The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00058

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
#J&risti FHyridiar,
OF GREATER FORT LAW DEROALE
I
Volume 5 Number 11
Friday, May 28, 1976
Fred K. Shocrnt Friday, May 21, 1976 Price 25 CeiUS
MHUAl HIRING SET FOR JUNE 1
CampaignNear$1.5 Million Mark
This year's Federation/UJA/Israel Emergency Fund
campaign has reached an all-time record total of $1.44 mil-
lion and continues to register major advances as the drive
moves into the summer months.
Expectations are high that the $1.5 million mark will
be passed before the end of summer.
Allan E. Baer, president of Baer will also note the in-
the Federation, and Leo Good- creasingly effective work of the
man, general campaign chair-
man, will report these and other
developments on June 1 at the
annual meeting of the Fedeia-
tion at Beth Israel Synagogue.
Major progress will be noted
by Baer in the expanding scope
of local humanitarian services
offered by the Federation, in
the increasingly successful op-
eration of the Jewish Commu-
nity Center, in the growth of
the Federation's Women's Divi-
sion, in the widening reach of
Community Relations programs,
and in educational and cultural
programs involving youth, sen-
ior citizens, singles and hospi-
alized and institutionalized peo-
rple of all ages.
various Federation committees
and agencies. In addition to
praising Goodman, Baer will
pay his respects to Anita (Mrs.
Louis L.) Perlman, president of
the Women's Division. Jacob
Brodzki, chairman of the Jew-
ish Community Center and per-
sonnel committees, and other
Federation officers and board
members.
Expanded election of a board
of directors will also be noted
by Baer.
The June 1 annual meeting
will be marked also by the pres-
entation of awards in a number
of categories, with special
awards to be made to those in
ALLAN E. BAER
the G ea*c uderdale
area who were campaign chair-
persons in their apartment
buildings, complexes or areas.
The campaign for 1976-77 will
start to take formal shape fol-
lowing return ot the Fort Laud-
erdale delegation from partici-
pation in the UJA's This Year
in Jerusalem annual conference,
Oct. 21 to 31.
Broward Community College
Offering Summers in Israel
Broward Community College, in conjunction with the
Consortium on International Education, will offer several
outstanding summer programs in Israel. The programs have
varying subject focus, credits, cost and dates of departure.
Academic credits will be granted upon successful comple-
tion of each program, including:
A summer institute de- of Israel's major universities
with lecture-field trips through
the Galilee and the Negev.
An Israel summer art semi-
nar, providing the opportunity
for participants to view Israeli
art and meet Israeli artists
while simultaneously develop-
ing their own talents.
Further information on all
these programs is available
from: William Greene. Coordi-
nator of Travel-Study Programs,
Broward Community College,
North Campus, 1000 Coconut
Creek Blvd., Pompano Beach,
Fla. 33066, Phone: 972-9100,
Ext. 17 or 18; or Barry Axler,
Jewish Federation office, 484-
8200.
JiRiied to give the student a
solid introduction to Israel
in overview of the land and the
eople by combining lectures
1 field work and kibbutz experi-
ence.
Summer on a kibbutz, al-
lowing the student to live and
work for 60 days on a kibbutz
and participate in a weeklong
seminar in Jerusalem.
Archaeology seminar, en-
1 abling the student to work side
by side with world-famous
| archaelogists near Beersheba.
A university study pro-
Igram, combining a four-week
[intensive study program at one
Allon Blasts Kahane
Threat of Soviets
JERUSALEM (JTA) Foreign Minister Yigal Al-
lon has sharply condemned Jewish Defense League leader
Meir Kahane's threats of violence against Soviet diplomats
in the U.S. and Europe. Kahane made the threats at a Tel
Aviv press conference when he spoke of "kidnapping and
possibly worse" against Soviet diplomats if the U.S. did not
take a tougher line on behalf of Soviet Jews. Kahane ap-
peared with Soviet immigrant activists Silva Zalmanson
land Alexander Tiemkin, who endorsed his threats.
IN HIS statement, Allon said such threats and action
e inadmissible in themselves and severely harmful for
cause of Soviet Jewry.
"Israel and the Jewish people have campaigned and
- continue to campaign consistently for the release of
Jboners of Zion' in the USSR, for the cessation of harass-
Int of Zionist activists and for the free right of emigra-
tion for any Jews seeking it," Allon declared.
He warned that Kahane's threats would both preju-
dice that campaign and alienate from it the various non-
Jewish bodies that had become involved in the struggles
[of Soviet Jewry.
BY HUMPHREY
Vetoed
Provisions
Pushed
WASHINGTON (JTA )
The Senate is expected to sus-
tain President Ford's veto of
the foreign aid authorization
bill. But Sen. Hubert H. Hum-
phrey (D.. Minn.), chairman of
the Senate foreign aid subcom-
mittee, said he would recom-
mend that the basic provisions
of the legislation rejected by
the President should be incor-
porated into new legislation ap-
plicable to both fiscal years
1976 and 1977.
Ford vetoed the bill last week,
just seven weeks before the end
of the current fiscal year to
which the measure applied. In
his veto message he alleged
that the bill, as it stood, would
seriously compromise the Presi-
dent's ability to conduct foreign
affairs.
HE REFERRED specifically
to what he characterized as "an
arbitrary arms ceiling ban" that
would limit his ability to re-
spond to "the legitimate defense
needs of our friends" and ob-
struct "U.S. indutf.ry from com-
peting fairly with foreign (arms)
suppliers."
The reference was to provi-
sions that would have given
Congress veto power over arms
deals by private American com-
panies in excess of $25 million
and would put a $9 billion ceil-
ing on U.S. arms sales abroad
in any given year
Continued on Page 15
This Year in Jerusalem
Dr. and Mrs. Milton Nowick, chairmen of the Federa-
tion's This Year in Jerusalem Conference Mission, have
reported that on May 17 75 enthusiastic people attended
a meeting and learned more about the "This Year in Jeru-
salem" program.
By the end of the evening 40 paid reservations had
been made and many others were promised. This is a tre-
mendous start toward one of the most exciting undertak-
ings ever by our Federation.
The group heard remarks
from Dr. and Mrs. Nowick; Mrs.
Val Silberman, a national chair-
man in charge of This Year in
Jerusalem for the State of Flor-
ida: Nathan Pritcher, Florida
East Coast chairman; and Irv-
ing L. Geisser, executive direc-
tor of the Jewish Federation.
They described their experi-
ences on past trips but pointed
out that this year's program
will be a once-in-a-lifetime hap-
pening.
More than 3,000 delegates
from cities across the United
States will experience one of
the most memorable times of
their lives. The delegates will
hear from Israel Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin, President Eph-
raim Katzir, Defense Minister
Shimon Peres and others, in-
cluding top officers of the Is-
rael Defense Forces. The dele-
gates will:
Be received in the City
Hall plaza by the people of Tel
Aviv in an atmosphere of fes-
tival and what Mayor Shlomo
Lahat has termed "glorious cele-
bration." The reception's theme
is "Baruch IJa'Ba" "Blessed
Be He Who Comes."
Take part in a UJA march
through the streets of Jerusalem
to Liberty Bell Park, where they
will be received by Mayor Teddy
Kollek. The march and the cere-
monies in the park will be de-
dicated to the family and frat-
ernal bonds that exist between
WANTED
Russian-speaking volunteers
to interpret and teach Rus-
sian families resettled by
ihe Jewish Federation,
"lease call Marcia Kaplan,
caseworker, at 484-82.
DR. AND MRS. NOWICK
American Jews and the Amer-
ican people and Israel's people.
Mayor Kollek will also salute
the American Bicentennial.
Visit Israel's great univer-
sities.
Make pilgrimages of re-
membrance to Yad Vashem in
Jerusalem, the Holocaust memo-
rial recalling the darkest mo-
ment of the Jewish people, and
to Masada, site of one of the
great martyrdoms of Jewish
history, where Professor Yigal
Yadin, Israel's foremost archae-
ologist and the first command-
ing general of Israel's Defense
Forces, will speak.
Take part in a caravan
visit to a number of Israel's
cities and settlements as an ex-
Continued on Page 2
Marilyn Smith (right), president o/ the Women's Divi-
sion of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, present-
ed the gavel of office to Anita Perlman, incoming presi-
dent, at the annual meeting of the Women's Division at
the Inverrary Country Club attended by over ISO per-
sons.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, May 28, 1976
Histadrut Women's Day Guests Are
Ambassador's Wife, Financial Analyst
Vivian (Mrs. Simcha) Dinitz,
wife of Israel's Ambassador to
the United States, will be guest
speaker at a Day of Solidarity
with the Women of Israel pre-
sented by the Israel Histadrut
Foundation (IHF) of South
Florida on Wednesday, June 9,
at the Holiday Inn, 400 South
Ocean Dr.
Dr. Morton Malavsky, chair-
man of the South Broward IHF
Council and rabbi of Temple
Beth Shalom, made the an-
nouncement of Mrs. Dinitz's ac-
ceptance, and added that the
Day of Solidarity will be pre-
sented in two parts a 10.30
a.m. seminar on "Women's Eco-
nomics 1976" followed by a
12:30 p.m. luncheon, featuring
an address by Mrs. Dinitz on
"The Modern Woman in Israel."
Carol Rutgers Matthews, busi-
ness and financial analyst and
columnist of The New York
Post, will be among the eco-
nomic specialists participating
in the June 9 seminar.
Among some of the provo-
cative subjects are "Searching
for Financial Security," "Estate
and Tax Problems for Today's
Women" and "Women's Will
Power," Rabbi Malavsky said.
The Israel Histadrut Founda-
tion provides financial support
for the vast network of Histad-
rut social service institutions in
Israel, and is directing its ma-
jor efforts toward providing
low-cost housing for Israeli vet-
erans through the Histadrut
Annuity Trust Fund.
.' American born Mrs. Dinitz
met her husband while she was
attending the University of Cin-
.i -^_^.^^^^^
This Year
*
; In Jerusalem
Continued from Page 1
oression of solidarity with Is-
rael's people and an American
Jewish salute to their aspira-
tions, achievements and strug-
gles.
Attend a gala musical pa-
geant as the guests of President
Katzir and join him in his of-
ficial residence for a seminar
on leadership.
The ten-day round-trip cost
which includes air fare, de-
luxe hotels in Jerusalem and
Tel Aviv, air-conditioned bus
transportation in Israel with the
foremost guides of the Jewish
Agency is $750. This very
low price cannot be duplicated
anywhere.
For those wishing to stay
abroad for as much as nineteen
days with participation in
the UJA conference included,
all the amenities listed above,
and three days in London en
route to Israel and three days
in Istanbul and two in Amster-
dam on the way home, the cost
is approximately $1,640.
Reservations are limited and
going fast. Make yours now by
calling Dr. Nowick at 566-3196
or Irving L. Geisser, executive
director of the Federation, at
484-8200; or fill out the coupon
on page 2 and mail to the Fed-
eration office.
Wfedo
business the
right way.
1700 Wnl Oakland Pvk Mm) .
Ft laudfttl*. Fl. 31111
>hont:71S-1110
OAKLAND TOYOTA
cinnati, and they were married
in 1954 and lived in Washing-
ton, where Ambassador Dinitz
served in the Israeli Embassy
and she worked as a research
analyst and later at the Depart-
ment of Health, Education and
Welfare.
When they were called back
to Israel, Mrs. Dinitz worked in
the Dublic relations office of a
major philanthropic organiza-
tion. In Israel she is a member
of the University Women's As-
sociation and Imahot Avodot
(Working Mothers).
Ms. Mathews, who has lec-
tured extensively, has written
for such respected periodicals
as Barron's, Dun's Review. The
Nation and the New York Stock
Exchange magazine.
Tickets for the June 9 IHF
Day of Solidarity with the Wom-
en of Israel, at $4 per person,
are available through the His-
tadrut Foundation office in Hol-
lywood, telephone 927-1656.
Above, from left: Frances Nusbaum, Irving R. Fried-
man, Evelyn Denner and Jacques Torczyner.
Century Village Hosts UJA Lunch
Irving R. Friedman, chairman
for the Century Village Deer-
field United Jewish Appeal, was
assisted by cochairpersons, Eve-
lyn Denner and Frances Nus-
baum. The Century Village resi-
dents met at trie Reef Restau-
rant for lunch on May 3 and
heard guest speaker Jacques
Torczyner and the singing of
Rabbi Harold Richter.
Friedman reported that a
good number of pledges and
checks were turned over to the
United Jewish Appeal, and
everyone came away from the
luncheon with a feeling of en-
richment.
US, f WANT TO GO TO ISMil. C0UHT ME Mf
Name ............................................................................................
Address ......................................................................................
City.......................................... State.................... Zip................
Telephone ........................................................................................
I want to be a member of the 10-day trip 19-day
My Deposit of $................. ($100 per person) is enclosed.
Mail to:
Dr. Milton Nowick
Jewish Federation
2999 NW 33rd Ave., Ft. Lauderdole, Fla. 33311
Rossmoor
Vf COCONUT CREEK
ilk" inasirr planned
iklnll condominium
romniiiiiif).
from SIK.800...
no land loaso
no irmvilion Iraw.
Take Turnpike exit 24.
West on Rte. 814. Phone (305) 971-3510.
From Miami TOLL FREE (305) 947-9906.
CAROL MATHEWS
VIVIAN DINITZ
NO MORE DISCRIMINATION
British Air Quits Blacklist
LONDON (JTA) Britain has assured Israel that
there will be no more anti-Israeli discrimination by British
Airways, the state-controlled aviation company. Gad Yaa-
cobi, Israeli Transport Minister, said he had received the
assurance from Stanley Clinton Davis, British Parliamen-
tary Undersecretary in charge of transport matters.
Davis had been shown about six examples of Israeli
name being omitted from British Airways publicity mate?
rial. He gave explanations for each one but assured Yaa-
cobi that such cases would not happen again.
,
CRISIS TELEGRAM BANK
Check one and clip and mail coupon and a check to:
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
2999 N.W. 33rd Ave.
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33311
att: Barry Axler
You are hereby authorized to send 1 ( ), 2 ( ), 3 ( )
4 ( ), 5 ( ), other ( ) .................... public-response-type
telegrams, at $2.50 each, in my name to public officials and/
or leaders of various governments in time of crisis. Enclos-
ed is a check for $........................ ($2.50 times number au-
thorized).
Name ..................................................................................................

Address
City .................................
(clip and mail)
State
Zip
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood ana Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In the Hollywood and Hallandale areas:
5801 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood.
920-1010
In the Fort Lauderdale area:
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.( Sunset Strip),Sunrise
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
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Other Riverside chapels in South Florida are located in
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FT.L8-28-76
FT.L5-28-76
FT.L6-2-7


Friday, May 28, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
Shavuoth History
Steeped in Ancient
Tradition, Custom
By DR. FREDERICK LACMdAN
Encyclopaedia JBdaiea
The festival of Shavuot takes
its name from the Hebrew lor
weeks," "Pentecost? and also
-the 50th day." It is celebrated
on the 6th day of Sivan (whfch
this year falls on June 4). Ac-
cording to Orthodox and Con-
servative tradition, it is also
celebrated on the 7th Sivan
(June 5, this year) outside ef
Israel.
One of the three so-called
"pilgrim festivals," Shavuot
marked the end of the barley
and the beginning of the wheat
harvest.
ACCORDING to the Encyclo-
paedia Judaica, it was probably
a midsummer festival in origin
and taken over from the Ca-
naanites. It is stated in Leviti-
cus: "From the day after the
.Sabbath, the day that you bring
I the sheaf of wave-offering you
[shall count fifty days, until the
day after the seventh week; then
I you shall bring an offering of
'new grain to the* Lord." Leviti-
cus also states that the sheaf
was waved on the day after the
Sabbath on the festival of Pas-
sover. Thus Shavuot falls 50
days after this day.
In rabbinic times a remark-
able transformation of the fes-
tival took place. Based on the
verse: "In the third month after
the children of Israel were gone
forth out of the land of Egypt,
the same day came they into the
wilderness of Sinai" (Ex. 19:1),
the festival became the anni-
versary of the giving of the
iTorah at Sinai.
THE DESCRIPTION of the
.feast in the liturgy is the time
'of the giving of our Torah. The
transformation was in accord
with a process to be observed
in the Bible in which the an-
cient agricultural feasts were
transformed into festivals mark-
ing an anniversary of signifi-
cant historical events in the life
of the people. Both Passover
and Sukkot are connected with
the Exodus; it was natural to
link Shavuot with this event.
It is customary to adorn the
synagogue with plants and flow-
ers on Shavuot because, tradi-
tion has it, Sinai was a green
mountain, and with trees, be-
cause Shavuot is Judgment day
for the fruit of the tree. Some
authorities disapproved of the
custom because of its similarity
to certain church rites.
In former time girls, deco-
rated the windows, and boys
brought field flowers and ivy
from the forest and adorned the
doors, windows and lamps on
Shavuot.
THERE WAS also a custom
of piercing eggs, emptying them
of their contents, drawing a
string through the empty shells,
gluing feathers to them, and
hanging them up in the open to
swing in the wind Use birds.
It is a home custom to eat
dairy products on Shavuot bo-
cause the Torah is compared to,
milk (Songs 4:11) and because
the law of the first fruit is
placed in juxtaposition to a law
concerning milk (Ex. 23:19).
In some communities it is
customary to eat triangular
pancakes stuffed with meat or
cheese because the Torah is of
three parts (Pentateuch, Proph-
ets, and Hagiographa) and was
given to a people of three parts
(priests, Leyites, and Israelites)
on the third month through
Moses who was the third child
of his parents.
IN ISRAEL, modern social life
has stimulated the adaptation
of religious ceremonies to a
secular society which wants to
keep the traditional national
folk ways. This is evident, for
example, in the Bar Mitzvah
ceremony whose religious signi-
ficance in a secular society is
reduced but not eliminated.
Under the initial impetus of the
Reform movement, the individ-
ual ceremony has been substi-
tuted by a collective "confirma-
tion" ceremony similar to that
of the Christian rite.
This takes place at the Sha-
vuot festival, chosen because
the traditional date of the giv-
ing of the law on Mount Sinai,
it seems the proper season for
adolescent boys and girls to
celebrate their initiation into
full Jewish adulthood.
As the Shavuot festival coin-
cides with the end of the school
year, the Judaica relates, the
ceremony, at times, bears the
character of a graduation.
IN ISRAEL the collective Bar
Mitzvah has been introduced in
non-religious kibbutzim.
The ceremony takes place
after the children have per-
formed some task, usually socio-
educational, which was imposed
upon each individual child (or
pair) by the community, school,
or youth movement (e.g., a
week's stay in a new settlement
with a newcomer's family in
order to help them; or in a
religious yeshivah in order to
learn Jewish ways strange to
them).
The Bar Mitzvah child then
has to write a composition on
his experiences. He further re-
lates his adventures during the
performance of the task at the
"confirmation" and the lessons
derived therefrqm are discussed
by the whole assembly.
Sisterhood Plans
Tuppertvare Party
Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-
El plans a Tupperware Party as
its next big fund-raising event.
The event, free and open to the
public, will be in the temple
auditorium on Oakland Park
Blvd. on Monday, June 7, 8
P-m. Homemade cake and coffee
and tea will be served.
Chairperson Bonnie Dudesik
has announced that there will
be gifts for the person who
brings the most guests, for the
one .with, the most outside sales,
and to the first SO arrivals that
night. There will also be a door
prize. For further information,
contact her at 472-6138 or Seena
Sloan at 7*2-8393.
A reminder: All orders placed
on June 7 most be prepaid, so
bring cash or checks.
camp ogriih;
For Boys & Girls 6-16
A CAMPINQ PARADISE IN THE HEART
OF THE POLLEN FREE, COOL HILLS
ft LAKES OF OCALA NATIONAL FOREST
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
AiTLsna- and Water Sports Wstankiini and RMing DsHy
Pro Golf and Ttnnis Arts and Crafts SaHine, Scuba
Trips by Canot Horssback Riding SpscW Tttn Proprsai
Raiding and Math Clinks Traditional Friday ft *****
Services Bar Mitzvah Lassoes All Dietary Laws Obssrvai
M.O. ft 2 R.H.'s Staff our Modorrt lirfknwry at AUTtam.
Accredited Momber American Camping Ataoclatioa
Your Camp Directors:
coach j.i. Homoguxf
MORRIS ft SHEILA WALDMAN.
P.O. ftox 402888, aflawi Beach. Flerida <
MOM UP MOW
NCJW Says Jewish Learning
Is a Lifelong Activity
Commission On
The Elderly
Meeting June 2
The Commission on the Eld-
erly, a committee of the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, will hold its next
meeting on Wednesday, June 2,
according to Paul Zimmermann,
chairman, and Jane Schagrin,
cochairman of the Elderly Com-
mission. The meeting will begin
at 8 p.m. at the Jewish Federa-
tion office.
Bill Goldstein, director of the
Jewish Community Center, will
detail the programs the Center
has initiated and will discuss
problems the elderly face. Inter-
ested persons are invited to at-
tend.
Commitment to the principle
that Jewish learning is a life-
long activity is the touchstone
for a new National Council of
Jewish Women project in adult
Jewish education to be launch-
ed locally by the Plantation
Unit.
Mrs. Fred Schopp, section
president, said, "This project,
entitled 'The Jewish Experi-
ence: A Study Program,' is de-
signed far Council women and
their families, in line with our
deeply felt concern for the
quality and continuity of Jew-
ish life in America." She cited
the NCJW National Resolution,
which urges Council women to
"foster the lifelong study of Ju-
daism and Jewish culture" as a
primary channel for transmit-
ting their shared heritage.
The Jewish Experience pro-
gram is a series of university-
level courses of Jewish study,
presenting an historical con-
tinuum from Biblical times to
the present. Each syllabus is
designed by a promient scho-
lar of Judaic thought. At each
meeting self led discussions
will be guided by special ques-
tions raised by the authors to
achieve optimum understand-
ing.
Mrs. Schopp, announced the
appointment of Mrs. Ervin Ban-
as chairwoman in the commu-
nity, and expressed hope that
the program would make a sig-
nificant contribution to the field
of adult Jewish learning.
For further information on all
Council projects, please caS
792-7414.
to -tr it
Plantation Unit has invited
all members and their friends
to Mystery Night, Saturday.
June 12, at 8 o'clock sharp.
Donation is SIS per couple, and
the dress is jeans.
RSVP to 792-7414 or 733-0213
before June 4.

Planning A Trip?
COUNCIL'S NEW AND
EXCITING TRAVEL
PROGRAMS FOR 1976
EUROPE, ISRAEL CRUISES
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JFWISH WOMEN
Call
LILLIAN ZAlXIN-735-5755
Temple Sholom
Honors Students
At the Hebrew School Grad-
uation at Temple Sholom in
Pompano Beach on Friday, June
4, at 8 p.m. students of the high-
est class in Hebrew studies will
receive their diplomas and as-
sist Rabbi Morris A. Skop and
Cantor Jacob J. Renzer in the
Shavuot Services.
Mrs. Mildred Epstein, class
teacher, and Sam Marks, chair-
man Of the temple's education
committee, will present the
awards for excellence in He-
brew study of the Bible, Jew-
ish history, customs and cere-
monies.
The parents will host the
Oneg Shabbat following serv-
ices.
When a nurse meets our
standards, she'll meet
yours.
You wart aw vary bast o
care tor your in-homa paatont So do we.
That's why each ot our RN-suparviasd nurooa
must maat our high standards batora wal
tot har mast yours.
Phono us. whan you wart > bast. Nigr<*ma
ordayttnwduty
MEDICAL PERSONNEL POOL 544-4333
The Nationally Recognized
FORT LAUDERDALE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
with Emerson Buckley Music Director/Conductor
ANNOUNCES
A limited number of choice reserved
are still available for the
1976-1977 CONCERT SEASON
#i
Oct. 19
Nov. 9
Nov. 30
Dec. 21
Jan. 4 -
Feb. -
Mar. 22
April 26
20, 1976
10, 1976
- Dec. 1, 1976
- 22, 1976
S, 1977
2, 1977
- 23, 1977
-,27, 1977
SUSAN STARR, Pianist
RUDOLF FIRKUSNY, Pianist
L1LIT GAMPEL, Violinist
MARK KAPLAN, Violinist
JOSE ITURBI, Guest Conductor A Pianist
IVAN DAVIS, Pianist
LYNN HARRELL, Cellist
RUGGIERO RICCL Violinist
For more information call the Symphony Office
462-8587


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian >oj Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, May 28, 1976
The Shavuoth Holiday
As we celebrate Shavuoth June 4, we will be more
' than ever conscious of the relationship between this
holiday and Passover.
Shavuoth is the "fiftieth day," or the seventh week
after the Exodus from Egypt. It is a festival in remem-
brance of the 40 years of wandering in the Sinai, and of
the giving of the Law to Moses on Mount Sinai.
Customarily, we adorn the synagogue with plants
and flowers on Shavuoth. And at home, we eat dairy
products.
The adornment of the synagogue is in recollection
of the traditional belief that Mt. Sinai, where Moses re-
ceived the Ten Commandments, was a mountain cover-
ed by trees. The emphasis on dairy foods comes from
the historic comparison between the Torah and milk.
Quite naturally, these traditions and beliefs reach
back to Jewry's ancient past, and it is through Shavuoth
, that this historic continuity of custom and tradition is
preserved.
But in the larger sense, we are still wanderers in
the desert. Though the Exodus has ended for many, there
are still countless numbers of Jews, in Russia and other
lands of oppression, trying to get to Israel.
As for Israel herself, the future remains perilous
and uncertain.
Shavuoth emphasizes this "incompleteness" of so
many millions of Jews across the world, who are at
home, but have not yet ended their wandering.
A Long Way to Go
Morton Silberman is the new president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation. He was installed at
Federation's 38th annual meeting Wednesday, which
also honored outgoing President Harry B. Smith.
The Silberman administration begins at a time
when the 1976 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Fund proceeds are nearing the $13 million mark
the entire total achieved during the 1975 CJA-IEF.
Wednesday night's campaign report indicated that
there is still a long way to go toward completing the
1976 CJA-IEF campaign.
No dollar goal for the campaign was set. Instead,
'its achievement may be measured by people men
and women whose commitment and involvement caus-
ed CJA IEF's message to reach each and every house-
hold in Dade County," declared Campaign Chairman
L. Jules Arkin in the report.
CJA-IEF's message is the vital Jewish responsi-
bility to "Tzedakah." Fulfill your share in that respon-
sibility. If you haven't given yet, then give now.
Anniversary Celebrations
Although Yom Haatzmaut was officially celebrated
on May 5, Israel and Jewish communities throughout
the world are continuing the 28th anniversary event
with special functions marking the occasion to the very
end of the month.
Both joys and fears are shared by Jewish com-
munities throughout the world.
While there has been no war, this last year has
shown that the chances for a permanent Middle East
peace are still a long way off. Israel, Zionism and the
Jewish people came under an unprecedented attack in
the United Nations and other international forums.
Israel's relations with the United States, the only
country it can rely on, have come under some severe
strain.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin may have best explained
it in his Independence Day message when he said
Israel's independence "draws a line between past sur-
vival by chance and future existence by self-will; or
being helplessly controlled by events and of controlling
events by our own choice, means and purpose."
Fidel at His Tricks Again
Jewish Floridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDKRDALK
OFFICE and PLANT 110 N.B. 6th at. Mlaipi, Fla. UlSf Phone 37!-4OS
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1-I7I-4SW
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FRED K. 8HOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashnrth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In its Columns
Published Bl-Weekly
Second Class Pontage Paid at Miami, Fla.
All P.O. 3679 returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Flc- O Fred K. Shoehet Friday, May 21. 1S7S
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Sevan Arte Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service. National editorial Association, American Aseocls-
t*M of BnsjIMi Jewish Nswesjsaurs, and the Florida Fress Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One YsarSt.OO. Out of Town Upon
Rsqwset.
Volume 5 Number 11
Friday, May 28, 1976 28 IYAR 5736
By JACK ANDERSON
WASHINGTON Fidel Cas-
tro is at it again.
Secret intelligence reports
claim that Cuban advisers are
training African guerrillas in
Mozambique for operations
against white-ruled Rhodesia.
Intelligence sources say, how-
ever, there is no evidence that
Cuban troops are crossing into
Rhodesia to take part in the
actual combat.
Castro, of course, caused an
Jack Anderson
international stir by sending
combat troops to Angola. The
intelligence reports estimate
that between 13,000 and 14,000
crack Cuban troops are still sta-
tioned there.
SOME ARE helping the new
rulers root out rival guerrillas
from the rugged southeastern \
section of the country. But their
main purpose, apparently, is to
deter any counter-offensive un-
til the country is stabilized.
American intelligence agen-
cies have also detected the
movement of Cuban troops from
Angola back to Cuba. One re-
port interprets this as an indi-
cation that Castro is withdraw-
ing some of his men. But other
intelligence sources suggest the
Cuban troop movements are
merely rotations, not withdraw-
als.
KGB CALL?: The Soviet Union
often harasses Jewish-Amer-
icans who visit Russia. But now,
the campaign lof intimidation
has apparently reached into the
United States.
For example, Greg and Nancy
Leisch traveled to the Soviet
Union in March. They were
picked up and questioned by
the KGB secret police after they
left the home of scientist Alex-
ander Lerner* When they re-
turned to their hotel, they found
that their room had been ran-
sacked.
The Leisches thought they
had left all this behind after
they returned home. But Greg
Leisch received a phone call
from a man who introduced
himself as Mr. Schneider and
identified himself as a State
Department official.
HE EXPLAINED that the So-
_ Con tinned on Page 11
Man Turned into a Machine
In winding up my column last
week, I wrote that piety and
patriotism seem to be what!
Americans are looking for today.
One easily recognizes the scoun-
drels for whom patriotism is the
last refuge. But piety? Quite a
few people challenged my use of
the word and its meaningfulness
to the 1976 American in the con-
text of the presidential cam-
paign.
I write this before the Mary-
land Primary results are in but
it doesn't matter. Either the
guru Governor of California,
Jerry Brown, or the Baptist
fundamentalist ex-Governor of
Georgia, Jimmy Carter, will
have been the winner. And if
anything describes them, for me
at least, it is the Politics of
Piety.
GEORGE ORWELL, in an es-
say on "Politics and the Eng-
lish Language," describes the
speaker who "has gone some
distance towards turning him-
self into a machine. The appro-
priate noises are coming out of
his larynx, but his brain is not
involved as it would be if were
choosing his words for him-
self.
"If the speech he is making
is one that he is accustomed to
make over and over again, he
may be almost unconscious of
what he is saying, as one is
when one utters the responses
in church. And this reduced
state of consciousness, if not
indispensable, is at any rate fav-
orable to political conformity."
Which is how I feel as I fol-
low the verbal meanderings of
the languages of Brown and
Carter, political language which
Orwell says "has to consist of
euphemism, question begging
and sheer cloudy vagueness."
IT IS no wonder they spend
much of their tune trying to
explain to puzzled reporters that
MI never said it like that," 'It
wasn't meant the way it sound-
ed," nd so forth.
EDWARD
COHEN
Nor is it any wonder that
Brown, with his. Jesuit training
and Zen inclination, appears to
be promising pie in the sky in
reflecting the Far Eastern
detached contemplation and ac-
ceptance of corrupt reality here
on earth, especially in Califor-
nia and Washington.
He appeals, one writer has
said, to those white middle-
class people who in recent
years have substituted personal
consciousness-raising for more
traditional political attitudes.
They, who have traveled from
Esalen to est in their search
for salvation, appear to have
found a new leader.
JIMMY CARTER'S evangel-
ical Christian approach is some-
what more puzzling. According
to James Reston in the New
York Times, Carter is said to be
a great admirer of Reinhold
Niebuhr and thus cannot be
labeled a "religious fanatic."
For this great liberal theo-
logian was, if anything, a so-
cial activist who dug into the
real issues of the day and was
a founder of Americans for
Democratic Action. Arthur
Schlesinger Jr. was a close as-
sociate of Niebuhr in ADA, and
he wonders if Carter can really
have understood Niebuhr whose
whole "argument was directed
against the notion that the prob-
lems of secular society would
respond to simple moral preach-
ments.
"American Christianity,"
wrote Niebuhr, "tends to be ir-
1'
relevant to the problems of jus-
tice because it persists in pre-
senting the law of love as a
simple solution to every com-
munal problem Religion
is more frequently a source of
confusion than of light in the
political realm. The tendency to
equate our political with our
Christian convictions causes pol-
itics to generate idolatry."
I CANNOT help but recall,
in this connection, the lead to
the Christmas column Billy Gra-
ham wrote in The Miami Herald
in 1972: "The need of the world
is Christian compassion and
concern."
To which The Man in the
White House, to whom he was
spiritual ad\tisor, undoubtedly
said "amen" as he ordered the
planes out to carpet-bomb
North Vietnam for a final time.
This is not to question the
sincerity of either Brown or
Carter, or to equate them with
the likes of Nixon, although col-
umnists Cockburn and Ridge-
way in the Village Voice don't
hesitate to state that the cam-
paign of 76 has been waged on
religious innuendo, masking pro-
grams of political reaction.
THE STRATEGIES (of Brown
and Carter)," they wrote,
'amount to ifie same thing:
transfer of hopes for socisjj^
amelioration from the opera-
tions of government to the
realm of religious meditation
and aspiration. In this type of
fatalism, words have little or no
connection with reality. The
candidate promises everythjnr
in nothing. In the end run it is
a form of propaganda for mat-
ing people accept the inequities
of the current political eco-
nomy: Nixonism under a new
hat."
My Orwell collection dates
his essay exactly 30 years ago
What concerns me now is how
the language of politics seems
not only more debased but to
have corrupted thought as we".
The Politics of Piety. Indeed.


Friday, May 28, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
UJA Telethon in Full Swing
Federation's campaign tele-
thon moved into its third week
of intensive; phone-calling as
this issue was going to press,
with hundreds of pledges being
received from persons who had
not been contacted for the UJA-
Israel Emergency Fund in any
other way.
General campaign chairman
Leo Goodman noted the success
of the telethon in a brief state-
ment lauding the response of
those being called and of the
volunteers making the calls
from the Federation's board
room at its headquarters in the
Jewish Community Center.
"A response to the needs of
the UJA and Israel Emergency
Fund is always gratifying," said
Goodman. "It is particularly
gratifying in this case in which
the one-on-one person-to-person
appeal is not face-to-face but
Hank Meyer and Hy Sirota
UJA chairman Adolph Greenbaum (left), president Herb
Graff and board of directors member James Galowich,
Plantation B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 2966.

Dora Cohen and Elsie Simon, B'nai B'rith Lauderhill
Women's Chapter
via the almost impersonal med-
ium of the telephone.
"Great credit for this re-
sponse is owed to the fine group
of B'nai B'rith men and women
who are doing the phone-call-
ing. The Federation, the UJA
and the Israel Emergency Fund
are the better for their good
work, and I take this means to
express our thanks to them."
The volunteers who have
been at the telephones during
all hours of the day and eve-
ning, starting in mid-morning
and continuing till 9 p.m. in-
clude:
Dora Cohen, Dorothy Hur-
witz and Elsie Seman, represent-
ing B'nai B'rith Lauderhill
Women's Chapter No. 1483.
Morris Axelrod, Al Kassover,
Murray Kastoff, Hank Meyer
and Hv Sirota, of Sunrise B'nai
B'rith Lodge No. 2953.
Herb Graff, president of B'nai
B'rith Plantation Lodge No.
2946; Adolph Greenbaum, the
lodge's UJA chairman; and Ja-
mes Gallowich, Alfred Newman
and Gene Resnick. members of
the lodge's board of directors.
Also calling from the Pom-
pano Lodge B'nai B'rith are
George I. Kern, Sam Simonoff.
Sam Schwartz, Abe Hersh, Hen-
ry Schneider, Joseph Fink and
Nat Evans. And from the Blue
Star Lodge B'nai B'rith were
Phil Solomon, Sid Friedman and
Joseph Sobel.
The telethon is continuing
into June, with volunteers set
to man the phones throughout
the month on an all-day and
early-evening basis.
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POULTRY PRODUCTS
available at your
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or contact
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Zion Corporation
1717 N.W. Seventh Avenue
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Tel: 324-1855
THE WHITE NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
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Ask about our spclo. wddtflq pochoga__
Murray Kastoff (left), Al Kassover and Morris Axelrod,
Sunrise B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 2953
Alfred Newman (left) and Gene nesmcK, members of
the board of directors of B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 2966.
'.'ft
am m --
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54,500 Tons Of run!
The "Fun Ships" CARNIVALE and
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When you think about going on a
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rate* are for base season sailing dates an<
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, May 28, 1976 "L
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
BILL GOLDSTEIN, Director
GLORIA KATZ, Editor
HARRIET PERER. Coed/for
2999 NW 33rd Avenue, Fort Lauderdale -:
Phone: 4844200
The Delight of Discovery
JCC of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale at last is able to offer an
environmental summer exper-
ence for children in second
through fifth grades. The pro-
gram will be interdisciplinary,
involving many varied learning
areas.
Change from a rural society
to an age of mechanization and
urban living has kept many
children from close contact and
understanding of the land, wa-
ter, air, fields, animals, etc. JCC
will offer our children a num-
ber of field trips and field-
related experiences, all geared
to opening these areas and en-
riching the children's thinking.
Two three-week sessions are
offered. Tuition is $85 and cov-
ers all costs. The program is
scheduled for Monday through
Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
and Friday, 9:30 am to 1 p.m.
A bus will be with us each day
for every field trip, all day.
Parents are responsible for
drop-off and pick-up of their
children at the Center. Children
are to bring lunch and JCC will
provide drinks and snacks. On
Fridays the children will be
served lunch at the Center.
"In Building" programs pro-
vided by the Audubon Society
and others, plus an Oneg Shab-
bat and Israeli singing and dan-
cing, will end the week's activ-
ities.
You may register for one ses-
sion. Registration must be made
prior to June 4 and a $10 fee
is required. If you have addi-
tiona questions, call program
registrar, Sandy, at 484-8200.
Tweens Going
To Disney World
The JCC is planning an all-
day trip to Walt Disney World
for sixth-, seventh- and eighth-
graders on Thursday, June 10.
The $25 cost includes transpor-
tation by air-conditioned Grey-
hound bus, breakfast, snacks
and a 12-adventure book.
Chaperoned by JCC staff, the
trip begins at 6 a.m. and ends
at 11 p.m. Interested Tweens
should register soon.
TM: A Key to a Richer Lifestyle
Life is meant to be lived. To
help us enjoy it, with clearer
minds and better health, the
Jewish Community Center is
offering an introductory pres-
entation on the Transcendental
Meditation technique on Wed-
nesday, July 7, at 7:30 p.m. at
the JCC. TM is a simple thing,
easily learned by people of all
ages. Practiced twice daily 15
to 20 minutes, it provides a rest
to the entire system, resulting
in the unlocking of hidden
energy sources and the release
Bar Mitzvah
JONATHAN M SIMON
Jonathan Marc Simon will be
called to the Torah in celebra-
tion of his Bar Mitzvah on Sat-
urday, May 29, at Temple Sho-
lom of Pompano Beach.
ft -6 -fr
RACriAEL ABRAMS
Rabbi and Mrs. Arthur
Abrams daughter, Rachael, will
be called to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah on Friday evening June
4, at the Reconstructionist Syna-
gogue.
ft ft ft
JAY SILVERBERG
Jay, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ron-
ald Silverberg, will become a
Bar Mitzvah at the Margate
Jewish Center on June 5. The
9 a.m. ceremony will be con-
ducted by Jay's teacher, Cantor
Max Gallub, and a kiddush will
follow services.
IEVITT
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of deep-rooted tensions.
Carol Goldberger, psychia-
triac social worker and TM in-
structor, will explain how TM
can systematically raise the
level of life. The information
provided in this presentation
gives new hope to every in-
dividual who has always be-
lieved that there must be some-
thing more to life and that there
must be a way to draw that hid-
den promise into daily exist-
ence.
Senior Adults
Summer Session
The following Senior Adult
Programs are open for registra-
tion:
Folk Dancing, Round and
Square. There will be two
classes, one each for beginners
and intermediates. Six week
course, $4.50, begins Tuesday,
June 1.
Yiddish. Begin a ten-week ses-
sion on Monday, June 14, 10
a.m. to noon, with Lorna Tom-
kin (formerly an actress on the
Yiddish stage). Don't miss the
fun. Registration is $5.
Gourmet Cooking. A ten-ses-
sion course in our brand-new
kitchen. All food is included,
and registration is $10.
To register, call Sandy at 484-
8200.
Shavuoth Greetings To All
TOM MIMS APPLIANCES
100 S.W. 1st AVENUE
POMPANO BEACH 33060
Serving the needs
of the Jewish Community
In our 3 locations
ENORAH
Ckapek
Mark Weissman
Joseph Rubin
Broward County's first
Jewish Funeral Directors
DEERFIELD
441 S. Federal Highway Phone 971-3330
MARGATE
5915 Park Drive Phone 971-3330
SUNRISE
6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Phone 739-6000
Shalom Singles Plan GeuTogethers
Something new has been
added! Starting on Thursday,
May 20, and every first and
third Thursday of the month
thereafter, the Shalom Singles
will meet, just to get together,
at the Jewish Community Cen-
Wnai Writh
Women News
Tamarac Chapter No. 1479
held a luncheon, fashion show
and card party at the Margate
Jewish Center on May 13. On
May 20 the chapter heard a
talk by Miss Margolin of the
American Red Cross.
Cr -Cr -to
Deerfteld Beach Chapter plans
a summer luncheon and card
party on Wednesday, June 16,
at 12:30 p.m. in the administra-
tion building at Century Vil-
lage. Tickets are available from
May Pollack, 421-8103, or Mol-
lie Hecht, 428-9484.
ter.
Spend an evening among
friends at the piano or enjoy
plain old-fashioned conversa-
tion.
Refreshments will be served.
Admission, 25 cents.
Seniors9 Cruise
A Success
In our continuing effort to
serve Seniors in a creative and
dynamic way, a group of 50
Seniors set sail for the Intra-
coastal on the Jungle Queen for
a songfest, lunch and tour. Fun,
togetherness and companionship
were the order of the day.
So successful was this
"cruise" that another jaunt is
planned, this time to Vizcaya
Museum and Gardens. On Tues-
day, June 15, buses will leave
JCC at 9:30 a.m. and return at
3:30. preregistration will be a
must. Watch for flyer and de-
tails!
Shavuoth Greetings To All
MARTIN COIN LAUNDRY
2105 N. FEDERAL HIGHWAY
HOLLYWOOD 33021
TELEPHONE 920-5197
Shavuoth Greetings To All
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tn%


Friday, May 28, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
OurCrow6
By roz fLeminq
UNESCO is Practically Broke
4
When I came to live in this
town, 11 years ago, there were
so few Jewish families that I'm
sure you could have counted
them on the fingers of one
hand. When Passover came, the
food had to be "imported" from
Miami Beach. My mah jongg set
collected dust and mildewed on
the top shelf in the closet.
Whom could I play with?
Well, maybe the game did orig-
inate in China but other
than old Mandarin men (and
how many Chinese families do
you think lived here 11 years
ago?), I have yet to meet any-
one but Jewish women who
know how to play M. J. Bridge
. bunko bingo fine!
But mah jongg? Forget itl So
the set sat, while I had day-
dreams of sitting around a table
and breaking a wall to the
sounds of two dot three
bam flower.
Today? Ah today! Well,
today you can buy the latest
mah jongg card in any gift shop
. there isn't a grocery store
in Broward County that doesn't
carry matzo and borscht on a
year-round basis and your
neighbors are eating bagels and
cream cheese at Sunday brunch
when they get home from
church. (Give it time and lox
will catch on with them too!)
Now add the exciting growth
of synagogues ... the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
jLauderdafe, comrflete with a
new community center ... a
Hebrew Day School the
"New York Style" delis ... the
Kosher butcher shops And
what does it all mean? It means
we are developing a young and
vibrant Jewish community .
and as members of this large
and growing "family" we need
a means of keeping in touch
with one another.
The Duroose of "Our Crowd"
is to helo us keen in touch .
to helo us feel that we are all
members of the same big family.
Do I have to remind vou that
it is this feeling of "We Are
One!" that has kept us surviv-
ing in a world that has so often
tried to see that we did not? If
we are one with Soviet Jewry
and one with our sisters and
brothers in Israel, then we are
certainlv one with each other
here in Broward County.
We want to get to know each
other ... to share with each
other the good news and
the sad. We want to know about
the births and the birthdays .
the anniversaries and the wed-
dings ... the Bar and Bat Mitz-
voth.
If someone is ill, let us know
so we can send good wishes.
Let us know what you did on
your vacation. Is someone visit-
ing you from back home? Then
let us say Hello to them. If a
Jewish family moves into your
neighborhood, let us know so
we can welcome them and let
the rest of the "family" know
of their arrival.
O.K.??? I know that every-
one likes to see his name in the
naper ... so help me do that
for you send vour news to
me: Roz Fleming, 8440 Olean-
der Dr., Plantation, Fla. 33317,
and I will be delighted to help
you share your news.
JUST BACK from an excit-
ing tour of Israel are Dr. and
Mrs. Alan Goldenberg, Dr. and
Mrs. Dick Greene and Dr. and
Mrs. Robert Segaul. We expect
to be able bring you the details
of that trip once these folks
have had time to unwind and
unpack. Happy 20th wedding
anniversary to the Irving Geis-
sers. Want to wish a Happy
Mike Gold both seven years
old and to Charlie Miller,
who is 72 years young. We want
to wish Harriet Cohen a very
speedy recovery (hope her back
trouble doesn't come back). To
Judy Magill we extend sincere
condolences on the loss of her
husband, Alan.
Remember to send me YOUR
news ... we want to fill this
column up with YOU! YOUR
family and YOUR friends .
but if YOU don't send me YOUR
news, you'll have to read about
ME!
Want to suggest you read
"George S. Kaufman and His
Friends" by Scott Meredith, pub-
lished by Doubleday. It's sheer
enchantment to read about this
witty man, one of the greatest
playwrights America has ever
produced, and his bright and
witty friends. I guarantee you
will find yourself laughing out
loud as you read some of their
.conversations. (This was the
Round Table crowd that met at
the Algonquin Hotel.)
On a second level of enjoy-
ment, it is with a great deal of
ethnic pride that you learn how
many of these great talents
were Jewish. It's a big book
and if you're a slow reader, it
should keep you laughing all
summer.
Write to me so I can keep
reading all summer too!
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS JTA UNESCO is practically broke and
may have to cut down on its activities before next year,
according to UNESCO sources here who said that this
"financial crisis" is a consequence of America's refusal to
pay its contributions as a protest against the organization's
anti-Israeli stand.
The sources said the U.S.
owes nearly $2 million on
its 1973-74 contribution and
has not paid its share of
$19.7 million for 1975, nor
has Congress been asked to
appropriate an equivalent
sum for 1976. Altogether,
these sources say the U.S.
will owe UNESCO over $41
million by the end of the
year, or a quarter of the
organization's budget.
CONGRESS voted in Novem-
ber, 1974, to stop participating
in UNESCO's budget following
the organization's general con-
Dr. Malavsky
Leading Tour
Dr. Morton Malavsky, rabbi
of Temple Beth Shalom, will
lead a two week tour to Is-
rael, beginning June 28. The
Herman Chanin family, who will
be on the tour, will celebrate
the Bar Mitzvah of their son,
Howard, at the Western Wall on
Saturday, July 3. The group
will participate in the Bar Mitz-
vah kiddush.
Howard will receive an of-
ficial Bar Mitzvah certificate
from the State of Israel.
This promises to be a very
beautiful happening. There is
still some room on the tour. For
information call 981-6111.
Howard Chanin will celebrate his Bar Mitzvah during
the tour to Israel led by Dr. Morton Malavsky (left),
rabbi of Temple Beth Shalom.
'Remember the way
MAMA used to cook
for the holidays?"
Great Kosher-style food.
Come to Twelve Tribes.
NE 123rd Street
just East of Biscayne Blvd.
North Miami
OPEN
NIGHTLY
ference adoption of a number
of anti-Israel resolutions.
UNESCO officials believed at
that time that the Arab states
as well as the Soviet Union
would make available the miss-
ing funds. These officials now
say these funds have not been
provided and that UNESCO's
financial situation is "highly
critical."
The organization's director
general and other top officials
have tried to negotiate both
with the Arabs and the United
States for a modus vivendi: a
more "moderate" approach to
Israel and an American prom-
ise to resume its payments.
UNESCO officials say that
"both sides have proven them-
selves adamant: the Arabs have
refused to budge from their
anti-Israeli stand and the
Americans have demanded that
UNESCO drop its politiciza-
tion."
The officials hope, however,
that some solution will be found
before the next meeting of the
Executive Council due to take
place next fall in Nairobi.
ON THE other hand, the
Arabs and the Soviet Union will
probably demand the imple-
mentation of UNESCO's charter
depriving members who do not
meet their financial obligations
of the right to vote.
Emanu-El Opening Branch School
Temple Emanu-El of Greater
Fort Lauderdale has announced
the opening in the fall of a
branch Hebrew school in Planta-
tion. Sylvia Mills, chairman of
the religious school committee,
said, "This is to accommodate
the large number of our stu-
dents living in Plantation. Two
classes will meet in the west in
addition to the complete He-
brew program in our own ex-
cellent school facilities."
Rabbi Joel S. Goor, who will
direct the temple's Hebrew and
religious school program, re-
ceived his Ph.D. from United
States International University
in San Diego. He told the com-
mittee that plans include a post-
Bar/Bat Mitzvah Hebrew teach-
er training prroagm as well as
a high school department for
post-confirmands.
"In San Diego," he said,
"more than half of our grad-
uates elected to return. I know
we will achieve similar stand-
ards in Fort Lauderdale."
The committee also heard
Rabbi Goor's plans to introduce
Hebrew to nursery and primary
school children. A program of
songs and games is being adapt-
ed from the successful work of
the Chicago Bureau of Jewish
Education.
ISRAEL MMONALIY ESCORTED BY
MR. EDWARD TUMAROFF
5HAL0MS1199 S^TSmnci
JULY 7 TO JULY 21
INCLUDIS: Round trip air transportation, Miami to Tel Aviv
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ACCOMMODATIONS IN 5 STAR HOTELS (with fall facilities based en
doable occupancy.)
Fall Israeli breakfast in Israel.
Fall sightseeing program in Israel air conditioned bases, English speaking
guide.
Plans are made for a reception at B'nai B'rith Headquarters in Tel Aviv;
also reception of the Israel Government Tourist Office, Jerusalem.
Tones A feesservice charge as imposed by hotels
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Pfege 8
The Jewish FloridUm of Greater. Fort Lauderdale
Friday, May 28, 1976
Hadassah New*
Israel Pleads for EEC Role
Herzl Group held its final
meeting of the season on May
12, when new officers were in-
stalled by Augusta Rubenstein.
The Bermuda Choral Group,
conducted by Bea Zeidman and
accompanied by pianist Jean-
ette Freund, entertained.
The committees will continue
to work during the summer and
the next regular meeting, in
September, will be announced.
ft ft ft
Fort Lauderdale Chapter held
a donor luncheon and officer
installation on May 13 at the
Diplomat Hotel under the chair-
manship of Mimi (Mrs. Lester)
Lasker. Mrs. Sherman Fast, vice
president of the Florida re-
gion, installed the following for
1976-77:
Mrs. Matthew Newman, presi-
dent; Mrs. Richard Tarlow, ad-
ministrative vice president; Mrs.
Jack Grebler, education vice
president; Mrs. Edward Hare,
fund-raising vice president; Mrs.
Irvin Freiberg, membership vice
president; Mrs. David Slass,
program vice president; Mrs.
Sol Mehlman, corresponding
secretary; Mrs. Morris Rashkes,
financial secretary; Mrs. Joseph
Bornstein, recording secretary-
Mrs. Slass, who introduced
the showing of Israeli and Amer-
ican fashions coordinated by
Jordan Marsh, also introduced
the newly installed group presi-
dents: Mrs. Harry Bernstein
(Armon), Mrs. Irving Winston
(Avivia), Mrs. Myer Lowenthal
(Bat Yam), Mrs. Ben Hecht (Gi-
lah), Mrs. Edward Slater (Ha-
verim), Mrs. Jack Drexler
(Dana). Mrs. Abraham Snider
(L'Chayim), Mrs. Bernard Zuck-
erman (Shalom), Mrs. Samuel
Barrocas (Shoshana) and Mrs.
Irving Klein (Tamar).
ft ft ft
Blyma Group (Margate) in-
stalled officers on May 20 at
the Golden Spike. Teny (Mrs.
Harry M.) Krimsky, outgoing
president, praised the three-
year-old group for tripling its
fund-raising quotas and more
than tripling its membership, to
whom she presented the 11 rib-
bons awarded the group at the
Florida Region Conference and
the silver bowl received in a tie
for Region Group of the Year
1975-76.
Officers installed by Mrs.
Morton Sellner, first Blyma
president, are: Selma (Mrs.
Harry) Corn, president; Celia
(Mrs. Sam) Glickman, educa-
tion vice president; Faye (Mrs.
Jack) Bram, fund-raising vice
president; Charlotte (Mrs. Dave)
Rosenzweig, program vice presi-
dent; Nettie (Mrs. Irving) Roth-
stein, membership vice presi-
dent; Lee (Mrs. William). Stearn,
recording secretary; Florence
(Mrs. Henry Pegrish, corre-
sponding secretary; Eva (Mrs.
Philip) Leibowitz, financial sec-
retary; and Mrs. Birdie Levin-
thai, treasurer.
Mrs. Reubin Binder led the
glee club, which had performed
"Twiddler-on-the-Roof" at the
recent conference.
LONDON (JTA) A call
for the European Commission
on Human Rights to examine
the situation in Israel was made
here by the chairman of the
Israeli branch of Amnesty Inter-
national.
Prof. Yoram Dinstein, of Tel
Aviv University, said that the
greatest contribution that the
European community could
make to peace in the Middle
East would be to permit Israel's
accession to the European Con-
vention on Human Rights.
DINSTEIN, an authority on
international law, said the Euro-
pean body was virtually the
only international institution
whose findings on allegations of
torture of political prisoners in
Israel would be respected-
Addressing a luncheon sev-
eral days ago, attended by rep-
resentatives of Amnesty Inter-
national and other human rights
organizations, Dinstein said that
there had been hundreds of al-
legations of torture of prisoners
in Israel but almost every case
had been proved to be unfound-
ed.
J?^L ^^r i^h
ft m + Hi
Many of the cases involved
terrorist suspects who were de-
fended by Mrs. Felicia Langer,
a member of the Control Com-
mittee of the pro-Moscow Ra-
kah Communist Party.
IN DINSTEIN'S view, Mrs.
Langer's constant readiness to
allege torture of terrorist sus-
pects had become counter-pro-
ductive. By crying "wolf," she
risked being disregarded should
a genuine case occur, he said.
The Israeli branch of Am-
nesty International is not a
typical one because, unjike other
branches, it takes an interest
in alleged cases in its own coun-
try. Dinstein said that his
branch functioned partly as a
"conduit" for the international
secretariat of Amnesty, which
is based in London.
In the past, relations have not
always been smooth between
the organization and the Israel
government.
THE ISRAELI authorities had
been especially critical of Am-
nesty's publication of a com-
bined report on allegations of
torture by Israel and Syria after
the Yom Kippur War.
A senior Amnesty official at
the luncheon told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that the
organization had been wrong to
Margate Mayor Robert W. Baughman (2nd from right)
was the recipient of the Israel Solidarity Award at Holi-
day Springs Condominium in late April. With Mayor
Baughman are (from left) Harry Kaplan, cochairman,
Israel Bonds committee; Councilman George Lieder-
man; Abraham Curewitz chairman, Israel Bonds com-
mittee; and guest speaker Rita Green.
To The Jewish Community in
South Florida We Extend
Greetings on Shavuoth
CAR RENTALS
371 NORTHEAST 6th AVENUE
DELRAY BEACH 33444
publish the report. Instead, it
should have simply submitted
its findings privately to the gov-
ernments of both countries.
The official also praised the
prompt and careful replies
which the organization receives
when it sends inquiries to the
Israeli Attorney General. Like
other branches of Amnesty, the
Israeli section has adopted
"Prisoners of Conscience" in *.
other countries. They include r
people in South Africa, Bolivia, > V
Indonesia, East Germany and '
Rumania.
Although he was not prepared
to give the Israel government
a "blank check" over allegations
of maltreatment of prisoners,
he stressed the sensitivity of
Israeli society to human rights.
In the United States, it had
taken two years for details of
the My Lai massacre in Viet-
nam to leak out. Then, only one
man was tried and was later
amnestied by the President,
Dinstein noted.
But when Israeli border
guards executed Arabs in the .
border village of Kfar Kassem
in 1956, every person in the
unit responsible was apprehend-
ed, tried and sentenced within ^ j
weeks. The Major in charge was
sentenced to 15 years.
%


-Friday, May 28, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Port Lauderdale
Page 9
Twelve Area Hebrew Schools
Observe Jerusalem Liberation
Fascell Leads in Drive
To Monitor Helsinki Accord
M'f
Yom Yerushalayim, Jerusa-
lem Day, will be celebrated Fri-
day, May 28, by students of 12
South Florida Hebrew day
schools with a special meeting
at the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy at 9:30 a.m.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross,
principal of the Hebrew Acad-
emy, largest Hebrew day school
in the United States outside of
Metropolitan New York, is gen-
eral chairman of the observance
of the ninth anniversary of the
reunification of Jerusalem dur-
ing the Six-Day War. The Israel
Army liberated the Old City on
June 7, 1967, the 28th day of
Iyar in the Hebrew calendar,
which is used to determine all
Jewish holidays.
A highlight of the event, co-
sponsored by the Central Agen-
cy for Jewish Education of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, will be the presentation of
Degel Yerushalayim, the Jeru-
salem Flag, by the Jewish Na-
tional Fund to the Hebrew day
school that has done the most
in the past year for the people
and land of Israel.
CLASSROOM and extracurri-
cular activities will help deter-
mine the prize, which gives spe-
cial credit for projects relating
directly to Jerusalem.
The dozen day schools par-
ticipating in the competition are
the Lehrman Day School of
Temole Emanu-El, the Temple
Menorah Day School, the Great-
er Miami Hebrew Academy,
Oholei Torah School, Beth David
Solomon Schechter School, the
South Dade Hebrew Academy,
Temple Beth Am Day School,
Hillel Community Day School.,
the Torah Academy of South
Florida, the Temple Beth Sha-
lom Day School of Hollywood,
the Jewish Day School of Fort
Lauderdale and the Jewish Com-
munity Day School of West
Palm Beach.
Mrs. Nily Salic, educational
consultant to the Jewish Na-
tional Fund of Greater Miami,
and Abraham Gittelson, asso-
ciate director of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
are working with Rabbi Gross
on the program.
A cantata, "The Seven Gates
of Jerusalem," will be presented
by Hebrew Academy students.
There will be Israeli songs and
dances, and greetings by Mrs.
Morton Weinberger, chairman
of the CAJE.
WASHINGTON The House
of Representatives has passed
legislation, 240-95, to establish
a Commission to monitor the
Helsinki agreement with re-
spect to human rights in the
Communist nations, Congress-
man Dante Fascell (D., Fla.) an-
nounced here.
Fascell is chairman of the
Subcommittee on International
Reconstructionist Synagogue News
Senior Torah School students
Naomi Abrams, Michael Frank-
el, Karen Klubeck, Debra Krin-
sky, Greg Lerman and Marge
Shulberg will be confirmed dur-
ing Erev Shavuot services at
the Reconstructionist Synagogue
at 8 p.m. on Thursday, June 3.
Michael Swartz, a senior stu-
dent at the Reconstructionist
Rabbinical College, will be the
congregation's first guest rabbi.
He will conduct evening serv-
ices on June 11 and Torah itudy
at 10 a.m. on June 12.
Political and Military Affairs,
which held hearings on the bill
last week.
THE ESTABLISHMENT of
the Commission is particularly
significant to the cause of So-
viet Jewry. The Helsinki ac-
cords provide for specific ac-
tions on the part of the signa-
tories of which the Soviet
Union is one with respect to
cooperation in the humanitari-
an fields, particularly in the
area of separation of families.
The purpose of the Commis-
sion would be to monitor and
report to the Congress the im-
plementation of the agreement
with the hope that continued
public scrutiny will encourage
greater compliance.
#
Compliments of Mr. Riley V. Sims
Who Extends Best Wishes
For Peace In The World .
a
"i
BURNUP & SIMS
INCORPORATED
4047 OKEECHOBEE BLVD.
WEST PALM BEACH 33419
|Hr*


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, May 28, 1976
v y
15,000 Marchers Protest Gush S^if^S^flf?
By YITZHAK SHARG1L
TEL AVIV (JTA)
More than 15,000 persons
marched through central Tel
Aviv in a vigorous but order-
ly demonstration against il-
legal settlements on the
West Bank by the Gush
Emunim.
The rally was organized
by Mapam and Moked in co-
operation with the Move-
ment for a Sane Policy.
THE DEMONSTRATION was
held on the eve of today's cru-
cial Cabinet meeting at which
the government debated the is-
sue of West Bank settlement
.policy and the specific issue of
the Gush Emunim squatters who
have been encamped near the
Kadum army base in Samaria
since last November.
Truckloads of Mapam young-
sters began arriving in Tel Aviv
yesterday afternoon from kib-
butzim all over the country to
attend the rally. They brought
banners and placards denoun-
cing the Gush Emunim and
their leader. Rabbi Moshe Le-
vinger of Kiryat Arba near He-
bron.
The long list of speakers at
the rally was headed by the
two Mapam Cabinet members,
Health Minister Victor Shemtov
and Absorption Minister Shlo-
mo Rosen. Mapam Secretary
General Meir Talmi declared
"We are here to say no to Ka-
dum."
ARYE ELIAV, an independ-
ent Knesset member and for-
' mer Labor Party Secretary Gen-
eral, scored the Gush for "hid-
ing behind the skirts of the
army" at Kadum and described
Levinger as a "high noon gun-
man" who was polarizing the
nation.
Levinger went on trial last
month for insulting Israel army
officers and interfering with the
performance of their duties on
the West Bank.
Prof. Yehoshua Arieli, an-
other prominent "dove," scored
last month's march by the Gush
Emunim and their followers
through the West Bank as de-
liberately provocative. "They
march when they know the
army is protecting them and
will come to the rescue if they
get in trouble. It is unthinkable
that this group should dictate
poficy to the government,"
Arieli said. Shulamit Aloni, head
of the Civil Rights faction in
the Knesset, described the Gush
as "hooligans and fanatical
chauvinists."
The demonstrators marched
a short distance through streets
adjoining the municipal square.
The only incident was a brief
scuffle between some of the
marchers and nationalist Betar
youths who waved pro-Gush
slogans.
Overshadowing the Kadum is-
sue is the possibility of a crisis
that could bring down the Ra-
bin coalition whatever the Ca-
binet's decision is and possibly
destroy the Labor Party's align-
ment with Mapam.
Leaders of the National Reli-
gious Party which ardently sup-
ports the Gush met with Rabin
late last week and urged him
not to evacuate the Kadum
squatters against their will.
THEY WERE reportedly re-
minded by the Premier that the
government had never promised
that the Kadum settlement was
permanent and, in fact, always
stressed its temporary nature.
The NRP Executive met later
and adopted a resolution to use
all of its means to oppose the
evacuation of Kadum. This was
interpreted in political circles
as an ultimatum that the NRP
would quit the coalition govern-
ment if the Cabinet decision
went against the Gush.
GENEVA (JTA) Claude Levy, director of organ-
ization at the Secretariat-General of the World Jewish Con-
gress in Geneva, died of a heart attack on Saturday. Levy,
who was 48 years old, served as special assistant to the
WJC Secretary General and last year was named director
of organization and member of the WJC General Council.
Levy represented the WJC at the United Nations in
Geneva and at numerous international conferences.
Shavuoth Greetings To All
*
t
Vl
Shavuoth Greetings To All
SOUTHERN
AUTO BODY
2050 SCOn AVENUE
WEST PALM BEACH 33406
PHONE 683-7604
B & T Amoco
804 NORTH STATE ROAD
MARGATE 33063
PHONE 972-9854
,
To The Jewish Community in
South Florida We Extend
Greetings on Shavuoth


Friday, May 28, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
What's Ahead? -
More Trouble
On West Bank
TEL AVIV Look for continued eruptions of dis-
rbances on the West Bank.
Over last weekend, a
strike by Arab mer-
chants in East Jerusa-
lem was thwarted by Is-
raeli security forceas.
And a 17 year old
Arab girl, Lina Nabulsi,
was fatally wounded
during a clash between
Israeli soldiers and riot-
ing students in Nablus,
with two Arab youths
wounded during a sub-
sequent demonstratior
over the girl's death.
Mayor Bassam Al-Shaqa of Nablus and the local
town council have sent a cable to United Nations Sec-
retary General Kurt Waldheim urging him to send a
committee of inquiry to the West Bank to investigate
the Israeli occupation.
Fidel at His Tricks Again
Continued From Page 4
viet Union had lodged a com-
pliant about their activities. He
was sympathetic. But he said
he would have to ask a few
routine questions: what organ-
izations or individuals were they
carrying messages for? Who
were these messages intended
for? What did the messages
say?
Leisch said he carried no
messages. But the conversation
struck him as a bit odd. The
questions, for example, were
virtually the same as those ask-
ed by the secret police in Rus-
sia.
So he did some checking. He
called the State Department. He
discovered that they had no Mr.
Schneider and that the Soviets
had lodged no complaint.
Apparently, the mysterious
Mr. Schneider was a KGB agent
here in the United States, as-
signed to gather information on
Soviet Jews. The FBI is now
investigating.
BRAZILIAN Torture: Grim
documents from Brazil, at the
risk of death, tell a gruesome
story of inhuman torture.
It happened on Apr. 1, the
12th anniversary of the coup
that brought the military dicta-
torship to power. To celebrate,
the Air Force brass in Recife
dragged four political prisoners
from their cells. Hoods were
tied over their heads. They
were thrown into a military ve-
hicle and delivered to the Air
Force police barracks.
There, they were put through
the most hideous torture. These
men were no threat to the gov-
ernment, just helpless prison-
ers who had already been lock-
ed up. Yet they were tortured
anyway, just for the amusement
of the brass.
WE HAVE reported repeat-
edly on the torture tactics in
Brazil. So what is the United
States doing about it? Not much.
Last February, Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger went to
Brazil and signed an agreement
with the military rulers.
It read, in part, that "No two
peoples in the world hold hu-
man dignity in higher regard
than the American and Brazil-
ian peoples."
But it seems that the Brazil-
ian regime has little regard for
human dignity.
To The Jewish Community
In South Florida We Extend
Greetings On Shavuoth
TOM'S AUTO CENTER
INCORPORATED
Tune-Ups ... Brakes .. Front End
Air Conditioning .. Carburetors
128 S.W. 1st AVENUE
POMPANO BEACH 33060
TELEPHONE 946-3191
Best Wishes To The Jewish People
For A Peaceful And Happy
Shavuoth
CRAVEN, THOMPSON
& ASSOCIATES INC.
1350 SOUTH POMPANO PARKWAY
POMPANO BEACH 33060
PHONE 971-7770


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, May 28, 1976"
Women's Division Annual Meeting
Officers of the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Laud-
,erdale elected for 1976-77 are (from left)
Anita Perlman, president; Susan Stein, re-
cording secretary; Ann Schneller, histori-
an; Roily Weinberg, corresponding secre-
tary; Rebecca Hodes, vice president of
campaign; Phyllis Chudnow, vice presi-
dent of education; Lillian Tucker, finan-
cial secretary; Mimi Bederman, vice pres-
ident of community relations. Marilyn
Smith, president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Women's Division, in-
stalled the officers and charged them with
the responsibilities of carrying out the
growing program of a year-round Wom-
en's Division.
Elated over the results of the 1976 Women's Division
campaign are Rebecca Hodes (left), 1976 campaign co-
chairman and 1977 general campaign chairman, and
Terri Baer, general campaign chairman of the 1976
Women's Division campaign, during which the Women's
Division raised over $260,000.
Helene Soref, chairman of
the annual meeting, wel-
comed guests and opened
the program. Because of her
activities and efforts on be-
half of the Women's Divi-
sion of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Laud-
erdale, Mrs. Soref was nam-
ed an honorary life mem-
ber. 1
WANTED
GOOD MALE SINGER
TO PARTICIPATE AND LEAD
TEMPLE LITURGICAL
QUARTET
Experience and background help-
ful .. Call for interview
Miami 949-0501
Hollywood 981-6113
Anita Perlman (right) presented a special campaign
award to Terri Baer. Mrs. Perlman praised Mrs. Baer
and her committee for outstanding fund-raising for
needed services in the Greater Fort Lauderdale area, in
Israel and throughout the world.
Allan E. Baer, president of
the Federation, brings
greetings on behalf of the
officers and board mem-
bers. He praised the wom-
en for their outstanding
work, noting many of their
achievements during this
past year.
Do you hate the four C't?
Cut Curl
Color Condition
Sandce
Hair Parlour
98 Coral Center
(SW Corner of Oakland
Pk Blvd &Fed Hwy )
564-1087
Shavuoth Greetings To All
from
Dixie Plywood Co.
2406 FLORIDA AVENUE
WEST PALM BEACH
Shavuoth Greetings To All
BIRD PAINTERS & DECORATORS
851 N.E. 30th STREET
OAKLAND PARK 33334
PHONE 566-2077
Through his songs and sto-
ries Israeli entertainer
Danny Tadmore presented
the spirit of Israel on the
eve of her 28th anniversary.
GOLD 4 MlVII OUOTIS*
At of 5-21-78. Silver 4.46 Gold 125.80
BUY SELL
KRUGERRAND $130 1131.50
MEX. 50 PESO $160 $161.50
MEX. 20 PESO $64 $66
AUST. 100 CRONA $122 $124 .
> BRIT. SOV.....$ 40 $ 42
U.S. 20 ST GAUO.-LIS $210 $211
'SILVER BAGS $1000 $3000 $3109
*MMwriii '* oia-oteee
... (fliwanvuiT mmm ...
*i* VrtwA/tVUVJatJ1
I.....wN.wlli.h..**'
mm. tinato Cafea Mata
FEKRAL PIECtMS NETftL
DEPOSITORY CORPORATION
411
.#..*<
Shavuoth QReetinqs to ail
781-7870
mi
*z/?o CARPETING
FOR HOME A OFFICE
Norm Nelson
Arlene Rot* Nelson
1436 E. Atlantic Blvd.
Pompano Beach, Fla.
Greetings on Shavuoth
MOORE ELECTRIC
2040 BUCHANAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD 33020
922-6114


lay, May 28, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
gUp
^Rablrimjral T$n$t
co-ordinated by ihe
Greats Miami Rabbinical Association
creditors
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz Raobi Robert J. Oritand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
GREAT AMERICAN JEWISH PERSONAUTIES
August Bond i
(1833-1907)
)n the third floor of the Tem-
House in Vienna there was
frn on July 21, 1833, a Jew-
boy who was destined to
a place in American Jew-
history as a "fighter for
fcedom."
)ne year after his Bar Mitz-
i, August (Anshel) Bondi
|ondy), 1833-1907, became the
jngest member of the mili-
Bt and revolutionary Vienna
ademic Legion. At 14 he took
in the student uprising
Binst Metternich which, start-
as a student prank, ended
[a full-blown revolution and
bath,
b IS he became a member
he Austrian National Guard
I Legion, helped build bar-
bes and fought the emper-
fsoldiers with paving blocks.
\y Jewish youths of Vienna
among those who perish-
k()TH SIDES of Anshel's fami-
jwere prosperous and stood
|h in Prague society, but the
litical upheavals in Europe
[ulted in bankruptcy of the
ndi textile and export busi-
es in 1846. Yet the children
Stinued with their studies and
shel entered the university
\\y in 1848.
fter the Austrian revolution
been suppressed by the
ftary, the restless Anshel
meed he was going to Hun-
to join the revolutionary
Dns under Louis Kossuth.
fen the boy's parents sug-
ed they all emigrate to free
brica instead, he immediately
fin with the idea. The family
Vienna on September 6,
3, and reached New Orleans
iNovember 10.
lie Bondis arrived in St.
|is by riverboat but the wan-
sting Anshel took off and
it the years 1848-1855 trav-
up and down the Missis-
|i, clerking, roustabouting on
[levees and doing a turn as
|rtender on a river packet.
TRIED to join a group
to Cuba to fight the Span-
but the venture failed. He
| to join Commodore Perry's
[expedition to Japan, but
by one day. From time
Be he returned to St. Louis,
avenworth and to Louis-
[Kentucky, where the fami-
tled on the advice of a
named Dembitz, who be-
Justice Brandeis' grand-
country and Congress at
ime were seething over the
I Nebraska controversy,
tier these new territories
i to be free or slave states.
55 Bondi and two friends.
\h Benjamin and Theodore
ft, struck out for die huh
tomie lands in Kansas to
I out claims to farmlands
en a warehouse and store.
Ettlement which grew up
" the warehouse was call-
Bnervillc.
> the adjoining slave-state
ssouri pro-slavery forces
and harassed the Free-
[ settlements. The Free-
under John Brown re-
in kind. Bondi, Wiener
f njamin had become mem-
John Brown's band.
er John Brown, Bondi
fiener, the little band of
grew to almost a hun-
sen. After a number of
with jhe pro-slavery
the large raids ended
pressure of the U.S. mili-
tary forces. Night raids were
made both ways across the bor-
der. Bondi was one of the or-
ganizers of the famous Kansas
"Jayhawkers." When peace
finally came, Kansas remained
a non-slave state.
FROM 18S6 until the Civil
War broke out, Bondi tried mer-
chandising, farming and trading
with the Indians, without much
success Bondi, Wiener and
Benjamin founded the city of
Greeley, Kansas. In 1860 Bondi
married Henrietta Einstein, who
was born in Buttenwiesen, Ba-
varia, and who came to America
about the same time as the
Bondi family.
When the guns boomed on
Fort Sumter on April 12 and
13, 1861, it wasn't long before
the humble Bondi cabin on the
Greeley farm became the scene
of a family debate as to whether
the restless Anshel should re-
main with his wife and infant
son or enlist in the Union Army.
His mother, Malka, made the
decision: "As a Jew I had the
duty to defend the institutions
which gave equal rights to all
beliefs." On November 26, 1861,
Bondi saddled his half-breed
mare and with his neighbors
rode off to Fort Lincoln.
With the 5th Kansas Cavalry,
Bondi took part in the Battle of
the Black River, the Battle of
Pine Bluff, Arkansas, and in
hundreds of skirmishes. In the
retreat of the Union forces fol-
lowing the Battle of Monticello
Cross Roads, Arkansas, he was
badly wounded and left for dead
on the field. During the night
he was found and cared for by
and old man and his son, who
was a Rebel lieutenant on sick
leave.
Later in the day a Union de-
tail, with a surgeon and under
a flag of truce, removed him to
the Post Hospital. This was in
September, 1864. By November
he was able to travel to Leaven-
worth and final discharge. From
there he returned to Greeley
and his family after an absence
of three years.
BONDI fathered 11 children.
He again tried merchandising
and farming but had a hard
time supporting his family. Sub-
sequently he began to dabble in
politics. He became Register's
clerk in the U.S. Land Office.
In 1881 he was elected police
judge. It is said he could have
risen higher in politics had he
been willing to compromise his
principles with those of the po-
liticians of his time.
On September 30, 1907, after
a round of visits to the famines
of his sons and daughters, he
dropped dead on a St. Louis
street. At Salina, Kansas, the
Jewish burial rites were follow-
ed by the Masonic rites. The
courts closed for the day in his
honor. The hearse was follow-
ed by a large contingent of
Masons, Elks, Odd Fellows and
veterans of the Grand Army of
the Republic. At the cemetery
Kaddish was recited by his sons
and grandsons.
Bondi's instructions to bis
family were that his funeral
should be plain. "During my
funeral I wish that mention be.
made of having all my life been
a fighter for freedom."
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Bhimenson, S. L. "Fighter For
Freedom." The National Jewish
Monthly, June, 1952.
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why do some
people put on two pairs of
Tefillin each morning instead
of the customary one pair?
Answer: The scrolls (there
are four of them) which are
contained in the phylactery that
is placed on the head are ar-
ranged in accordance with a
certain order as mentioned in
the Talmud (Babli, Menachoth
34b).
Two of the most famous of
the Medieval commentators of
the Talmud differ in their as-
sessment of this order and its
interpretation. The one whose
opinion is widely accepted is
the French commentary known
as Rashi. The one who differs
with him is his own grandson,
who came to be known and re-
ferred to as Rabbenu Tam.
Some Jews try to fulfill the
commandments in the most per-
fect manner. These Jews, when
confronted with such a conflict
of authoritative opinions, try to
make sure that they would be
considered as having fulfilled
the commandment of putting on
the Tefillin according to all
opinions.
They therefore put on Tefil-
lin whose headpiece has been
fcrransjed according fto Rashi
first. Toward the end of the
service they take these off and
put on the other Tefillin, which
have been written and arranged
according to Rabbenau Tam.
The second pair of Tefillin is
thus referred to as the Tefillin
of Rabbenu Tam.
*r
Question: Why is it Oat
in die Taflllin placed on the
arm there Is only one scroll,
while in the Tefillin placed
on the head mere are tear
scrolls?
Answer: The Bible, when
speaking of the Tefillin which
is placed on the arm speaks of
a singular noun, "And thou
shalt bind them for a 'sign'."
Thus tile scroll is an all-inclu-
sive one.
When speaking of the Tefil-
lin which is out on the head,
the Torah, in the same verse
says: "And they shall be for
'frontlets' between thine eyes."
The Talmud interprets the He-
brew word for frontlets, i.e.,
"Totafoth," to indicate that
"toth" indicates two and "foth"
also indicates two.
Thus the word Totafoth is
made up of two plural stems
thus totaling four. This differ-
ence between the headpiece
and the armpiece is interpreted
by the rabbis as indicating that
while the mind of man is given
permission to speculate among
various ideas and opinions, the
act of man, represented by his
arm, should be consistent and
uniform rather than contradic-
tory and confusing.
One may have a variety of
ideas but he should have a
unity of action.
On Picking New Leaders
For Country, Congregations
By RABBI MORRIS A. SKOP
Temple Sholom, Pompano Beach
America, during our Bicen-
tennial Year 1976, is beginning
to wrestle with choices for our
next President of the United
States. Some will insist on se-
lecting a leader on issues and
stands the candidate may take.
Others vote on the image
young, old, liberal, conserva-
tive.
When the month of April
rolls around in American Jew-
ish communities, there is also
a restlessness and turmoil
who will be the next temple
president? Shall we select a
man of age and experience .
retired one who will give
the time to the daily operation
of expanding and busy congre-
gations? Or shall we select a
"young man" with young ideas
who will bring the younger set
into active leadership in the
Temptt and Congregation?
In my experience of many
years as rabbi, I have noticed
that there is no guarantee that
an old man will be better be-
cause of his experience nor
will a younger man or woman
necessarily bring in new ideas
or younger leadership. There
are older men with young ideas
and many young men who are
obstinate and reactionary and
often keep a congregation from
making progress because they
are insistent on their points of
view. Ultimately the best choice
is not in age or experience, but
rather in attitude and dedica-
tion toward Jewish identity and
survival.
Any person young, old,
man or woman who is com-
mitted to a temple and all it
represents in history, meaning
and influence in the commu-
nity can become a successful
leader. The person must love be-
ing Jewish, enjoy Jewish asso-
ciation and worship and holiday
celebrations. He must have a
deep empathy foi otheYs; be
ready to share his time and en-
joy the cooperation of an un-
derstanding spouse, to be a good
leader of a congregation.
It is always a ioy to see a new
leader step into the' responsi-
bilities and, by giving some
time and labor to work with
others, mature into a fine force
for good in a congregation. What
congregations have to learn,
however, is how to show some
appreciation for the efforts of
these leaders. Criticism is usual-
ly constant, but praise seems so
seldom expressed.
Giving leaders a plaque or
gift at the end of a term in a
routine fashion is not enough.
Congregations should learn to
recognize their leaders publicly,
in temple and Sisterhood, Men's
Club and youth leadership, so
that the labors of dedicated peo-
ple may find worthy praise of
grateful congregants.
Blessed are the leaders and
more blessed are the people
who properly select good ones.
in
CANOiaiGHTlNG TMtt
28 IYAR 7:47
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Bamidbar
"A good way off shall they pitch round about
the tent of meeting" (Num. 2.2).
BAMIDBAR "And the Lord spoke unto Moses
in the wilderness of Sinai, in the tent of meeting, on the
first day of the second month in the second year after
they were come out of the land of Egypt, saying: 'Take
ye the sum of all the congregation of the children of
Israel, by their families, by their fathers' houses, ac-
cording to the number of names, every male, by their
polls; from twenty years old and upward, all that are
able to go forth to war in Israel: ye shall number them
by their hosts, even thou and Aaron'" (Numbers 1.1-
3). Exclusive of the Levites, who were not numbered,
the total sum of men of military age was 603,555. There
follows a description of the Israelites' encampments
during their journeys through the desert: there were
four major camps, each of three tribes; one under the
flag of Judah, one under the flag of Reuben, one un-
der the flag of Ephraim, and one under the flag of Dan.
The Levites camped separately near the sanctuary;
among the Levites, each clan had a particular service
to render in regard to the sanctuary.


N
Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, May 28, 1976
News irom Israel Bonds
NBC CreVO Community Calendar Meeting June 9
PRIME MINISTER'S CLUB
HONORS NEW MEMBERS
Chaim Even-Zohar, of the Is-
rael Embassy in Washington,
will present the 1976 Israel
Prime Minister's Awards at the
home of Dr. Maxwell and Reva
Dauer, Wednesday evening,
June 2. .
The Prime Minister's Club,
established to honor people who
purchase a minimum of $25,000
in Israel Bonds each year, was
officially'inaugurated by Prime
Minister Golda Meir at the Feb-
ruary, J.574, International Israel
Bond GijHference in Israel. Mrs.
Meir and the late David Ben-
Gurion tpunded the Israel Bond
Organization twenty-five years
ago. ''.,<:
JThe jnembers of this club
represent an honorary society
of the rjitt distinguished Jew-
ish communal and business lead-
ers," said Dr. Dauer. "The pur-
chase of Israel Bonds is evi-
dence of the understanding of
the difficult economic situation
facing the people of Israel this
year."
Even-Zohar, Assistant Eco-
nomic Counselor at the Israel
Embassy, will carry the words
of Prime Minister Rabin as he
presents the awards. Rabin re-
cently said, in a message on
Israel's Independence Day, "Is-
rael Bonds enable you, our fel-
low Jews of America, to join
with us in the practical work
of building, developing and
strengthening Israel. Through
this partnership we expand our
economy, and the expansion of
our economy has become a cru-
cial factor of our future
strength. We do not have the
fantastic oil wealth of our Arab
neighbors. Nor do we have their
rich natural resources. But we
do have you, and it is your
commitment that enables us to
build the factories, the plans,
the roads and the railways that
enable us to produce more, ex-
port more and offer jobs to
more immigrants as they come."
The awards are presented
under the auspices of the South
Florida Israel Bond Organiza-
tion.
Ci -to NEW LEADERSHIP
DINNER DANCE
JUNE S
The first South Florida- Israel
Bond New Leadership' inau-
gural dinner dance is ftlimned
for Saturday, June 5, at 7:4$
p.m. in the Voltaire Suites it
the Fontaineblaau Hotel, it Waft
announced by Ronald Krongold,
regional chairman, Southeast
United- States.
The event, which will be at-
tended by couples from through-
out Dade and Broward Coun-
ties, will feature a keynote ad-
dress by Avi Primor, Chief of
Information of Israel's Foreign
Ministry.
Dinner cochairmen include
Charles and Wendy Citrin, Ste-
phen and Arlyn Cypen, Gary
and Sandy Dix, Steven and Mar-
lene Josias, Arthur and Betty
Kail, Richard and Michelle
Krinzman, Arnold and Suzanne
Lasky. Michel and Connie Nah-
mad, Steven and Ruth Shere
and Elliot and Enyd Sokolow.
Tony St. Thomas will enter-
tain, along with Stu Granger
and his orchestra.
Israel Bonds' campaign theme
in 1976 is "the year of energy"
energy to build the oil pipe-
lines from Eilat, to finance in-
creased electric power, to build
an oil refinery at Ashdod. to
stimulate oil exploration and aid
in the construction of new power
nlants.
*

COMPLIMENTS OF
MR. JAMES D. CARLTON
2750 OKEECHOBEE BLVD.
WEST PALM BEACH 33402
.
Detained
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Several cameramen and a
correspondent working for
NBC-TV News were detained
in Jenin for several hours
after Israeli military author-
ities there ascertained that
their presence sparked a
large gathering of townspeo-
ple and the beginning of a
"staged demonstration"
The TV crew was .instruct-
ed to leave, and when tbey
refused, authorities detained
them for three hours and
then released them.
ISRAELI authorities have
charged that the appearance of
TV crews on the West Bank has
encouraged local residents to
stage demonstrations, sometimes
in exchange for payments from
foreign newsmen.
Israeli Ambassador Chaim
Herzog told the UN Security
Council last week, during its
debate on Israeli practices on
the West Bank, that an investi-
gation is underway concerning
the proposal by a West Bank
resident to a foreign TV crew
to organize incidents such as
the burning of tires or setting
up road blocks for a payment
of $300.
Religious
Services
FORT LAUDERDALE
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9108
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman. 44A
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 71O0 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
Labowiti. Cantor Maurice Neu. 42
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. S24B W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Joel
S. Qoor. Cantor Jerome Klement, 4S
YOUNG ISRAEL OP HOLLYWOOD.
3891 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moahe Bomzer. 52
The important meeting of the
Community Calendar Commit-
tee of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale is
scheduled for Wednesday, June
9, at 7:30 p.m. at the Jewish
Federation office, 2999 NW 33rd
Avenue, Lauderdale Lakes, ac-
cording to Janice Starrels, chair-
man of the Calendar committee.
Mrs. Starrels said that with
the tremendous growth of the
Jewish community in North
Broward and the estabishment
of many Jewish organizations,
the Community Calendar is a
way of preventing organizations
from scheduling major meetings
or fund-raising events on the
same date. "The Calendar is an
important tool for building and
fostering cooperation among all
Jewish organizations in our
community," she observed.
Presidents or appointed rep-
resentatives from each organ-
ization are urged to contact
Barry Axler at the Jewish Fed-
eration office, 484-8200, to no-
tify him of their attendance at
this meeting, Mrs. Starrels
added that these representa-
tives are requested to bring to
their meeting a list of their of- -i
fleers, regular meeting and spe-
cial' event dates.
*

May
28 Senior Adults
June
1 Senior Adults
14 Senior Adults
Senior Adults
Lecture with question-and-answer
period on "Arthritis" 1:30 p.m.
Folk Dancing, Round and Square 1 p.m.
New ten-session Yiddish class begins.
Lorna Tomkin.instructor. 10 a.m.
Gourmet Cooking class begins.
Registration for $10 required. 1:30 p.m.
PLANTATION
'PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 8. Nob Hill Rd. Lit-
eral Reform. Rabbi Arthur S.
Abrame. #4
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNAGOGUE
747S N.W. 4th St ft
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 1S2 SB 11th
Avs. Conservative. Rabbi Morris A
Skop. Cantor Jacob Rertzor. 48
-JJ,-------------------------------------------------
Best Wishes To All At Shavuoth
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 4101
NW tth 84. Conservative. 44B
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION.
7840 Maroate Blvd. Conservative.
Cantor Charles Perlmen.
CORAL SPRINGS
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON.
QREGATION. S721 NW 100th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Max Waits. 44
Rabbi David Boront. 83
DEERRELD BEACH
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER .
BETH ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE. Can.
tury Village Ea" Conservative.
To The Jewish Community in
South Florida We Extend
Greetings on Shavuoth
Polynesian Village
Motor Inn
<
9711 NORTH OCEAN BLVD.
FORT LAUDERDALE 33308
PHONE 721-2750
L & K HARLEY
SALES
SPECIALIZING IN SERVICE
601 N.E. 44th STREET
FT. LAUDERDALE 33309
PHONE 772-0786
To The Jewish Community
In South Florida We Extend
Greetings On Shavuoth
ATTACHE
RESORT
MOTEL
Observing Friday Night Dinners
2711 SOUTH OCEAN BLVD.
HOLLYWOOD 33020
TELEPHONE 923-4631
-,*-


Way, May 28, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 15
HHH Pushes Vetoed Aid Proposals
Continued from Page 1-A end of fiscal 1976 and the start
The President did not men- of fiscal 1977 under which Is-
Ition the bill's protfslons for rael would have received an
transitional quarter funding for extra $550 million in military
{he three months between the assistance. Nor did he refer to
another provision, opposed by
the Administration, that would
cut off aid to countries that
harbor international terrorists.
BUT FORD assailed the mea
sure's insistence on "compliance
by recipient countries with visa
practices or human rights stand-
ards set by our Congress as a
condition for continued U.S. as-
e're Making World Safe for Communism
WASHINGTON Norman
ihoretz, editor of Commen-
magazine, today accused
|th the liberal and conserva-
Ve elites in this country of
psing into isolationism and
Famed that such a policy is
antamount to "making the
rorld safe for Communism."
However, he added, there is
no assurance that the masses
of Americans have adopted this
attitude and there are now in-
creasing signs that they respond
enthusiastically to the calls of
eople like Daniel P. Moynihan
|o proclaim the superiority of
pur political values as the tradi-
tional defender of liberty
(gainst the political culture of
larxism.
THE COMMENTARY editor,
|dressing a session of the
lerican Jewish Committee's
ih anniversary annual meet-
being held at the Washing-
Hilton Hotel here, explain-
that in reaction to American
Eilure in the Vietnam War, the
Iberal elite in this country de-
veloped doubts about the entire
tale of the U.S. in world af-
fairs.
Thus, the liberals, who had
een the most vigorous expo-
nents of an interventionist anti-
Zommunist policy in the post-
/orld War II era and who led
Jhe country into the Vietnam
Var, became the exponents of
foreign policy based not on
lerican opposition to Com-
anist power but on the idea
a new world order of inter-
endence and cooperation.
According to Podhoretz, this
is a wishful illusion, and
shed by the Soviet military
i-up and by Soviet policy
frica and the Middle East.
CONSERVATIVE elite,
including Nixon, Ford, and
Ssinger, has opted, in the
termath of Vietnam, for a
Jased American withdrawal,
reality if not in rhetoric,
\m an activist anti-Commu-
policy, and for a willing-
Is to "do business with
fezhnev."
[he conservative view, as
pressed often in private by
etary Kissinger, is that the
ted States no longer pos-
es the will to check Soviet
isionism, and that we must
fore get out of the way
facefully as possible. The
implication of this view,
fretz declared, is the
anment of the American
Itment to defend Western
and Japan from Russian
and a corresponding un-
less to confront Russian
ices in the Middle East.
Ihoretz said that the So-
Union would be the only
ficiary of American with-
tal from an anti-Communist
|y, for unlike the United
ts, the USSR is in a pe-
of "active imperialist ex-
monism."
cited the Soviets' con-
pursuit both of military
|ority in strategic nuclear
is and in conventional
including ships and
designed for offensive
ts, and he also pointed
pr dispatch of Cuban
to Angola.
RUSSIANS, he said,
expected to go as far
pir own ideological and
ambitions, and the ab-
of effective resistance,
irry them and that
[well be to the ends of
bth."
Commentary editor
that even the relative
Idence of Communist
in countries like Italy
ice from Russian con-
trol, as well as the autonomy
of other Communist countries
like Yugoslavia and China,
would be threatened by an
American withdrawal.
He asserted that these nation-
al Communist movements them-
selves now acknowledge that
their ability to escape Soviet
domination has "all along been
a byproduct of the success of
American power in containing
the Soviet Union."
HOWEVER, Podhoretz took
issue with their proposal that
American power be used "to
save Communism from the Rus-
sians." For, he said, Commun-
ism has been a "curse" and has
destroyed the civil and political
liberty "of every people which
had had the misfortune to be
forced to live under it."
Nor, he said, has the record
of Communism been any bet-
ter in improving the material
condition of the countries it has
ruled or in wiping out inequal-
ities of condition. He expressed
skepticism that the Italian or
French Communists would do
any better if they ever came to
power.
"A COMMUNIST culture
global in its dimensions
whether or not it was under the
control of Moscow would be
impossible to shut out entire-
ly. The Communist temptation
to subvert and undermine the
last remaining democratic so-
ciety would be irresistible, and
to combat such subversion
would require a degree of re-
pression which would itself en-
danger democratic freedoms."
Podhoretz asserted that the
United States still possessed
sufficient power to defend the
free world against the spread
of Communism if the will were
there. He suggested that the
isolationist attitude of the li-
beral and conservative elites
might not reflect the view of
most Americans; but until this
is determined in the national
political arena, the question of
"whether the new isolationism
is as pervasive among the
masses of Americans as it is
among the elites will have to
remain moot.
Hadassah Honors
Margate Center
For the second time the Mar-
gate Jewish Center has been
honored by having its name in-
scribed on a plaque in the Book
of Synagogues. The announce-
ment was made by Mrs. Teddy
Krimsky, president of Blyma
Chapter of Hadassah, who said
that she had forwarded a check
donated by the temple's daily
minyanaires to Israel's Mount
Scopus Medical Center, to be
used for the benefit of all man-
kind.
Greetings at Shavuoth
RELIANCE AUTO BODY
238 S. DIXIE HWY. EAST
POMPANO BEACH 33060
PHONE 782-0343
Mr. W. M. (BUI) Wilson Extends
Best Wishes To All Jewish Families
For A Peaceful And Happy
Shavuoth
NATIONWIDE
INSURANCE
LIFE ... HEALTH &
ALL LINES OF FIRE INSURANCE
104 SOUTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
POMPANO BEACH 33060
TELEPHONE 943-0377
'If it should turn out that the
new isolationism has indeed
triumphed among the people,"
he concluded, "then the United
States will celebrate its two
hundredth birthday by betray-
ing the heritage of liberty which
has earned it the wonder and
envy of the world from the
moment of its founding to this,
and by helping to make that
world safe for the most deter-
mined and ferocious and bar-
barous enemies of liber*v ever
to have appeared on the earth."
sistance."
He claimed that provision
"ignores the many other com-
plex factors which should gov-
ern our relationships with those
countries." The provision was
aimed against countries, such
as Saudi Arabia, which dis-
criminate against Americans on
grounds of race, religion or sex.
Humphrey charged the Presi-
dent with seeking to "under-
mine" the work of Congress.
He said the veto "seriously
complicates the operation of
many important programs, in-
cluding his (Ford's) own Middle
East initiatives."
Meanwhile, the Senate-House
conference bill on appropria-
tions to fund the foreign aid
programs established by the
vetoed authorization legislation
is being held up by the House
foreign aid subcommittee pend-
ing possible compromises on
means to provide the funds un-
der existing authorization mea-
sures.
To The Jewish Community in
South Florida We Extend
Greetings on Shavuoth
Able Rent All &
Sales Company
414 WEST LANTANA ROAD
LANTANA 33462
TELEPHONE 582-9994
Best Wishes For
A Peaceful And
Happy Shavuoth
William D. Adeimy
Inc.
1201 OMAR ROAD
WEST PALM BEACH 33405
PHONE 832-6305


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, May 28, 1976 V
NORTON TIRE CO.
WHERE YOU ARE THE IMPORTANT ONE!
.
Back in 1924 my father, Louis E. Pallot, started Norton
Tire Company on a simple business philosophy.
Treat the customer right and he'll be back. We are still
a family business... now with 22 stores throughout Florida
.. .still following that advice. We strive to give you the
best product, the best price and the best service every
time. We appreciate your business. At Norton Tire
Company you are the important one. Ron, Howard and
I guarantee it.
NORTON S PALLOT
President

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ONLY THE VERY
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SIZE
CR78-14
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ER78-14
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HR78-15
JR78-15_
LR78-15
REGULAR SALE PRICE F.E TAX
50.68 39.93 2 31
52.88 41.66 242
55.27 43.55 249
57.68 45.44 2 69
60.22 47.45 289
63.37 49.93 3 07
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64.97 51.19 3 15
67.15 52.91 331
71.67 56.47 3 47
NORTON TIRE CO's. LIMITED WARRANTY
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If for any reason you are not completely satisfied with
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Install new Oelco
(no.t rebuilt) front wheel
disc pads
Check rotors & calipers
Repack outer front wheel
bearings (if needed)
Adjust and bleed brakes
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Bird & Douglas Road 446-6101
NORTH MIAMI
13360 N.W. 7th Ave 681-8541
N. MIAMI BEACH
1700 N.E. 163 St 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH DADE
9001 8. Dixie Hwy 667-7575
HlALEAH/ PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 49th St 822-2500
CUTLER RIDOE
20390 S Dixie Hwy 233-5241
WEST MIAMI
Bird & Galloway Rdi 552-6656
HOMESTEAD
30100 S. Federal Hwy. 247-1622
W. HOLLYWOOD
497 S Stata Rd 7 987-0450
FT. LAUDERDALE
1740 E Sunriae Blvd 463-7588
PLANTATION
361 N State Rd 1 587-2186
POMPANO BEACH
3151 N. Federal Hwy. 943-4200
WEST PALM BEACH
515 South Dixie 832-3044
LAKE PARK/N. PALM BEACH
532 N Lake Blvd 643-2544
FT. PIERCE
2604 South 4th St. 464-8020
VERO BEACH
755 21 tl Street 567-1174
ORLANDO
3620 E Colonial Dr 896-1141
WINTER PARK
881 S. Orlando Ave. 645-5305
DAYTONA BEACH
90T Voluaia Ave 255-7487
NAPLES
2065 E Tamleml Tr. 774-4443
t>
*r


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FILES


f* Friday, May 28, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
1
UJA Telethon in Full Swing
Federation's campaign tele-
thon moved into its third week
of intensivle phone-calKng as
this issue was going to press,
with hundreds of pledges being
received from persons who had
not been contacted for the UJA-
Israel Emergency Fund in any
other way.
General campaign chairman
Leo Goodman noted the success
of the telethon in a brief state-
ment lauding the response of
those being called and of the
volunteers making the calls
from the Federation's board
room at its headquarters in the
Jewish Community Center.
"A response to the needs of
the UJA and Israel Emergency
Fund is always gratifying," said
Goodman. "It is particularly
gratifying in this case in which
the one-on-one person-to-person
appeal is not face-to-face but
Hank Meyer and Hy Sirota
UJA chairman Adolph Greenbaum (left), president Herb
Graff and board of directors member James Galowich,
Plantation B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 2966.
I
Dora Cohen and Elsie Simon, B'nai B'rith Lauderhill
Women's Chapter
FALLS KOSHER
POULTRY PRODUCTS
available at your
LOCAL KOSHER BUTCHER
or contact
Arthur Horowitz
Poultry Sales Manager
Zion Corporation
1717 N.W. Seventh Avenue
Miami, Fla. 33136
Tel: 324-1855
THE WHITE NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
MAY SPECIALS
I- 8* 10. mnd i- J7porlroift In Tru-Cohr
o $47.50 value, for $20.00
SK ABOUT OUR BAR MITZVAH 4 WEDDING SPECIALS
Additional cnarge tor couples or ramny groups.
Havton Studio*
Over forty yean in New York and Chicago
*444N. E 12th AVENUE
|SeV4111
1603 E. LAS OLAS BLVD.
TOUT LAUOCRDALE. FLORIDA *3-31'
* Ask obou. our spaclol wddlftg pockoq*

via the almost impersonal med-
ium of the telephone.
"Great credit for this re-
sponse is owed to the fine group
of B'nai B'rith men and women
who are doing the phone-call-
ing. The Federation, the UJA
and the Israel Emergency Fund
are the better for their good
work, and I take this means to
express our thanks to them."
The volunteers who have
been at the telephones during
all hours of the day and eve-
ning, starting in mid-morning
and continuing till 9 p.m. in-
clude:
Dora Cohen, Dorothy Hur-
witz and Elsie Seman, represent-
ing B'nai B'rith Lauderhill
Women's Chapter No. 1483.
Morris Axelrod, Al Kassover,
Murray Kastoff, Hank Meyer
and Hy Sirota, of Sunrise B'nai
B'rith Lodge No. 2953.
Herb Graff, president of B'nai
B'rith Plantation Lodge No.
2946; Adolph Greenbaum, the
lodge's UJA chairman; and Ja-
mes Gallowich, Alfred Newman
and Gene Resnick, members of
the lodge's board of directors.
Also calling from the Pom-
pano Lodge B'nai B'rith are
George I. Kern, Sam Simonoff.
Sam Schwartz, Abe Hersh, Hen-
ry Schneider, Joseph Fink and
Nat Evans. And from the Blue
Star Lodge B'nai B'rith were
Phil Solomon, Sid Friedman and
Joseph Sobel.
The telethon is continuing
into June, with volunteers set
to man the phones throughout
the month on an all-day and
early-evening basis.
learned
romour
live through
events is not
{js to share
then-
Murray Kastoff (left), Al Kassover and Morris Axelrod,
Sunrise B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 2953
Alfred Newman (left) and Gene KesmcK, members of
the board of directors of B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 2966.
H500 Tons Of fun!
The "Fun Ships" CARNIVALE and
MARDI GRAS, 27,250 gross tons each,
offer you more than any other 7-day
Miami-based Caribbean cruise ship. We
have more swimming pools (even in-
door pools), more lounges, more ship-
board activities, more entertainment
(including two different shows each
night), more public deck space and the
largest staterooms. The reason we have
so much space is that each of the "fun
tss CARNIVALE, Departs
Every Saturday From Miami
For San Juan, St Maarten
And St Thomas
ships" are HALF-AGAIN LARGER
than any other 7-day cruise ship out of
Miami! We also offer the finest Inter-
national and American cuisine, full
gambling casinos, the most popular
ports-of-call, and we're the only 7-day
fleet that docks at every port.
When you think about going on a
cruise, think of "the Fun Ships". We
offer more bounce to the ounce. More
fun to the ton!
tss MARDI GRAS, Departs
Every Sunday From Miami
For Nassau, San Juan And
St Thomas
For information or reservations see your Travel Agent
Carnival Tdurs, 820 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Florida 33132
H
Cruiae "the Fun Ship*"
KsCaiTi[\ak'
.ss'MaiulGi^s
each 27,250 groas tons registered in Panama
$365-$565
per person double occupancy
rates are for base teason sailing date* and
are higher for certain peak


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian o) Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, May 28, 1976
i
The Shavuoth Holiday
As we celebrate Shavuoth June 4, we will be more
' than ever conscious of the relationship between this
Holiday and Passover.
Shavuoth is the "fiftieth day," or the seventh week
after the Exodus from Egypt. It is a festival in remem-
brance of the 40 years of wandering in the Sinai, and of
the giving of the Law to Moses on Mount Sinai.
Customarily, we adorn the synagogue with plants
and flowers on Shavuoth. And at home, we eat dairy
products.
The adornment of the synagogue is in recollection
of the traditional belief that Mt. Sinai, where Moses re-
ceived the Ten Commandments, was a mountain cover-
ed by trees. The emphasis on dairy foods comes from
the historic comparison between the Torah and milk.
Quite naturally, these traditions and beliefs reach
back to Jewry's ancient past, and it is through Shavuoth
, that this historic continuity of custom and tradition is
preserved.
But in the larger sense, we are still wanderers in
the desert. Though the Exodus has ended for many, there
are still countless numbers of Jews, in Russia and other
lands of oppression, trying to get to Israel.
As for Israel herself, the future remains perilous
and uncertain.
Shavuoth emphasizes this "incompleteness" of so
many millions of Jews across the world, who are at
home, but have not yet ended their wandering.
A Long Way to Go
Morton Silberman is the new president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation. He was installed at
Federation's 38th annual meeting Wednesday, which
also honored outgoing President Harry B. Smith.
The Silberman administration begins at a time
when the 1976 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Fund proceeds are nearing the $13 million mark
the entire total achieved during the 1975 CJA-IEF.
Wednesday night's campaign report indicated that
there is still a long way to go toward completing the
1976 CJA-IEF campaign.
No dollar goal for the campaign was set. Instead,
'its achievement may be measured by people men
and women whose commitment and involvement caus-
ed CJA IEF's message to reach each and every house-
hold in Dade County," declared Campaign Chairman
L. Jules Arkin in the report.
CJA-IEF's message is the vital Jewish responsi-
bility to "Tzedakah." Fulfill your share in that respon-
sibility. If you haven't given yet, then give now.
Anniversary Celebrations
Although Yom Haatzmaut was officially celebrated
on May 5, Israel and Jewish communities throughout
the world are continuing the 28th anniversary event
with special functions marking the occasion to the very
end of the month.
Both joys and fears are shared by Jewish com-
munities throughout the world.
While there has been no war, this last year has
shown that the chances for a permanent Middle East
peace are still a long way off. Israel, Zionism and the
Jewish people came under an unprecedented attack in
the United Nations and other international forums.
Israel's relations with the United States, the only
country it can rely on, have come under some severe
strain.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin may have best explained
it in his Independence Day message when he said
Israel's independence "draws a line between past sur-
vival by chance and future existence by self-will; or
being helplessly controlled by events and of controlling
events by our own choice, means and purpose."
Jewish Floridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
OFFICE and PLANT 10 N.B. th at.. Mlirl, Fla. SUM Phone 371-4SO*
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1-I7I-40S
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O. Box 012*73. Miami, Florida SUM
FRED K. 8HOCHBT SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Aaelitant to Publisher
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In its Columns
Published Bl -Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Miami, Fla.
All P.O. S67* returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Flo-dlan, P.O. Box 012*71. Miami. Fla. SS101.
O ""rod K. Shochst Friday, May 21. 1*7
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Sevsn Arts Feature Syndicate.
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, Amoriean Aseocle-
ttoa of wfllsh Jewish Nswupaosrs, and the Florida Press Asooclstlon.
SUBSCRIPTION RAT*8: (Local Ares) One YesrfS.OO. Out of Town Upon
Requeet.
Volume 5 Number 11
Friday, May 28, 1976 28 IYAR 5736
Fidel at His Tricks Again
JZ 6,
By JACK ANDERSON
WASHINGTON Fidel Cas-
tro is at it again.
Secret intelligence reports
claim that Cuban advisers are
training African guerrillas in
Mozambique for operations
against white-ruled Rhodesia.
Intelligence sources say, how-
ever, there is no evidence that
Cuban troops are crossing into
Rhodesia to take part in the
actual combat.
Castro, of course, caused an
Jack Anderson
international stir by sending
combat troops to Angola. The
intelligence reports estimate
that between 13,000 and 14,000
crack Cuban troops are still sta-
tioned there.
SOME ARE helping the new
rulers root out rival guerrillas
from the rugged southeastern
section of the country. But their
main purpose, apparently, is to
deter any counter-offensive un-
til the country is stabilized.
American intelligence agen-
cies have also detected the
movement of Cuban troops from
Angola back to Cuba. One re-
port interprets this as an indi-
cation that Castro is withdraw-
ing some of his men. But other
intelligence sources suggest the
Cuban troop movements are
merely rotations, not withdraw-
als.
KGB CALL?: The Soviet Union
often harasses Jewish-Amer-
icans who visit Russia. But now,
the campaign of intimidation
has apparently reached into the
United States.
For example, Greg and Nancy
Leisch traveled to the Soviet
Union in March. They were
picked up and questioned by
the KGB secret police after they
left the home of scientist Alex-
ander Lerner* When they re-
turned to their hotel, they found
that their room had been ran-
sacked.
The Leisches thought they
had left all this behind after
they returned home. But Greg
Leisch received a phone call
from a man who introduced
himself as Mr. Schneider and
identified himself as a State
Department official.
HE EXPLAINED that the So-
Continued on Page 11
Man Turned into a Machine
In winding up my column last
week, I wrote that piety and
patriotism seem to be what
Americans are looking for today.
One easily recognizes the scoun-
drels for whom patriotism is the
last refuge. But piety? Quite a
few people challenged my use of
the word and its meaningfulness
to the 1976 American in the con-
text of the presidential cam-
paign.
I write this before the Mary-
land Primary results are in but
it doesn't matter. Either the
guru Governor of California,
Jerry Brown, or the Baptist
fundamentalist ex-Governor of
Georgia. Jimmy Carter, will
have been the winner. And if
anything describes them, for me
at least, it is the Politics of
Piety.
GEORGE ORWELL, in an es-
say on "Politics and the Eng-
lish Language," describes the
speaker who "has gone some
distance towards turning him-
self into a machine. The appro-
priate noises are coming out of
his larynx, but his brain is not
involved as it would be if were
choosing his words for him-
self.
"If the speech he is making
is one that he is accustomed to
make over and over again, he
may be almost unconscious of
what he is saying, as one is
when one utters the responses
in church. And this reduced
state of consciousness, if not
indispensable, is at any rate fav-
orable to political conformity."
Which is how I feel as I fol-
low the verbal meanderings of
the languages of Brown and
Carter, political language which
Orwell says "has to consist of
euphemism, question begging
and sheer cloudy vagueness."
IT IS no wonder they spend
much of their time tryiruj to
explain to puzzled reporters that
"I never said it like that," "It
wasn't meant the way it sound-
ed," nd so forth.
Nor is it any wonder that
Brown, with his. Jesuit training
and Zen inclination, appears to
be promising pie in the sky in
reflecting the Far Eastern
detached contemplation and ac-
ceptance of corrupt reality here
on earth, especially in Califor-
nia and Washington.
He appeals, one writer has
said, to those white middle-
class people who in recent
years have substituted personal
consciousness-raising for more
traditional political attitudes.
They, who have traveled from
Esalen to est in their search
for salvation, appear to have
found a new leader.
JIMMY CARTER'S evangel-
ical Christian approach is some-
what more puzzling. According
to James Reston in the New
York Times, Carter is said to be
a great admirer of Reinhold
Niebuhr and thus cannot be
labeled a "religious fanatic."
For this great liberal theo-
logian was, if anything, a so-
cial activist who dug into the
real issues of the day and was
a founder of Americans for
Democratic Action. Arthur
Schlesinger Jr. was a close as-
sociate of Niebuhr in ADA, and
he wonders if Carter can really
have understood Niebuhr whose
whole "argument was directed
against the notion that the prob-
lems of secular society would
respond to simple moral preach-
ments.
"American Christianity,''
wrote Niebuhr, "tends to be ir-
<>
relevant to the problems of jus-
tice because it persists in pre-
senting the law of love as a
simple solution to every com-
munal problem Religion
is more frequently a source of
confusion than of light in the
political realm. The tendency to
equate our political with our
Christian convictions causes pol-
itics to generate idolatry."
I CANNOT help but recall,
in this connection, the lead to
the Christmas column Billy Gra-
ham wrote in The Miami Herald
in 1972: "The need of the world
is Christian compassion and
concern."
To which The Man in the
White House, to whom he was
spiritual adwsor, undoubtedly
said "amen" as he ordered the
planes out to carpet-bomb
North Vietnam for a final time.
This is not to question the
sincerity of either Brown or
Carter, or to equate them with
the likes of Nixon, although col-
umnists Cockburn and Ridge-
way in the Village Voice don't
hesitate to state that the cam-
paign of '76 has been waged on
religious innuendo, masking pro-
grams of political reaction.
THE STRATEGIES (of Brown
and Carter)," they wrote,
'amount to tjie same thfng:
transfer of hopes for socisjfc
amelioration from the opera-
tions of government to the
realm of religious meditation
and aspiration. In this type of
fatalism, words have little or no
connection with reality. The
candidate promises everythjar
in nothing. In the end run it
a form of propaganda for rna*-
ing people accept the inequioe*
of the current political eco-
nomy. Nixonism under a ne*
hat."
My Orwell collection dates
his essay exactly 30 years
What concerns me now is now
the language of politics seems
not only more debased Mt
have corrupted thought as weu
The Politics of Piety, too**