The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00055

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
fflJemst? Floridian
OF GREATER FORT LAWOERRAEE
Volume
5 Number 8
Friday, April 1$, 1976
O Frd K. Shochtt April 16, 1S7I
3 Sections$1.00
Campaign Surpasses Last Year's Total;
But $300,000 Still Outstanding
Gifts to this year's Jewish Federation campaign on
behalf of the UJA and Israel Emergency Fund are running
51 percent ahead of last year, with over $1,365,000 amassed
so far. Last year the total campaign raised $1,358,000.
Leo Goodman, general campaign chairman, hailed the
showing as "a tribute to Fort Lauderdale Jewry," asserting
that "maintenance of the current standard of giving would
put the campaign over the top."
Goodman pointed out, how-
ever, that over $300,000 is still
outstanding from people who
pledged last year and have not
yet made their 1976 campaign
commitments.
Goodman particularly stressed
the need for continued giving at
the current pace. He noted that
gifts all along the line were sub-
stantially higher than those
made a year ago by the same
contributors, and he pointed opt
that most amounts from new
contributors were also in the
range of "good giving."
To insure the current cam-
paign pace and giving stand-
ard, teams of leading campaign
workers and contributors have
been formed to solicit persons
who gave to last year's drive
but have not been registered as
givers this vear.
The special solicitation effort
has a $300,000 goal and a two-
month limit. The team members
met at Federation headquarters
on March 31 to receive the
names of prospects and hear a
special broadcast from Jerusa-
lem that included addresses by
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin,
Jewish Agency chairman Joseph
Almogi, UJA general chairman
Frank R. Lautenberg, Jewish
Agency board of governors
chairman Max M. Fisher, and
Council of Jewish Federations
and Welfare Funds president
Jerold C. Hoffberger.
Prime Minister Rabin told his
listeners hundreds of cam-
paign leaders in cities across
the U.S. that "We in Israel
are moving ahead with a tough
Continued on Page 2-A
Dr~ Milton Nowick, with
his wife, Frances, has been
named chairman of the
Jewish Federation's dele-
gation that will attend the
UJA's "This Year in Jeru-
salem" national conference
in late October.
Israel Consul to Attend
Sizable Local Delegation Shaping Up
Yom Uaatzmaut Celebration For October UJA P arley in Jerusalem
Consul of Israel, Meir Ro-
mem, will be present at the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale's Yom Haatzmaut
(Israel Independence Day) pro-
gram on Sunday, April 25, 10
a.m. at Holiday Park. The an-
nouncement was made by Faye
Geronemus, chairman of the
Jewish Community Center's Is-
rael celebration committee. Mrs.
Geronemus also said that Ron
Hunter, Channel 10 newscaster,
will be master of ceremonies.
Meir Romem, born in 1941 in
Tel Aviv, finished secondary
education in Rehovoth and serv-
ed from 1959-61 in the Israel
Defense Forces.
HE RECEIVED a Bachelor's
degree in political science and
history of the Moslem peoples
and a Master's in history of the
Moslem peoples. He has been
with the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs since 1965, and since
1970 in the Minister's Cabinet.
He is married to Dr. Rosalind
Romem and they have two sons
and a daughter.
The Drogram will begin with
a solidarity march of Jewish
youth, featuring the children of
North Broward religious and
Sunday schools and youth
groups. The march will include
floats on different themes.
In addition to the many local,
state and national dignitaries
on the program, special guest
performer will be folksinger
Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach.
Mrs. Geronemus, who said
there is no admission charge
for the program, urged every-
one to attend. Israeli food will
also be sold at the event.
A Fort Lauderdale delegation, expected to number
more than 60 and possibly as many as 75, has started shape up for the UJA's annual national conference sched-
uled to meet in Jerusalem from Oct. 24 through 31.
The conference bears the dis-
tinctive title "This Year in Jeru-
salem."
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin,
expressing keen pleasure that
this year's priority and goal-
setting UJA conference would
be held in Jerusalem, comment-
ed in a nationwide radio address
heard by Jewish community
leaders that it was "a wonder-
ful way of demonstrating our
togetherness."
The Prime Minister said he
was looking forward to seeing
"very many of you here in Jeru-
salem."
The Fort Lauderdale delega-
tion will represent the Jewish
Federation and its campaign on
behalf of the UJA and Israel
Emergency Fund. Dr. Milton
Nowick, of the Galleon Condo-
minium on the Gait Ocean Mile,
has been named delegation
chairman. He and his wife,
Frances, in a meeting with Fed-
eration executive director Irv-
ing L. Geisser, expressed satis-
faction with the initial response
to invitations to join the dele-
gation.
"Jews here and elsewhere are
now sitting down for Passover
seders in which they will recite
the ancient bvword 'Next year
Continued on Page 2-A
RABBI LEON KR0NISH TO OFFKIATt
International Harvester Vows
Not to Bow to Arab Boycott
SAN FRANCISCO(JTA)
In the first vote of a na-
tionwide campaign, share-
holders of International Har-
vester last week cast 1,200,-
000 votes (or 5.2 percent of
the total) in favor of a reso-
lution submitted by the
American Jewish Congress
that would require the com-
pany to prepare a detailed
report on its policy toward
compliance with Arab boy-
cott demands.
An AJCongress spokesman
noting that the Congress
owned only five shares of
stock in the companyhail-
ed the result as "a remark-
able demonstration of public
[support of our campaign to
expose pressures on Amer-
ican industry to surrender
to the Arab boycott."
EDWIN M. Epstein, associate
dean of the school of business
at the University of California
and a leader of the AJCongress
in San Francisco, presented the
resolution at the meeting.
Rabbi Goor Will Be Installed
As Emanu-El Spiritual Leader
In a statement following the
vote, Epstein noted that the
number of votes in favor of the
AJCongress resolution "comfort-
ably exceeded the three percent
required to place the resolution
on next year's agenda automa-
tically."
At the meeting, Epstein said
he was aware that International
Harvester officials had pledged
not to comply with the boycott
but that what the AJCongress
wanted was a statement on ac-
tual practices as well as prin-
ciple.
Brooks McCormick, president
and chief executive officer, re-
sponded: "The Arab boycott is
a barrier to trade and we are
opposed to it as we are to any
other trade barrier but if we are
to perform responsibily for our
shareholders we must cope with
it."
THE IH president described
the AJCongress' resolution as
"broad and burdensome" and
added that it would be costly
and might be harmful to the
company given the uncertainty
of laws and regulations which
are now being developed to deal
with the situation.
Rabbi Joel S. Goor will be
installed as the new spiritual
leader of Temple Emanu-El,
Fort Lauderdale, by his long-
time colleague and friend Rabbi
Leon Kronish of Temple Beth
Sholom, Miami Beach. They
have served together for ten
years on the Alumni Board of
Overseers of the Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of Reli-
gion, the Reform rabbinic semi-
nary.
A blast on the shofar by one
of the youth in the congregation
will signal the opening of the
service. A procession of the
Torah scrolls will be led by of-
ficers and past presidents of the
congregation, the oldest in
Broward County. Cantor Jerome
Klement will sing special instal-
lation prayers and psalms. Rab-
bi Kronish will deliver the
charge to which Rabbi Goor will
respond.
Rabbi Goor formerly led Tem-
ple Beth Israel in San Diego.
His congregation, formed by a
merger with Temple Solel of
San Diego, was the largest in
Southern California outside of
Los Angeles. During his 15
years of leadership, his congre-
gation grew from 40 to 800
families.
IN A FAREWELL letter, May-
or Pete Wilson said, "On be-
half of San Diegans of all faiths,
thank you for your willingness
to undertake so many projects
that have improved the quality
Continued on Page 14-A
RABBI GOOR
CommunityRelations Committee
Meets with Congressman Burke
The Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale recently held a special
meeting with Cong. J. Herbert
Burke, according to Alvin Capp,
committee chairman.
The meeting, held at the Jew-
ish Federation office, was at-
tended by over 40 persons who
are members of the CRC or
the board of directors of the
Jewish Federation, or presi-
dents of the Jewish organiza-
tions of North Broward.
Cong. Burke dealt with many
issues of concern to Israel and
the Jewish community. He had
great praise for former UN Am-
bassadoi Daniel Patrick Moyni-
han, but called William Scran-
ton, the new UN Ambassador,
"an amateur diplomat."
Burke, a member of the
United States UN Delegation,
Continued on Page 3-A


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The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
*TM*7. April 16. 197
Hornstein to Host Reception
For Society of Fellows May 1
Lauderdale Oaks Schedules
Fifth UJA-IEF Fund-Raising Rally
Moses Hornstein, Hollywood
business and religious leader,
will host a reception honoring
members of the Society of Fel-
lows., of the Synagogue Council
of America on May 5 in his
Emjgald Hills home.
fc-nstein is national cochair
man'-W the Society of Fellow*,
honor organization of the Syna-
gogue Council. The SCA is the
coordinating agency for Ortho-
dox, Reform and Conservative
Judaism in the United States.
Special guests at the recep-
tion, expected to attract top
leaders of the South Broward
and North Broward Jewish com-
munities, will include Rabbi
Henry Siegman of New York.
Rabbi Siegman is national ex-
ecutive vice president of the
Synagogue Council of America.
ALSO TAKING part in the
receotion tendered by Mr. and
Mrs. Hornstein is Dr. Irving
Lehman, rabbi of Temple
Emanu-El in Miami Beach and
Hornstein's cochairman for the
Former Marine Boxer to Head
US. Maccabiah Games Team
Society of Fellows. He also is
past national president of the
Synagogue Council, which now
is headed by Dr. Joseph H.
Lookstein, chancellor of Bar-
nan University.
Hornstein pointed out that
the financial support of the So-
ciety of Fellows has made pos-
sible a major expansion of
SCA activities in recent years.
These include development
of programs for and research
into synagogue responsibilities
for th? growing Jewish senior
citizen population and an inter-
national effort to further im-
prove Jewish Christian rela-
tionships and dialogue.
Hornstein is honorary chair-
man of the Hollywood-Hallan-
dale Chapter of the American
For the fifth consecutive time
the Lauderdale Oaks UJA-IEF
committee, in cooperation with
the Jewish Federation of Great-
er Fort Lauderdale. has sched-
uled a fund-raising rally. The
event will take place at the
Clubhouse on Monday, April 26,
at 7:30 p.m.
Al Golden, of the National
Commission of the Anti-Defa-
mation League, will be the guest
speaker, and honoree is Mrs.
Harriet Enrol.
The residents of the 19 build-
ings are, as always, giving their
fullest cooperation. The build-
ing representatives are Sam
Steinman, Edith Dambroth, Jo-
seph Lakin, Irving Sacks, David
Sokol, Gregg Schiff, Milton Sin-
ger, Lou Garner, Max Mitchell
Lou Weishaus, Edith Cohen, jy
Lavin, David Katler, Bernard
Warshower, Harry Weiss, Sam
Scolnick, Morris Gersch, Fred
Hylan, Hy Isenberg, Sam Spin-
ner, Esther Stolov, Sidney Sto-
lov, David Musiker, Rose Musi-
ker, Louis Amster and Elsie
Amster.
w
B'nai B'rith Women Tamarac
Chapter No. 1479 will hold a
regular meeting on Thursday
ADril 29, at the Tamarac Jew-
ish Center at 12:30 p.m.
The program will feature a
B'nai B'rith guest speaker.
Co). Phil Cohen of North Mi-
ami Beach, USMC Ret., has been
selected as team captain of the
United States team for the tenth
World Maccabiah Games in Is-
rael, July 10-22. 1977.
Making the announcement
were Nat Holman, president of
the United States Committee
Sports for Israel (USCSFI),
which sponsors the American
team, and E. Albert Pallot,
USCSFI Florida chairman.
A former Marine Corps heavy-
weight boxing champion who
has worked extensively with
young people, Col. Cohen was
U.S. Maccabiah team manager
in 1965, 1969 and 1973. As part
of his Games activities he co-
ordinated security for athletes
and officials from 26 countries.
A MEMBER of USCSFTs board
of directors since 1961, Col.
Cohen is Southern regional di-
rector of B'nai B'rith, coordi-
nating and supervising mfore
than 14,000 members in Florida.
A native of Philadelphia, he
was graduated from Temple
University with a B.S. degree
in Physical Education and did
postgraduate work in psychol-
ogy.
Persons interested in more
information about the U.S. team
or next year's Maccabiah in Is-
rael should contact Col. Cohen
at the B'nai B'rith Regional Of-
fice in Hollywood.
Sizable Local Delegation Shaping Up
FriendiWo?ctneVbrewM5n?v^ *For October UJA Parley in Jerusalem
sity, Broward chairman of the
Continued from Page 1-A
Prime Minister's Club for State
of Israel Bonds, and a key
leader of the Hollywood Jewish
Federation and its' CJA-IEF
drive.
HE ALSO is a founder of
Bar-Ilan and Yeshiva Univer-
sities, and has played a deci-
sive role in the expansion
of Hebrew day schools in the
United States.
Working closely with Horn-
stein in planning the Hollywood
function is Matthew B. Rosen-
haus of Miami Beach, South
Florida chairman of the So-
ciety of Fellows of the Syna-
gogue Council of America.
Campaign Surpasses Last Year's Total;
But $300,000 Still Outstanding
Continued from Page 1-A
program of economic reform
that is made essential by the
continuing heavy costs of de-
fense."
He continued: "We know that
we have no choice but to carry
this burden because it is the key
to deterring war, to protecting
ourselves if again attacked, and
to fostering the chances of
movement toward peace."
At the same time, he added,
"We must not relax for a mo-
ment in guaranteeing the hu-
man needs of v-our society.
Everything we do together to
help bridge the social gap and
to irriprove the quality of life
of our people adds to the inner
strength of Israel."
Rabin expressed his apprecia-
tion for the help of American
Jews, stating, "What you are
doing through UJA is to expand
the resources and thereby make
the job manageable. Here is a
Jewish unity in support of Is-
rael in a clear and tangible
fashion. What I ask of you to-
day is to join us in working
even harder for the great hu-
man purpose of Israel. If all of
us will do what we can, there
is no obstacle that we cannot
overcome together."
Almogi told the Federation
UJA campaign leaders that Is-
rael is the world's only nation
"whose very physical existence
is dependent upon its quality.
"We have to balance quality
against quantity," he declared,
because Israel "cannot afford
poverty, we cannot afford a
wide gap of income, we cannot
afford poor housing, we cannot
afford an inadequate system of
education."
' The Jewish Agency chairman
llauded his American listeners
ifor having performed "won-
ders" on Israel's behalf. "You
are truly our partners," he said,
"but we need a greater effort.
mania^JMorocco and the Soviet
Give ns your good hand and
good-heart, and both of us will
continue to strengthen Israel to
be a free, democratic atysiety."
Lautenberg noted that "Amer-
ican Jews are not being asked
to do anything more than the
people of Israel are doing for
themselves." Noting that Fort
Lauderdale and other American
communities were on the
threshold of initiating special
soliciation drives, the UJA gen-
eral chairman declared:
"There is no other course, no
relief from our responsibility.
We can and we must attain our
goals. The campaign will im-
prove the JDC (Joint Distribu-
tion Committee) lifeline to Ru-
Union. and deliver cash to the
Jewish Agency in Israel."
Those attending the meeting
and participating in the special
solicitation effort are Samuel
Greenberg, Ben Roisman, Al-
fred Sharenow, Leo Goodman,
Clarence Obletz, Bernard Li-
bras, Leon Messing, Charles
Locke, Casey Greene and Rich-
ard Romanoff.
Also Israel Resnikoff, Louis
Colker, Dr. Robert Segaul, Dr.
Robert Grenitz, Victor Gruman,
Nathaniel Gora, Joseph Kran-
berg, Dr. Alvin Colin, Jack Le-
vine, Mrs. Milton Frankle, Al-
vin Ghertner, Dr. Milton No-
wick, Mrs. Louis Perlman and
Samuel Soref.
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From Miami TOLL FREE (305) 947-9906.
in Jerusalem'," Dr. Nowick said.
"In order to show our commit-
ment to that fateful injunction,
we shall make 1976 the year
that became 'This Year in Jeru-
salem'."
Dr. Nowick called attention
to the special $750 round-trip
rate for delegation members,
noting that it would include air
fare from Miami to Israel, ac-
commodations in deluxe hotels
with most meals included, plus
participation in what he said
would be "numerous unforget-
table special events."
"It's a once-in-a-lifetime trip
that will also be a not-to-be-for-
gotten happening," he declared.
Dr. Nowick pointed out that
while the UJA conference would
cover an eight-day period, the
cost to delegation members
would be for a total of 10 days.
The UJA conference will be a
combination of plenary, study
and technical sessions and a
series of visits to various cities,
immigrant settlements, border
locations and schools, factories,
historic and religious sites.
A high point of the confer-
ence will be Solidarity March
through the streets of Jerusa-
lem by delegates from every
part of the U.S. Dr. Nowick said
the expectancy by UJA officials
is for upward of 3,000 delegates
from communities throughout
the country.
Dr. Nowick pointed out that
plans for the Fort Lauderdale
delegation call for its composi-
tion to be completed by June 1,
with deposits due from each
participant by that date.
He urged that inquiries con-
cerning membership on the dele-
gttion be addressed to him, to
Oeisser or to the Federation's
staff of campaign associates.
The latter include Joseph Calig,
Ruben Lefkowitz, Nathan Rob-
erts and Janice Salit. All can
be reached at the Jewish Fed-
eration's office, 2999 N.W. 33rd
Ave. in Lauderdale Lakes, or
bv ohone at 484-8200.
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood ana Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In the Hollywood and Halhndale.
5801 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood.
920-1010
In the Fort Lauderdale ana:
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.( Sunset Strip),Sunrtee
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc./Funcral Dlrecton
Other Riverside chapels in South Florida are located hi
North Miami Beach. Miami Beach and Miami.
Riverside serves the New York Metropolitan area with chapels In Manhattan,
Brooklyn. Bronx. Far Rockaway and Westchesler
Murray N. Rubin. FD.
rr.L-
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1-7I
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Friday, April 16, 1976
The Jewish FloridUm o\ Greater Fort Lauderdate
Pajre 3-A
BB International Council Director
To Speak at Passover Breakfast
The B'nai B'rith Foundation
of the United States will ob-
serve Passover with a tradi-
tional kosher breakfast to bene-
fit its National Youth Services
Appeal on Sunday, April 18, at
9:30 a.m., at the Diplomat Ho-
tel in Hollywood.
Dr. William Korey, director
of the B'nai B'rith Internation-
al Council and B'nai B'rith's
former representative at the
United Nations, is scheduled as
guest speaker, according to
breakfast chairman Alan J.
Blaustein. Dr. Korey is one of
the foremost authorities on So-
viet Jewish affairs, and is au-
thor of "The Soviet Cage: Anti-
Semitism in Russia."
Alfred Golden, a national
commissioner of the Anti-Defa-
mation League of B'nai B'rith
and one of South Florida's
most dynamic speakers on
B'nai B'rith youth services,
will serve as master of cere-
monies, Blauitain aided.
ALSO TAKING part in the
program will be two members
of the B'nai B'rith Youth Or-
ganization (EBYO): Neil Jay
Wolff of Hollywood, president
of the Gold Coast Council of
Aleph Zadek Aleph (AZA), and
Lisa Wyner of Hollywood,
president of the Gold Coast
Council of B'nai B'rith Girls.
B'nai B'rith national youth
services provide for the main-
tenance and growth of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations,
which serve 340 college cam-
puses, support of BBYO and its
more than 1,100 teenage groups
and Career and Counseling
ScrvlcM in 20 major commu-
nities.
Reservations for the break-
fast are available, at $4.75 per
person, through the Hollywood
B'nai 3'rith office.
MEMO
Community Relations Committee
Meets with Con gressman Burke
Continued from Page 1-A
said that Scranton's recent state-
ments criticizing Israel did not
reflect a change in Administra-
tion policy but were ill-timed.
BURKE STATED that he was
opposed to the selling of C-130
transport planes to Egypt. As
a member of the International
Relations Committee he com-
mented that no assurances can
be given that secret agreements
have not been worked out with
Egypt's President Sadat or King
Hussein of Jordan on future
arms sales.
On the issue of President
Ford's opposition to the addi-
tional $550 million in aid for
Israel, Burke said Ford was act-
ing out of a concern to hold
down his overall budget. Capp
said that while holding down
spending is important, it should
not be done at Israel's expense.
It was further brought out in
discussion that the S550 million
was agreed to by Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger during
the Sinai talks, and covered the
change of the fiscal year from
July 1 to October 1. Burke
would not firmly commit him-
self to voting for the aid.
Capp suggested that telegrams
be sent to Cong. Burke, urging
his support for the $550 mil-
lion. He also said that anyone
wishing to become active in the
activities of the Community Re-
lations Committee is requested
to contact the Federation office,
484-8200.
To: All Presidents of all Jewish Organizations in North
Broward County.
Prom: The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale.
The Jewish population of North Broward County has increas-
ed immeasurably in the past few years, and there are many new
organizations of which Federation is unaware. We would appre-
ciate your filling out and returning to the Federation office as
soon as possible the coupon below.
North Broward Jewish Federation
2999 NW 33rd Avenue
Lauderdale Lakes, Florida 33311
My name is ................ ......................................
I am president of (organization)
Mailing address ....................................................................................
City .................................... State ....................... Zip
My term of office is from .............................. to ...................
My home address is
City .......................
State
Zip
My phone number is
Vfedo
business the
right way.
Dade and Broward Jewish Groups
Will Participate in Yom Haatzmaut
All Jewish organizations in
Dade and Broward Counties are
being invited to participate in
the official communitywide ob-
servance of Yom Haatzmaut In
the Miami Beach Convention
Center, Saturday night, May 1.
Gerald Schwartz, chairman,
and Mrs. Harriet Green, coordi-
nator of the mass rally, which
is expected to draw more than
10,000 persons for the celebra-
tion of the State of Israel's 28th
anniversary, said both Zionist
and non-Zionist groups have
been invited to participate.
"Israel Independence Day,
Yom Haatzmaut, now is a holi-
day not only in Israel but for
the Jewish people the world
over. Every Jew should observe
the event by demonstrating soli-
darity with the Israelis in their
hours of greatest need,"
Schwartz said.
SIMCHA DINTrZ. Israels Am-
bassador to the United States,
will be the keynote speaker for
Yom Haatzmaut, which begins
jk_8:30 p.m. Saturday with what
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will be the largest observance
in the United States of Israel's
Koach (strength or 28th) birth-
day.
"A complete program of mu-
sic and entertainment also is
being planned," Mrs. Green
said, "but the serious side of
Yom Haatzmaut will not be
neglected."
Committees are preparing
resolutions on aid to Israel, to
Soviet Jewry, to Syrian and Ira-
qi Jewry, on Aliyah, Israel tour-
ism, etc.
Tickets for the community
rally, sponsored by the Amer-
ican Zionist Federation and its
constituent bodies, are available
at the AZF office, 605 Lincoln
Road Building.
Mrs. Green, president of the
South Florida Zionist Federa-
tion and of the Pioneer Women
Council of South Florida, said
Jewish youth groups particu-
larly are being urged to. join in
the observance of Yom Haatz-
maut.
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Page 4-A
The Jewish Floridum of Greater Fort Lauderdale

Friday, April 16, 1976


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/T
xr.
A Delayed Decision
It is now some seven months that Miami Attorney
Sidney Aronovitz was recommended to fill a vacancy
on the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida.
As is traditional in these matters, the recommenda-
tion came from the state's senators in Washington, in
this case Senators Lawton Chiles and Richard Stone.
As is also traditional in these matters, the President
was expected to respond to the recommendation within
a reasonable time in order to assure the fact that the
vacancy does not hamper the ongoing juridical respon-
sibilities of the court.
The fact is that nothing has happened thus far. The
President has not acted on the recommendation, and we
wonder why. Can it be that the appointment is hung up
in a net of politics seeking to ignore the Chiles-Stone
recommendation in favor of a "party appointment" in
this presidential election year?
Mr. Aronovitz is a distinguished member of the
bar, in practice for the past 30 years. He is a former vice
mayor of the City of Miami and a former City Com-
missioner.
His longtime civic and philanthropic activities in
Florida are so numerous that they can hardly be cata-
logued here. Suffice it to say, they are, in themselves,
a splendid recommendation for his appointment to the
judgeship in question.
Isn't it about time that the President acted favor-
ably in this matter?
Need for Public Relations
Public relations has never been Israel's long suit.
Up until the 1973 war, this didn't seem to matter too
much.
Up until then, the tide was going all her way. World
sympathies, rooted in the bestiality of the Nazi war
machine, still recalled the tragic indifference to Jewish
suffering.
In Israel, the world seemed to want to atone.
The Yom Kippur War has changed all of that. It is
not our intention here to explain why. Countless thou-
sands of words in these editorial columns since October,
1973, have documented the causes behind the change.
The fact is, there has been a change.
Time Magazine's 'Report9
The consequence of the change is that the world is
no longer willing to respond positively to Israel in tra-
ditional knee-jerk fashion.
Automatic sympathy in the past is just that a
thing of the past. Now it is incumbent upon Israel to
become more skillful in her public utterances in order
to combat a parallel advice in the skillful use of public
utterances by the Arabs to argue their own cause.
We have here in mind the current Time Magazine
report of Israel's Atom Bomb arsenal which she was
allegedly preparing to deliver when the Yom Kippur
War was going against her.
We have never doubted Israel's capacity to build
nuclear weapons. As early as the mid-1950's, Abba Eban
repeatedly remarked that "Who do you think built the
Atom Bomb in the first place?"
What strikes us as dangerous, however, is the cava-
lier manner in which Time "reports" the allegedly
scheduled Israeli strike in early October, 1973. Its tone
suggests that Israel was ready to see the whole world
go up in flames in one final Armageddon act before go-
ing down herself.
A Response is Necessary
Whatever the truth or falsehood in the magazine's
report, it is the tone that counts. It represents one of
the most vicious propaganda attacks against Israel to
date, and that includes the worst that the Arab-Commu-
nist-Third World bloc has been able to hurl at Israel
since the Yom Kippur War.
If Israel does not take care and respond to this
viciousness artfully and professionally, things will not
get better, but only worse.
'Seven Beauties9 a Great Film
Jewish Flor idian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
OFFICE and PI^ANT 120 N.H. th St., MlanM. Fla. 831S2 Phone S7S-4806
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1-171-4*06
MIAMI ADDRES8: P.O. Box 0127S, Miami. Florida SS101
FRED K. 8HOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET 8ELMA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
The Jewish Florldlan Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchsndlse Advertised In Its Columns
Published Bl -Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
Alt P.O. S5T9 returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Flo-'dlan. P O. Box 01J978. Miami. Fla. 83101
O Fred K. Shochet April 16, 1078
The Jewish Fleridlan ha* absorbsd the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndlcste.
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Assecls-
tlon of English Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Frsss Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
Volume 5 Number 8
Friday, April 16, 1976 16 NISAN 57736
A SPECIAL preview served
up by Wometco Theatres
the other night unfurled a new
Lina Wertmuller film that ob-
solutely must not be missed.
"Seven Beauties" was espe-
cially electric compared to the
Marxist flat tir\ CostvGavras'
"Special Section," with which
it was shown, if you've seen
"Z," then you well know what
"Special Section" is about.
The Costa-Gavras production
proposes the agonizing pragma-
tism of a Muscovite decision
once again to deal with the
capitalist pigs as allies in the
never-ending war against fas-
cism.
WHAT CAN one do? If one
Mindlin
is fighting the same enemy as
are the capitalists at this par-
ticular moment (in "Special
Section," it is Hitler in Vichy
France during World War II),
then one may as well enjoy the
benefits of an alliance with
them.
But never forget, fellow-Boy
Scouts: after the death of the
fascists must come the death
of the capitalists since, really,
they are one and the same
thing.
As in "Z," what you miss in
"Special Section" is a sense of
humor, which is necessary in
art to the creation of life itself.
And that is the hallmark of
Costa-Gavras* work: it is with-
out humor, and therefore it is
without life.
"SPECIAL SECnON" is not
about people. It is about poli-
tics as an abstraction, and so
one can only regard it as a
corpsea special kind of Marx-
ist corpse which subordinates
people and life to ideology.
Never does Costa-Gavras take
the long view and poke fun at
the lifelessness of his cause,
which repeatedly fails to see its'
own profoundest flaw, but of-
fers itself instead as a paean of
praise to life and liberty.
"Cause" people never do take
the long view; they never do
see the possibility of humor in
their humorlessness, and that
is their greatest sin.
That is what kills their cause
before it is born. They do not
conceive that they can be
wrong, or that their dedication
to their errors can be humor-
ous. In an artist, this substitu-
tion of ideology for life is a
fatal flaw.
BY CONTRAST, "Seven
Beauties" is exquisite. Even on
its own terms, it is no less so.
Lina Wertmuller focuses her
genius on pre-World War II Na-
ples. Pasquale, a swaggering
lower middle class son of a
mattress-maker, tries to work
his way up into the hierarchy
of the Neapolitan underworld.
He sports a pistol as the sym-
Continued on Page 13-A
Letter Got a Lot of Space
It was most encouraging to
read a letter critical of a col-
umn I wrote in last week's edi-
tion. There haven't been any
lately and, for one as polemical
as I tend to be, a matter of
some concern:
Are my columns too bland?
Have my "way out" views
become "in"?
Does nobody care?
Just because the first class
postage has gone up to 13 cents,
am I not worth it?
WELL, David Giesser broke
the ice last week and got about
equal space. And, after reading
his letter carefully, I've come
to the conclusion that he
really was after space. His
opus bore out a previous one of
mine in which I pointed out
that what made columnists
omnscient was a typewriter, pa-
per and the willingness of some-
one to print the stuff.
I don't want to come to any
hasty conclusion, but it may be
that in every fund-raiser's heart
(heart?) there lurks the soul of
a writer.
Add another category to my
concern (although it is one I
have always suspected) and that
is the misunderstood column.
Giesser, who obviously was out
to defend fund-raising and its
ilk against a fancied slight of
mine, just as obviously devoted
most of his column to a demon-
stration of Jewish erudition that
was impressive.
AND I further suspect that
was the real reason for his
"response" to me. Okay, I'm
impressed.
Looking over the Mar. 12 col-
umn again, it was clear to me
what I was trying to say: that a
man named Simon Wiesenthal
came to Miami to tell of an im-
portant event in Jewish history
EDWARD
COHEN
without tying it to a fund-rais-
ing projept; that there was a
response from the audience
which was unique in that in the
love and respect for the man,
which became manifest, there
also was a spontaneous outpour-
ing of contributions, which had
not been requested.
I tried to spell out a lesson
in this minor Sunday morning
incident. That lesson was not
intended to downgrade fund-
raising but to try to uplift it.
WHEN I wrote that "I have
been discouraged with the lack
of response to the needs of the
community from most, except
the wealthy, who carry a great-
er share of the financial burden
than is healthy for a viable Jew-
ish future," the intent was not
to be critical of those generous
rich, as Giesser seems to be-
lieve, but quite the opposite.
I am appalled by the com-
naratively small number of Jews
of considerable or moderate
means who support any Jewish
cause, and it is this which gives
me concern for the future of
Jewish life unless we find a
better way to reach more Jews
than at present.
I suggested that we need
"Jewish heroes as well as
martyrs" and that the response
to Simon Wiesenthal was evi-
dence of that.
IN THIS connection, I ex-
pressed my disappointment with
the failure of rabbis and educa-
tors to take advantage of the
presence of this outstanding
personage in our community by
coming to hear him. I was kind
tjy not mentioning the fund-
raisers and Jewish agency pro-
fessionals on that occasion
They are too busy, I imagine,
to attend anything that bean
the taint of Jewish knowledge,
for their presence is not con-
spicuous at the many lecture
and other cultural opportuni-
ties offered Jews in Greater
Miami throughout the year.
That lack of interest was reveal-
ed by a Federation professional
who called me on the Friday
before Wiesenthal's Sunday
morning appearance to inquire
whether he could be used for a
condominium fund-raiser that
evening.
He admitted that he was not
aware that Wiesenthal's pres-
ence in Miami had been an-
nounced the previous July and
in later publicity concerning the
lecture series which brought
him here. ,
AS FOR Giesser's satirical
comments on Jewish intellec-
tuals who are outside the pale
of the American Jewish com-
munity and who, for him, would
"desecrate the memory of my
old-fashioned shtetl parents,
they would have greater impact
if I could have counted him and
his colleagues in the local au-
dience which came to hear Irv-
ing Howe, another kind of Jew-
ish intellectual.
Anyhow, I hope he reads his
book, "The World of Our Fatn-
ers." which is only one of many
important positive works oy
modern Jews and which migm
give our fund-raisers some new
ideas in reaching those Jews
who now are unreachable.
>


Friday, April 16, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater rort umaeraaie
Page 5-A
A FASSOViU MSSAGt
New Leadership Delegation
Freedom, Economic Dependence Leaves for /w April 26
I
By ROBERT M. HERMANN
Chairman
North Broward County
Board of Governors
Sooth Florida Israel Bond
Organization
The unique importance of the
Passover holiday is that it Is a
time for questions and a time
for answers about the funda-
mental concepts of freedom and
survival for our people.
In every Passover season
some major aspect of the Exo-
dus from Egypt finds a striking
parallel in current issues and
problems affecting our people
and the State of Israel.
The plight of Russian Jews
struggling to find freedom has
in recent years been a dramatic
reminder of increasing urgency
of the meaning of Passover. But
the dream and the reality of
freedom that we celebrate on
this festive occasion are cloud-
ed this year by Israel's critical
and pressing economic prob-
lems.
THERE IS an immediate need
for positive action to strengthen
Israel's economy, which is a
central pillar of her hard-won
independence. We are called
upon to lend some of our re-
sources to the people of Israel
through the instrumentality of
Israel Bonds to help them meet
unprecedented financial diffi-
culties.
Israel's economy is beset by
such serious difficulties as a
record balance-of-payments de-
ficit of close to $4 billion and
defense requirements that con-
sume 40 percent of her budget.
There is a danger of increased
unemployment as some sectors
of the economy are restrained
in order to permit concentration
on the expansion of export-pro-
ducing industries.
As a result, most of the peo-
ple in Israel will observe Pas-
sover in an atmosphere of aus-
terity and sacrifice, but in the
hope that American and Cana-
dian Jewry will act quickly and
adeouatelv to relieve the eco-
nomic pressures that have
sharply increased Israel's de-
pendence on outside sources.
In addition to the traditional
questions associated with the
Passover observance, we must
find the answers for these cru-
cial questions:
CAN ISRAEL preserve the
strength to prevenj aggression
and maintain the momentum to-
ward peace? Can Israel over-
come her present financial dif-
ficulties? Can Israel prevent a
rise in unemployment? How can
Israel reduce her huge trade
deficit? Can Israel fulfill the
potential of the new economic
breakthroughs in trade with
Europe and the United States?
At every critical turn in Is-
rael's history during the past
quarter-century the Israel Bond
program has provided much
needed strength for its eco-
nomy. At no time in the past
decade has the Israel Bond cam-
paign had a greater role to play.
Increased support through Is-
rael Bonds will go far in an-
swering the vital questions in-
volving Israel's economic future
and freedom this year.
A delegation of young men
and women from North Brow-
ard County will be among the
New Leadership Presidents
Delegation to Israel, on behalf
of the South Florida Israel Bond
Organization campaign, April
26 through May 6, it was an-
nounced by chairman Steve Jo-
sias of Fort Lauderdale.
The young leaders on the
fact-finding tour will study Is-
rael's air defense and visit an
Israel Aircraft Industry plant
with Asher Ben-Nathan, chief
advisor to the Minister of De-
fense.
Following a reception with
Tel Aviv Mayor Gen. Shlomo
Lahat and representatives of
the Israeli Economic Ministry,
the group will tour Caesarea,
Rosh Hanickra on the Lebanese
border, and an Air Force tech-
nical faining school.
THEY WILL also visit local
plants and community projects
and meet with City Councilmen
at the Israeli settlement de-
velopment town of Kiryat Gat.
After a meeting with local Arab
leaders in Gaza and a briefing
by the military governor they
will talk with scientists, profes-
sors and students at the Beer
Sheba University and hear an
address by Joseph Tekoah, uni-
v--sitv president and former
Israeli representative to the
United Nations.
Included in the itinerary are
Ramat David Air Base, the
Golan Heights and the airfield
.t Mahanayim. The mission will
include meetings with Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin, Defense
Minister Shimon Peres and
President Enhraim Katzir.
Ronald Krongold is the re-
gional chairman for the South-
eastern United States.
NCJW Schedules Seminar, Lunch
Israel Bonds Campaign Events
HOLIDAY SPRINGS
NIGHT IN ISRAEL
Robert W. Baughman, Mayoi
of the City of Margate, has beer
named recipient-elect of the
Israel Solidarity Award, ac-
cording to an announcement by
Abraham Curewitz, Holiday
Springs Israel Bonds committee
chairman.
The presentation to Mayor
Baughman, on behalf of the
1976 South Florida Israel Bond
Organization campaign in North
Broward County, will be made
at the Holiday Springs "Night
in Israel," Sunday, April 25, at
7:30 p.m. at the Holiday Springs
auditorium in Margate. A spe-
cial feature will be a perform-
ance by Aaron Heyman, star
of "Sholem Aleichem ... The
Man."
Baughman, who had served
as president of the City Coun-
cil, was reelected Mayor in
March, 1975. He is a member
of the Cokesbury Methodist
Church and an honorary mem-
ber of the Hadassah and Ital-
ian-American Association. He
is on the advisor/ boards of
Margate General Hospital,
Broward Council on Aging,
Florida Planning and Zoning
Association and Florida Urban
Committee Administration.
orary chairman tl Councilman
George Liederman.
Cr tr The National Council of Jew-
ish Women, North Broward Sec-
tion, will hold a general meet-
ing Wednesday, April 28, at the
Wilton Manors Women's Club,
beginning at 10 a.m. Focus of
the all-dav seminar is "Con-
tinuing Choices for the Aged."
There will be a lunch break
and coffee will be served. Hus-
band and frinds are invited to
attend.
The woun's installation lunch-
eon is scheduled for May 6 at
non at the Arrowhead Golf and
Tennis Club. Reservations must
b. in, bv April 28, to Jean
Lewin, 2000 S. Ocean Blvd..
Pomoano Beach. Fla. 33062.
MAYOR BAUGHMAN
A MEMBER of the American
Legion Post No. 157 and Ki-
wanis Club, he is chairman of
the Mayors' Council of North
West Broward and the Florida
League of Cities. He has been
honored by the Margate Jay-
cees and the Boy Scouts of
America.
Holiday Springs condominium
president is bamuel Sander-
man and Israel Bonds commit-
tee cochairmen are Harry Kap-
lan and Richard Korman. Hon-
Tamarae B'nai B'rith Lodge
Install* 1976-77 Officers
More than 450 members,
wives and friends attended in-
stallation of officers ceremonies
of B'nai B'rith Blue Star Lodge
No. 2912 of Tamarac on March
21 at Piper High School audi-
torium.
In his acceptance address, Dr.
Herman Weiss, newly elected
president, said that a significant
Dart of lodge activity during his
term of office would be devoted
to community service.
"A vital B'nai B'rith func-
tion," he said, "is to provide as-
sistance to the sick, the infirm,
the needy, without regard to
race or creed. There is much
to be done in these difficult
days and we will do our
part."
Morris Glicksman, former
Vice Mayor and Councilman,
and chairman of the Anti-Defa-
mation League, was piaster of
ceremonies.
Awards to the lodge for out-
standing service were made by
Irv Zucker, immediate past
president of B'nai B'rith, who
presented the Man of the Year
award to Matthew Dinah, past
vice president.
Officers installed by Dr. Mike
Teitelbaum, president of B'nai
B'rith Florida State Association,
are Harry Singer, Lou Plevy,
Mortimer Zinn and Tamarac
Councilman Morton Weinberger,
elected 1976-77 vice presidents.
Also Mark Weissman, finan-
cial secretary; John Goldmann,
treasurer; Robert Shurr, cor-
responding secretary; and Irv
Zucker, chaplain.
Mayor Walter Falck spoke for
the City of Tamarac in his wel-
coming address, and Vice May-
or Helen Massaro joined In the
festivities.
The highlight of the evening
was a performance by the B'nai
Shalom Singers. The. group is
made up of non-Jews who have
dedicated their lives to the sur-
vival of Israel.
BENJAMIN FIGELMAN
TEMPLE SHOLOM
DINNER OF STATE
Benjamin Figeln.an has been
named chairman of the temple
Sholom-Israel Dinner of State
scheduled for Sunday, May 2,
at 7 p.m. at the temple. The
announcement was made to-
day by Milton M Parson, ex-
ecutive director, South Florida
Israel Bond Organization.
Figclman was the host dele-
gate of the Zionist Emergency
Committee, which invited
Christian clergymen and educa-
tors of Long Island to the 1946
American Christian Palestine
Committee Conference for the
establishment of a Jewish state.
In 1951 he was the first Israel
Bond chairman in Huntington
Township, N.Y., and chairman
of the Greater Huntington Is-
rael Bonds campaign in 1961-
62.
He is a former president of
the Huntington Zionist District,
Huntington Lodge No. 2090
B'nai B'rith and chairman of
B'nai B'rith Israel Affairs for
Nassau and Suffolk Counties.
He has received citations from
the Huntington Hebrew Con-
gregation, B'nai B'rith, UJA,
Israel Bonds, Kiwanis and as a
Founder of Technion in 1975.
In 1958 he and Mrs. Figel-
man visited Israel on their 25th
wedding anniversary. In 1962
Figelman was a guest of the
Israel Army for Va'ad Lemaan
Hechayal, and in 1963 on an
Israel Bond mission he was the
Siest at the Convocation of
ebrew University.
Woodlands Country Club Community leaders honored
Israel Bond campaigners at a dinner dance March 23
at Woodlands Country Club. The State of Israel paid
tribute to Ben and Pauline Roisman (right), who receiv-
ed the David Ben-Gurion Award, and Sen. Samuel L. and
Esther Greenberg, who received the Israel Solidarity
Award.

Fort Lauderdale resident Harold Slater (left) received
the State of Israel 27th Independence Day Coin from
Robert M. Hermann, chairman of the North Broward
board of governors for the South Florida Israel Bond
Organization campaign. Slater is a member of the Prime
Minister's Club.


Page 6-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 1976


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The Colins Are Honored
At JNF Inaugural Banquet
Orer 250 people paid tribute
to Dr. and Mrs. Alvin K. Colin
at the Jewish National Fund In-
augural Bicentennial Banquet,
March 28.
In addition to the guest speak-
er, Ira Hirschmann, Meir Sho-
ham. former Ambassador of Is-
rael to Uruguay and now as-
sistant director to the Minister
of Interior, and Dr. Aron Wein-
berger, national director for the
Foundation of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund of America and as-
sistant executive vice president,
also attended.
Also present were Dr. Morton
Malavsky. chairman of the JNF
for Broward County, and Zev
W. Kogan, president. JNF South-
ern Region.
The invocation was given by
Rabbi Joel S. Goor and the na-
tional anthems were sung by
Cantor Jerome Klement of Tem-
ple Beth Israel and Cantor Mau-
rice Neu of Temple Emanu-El
Entertainment was provided by
Lois Yavnieli and Cantor Saul
H. Breeh.
Dr. and Mrs. Colin were pre-
sented with a plaque acknowl-
edging their services to the
community and to Israel.
The dinner committee con-
sisted of Ludwik Brodzki, chair-
man; Josenhine (Mrs. Matthew)
Newman, and Bernard Oshin-
sky, cochairmen; Jacob Brodzki,
Alvin Garnitz. Rabbi Joel S.
Goor, Robert Hermann, Cantor
Jerome Klement, William Kling,
Rabbi Philip Labovitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu. Joe Reinstein, Lee
Shainman, Rabbi Emanuel
Schenk, Rabbi Morris Skop and
Rabbi Max J. Weitz.
There Won't Be Any More
Easy Wins for Israel
By JACK ANDERSON
WASHINGTON Israel can
never again expect to win an
easy victory over the Arabs, ac-
cording to the Pentagon's latest
secret intelligence estimates.
The Arab nations have amass-
ed tremendous stockpiles of So-
viet weapons, giving them vast-
ly superior firepower.
The comparative figures are
classified "Secret Sensitive."
Since the Soviets supplied the
equipment, they obviously know
the figures. We, therefore, be-
lieve the American people, who
may be called upon to support
Israel, are also entitled to the
facts.
The six leading Arab powers
Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Iraq,
Libya and Saudi Arabia have
a combined strength that is
overwhelming.
Roughly, they have a 4-to-l
uperiority over Israel in com-
bat planes, a 3-to-l edge in
Mined pilots, a 19-to-l advant-
age in anti-aircraft missiles and
a 3-to-l superiority in ships and
submarines.
It is the Pentagon's view,
nevertheless, that Israel would
win the next military conflict
but that the victory would be
costly.
Concurring, the Central Intel-
ligence Agency estimates that
a future Arab-Israeli outbreak
would produce at least 36,000
Israeli casualties. On a propor-
tionate basis, this would be
equivalent to about 2.5 million
casualties for the United States.
HERE ARE some highlights
from the secret intelligence fig-
ures:
During the 1973 war, only
one Israeli plane was shot down
in combat. But a sobering 120
were brought down by anti-
aircraft weapons, particularly
the Soviet SAM missiles.
Reprinted from Jack Ander-
son's syndicated column, March
8, 1976.
Margate Men Plan
Holiday Weekend
The Margate Jewish Center
Men's Club has organized a
Memorial Day Weekend from
Friday, Mav 28. to Monday,
May 31. Guests will stay at the
Algiers Hotel in Miami Beach.
The cost of $75 per person
includes kosher meals, round-
triD bus transportation, enter-
tainment and cocktail hours.
Friends and relatives are in-
vited. Further information and
reservations are available from
Kaopy Kaplow, 971-2811, or Sam
GHckman, 974-5761.
As a service of the Community Relations Committee the
addresses of our Senators and Representative are listed below.
Cong. J. Herbert Burke
2442 Rayburn Bldg.
Washington, DC. 20515
Sen. Lawton Chiles
2107 New Senate Office Bldg
Washington, DC. 20510
Sen. Richard Stone
358 Old Senate Office Bldg.
Washington, DC. 20510
ill
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Hadassah Associates were honored at a
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the home of chairmen Mr. and Mrs.
Abraham Fine. Honored guests were Mr.
and Mrs. Maxwell Weisberg. Mrs. Weis-
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of Hadassah. Mrs. Ralph Cannon, chap-
ter president, welcomed the guests.
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rnday, April 16, 1976
The Jewish FloridUm of Greater Fort Lauderdale
7-A
Passover: The Taste of Freedom
By MILTON M. PARSON
Executive Director
Sooth Florida Israel Bond
Organization
The Passover tradition re-
quires that every Jew include
exodus as a personal experience
to recall the successful struggle
from normal relations with the
rest of their people, will for the
for freedom of ancient times.
Since the proclamation of Is-
rael's independence 28 years
ago, the Jews of America have
witnessed a vivid reenactment
of the flight from Egypt.
Nowhere has this parallel of
an ancient miracle been so
dramatic as in the case of tens
of thousands of Russian Jews
who have brushed aside almost
insurmountable barriers to reach
the Promised Land. It is a
source of real joy that so many
Russian Jews, so long cut off
first time celebrate Passover in
freedom as new citizens of the
free State of Israel.
The miracle of Passover of
thousands of years ago, now re-
peated in the contemporary
miracle of escape from bondage
in the Soviet Union, must not
blind us to the magnitude of
the resources needed to sustain
and give substance to this re-
markable development in Jew-
ish history.
AS WE approach the holi-
day, Israel is faced with the
realization that in the next de-
cade she will have to invest $3
billion, or $300 million annually,
to develop new sources of en-
ergy energy that is vital not
only to the men, women and
children living there but to the
Russian immigrants and other
freedom-loving neoDle who will
some day reach the Promised
Land. A substantial share of
THE
PREMIUM
PASSOVER
WINE
To your health,
to happiness,
and, to peace.
The premium kosher wine you can
almost cut with a knife."
Classic concoroa. full bodied and
rich in flavor, and a wide variety of
fruit and honey wines. All
Kosher, and. all so very delicious.
MILTON M. PARSON
this amount will have to be pro-
vided by State of Israel Bonds.
Employment opportunities in
Israel must be geared to the im-
migrants' skills and training,
and the economy must be ex-
panded to create more jobs
quickly.
Because the economy plays a
central role in integrating im-
migrants into the normal pat-
tern of life in Israel, the pro-
gram of the Israel Bond Organ-
ization must provide the finan-
cial resources to promote the
growth of industry and agricul-
ture and to stimulate the estab-
lishment of new enterprises as
part of the country's overall de-
velopment prof- am.
We in the South Florida Jew-
ish community can say to the
people of Israel that we feel
closer to you than ever before,
that we are prepared to assume
a greater responsibility in any
measure and in any form neces-
sary to protect Israel's freedom
and its independence.
We will commit ourselves and
express our solidarity with you
through Israel Bonds and
through every channel of pol-
itical and moral support.
As long as there are Jews to
seek freedom in Israel, the mes-
sage of Passover will call on us
to provide the economic means
to turn immigrants intq produc-
tive and self-sustaining citizens
of the Jewish homeland.
Osceola Lake Inn Opens
With New Additions June 4
Kubin's Osceola Lake Inn, in
the scenic Blue Ridge Moun-
tains on Lake Osceola in Hen-
dersonville, N.C., is reopening
June 4 for its 36th season.
There are some new addi-
tions, including guest rooms,
card room, TV room and recrea-
tional facilities.
Popular with lovers of the
outdoors as well as with those
who simply want to relax, the
inn features a host of activities.
Horseback-riding, pool, boating,
fishing, tennis, a nutting green,
shuffleboard, horseshoes, ping-
pong, volleyball and badminton.
Specially supervised programs
are available for children, and
two 18-hole championship golf
courses are nearby.
The Osceola Lake Inn loca-
tion boasts some of the finest
scenery in the Eastern United
States. Situated at a height of
2,500 feet, the resort has accom-
modations for up to 125 guests.
Attire is always informal at all
times, and the American Plan
cuisine is Jewish American
style. Fresh-baked breads and
pastries have become synonym-
ous with Osceola Lake fan, and
are prepared by Arthur Rubin,
a graduate of the Culinary In-
stitute of America.
Owner manager host Stuart
Rubin is beginning his 17th
year of operation, taking over
its management from the late
Joe Rubin, .who founded the Inn
in 1941.
A color brochure and rates
arc available from Rubin's Os-
ceola Lake Inn, Hendersonville,
N.C. 28739 or by phoning Stuart
Rubin at the inn's Miami office.
Planning A Trip?
COUNCIL'S NEW AND
EXCITING TRAVEL
PROGRAMS FOR 1976
EUROPE, ISRAEL CRUISES
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JFWISH WOMEN
Caff
LILLIAN ZALKIN-735-5755
Fm Nancy.
Frnone of
the more than
7200 people
at National
wishing you a
happy Eassoven
NationalCwAirlines.


Page 8-A
The Jewish Floridian o1 Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 1976
1976-Israel's Year of Energy
Brandeis Camp Institute r
With the approach of Yom
Haatzmaut, Wednesday, May 5,
Robert M. Hermann, chairman,
board of governors, North Brow-
ard County, South Florida Israel
Bond Organization campaign,
stressed that Israel must strive
for total economic independence
on Israel's Independence Day.
At a meeting of key Israel
Bond campaign leaders from
throughout Broward and Dade
Counties Hermann said that "Is-
rael is fighting for survival on
two fronts and victory on the
first, political survival, will be
empty without victory on the
second, economic survival."
"In 1976 Israel Bonds for eco-
nomic development will be
bonds of Jewish solidarity to
meet the unprecedented pol-
itical and economic Arab offen-
sive against Israel," Hermann
said. "Through the Israel Bond
Organization. Israel receives the
tools to establish an infrastruc-
ture that provides a very sound
foundation for her security.
"It is the total support by
American Jewry every per-
son who is a purchaser or in-
volved in the purchase of State
of Israel Bonds that keeps
Israel going and maintains the
vital economic development and
agricultural programs. The im-
portance of funds mobilized
through the South Florida Is-
rael Bond Organization cam-
paign are many," Hermann con-
tinued.
"Because of the severe short-
age of foreign currency, Israel
has been forced to curtail her
economic development activi-
ties. This year the entire de-
velopment budget will total $1
billion, and the largest possible
share of this must come from
Israel Bonds. Because of Israel's
total dependence on imported
fuel, increased funds were al-
located for developing Israel's
own sources of energy but these
have had to be curtailed. Funds
for the search for new sources
of energy must come from Is-
rael Bonds."
Is Accepting Applications
Kester Named Vice Chairman
Of United WayV 1977 Campaign
Stewart R. Kester, vice chair-
man of the board of Florida
Rancorn, Inc.. has been named
Mm Brodzki and Dr. Issenberg
To Marry in Fort Lauderdale
The engagement of Bella
Brodzki, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Ludwik Brodzki of Fort
Lauderdale, to Dr. Henry J. Is-
senbei-R, son of Mr. and Mrs.
David Issenberg of Coral Gables,
has been announced.
The couple will be married
in Fort Lauderdale on May 23
by the groom's uncle, Rabbi
Leo Heim. A reception at the
Inverrary Country Club will fol-
low the ceremony.
Miss Brodzki, a graduate of
Nova High School and Sarah
Lawrence College in Bronxville,
N.Y.. studied also at the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem, the
Universite d'Aix-en-Prbvence,
France, and the Universite de
Geneve in Switzerland. She is
continuing her studies at Brown
University in Providence, RJ.
Dr. Issenberg is a graduate of
Coral Gables High School and
Emory Medical School in At-
lanta, from which he received
his M.D. degree. He works in
the Pediatrics Department of
Albert Einstein College of Medi-
cine at Jacobi Hospital in the
Bronx. N.Y.
rice chairman of the 1977
United Way Campaign.
Announcement of the appoint-
ment was made by S. Kelly Jor-
dan, campaign chairman.
Former mayor and vice mayor
of Pompano Beach, Kester is
chairman of the Florida Coast
Bank of Coral Springs and a
managing partner of R ft S Pro-
perties and Kester Brothers,
real estate holding companies.
Vice chairman for the profes-
sional division of the campaign,
Kester is responsible for the
architects, attorneys, CPA's,
clergy, engineers, funeral direc-
tors, insurance, investment and
real estate segment of the 1977
United Way fundraising effort.
College-age men and women
seeking a unique Jewish living-
learning experience this sum-
mer will be interested in the
Brandeis Camp Institute, which
has served Jewish youth since
1940. The month-long summer
institutes, held in Santa Susana,
Calif., are accepting applica-
tions for 1976.
College students in the South
Florida area may apply to BCI
through the Hillel Jewish Stu-
dent Center at the University of
Miami, a member of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's fam-
ily of local agencies. Funds for
summer camp institute scholar-
ships are made available to
qualified applicants by the Fed-
eration. BCI sessions are sched-
uled for July and August, each
accommodating 400 500 stu-
dents from college campuses
throughout North America.
BCI offers cultural, educa-
tional and religious experiences
in a country setting, patterned
after the lifestyle of the Israeli
kibbutz. Students attend ses-
sions with noted Jewish scho-
lars and artists-in-reaidence,
and participate in the institute's
operation, encounter programs
and cultural happenings.
BCI is not affiliated with a
particular branch of Judaism!
Its programs are geared to in-
volve and to interest young men
and women through participa-
tion in living art forms and cur-
rent thought trends, along with
the rich traditions of Jewish
culture and the Jewish people.
All applicants to BCI must be
undergraduate or graduate col-
lege students. Additional infor-
mation on application and scho-
larship availability is obtainable
from Rabbi Stanley A. Ringler,
Hillel Jewish Student Center
1100 Miller Dr., Coral Gables.
1
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Delicious. JM offers a tempting array of Barton's chocolates and
baked specialities to enhance the festive mood of your
holiday entertaining. A sweet idea for gift-giving.
The enticing selection includes:
Bartonettes, 1 pound box, 4.25
Passover Assortment, % pound box, 3.45
Chocolate Matzos, 13 ounce box, 2.98
Chocolate Seder Mints, 9 ounce box, 2.45
Passover Truffles, 2.46
Chocolate and Vanilla Macaroons, 2.50
Passover Surprise Bag, 6 ounce bag, 1.75
Layer Cake, 3.50
Fine Foods, at all jm stores
except lauderhill and pompano
It's a pleasure to shop with ajm credit card
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\


I
Friday. April 16, 1976
'tut Ji.wu,n twriduin o; 1,1 cuter tort Luuderaau
Page 9-A
Water Bridge: United Effort for UJA
The executive committee includes (front
row, from left) George Hillman, Dora
Sussman and Jean Griff; (second row,
from left) Joseph Curewitz, Charlotte
Clompos, Irene Glowinski, and Milton
Kahn; (third row, from left) Phil Clom-
pos, Charles Weiss, Abe Glowinski, Jack
Younger and Isadore Gladstone.
Photographed at the North Broward Chapter of Hadas-
sah Ciiai Group youth aliyah luncheon were Rose
Strome, Rochelle Stenn and Roz Tannenbaum.
Chai Group Lunch
Is a Huge Success
On the dais are (from left) Louis Bru-
man, executive committee; Este\le Pott,
president. Women's Club; Pincus Deren,
cochairman; Louis Colker, chairman;
Edythe H. Geiger, guest speaker; David
Wachs, president. Men's Club.
Roz (Mrs. Lawrence) Tannen-
baum, Youth Aliyah chairlady
of Chai Group, North Broward
Chanter of Hadassah, wishes to
thank her cochairlady, Rose
(Mrs. David) Strome, president
Rochelle (Mrs. Irwin) Stenn
and all members and friends of
the grouo for helping to make
the Feb. 25 luncheon at Bahia
Mar Hotel and Yacht Club a
iue financial and artistic suc-
:ess.
The ballroom was decorated
n a mushroom and orange co-
lor scheme, highlighted with
natural shell sculpture center-
pieces by Cecile Chachkes
which were awarded to all do-
nors of $50 and over.
Mrs. Tannenbaum chose "Na-
ture from the Sea" as the theme
to symbolize the small child
who comes to our youth aliyah
program in a "natural state."
It is our artistry and knowhow
that help form this yearling into
a productive, happy human be-
ing. Today's youth are tomor-
row's leaders and our future.
The 300 guests at the lunch-
eon saw a fashion show by Lil-
lie Rubin, with music by Chet
Savage.
PASSOVER....
A TIME OF FEASTING
AND WARM FELLOWSHIP.
JORDAN MARSH EXTENDS
BEST WISHES FOR A
HAPPY HOLIDAY TO YOU
AND YOUR FAMILY
lordarj
Jmarsn
All* Of MM
/


Page 10-A
The Jewish FlorUHan of Greater Fort Louder dale
Friday, April 16. 1976
Florida-Israel Chamber of Commerce Honors Topf

. -
Metro Mayor Steve Clark (2nd from right)
presented a Commendation and a Key to
Dade County to Sam Topf (2nd from left)
at the Florida-Israel Chamber of Com-
merce dinner held Saturday at the Eden
Roc Hotel at which Topf was honored as
Industrialist of the Year. In his name the
Kibbutz Association set up a two-year
scholarship, and Milton M. Hecker, ex-
ecutive director of the Florida-Israel
Chamber of Commerce, presented an
award to him from the Jewish Agency
for Rural Development. Sen. Jack Gordon
(left), vice chairman of the chamber's
beard, described the value to Israel of its
"Aid Through Trade" programs. At right
is Herbert Gruber, president of the Heller
Co. Cong. William Lehman talked about
the necessity of strengthening trade pro-
grams with Israel.
Shown at the dinner are (seated, from
leH) Arthur Rosichan; Roger McCauley
of the U.S. Department of Commerce,
who discussed Israel's economic viability
and business opportunities for foreign
investors; Eytan Bentsur, Israel's eco-
nomic affairs consul in Washington, who
described the political situation in the
Mideast. Standing are Mr. and Mrs. J.
Arthur Goldberghe was toastmaster
and dinner chairman Rhoda Shainberg.
alt*.
rtf Mfng r < Rear +*% ****'
&a.j I.. Owm w* M ** .
o'tat *. i> <%* tiiriwt
'* m> m -w*
ISRAEL
ANNIVERSARY
SPECIAL
ISRAEL. .
It has special significance for
us. The Chairman Emeritus
and Founder of American
Savings, Shepard Broad, was
present at the meeting where,
according to David
Ben-Gurion, the State of
Israel was born. Step into any
of our offices and pick up
your complimentary reprint
of the Miami Pictorial cover
story. It features the role
which Shepard Broad
played in making the State of
Israel a reality.
ERICAN SAVINGS
& Loan Association of Florida
Convenient locations throughout South Florida
Levy Elad (left), Israel's economic affairs consul for the
Southeast U.S., chatted with Shmuel Erner, manager of
the new Florida branch of Ampal and Bank Hapoatim.
Ovadia Sof f er to Speak At
Histadrut's Third Seder
Ambassador Ovadia Soffer, a
member of Israel's permanent
mission to the United Nations,
will address the annual Third
Seder of the Israel Histadrut
Council of South Florida at the
Fontainebleau Hotel Sunday
evening, April 18, it was an-
nounced by Dr. Leon Kronish,
honorarv chairman of the local
Council, and board chairman
Moe Levin.
Morris Newmark, president of
the Histadrut Council, and his
wife. Anna, will be honored at
the traditional Third Seder,
which has been conducted by
the Council for more than 20
years.
A GRADUATE of the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem, Sof-
fer holds degrees from Tel Aviv
and New York Universities.
Ambassador Soffer joined the
Israeli Foreign office in 1963
and has served in the Central
African Republic, as ambassador
to the Republic of Chad and as
a member of the Israeli dele-
gation to the UN General As-
sembly.
The Israel Histadrut Cam-
paign, which is sponsoring the
Third Seder, has raised more
Hum $100 million since 1924 for
the support of Histadrut in the
development of numerous in-
stitutions which today are con-
sidered essential elements in Is-
rael.
Reservations for the Third
Seder must be made prior to
April 12. For more information,
call the Histadrut Campaign of-
fice in Miami Beach.
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t, April 16, 1976
The Jewish Flondian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11-A
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER

BILL GOLDSTEIN, Director
GLORIA KATZ, Editor
HARRIET PERER. Coedifor
2999 NW 33rd Avenue, Fort Lauderdale
ESP, Anyone?
Develop your Extrasensory
Perception under the guidance
of Ethne Hampton Chesterman.
Ms. Chesterman, who has a
Master's degree in Behavioral
Science and is working on her
Doctorate, writes a monthly
astrological column for Brow-
ard Life and on local TV has
discussed the psychic life of
past presidents.
Classes will be held Wednes-
day, 10 a.m. to noon, beginning
April 28. Eight lessons, $11. All
adults interested should regis-
ter by calling Sandy at 484-8200.
Phone: 484-8200
Children's Cultural Series
Is Off to a Good Start
Over 250 people, most of
them between the ages of S and
11, packed the Fort Lauderdale
High School auditorium to lis-
ten to the symphony orchestra's
string quartet. In a specially
planned presentation the quar-
tet played many selections,
opening with "Hatikvah."
The crowd obviously enjoyed
the performance and sang along
with music they knew. One girl
from the audience conducted
&
Irk Allan, hypnotist and telepath, performed his feats
lore 65 college students during the Spring vacation
e mixer on March 23. Students from Georgia, New
rk, Pennsylvania and Florida met and shared college
periences. This was the second successful mixer and,
\ause it was so well-received, the JCC will continue
[plan programs for Jewish college-age people.
\ite Magic one of the South's best rock bands
appear at the second rock 'n' roll dance, Saturday,
\il 24, 8 p.m. for boys and girls in grades 9 to 12.
dance will be held at Temple Beth Israel because
\e large attendance expected. Admission is $2 and
tshments will be served.

\iers of the recent Tween Bowling Trip were Rebec-
ilame and Mike Steinberg of Plantation's Seminole
School.
Israel Independence Day-
Poster Contest Winner
Mrs. Shoni Labowitz, poster
committee chairman of the In-
dependence Day program, has
chosen the poster that will an-
nounce the event. Posters were
submitted by all the Hebrew
schools' children and over 200
were runners-up.
The winning poster was sent
in bv Miriam Minnett of the
Hebrew Day School. Our con-
gratulations to her and a thank
you to all children who sub-
mitted entries. Their posters,
along with the winner's, will be
used for displays in shops all
over town.
the group, and two boys danced
on stage.
The main obective of the pro-
The main objective of the pro-
Dte to theatre and music they
would not ordinarily be ex-
posed to. Committee chairwom-
an Suzanne Mellin enjoyed a
comment from one young moth-
er who said the youngsters now
want to go to a "full-blown
orchestra performance."
Tho series continues on Sun-
day, April 11, with Ann Laven's
life-size puppets and ends on
Sunday, May 23, with the Pied
Piper Players, who will present
an original musical adaptation
of "Pippi Longstocking" All
programs begin at 2 p.m.
~N ft h
1 !) WE 1 1 r 1 j
Violist and leader of the Symphony Quartet, A. Baldas-
sarri, with two fans.
CALENDAR
The United Jewish Appeal
has published "The Fifth
Cup," a special text de-
signed to complement the
Haggadah. At a traditional
Seder four cups of wine
are consumed, but the fifth
the cup of Elijah, a sym-
bol of hoperemains un-
April
IS HAPPY PASSOVER .
OFFICE CLOSED
17 Seder and Dessert
19 Radio and TV personality
Barbara Wolf speaks
20 Regular Tuesday program
22 OFFICE CLOSED
24 SO's Dance
Coffee and Conversation
25 Open Meeting
26 Discussion Group
27 Canasta, Arts and Crafts
29 "The Generation Gap"
(a musical group will
produce a variety show
of songs and comedy)
Guys and Gals
8:30 p.m.
Singles of Broward 8 p.m.
Senior Adults 1:30 p.m.
Guys and Gals 8:30 p.m.
Singles of Broward 8:30 p.m.
Guys and Gals 8 p.m.
Singles of Broward 8 p.m.
Senior Adults 1 30 p.m.
Senior Adults 1:30 p.m.
TEEN TOUR RESERVATIONS
TRAVEL REGISTRATION FORM
^Sv^SH^ERATION OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Attn.: Barry Axler
2999 N.W. 33rd Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311 or5no a^nosit for the Greater Fort Laud-
Enclosed is my check in the amount of $100 covering deposit for tne urea
erdale Israel Teen Tour.
Name in fun: .......................................................... .............Telephone No.: ................................
Home address: ............................................................^^ ............ ........ Zip Code ....................
X in school as of Sept ^ dfte j*2
Applicant's Age Applicant's place of birth ....................
Parents' name and permanent address Telephone No.: ......................
. Telephone No.: ................................
E7nS^<.>**"tfi'iZ+ b. -acted in M rt energy:
No
> y1 No If answer is yes, please state reasons on separate sheet of paper.
I have re-d the genial^ormatioHid agree 'to' the terms and conditions set forth in this bro-
chure.
Date Signature of parent or legal guardian


Page 12 A
The Jewish Floridian oj Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 1976
North Broward Hadassah
Hosting Regional Conference
On Monday, April 26, the
North Broward Chapter of Ha-
dassah will welcome the more
than 350 delegates to the 26th
annual conference of the Flor-
ida Region at the Deauville Ho-
tel, Miami Beach.
The conference will be host
"ed by the North Broward Chap-
ter with a committee, headed
by Adeline Moll, of almost 100
women taking charge of activi-
ties.
This year's theme is "Hadas-
sah the American Connec-
tion." The American and Zion-
ist Affairs plenary session
"Guide to Action" is sched-
uled for Monday evening, when
guest speakers will be Marshall
Harris on "Social Service in
Florida" and Prof. Michael Cur-
tis on "Mideast Update."
Esther Cannon, chapter presi-
dent, said the women have been
putting in long hours over many
months, designing and planning
a decorative and warm atmos-
phere for the entire three-day
conference.
Mrs. Moll, according to Mrs.
Cannon, has not only directed
the committee with efficiency
and imagination, but has also
done much of the necessary leg-
work. "She is to be commended
highly for her calm organiza-
tional ability. The success of the
conference hospitality will be
due, in large measure, to Mrs.
Moll's leadership."
Special mention must be
made of those heading the sub-
committees: Sylvia Beckman,
physical arrangements; Anne
Meiroff and Helen Shield, treas-
urers; Ruth Gorelick and Flo-
rence Krantz, visual aids; Betty
Sells and Ethel Goodman, gift
beach bags; Cindy Collins, dele-
gates reception; Fran Sindell,
earlybird prizes; Mary Pavony,
banquet table reservations;
Edith Berlinger, boutique.
Also Gloria Hirsch* bookti-
que; Ethel Binder, showtime;
Marion Cerul and Blanche Herz-
lich, registration; Elaine Rand,
hostesses and personnel; Sylvia
Siegel and Betty Marcus, table
decorations; Bella Golkin, social
secretary and timekeeper.
Regional chairperson of the
conference is Selda Milton of
Coral Gables, while workshop
coordinator is Betty Miller of
Miami Beach. Advisor to the
conference is Deborah (Mrs.
Aaron) Kaplan, member of the
National Board of Hadassah and
holder of various national port-
folios.
At the opening luncheon Ade-
line Moll will offer the invoca-
tion and Esther Cannon will
extend the welcome of the
North Broward Chapter of Ha-
dassah to the delegates.
'
Youth Builders Seminar
Is Scheduled for May 3
The Israel Bond Youth Build-
ers Club first educational semi-
nar will be held for Broward
County synagogue spiritual lead-
JUDITH BEILIN
era, educators and administra-
tors on Monday, May 3, at noon
at Temple Beth Shalom, Holly-
wood.
The announcement, by Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz, spiritual
leader, Temple Menorah, Miami
Beach, and acting chairman, Is-
rael Bond Youth Builders Club,
said that the South Florida Is-
rael Bond Organization cam-
paign will launch the Youth
Builders Club Program on Yom
Haatzmaut, Wednesday, May 5,
throughout Dade and Broward
Counties.
The program has been estab-
lished to allow young Jewish
people to purchase State of Is-
rael Bonds from gifts received
at the time of Bar or Bat Mitz-
vah.
THERE WILL be a special
address by Mrs. Judith Beilin,
a member of the Ministry for
Foreign Affairs of the State of
Israel and in her third term as
Consul of Israel in New York.
Mrs. Beilin represented Israel
as an observer at the Commis-
sion on the Status of Women at
the United Nations. Previously,
she was liaison officer between
the Foreign Ministry and the
hundreds of foreign correspond-
ents in Israel who covered the
Eichmann trial.
Rabbi Abramowitz said this
program will illustrate to Jew-
ish youth the meaning of "Am
Echad" Jews are one people
thus teaching of the central-
ity of Israel to Jews all over the
world.
B'nai Shalom Singers in Concert
The internationally known
B'nai Shalom Singers will per-
form in concert on Sunday,
April 28, 8 p.m. at Temple Beth
Israel. Proceeds from the con-
cert will benefit the Hebrew
Day School of Fort Lauderdale,
according to Lois Polish, chair-
man of the event.
B'nai Shalom is a deeply dedi-
cated group of non-Jews devoted
to the welfare of the people of
Israel and the Hebrew culture.
They have appeared in concert
around the world, with one pre-
vailing theme: Israel must live,
for the sake of the whole hu-
man family.
Mrs. Polish said that tickets
can be purchased at the Hebrew
Day School office, the Jewish
Community Center or at the
door.
Workmen's Circle
Seder, Meeting
The Workmen's Circle Branch
No. 1046 Third Seder will be
on Saturday, April 17, at noon
at the Reef Restaurant. For
reservations, call Minerva Kap-
lan. 733-3790.
The Thursday. April 22. meet-
ing will be held at the court-
room of the New Lauderdale
Police Station in Lauderhill at
7:30 p.m.
Joseph Katoff will discuss
"The Life and Times of Paul
Muni" and there will also be
a memorial for the late Meyer
Siegal, who was financial sec-
retary.
DEBORAH KAPLAN
Mrs. Cannon
Is Elected
Vice President
Esther (Mrs. Ralph) Cannon,
of Pompano Beach, has been
elected vice president of the
Florida Region of Hadassah for
1976-77. Mrs. Cannon is com-
pleting three years of presi-
dency of the North Broward
Chapter of Hadassah, which she
has headed since it was organ-
ized in 1973 as a Chapter-on-
the-Group plan. Starting with
only three groups and 333 mem-
bers, it is now a Chapter with
ten groups and more than 2,600
members.
Esther Cannon came to Flor-
ida from the Washington, D.C.,
area, where she was president
of the Montgomery County, Md.,
Chapter. Prior to that she was
vice president of the Seaboard
Region of Hadassah and presi-
dent of the Business and Pro-
fessional Division of the Wash-
ington Chapter of Hadassah.
BEFORE the establishment
of the State of Israel, she was
active with the Christian Pales-
tine Committee and worked with
press, radio and Congress on
public-relations programs. Pro-
fessionally, she was engaged in
nress, radio and television in
Washington and with the United
States Information Agency over-
seas. In Jordan she held a for-
eign correspondent's press card.
Mrs. Cannon will be installed
by Marilyn Weissman. past
president of the Florida Region.
Tuesday evening, April 27, at
the Deauville Hotel in Miami
Beach, at a banquet during the
annual conference of the Flor-
ida Region of Hadassah.
The guest speaker at the in-
stallation banaouet will be the
Conference Advisor. Deborah
(Mrs. Aaron) Kaolan. a member
of the National Board of Hadas-
sah. Mrs. Kaolan is national
fnnd-raisin chairperson of Ha-
dassah Israel Education Serv-
ices and was chairperson of the
AID Grant Implementation a
$5 million grant given to Hadas-
sah bv the United States gov-
e-nment.
The newlv elected president
of the Florida Region is Marilyn
T.-Vin of St. Petersburg. Other
'ice nresidents are Bettv Fast
of Miami Beach. Bella Knbocow
of Maitbnd. Fllen Mand'er of
Miami. Ous Mentz of Miami
Rearh. Terrv Rananort of North
Palm Roach and Anne Rale* of
Tmn. TlWMIimi fa Rita Roller
of Oriando. recording secretary
is Stad Legser of Palm Beach
nd cofroanonHinR secretary is
faahel Kt7. of Clearwater.
na|p4t.*t-farg>* qrp R]]o
Aaron. Hallandale: Bettv Miller.
**imi Beach: Audrey Pearl-
roarj. Orlando: Carol Roberts,
plm Reach: Sylvia Herman.
Miami; and Lisle Schick. Clear-
water
rWKIHHS
By Norma Barach
COFFEE-FLAVORED CHIFFON JTE
Baking at home tends to become more popular as the
prices of flour and sugar come down. This pie is good for
people watching their cholesterol level as no egg yolks are
used.
y* cup sugar
1 tap. almond extract
3 egg whites
% cup sugar
10-inch baked pie crust
K cup cold water
1 envelope kosher gelatin
% cup boiling water
2 tblsps. instant coffee
(do not use freeze-dried)
9 tblsps. fresh egg substitute
Soften gelatin in cold water. Dissolve coffee in the boiling
water. Add gelatin and stir until everything is dissolved. Beat
egg substitute until thick, then gradually add the % cup sugar.
Add almond extract and mix well. Add egg mixture to gelatin
mixture. Chill about 30 minutes. Stir until smooth. Beat egg
whites and gradually add tile % cup of sugar, beating until
stiff. Fold into the coffee mixture. Spoon into the cooled baked
Me crust. Chill for several hours.
BEEF CHUNKS W WINE
A meal in one dish seems to be today's busy housewife's
dream. Here is a nourishing, flavorful stew. Serve with a
fresh green salad and your meal is complete.
3 lbs beef, cut in chucks
2 medium onions, chopped
1 tblsp. oil
1 cup sweet red wine
1 cup water
1 tblsp. tomato paste
1 tblsp. oregano
2 allspice berries
% tsp. pepper
2% lbs. potatoes,
cut in quarters
1 lb. carrots, cut in thirds
Saute onions in oil. Add meat and brown for 45 minutes.
Add wine, tomato paste, allspice, oregano and pepper. Bring
to a boil. Continue to simmer for tt hour. Add potatoes and
carrots and simmer for an additional hour. Serves 6.
PINEAPPLE-FLAVORED SWEET POTATOES
Sweet potatoes are in season. They are expecially good
with turkey or chicken. Here are two variations to try.
6 medium-size sweet potatoes 3 tblsps. pineapple juice
' cup margarine concentrate
cup dark corn syrup
% cup brown sugar
Cook unpeeled potatoes in boiling water IS minutes. Peel
and cut in half lengthwise. Melt margarine in a casserole.
Place potatoes in casserole. Mix corn syrup, juice and sugar.
Pour over the potatoes. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes,
basting often.
SHERRIED SWEET POTATOES
8 medium-size sweet potatoes % cup non-dairy coffee
Vi cup margarine creamer (liquid)
3 tblsps. brown sugar 2 tblsps. sherry
Boil potatoes until tender. Peel and mash. Whip potatoes
with remaining ingredients and bake in a 350-degree oven 25
minutes or until top is brown. Serves 8.
WIENER SCHNITZEL
I am pleased to bring to your attention tins week a new
cookbook published by the Hebrew Academy of Greater Kan-
sas City. The book, entitled "BTayavon," offers a wide range
of good recipes. It also has helpful photographs to aid in pre-
paring some items, as well as information relating to the
various religious holidays. To order your copy, send $5 plus
40 cents for postage and packing to the Hebrew Academy of
Greater Kansas City. 5311 W. 75th St., Shawnee-Mission,
Kansas 66208. Now for one of the recipes, a prize-winning one
from a contest held in preparation for the cookbook.
2 tblsps. water
K cup flour
1 cup fine bread crumbs
1'4 cups cooking oil or
margarine
lbs. veal, cut into
slices "4-inch thick
1 cup fresh lemon juice
salt
freshly ground pepper
2 eggs
In a glass dish, marinate cutlets in lemon juice for one
hour. Pat cutlets dry with paper towels; sprinkle with salt
and pepper; dip in eggs beaten with water, then dip in flour
and shake off the excess, and finally dip in bread crumbs.
Refrigerate for 20 minutes. Heat oil in a heavy 12-inch skillet
until a light haze forms. Add cutlets; cook at medium heat
three to four minutes on each side. Turn with tongs. Serve
over lemon garlic vermicelli (see following instructions).
Lemon Garlic Vermicelli
Saute 2 large onions, sliced in rings, in one stick mar-
uine. When onions are golden, add 1 pound sliced fresh
mushrooms. Add 2 cloves crushed garlic or minced garlic and
iuice from half lemon. Cook additional 2 minutes. In large pot,
boil vermicelli according to package. Blanch and drain welL
Add to mushrooms and onions and toss. Additional margarine
may be added. Toss until hot. Serve with slices of veal on top.
BRUSSELS SPROUTS
Winter finds us trying out new ways to cook vegetables.
Here is a different method for preparing Brussels sprouts that
is flavorful and low calorie.
12 oz. fresh Brussels sprouts
2 chicken bouillon cubes
ltt cups boiling water
Mix bouillon cubes with .
sorouts. onion flakes and parsley flakes. Cook covered for 15
minutes. Pour lemon juice over the vegetable just before serv-
ing.
t
1 tblsps. instant onion flakes
1 tblsps. parsley flakes
1 tblsp. lemon juice
boiling water. Add Brussels



. April 16, 1976
The Jewish Flohdian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
-.
Page 13-A
MINDIIN
ertmuller's 'Seven Beauties9 a Great Film
ntinued from Page 4-A
his virility. His impulses
Llfish and human. One of
liters turn whore, and he
her pimp for refusing to
her. It is a question of
not of politics or hu-
tarianism, as he later ex-
. LOCAL Don, an ugly
and therefore a more
lil-to-life characterization
Godfather than Brando
|cino ever could be, tells
ale that he must show
and creativity in dispos-
the body. He must not
A'ay from it like a "com-
triminal," leaving it to de-
bed and as, in fact, Pas-
Ihas done.
. result is a hatchet mur-
la dismembering of the
[which Pasquale performs
revulsion and terror, not
\merican TV panache.
[audience laughs, it is not
ed, because Wertmuller's
. is always on Pasquale
jn as a mildly absurd
Jtfigure, not on his murder
ne details of the murder,
one is not really meant
seriously.
RESULT, Pasquale is
and merely swaggers
nore, for now the papers
the "Beast of Naples."
At worst, he is more of an anti-
hero than before.
He is tried, pleads insanity
and is sent to a mental institu-
tion, from which he is released
by promising to join the Mus-
solini forces in their alliance
with the Germans, for by now
World War II has broken out.
The film begins with docu-
mentary footage of Hitler and
Mussolini strutting their stuff
as orators before their teeming
millions. One hears cowboy
tunes and country western mu-
sic in polyglot jibberish intend-
ed as commentary on the po-
litical insanity of their aspira-
tions the slaughter of teem-
ing millions to the greater glory
of teeming millions.
If Pasquale has joined them,
it is not because he, too, is one
of the teeming millions, but be-
cause he, too, is "insane."
AGAINST ALL of this as a
backdrop, Pasquale is now re-
vealed to us as a deserter in
the process of running away
from the war with a companion.
Not only do they hate their
German allies who hold Italians
in contempt, but they see no
sense in the war. What is in it
for them?
As a selfish individual, he
seeks to flee the polyglot ideal-
ism about Italy as warrior and
artist, which is meaningless to
him.
When Pasquale and his pal
come upon a mass shooting of
naked prisoners in a woods, in-
stead of heroically attempting
to halt it, he runs even faster
than before.
PASQUALE reasons with
some sympathy that it must be
Jews who are being murdered,
but after all he is not a Jew,
and so wouldn't it be foolish to
try to interfere?
Still, it suddenly dawns on
him that not to have said "No"
to the German murder of the
Jews was to have said "Yes" to
it. By refusing to be involved,
he has become a murderer him-
self a real murderer.
Th3 pimp had been a matter
of honor in his Neapolitan
struggle for survival and ad-
vancement. In fact, he had kill-
ed the pimp to prove himself a
worthy citizen of the under-
world in the eyes of the Don,
an: so perhaps it had not been
his sister's honor at stake at
all, but his own. The murder of
the Jews, on the other hand,
was something altogether dif-
ferent not a matter of self-
aggrandizement but of moral
principle.
THIS IS pure Jean-Paul Sar-
tre, and it is here that the film
It* k**-*l
w
**
adopts its philosophical polar-
ities Sartre and involvement
vs. Albert Camus and the Ca-
absurd.
The world is absurd because,
unlike the Germans who do
everything in an orderly way,
there really is no order except
disorder, and to behave as if
there were order is to believe
in something that doesn't exist.
It is to be a victim of absurdity
much as the Germans were.
OF COURSE, Pasquale and
his companion are captured and
themselves incarcerated in the
concentration camp on whose
shooting grounds in the woods
they had accidentally stumbled.
There, in true Sartre fash-
ion, Pasquale goes through the
agonizing torture of self-con-
frontation a process by which
he learns at the peril of his life
just who and what he is.
In prison, he learns that he
must not only become involved
with the Other (humanity), he
must take responsibility for the
Other, too. In a terrifying scene
evoking the sadistic Bitch of
Buchenwald, he makes love to
a Brunnhilde-type woman Gaul-
eiter of the camp to the music
of "Die Walkure" in order to
save himself from being shot.
HE RECALLS the narrow,
selfish days of his Neapolitan
past, but another fellow-prison-
er, an anarchist, who commits
suicide by drowning himself in
the bowels of a latrine, argues
that Pasquale's life in Naples
may not have been so wrong
after all.
The anarchist is pure Camus.
The only value in life, he de-
clares, is to struggle against its
valuelessness. The Germans
murder inferior non-Aryan peo-
ples (Italians, Jews) to create
a higher order.
The way to beat them at
their crazy game, he says, is
to have overwhelming numbers
of (inferior) children, who will
affiim the disorder of the uni-
verse in the profusion of their
inferiority as its only order, and
thus to bring the triumph of
absurdity (disorder).
IN PASQUALE'S act of love
with the Bitch, she marvels at
his stamina that he can be
sexually viable in the face of
his physical weakness and
starvation just to save his
miserable "spaghetti" skin.
In his act of love, she antici-
pates the anarchist's belief and
bitterly foresees the German
iring to turn the earth during offi-
\roundbreaking ceremonies in Holly-
for Riverside Memorial Chapels'
ith facility in Florida were six Brow-
bounty rabbis (above, from left): Dr.
m Malavsky, Temple Beth Shalom,
]wood; Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe, Temple
\Bl, Hollywood; Rabbi Milton Schlin-
sky, Sharon Gardens Memorial Park;
Rabbi Avrom Drazin, Temple Israel of
Miramar; Rabbi Israel Zimmerman, Ta-
marac Jewish Center; and Rabbi Emanuel
Schenk of Fort Lauderdale. The River-
side chapel, scheduled for completion
this fall, will be at 2230 Hollywood Blvd.
-Raising Coffee In Cooper City
educational and fund-
coffee on behalf of the
Women's Division Cam-
of the Jewish Federation
ater Fort Lauderdale was
pently at the Cooper City
F Carol Strasler.
[15 women attended the
and heard Susan Se-
Jirman of the Plantation
Division of the Jew-
eration of Greater Fort
ale, and Barry Axler,
director, answer the
aestions" of the 1976
i. They discussed the
[the Jewish Federation
imunity and described
services, activities and
programs.
Anyone interested in organ-
izing such a coffee in her area
is requested to contact Barry
Axler at the Jewish Federation
office, 484-8200.
IEVITT
memorial chapels
1*11 rMM< U. ISMS W, OhW Hwy.
S144497
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
BMCTORS: .... ^_
IrwnJetle. tM&mMUm -JsiSI
!Vmffi.UIS.U,M
1283 CONtY ISUNO AW, WUM.M
212/776-8100
M ILQWOO
OAK COUNTY 133K W OnOE Hft
947-1185 RwbtsaniYiwn.ra
MJWMO COUNTY -1921 PlMBMtt >
925-2743 hpws MIM KACM COUNTY 825 S. OUVt UK.
1-925-2743 .*?.
Sec tc svs^bl* al coisv-
nM.l*Nw*rtind though*
im&MerMwimM
downfall. Since Pasquale's love
has the capacity of profusion,
even if of profuse inferior
progeny, it is nevertheless a
profusion of individuals who
will overwhelm a sterile intel-
lectual ideal (Hitler's Nazism,
Costa-Gavra's Marxism) that is
anti-individual and therefore
anti-human.
And so Pasquale does just
that. He survives and returns
to Naples to have, as he puts it,
25 or 30 children with a young
girl he once knew who, like his
sister, has grown up to be a
whore.
WHY NOT a whore, whose
profession guarantees fertility
of effort? Honor in matters of
marnage as in everything else
is an irrelevancy in an absurd
world.
Neither his murder of the
pimp nor his "murder" of the
Jews (for failing to try to stop
their mass execution and there-
fore saying "Yes" to it) can
possibly matter. What does mat-
ter is that Pasquale has learn-
ed something from his prison
agony.
As Camus argued in his "Let-
ters to a German Friend," what
counts is the struggle against
a meaningless universe; other-
wise, men are meaningless, too.
IT IS in the end not mean-
ing in the universe we must
find, as the Bitch reasons the
Nazis were doing through the
establishment of a master race,
but meaning in ourselves.
Through all of this, Wertmul-
ler uses her cameras like a
Breugel imbued with the cyni-
cism of Lautrec, the prophetic
decadence of Grosz. There is
abundant humor, even if we
are forced to laugh with tears
in our eyes. We see the ugli-
ness and smell the stink of life,
and that is the triumph of the
film.
We are not forced, as in
Costa-Gavras, to submit to the
reduction of life to arid intel-
lectual ideas, thus conforming
to the Marxist principle that
art that does not advance the
cause of revolution is not art
at all.
"Seven Beauties" IS art. It is
a film not to be missed, wher-
ever it will appear in South
Florida.
MIXER'S
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY
nitSONAUZED MEMORIALS
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUR WORKSHOP
INVIW AS M8 MS 6ZZS
19M-8Z9 PJ*>JS lZ60-m
Serving the need;.
of the Jewish Community
in our 3 locations
ENORAH
Cfcapefe
Mark Welssman
Joseph Rubin
Broward County's first
Jewish Funeral Directors
DEERFIELD
441 S. Federal Highway Phone 971-3330
MARGATE
5915 Park Drive Phone 971-3330
SUNRISE
6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Phone 739-6000
J


Page 14-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Uuderdale
Friday, April 16, 1976

Rabbi Goor Will Be Installed
As Emanu-El Spiritual Leader
Continued from Page 1-A
of life in San Diego. You will
be missed."
In addition to serving on the
Mayor's social science advisory
committee, Rabbi Goor was co-
chairman of the board of the
National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews, whose Brother-
hood Award he received in 1972.
Serving in many civic organ-
izations, the rabbi was on the
steering committee of the San
Diego Urban Coalition and the
board of United Community
Services and Legal Aid, and was
vice president of the UCSD Re-
ligious Conference. He was fre-
quently called upon to deliver
keynote addresses at commu-
nity functions, such as the Mar-
tin Luther King, Jr., Memorial,
the,San Diego Rally for Soviet
Jewry and the March for Fair
Housing. He participated in the
work of Dr. King, and was
jailed with him in St. Augustine
in 1964. In 1968 Rabbi Goor
gave the opening prayer for the
United States Senate.
Within the national Jewish
community, Rabbi Goor served
three times as resolutions chair-
man of the Central Conference
of American Rabbis and was
president of its West Coast body,
the Pacific Association of Re-
form Rabbis.
HE WAS the first rabbi to be
appointed to the United Jew-
ish Appeal National Young Lead-
ership Cabinet in 1969 and is
a member of the UJA Rabbinic
Religious
Services
FORT LAUDERDALE
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
lirael Zimmerman. 44A
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
Labowitz. Cantor Maurice Neu. 42
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 8246 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Joel
S. Qoor. Cantor Jerome Klemant. 48
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
3891 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moahe Bomxer. 52
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA-
TION. 400 So. Nob HIM Rd. Rabbi
Arthur 8. Abrama. 64
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE
7473 N.W. 4th St. 60
Advisory Council. Following his
mission in 1972 to Jews behind
the Iron Curtain, he was the
speaker for many UJA cam-
paigns in the Western United
States.
Rabbi Goor earned his Ph.D.
in Human Behavior from United
States International University,
where he studied with renowned
psychologist Carl Rogers. He
taught Biblical history at the
University of San Diego for nine
years.
The New York-born rabbi,
who grew up in Phoenix, was
the U.S. Air Force Chaplain for
Jewish personnel in France,
Spain and Morocco from 1959
to 1961. In 1975 he lived in
Jerusalem, where he studied
with his friAnrf Rabbi Mordecai
Kaplan, the founder of the Jew-
ish Reconstructionist movement.
He did a research trip through
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th
Ave. Conaervative. Rabbi Morrla A.
SKop. Cantor Jacob Renzer. 49
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 6101
NW 9th St. Conaervative. 44B
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION.
7640 Margate Blvd. Coneervatlve.
Cantor Charles Perlman.
Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and
Syria before returning to the
United States.
RABBI GOOR is married and
the father of three children.
His wife, Lucille Roussin, an art
historian and archeologist, will
be joined at the service by his
mother, Anne Goor, of Phoenix,
and his son, Don, of San Diego,
a former Eisendrath Exchange
Student in Israel
The Service of Installation is
scheduled for 8 p.m. Thursday,
April 22, at Temple Emanu-El.
Robert M. Hermann, the con-
gregational vice president, chair-
man of North Broward County
Board of Governors of Israel
Bonds and vice president of the
Jewish Federation, is chairman
of the event. He announced that
due to limited space, attendance
is by invitation only. Non-mem-
bers may call Temole Emanu-
El (731-2310) for reservations.
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community

Thursday, April IS
Jewish Holiday First Day Passover
Jewish Federation building closed
Temple Emanu-El Executive Board Meeting 8 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Women Tamarac Chapter No. 1479 regular meeting
Friday, April 16
Jewish Holiday Second Day Passover
Jewish Federation building closed
Sunday, April 18
Fund Raising breakfast at Diplomat Hotel of
B'nai B'rith Foundation Century Club 9:30 am.
Tuesday, April 20
Temple Beth Israel Adult Education
Sisterhood Board meeting at Temple Emanu-El 9:45 am.
Wednesday. April 21
Jewish Holiday Seventh Day Passover
Jewish Federation building closed
Thursday, April 22
Jewish Holiday Eighth Day Passover
Jewish Federation building closed
Rabbi Goor installation Temple Emanu-El 8 p.m.
Saturday, April 24
Temple Emanu-El Cadillac Affair 7 p.m.
JCC Teen Rock Dance live band at Temple Beth Israel
8 p.m.
Sunday, April 25
JCC Israeli Independence Day celebrationcommunity wide
at Holiday Park. Ron Hunter (Channel 10 News) will host
Admission FREE10 a.m.
Monday, April 26
Florida Regional Hadassah annual conference
Deauville Hotel. Miami Beach
Hosts: North Broward Chapter April 26. 27 and 28.
Lauderdale Oaks Fund-Raiser 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 27
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood donor luncheon
at Sheraton Hotel noon
Temple Shalom, Pompano General congregation meeting
8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Adult Education
Wednesday, April 28
Women's ORT Inverrary Chapter Card Party
Plantation Women's Division Coffee at Susan Segaul's home
8 p.m.
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-v.':i
Kokrt
Abortion: A
Candidate's
Dilemma
A BORTION, Busing, and Crime are as much if not more
n the ABCs of the 176 Presidential election campaign than
ire issues of such magnitude as the SALT talks, unemDlov-
ment, inflation, and the crying need for peace.
Abortion especially has been seized upon as a matter of
luch importance that Presidential aspirants may find the suc-
cess or failure of their campaigns depending upon their views
on this one issue only, and how they express those views
THE FORDS husband and wife are having difficulty
with their conflicting public statements about abortion. Ortho-
dox Jewry has so underlined its significance as to touch off
controversy within the Jewish community. And Catholics have
mounted a campaign of considerable election-year proportion
on the subject.
Over in their own corner, adherents of the American Party
and the Birch Society most certainly be rejoicing over media
attention given to the abortion debate because the hard feel-
ings stirred up by the issue may yet breathe new life into
America's right wing organizations.
Early in the year, the Knight-Ridder newspapers reported
on a survey indicating that 81 percent of those questioned
believe that abortion is none of the government's business.
THE QUERY was put thus: "If a woman wants to have
Jan abortion, that is a matter for her and her doctor to decide
and the government should have nothing to do with it."
Only 15 percent of those interviewed disagreed; three in
every four Catholics held that this was a matter the govern-
ment should stay out of; so did 82 percent of the Protestants
questioned.
HOW DID Jews respond? Only 2 percent saw a role for
government in the problem. But strongly backing that minority
is a resolution issuing from a recent convocation of the Rab-
binical Council of America putting Orthodox leaders firmly on
record as being shocked "by the blindness of those Jewish
leaders who join coalition groups in their advocacy of permis-
sive abortion."
Even so, Jewish organizations continue a vital part of the
Religious Coalition For Abortion Rights, holding that prospec-
isdiction of civil law.
Meanwhile, a spirited debate has been reported in the Knes-
set on efforts to liberalize Israel's current abortion laws. There
a proposed amendment to the abortion law would permit abor-
tions within the first three months of pregnancy and only in
mproved medical institutions.
ive mothers have religious rights on the issue, outside the jur-
IN THE United States Presidential sweepstakes, the quarrel
'er abortion has been sharply dramatized by a Long Island
lousewife, Mrs. Ellen McCormack, who is running for President
the candidate of the Pro-Life Action Committee.
Ample financial backing has found its way to her cam-
>aign. If a political quirk puts Candidate McCormack into the
Wiite House, she may be able to do something about abortion.
t is not easy to know just what inasmuch as the Supreme
jourt has ruled that states cannot prohibit abortions in the
tot three months of pregnancy.
MORE TO the point, one wonders what Candidate McCor-
nack, if elected, would be able to do about the energy crisis,
oreign policy, the crying need to create jobs, and a host of
Mher pressing, issues requiring a President's studied judgment
wd firm action.
Psychologists should be far better equipped than politicians
* explain why the topic of abortion has moved so close to the
"cart of all questioning of candidates in 1976.
The controversy gave Ronald Reagan a better chance in
campaign, hurt Birch Bayh and Sargent Shriver, and threw
nous obstacles in the paths of other candidates. One person
no has a heavy stake in the outcome of the election may have
barrassed her favorite aspirant Gerald Ford by ex-
wing a wife's prerogative to differ with her husband.
"I AM glad to see that abortion has been taken out of the
Kwoods and put in the hospitals where it belongs," Mrs.
ra declared with spirit while the President was waffling on
' issue.
a
ge 15-A *Jewlstincrkttar Friday, April 16, 1976
Hie Boys from Brazil'
Is Not Really a Novel
IRA LEVIN of "Rosemary's Baby" fame has
written a new novel, "The Boys from Brazil"
[Random House, $8.95). But it is not really a
novel. It is a series of exciting adventures with
io literary merit. In other words, a screenplay
'or a movie.
I am not averse to the book because Levin
sai chosen to fictionalize as serious and sen-
ntive an event as the Holocaust with a fan-
:astic plot surrounding the infamous Dr. Men-
gele of Auschwitz. No, a novelist has the license
to fictionalize any historical event even the
Holocaust. It is simply that the book is poorly
written.
LEVTN DOES present a few thonght-pro-
foking issues for his Jewish readers. He does
lot want us to forget the Holocaust, but he
s not sure how Jews should defend themselves
day. The main character, Yaakov Lieverman,
nodeled after Simon Wiesenthal, presents the
ideal Jewish ethical position.
He is humane and follows the golden rule.
On the other hand. Levin gives a JDL-type
organization a significant amount of credence
in the book. In fact, considering the sequence
of events in the book, the "JDL" "s extreme
and untenable position is quite inviting. There,
I've gone and piqued your interest. But wait
for the movie .
THE BIRNBAUM Haggadah" (Hebrew Pub-
lishing Company, $4.95, hard; $2.95, paper) has
been reissued in time for Passover. The hard-
bound copy is well worth the price as it is
sturdily bound, has washable covers and hence
is somewhat safe at the table.
This is a scholarly Haggadah: it is for those
who make the Seder a learning experience,
not just a gastronomical one. The Hebrew and
English texts are traditional and Birnbaum's
commentary runs along the bottom of every
page.
Attractive reproductions of illuminated Hag-
gadot, woodcuts and Passover ceremonial ob-
jects grace the text, though none are in color.
FOR LOVELY color plates of old Haggadot,
Bezalel Narkiss, in cooperation with file "En-
cyclopedia Judaica," has produced "Hebrew
Illuminated Manuscripts" (Leon Amiel, $20).
This large volume contains 60 color plates
with in-depth historical surveys of illuminated
Bibles, Haggadot, Siddurim and Kettubot of
Oriental, Spanish, French, German and Italian
origin. It is a significant contribution to Jew-
ish art history.
The text accompanying the plates delves into
he Jewish attitude toward art, and the in-
fluence of Christian illuminators upon that art.
Narkiss discusses the materials and techniques
used in the creation of illuminated manuscripts.
The author also differentiates among the
styles of the Orientals, Sephardim and Ashken-
azim.
IT IS no wonder that those who can afford
to, collect these Hebrew manuscripts. Some of
the illuminations are vibrant reds and purples
with streams of gold throughout.
Others are softly touched with subtle shades
of blue, lavender and primrose, delicately sur-
rounded with golden filaments. Their beauty is
sxceeded only by their historical value.
As Many Israelis See It,
A Job Ought to be Forever
Haifa
^GAIN AND again, Israeli economists, both
in and out of the government, have warn-
ed that there must be an acceleration of ex-
ports if the country is to obtain the hard cur-
rency required to assure national financial
stability. Yet in many parts of Israel plants
producing for export complain that they are
unable to obtain the skilled help they require.
Everybody has a job, and nobody wants to
change.
The immobility of labor has been spotlight-
ed in recent weeks at the Friedman plant in
Jerusalem. The factory, which produces refrig-
srators, washing machines and heating stoves
for the local market, has been finding it in-
creasingly difficult to stay in the black. Its
sales dropped off sharply,
AFTER SEVERAL desperate attempts to
stave off the inevitable, the Friedman manage-
ment notified 108 of its 300 workers that there
was no choice but to dismiss them and they
would receive full severance compensation,
dependent on the number of years they had
been with the firm, this in accordance with
the labor agreement.
It has been some years since Israel has had
an economic recession, and Jerusalem's labor
council refused to accept the dismissals. The
men must stay on the job, they insisted. They
all have "kvivut," and in labor parlance that
means permanent rights for life.
THERE WERE demonstrations and pro-
tests reaching as far as the Knesset. Friedman,
backed up by the Manufacturers' Association,
was perfectly willing to continue operating, but
wanted to know who was going to pay his bill*.
The Labor Council? Shift to other lines of pro-
duction? Would the Labor Council finance the
retooling, and guarantee sales?
Labor declared that was Friedman's prob-
lem. In the meantime, he could not ignore his
responsibility to these men, more than half of
whom had worked for the plant for over ten
years and some of them over twenty.
BESIDES, he had not made the slightest
gesture to increase the severance compensation
voluntarily, over and above that required by
the contract. Observers recalled that the dis-
missed copper miners at Timna had staged
riotous demonstrations to demand severance
four times that due to them.
It remained for a writer in Davar, official
Drgan of the Histadrut, to point out that the
:ountry needed an industrial revolution a
hift of labor from non-profitable or non-pro-
ductive plants, to those whose production help-
ed the national defense efforts or the export
program.
Perhaps Israel's labor leadership should
take a new, long thoughtful look at itself and
its responsibility for the national welfare.
ni'iii......n.rir: '" "''.ruii'i.n.r BMHBMi
'ft Hard to Believe That a Bar Mitzvah Boy Could Have Said This
^PAVE YOU ever met a Jewish scholar who has
MT virtually committed the Talmud to memory?
\M r It is an amaginz feat, and quite a number of
Ple can do it.
^njkne of them is the rabbi of Congregation B'nai
*i Wi, Highland Park, HI. His name is (Dr.) Sholom
?er. He and his wife were recently honored on
r Chai (18th) anniversary with the congrega-
DR. SINGER writes learned tomes, but I men-
him today because he inspired one of the fin-
Bar Mitzvah talks I've ever read. It's hard to
eve that 13-year-old Steven Klauber could have
,en the talk which goes, in part, like this:
One of the most apparent concepts in the Jew-
faith is that He is a personal God, not in the
faith is th

sense that He has a body, but that He deals with
man at will, through justice, anger and love. He
is a God of hope, for the world which he created
with a purpose is not an illusion, and history is not
an endless cycle .
"WHEN YOU reach the Bar Mitzvah age it be-
comes time to reflect upon your life: the meaning
of being Jewish ... A Jew believes that God is one,
so as God is one, so is life. Every part of it must be
sanctified. There is no division between the evil
represented by body and the good represented by
soul, for both must served God.
"These concepts to me mean that I should be
faithful to my religion, family and country. I wouldn't
lie, steal or cheat. I would follow the commandments
and obey my parents. I would help keep Israel alive
and- well.
"I WOULD like to thank our rabbi, my teacher,
ind my parents for the 13 years they've put up with
me, my relatives for happy times I've had with them
and my friends for being friends."
What "nachas" those parents must have had.


Page 16A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, i97A
Plantation Jewish Congregation ^p1^ ShoW8 Jerusalem's
. Holy Places in Jordan
To Celebrate First Anniversary
The newly reorganized Planta-
tion Jewish Congregation will
hold its first annual punch-
brunch on Sunday, May 2, on
the temple grounds to celebrate
Its first anniversary. The festi-
vities will take place between
10 a.m. and noon at 400 S. Nob
Hill Rd. in the Jacaranda area
of Plantation. The punch-brunch
is open to all members, pros-
pective members and friends.
There is no admission charge.
The Liberal Reform Congre-
gation is interviewing and hir-
ing teachers for its second year
of afternoon Torah school pro-
gramming. The 200 children
school program will feature out-
standing teachers and materials
fox the coming academic year.
The daily preschool and kin-
dergarten will meet through the
slimmer, offering an arts and
crafts program directed by two
qualified crafts teachers. The
weekly fee for this morning-
only nrogram is $12 per child.
Class size is limited to 25 chil-
dren between the ages of 3 Mb
and 6.
A first-grade full-day pro-
gram, with transportation, and
the regular morning preschool
and kindergarten, with trans-
portation, are being offered for
the fall. Application forms a.re
available in the temple office
or by calling 472-1988.
The Liberal Reform congre-
gation is also interviewing rab-
bis for the pulpit. The commu-
nity is invited to attend Friday
evening services, when prospec-
tive rabbis and cantors will of-
ficiate.
For additional information on
all the temple's activities, in-
cluding Sisterhood, social ac-
tivities and youth programs,
please call the office at 472-
1988.
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Diplomatic correspondents at
the State Department were tak-
en aback on Mar. 30 over the
pictorial display of Jordan in
the Department's lobby in honor
of King Hussein's visit that in-
cluded an entire panel of holy
ADL National Gommissioner Will Be M.C
At B'nai B'rith Passover Breakfasts
Alfred Golden, a national
commissioner of the Anti-Defa-
mation League, will be master
of ceremonies at two Passover
breakfasts sponsored by the
B'nai B'rith Foundation of the
United States Sunday, April 18,
at 11:30 a.m. at the Konover
Hotel in Miami Beach, and at
9:30 a.m. at the Diplomat Ho-
tel in Hollywood, it was an-
nounced by general chairman
Malcolm H. Fromberg.
Guest speaker at the break-
fasts, which will be traditional
kosher Passover meals, will be
Dr. William Korey, director of
the B'nai B'rith International
Council and B'nai B'rith's for-
mer representative at the
United Nations.
Golden, a former national
Hillel commissioner, is a mem-
ber of the board of governors
of B'nai B'rith District Five,
an area encompassing seven
Southeastern states.
A PROGRAM featuring some
of the area's B'nai B'rith youth
is also planned as part of the
Passover breakfasts, which will
benefit the National Youth Serv-
ices Appeal, providing for the
maintenance and growth of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations,
support of the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization (BBYO) and
Career and Counseling Services.
Louis Hymson and Fred Sny-
der are chairmen of the Miami
Beach breakfast, and Alan J.
Blaustein is chairman in Holly-
wood. Honorary chairmen are
Levin, E. Albert Pallet and
Burnett Roth.
Reservations for both events
are still available. For more in-
formation, contact the B'nai
B'rith Foundation office in Mi-
ami Beach.
ALFRED GOLDEN
places in Jerusalem and Bethie-
hem. ^^
The State Department prom-
ised under questioning that it
would supply a response at to
how this took place. But, meaa.
while, considerable questionin.
indicated a feeling among son*
of the reporters that the du-
play reflected a change in Amer--
ican poncy away from brat
and in favor of Jordan.
When the question Wi
raised whether the display im.
plied that the Department coo-
sidered East Jerusalem a part
of Jordan, spokesman Robert
Funseth said that "the exhibit
does not imply anything except
that it is an exhibit for the
King." w
When a reporter pressed why
the holy places were shown u
part of Jordan, Funseth said he
did not know but that he would
not attach political significance
to the oeople who put picturei
on panels.
HOWEVER, a reporter point-
ed out that the Department's
Jordan desk officer said that*
the inclusion of the holy placet |
in Jerusalem in the display on
Jordan was not a mistake but
deliberate policy and an indica-
tion that the U.S. recognizes tho
holy places as part of Jordan.
** ilCillV/ir-iu
Left to right: Hon. Zev W. Kogan, Pres.
JNF Southern Region, Ambassador Meir
Shoham, Mrs. Ludwik (Paula) Brodzki,
Mr. Ludwik Brodzki, Chairman, Rabbi Dr.
Morton Malavsky, Broward J.N.F. Chair-
man, Dr. & Mrs. Alvin K. Colin, the Hon-
orees, Ambassador Ira Hirschmann, Guest
Speaker, Dr. Aron Weinberger, National
Director, J.N.F. Foundation, Cantor Saul
H. Breeh, Chairman, JNF Hi-Rise and
Synagogue Activities.
DR. & MRS. ALVIN K. COLIN, Honorees
Left to right: Mr. Ludwik Brodzki, chairman; Mrs. Lud-
wik (Paula) Brodzki, Dr. Morton Malavsky, Broward
JNF chairman; and Dr. and Mrs. Alvin K. Colin, honorees.
Left to right: Mr. Ludwik Brodzki, Chairman
Mr. Bernard Oshinsky, Co-Chairman
Mrs. Matthew (Josephine) Newman, Cochairperson,
Mr. Matthew Newman


rjewisfiftoridiari
oj Greater Fort Lauderdale
Section B
Friday, April 16. 1976
The story of Passover is
the story of a glorious Jew-
ish exodus from slavery to
fredom. The Passover Seder
recounts this story in all its
ancient glory. But Passover
today is also the story of
a Jewish struggle to remain
free. In this feature on "The
Jewish Holy Places," there
s recounted the ages-long
Jewish quest for spiritual
purpose and worldwide
determination throughout
our history to bring that
purpose low. Nothing sym-
bolizes this determination
more graphically than the
photos on this page. To ig-
nore their meaning is to ig-
nore the meaning of Pass-
over itself and the Jewish
view of freedom: Freedom
never IS; freedom is always
a process of BECOMING.
Elsewhere in this holiday
section devoted to Passover
are other feature articles
recounting this ancient
struggle waged again and
again in our own time,
ranging from "Germans
Would Forget Horrors of
Dachau" (Page 4-D) to
"Egypt Invests in Husky Re-
birth" (Page 6-0). All tell
the same tale: history's de-
votion to the theme of tha
eternal Jewish striving tow-
ard higher spiritual pur-
pose.
Jordanian bunker built with tombstones from the Mount of Olives. The holy places of Jewish history read
like a Book of Lamentations written by the occupying forces of two millenia of tyrants.
vjhw ike C<
ourse
4 V*
tnte
The Jewish Holy Places:
Their GloryAnd Agony
By DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
Executive Editor
Encyclopaedia Judaic*
Although certain sites in Is-
rael are popularly considered
to be holy and as such are ven-
erated and visited, the notion
is almost nonexistent in primary
Jewish sources.
In the course of time, how-
ever, and perhaps undei non-
Jewish influences, Jews came
to regard some places as being
holy and prayer offered there
as more efficacious than at
other places. The most ven-
erated of these places is the
Western Wall, a relic of the
Temple of Herod.
WITH THE" reunification of
the city in 1967, the Wall be-
came the central attraction for
Jewish pilgrims. Prayer serv-
ices are held there daily from
sunrise to nightfall and people
come at all times for medita-
tion. While there is a popular
custom of inserting slips of
paper bearing petitions in the
cracks of the Wall, some peo-
ple refrain from even touching
it because of its holiness.
The other holy places are all
graves of biblical figures or
famous rabbis and pious men
from the mishnaic period until
today.
In Jerusalem, the Mount of
Olives was a center of pilgrim-
age, perhaps because of its
proximity to the Temple site or
because of the prophecy that on
the Day of the Lord (that is the
Day of Resurrection according
to the oral tradition): "His feet
shall stand upon the Mount of
Olives" (Zech. 14:4).
THE MOUNT has served as a
general burial ground for many
centuries and according to tra-
dition, the prophet Zechariah is
buried at its foot. Also in Jeru-
salem is the tomb of King David
on Mount, Zion, which is cer-
tainly spurious. This fact did
not, however, prevent it from
being a popular focus for pil-
grimage. The grave of Simeon
the Just in Jerusalem is also
popular and, to some degree,
serves _as a substitute for that
of Simeon b. Yohai in Meron.
The most important grave is
that of the patriarchs in He-
bron. This shrine, known in the
Bible as the cave of the Mach-
pelah, is housed in a building
Continued on Page 12-B
A latrine in a Jordanian army camp with tombstone doorstep



Page 2-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Fflday. April 16, 1976
'THE CHIEF censor in Uokow
in the 1930s, one of three
servicing foreign correspond-
ents, was a Jew. He was tho-
roughly assimilated In the
Czariat days, he had studied
philosophy in Switzerland, hav-
ing fled Russia because of his
revolutionary activities.
After the Soviet Revolution
he returned to Russia, consider-
ing himself one of the Bolshe-
viks who was living In exile.
Since he spoke English, French
and German very fluently, he
immediately found service in
the Foreign Commissariat Be-
cause of his great erudition, he
was appointed chief censor.
HIS NAME was Yakov Podol-
sky, a genuinely Jewish name,
which he had not changed, al-
though he was far removed
from Jewish interests, and he
did not know a word of Yiddish.
He was a very cultured person;
he never displayed the arro-
gance one often found among
censors.
Here and there he would ez-
ounge a word or a phrase in my
cables. I had never encountered
serious difficulties with him, al-
though he stood eminently vi-
gilant in his solicitude of Com-
munist interests. He was a mid-
dle-aged man, married to a gen-
tile woman with whom he had
The Liquidation
Of Moscow's
Jewish Censors
By BORIS SMOLAR
HE ACKNOWLEDGED the
force of my argument and we
arrived at an agreement mat
he would pass all news, even if
it were detrimental to Soviet
interests, provided I showed
him the Soviet newspapers
which were die sources of that
news, including Soviet-Jewish
newspapers. From here on it
was easy for me. In the Soviet
Union, the government-control-
led press is the principal source
of news for foreign correspond-
ents.
Jewish Communist papers did
not let a day go by without re-
porting that some synagogue
here or there had been convert-
ed into a club, or that in such
and such a town some Jews
Continued on Following Page
had three children. His com-
plete devotion as a husband and
father was exemplary. Among
the foreign correspondents he
was held in the highest respect.
From the first day I arrived
in Moscow, I reached a sort of
understanding with him.
"MY DUTY," I stated, "is to
send news.. Yours is to ensure
that these news items are based
on fact and that they do not
promulgate anti-Soviet propa-
ganda. Now, what could be more
valid than facts reported in the
Jewish Communist press, or
those reported In the general
Soviet news publications re-
garding matters pertaining to
Jews?
"Many of these facts es-
pecially the aggressive attacks
on rabbis and synagogues, on
Zionism and Hebrew produce
a very agonizing impression on
Jews all over the world. I must
inform you beforehand that they
will take up considerable space
in the daily cables which I will
submit to you for censorship.
"If you didn't pass them their
contents would, in any case be
read by Jews all over the world,
because your newspapers reach
neighboring non Communist
countries from where cables
car. be transmitted freely to
America."
Passover Greetings
and Best Wishes To AU
SOUTHERN
AUTO BODY
2050 SCOTT AVENUE
WEST PALM BEACH 33406
Telephone 683-7604
I
May this Holiday of
Liberation and Freedom
Extend its Ancient
Promise and Hope
To AU Men Everywhere!
BIG B. RANCH
BELLE GLADE 33430


T
Friday. AprU 16, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3-B
Brutal Liquidation
Continued from Preceding Page
were arrested because they had
Icretly celebrated a: circumci-
jion (which had been prohibited
i Soviet Russia); or that in
gome town an illegal Hebrew
.chool had been discovered.
Every time I appeared before
Podolsky with a cable contain-
ing such news he would become
irritated in his mild fashion
against the Jewish^ Communist
publications reporting it. He
nevertheless passed the cables.
He really had no choice, be-
cause he understood that two
days later the "Ernes** and other
Jewish-Soviet newspapers would
arrive abroad thence the news
would be transmitted to Amer-
ica anyway.
IT FINALLY reached a point
some months after my arrival
in Moscow that Podolsky con-
cluded that the "Ernes" and the
other Jewish Communist news-
papers in Kharkov and Minsk
were more detrimental than
useful to Soviet interests be-
cause they could not compre-
hend that they were providing
anti-Soviet material to the out-
side world. What had most un-
nerved him was the fact that
the people in the Yevsekzia,
Jewish section of the Commu-
nist Party, began to accuse him
before "higher inner circles" of
passing anti-Soviet news for me.
These people conveniently
failed to mention that those
news items originated in their
own publications.
Podolsky was thoroughly con-
versant with his work and the
Yevsekzia denouncements did
not harm him in any way. He
had ready access even to Stalin
himself whenever that became
necessary. His record as a Com-
munist stood above suspicion.
He had been a Bolshevik long
before any of the leaders of the
Yevsekzia had adopted that
persuasion. The largest part of
the Yevsekzia, before the Revo-
lution, had been either Bundists
or Socialist-Territorialists.
EVENTUALLY Podolsky was
appointed Soviet Ambassador to
Vienna. That waa a very im-
portant post becauae Vienna, at
that time, was the diplomatic
center of Central Europe and
all the Balkan countries. After
period of service in Vienna,
he was designated Soviet Am-
bassador to Iran, which waa a
still more important post, be-
cause of the common border
shared by Soviet Russia and
Iran, and, also because Iran was
the center from which the So-
viets were contending with Eng-
land for diplomatic influence in
the Moslem countries of the
Middle East.
I left Moscow for America
before Podolsky's appointment
as Ambassador to Vienna, and
then I heard nothing more
about him. When I visited Mos-
cow again after the war years,
I met a number of well-known
Soviet writers who had survived
Stalin's insane years of mass
liquidation. I naturally inquired
after people whom I had known
years before, among them Po-
dolsky. The facts I learned left
a gruesome impression on me.
This is what they had told me
about Podolsky.
In 1938, when Stalin began to
eliminate Jews from important
positions, especially in diplo-
matic posts, Podolsky, who was
then in Teheran, the capital of
Iran, received an urgent call to
return to Moscow. He was told
that he was being recalled for
an important consultation of
Soviet diplomats. Without was-
ting any time, the very next
day, Podolsky boarded a train
to Moscow.
WHEN THE train crossed the
Iranian border into Soviet Rus-
sia, and stopped at one of the
larger railway stations, a Soviet
civilian official entered the car
where Podolsky sat and inform-
ed him that there was an espe-
cially urgent message for him
from Moscow. He told him that
the station master had been in-
structed to deliver it to him in
person and to wait for an im-
mediate reply for transmission
by telegraph to Moscow.
Unsuspecting of any foul play,
Podolsky left his traveling bags
on the train and went down to
the station master's office to
pick up the message.
He never boarded that train
again. It left for Moscow with-
out him. He vanished in that
railway station and was never
heard from again. Later it be-
came known that he had been
among those who perished in
the great liquidation which Sta-
lin had carried oat
His wife and children were
informed in Teheran that they
should return to Moscow. They
were led to believe that Podol-
sky was to remain in Moscow a
long time. Without suspecting
anything, the family came to
Moscow expecting to be met by
Podolsky at the railway station.
No one appeared. They could
not understand what had hap-
pened. They spent that night in
the station sleeping in their
clothes.
THE NEXT morning his wife
began to telephone the Foreign
Commissariat and other places
to learn the whereabouts of her
husband. Everywhere she re-
ceived the same answer: no one
had seen him in Moscow. No
one had even known that he
was to come to Moscow.
Some people who were ac-
quainted with the Podolsky
family had seen bis wife and
children sleeping oa park
benches for several days. Ap-
parently they had found no liv-
ing quarters. What finally be-
came of them no one knew.
That was the tragic end of
one of the three Jews engaged
in censoring news of foreign
correspondents during the first
15 years of the Soviet Revolu-
tion. The other two were also
liquidated under tragic circum-
stances.
At present, none of the cen-
sors in the Soviet Foreign Min-
istry is a Jew.
Passover Greetings
BRYSON & HICKS
INCORPORATED
1241 OKEECHOBEE ROAD
WIST PALM BEACH 33402
Passover Greetings
GREG'S BODY
& PAINT SHOP
EXPERT EUROPEAN CRAFTSMANSHIP...
AMERICAN & FOREIGN CARS
1225 OKEECHOBEE ROAD
WEST PALM BEACH 33401
PHONE 833-5626
Passover Greetings To All
PALM ELECTRIC
INC
6900 BARBOUR ROAD
WEST PALM BEACH 33407
Passover Greetings To All
ART CENTER
WORKSHOP
1401 NORTH FEDERAL HWY.
FORT LAUDERDALE 33304
PHONE 565-5951

m
Happy
Passover
ROGER JORN
ASSOCIATES
REPRESENTING WOOD-MODE
CUSTOM CABINETRY
517 LAKE AVENUE
LAKE WORTH 33460
Telephone 586-2310
;
Happy
Passover
ELECTRIC MACHINERY
OF SOUTH FLORIDA
INCORPORATED
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
4425 N.E. 6th TERRACE
FT. LAUDERDALE 33334
Telephone 776-5522


/
Page 4-B
The Jewish PToridkm of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 1976
V,
Germans Would Forget Horrors of Dachau
.-
By JACK SIEGEL
Dachau
IT WAS a grey, gloomy and
somehow very fitting day. I
and a friend, armed with a 35
mm. camera and driving the
rented Opel, left Munich for
Dachau about 20 miles away.
As we left, I thought of the
story in the International Herald
Tribune just several days earl-
ier about the people in Dachau,
now a city of 33,000 (13,000 be-
fore World War II), who were
not interested in and even hos-
tile to the existence of the me-
morial camp site, its history
an everpresent reminder.
I thought, on the contrary,
it should be exposed again and
again and made visible wher-
ever possible "to honor the
dead and remind the living."
MUNICH'S grand streets, the
well-built houses and well-fed
and clothed people were traf-
ficking in their clean streets
Munich the birthplace of Ger-
man fascism where in Novem-
ber, 1923, Hitler attempted a
coup d'etat beginning at the
Buergerbraeu and ending at the
Feldhernhalle, and where 11 of
his "genossen" (comrades)
were killed while he fled in
ignominy.
Now, however, that was an-
other history as we drove up
Ifland Strasse to Ise Ring, fol-
lowed the Mittlerer Ring and
finally found ourselves on Da-
,chauer Strasse heading towards
that medieval town.
But the roads were heavy with
modern traffic, and on either
side was all the evidence of a
city well-heeled. Farther out,
the landscape thinned, and after
25 kilometers, we saw the KZ
(Konzentrationslaager con-
centration camp), sign right too
late jand passed it.
WE MADE an illegal U-turn
and stopped to ask a gas attend-
ant where the KZ was. He mut-
tered an unfriendly direction in
his thick Bavarian accent, and
we took off to the sign "Gedenk-
staette" (memorial site). A bare
road led us to a parking area
just outside the barbed wire of
such things together was not
real, and we moved into the
long and wide field where, flank-
ed by watch-towers once ma-
chine gun-manned, there were
two sections of oblong-number-
ed areas where the barracks
housing the inmates used to be
ON THE right, as we moved
in, was a moat, now a dry ditch
with patches of snow, which
separated the field from the
fence shielded by trees. They
were bare of foliage in the
winter and hardly shielded the
camp of whose activities people
used to say, we didn't know
what was happening.
A plaque, somehow aged and
Memorial statue in honor of dead and reminder to living.
Passover Greetings
Westwood Fleet
Service
Truck Repair & Welding
4180 WESTWOOD DRIVE
WEST PALM BEACH 33407
Telephone 842-8821
I
the camp.
My friend and I pulled up
almost simultaneously with an-
other car driven by a German,
and when we got out together,
I' asked him if he were visiting
the city, and he said he was
from Munich. He was about 45,
and I asked what he thought
of Dachau and its tunes. He
called it a "dirty history."

1 I said as we stood there in
the biting winter cold where
likely, hundreds of "Kazettlings"
(inmates) must have marched
into the camp and their ulti-
mate death that this would
never happen again.
THE MAN, said shrugging,
"Who knows? The Nazis will
come again because there is so
much 'communismus' in the
country." He cited the Bader-
Meinhof gang, and I said they
were anarchists not commun-
ists, and the man said, no, they
are communists and that the
high schools were full of Reds.
His words had the smell of
Hitler again and they depress-
ed me. My friend and I walked
past the barbed wire, and I
could almost visualize the gaunt,
sickened faces and clawlike
fingers pressed to and gripping
the interstices.
Ahead were some buildings;
one was a museum ,and inside
a sleepy guard In a green uni-
form sai at the door. We didn't
stay long, the effect of putting

I
*
i
V
Best Wishes from Mr. <& Mrs. Charles Gerstel
For A Peaceful and Happy Passover
i
>-3$$&
SOLTTRON
DEVICES INC
1177 BLUE HERON BLVD.
RIVIERA BEACH 33404
UNIVERSITY SUNOCO
2185 UNIVERSITY DRIVE
SUNRISE 33313
Telephone 741-9570
59"


/
1
Friday, April 16, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
ageless, said, "Plus Jamais, Nie
Wieder, Never Again," and the
same, I guessed, in Russian
which I couldn't read.
Two young men passed our
way and turned out to be Aus-
tralians on their way to Inns-
bruck for the Olympics. I stop-
ped briefly to talk to them. Da-
chau was before their time, and
they were at a loss for words
and one could only mutter,
"what a horrible mess."
ONCE AGAIN, I surveyed the
field and invoked from my own
memory and experience in the
time, the rows of barracks, the
guttural German commands, the
frenetic activity for those still
then among the living.
At the opposite end of the
field, were three monuments
Protestant, Catholic and Jewish
symbolic of the religion of
all the people who were anni-
hilated there. Some nuns, who
stopped to pray over one bar-
racks site, moved hi the Cath-
olic memorial which had a
church in the rear.
It was called Hellige Blut
(holy jblood). I and my friend,
a non-Jew, stopped before the
Page 5-B
Writer at entrance to Concentration Camp.
Jewish memorial, built in 1965,
for a quick moment, not as
much in prayer as in recall. We
moved on past another moat
and met two young men coming
our way, dressed in winter sport
clothing.
I stopped them, too, and ask-
ed where they were from. Nor-
way, one said, and I asked what
they thought of the camp. "Gro-
tesque," one said. We talked
very briefly and went our sep-
arate ways, they away from the
crematoria and we towards
them.
BUT THE word "grotesque"
rang in my ears. My friend and
I passed the "Grave of the Ten
Thousand Unknown," to an area
once used as a shooting range
and where executions were per-
formed. In back of the range
was the blood ditch. Turning
around again and surveying the
area, it was all so difficult to
believe. The surroundings were
now so bland, even Christmasy,
with the snow.
The term, "moving," which a
woman used about the memo-
rial as she left, hardly began to
reach the enormity of the bes-
tiality. It escaped comprehen-
sion as though momentarily it
would be necessary for the jack-
booted Nazi janissaries to come
out of that history commanding
respect for their reality.
Nevertheless, a reludous state-
Continued on Page 14-B
NATIONAL

.^-
CAR RENTALS"

, A Happy Passover
ARRQW PRINT!
LETTERPRESS & OFFSET PRINTING
1400 S. DIXIE HWY.
POMPANO BEACH 33060
Phone 946-3113
Wishes *fl
\V\ ffS
FINCH & SONS
INCORPORATED
PLUMBING CONTRACTORS
, 1231 ROEBUCK COURT ,
WEST PALM BEACH 33401
PHONE 833-5679 \
Best Wishes For
I

A Happy And Peaceful Passover
)
JOHN'S SHELL
^GENERAL AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS
2274 OKEfCHOBEE BLVD.
WEST PALM BEACH 33401
PHONE 683-9997

:--------------------\:
Passover Greetings and Best Wishes
a v i
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\-
371 NORTHEAST 6t*i AVENUE
DELRAY BEACH 33444
v
Telephone 278-2864

!
-~

I
Marine
-MARJNH 4Jr^^W.JDEALft?
1713 NORTH DIXIE HIGHLY
fV WiST ttM ttACH 39460 j
V if i\
I
-^ r
ifmJn


Page 6-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Port Lauderdale
PWday, April 16, 1976
Egypt Invests in Husky Rebirth
By JANE and LEE K-THORPE
Eighty miles of desert sand
separate the crowded streets of
Cairo from Suez City, and all
along the way are military en-
campments. We see radar in-
stallations, missile launching
pads, military vehicles and ma-
teriel from our bus windows,
and occasionally the turbaned
heads of soldiers in the bunkers
come into view.
We are all reporting at rapid-
fire rate into our tape record-
ers on what we see, and there
is a hum of voices in the bus.
Our cameras are out of sight in
the overhead luggage rack; we
have been warned not to take
any pictures along this road.
WE ARE part of a group of
32 American journalists attend-
ing an Editorial Conference on
the Middle East, and we are
traveling the highway to Suez
City, Egypt's new community
rising out of the debris and
wreckage of its 1967 war with
the Israelisthis is the new city
that is Egypt's assurance of its
hopes for peace.
And it is, indeed, reasonable
to believe that Egypt would not
give Its "Nunroer One Prtorlty-
to rebuilding Suez (aa we had
been told it does by John Craig,
EDITOR'S NOTE: Jane and Lee K-Thorpe last year
went on a newsmen's tour of the Middle East, in-
cluding several Arab countries. In this report they
discuss "Egypt Post-Yom Kippur."
Economic Officer at the U.S.
Embassy in Cairo) with the
knowledge that this vulnerable
city could again be destroyed in
yet another war.
But we observe that Egypt's
commitment is prudently back-
ed up by all these many miles
of military installation and mis-
sile launching pads between
here and Cairo.
THERE IS, agreed, a huge in-
vestment here for Egypt to pro-
tect, and it is, agreed, one of the
most hopeful signs we have
noted so far in all of our many
miles of travel in the Middle
Eastthis bustling development
of the Suez Canal towns of Port
Said at the north, Ismailia and
Suez City.
We trek through the rubble
and the rough sand to see the
King Faisal district of the new
Suez City, named for the late
Saudi Arabian king who pledged
$300,000,000 to help finance an
almost bankrupt Egypt's plans
for development.
The total cost of Project 2000,
this rebuilding of Suez, is esti-
mated at $800,000,000, and it is
expected to take seven more
years to complete. It is also ex-
pected, according to Under-Sec-
retary of State and General En-
gineer Mohamed Shahine, in
charge of the project, that Suez
City's pre-war population of
226,000, with the completion of
127,000 new housing units, will
be increased to over 800,000.
GENERAL ENGINEER Shahi-
ne, a serious and earnest man.
leads us to a shed protected
from the hot sun to show us on
mounted maps and charts what
he expects to accomplish.
All about us are construction
workers, wearing suit jackets
over long cotton skirts or pants,
all of diem with their heads cov-
ered by dusty turbans; they
climb about the four-story stone
and concrete "Economy Hous-
Conthmed on Following Pag*
Passover Greetings To AU
OPB FARMERS
MARKET
3159 W. OAKLAND PARK BLVD.
OAKLAND PARK 33311
PHONE 731-4711
Best Wishes For
A Happy And Peaceful Passover
JERRY SOOWAL
700 N.E. 25th AVENUE
POMPANO BEACH 33062
n
i
t
\
BEST WISHES
FOR A HAPPY
PASSOVER
HOLIDAY
WASTE MANAGEMENT
INCORPORATED
2300 WEST COMMERCIAL BLVD.
FORT LAUDERDALE 33309
*
f


Friday, April 16, 1976
Si
EgyP?8 Husky Rebirth
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort LouderdaU
Page 7-B
B
Coatlmed from Precedinc Paa*
fug" structures where they are
working, fitting wood frame* in-
to windows, sifting sand through
screens for miring, poshing
wheelbarrows foil of gravel
along the walkways.
The buildings here, despite
their misleading designation
are considered "top of the line."
The workers have obviously
been at the site for a while; their
sunburned skin is the color of
dark copper.
THEY WAVE to us, stopping
work, smiling at us, inviting us
to photograph them. If s clear
that picture-taking is permitted
here; in fact, it is actively en-
couraged. The Egyptians are
very proud of the Suez develop-
ment project.
"Low Cost Housing." less at-
tractive then the Economy
Housing, provides for elongated
common-wall structures of ce-
ment block, one story high, with
subdivisions of very small two
and three-room apartments.
Small, high windows keep the
rooms dark, and keep out die
intense heat. I have a mental
image of die crowded families
that will live here.
EGTPTS MINISTER of Pub-
lic Welfare, Dr. Aisha Rateb,
has told us she looks forward
to the time when electricity is
brought to every village in
Egypt, and with it television and
radio. She says that only then
will the nation's family planning
centers be successful in bring-
ing down the birth rate in this
alarmingly overpopulated coun-
try.
'Term Workers' Housing,''
at the bottom of the scale in
Sues, is similar to Low Coot
Housing It is being built a short
distance away in two farm vil-
lages that together will bouse
bout 8,000 persons. Each farm-
ing family will live in a small
three-room unit. People will
work on farm collectives outside
the communal housing
Also planned in Suez are
luxury resort accommodations
with golf courses, tennis courts,
swimming pools and water sport
faculties that Egypt hopes will
make the area a popular tourist
spot A prototype of this kind
of palatial "Pslm Springs" kind
of splendor is the newly opened
Mena House in Oberoi, near the
foot of the Pyramids.
LEAVING SUEZ now, we pass
through the old harbor city.
Here over 6,000 houses have
been bombed beyond repair
Continued on Page 10-B
Mauro, Margaret and Anthony
Extend Best Wishes For A
Happy Holiday
MAURICE'S
Italian Restaurant
191 BRADLEY PLACE
PALM BEACH 33480
PHONE 832-1843
i
i-aso
*
May your celebration of the Passover Festival be a joyous one!
\ HARBEKE
PLUMBING
/ /
s
COMPANY
RESIDENTIAL ... COMMERCIAL .. .
CONDOMINIUM
4460 CARVER STREET
LAKE WORTH 33460
Telephone 965-2184
. /

4 '
v


Page 8-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 1976
On Jan. S, a group of 24 Ro-
man Catholic, Protestant and
Jewish women lay and profes-
sional leaders left for a 17-day
study tour of the Middle East.
We went to meet women, to
express our strong commitment
to peace and justice for all the
people of the area, the survival
and security of the State of Is-
rael, and the right of the Pales-
tinian people to self-determina-
tion.
We wanted to learn more
about the women of these coun-
tries, to hear their hopes and
aspirations, and exchange views
about the role that women can
play in bringing about our
shared goals.
The tour was co-sponsored
by the Leadership Conference
of Women Religious (Roman
Catholic), United Presbyterian
Women and the American Jew-
ish Committee, in cooperation
with the Division of Overseas
Ministries of the National Coun-
cil of Churches. Its co-leaders
were Ms. Sarah Cunningham,
editor of "Concern," a Presby-
terian women's journal; Sister
Ann Patrick Ware, associate
director of the Commission on
Faith and Order of the Nation-
al Council of Churches, and this
writer.
PARTICIPANTS were drawn
from a New York-based dia-
logue group on the Middle East
reflecting a wide diversity not
only of religious backgrounds
but of political and social orien-
EDITOR'S NOTE: The author
is program specialist for
Interreligious Affairs of
the American Jewish Com-
mittee
A WOMAN'S VIEW
Interfaith Group
Seeks Justice For
All in Mideast
By INGE LEDERER GIBEL
tation as well. Tour participants
from other parts of the United
States and Canada reflected the
same diversity.
Egypt and its people had a
strong and highly positive im-
pact on the group. In meetings
with women active in that na-
tion's political life, including
Aisha Rateb, the only woman
in the Egyptian Cabinet, we
were impressed with programs
being conducted in family plan-
ning, community development,
combatting illiteracy and other
areas of health, education and
welfare.
Many of these women, and
Dr. Tahseen Beshir, official
spokesman for President An-
war Sadat, expressed to the
Christian and Jewish tour par-
ticipants their sincere desire for
peace, if not yet friendship with
Israel.
A JOURNEY to the city of
Suez, being rebuilt at a fantastic
rate, with hundreds of new
housing units completed each
day, underscored that convic-
tion. Everywhere we went, and
everyone we talked with, re-
peated to us a version of Dr.
Beshir's comment: that Egypt
desperately wants to use her
resources for nation-building
and not war, and an underlying
commitment that if Israel would
withdraw to the pre-1967 bor-
ders and accept a Palestinian
state on the West Bank and in
Gaza, peace, and even one day,
normal relations, would be a
reality.
Meetings with Egyptian Jews
a sad, elderly, and drastical-
ly diminished community, but
seemingly free to worship and
live free of terror included a
Shabbat service and served as
poignant reminders of the great
human cost of the Middle East
conflict beyond the battlefields.
The reaction of the Egyptians
we met to our interreligious
and outspoken group, whether
while lighting Shabbat candles
in our Cairo dining room, or in
random conversations with
young and old in streets, mu-
seums and hotel lobbies, was
always warm and friendly.
Continued on Following Page
Passover Greeting*
KEN'S DAGHAM
OIL
3690 DAVIE BLVD.
FORT LAUDERDALE 33312
Passover Greetings
ROSS NELSON
1436 EAST ATLANTIC BLVD.
POMPANO BEACH 33060
PHONE 781-7870

Passover Greetings
CHARLIE EASTERLING
EXPERT FURNITURE REFINISHING
3020 N.E. 8th WAY
OAKLAND PARK 33334
Passover Blessings!
SWAN LUND
REALTOR
TELEPHONE 565-7746
SWAN HOMES
ft INVESTMENTS INC.
1607 N.E. 25th STREET
FT. LAUDERDALE 33305
Happy
Passover
Carter Electric
408 S.E. AVENUE E
BELLE GLADE 33430
Telephone 996-7218
I
i
we extend holiday greetings
to you and your family
JEMACO
DISTRIBUTORS
INCORPORATED
584 NORTHEAST 20th STREET
FT. LAUDERDALE 33305


iday, April 16, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9-B
Justice in Mideast
i.
Continued from Preceding Page
Though poor, they are a proud
people, not in the least arro-
gant, aware of their ancient cul-
ture^ and convinced they are
moving forward.
OUR SYRIAN experience was
shorter and sadder. The Syrian
Women's Union, our hostess
group, an arm of the ruling
Baath Party, gave us little free-
to roam on our own and
[in exceedingly rigid political
I line of no compromise nor ac-
ceptance of Israel.
At the state-run School for the
Children of the Martyrs, in Da-
mascus, we were shocked and
saddened to discover children
of Palestinian and Golan Heights
fathers killed in military en-
counters with Israelis, being
raised to think of themselves
as children of the state, sworn
to vengeance.
One teenage boy, visited in
his classroom, was asked what
message he would like to send
to an Israeli boy whose father
had been killed by Arabs. He
replied, "Tell them to get off
our land and go back to Amer-
ica, Russia and Europe."
THE REQUESTS we had
jade to meet with Syrian Jews
\^m ignored. Nevertheless, we
Iwnd our way to the Jewish
quarter and entered some shops
there. In one, after some pur-
chases had been made, and only
three of the Jewish women re-
mained, the owner, spotting a
"Chai" locket, said in French
"I am an Israelite."
Our response, that we were
also Jewish, lit up the face of
his young assistant. The older
man, lifting his hat to the sky,
half shouted "Shalom l'Yisrael,"
and tearfully presented us with
gifts, "to remember me." We
were afraid to go any further,
or spend more time, lest we
cause problems for this be-
leaguered community. But we
asked that he convey to his fel-
low Jews our love and concern,
to assure them they are not for-
gotten.
In Jordan and in Israel we
met Palestinians who impressed
us that their longing for self-
determination in their own land
was as real, even though of
more recent vintage, as that of
the Jewish people. Although the
rhetoric was sometimes ada-
mant, we felt, overwhelmingly,
that these people realize that
Israel is a reality, for now and
the future, and that they would
be willing to settle for a state
of their own, alongside the Jew-
ish State, but would remain the
source of Middle East ferment
until a solution which recog-
nizes their strong sense of
unique identity had been found.
ISRAEL, the only real dem-
ocracy in the area, presented
the group with the widest range
of freely expressed positions,
officially and unofficially. We
heard there from a group of
prominent Jewish women gath-
ered together to meet us at a
reception given by Leah Rabin,
wife of the Premier, and from
Knesset members including Es-
ther Herlitz, Marcia Freedman,
Ora Namir and Shoshana Ara-
belli-Almozlino, and Rabbi Jack
Cohen and Israel Prize winner
Aryeh Simon. But whether it
was an Auschwitz survivor tell-
ing us her story at Yad Vashem,
a North African Jewish woman
of Beit Shean telling us that
peace is the most important
thing, or a prominent Israeli
Arab in Nazareth describing her
concern, during the war, for
"my friend, Esther, in the next
street, and Fatimah, in Jordan,"
we left the Middle East con-
vinced that people on all sides,
with all their unmeasurable pain
and all their unfulfilled hopes,
want an end to the bloodshed
and are willing to compromise
to achieve real peace.
We believe women have a
special role to play in bringing
this goal to fruition, and will
be developing several projects
designed to increase dialogue
this year, not onlv among Chris-
tians and Jews, but also among
Arabs and Israelis.
1
As the story of the Exodus is once again
retold may you and yours share all the
joys that Passover can hold.
A Happy and Joyous Pesach
'i
HOVNANIAN FLORIDA
INCORPORATED
LE MEDITE^RANIAN HOMES ...
VILLA DEL TRIO
West of Lake Worth
P.O. BOX 1414
LAKE WORTH 33441
967-6050
Passover Greetings To All
FARTHING PUMBING CO.
2301 S.W. 57th TERRACE
HOLLYWOOD 33023
PHONE 983-2653
Passover Greetings
South Florida
Golf Association
3691 N.E. 12th AVENUE
POMPANO BEACH 33064
Telephone 942-7200
PINE CABINETS
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
101 N.W. 15th PLACE
POMPANO BEACH 33060
Telephone 946-0771
Extends To The Entire Jewish Community
A Very Happy Passover
J.B. PLASTICS INC
442 SOUTH DIXIE HIGHWAY EAST
POMPANO BEACH 33060
Extends To The Entire Jewish Community
A Very Happy Passover


Page 10-B
The Jewish Floridkm of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 1976
ta
8
Husky
Rebirth
Continued from Pace 7-B
walls sloping to the ground,
shell holes perforating every
surface. Some 20,000 buildings
that have been damaged less
severely have been partially or
fully rebuilt, and it is in these,
among the nibble and stones,
that die returned refugees of
Suez, plus all of the "temporary"
construction workers and their
families, are living.
The occupied buildings are
easy to identify, although from
a taiis window they seem as un-
safe for living as the deserted
ones. Blankets and rugs hang
over the crumpled ornamental
iron balconies, and the red-tiled
roofs show broken, gaping holes.
Billboard on site of construction of the new Suez City.
Left is President Anwar Sadat, of Egypt. Right is King
Faisal, of Saudi Arabia, who has since been assassinated.
The influence of French archi-
tectural design is everywhere.
Back in the heavy traffic of
Cairo we pass the low ochre-
\
Passover...

Mr. Wank Olfrien and His Staff Extend
Best Wishes To AU Jewish Families -
in the State for a Peaceful
and Happy Passover
OK SERVICE CENTER
GOODYEAR DEALER ...
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE

\-
-V
702 McNAB ROAD
POMPANO BEACH 33060
TeWphone 781-0990
J. ':
<
> \
c
colored mausoleums of the City
of the Dead and see that here,
too, some people make their
homes. Children play among the
tombs, and we can see a stray
donkey polling a cart along the
long dry cemetery roads.
THERE IS also much new
building in Cairo-^new apart-
ment buildings mirwith beau-
tiful older homes on the quiet
residential streets. But most of
the buildings that are of older
vintage show signs of neglect
due, we are told, to strict gov-
ernment rent controls that make
It impossible for owners to keep
them in repair. They are, of
course, over-occupied as well;
Egypt's population has risen by
one third in the last IS years.
This is a phenomenal rate, and
it is still growing.
So fast, in fact, is the popu-
lation of this country growing
that neither the government nor
private agencies can keep up
with it in providing public serv-
ices. Now there are 37,000,000
people everywhere, lining up at
stores, waiting in front of res-
taurants and crowding into
buses, even hanging on outside
the bases, clinging to bumpers,
windows and fenders as thay go
hy.
People elbow each other at
cases in die Cairo Museum to
see the treasures of Tutank-
hamen's tomb and the fabulous
jewels of die pharaohs; they
queue up to use the telephones;
they crowd into elevators, chil-
dren riding sideways on their
parents' shoulders, one leg in
front and one in backwhich
to be the custom
ALMOST ALL night long in
Cairo we can bear the noise af
traffic in the streets as taxis,
operating for only a few piasters
a mileagain, due to govern-
ment controlsbicycles, donkey
cards and trucks sounding their
horns go past beneath our city-
side windows at the Nile Hil-
ton. Even on the hotel's river-
side, our friends tell us, the traf-
fic can be heard.
During the day the policemen
are somehow able to control
their frustrations as they try
with whistles and wide gestures
to control, from their raised ga-
Continued on Following Page
May all of our Jewish customers and friends
have a Very Happy Passover
ADELE A FRED SHERMAN
SOUTHERN FORMAL
1311 LAS OLAS BOULEVARD
1
A Happy Passover
MIKE'S MOBIL
Air Conditioning Specialists ..
Tune Ups .. Complete Stock
of Tires and Batteries
5000 NORTH STATE ROAD 7
TAMARAC 33309
Telephone 731-9717
^Wisjjes-
AAMCO
Transmissions
517 N.E. 5th AVENUE
BOYNTON BEACH 33435


ay, April 16, 1976
Egypt*8 Husky Rebirth
The Jewish Floridkm of Greater Port Lauderdale
Page 11-B
Continued from Preceding Page
zebos on the corners of the
streets, the heavy traffic. Their
uniforms are strikingall black
with conspicuously striped black
and white oversleeves pulled up
over their elbows.
Lee and I, big-city people,
both of us, find ourselves stun-
ned and excited by the surging
masses of people all around us.
How many are Jews, we won-
der?
WE LATER learn from His
Excellency Dr. Kamam Abul-
magd, Minister of Information
(and we find it almost incred-
ible), that of the 85,000 to 100,-
000 Jews who lived in Egypt be-
fore the middle forties, only 500
remain; 350 in Cairo and 150 in
Alexandria. Most of these are
elderly people; the others have
all emigrated to Israel, America,
Europe and France, in particu-
lar, with a few going to other
countries.
Egypt gives its citizens full
religious freedom, Dr. Abulmagd
tells us, and then explains that
the concept of religious freedom
Is different in Egypt than la
America.
"In Egypt," he says, "each
religious community resolves its
own problems of theology and
personal affairs (such as inter-
marriage, so that we do not have
the same fear of assimilation
that you and other countries
do."
ONLY ONE synagogue in
Cairo remains open now for
services, in the downtown sec-
tion of the city. We visit it and
find the caretaker and a young
American rabbi, Baruch Helman
of Massachusetts, who is at-
tempting to persuade the Egyp-
tian government to use money
left by the refugee Jewsstill
held in trust to restore the
synagogues. He is also working
with the Ministry of Tourism to
encourage Jews from America
and elsewhere to visit Egypt.
Both the caretaker and Rabbi
Helman show us the syna-
gogue's deteriorating but still
lovely old sanctuary, where we
meet an elderly Polish woman,
a member of the congregation,
whose family left Egypt years
ago. We are asked by all three
not to take pictures of the syna-
gogue's exterior for fear of "at-
tracting attention to it," only the
interior "where it is safe." Our
inquiries afterward at the U.S.
Embassy and at a press sym-
posium with Egyptian ministry
officials fail to explain the rea-
son for this caution.
IN THE evening, at the Omal
Khayyam riverboat restaurant
on the Nile, no such caution
about Jewish identification is
shown by a partying group of
Jews at a long table near us.
For them, the orchestra plays a
medley from "Fiddler on the
Roof and then the familiar
"Hava Nagila" and the hora
has never been more enthusi-
astically danced. A good num-
ber of us U.S. journalists, too,
put down our tape recorders
and our reserve and happily
join the circleeven a few of
the one-third of us who are not
Jewish.
Our group Is the guest of his
Excellency Adel Taher, Under-
secretary of the Ministry of
Tourism. Also present and film-
ing all of it, hora dancers and
belly dancers alike, is an
American (NBC) television crew
at work on a "special" on tour-
ism in Egypt for Barbara
Walters' "Today" show.
The truth is often not an easy
thing to find. Are we seeing a
company called out of Centra'
Castingor is this the way It
really is?
Best Wishes For A
Happy and Peaceful Passover
JUNGLE QUEEN
BAHIA MAR YACHT BASIN
ROUTE A1A
FT. LAUDERDALE
Telephone 4625596
May peace
be yours
during this
Pesach holiday
ROYAL PALM
PRESS
COMMERCIAL OFFSET PRINTING
1462 S.W. 12th AVENUE
POMPANO BEACH 33060
Telephone 942-3768
May the significance
of Passover,
the Festival of Freedom,
find expression
in human liberty
for all the world.
s & E SUNOCO
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
7100 KIMBERLY BLVD.
NORTH LAUDERDALE 33063
Telephone 721-6490
be$t\/rispe?
ftra,
Metrix Warehouse
Incorporated
Providing Parts for Mercedes Ben*
1211 S.W. 2nd STREET
POMPANO BEACH 33060
Telephone 941-3137


Page 12-B
The Jewish Flondian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 1976 .

Mass reburial of bones and ash from desecrated cemetery on Mount of Olives.
Jewish Holy Places i
Continued from Page IB
with Herodian walls which was
converted in its last phase into
a mosque and was therefore in-
accessible to both Jews and
Christians for centuries.
"INFIDELS" were allowed to
ascend to the seventh step of
the entrance, but there is evi-
dence that in the late Middle
Ages, there was a synagogue
next to the mosque. After 1967
this site became a focus for pil-
grimage and special hours are
set aside for non-Muslim vis-
itors.
The traditional tomb of Rachel
is near Bethlehem, while that
of her son Joseph is in She-
ohem. In Haifa the cave of Eli-
jah, where according to tradi-
tion the prophet hid, is consid-
ered holy and a place for pil-
grimage.
Most of the graves visited by
pilgrims are in Galilee, because
most of, the rabbis of the Tal-
mud lived and taught there.
Particularly important is the
town of Meron where Simeon
b. Yohai and his son Eleazar
are reputedly buried.
EXTENSIVE popular celebra-
tions take place the^e on Lag
Ba-Omer and a kind of cult has
grown up around the grave.
Hillel and Shammai, among
others, are also believed to be
buried in Meron.
Safad and Tiberias are very
important centers for' pilgrims
to the graves of famous scho-
lars. In Safed are the reputed
graves of Shemaiah and Avta-
lion, Phinehas b. Jair, R. Joseph
Card,.the kabbalists Isaac Lu-
ria, Moses Cordovero, and Solo-
mon Alkabez, as well as many
later scholars, saints, and hasi-
dic zaddikim.
t
Tiberias was a center of rab-
>inic activity in talmudic times,
and. the graves of the tarmaim
Akiva, Meir, Johanari b. Zakkai,
and Eliezer b. Hyrcanus and
those of the amoraim Ammi and
Assi as well as of Maimonides,
and Isaiah Horowitz are fre-
quently visited.
Passover Greetings to our
Jewish Customers
and Friends
RED BARN
GROVES
3491 W. SUNRISE BLVD.
Phone 587-9803
f
i
pASSOVCR
Wf hthw io dm MENDS Of THE
Awish coMfiifimr Btsr wishes m
a most "HApfr nssovar
,
S.N. KNIGHT k SONS'
' I
1
; I
I
I N
*

BELLE GLADE
w/

v,
Passover Greetings
Jackson Body, Shop
\
1408 AVENUE E.
RIVIERA BEACH 33404
Phone 844-0344
.
Passover Greetings
BRO-DAbE INC.
P.O. BOX 21429
FT. LAUDERDALE 33316
-
x
* Passover Greetings
INTERNATIONAL
PRINTING
5107 S. DIXIE HWY.
WEST PALM BEACH 33405
PHONE 585-7025
I

A Happy Passover
Bird Painters

& Decorators
851 N.E. 30th STREET
\
OAKLAND PARK 33334
Telephone 566-2077
^
\
Best Wishes pn Passover
Plaza
\

Service Center lac.
General Automotive Repair* .'m.Jk
a;- ru^^tet^! z__

,JUr
Conditioning
* 200 S.W. 6th STREET
POMIlANO BEACH 33060
Telephone 781-5286
\
v

*
'<


ly, April 16, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
r
Page 13-B
?
to sirn
f^kr
ST. HELENA RD.
ISRAEL POLICE >-C-l'*J/i
inpi/in VtijjV ni)nin
rrt aipn in uiwnji oVinn ]sixi Minn witf -rrr ijnnn 1
omox i7W "*'" "n ,,,in nonn - nij7irn umdhV i'x 3
.mrox win nf tn tajn nmo o-VuVun rn Tnm wmwn 4
-nnninnS win "oi cninnn a'linnn nnrnnV nuinwnn 5
nun -xrinini nn'Vn
. lpmv .;Vjx nix-nn -mn o'vnnn e
j
WSTWCTrOW TO THE VIMTIN6 PUBUt
1. T1IIVlSlTRSHIUIJQllSSARIATtRAHAIHfR
ARfMfllATT: H TK MUM SI Of TM SHI.
t. UIWt.MIIUIK.SMDIIS.IMIN INAtMALS
JtAIIRC WHS Ml CKAHK IISTUMUIKE -
3.. IT IS FMSIOM R TO (MTIR with |U!f 5
4. TM U5F OF
AOW-TRMSKTOJB.IOIIQ CORVHKATUR ARO
Ml Of A MTHMMCt AM fOMIOHR.
5. STB NTOIOUI AUTHORr
IR AU THAI RELATIS T RftlPf R I
HARBATIR' ClguiATORr
t *H0 00 R0'
fill ICASRIOTOlfAn TNI
, n>< Lf
**,< A U- V .. -----111 Ji4_- '
4u/iJUd"wUL<
sign now appears outside the holy places of all religions in/the State
ram. Jordanian forces occupying these sites and territories were ruth-
in their acts of desecration.
It
-
I
I
Happy PasfOV#r
Rowe Draperies
2121 BROADWAY
RIVIERA BEACH 33404
Telephone 8444377
a Very Happy Passover,
Happy and Joyous
Passover .Greetings
SHrfflHD
COHVALARIUM
2673 N. ANDREWS AVI.
Hwm 563-5714
7
To All Our Friends
In South Florida
Passover Greetings And
Best Wishes
American National Bank
and Trust Company
of Fort Lauderdale
1415 E. Sunrise Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33304
Telephone (305) 763-6300
A First Bancshares Bank *
S
'
HAPPY PASSOVER
GREETINGS TO ALL ~
BoUn's Standard
Service
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE WORK]
...AIR-CONDITIONING
2100 W. OAKLAND PARK BLVD.
OAKLAND PARK 33311
Phone 484-9552 i
\~-
Mirror Marl Inc.
919 W|TH DIXI1\ v i
PALM BEAHS33480
Extends To The Entire (h Community
A Very Hlfpjp PaSjygr________^
V


Page 14-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 1976
Plaque commemorating medieval and "cultural" origin
of the City of Dachau.
- I | MM
llll Mil
------ju ftswLc
Memorial sculpture inside camp.
Photos illustrating Jack
Siegel's report are by
Sue Brown.
A Very Happy Passover
Ronkonkoma Shell
Complete Line Shell Products
Air Conditioning .
Automotive Repairs
1901 NORTH STATE ROAD 7
LAUDERHILL 33313
Telephone 733-5430
A Happy Passover
Moore Electric
2040 BUCHANAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD 33020
Telephone 922-6114
:
Germans Would Like to Forget Dachau
Continued from Fife 5-B
ment stood in defense of the
truth: "But the souls of the
righteous are as the hand of
God and there shall no torment
touch them." Now ahead were
the crematoria and we advanced
towards them, I with some dis-
taste, and my friend with a kind
of professional eagerness to
record its details as well as ab-
sorb it for the first time as a
phenomenon which had occur-
red before her birthdate.
The "Brausebad" (shower),
which was used as a decoy to
get inmates to enter, ultimately
to be gassed, was Just a bare
room. Further in were the ovens
themselves, standing there so
benignly as though they once
had baked bread.
OVERHEAD were solid beams
with hanging cord where, I
learned for the first time, some
inmates were hung to death,
perhaps simultaneously with the
burning of others. The clatter
of wooden boots suddenly sound-
ed echoingly, and for a frighten-
ing moment I thouRht it was
the SS coming, but it was just
the police guard having a look
around.
There were faint scratchings
on the wall, and I didn't bother
to read them because I knew
what they would say. The cam-
era clicked repeatedly, and I
tried to personalize this, in the
Germany I knew after the war
as a soldier, in the memory of
two of my late wife's sisters,
one of whom was killed in
Auschwitz.
I BECAME impatient and
wanted to leave, uncomfortable
and frightened in the square,
bare block buildings, but I had
to wait until the pictures were
Greetings to all of our
Jewish Customers
and Friends
LAURY LEE
ELECTRIC
5115 S.W. 64th STREET
PHONE 791-3490
Holiday Greetings to our
Jewish Customers
and Friends
MIJOLIS
RESORT WEAR
3352 N. OCEAN BLVD.
Holiday Greetings to our
Jewish Customers
and Friends
MR. FABULOUS
LAUNDRY
2200 N.E. 21st STREET
Phone 566-9477
Passover Greetings to our
Jewish Customers
and Friends
STEPHANIE
ANN'S
3320 N.E. 34th ST.
taken. The interest superseded German guards, one young, one
my needs, although I asked for older, a Czech. We talked, and
one special shot the Czech said he had been a
Outside, there were now two Continued on Following Page
Holiday Gretings to our Jewish Customers
and Friends
AZTEC GLASS & MIRROR CO.
4256 Peters Rd.
584-8540
Passover Greetings
COMPLIMENTS OF
North Ridge Bank
of Oakland Park
5100 NORTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
OAKLAND PARK, FLORIDA
A Happy Passover
FRANK'S
Service Center
TIRES ... BATTERIES & GENERAL
AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS
3300 WEST LANTANA ROAD
LAKE WORTH 33462
PHONE 965-9920
Passover Greetings To All
Bob's Standard
Service
5850 OKEECHOBEE BLVD.
n WEST PALM BEACH 33409
PHONE 686-9723
A Happy Passover
R.L. GRUMMONS
PRINTING
210 N.E. 3rd STREET
BOYNTON BEACH 33435
PHONE 732-9055
Passover Greetings
ARGO UNIFORM
COMPANY
1000 SOUTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
HALLANDALE 33009
/,
- ,;
'< r


^l
iday, ApYU 16> i976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Port Lauderdale
Page 15-B
Crematorium and hanging beam.
Passover Greetings
NATIONAL
CAR RENTALS
371 N.E. 6th AVENUE
DELRAY BEACH 33444
Telephone 278-2864
^a/>/w r&
Germans Forgetting Dachau?
Continued from Preceding Page
POW in the Soviet Union dar-
ing the war, as though that
would get my sympathy.
The young man was from Da-
chau and said all this had hap-
pened before he was born and
knew nothing of the times. The
older cop said, "We knew no-
thing. Those who did and talked,
ended up here."
HE WANTED to put a happy
note on the proceedings. "Three
of them stayed on in Dachau
and became rich." I thought I
heard a familiar theme. "Jew?"
"No," he said. "Communists.
They made business. But one
died recently from too much
drinking." We talked on farther.
The afternoon was drawing to
an end. The camp closed at five,
and it was a quarter to.
I looked for my friend who
was nowhere to be seen. I look-
ed down the long grey field
where the barracks once stood
Happiness to the Jewish
Community at Passover
Ralph's Cleaners
897 N.E. 62nd ST.
(Next to Li'l General)
Cash & Carry
PHONE 771-1785
Passover Greetings to our
Jewish Customers
and Friends
SHEFFIELD
PLATING CO.
3511 N.W. 9th AVENUf
Phone 565-0162
Holiday Greetings to our
Jewish Customers
and Friends
TRIANGLE GLASS
& MIRROR, INC
17 N.W. 44th STRUT
Phone 772-3950
<5W
044006b'
From Our House to Yours...
POMPANO FENCE
COMPANY
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL ...
INDUSTRIAL CYPRESS & REDWOOD
FENCING ...
CHAIN LINK & TENNIS COURT
SPECIALIST ... ALL TYPE FENCING
104 SOUTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
POMPANO BEACH 33060
Telephone 946-5150___________________
/
and became scared all over
again as if the jack-boots would
suddenly appear, and I would
be locked in, to remain and suf-
fer the same fate, with body as
well as mind.
FINALLY, running and cam-
era swinging, my friend appear-
ed, and we left the camp.
I took one last look. It
cold with unremembered his-
tory, and I said, one most do
this again and again and keep
this death alive.
We walked to the car. and
across the lot was a ball field
where some young Germans
were playing soccer as if no-
thing had ever happened.
A Happy Passover To AU
Canada Dry Bottling
Co. of Florida Inc.
\
1649 AVENUE L
RIVIERA BEACH 33404
A Happy Passover To AU
TOM MIMS
APPLIANCES
100 S.W. 1st AVENUE
POMPANO BEACH 33060
PHONE 942-6733
4-
Passover Greetings
Gribetz & Co. lnc
2617 PARK LANE
HALLANDALE 33009
PHONE 961-8555
A Happy Passover
SIBOl^EY MOTOR
CENTER
1340 N.W. AVENUE L
BELLE GLADE 33430
Best Wishes For
A Happy And Peaceful Passover
CRYSTAL KLEAR
WATER
710 SOUTH SW1NTON AVENUE
DELRAY BEACH 33444
PHONE 276-4185


"(9- +-*
(*age 16-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort LauderdaU
Friday. April 16, i976
Passover Greetings
BODEL COMPANY
INCORPORATED
COMMERCIAL PRINTERS
460 N.E. 5th AVENUE
DELRAY BEACH 33406
Best Wishes for Passover
CENTRAL
MATERIALS INC
1216 SOUTH DIXIE HWY. EAST
POMPANO BEACH 33060
PHONE 941-0310
Mr. D. Victor Knight Extends Best Wishes To
All Jewish Families in the State of Florida
For A Peaceful AndHappy Passover ..
RIVER FRONT
, GROVES INC.
SHIPPERS & PACKERS OF
INDIAN RIVER GRAPEFRUIT
P.O. BOX 1148
VERO BEACH 32960
?
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Telphone 395-1722
y


Friday, April 16, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort i*,, Author Finds Egypt Changed-
And Difficult for Tourists
By ROBERT ST. JOHN
C AIRO On the day that my
^ biography of Nwer, The
Bom." appearod 13 yean ago,
Nasser's confidante and editor
of a! Ahram, llnhamrl Haa-
Mnetn Heikel, made a thrw-
part offer after rwillag the
"M yoa'U via* Egypt again
111 see that you get a visa, you
can stay in my apartment, and
I'll give you a whole column
on the front page of Al Ahram
in which you can write any-
thing you please."
THAT WAS IS yenra ago. Last
month I finally went back. I
didn't need Baikal's help to gal
a visa. Anyone who can satisfy
the requirement of
A Happy Passover to All...
DONNA UniTS CLOTHES GARDEN
900 LAS OUS BOULtVARO
rernfony Of
ttffo iKMriy SsJt* mi km Staff
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BOlSTSrS COIFFURES
3025 NORTH OOAN BOULEVARD
PHONE 566-6534
1909 Tyler 925-8111
rVaif MoflrvgW
5950 Washington Street ......................... 981-2000
Mb
140 S. Federal ........................................ 923-8241
Mb
6100 Griffin Road .................................... 584-5000
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att-JaW
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N. BiscayM
20091 Biacayne Boulevard 932-1533
*OWrja
7880 W. Oakland Park Boulevard 741-8800
8142 N. University Drive ..................... 722-1600
H. imstWwde
511 E. Broward Boulevard 463-4282
Uot for ffctsg atw gffktg fftflfaf mm
toffaM trass
COUNTRY aw Of MIAMI
EAST SUNRISE SHOPPING CENTO
$100 from hard currency intt
Egyptian pounds at Cairo Air-
port can get into the country-
Jew, Christian, atheist. Commu-
nist or critical biographer.
(While we were there, 25 Jew-
ish businessmen and Jewish
journalists on a tour of the Mid-
dle East were not only admitted
but were given an evening of
wining, dining and belly-dancing
on a Nile River boat by the
Minister of Tourism, who at-
tended in person, perhaps on
the theory that American dol-
lara are more important to
Egypt at this point than dis-
criminating against Zionists aa
in the past.)
Page 17-B
A* for the free
Ha&el was off in Libya wooing
Contiaaed on Page 164
Robert St. John, whose ac-
companying article records
his reactions on another of
his many visits in Egypt, is
one of America's most noted
journalists. He is the author
of many books, including bi-
ographies of David Ben-
Gurion, Eliezer Ben Yehu-
dah, as well as of Gamal
Abdel Nasser, the latter un-
der the title "The Boss,"
which had a long run as a
best-seller and is now out
of print.
A Happy Passover to All...
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RENTAL F-.A. SYSTEMS
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Passover Greetings To All
TRI-PLAZA, INC
2300 PALM BEACH LAKES BLVD.
WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 33409
Passover Greetings to Our
Jewish Customers
and Friends
NUOLE'S
RESORT WEAR
3352 N. Ocean Blvd.
BRAMAN Cadillac, Inc.
Florida?* largest Cadillac Dealer
Wishes AU of
Their Friends a
Happy and Peaceful
Passover
CALL 305-576-6900
BRAMAN
2044 BISCAYNE BLVD.. MIAMI
pASSOVeR
QReexriNQS
Wf tXUHD TO OUR flWHWK Of THI
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A MOST "HAPPY PASSOVER"
GUTOA'S ITALIAN
MEAT MARKET
& DELICATESSEN
1611 N. STATE ROAD
LAUDERHIIL, FLORIDA 33313


Page 18-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laudcrdale
Friday, April 16, 1971
pASSoven
QRCedNQS
WE EXTEND TO OUR FRIENDS OE THE
JEWISH COMMUNITY BEST WISHES TOR
A MOST "HAPPY PASSOVER"
R&A
GENERAL AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALISTS...
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& COMPLETE LINE OF BRAND NAME
ACCESSORIES
5610 N.W. 8th STREET
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PHONE 971-8470
THE DIANA
RESTAURANT
3325 EAST ATLANTIC BLVD.
POMPANO BEACH 33062
Compliments of the Above
A Happy Passover to All...
PHIL'S PIZZA
EXCELLENT ITALIAN FOOD
1111 N.E. 36th STREET
POMPANO BEACH, FLORIDA 33062
711-6520
BEST WISHES FOR THE PASSOVER HOLIDAY
VALDES STANDARD
Trans mission Auto Glass
380 EAST 9th STREET
HIALEAH, FLORIDA 33010
887-3477
BEST WISHES FOR THE PASSOVER HOLIDAY
B&T AMOCO
GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS
Complete Line Amoco Products
804 N. STATE ROAD
MARGAH, FLORIDA 33063
972-9854
PASSOVi* GREETINGS
KEN'S DAGAM
OIL
3690 DAVIE BOULEVARD
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 33312
BEST WISHES FOR THE PASSOVER HOLIDAY
Sherwood Park
Golf Club Inc.
14857 FOREST ROAD
DELRAY BEACH, FLORIDA 33444
278-3716
HAPPINESS AT PASSOVI*
ALDEN HOUSE
NURSING HOME
1800 EAST OAKLAND PARK BLVD.
A Happy Passover to All...
South Florida Leasing & Rentals
200 E. SUNRISE BOULEVARD
PHONE 764-5992
Good Health and Happiness to Our
Jewish Friends and Customers
ED STRICKLIN
UNIVERSITY HEARING AID SERVICE
6507 SUNSET STRIP
PHONE 484-3240
Author Finds
Egypt Changed-
And Difficult
Continued from Page 17-B
President Qaddafi all the time
we were in Egypt. Even if he
had been there, he could not
have made good on his third
offer because a year or so ago
he lost his editorship of AJ
Ahram and is now neither an
editor nor a presidential ad-
visor.
AT ONE time tnere were only
two men in the world who had
a key to the front door of Nas-
ser's home and who knew the
number to dial to reach the
white telephone on Nasser's bed-
side table. One was Field Mar-
shal Amer, head of the army of
the United Arab Republic; the
other was Heikel.
After Amer was made the
scapegoat of the Six-Day War
and was required to commit
suicide, Heikel remained Nas-
ser's only true confidante. Now
he has been succeeded by Mus-
tafa Amin, whom Nasser sent to
prison for nine years, and his
twin brother, All, who has been
years in exile.
They are today the two most
powerful newspaper editors in
Egypt. But our first discovery
in Cairo was that the Amin
twins still do not have nearly
the powerful influence on Sadat
that Heikel had on Nasser.
After 15 vears there are other
changes. The latest census fig-
ures quoted in almanacs and
encyclopedias give the current
population of Cairo as between
3 and S million.
BUT CAIRENES themselves-
GREETINGS TO OUR
CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS
LESTROIS
MOUSQUETAIRES
RESTAURANT
2447 SUNRISE HWY.
PHONE 564-7513
BEST WISHES FOR A
HAPPY PASSOVER
BK-J's
DISCOUNT
OF NATIONALLY
ADVERTISED BRANDS
BED and BATH SHOP
LINENS AND ACCESSORIES
1523 LAS OLAS BLVD.
Phono 764-4763
Greetings to
Our Customers
and Friends
KITCHENS
by FAY
5060 N. DIXIE HWY.
PHONE 772-2229
Holiday Greetings to Our
Customers and Friends
MAHNKE'S
PROSTHETIC-
ORTHOTICS, INC.
1915 N.E. 45fh STREET
SUITE 108-110


Friday, April 16, 1976
T
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort LauderdaU.
Page 19 B
from government officials down
to taxi driversclaim that the
oomilation is now 9 million by
Zy 7 million at night.
If true, this makes Cairo one
of the six or eight largest cities
in the world.
Watching hordes of people
from outlying districts coining
t0 work in the dty each morn-
ing one can believe the statistic.
Cairo by day is an anthill.
Every bus and tram car is
festooned with humans, riding
on the roof, Jampacked inside
to tightly that anna and legs
stick out the windows, with oc-
sional amputations occurring
hen a bus careens around a
I Corner and sideswipes a tele-
AS WE Jostled and squirmed
our way through the humanity-
cluttered streets I remembered
a 1973 interview with an Israeli
soldier who waa angry and
frustrated because Israel had
been forced to sign the Yom
Kippur War ceasefire just when
the Egyptian army was about to
be destroyed. "Next time," he
said, "we'll not stop until we
occupy Damascus and Cairo."
Occupy Cairo? If all 2.8 mil-
lion Jewish Israelismen, wom-
en, and children were given
Uzis and sent to Cairo they
couldn't begin to control the
city.
The Aswan Dam was sap-
posed to flood enough land to
grow enough food to raise the
living standards of everyone In
Egypt significantly. But during
the years of building, so many
A Happy Passover to All...
Margate Garden Center
LAWNMOWE* SALES
5857 MARGATE BOULEVARD
MARGATE, FLORIDA 33063
972-6640
more millions were born in
Egypt that the living standard
actually declined, despite the
dam.
MY PRINCIPAL observation,
after some weeks in Sadatland,
is that the mass of Calrenes are
probably much more interested
in having a seat in a bus on the
way to work or in being able to
buy a little more food with the
handful of paistres they earn a
day than in trying to push two
or three million Israelis into
the sea.
Tel Aviv is less than an hour
by bombing plane from Cairo,
but despite all that has hap-
pened in the past 26 years, it is
still remote to the everyday
problems of the average Cal-
rene.
As for the fellaheen in Upper
Egypt, despite the Nasser Revo-
lution and all the talk about
bringing Egypt into the 20th
Century, most of them still plow
their fields and raise water
from their canals with the same
crude instruments you can sea
their ancestors using three
thousand years ago in bas re-
lief s in the Egyptian Museum.
MOST OF them have never
heard of Tel Aviv and to them
Cairo is the place where the alt
important decision is made as
to when to raise or lower the
level of water in the Nile, which
may mean for them the differ-
ence between starvation and
having a modicum of food.
jjWHfflWIH!WIHtlHHHHHHt%
* Sute&iMotmt
SALES SERVICE PARTS
------dH------
hsssr 941-6156-
.'. 2M SOUTH FEOERAl MWV POMPAHO .
May the significance
of Passover,
the Festival of Freedom,
find expression
in human liberty
for all the world.
BLOOD'S
HAMMOCK
GROVES

P.O. BOX 2106
4549 LINTON BOULEVARD
DELRAY BEACH, FLORIDA 33444


Page 20-B
* i i =
The Jewish Floridkm of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. Aprtl la, ly/J
Mr. Harold Blanche Extends Best Wishes
To All Jewish Families For A
Peaceful and Happy Passover...
HARLEE FARMS
THERAPEUTIC TREATMENT
FOR THOROUGHBREDS
DEUtAY BEACH, F10R1DA 33444
278-5357


Through the generations, the Passover
Haggadah has been one of the most
popular works ... in Jewish religious
literature. Many versions have been
preserved in various manuscripts dat-
ing from the 13th to the 15th centuries,
and in fragments from the cairo
Genizah.
History of the Ha^adah and the Ancient Seder Service
By DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
Executive Editor, Encyclopaedia Judalca
JVE HAGGADAH is based on the Seder serv-
ice prescribed by the Mishnah (Pes. 10),
which had apparently been conducted in the
form of a banquet.
The observance of the precepts at the Seder
the eating of the pesah (the paschal sacri-
fice), mazzah (unleavened bread), and maror
(bitter herbs); the drinking of arba kosot (four
cups of wine); and the recital of the story of
the exodus from Egypt (the narrative of the
Haggadah) were integrated into this banquet
celebration.
THE HAGGADAH is essentially an account
of the Egyptian bondage, a thanksgiving to
God for the redemption and, in Temple times,
a thanksgiving for the acquisition of the Land
of Israel. After the destruction of the Second
Temple, the latter was replaced by a prayer
for the ultimate redemption.
The purpose of the Haggadah ("Ve-higgadta
le-vinkha" "And thou shalt tell thy son,"
Ex. 13:8), one of the central commandments
of the day, is represented by the narrative
itself.
Not written by any particular author, or
group of authors, the Haggadah is not a "lit-
jrary composition', in the accepted sense of
the term. Its narrative is a collection of ex-
cerpts from the Bible, Mishnah, and Midrash,
interpolated with the ritual performances:
the Kiddush, the benedictions recited on the
performance of precepts, and for food, Grace
after Meals, and the Hallel. Gradually, stories,
psalms, and songs were added.
THROUGH the generations, the Passover
Haggadah has been one of the most popular
works, perhaps the most popular, in Jewish
religious literature. Many versions, have been
preserved in various manuscripts mostly dat-
ing from the 13th to the 15th centuries, and also
in fragments from the Cairo Genizah.
These manuscripts originate from all coun-
tries in which Jews have lived. Since the 15th
century, the Haggadah has had more than
2,700 editions, either with or without com-
mentaries. Later editions have included as
many as 200 commentaries.
Chanting and singing the texts of the Hag-
gadah is generally observed in all Jewish com-
munities, each one according to its peculiar
style and custom. Although tht celebration of
the Seder night is a family affair in which
nobody is obliged to sing, it is customary to
do so according to the example set by one's
parents.
AT SOME places it is regarded as a merit
and even a duty to extend the celebration of
the Seder night by joyful singing, eventually
accompanied bv dance steps, for as long as
possible. This custom, of course, has Its roots
in mystical concepts, but it did not remain
confined to such circles and is honored by
eastern and western communities as well.
HMMHBI^HH


Page 2-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdahs
Friday, April 16,197^
Success Worries French Jewish Leaders
By BEN G. FRANK
CEPHARDIC Jews from North
Africa who have today a
slight majority in the French
Jewish community have done
so well in their adjustment to
France that the success wor-
ries French Jewish leaders.
What will the next decade
bring?
One Jewish leader even goes
- sd far as to say that Jews in
France simply assimilate after
the second generation.
Others say it will not happen
now, for there are close ties
with, the State of Israel and
France has a vibrant Jewish
community.
ONE FACT certainly is
emerging. There is no doubt
that the French Jewish com-
munity, the third largest out-
side of Israel, is gaining in im-
portance in world Jewry and
Paris itself has become a cen-
ter of Jewish life.
There are about 250,000 to
300,000 Jews, 70 synagogues
and 120 kosher butcher shops
in the French capital, plus of
course two large Jewish com-
munity centers. One is called
the Centre Universitaire Broca
in Boulevard de Port Royal and
one is located at 19 Blvd. Pois-
sonniere. The Broca Center is
new and modern and any Jew-
ish community in the U.S.
would be proud to have such
a center.
There are several impressive
monuments and memorials to
Jews who perished in World
War n. There are historic land-
marks for Jews, such as the
Happy Healthy Passover
THE BEST SHOPPE
Consignment Apparel
1622 N. FEDERAL HWY.
$0. of MorriKm'. Cafetoria
Happy Passover to our
Jewish Cusfemers ft Friends
EVELYN
CO-ORDINATED
INTERIORS
3413 QAIT OCEAN DRIVE
Phone 566-4400
GISCARD D'ESTAING
discussed Soviet Jews
hotel where Theodor Herzl
wrote the "Jewish State." There
are kosher restaurants, a Jew-
ish museum and several famous
synagogues.
ACTUALLY, it is the North
African Jews who have con-
tributed to French Jewish life
with their clubs and activities.
They are the ones who have
given the community its
strength to demonstrate, if need
be, for Jewish rights, and for
Israel.
One French Jewish leader
said that it is the North African
Jews who give the community
a push when demonstrations
are needed. And French Jewry
in recent years especially has
made what they call "repre-
sentations" to the French gov-
ernment to point out that
French interests would be bet-
ter served by supporting Is-
rael, too.
(France, as did other Com-
mon Market nations, voted
against the anti-Zionist resolu-
tion.)
FRENCH Jewish leaders and
Israeli officials agree that the
atmosphere is better regarding
Israel French relations. At
A Joyous Passover to our
Jewish Customers ft Friends
TOM'S FRUIT ft
VEGETABLE MARKET
3309 N.E. 33rd ST.
Phone 564-6*31
A HEALTHY & HAPPY PASSOVER
MEDICAL PERSONNEL POOL
Always at your service with our
RN supervised nurses
PHONE 566-4333
A VERY HAPPY & JOYOUS PASSOVER
TO OUR JEWISH CUSTOMERS & FRIENDS
CENTURY TILE ft MARBLE, INC
5120 N.E. 12th AVENUE
5614)030
least, said one Israeli, the
French will listen and while
on some issues they will be
pro-Arab, they have moved to-
ward Israel when they felt it
was in their interests to do so.
For example, they did agree to
the European Common Market-
Israel accord which gave the
Jewish State the right to ex-
port goods to France and other
nations in Europe duty free by
1977.
The pact gives Israel an
opening to 250 million duty-
free customers. Israel was the
first Mediterranean nation to
be accepted on this basis; the
Arabs were left at the railing
despite their powerful oil re-
sources used as political lever-
age. Moreover, though France
sells military hardware to the
Arabs, it also can sell to Is-
rael; the embargo has been
lifted. Finally, there have been
diplomatic and cultural ex-
changes and an Israeli noted
that last year the French for-
eign minister came to Israel
and even "went up" to Jeru-
salem.
While there are delicate rela-
tions between France and the
USSR, French Jewry has dem-
onstrated en masse for Soviet
Jews and the press noted that
the French President Gisctrd
d'Estaing agreed to discuw the
matter of Soviet Jews with the
Russians on his recent trin t
the USSR. T M
BUT A visitor to the French
Jewish community is also struck
by the realization that new
community centers, more He-
brew schools, more youth ac-
tivities, are needed if French
Jewry is to survive.
For France assimilates jw
pie faster than any other coun-1
try in the world and that goes
for Jews, too. "AssimuanVi
is unavoidable in a wide open
society such as the French
Happy Holiday to our
J#witn CusfonMcs Prt#nos
CLIK CAMERA
2718 DA VIE BLVD.
811 E. LAS OLAS BLVD.
HAPPY-HEALTHY-JOYOUS PASSOVER
HANAUER, STERN & CO.
2740 E. OAKLAND PARK BLVD.
564-9666
TAX FREE MUNICIPAL BONDS
FROM
WALKER PRODUCE
WHOLESALERS OF VEGETABLES
& FROZEN FOODS
P.O. BOX 222
FT. PIERCE 33450
Telephone 461-1581
.'< v


Friday, April 16, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page i-C
one," said r Jewish leader to
this writei. Religion also is on
the wane in France and lack
of interest in religion on the
part of Christians also per-
colates down to the Jews.
Leon Masliah, director of the
Consistoire Centrale Israelite de
France, said that for the first
jO years. North African Jews
were busy working on getting
settled ecnomically, but now
because of French society.
every opportunity is open to
them.'
MOREEVER. because the
French economy has done very
well these past dozen years,
following the drain of French
participation in Vietnam and
the Algerian war, French Jews
have fared well financially.
There are few poor Jews in
France, asserted one Jewish
leader.
In fact. North African Jews
have made sure that their chil-
dren took advantage of the
French educational system and
many Sephardim have entered
the professions.
They are doctors, pharma-
cists, lawyers, and professors,
and no longer only artisans
and businessmen as many were
in Algeria or Morocco. French
Jewish leaders agree that
Sephardic Jews have fared
better economically and pro-
fessionally than their counter-
ts in Israel which of course
es not have as high a stand-
ard of living as does France.
BUT JEWS in France, whe-
ther they are from North
Africa, Eastern Europe, or na-
tive-born, have played and are
playing an important role in
French life in all fields, in cul-
ture, politics, the economy and
in communications and travel.
Just to cite a few besides
the Rothschilds there is Rene
Cassin, the Nobel Prize-winning
scientist; Pierre Mendes-France,
former French Prime Minister;
Raymond Aron, the sociologist;
Max Albert, general manager
for France of Air France
Andre Schwarz-Bart, winner of
the prestigious Goncourt prize
for literature for his novel,
"The Last of the Just."
In the arts, there are, of
course, Marcel Marceau, Si-
mone Signoret, Anouk Aimee
and thousands of others.
But the success also brings
problems. Intermarriage is 40
to 50 percent.
WHILE there probably is
anti-Semitism in France
where is their not anti-Semit-
ism? it is not talked about
by French Jewish leaders as a
current threat. They say anti-
Semitism has been reduced by
ecumenism. Now that the
French economy has slowed
down somewhat, however, and
there is unemployment in
France, some Jewish leaders
feel that with a recession, anti-
Semitism could rise.
It is not clear whether French
Jewry can arrest the assimila-
tion. But closer ties with Is-
rael and with America could
help in bringing modern educa-
tional methods and programs
that could slow down the rate
of assimiliation. There are shali-
chim from Israel in France.
There is an increase in the
number of day schools and
Jewish religious schools.
Contacts between American
Jewry and French Jewry should
continue and should increase.
For after all, French Jewry is
a larger Jewish community
than England or South Amer-
ica, and because of its vitality
and strength it deserves more
approaches and communication
with other Jewish groups than
it has received in the past.
Passover Greetings To All
Herbert WiUard
Trucking
EXPERT TRUCKING & INSURED
P.O. BOX 4016
LANTANA 33462
Passover Greetings
BOB CARROLL'S
TIRE SERVICE
NOW IN A NEW LOCATION
TO SERVE YOU BETTER
5391 NORTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
POMPANO BEACH 33060
Phone 421-2856
Happy
Passover
JOYOUS PASSOVER GREETINGS
TO OUR MANY FRIENDS
FOR THE PASSOVER SEASON
FROM ...
BILLY ROGERS FARMS
P.O. BOX 70
SOUTH BAY 33493
THE NEW
FARMERS MARKET
1200 SOUTH CONGRESS AVENUE
WEST PALM BEACH 33406
PHONE 965-1500
.......:>;:;;:::;-:


Hage 4-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 1976
Ecuador Refuge
For Jews Who
Fled from Hitler
By JIM REIBEL
However, those few families
who leave for Israel return
aoon after. As for Zionism, "no-
body knows what it is."
Relations with the rest of
society range from benign
neglect by the government,
"We asked 'Bombita' (ex-Presi-
dent Rodriguez Lara) for greet-
ings on the Jewish New Year;
he didn't respond," to friend-
ship with the Arabs living here.
The local Arabs are mostly
Lebanese Christians, called
"Turcos," and along with Ecua-
Quito
pOR THOSE Jewish families
who fled from Europe in the
face of Hitler's rise to power
and for those who survived the
Holocaust, Ecuador, pursuing
an open-door policy, offered a
safe refuge. Senora Carolina
Kywi, president of WIZO, in
describing the immigration of
the late 1930s and '40s, said that
"when we came we didn't have
much money, so there was a
very close feeling. Now it's not
that way."
Taking advantage of the op-
portunities offered by a highly
undeveloped society, the com-
munity has thrived economical-
ly over the past 40 years. To-
day it's faced with a dichotomy,
caught between the desire to
integrate fully into the main-
stream of Ecuadorian society
and a sense of dismay at the
possibility of losing its cultural
identity.
OF THE estimated 800 to
1,000 people who consider them-
selves, and /or are identifiable
as "Israelitas" (the preferred
term) the predominant number
of the first generation immi-
grants came from central and
eastern Europe, mostly Ger-
many Austria, Czechoslovakia,
Poland, Rumania and Hungary.
A few others came from Italy,
Peru, Argentina, the United
States and most recently 15-to-
20 families from Chile, both
prior to and following the over-
throw of the Allende govern-
ment.
The second generation has
moved in two distinct direc-
tions. A small group has gone
to work in their fathers' busi-
nesses, being groomed for even-
tual control. The second, and
much larger number have left
the country to study in the
United States or Europe; gen-
erally, they don't return.
This appears to be happening
for several reasons, the first of
which is that intermarriage is a
very real and tangible threat.
On the average, out of the last
10 marriages in Quito where
one member was a Jew, six to
seven of them were with per-
sons of another faith. Addition-
ally there is not a large num-
ber of Jewish people of mar-
riagable age to be found..
FOR EXAMPLE, there are
only 25 young people between
the ages of 16 and 20 in Quito.
the capital and area of major
Jewish concentration in Ecua-
dor. Finally, as Itzhak Shefi, Is-
raeli Ambassador to Ecuador
put it, ". the young genera-
tion is trying to find other
places with more opportunity."
The pulse center of Jewish
life in the country emanates
from the Association Israelita
de Quito, known locally as the
Beneficiencia (social welfare
organization). The Beneficien-
cia, started in 1936 by 30 fami-
lies, houses Bene Berith (B'nai
B'rith) with 37 members, WIZO
with 200, an Orthodox shul and
pie has been without a rabbi
for some time now; services
are conducted by Joshua Erlis-
che, a teacher at the Colegio
Alberto Einstein and two-time
delegate from Argentina to the
Jewish Latin American Con-
gress.
THE COLEGIO Alberto Ein-
stein was established by the
community three years ago and
today teaches 240 students, 100
of whom are Jewish. As Erlis-
che noted. "You can't support
the school without the 150 non-
Jewish students." In addition,
$10,000 a year in aid comes
from the Jewish Agency's De-
partment of Education for the
Diaspora. In spite of this a
major problem seems to be
education, or rather lack of it;
in particular Jewish aware-
ness.
Every three months a rep-
resentative of the Israeli De-
partment of Immigration visits
Ecuador to talk about aliya.
PASSOVER GREETING
MARGATE
Kosher Mkt.
(Under New Management)
MEATS-POULTRY-DELI
Appetizing
EGGS FRUITS PRODUCE
Under The Jurisdiction of O.R.C.
167 S. State Rd.,7 (441), Margate Fashion Centre
PHONE 972-7230
PASSOVER GREETINGS TO THE
JEWISH COMMUNITY
NEW TURF SOD & GARDEN SHOP
3425 N. DIXIE HWY., OAKLAND PARK
PHONE 564-1464
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
dorian Jews are members of
the same economic strata, pri-
marily middle or upper class
merchants.
IN FACT, a recent Presi-
dential candidate and ex-mayor
of Guayaquil of Lebanese ex-
traction, Assad Bucaram, was
supported by a number of "Is-
raelitas."
The Jewish Ecuadorian com-
munities of Quito, Cuenca and
Guayaquil are beginning to
awaken to the quandary they
find themselves in. Ecuador of-
fered a haven to Jewish refu-
gees at a time when most of
the rest of the world's doors
were firmly barred. Life has
been peaceful and prosperous
here.
Nevertheless, assimilation and
youthful emigration in search
of better opportunity have taken
their toll. As Senora Constan-
tina Di Capua, archaeologist
and scholar, unhappily con-
cluded, "the only future for the
Jew here is the cemetery." The
unanswered question is, how
long will it take?
BEST WISHES
FOR A HAPPT
PASSOVER
HOLIDAY
SKIP LAND
CITIZENS BAND RADIO
1300 SOUTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
POMPANO BEACH 33060
Telephone 943-5570
As the story of the Exodus is once again
retold may you and yours share all the
joys that Passover can hold.
A Happy and Joyous Pesach
FORT PIERCE
TOMATO GROWERS
GROWERS ... PACKERS & SHIPPERS
OF TOMATOES AND ONIONS
P.O. DRAWER 3030
FT. PIERCE 33450
j'


Friday, April 16, 1976
Vatican Seen Shifting
Toward Approving
Jewish Jerusalem
By TUVIA MENDELSON
The word's out. The Vatican promises no longer to
insist on international status for Jerusalem, according
to Father Pierre De Contenson, secretary of the Vati-
can's Commission for Judaism.
The Vatican official said on a radio interview here
that the Pope only desires international guarantees for
preserving the status of holy sites in the city. If that is
the case, it represents a major change on the part of
the Holy See with regard to the future of Jerusalem and
Israel's sovereignty over the united city.
FR. DE CONTENSON, who was a member of a
Papal delegation that participated last week in the first
interfaith dialogue with Jews ever held in Jerusalem,
also offered a written apology for disparaging remarks
he made on the radio with respect to the high-rise build-
ings that have altered Jerusalem's skyline.
Speaking in French, in reply to a question, the
Catholic leader said that "With so much dynamite about,
it is a pity the terrorists don't use some of it on some
of those buildings."
He described his statement as a foolish remark
that was meant to be a joke. "The word terrorist came
to my mouth because generally terrorists use dyna-
mite," he said, adding that "everyone knows I love the
city of Jerusalem and that I am for peace and against
terrorism."
FATHER DE CONTENSON's criticism was aimed
primarily at the recently built Hilton Hotel and other
modern structures, but they also included certain
Christian churches and the venerable King David Ho-
tel, erected in the early 1920s, which many architects
consider a magnificent structure of native Jerusalem
stone which blends perfectly with its surroundings.
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
5-C
A Happy Passover
Brink's Auto
Body Shop
REPAIRS & PAINTING
101 N.W. 3rd STREET
BOCA RATON 33432
Telephone 395-8170
A Happy Passover
BEKINS MOVING
& STORAGE
121 N.W. 11th STREET
BOCA RATON 33432
Passover
Best
Wishes
Compliments of
WILLIAM ELLER
Extending Best Wishes To The
Jewish Population For A Peaceful
And Happy Passover
FT. LAUDERDALE 33308
May peace
be yours
during this
Pesach holiday.
PEPPINO'S
ITALIAN RESTAURANT
Serving The Finest Italian Cuisine
2121 EAST ATLANTIC BLVD.
POMPANO BEACH 33060
PHONE 943-7390


Page" 6-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Fi president Ford, in a
campaign appearance in
Chicago, claimed he had
"assurances" that Soviet
Jewish emigration would
have exceeded the high mark
of 35,000 in 1973 had Con-
gress not adopted the Jack-
son-Vanik Amendment. He
did not identify the sources
of the assurances nor pre-
cisely when he received
them.
lhe President also said
he thought "world pressure
is going to be helpful in con-
tinuing the momentum" in
which "we played an active
Ford Still Sees
Jackson Bill
As Detrimental
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
part" in bringing about a
resolution of the problem*
in the Middle East.
HAPPY & HEALTHY PASSOVER
MITCHNIK'S
DELI-APPETIZER & BAKERY
FRESH BAKED DAILY
Hebrew NationalKosher Products
Passover Foods
651 S. CYPRESS PLAZA, POMPANO BEACH
PHONE 943-9070
^wislp?
B & K TOWING
SERVICE
1701 NORTH U.S. 27th AVENUE
WEST HOLLYWOOD 33147
PHONE 431-2822
FORD MADE these remarks
following his prepared address
before the Chicago World Af-
fairs Council in which he
stressed his "policy of peace
through strength."
His only reference to the
Middle East in his text was one
sentence that "the Sinai agree-
ment between Israel and Egypt
reached last September is work-
ing well and is a milestone to-
ward a permanent settlement
in the Middle East"
Asked about prospects for
continued stability in the Mid-
east, Ford said, "Obviously,
there are very great problems
to solve the policy of the
PLO, the Golan Heights, the
West Bank, the rest of the Sinai
and agreements to be reached,
whether a full peace or non-
belligerency."
He noted, "These are very
complicated and emotional is-
sues. But I am an optimist, pre-
dicated on the success we had
with Prime Minister (Yitzhak)
Rabin and (Egyptian President
Anwar) Sadat."
FORD THEN added: "I think
it would be in the interest of
the world as a whole and cer-
tainly in the best interest of
that volatile, complicated, con-
troversial area if we could con-
tinue to move ahead respon-
sibly bearing in mind that this
country is dedicated to the se-
curity and survival of the gov-
ernment of Israel, that this
country believes that we have
to work with some of the Arab
nations to convince them of our
good faith and that they can
trust us.
"But, if we stop and do no-
thing, if we don't move to help
the momentum going, I think
we could have another outbreak
and we've had four in 25 years
and each one gets bloodier and
worse with world powers poten-
tially involved. So we have an
obligation to work with the Is-
raelis as well as their Arab
neighbors and this Administra-
tion will," he emphasized, be-
cause "we have their faith and
we have shown results by work-
ing with them."
HIS REFERENCE to Soviet
Jewish emigration arose in what
he described as "some actions"
by Congress which he said were
"harmful to the implementation
of an effective foreign policy"
since his assuming the Presi-
dency 19 months ago.
The "certain limitations," he
said that were placed in the
1974 Trade Act the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment were "a
bad mistake because, I was per-
sonally confident from assur-
ances that I had that instead of
keeping the emigration at 35,000
it probably would have increas-
ed if we had not had the action
by the Congress."
Good Health & Happiness
for the Passover Holidays
FELIX ECKER
JEWELERS
606 E. Us (Mas Blvd.
462-8292
Greetings
to our friends
at the time of
Passover.
OJ. Do-It-Yourself
PLUMBING SUPPLY
5055 NORTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
POMPANO BEACH 33060
PHONE 4614308
pASSoven
QReeriNQS
Hollywood Mall
Delicatessen
SPECIALIZING IN
BUFFET CATERING..
IMPORTED SPECIALTIES
HOLLYWOOD MALL
HOLLYWOOD 33021
Telephone 989-9498
A HAPPY AND HEALTHY PASSOVER
TO OUR JEWISH CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS
BERTA SAWYER
Mil tl W. COMMERCIAL HVD.
73*0057 __
A VERY HAPPY PASSOVER TO
OUR JEWISH CUSTOAAERS AND FRIENDS
CLEO De MOTT & ASSOCIATES
REAL ESTATE
4040 GALT OCEAN DRIVE
5-4831
<


Friday. AP"1 lo> 197
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
rage 7-C
WE SOLEMNLY count the 49
days between the first day
ot Passover to Shavuoth, the
Feast of Weeks, the anniversary
of the giving of the Torah. Just
as one who awaits a most inti-
mate friend on a certain day,
counts in ardent expectation
the days and even the hours
oil his coming, so we count the
days from the anniversary of
our departure from Egypt's
bondage till the festival of the
giving of the Torah.
For this was the aim and ob-
ject of the exodus, says Mairao-
oides The days between Pass-
over and Shavuoth were known
to the farmers in ancient Pales-
tine as Omer days, for tins was
the time when they gathered
their harvest.
IN LATE centuries, these sev-
en weeks came to be full of sad
memories to Israel, for dire ca-
lamities repeatedly befell our
people at this time. It started
with the horrible sufferings un-
der Roman persecution. Tradi-
tion tells of pestilence that
swept away tens of thousands of
Rabbi Akiba's followers during
the weeks of the counting of
the Omer a measure for mea-
suring the grain. History rec-
ords appalling massacres at this
season by crusaders in the year
11098 These and succeeding
[tragic events are commemo-
I rated by special elegies.
The Omer Season, being a
period of semi-mourning, we
Omer Counting
Brings Us To
Torah Birthday
By DR. BLANCHE KATZEN
.
abstain from weddings and re-
joicing, except on the 18th of
Lyar, which is the 33rd day of
Omer, when there was a ces-
sation of plague in Akiba's age
and when Bar-Kochba won a
great victory over the Roman
persecutors. This day. Lag Be-
Omer, is another festival com-
memorating a victorious battle
for independence.
THE COUNTING of the Omer
is done toward the close of the
evening service on the first day
of Passover. We recite: "Lo, I
am about to fulfill the affirma-
tive precept of the counting of
the Omer as it is written in the
Torah! And ye shall count unto
you from the morrow after the
day of rest from the day that
we brought the Omer as a wave
offering, seven complete weeks
they shall be, unto the morrow
of the seventh week, shall ye
number fifty days" (Leviticus
23:15-18).
And we recite the blessing:
"Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord our
God, King of the Universe, who
hast hallowed us by Thy com-
mandments and hast given us
command concerning the count-
ing of the Omer."
AN OMER is a half gallon of
barley, the first to ripen of the
grains sown in winter; it was
solemnly cut in the field and
the yield of this sheaf was
brought to the sanctuary as a
token of gratitude to the Lord
of the harvest.
The third day of this period,
Lag Ba-Omer, is celebrated as a
half holiday and all restrictive
laws valid for other days are
suspended.
A Happy Passover
Wendell Hall Lie.
PLASTERING CONTRACTOR
P.O. BOX 8068
WEST PALM BEACH 33407
Telephone 683-9125
GOOD HEAUH AND HAPPINESS AT PASSOVER
LILLI JEANNE BOUTIQUE
717 EAST LAS OLAS BOULEVARD
SOUTHPORT
AMERICAN
NATIONAL BANK
1491 SOUTHEAST 17th STREET
FT. LAUDERDALE 33315
Telphone 525-4242


^age 8-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 1975
Ynun?. girt fr<- c! v ..,.. African ghetto displays her
kosher-for-Passover matzot.
Passover Festival:
Eye on Absence
of Right, Justice
iy DR. HELEN IIIKSCH
.JAN INVARIABLY yearns for
those things of which he
i been deprived. During the
iax and crucial millennia of its
x.stence, the Jewish people
;tve often been forced into bit-
:r awareness of the absence of
ght and justice in their relent-
o.ssly persecuted lives and of
tie humiliating recognition of
ow small a part their harassed
minority played in the affairs of
.1 inimical world, which re-
satedly imposed its iron will
own them.
in our eager search for the
uurce of the festival, it be-
omes evident that the seasonal
ransition from icy winter to
almy spring has been one of
ne main factors. From hoary
.otiquity on, this always has
een the time for eager plant-
ng as well as the birth of the
iretlings. of the flock.
AROUND THIS period of wel-
ume change, filled with the
opes and anxieties of the peo-
te it naturally evokes, have
^cumulated customs and pray-
:rs all directed to the same end
r!uit life shall prosper, that peo-
->te should not want and live in
f>-*ace and harmony. To man*
uind everywhere, springtime
-neans a happy feeling of re-
newal and release associated
'vith our two spring festivals,
i*urim and Passover.
The Feast of Unleavened
Bread, the bread of affliction,
begins on the 4th of Nisan (the
first Seder night being celebrat-
ed on March 27) and lasts eight
days. It commemorates Israel's
redemption from Egypt's slav-
ery, a memorial forever.
The evening before the first
of the cruelly enslaved He-
brews from Egypt which the
Jews perceived one of the
greatest acts of their God.
Because of its profound and
extraordinary significance, both
for the popular consciousness
and the historical life of Israel,
the month of the redemption
from Egypt become the first
month, as ordered by the Al-
mighty: And the Lord spoke
unto Moses saying: "This month
shall be unto you the beginning
of months: it shall be the first
month of the year to you."
(Exodus 2:2.)
TIME AND events have great-
ly heightened the significance
of Passover. Considered before
only as a series of festive days
to remember forever the de-
liverence of a small people from
cruel bondage, it now assumed
the svmbolic meaning of human
freedom in general and of the
the universal hope for the end
of all oppression the world over.
This Passover stands for dignity
and equalitv for all mankind.
History and legend, laws and
customs and a vast literature in
general, which, since Biblical
times, has grown up around it,
as well as the many and varied
aspects of the Passover festival
to which great teachers, think-
ers and writers, poets and
artists of all ages have contri-
buted, are being reviewed in
the solemn celebration of this
dearly loved festival, which
A HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL .
CORAL RIDGE INSURANCE AGENCY
2631 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Telephone 564-0548
carries its ageless message to
all
IT HAS been said: "In every
generation, each person is ob-
liged to look upon himself as if
he personaly had come out of
Egypt" (Passover Haggadah).
Today, not only physical pre-
paredness alone is required of
us, but also a spiritual prepared-
ness, for the lives of the Jews,
the physical and the spiritual,
are closely linked together in
the celebration of our festivals.
The redemption from evil has
always been a timely story for
the Jews, for it is the moving
tale of the special Divine Provi-
dence which alone determines
the fate of our people. The story
of Israel's bitter enslavement
and miraculous deliverance am-
ply illustrates that our fate is
determined by a just God.
WHEN WE participate in the
annual commemoration of our
miraculous deliverance, the
dramatic first chapter in our
history, it is, indeed, our own
survival which we are primarily
celebrating, of the Exodus with
a revealing blessing.
Every redemption is but an-
other victorious encounter in
the dynamic process toward the
achievement of our unique des-
tiny, yet another manifestation
of transition from slavery to
freedom, from stragnant assimi
lation to national preparedness
Today. Passover still calls the
Jews to hold to their sacred
conviction that justice and free-
dom shall prevail
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL
AtlanticFederal
Savings aid Loan
Offices serving
Bade, Broward and
Palm Beach Counties
pASSoven
QReex:iNC7s
WE EXTEND TO OUR FRIENDS Of WE
JEWISH COMMUNITY BEST WISHES FOff
A MOST "HAPPY PASSOVET*
DIXIE ELECTRIC INC
1030 EAST COMMERCIAL BLVD.
FT. LAUDERDALE 33308
Telephone 659-1567


Friday, April 16, 1976
The Jewish Floridian 0/ Greaier Fort Lauderdale
Page 9-C
COLLECTION AT HFBMW UNIOM CO UfGf-JfWBH WSTITuTf Of RtUGION
Unusual Seder Plates a Mirror of History
A THREE-TIERED silver Se-
der plate from early nine-
teenth century Vienna is one of
many Passover treasures to be
seen at the Jewish Museum of
the Hebrew Uhion College-Jew-
ish Institute of Religion in Cin-
cinnati. Prof. Joseph Gutmann
describes the plate as a fine
example of Passover ceremonial
objects made in the Austro-
Hungarian Empire, which pro-
duced many splendid Seder ap-
purtenances during the late
eighteenth and early nineteenth
centuries.
Very few of the surviving
ceremonial objects used t
grace the Seder table, or for
other Jewish purposes, go back
further than the seventeenth
century, Prof. Gutmann ex-
plains, due to the constant rav-
ages and expulsions suffered by
the Jewish people during the
Middle Ages. In any case, most
Seder items could not antedate
the early Middle Ages as it was
not until then that the Seder
ceremony as we know it today
was fixed. The earliest illumi-
nated Passover Haggadot which
give us a glimpse of the lost
ceremonial objects are no older
than the thirteenth century.
THE SEDER, as it developed
during the Middle Ages, pro-
vided many opportunities for
the fashioning of cerfcrrvonial
objects. The pious women of
the household in particular
found opportunities to embroid-
er covers for the matzot, hand-
towels for the prescribed wash-
ings of the hands, and covers
for the cushion upon which the
head of the household custom-
arily reclined. Most important
for the celebration p the Seder
was the Seder tray placed in
the center of the Seder table.
On it were placed the covered
matzot and the prescribed sym-
bolic foods.
In most households, plain
pewter plates were used for this
purpose. These carried charm-
ing but naive engravings of epi-
sodes from the Passover Hag-
gadah, such as the story of the
four sons or an actual depiction
of the Seder celebration. Most
typical were plates having a
nointed star with the Passover
lamb in the center and Hebrew
inscriptions and illustrations of
the final song at the Seder cere-
mony, "Chad Gadya," "An Only
Kid," around the rim as in
a plate made by the Jewish folk
engraver, Joel ben Jehudah, in
Germany in 1779.
THE STRIKING Viennese Se-
Our
Best Wishes
for a
Joyous
Holiday
Pompano Bowl
2200 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
POMPANO BEACH 33062
Telephone 941-0968

VALENTINO'S
FINEST ITALIAN CUISINE ...
FINE WINES ..
YOUR HOST TOM ROCCHW
4077 N.W. 16th STREET
FT. LAUDERDALE 33313
Telephone 735-6531______
der plate at the Jewish Museurr
in Cincinnati dates back to
1815. It has three compartments
to separate the three required
matzot the unleavened bread
or bread of affliction which is
to remind us both of the hard-
ships our forefathers endured
and the bread they ate in their
hasty departure from Egypt. On
the top tray are six small fig-
ures.
The two figures with the boat-
like containers on their heads
were designed to hold the roast-
ed egg the traditional symbol
of the burnt offering brought
on festivals into the Temple at
Jerusalem and the roasted
bone (symbolic of the Passover
lamb sacrificed in the Temple
by our ancestors). The two
women are holding vessels
above their heads for the "ma-
ror" (usually horseradish and
intended to be symbolic of the
bitterness of slavery in Egypt)
and "karpas" (greens, such as
parsley or celery), which were
usually dipped into the salt wa-
ter cauldron held by the hatted
male figure in the foreground.
This was to remind us of the
tears shed by our forefathers in
Egypt. Another hatted figure is
pushing a wheelbarrow, which
was intended to hold the charo-
set" (a mixture of apple, cin-
namon, nuts and wine).
OWING TO its appearance,
this mixture was likened by tra-
dition to the clay mixed with
straw out of which the Israel-
ites made the bricks for the
building they were forced to
construct b\, their Egyptian
taskmasters. Finally, in the cen-
ter of the Seder container stands
the majestic figure of Moses,
staff in hand, carrying on his
head a receptacle intended for
the wine glass, known as the
cup of Elijah.
The Prophet Elijah was eager-
lv anticipated on the Seder
night as tradition held that he
would announce the coming o:
the Messiah on that night.
Best Wishes to the Jewish
Community in South Florida
at the Holiday Season
Mercedes-Benz
Engineered like no other car
in the world.
Buy or Lease
MARLIN
IMPORTS
116 SOUTH FEDERAL HWY. (north end of tunnel)
FT. LAUDERDALE
PHONE 462-4381
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V
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AIRLINES ^ll"*""fM
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Best Wishes from Our Management and Staff
For A Peaceful and Happy Passover

\A/
CLEWISTON INN
MOTEL & HOTEL
P.O. DRAWER 1297
CLEWISTON 33440


-aae 10-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 1976
What Holiday After Passover?
| AG BA-OMER is the 33rd day ond day of Passover until Sha-
(if the counting of the Omer, vuot. ("Lag" is the equivalent
\7hich is reckoned from the sec- of 33 in Hebrew letters).
Greetings
to our friends
at the time of
Passover.
Tom's Auto Center
Incorporated
TUNE-UP .. BRAKE REPAIRS
. .. AIR CONDITIONING
AMERICAN & FOREIGN CARS
128 S.W. 1st AVENUE
POMPANO BEACH 33060
Telphone 946-3191
Happy
Passover
NATIONWIDE
INSURANCE
LIFE HEALTH AND ALL
TYPS OF FIRE INSURANCE
104 SOUTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
POMPANO BEACH 33060
Telephone 943-0377
PASSOV6R
(SneeoNQS
ARNOLD PALMER CLEANING CENTER
701 W. LANTANA ROAD
LANTANA 33462
It has been celebrated as a
semi-holiday since the Middle
Ages. On Lag Ba-Omer the tra-
ditional mourning customs of
abstention kept during the Omer
period are lifted: haircutting
and shaving are permitted, mar-
riages are celebrated, and other
sorts of entertainment are en-
joyed.
ACCORDING to talmudic and
midrashic sources, 24,000 dis-
ciples of Rabbi Akiva died of a
plague during the period be-
tween Passover and Shavuot be-
cause they did not sufficiently
honor one another.
The plague ceased on the day
of Lag Ba-Omer which, con-
sequently, became a holiday,
especially for rabbinical stu-
dents in the Middle Ages (the
"Scholar's festival"). It was cus-
tomary to rejoice on that day
through various kinds of merry-
making-
According to one interpreta-
tion of Exodus 16, the manna
began to fall on Lag Ba-Omer
giving another reason for the
holiday. The Kabbalists hold this
date to be the anniversary of
the death of Simeon b. Yohai,
regarded by them as the author
of the Sohar.
IT IS celebrated in Israel in
the village of Meron (near
Safed) where Simeon ben Yo-
hai is traditionally buried. The
celebrations are carried out
with songs and dances by the
thousands who gather there.
A special hymn, consisting of
ten stanzas corresponding to
the ten Sefirot in the Kabbalah,
is sung on this occasion. Three-
year-old boys are given their
first haircut while their parents
distribute wine and sweets.
The same rites, says the En-
cyclopaedia Judaica. are ob-
served at the grave of Simeon
the Just, in Jerusalem.
THE CUSTOM of the children
playing with a bow and arrows
on Lag Ba-Omer is traced, by
certain scholars, to a story about
the students of Rabbi Akiva
who, it is suggested, actually
fell fighting against the Ro-
mans in the revolt led by Bar
Kokhba. Lag Ba-Omer in mod-
ern Israel is a school holiday.
Youngstrs light bonfires in
open spaces in towns and vil-
lages and Students' Day is cele-
brated on the campuses of the
universities. The scores of wed-
dings held on Lag Ba-Omer add
to the festive character of this
semi-holiday, concludes the Ju-
daica.
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.

lay, April 16, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page ll-C
ind To Belligerency Is A Test Of Arab Intention
|josef Tekoah, former Israeli
unicipal elections last Monday
nbassador to the United Na-
bns, has declared that Israel's
oposal for an end to belliger-
|cy with the Arab states is a
k of Arab intentions towards
Itering into a final peace
reement with the Jewish
ate.
TTekoah addressed the quar-
trly meeting of the national
kecutive committee of the Zion-
I Organization of America after
Jr. Joseph P. Sternstein, ZOA
esident, denounced the U.S.
bvernment's intention of sup-
lying military equipment to
Fgypt as "a Machiavellian
Knee completely without moral
Istification."
I DISCUSSING the proposal for
non-bellingerency accord be-
een Israel and its Arab neigh-
ors, Tekoah said that although
irael is ready to renew the
eneva conference, the non-
elligerency proposal would test
rab intentions of "what is pos-
ble now." He said it would
to give Israel time to strength-
f itself"
[if the Arab states agree to
. belligerency, then Israel
lould make its proposals on the
irms of agreement with Egypt
Ir other countries, Tekoah said.
But, he added, if the Arabs re-
use to end belligerency, Israel
nil be "facing political gravity
rithout precedent" and will
_ke "a new look for negotia-
tions for peace." Tekoah said
pnly one method would remain,
eoarate bilateral negotiations
rith each Arab state.
Referring to the question of
Ihe renewal of the UNDOF
ndate by Syria, Tekoah stated
lhat "Israel can do without
fUNDOF on the Syrian border."
HE EMPHASIZED that a
[Syrian refusal to renew UN-
iDOF's mandate would be "a
ave violation" of the disen-
gagement agreement. "How-
ever." he added, "there can be
Itranguility and maintenance of
|the cease-fire without UNDOF's
presence while there can be vio-
lence even though the UN
forces remain along the fron-
tier."
The Israeli diplomat, who is
JOSEF TEKOAH
we don't seed UNDOF
president of the Ben Gurion
University of the Negev, cate-
gorically rejected the idea of
any Israeli talks with the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization and
any notion of a second Palestine
state, in addition to what he
termed the Arab-Palestine State
of Jordan.
"Israel's position on the so-
called Palestine question and
Israel's refusal to have any deal-
ings with the PLO is based on
Israel's legitimate national in-
terest in peace and security and
is in full conformity with gen-
erally recognized principles of
international law and morality,"
Tekoah declared.
DURING World War U. when
the United States, Great Britain,
the Soviet Union and other al-
lies battled Nazi Germany, "no
one would have dared to sug-
gest that Washington, London
or Moscow should sit down with
the representatives of the Nazis
and negotiate an agreement with
them," he said
"To the Nazis, the Allies of-
fered only one thiqg uncon-
ditional surrender. This was
despite the fact that the Nazis
never even questioned the right
of Americans. Britons and Rus-
sians to have their own states.
What the allies were entitled to
say to the Nazis during World
War n, we Jews are entitled to
say to the Nazis of the Arab
world today."
Warning that "we should not
rush into such type of negotia-
tions" as the Geneva confer-
ence. Tekoah said that the Ge-
neva conference framework
opens the door for Arab de-
mands to invite the PLO as a
participant. He also observed
that the Geneva conference is
under the UN auspices "and the
UN has become totally inimical
to us, including the Secretariat
and the man who heads it to-
day."
STERNSTEIN declared that
the U.S. government's proposal
to become a supplier of arms to
Egypt "must be clearly and
vigorously condemned." He ask-
ed, "Why does Egypt need these
arms? Who threatens her?"
Stating that "bribes cannot
buy Egypt away from Russian
influence," Sternstein said that
the U.S. action is "a betrayal of
American support for Israel"
and "no less disturbing, it is a
betrayal of America itself."
He said the most the bribe
of arms can do is to gain some
time but "how much time can
be bought by a bribe before it
must be paid again and again?
The United States, dedicated to
peace, will have become a deal-
er in death."

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Page 12-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 1976
w Golda Meir Gave Assent
To Return
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
Mrs. Golda Meir has
agreed to participate actively in
the affairs of the Labor Party,
a role she gave up when she
retired from the Premiership in
19*4.
Mrs. Meir, who is immensely
popular with many Israelis in
and out of Labor ranks, will be
a member of a new Labor Party
leadership forum, to be headed
by Premier Yitzhak Rabin. It
will attempt to unravel the seri-
ous financial and ideological
problems that are presently
threatening the unity of Israel's
governing political faction.
MRS. MEIR gave her assent
to a group of party leaders who
visited her Tel Aviv home last
week. They included Rabin, Fi-
nance Minister Yehoshua Ra-
binowitz and two of Meir's old-
est friends and political asso-
ciates, Minister-Without-Portfo-
lio Israel Galili and former
Minister Chaim Gvati.
Also present was Labor Party
secretary general Meir Zarmi
who submitted his resignation
Happy Passover Greetings
to All Our Friends
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last month but is being urged
to reconsider.
The projected leadership fo-
rum is intended to solve many
of the difficulties that prompted
Zarmi to resign
Chief among these are the
party's poor financial condition
and the situation alleged by
Zarmi and others in which a
small group of Cabinet minis-
ters by-pass the party's legally
constituted bodies in the deci-
sion-making process.
THE LEADERSHIP forum will
bring together top representa-
tives of the various factions that
comprise the Labor Party. The
Premier, Rabinowitz and Justice
Minister Haim Zadok represent
Mapai which in years past was
Mrs. Meir's political platform.
Either Galili or Foreign Min-
ister Yigal Allon will participate
in behalf of the Achduf Avoda
faction, and Defense Minister
Shimon Peres for Labor's Rafi
wing.
Other members of the forum
will be former Labor Minister
Josef Almogi, presently chair-
man of the World Zionist Organ-
ization and Jewish Agency Exe-
cutives, and Yeruham Meshel,
secretary general of Histadrut.
Zarmi will be included if he
withdraws his resignation. Some
observers say this is highly
probable in view of the new
development.
MRS. MEIR'S agreement to
serve is considered by many to
be the most important feature
of the new leadership forum.
Although she is one of the old-
est and most familiar figures on
Israel's political scene, she is
not associated with the events
of the past two years that have
led to the near breakdown of
the Labor Party and in that
respect represents a "new face."
Rabin was reported to be
greatly relieved when Mrs.
Meir agreed to Darticipate in
the party forum.
"I am glad that Golda is com-
ing back to active work," the
Premier said after the meeting
with her. Mrs. Meir is also ex-
pected to return to the Labor
Party Bureau which she left on
her retirement.
GOLDA SAYS SHE'LL COME BACK.
Passover...
i
KEELER DRAPERIES
3415 SOUTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
DELRAY BEACH 33444
Telephone 278-2877
irr*


r, April 16, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13-C
itory of a Victim of Nazi Terror
JEAN KARSAVINA
PAS born In Warsaw, Po-
nd, then part of the Tsarist
lire under Nicholas n, be-
I World War I. Mine was a
fortable upper-middle class
i-Jewish family of the kind
I find, many American
simply refuse to believe
ed: we felt more Polish
Jewish, which meant we
culturally assimilated but
out ever denying our Jew-
ess.
were aware of anti-Semit-
9th in the Russian-go vern-
al establishment and social-
family friends were as
to be Gentile as Jewish,
important, my family were
involved in the Polish in-
ndence movement.
|)R ME, this meant a child-
I which was a curious blend
bettered privilege (a French
Jrness, summers in the wa-
place of Western Europe,
Karsavina won the
lm and Janice Epsteir
National Jewish Booh
rd of JWB's Jewish
Council for her novel
iite Eagle, Dark Skies.'
[following is part of her
nance speech.
and so on and on the other hand
constant awareness of dark,
threatening, realities: the adults
around me were in constant
danger of arrest, jaij Siberian
exile, sudden flight.
I cannot remember a time
when political and patriotic ac-
tivity was not part of our daily
scheme of things.
I studied with tutors, and we
lived briefly at various times in
Paris, Moscow. LondonI was
raised bilingual and by age ten
spoke French, Russian and Ger-
man fluently. (Eventually I de-
veloped a total block against
German)
AT AGE ten. my parents
brought me to New Yorkfor a
six-month stay which turned out
to last a lifetime. Here I went to
the Calboun School, and later
Smith College.
My lifelong love affair with
the English language began in
my freshman year in high
school, when someone gave me
a copy of Joseph Conrad's
"Youth."
By then there was no doubt in
my mind I would be a writer,
but I hadn't quite decided which
language to settle on Conrad
made the decision for me. He
was a Pole, and he hadn't start-
ed to study English until his
19th year.
So, I reasoned, if he could do
it, I could do it.... I have often
thought that I had decided to
sticke with Polish, I would have
doubtless returned to Poland
with my parents after the peace
was declared and the Treaty of
Versailles created an independ-
ent Polish Republicand who
knows if I would even be alive
today!
AFTER college came the
problem of making a living and
getting started as a writer dur-
ing the Depression. I managed
both once I discovered the art
of practicing a kind of schi-
zophrenia: what I wrote for
pleasure (or for the sake of the
soul!) was rarely published, and
never for more than pennies;
what 1 wrote commercially
made me a living but was pure
literary carpentry in those
early years mainly pulp fiction,
either love stories at one cent
a word or confessions at two
cents, and articles for the movie
magazines.
I wrote those because they
paid the rent, bought good red
Continued on Page 14-C
. ... the search for freedom is universal
Best Wishes For A Peaceful
And Happy Passover
OSCEOLA FARMS
COMPANY
SUGAR FACTORY IN PAHOKEE
316 ROYAL POINCIANA PLAZA
PALM BEACH
Envoy in Lebanon
Ordered Not To
Contact PLO
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department
said Apr. 1 that President Ford's instructions to special Am-
bassador G. Dean Brown on his mission to Lebanon "do
not include authorization to have contact with the PLO."
But the Department would not rule out the possibility
of such contacts. Brown was sent to Lebanon Mar. 30 to
examine the situation in that war-torn country.
STATE DEPARTMENT spokesman Robert Funseth said
that he had not yet made a report. Asked if Brown was
specifically instructed to avoid the PLO, Funseth reiterated
that contact with that group was not included in his in-
structions.
When a reporter raised the possibility of "indirect con-
tacts" with the PLO, Funseth replied that the U.S. "never
precluded ourselves from the benefit of PLO views."
Asked again if Brown's instructions precluded contact
with the PLO under any circumstances, Funseth said, "We
must see what the circumstances are" and added "we do
not rule it out."
Uganda Embassy
Praises 'Protocols'
TORONTO (JTA) The Embassy of Uganda in
Canada has distributed to Canadian newspapers a press
release extolling the "Protocols of the Elders of Zion."
The purported excuse for the Embassy's 850-word text
is said to be a criticism by Canadian Jewish groups of,
among others, President Idi Amin for his espousal of last
year's anti-Zionist resolution at the United Nations.
The release states: "You cannot understand Zionism
without reading the Protocols of Zion. This book has been
called the greatest lie in history. It has also been called
the greatest truth in history. It is both."
The release adds that to ensure Israel's survival the
Zionists are plotting "to gain decisive influence over Amer-
ican economic, social, political and military affairs."
The Ottawa Journal rebuked the embassy for circulat-
ing "racist hate literature" and noted that the Department
of External Affairs "should have a few rough words" for
the embassy representatives for abusing diplomatic mail
privileges.
Fascell Sponsors
'Holocaust Day9
Remembrance
WASHINGTON Congressman Dante Fascell (D,
Fla.) has joined in sponsoring a resolution in the U.S.
House of Representatives which would establish Apr. 15
of each year as "Holocaust Remembrance Day."
Apr. 15 is the anniversary of the beginning of the
uprising of the Warsaw Ghetto.
FASCELL NOTED that the day should be set aside
so that all Americans could "contemplate the conse-
quences of racial, religious or ethnical hatred.
"Even though the infamous days of the Holocaust
are 30 years behind us," Fascell said, "we should not
forget the horrors that it brought to all mankind.
"This day would also serve to teach those who are
too young to remember that period of the inhumanity
that men and women are capable of inflicting on each
other in the false name of patriotism or some other high-
sounding virtue."
HAPPJLHOIDAY
Cy4c

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Cage 14-0.
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. April 16, 1976
Our
Best Wishes
for a
Joyous
Holiday
Mrnrs grocery
THE FAMILY STORE
(42 WEST HILLSBORO BLVD.
S3EERFIELD BEACH 33441
Telephone 427-1270
PASSOVER GREETINGS
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"do it yourself" picture framing
3o it yourself and save approximately 50%
PHONE 491-0777
Victim of Nazi Terror
Continued from Page 13-C
meat, and in the meantime
taught me a lot about discipline
and technique.
Hitler made me think in terms
of serious writing again, bat
neither American magazines nor
publishers nor Hollywood were
ready to admit Nazism had any
connection with as here. (A
movie scenario I submitted in
1937. called "Kol Nldre"about
the plight of Jews in Germany
was turned down as irrelevant
by the company which two years
later did "Confessions of a Nazi
Spy")
BY THE time World War II
broke outand my mother and
all my relatives with one excep-
tion were cut off in Warsaw at
the time of the German inva-
sionI suddenly found myse'
unable to write potboilers any
longer.
Fortunately there were all
kinds of routine writing jobs
during the war years to survive
one, and in the meantime my
mind kept churning with what
I knew was going on in my na-
tive land. Hardly realizing
which way I was going, I began
to plan what eventually turned
into "White Eagle. Dark Skies
But only to plan, not write it.
In the meantime I had bees
married and divorced. I was
living alone and not liking it
and keeping very busylargely
helping European refugee art-
ists and writers from Nazi-oc-
cupied territories. I kept learn-
ing about what was going on in
Europe, and often couldn't
sleep. Then came the headline]
about the Warsaw Ghetto Up-
rising, and months later the
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1350 SOUTH POMPANO PARKWAY
POMPANO BEACH 33060
Telephone 971-7770
Warsaw Uprising of the whole
city. _____
BY THEN I waa having a
chance to read smuggled in-
formation and the projected
book about my family began to
take firmer shape.
At the very end of the war,
before Warsaw was liberated, I
was asked to do a teenage novel
with a Polish locale. This I did
with maps of Poland and of the
advancing Soviet armies clipped
from the New York Times and
tacked all over the walls of my
study.
I finished the book about two
weeks before the Nazis finally
retreated from Warsaw and
when the news began to come
In freely, I found I had had such
a profound certaintly about my
fictional characters and their
milieu that what happened to
my little heroine and her friends
was exactly what happened in
reality.
The book won a Child Study
Association award and gave
me a new kind of sense of se-
curity about my project.
ILLNESSmany years of it
in a rowthrew a monkey
wrench into my carefully built
plans. I had just finished a sec-
ond teenage book, "Three by the
had tuberculosis.
After an apparent recovery
Waters," when It was found 1
I had a second, more serious
breakdown resulting in three
unbroken years of hospitals,
surgery and sanitariums. No
writing, of course, except what
could be done longhand, in bed-
a few opera librettos "TK,
Jumping Frog of Calaveru
County," with Lukes rW
Tchaikovsky*! "Pique Dan*-
for NBC-TV; an English Ubrett0
for Prokofieffs duenna. I also
started to paint in bed.
When I was released, the
whole writing world had
changed and I had to relearn
how to earn a living. Magazines
were dying. Radio was dead and
I didn't have the energy to
tackle TV.
IN TURNED to ghosting:
three books in a row on Yoga;
career books; a best-selling
autobiography of an aging coun-
try doctorfor which I got a
flat sum, an dno royalites; cook-
books"Polish Cookery," pub-
lished by Crown, has gone into
dozens of printings; medical
articles. And finally a new
source of steady income: trans-
lating and editing from Soviet
economic and technical jour-
nals, the kind which interest
only specialists, which come out
in editions of three hundred to
a thousand, cost a mint and are
subscribed to by specialized
libraries. Suddenly I was worth
my weight in gold.
With my living assured once
more, I was free to do what I
pleased with my so-called spare
time. The was now sifficienuy
far in the background so that I
could look upon the events in
Warsaw from a vantage point
of some emotional perspective.
I REALIZED that to do the
kind of story I must do, for an
American audience unfamiliar
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--* "T


Friday, April 16, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lau/lerddle
Page 15-C
with the world I would be writ-
ing about, I would have to work
in historical terms.
I narrowed this down to start-
ing a family saga, beginning
with a time whn my own
father had beeen a young man
up to his ears in political ac-
tivity, when with the laws of
the Pale recently enacted Po-
land was suddenly the unwilling
host to over a million Russian
jews in addition to her own old
Jewish population, when the
university "intelligentsia" was
making a point of a certain
amount of unity between Polish
Gentile and Jewish activists.
One morning I decided to take
the day off, and without so
much as an outline, in one day,
wrote me first chapter of the
first draft of "White Eagle."
FROM THEN on, for eight
years, I took one day a week to
work on this book. I also time
to get married againthis time
it's working!and one of the
many things I am grateful to
my husband for is that he has
unfailingly, and patiently, acted
as a sounding board while I
tried oat my work, using Mm as
my slightly atypical American
audience.
An American-born Jew, it was
mazing how little he really
knew about the Jews of Eastern
Europe: like so many other peo-
ple he had assumed they had
all come from the shtet'lfrom
the world of Sholom Aleichem.
WHAT HAD started as a
family saga I had felt impelled
to write in tribute to those who
had been wiped out fighting for
their twin right to first-class
citizenship (as Jews in a Gentile
state) and to national independ-
ence as part of that state has
ended uplargely because of
the questions my husband kept
asking as a true historical
novel, carefully researched after
a first draft was finished; re-
searched so as to give the Amer-.
ican reader a clearer under-
standing not only of my char-
acters and their immediate
milieu, but of a whole political
period.
I was forced to explore social
history, the complex relations
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of Gentiles and Jews and of
both together with the tyran-
nical Tsarist authorities. In die
end, I had learned so much and
had so much left to say that all
I can do is plan a second and
third volume of what must in-
evitably turn into a trilogy.
"White Eagle, Dark Skies-
ends with the abortive revolu-
tion of 1905, when the Russian
people at one end of the Em-
pire, and the Polish patriots on
its western territories, made a
bid for freedom.
SINCE MTf own family were
again active in rebuilding the
new Poland after World War I
.and the Treaty of Versailles,
then suffered from Poland's na-
tive fascism in the '30s, and
eventually participated and
were wiped out during the
anti-Hitler resistance, when sev-
eral members acted as liaisons
between Polish and Jewish un-
derground groups until the end,
this is what I am now starting
to write about.
True, I can now take two or
three days out of each work
week to do ft, but still it's a
long project, undertaken for
love, not money. Books like this
simply don't make money until,
if one is lucky, an accumulative
effect begins to work. That is
why I am particularly grateful
as well as proudto be the
recipient of the JWB's Jewish
Book Council Award. I propose
to use the money to help fi-
nance a research trip to Poland
next falL
I only hope I can do the
justice.
Best Wishes
From
JAMES D. CARLTON
Best Wishes For A
Happy and Peaceful Passover
TIP PRINT INC
3030 SOUTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
WEST PALM BEACH 33405
Telephone 832-1787


Page 16-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 16, 197<,
Concern Mounts Over Rift Between Rabin and Peres
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Members of Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin's cabinet are be-
coming concerned about the
growing deterioration in the
relationship between Rabin
and Defense Minister Shi-
mon Peres. The differences,
which were confined to cab-
inet meetings, are being ex-
pressed more and more
openly.
The first major public dis-
play was the remarks to Is-
raeli reporters by Rabin
during his visit to Washing-
ton that the shopping list
prepared by the Ministry of
Defense was poorly pre-
pared and did not reflect
"honor" on Israel. This was
seen as a direct criticism of
Peres, and Rabin on his re-
turn had to make a public
apology in the Knesset.
THE DIFFERENCES between
the two officials broke out again
publiclv over the weekend when
I'i'es in an interview in Maariv
said Israel's policies toward Is-
raeli-Arabs had been mistaken.
He said the problem of Israeli
Arabs is a cause of greater con-
cern than of maintaining good
relations with the Arabs on the
West Bank. Specifically, Peres
said that Arabs should have
been. encouraged to form their
own political parties rather than
having been brought into the
Jewish-dominated parties, and
that they should have been
given more opportunity to re-
flect their ethnic heritage.
Rabin immediately replied
that while Israel has made some
mistakes, its basic policy on Is-
raeli-Arnhs was sound.
DURING THE recent dis-
turbances on the West Bank.
Peres had disagreed with Ra-
bin's policy of showing force in
the administered territories and
had instead urged that Israeli
troops keep a low profile
Shlomo Nakdimon, Yediof
Achronot's veteran political re-
Dorter. wrote last week that
cabinet ministers said that Ra-
bin demonstrated his impatience
during a report by Peres on
the administered territories and
interrupted several times, belit-
ting Peres
Nakdimon said these remarks
were made in the presence of
Defense Ministry officials and
officers who are subordinates
to Peres.
THE YEDIOT Achronot arti-
cle attributes the source of the
tension to the small majority by
which Rabin defeated Peres for
the premiership and Peres' am-
bition to be Premier
At the same time, there is no
secret that Peres is more pop-
ular with the public than Rabin
He has made a much better im
pression in his television ap-
pearances
Rabin, meanwhile, as a for
mer Chief of Staff, as well as
a former field commander, does
not agree with Peres on many
security problems. Rabin's con-
cept of the security network Is
different than the one Peres is
carrying out.
The feeling among the ramu-
tere, according to Nakdimon, in
that the situation cannot con
tinue indefinitely since it threat-
ens the defense and security of
the country
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