Salvage, one of our
most outstanding Young
Judaeans. Today I received a
letter from her at camp which
impressed me very much, and I
thought you might be interested
in including it in your column of
Jewish topics and people. Here it
is, in part:
" 'I have been in camp now for
one week. The impression that
this camp has given to me is very
positive. I think that at Camp Tel
Yehudah a Jewish person learns
more about himself and the world
around him as far as being
Jewish is concerned. He learns
the significance of being proud of
being Jewish.
'1 myself have found that
such things as saying the prayers
for beginning and ending of the
meal are very satisfying. Also the
Sabbath is a very important high
point of Camp Tel Yehudah.
'Here at this camp are the
future leaders of Zionist groups.
Also here is proof that some
Jewish kids care about Judaism
and Israel.
'I feel that the more I am
told about my heritage as a Jew
in America, the greater is my
pride in my Judaism and the
stronger is my feeling of making
Aliyah sometime in the near
future.'
"I thought this was beautiful.
Thank you. Hope you can use it."
WASN'T THIS JUST a
perfect Fourth of July? The
weather was perfect the
fireworks dazzling the TV
coverage of the Tall Ships
spectacular. When I drov
through the neighborhood am
noticed all the many flag
displayed, 1 got goosebumps.
I felt pride in America ... 1
felt in harmony with the millions
of us, Americans all, who were
celebrating this Bicentennial in
peace and with a feeling of
togetherness.
And yet and yet the
only time I cried (and I am a
person who is always moved to
tears by anything sadness
. happiness beauty .
music .) during the entire 24-
hour celebration was when I saw
the news reports of the Israelis
celebrating the commando raid
and successful rescue of most of
the hostages. For me, I must
admit, that news made me
happier than anything I've heard
in a long time.
And as proud as I was, that
memorable day, of being an
American ... as happy as I was
to be celebrating our nation's
birthday nothing touched
that secret place in my heart as
much as seeing the joyful return
of those hostages and
knowing that "we" had pulled off
a miracle. Because, in my heart,
there is no "they" for Israelis .
I feel part of them and that they
are part of us.
After all, "We Are One!" I was
also thrilled for the success of the
daring raid because I hoped it
would remind us all that God is
watching over us, His people,
Israel. And it was feeling this
that brought the tears of joy!
(Plus the pride in those brave
men.)
So on this most special occa-
sion, the two hundredth birth-
day of America, my home, I
came to realize how much I also
consider Israel my home. I will be
going there in October my
heart is already there!
Sorry not to have more news
for you this time. I think we must
still be recovering from all the
fireworks and picnics. I'll be
checking my mailbox for your
letters. (Roz Fleming, 840
Oleander Dr., Plantation 33317.)
By the way, how about sharing
some of your favorite recipes with
us?
Religious
Directory
FORTLAUDEROALE
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 910*
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman (44A).
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
Labowiti. Cantor Maurice Neu (42).
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 324S W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi
Joel S. Goor. Cantor Jerome Klement
(43).
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
4171 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moshe Bomier (S2).
+ + +
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA-
TION. 400 S Nob Hill Rd. Liberal Re-
form. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr (*4).
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNAC
OGUE 7473 NW 4th St. (M).
+ + +
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Avt.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Shop.
Cantor Jacob Remer(49).
+ + +
MARGATE
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION. 7*40
Margate Blvd. Conservative. Cantor
Charles Perlman
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 4101
NW ?th St. Conservative. (44B).
+ + +
CORAL SPRINGS
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 3721 NW 100th
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Max Weitz.
(44)
+ + +
DEERFIELD BEACH
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER-
BETH ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE.
Century Village East. Conservative.
Rabbi David Berent(tt).
i
WHERE CAN YOU GO?
AND HAVE AN 11 OL NEW
YORK STRIP STEAK DINNER
WHICH INCLUDES: SALAD,
SOUP, BAKED POTATO, VEGETABLE,
COMFORTABLE ATMOSPHERE
AND LIVE MUSIC $475
ALL FOR ONLY **
MONTE CARLO RESTAURANT
3300 N. STATE RD. 7, HOLLYWOOD
THAT'S WHERE!
ALSO A VAST SEAFOOD. BEEF
AND ITALIAN SELECTION.
All MODERATELY PRICED.
JIMMY SHUU AT THE ORGAN
High Holiday and School News
From Temple Beth Israel
Temple Beth Israel is selling
tickets for the High Holiday
services at the temple for
members in good standing at
Inverrary Country Club and
Camelot Hall for the community-
at-large, a"nd at Aragon for the
Youth Services.
Services at the temple will be
conducted by Rabbi Phillip A.
Labowitz and Cantor Maurice A.
Neu and the choir. At Inverrary
Country Club they will be
conducted by Cantor David
Golinkin.
Services at Camelot Hall will
be conducted by Rabbi Emanuel
Schenk and Cantor Sol Schwartz,
while the Youth Services will be
conducted by Harry Silverman,
USY director.
For information and tickets,
contact the temple office at 735-
4040.
MIRIAM SCHMERLER,
principal of the religious school,
has a new and dynamic program
planned for 1976-77, one of the
best in Southern Florida.
Register your children now and
don't be shut out. For additional
information, call the temple
office.
:
A letter to
Lippman
from Israel.
Reprinted below, is a letter to Broward Congressional
candidate Fred Lippman from Don Solomon,
a part-time resident of Israel.
\
Lippman
leads the fight
for Broward; ^
Fred Lippman Democrat
12th Congressional District
Paid (or by Fred Lippman campaign tund -William Casady. Treasurer

4


Jrl
- Friday, July 23,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
Pharmacist Fred Lippman and his wife, Judy, with their sons
Matthew, 11 (left), Peter, 13, and Steven, 16. Lippman is
seeking the Democratic nomination in the 12th Congressional
District.
Fred Lippman Starts Campaign
For Democratic House Seat
'
Pharmacist Fred Lippman, a
longtime community leader, is a
candidate for the Democratic
nomination in the 12th
Congressional District.
A resident of Florida for 17
years, Lippman has lived in
Broward County for the past 14
years and has been involved in a
wide cariety of activities, in-
cluding the Jewish Welfare
Federation of South Broward and
recent campaigns to pass the
Florida Generic Drug Bill.
He says* a keystone of his up-
coming political race wil be to
give "unflagging support for
Israel."
Fred and his wife, Judy are
members of Temple Beth El,
where their two oldest sons
Steven, 16, and Peter, 13,
celebrated their Bar Mitzvoth.
Their youngest son, Matthew, 11
attends Hebrew school at Beth
El.
In 1973, lippman was
unamiously selected by the
Broward legislative delegation to
head a commission chaged with
devising a charter form of
government for Broward. The
voters approved the Charter
during the November, 1974,
election.
Another of Lippman's recent
political activities involved his
support of the recently enacted
Generic Drug Bill, which allows
consumers to buy prescriptions
under their generic or chemical
names, which are less expensive
than brand or trade names.
Robert M. Baer is Lippman's
campaign chairman.
By RABBI DR SAMUEL J. FOX
Q: Why is the afternoon
prayer service called "Min-
chah"?
A: A variety of reasons are
advanced for this name. Some
feel the name "Minchah" comes
from the verb "to lead." The
meaning would thus be that this
service, or the sacrifice which
once accompanied it, "leads" a
person to the Almighty.
Another source (Oruch ha-
Shulchan 232) claims that the
term Minchah means a "gift."
The implication is that original-
ly once a day, or one service
of prayer a day, would have
been sufficient. This would have
been an obligation and the in-
dividual would be offering the
sacrifice of the morning or the
morning prayer service as a
payment for a debt (see Maimo-
nides, Tefillah 1:2).
The Jewish tradition added
the afternoon praver as an
added obligation. This added
duty is comparatively a gift that
is offered bv the worshipper. It
la also contended that "Min-
chah" is a term which refers to
the specific time of day when
the prayer is offered. The term
would then come from a root
meaning to "rest," to "recline"
or to "decline." The meaning,
then, is that this is the time of
day when the sun descends or
declines from its height reached
during the noon hour.
%
Experienced Sunday
School Teacher needed.
Some knowledge of Hebrew
preferable. Call 583-7770
Mon. through FrL, 9 a.m.
until Noon.
I to cook '
f
Reserve Now For The
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a new addition to the
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Consumers, in our opinion, should bo label
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And now, we have added the signature of
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The Falls Signature Collection....
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THE NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
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ReconstructionistDean
Will Lead Aug. 6-7 Services
The Reconstructionist
Synagogue will hold a mem-
bership information meeting on
Sunday, July 25, at 7:30 p.m. at
the synagogue, 7473 NW 4,th St.,
Plantation. Officers and members
of the board will discuss how the
Reconstructionist Synagogue
and Reconstructionism, with an
innovative, creative approach to
Judaism, can meet the needs of
today's Jewish American.
Interested individuals are
invited to attend.
The synagogue's next guest is
Rabbi Frederic Kozan, dean of
Reconstructionist Rabbinical
College, who will conduct ser-
vices Friday evening Aug. 6.
He will also officiate at the Bar
Mitzvah of Michael Cohen at
Saturday morning services Aug.
7 at 10. All of Michael's friends
are invited to join him and his
parents, Alan and Harriet Cohen.
The Oneg Shabbat on Friday
evening will be sponsored by Mr.
and Mrs. Leon Garland and Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Cohen,
Michael's proud grandparents.
Delta Players Donate Ambulance
Israel's official Red Cross
agencythe Magen David
Adornwill receive a new am-
bulance from the Delta Players,
an active local amateur theatrical
group.
Leon Yudoff, treasurer, said the
organization voted to use
proceeds from last year's per-
formances to purchase a rescue
vehicle through the American
Red Magen David for Israel.
The ambulance is on display at
the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy, according to Samuel
Reinhard, Florida state Armdi
chairman. Sol Drescher is
regional chairman.
Mary Wolfe, Delta Players
publicity chairman, said a formal
dedication will be held in Sep-
tember at the Hebrew Academy.
Planning A Trip?
COUNCIL'S NEW AND
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PHONE 751-65*9


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 23. 1976
Jewish Community Center
UN, Dircfer
2999 N.W. 33rd
>RIA K ATZ, Editor HARRIET PERER, Coeditor
, Fort Lauderdale Phone:484-8200 _______
JCC Offering Yoga and Karate A Thank You |Tuesday Trips Are Fun-Filled-----1
Karate (Physical Arts) should
be studied for its emphasis on
deep powerful exercises, which
develop stamina, endurance and
cardiovascular (heart and cir-
culatory) health.
The dance forms (kata) are
excellent for developing balance,
coordination and timing. The
intensity that is necessary to
become skillful is an impetus for
self-discipline, which carries over
into other areas of life.
The self-defense (safety) factor
is crucial today and gives the
skilled practitioner the con-
fidence to avoid danger.
Most important, karate is fun
and allows for individual
development, style and skill.
Larry Herkley, a second-degree
Black Belt, instructs classes,
which began July 18 and will
continue to August 15, Sunday
evenings from 8 to 9, at the JCC.
Cost is $2.50 for the course.
YOGA CAN BE translated as
union or harmony or, to be more
specific, the skill of inner (con-
sciousness) health with outer
(physical) health in relationship
to living a creative life.
Yoga exercises, once studied,
understood and practiced, can
lead to increased relaxation and
an improvement in one's overall
health. Yoga postures are done
slowly, gently, without strain,
ind, done properly, they
stimulate and refresh in a relaxed
way. Approached attentively,
yoga exercises sharpen one's
mental faculties. Wear loose
clothing and bring a mat for the
floor.
Class is limited to those age 16
and up, young adults and adults.
Classes began July 18 and will
continue for five Sundays, from 9
to 10 p.m., at the JCC. Instructor
is Larry Berkley and the fee is
$2.50 for the series.
College-
Coffee House
The Jewish Community Center
of Greater Fort Lauderdale hosts
for all college students home for
the summer a "Coffee House."
The welcome mat is out! Meet
other students, exchange ideas,
thoughts or just relax and have
fun. Bring your friends.
Every Wednesday night in the
new "Jean Scene Lounge" at the
Center, 2999 NW 33 Ave.
For additional information call
Larry at 484-8200.
Shalom Singles
Get-Together
Every Thursday night is
Shalom Singles' get-together
evening. The fun begins at 8 p.m.
at the JCC. Relax in the "cool"
bunge, where you can enjoy the
jukebox and piano. If you like,
bring along your games or cards.
Do your own thing!! Enjoy the
fun and have coffee all for 25c.
Don't forget our Cocktail
Party on Sunday, Aug. 29, 6:30-
10 p.m. Cocktails and soft drinks
available at a nominal price.
Admission, 50c for members, $1
for non-members, includes
nosherei and hors d'oeuvres.
Phys. Ed. Classes Are Scheduled
The course is designed for a
leisurely introduction into
relaxed exercise, gentle and
slow stretching, and deep
healthful breathing. The
exercises will be in standing
and sitting positions with the
emphasis on flexing the
muscles, limbering the neck,
arms, and hips, and improving
circulation.
A six-week course, meeting
each Wednesday. 9:30-10:30
a.m. Cost is $1.50 for the six
sessions.
WOMEN'S SLIMNASTICS
The classes will ac-
commodate the full-time
athletic woman, the part-time
athletic woman and those
women who are beginners in
the arts of health, exercise and
feeling good.
The class includes yoga for
stretching and limbering,
dance exercise for toning and
figure contouring, and
exercises to strengthen the
heart and improve circulation.
Each person is encouraged
to work at her own pace,
which allows for individual
improvement according to
individual skill. A six-week
course, meeting each Wed-
nesday, 1:30-2:45 p.m.
Cost is $1.50 for the series.
Jewish Guys and
Gals Calendar
SATURDAY, JULY 24: NIGHT AT THE RACES
Place: Pompano Park Harness Race Track (meet at the
clubhouse)
Time: 7:30 p.m. (first race starts at 7:30)
Price: $2 admission to clubhouse
SUNDAY. JULY 25: OPEN MEETING. ALL WELCOME
Place: JCC
Time: 8 p.m.
SATURDAY, JULY 31: SHOW NIGHT
Place: Seven Seas Lounge, Newport Hotel
Time: 9 p.m.
Price: No Cover, No minimum
To Nate and Flossie Fisher for
their generous contribution of
a pool table to our teen-age
lounge. It's appreciated by all
who will derive pleasure from
it.
Summer Jean
Scene Lounge
The Jean Scene Lounpe for
Teens and Tweens (entering
grades 7 to 10) continues during
the summer, each Tuesday from
7:15 to9:30 p.m.
The evening includes refresh-
ments, bumper pool, air hockey,
jukebox and, most important, an
opportunity to meet new friends.
Our crafts specialist, Sandy, is
on hand to develop projects. Also
meet Larry, our athletic
supervisor, and learn yoga,
karate, basketball, etc.
Special trips are planned. For
more information, call Sandy at
the JCC, 484-8200.
A busload of 6- to 13-year-olds
went to Hollywood for a fun-filled
day at T-Y Park.
The JCC has two more all-day
Tuesday trips scheduled to places
of educational and cultural in-
terest in our area for elementary
and "tween-age" children:
27: Live theater for
"Midas and the Golden
JULY
children:
Touch" ^
AUG.3: "Jungle Queen" and a
tram ride on the Voyager.
COOKING
-
*v**-
To All Teens
If you have a problem or
concern and wish to discuss it
confidentially with a
professional social worker, call
Bill Goldstein at the JCC, 484-
8200.
He is always there and
ready to listen and help. He is
the director of the Jewish
Community Center and has
years of experience working
with teenagers.
w
0
Folk Dance
Registration Open
For a cultural and enjoyably
sociable experience, join the Folk
Dancers at the Jewish Com-
munity Center, 2999 NW 33rd
Ave., Fort Lauderdale, Tuesdays
2:30 to 4 p.m. Over coffee and
cake you greet old friends and
meet new ones. There are six
sessions for $4.50, which includes
refreshments.
The "Around-the-World" Folk
Dance classes are led by Bea and
Phil Statnick, instructors in
Broward and Dade Counties,
Broward Community College,
Broward County Adult
Education, Fort Lauderdale
Recreation Department, and
other educational and
recreational groups.
Come and join in the fun of
learning the beautiful Jewish,
Israeli and Greek dances, as well
as ethnic dances of people around
the world, and intersperse them
with interesting American
squares, novelty and round
dances.
CRAFTS
U 1 ^ M
- -7' .
RECREATION
I (clip along this line )|
REGISTRATION FORM FOR "SIX DAYS IN SUMMER'
Mail to: JCC
2999 N.W. 33rd Avenue
Lauderdale Lakes, Fla. 33311
NAME.
ADDRESS.
PHONE
CITY.
.STATE.
ZIP.
AGE
I wish to register for___trip (s) at $6 per trip.
Enclosed is my check payable to JCC for $__
%*
y
V


Friday, July 23, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laucterdale
Waldheim's Objectivity
Many important personalities and organizations
are rightly indicting UN Secretary General Kurt Wald-
heim's instantaneous reaction to the Israeli raid on En-
tebbe as a "violation" of Uganda's integrity.
What about the terrorists' violation of the human
rights of those whom they hijacked? What about the
violation by Idi Amin of the right to security of the
102 hostages whom he separated from the 140-odd other
non-Jewish hostages ana sent on their way?
What about the UN's silence, and Dr. Waldheim's
silence, in response to the hijacking and the long,
agonizing week that followed the hijacking, during
which "only" Israelis and Jews were being abused?
Why Dr. Waldheim's sudden burst of energy and
oratory when the rescue operation took place?
We join the personalities and organizations indict-
ing Waldheim and calling for his resignation.
Dr. Kissinger's Campaign
Secretary of State Henry Kissinger is correct in
pressing for international legislation against hijacking
of airplanes. It is not certain, even if the legislation
is passed, that nations, particularly in the Third World-
Arab-Soviet bloc, would comply.
But at least it would be a beginning. It would
mean that signatories to the accord would deny land-
ing privileges to terrorists on such phony "humanitar-
ian" grounds as Uganda's Idi Amin proposed as his
reason for sheltering them, hence putting a substantial
crimp into their contemptible operations.
Dr. Kissinger is zeroing in on the United Nations
as the logical place for his latest campaign. We hold
out little hope that the Third World-Arab-Soviet bloc
there will be any more responsible in this matter than
it has been in others in the past.
Still, now is the time. Even among Israel's ene-
mies, there is hardly anything but profound admira-
tion, silent or not, for the Entebbe raid. Joseph Pola-
koff, chief of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency Bureau
in Washington, reports that on his trip to India while
the rescue operation took place, he found "overwhelm-
ing support for Israel's achievement among Hindus
and Sikhs" whom he questioned.
Now is the time, and we wish Dr. Kissinger well.
Anti-Boycott Legislation
Despite the continued opposition of the Ford Ad-
ministration, the evidence continues to pile up that
strong legislation is needed to prevent the compliance
of American business firms with the Arab boycott
against Israel. Voluntary measures have not worked.
Treasury Secretary William Simon, in a recent
appearance before the House International Relations
Committee, opposed any new legislation as a hindrance
to Middle East peace efforts and against American in-
terests in the United States and the Middle East. "It
is our considered judgement that confrontational poli-
cies will not move to remove the boycott and could un-
dermine the delicate search for peace in that troubled
region of the world," Simon told the congressmen.
No one wants peace in the Mideast more than Is-
rael and American Jews. But it is outrageous for an
American governmental official to argue that peace
will be blocked unless the United States abandons its
opposition to discrimination and its principles of de-
cency.
Jewish leaders have long argued that if American
firms stand up to the Arabs the latter will back down
because they need the economic power and know-how
that only the United States can give them.
Dr. Arthur F. Burns, chairman of the Federal Re-
serve Board, told a congressional subcommittee, and
we agree, if diplomacy will not end American com-
pliance with the boycott, then Congress has to pass the
laws that will do it.
Page 7
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Gen. Brown and Entebbe Raid
plume 5
fiday, July 23, 1976
Number 15
25TAMUZ5736
^HAT WOULD have happen-
ed were the debate over the
reappointment of Gen. Brown
as chairman of the Joint Chiefs
to have taken place after the
Entebbe raid rather than before
it?
The answer is, of course, in
the realm of pure speculation,
but the number of votes cast
against the General was sur-
prisingly large, given that con-
firmation seemed a foregone
conclusion.
AND SO, surey, it is conceiv-
able that he might have won
by an even narrower margin, or
possibly that he might not have
won at all, although I am con-
vinced of the former, while the
latter seems too much like an
idealist's dream.
At issue was the General's
remarks on June 28 before the
Senate Committee on Armed
Services in which he reneated
his stand in 1974 that the
American Jewish community
"has undue influence on the
Congress of the United States."
The first time out, Gen.
Brown apologized for such
seemingly anti-Semitic decora-
tions to his cake as that Jews
control the American press and
the American banking estab-
lishment, too.
A BATTERY of facts it wcl
to prove him wrong that led to
his recanting. But obviously, he
has not changed his mind oth-
erwise and, in all frankness, I
would have been disappointed
if he had.
Apart from Brown's biagga-
docio manner, which I find both
inexcusable and dangerous in
a man now occupying his high
position for a second time, all I
would have demanded from
Brown on this second occasion
of his demonstration of the
simplistic, demagogic military
mind would be an explanation
of his qualifying term, "undue."
The Congressional Record of
July 1 features an address to
the Senate by Florida's Richard
Stone who feared that, without
explanation, the General's view
would henceforward "have their
own undue influence over our
military policy."
IN URGING a "nay" vote
against confirmation, Sen. Stone
reminded his colleagues "that
the first time someone does
something to you, shame on
him. But the second time some-
one does something to you,
shame on us."
Stone did not want "shame
on us" in letting Brown off the
hook once more, but he missed
the point entirely when he re-
minded the Senate of Brown's
apparent lack of contrition in
his June 28 statement.
"In all candor, I do," the
General declared on June 28 tp
those members of the Senate
Committee on Armed Services
who questioned him on wheth-
er he did, indeed, believe in the
existence of "undue Jewish in-
fluence" on the Congress.
IT IS not only Stone who
missed the point. Most of us
miss the point in rebutting such
arguments and repeatedly.
There is nothing furtive, il-
legal or immoral in lobbying.
Ideally, the lobbyist supplies in-
formation on a variety of issues
to "enlighten" congressmen so
that they should be able to con-
tribute to the legislative proc-
ess more knowledgeably.
Capitol Hill is full of lobby-
ists all the time, all of them
well-known and all of them reg-
istered with the government as
lobbyists if they represent for-
eign interests.
What IS furtive, illegal or im-
moral is the manner in which
some congressmen respond to
lobbying tactics. And in such
cases therefore, the furtive, il-
legal or immoral tactics them-
selves.
CONSIDER THE following
Mindlin
lobby forces in Washington:
the Pentagon itself, the mer-
chants of death (weapons, mil-
itary electronics and aeronau-
tical manufacturers), petroleum,
agriculture, pharmaceutical, in-
surance, medical and, the most
recent and daring, the Arab
lobby.
All of them have axes to
grind. All of them attempt to
exert influence on Congress.
Which of them does not attempt
to exert influence at one time
or another? Not a single one,
or they would not be worth
their salt.
"Undue" influence is another
matter. What "undue" means is
when the influence works
when a legislator succumbs to
the outer limit of lobbying,
when he permits the further
flow of "information," pressure
or reward to interfere with his
own convictions.
THE POINT, which most of
us miss, is that it is absurd to
deny the existence of a Jewish
lobby because of course there
is one.
The point is that only the
qualifying "undue" should be
an issue, and only this issue
should have been put to Brown
in his confirmation testimony
or raised by Stone in his state-
ment to the Senate to empha-
size, not that there is no Jew-
ish lobby, which would be un-
true, but that there is nothing
unique in the existence of a
Jewish lobby.
Furthermore, that "undue" is
a function of legislators who
respond to the influence of a
given lobby in a given way, and
not of the lobbyists who exer-
cise it.
I NOTICE, for example, no
such phony disclaiming cries
that they have no lobby among
members of the American Med-
ical Association, one of the
strongest lobbies in the coun-
try, or against Secretary of
Agriculture Earl Butz, who con-
tinues to act today as if he still
were a riember of the board of
Ralston Purina.
Or against Roger Tamraz, the
American trained Lebanese
who, after the Yom Kippur
War. put us on notice that
henceforth the Arab League
would be buying American
public relations and lobbying
know-how in copious quantity
to bury what he also charac-
terized as "undue" American
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
DIRECTORS
IrmnJffftr MudwinJtfft. AivmJtflw
MNEWVWK.
188 11 WlSIOf AW, H01US, U, NY
1283 CONEY ISLAND AVf, BKUN. N Y
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Soviets available in all com
munties in New York and throughout
the Greater Mam area
Jewish political (Zionist) influ-
ence.
Does Brown recognize these
important distinctions, or is he
simply raising the Nixon-Agnew
anti-Semitic spectre of a "Jew-
ish cabal"? That should have
been and should be in the fu-
ture the issue for those who
would defend American Jews
and Israel against such absurd-
ities as Brown deals in.
AS TO the original question:
Would Entebbe have made a
difference in the Brown con-
firmation wrangle?
I believe the answer is yes
because it would have weaken-
ed the Brown "warning" to
America's "security minded"
about Jewish influence.
Neither Jews nor Israel are a
threat to the security of Amer-
ica as Brown implied. But Sen.
Stone's own argument against
the Brown confirmation is a
perfect illustration that you can
neither lick 'em nor join 'em
on Brown's terms without do-
ing more harm than good, for
Stone is, himself, one of Amer-
ica's "security-minded."
IN HIS objection to the con-
firmation, Stone held that he
must be taken seriously because
he has "a 100 percent record
in supporting every Defense re-
quest" since he joined the Sen-
ate.
Sui generis, Brown's testi-
mony tags Stone as a Jew, and
hence as a threat to the na-
tion's security because alleged-
ly his Defensi voting record is
a question of Jewish influence
in behalf ot Israel, not of the
U.S.
Nevertheless, there can be no
doubt that the initial shock of
the 1973 Yom Kippur War ob-
scured its oucome and showed
Israel to be a security liability
even if not a downright threat.
BUT ENTEBBE has at least
for the moment recast Israel in
her more traditional superman
image. In fact, the raid makes
pipsqueaks of the west as a
whole its servile acquies-
cence to Arab terrorism.
After the raid, there would
surely be greater impatience
with Brown's testimony and
surely even more votes against
his confirmation than the sur-
prisingly large number cast
against him in the first place.
IEVITT
memorial chapels
1911 Pembroke Rd
Hollywood, Fla.
S24-M97
Sonny Levitt, F.D.
13MSW. DixitHwy.
North Miami, Fla.
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Palmer's Miami
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Personalized Memorials
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Page8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July 23, 1976
The People of
Israel Will 1>o
the Impossible.
All We Ask
Is That You Do
the Possible.
I
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s
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a
e
n
a
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ej
B.
s<
U
Please
pay your
pledge today
S/
SI
SA
I
JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER FT. LAUDERDALE
1999 NW 33rd Ave. Ft. LauderdaU, Fla. 33311 Phone:484-8200


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