The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00052

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
pJewisti Ftoridiari
i
OF GREVTEtt FOHT LAUDERnALE
Hume
5__Number 5
Frd K. Shochel March 6. 197
Friday, March 5, 1976
Price 25 cents
[Brodzki Is Chairman of JNF
Dinner Honoring the Colins
Technion President Horev to Speak At
Federation's Man of the Year Dinner
According to Ludwik Brodz-
L dinner chairman, the Jew-
& Natioml Fund has announc-
the planting of a Bicenten-
,] forest in Jerusalem.
The Broward County Council
jNF has undertaken the
Usorship of the park En-
trs-d bv the African Revo-
ion Bicentennial Administra-
hn, the forest has 37 senators
hd13 giveinors as members.
[The rail*, which will be ded-
al'd m Je.i'.salem on July 4,
b a li ing testimonial to
bond between Israel and
o the bond be-
ecn the people of Broward
and Israel.
Forests, roads, settlements
and groves created by JNF
along the borders played a
One of Israel's foremost mili-
tary figures is to be the guest
along the borders played a vi- speaker at the Jewish Federa-
tal role in strengthening the lion's first annual Man of the
securities of the frontier in the Ye*r awards dinner on Sunday
1973 Yom Kippur War.
decisive role in opening die
legendary "Burma Road" that
Broizli and his cochairmen,
Bernard Oshinsky and Mrs.
Josephine (Matthews) New-Tin,
are proud to be a pa.t of this
JNF project.
We call all f-inds of the
Colins ar.d the JNF to attend
tins dinner. For tickets, contact
Lee Shainman. Temple Emanu-
El (731-2310) or Bernard
Oshinsky. Temple Beth Israel
(735-403C).
Golda Says Soviet Jewish
Policy is 'Irrational'
Maj. Gen. Amos Horev, tech-
nical advisor to Israel's Defense
Ministry and president of the
Technion Israel Institute of
Tchnoloev (! nown as Israel's
MIT), will address guests who
come to nay tribute to Samuel
M. Soref as the Federation's
Man of the Year.
Oen'rrpl Horev, a sabra born
and educated in Jerusalem and
a graduate as Well of MIT, be-
gin his military career in 1941
as a member of the Palmach,
the Haganah commando unit.
!n the 1948 War of Independ-
ence. General Horev command-
ed a battalion during the siege
of Jerusalem, and played a
AMOS HOREV
helped to raise the siege. In
1949 he participated in the li-
beration of the Negev and was
appointed Chief of Operations
of the Southern Front
Israel's Defense Forces
emerged from the Haganah with
the establishment of the Jew-
ish state in 1948, and Horev has
held the rank of general since
that time.
At the time of the Sinai Cam-
paign in 1956 he served as chief
of the Ordnance Corps for sev-
eral yean?, and led the corps
dunng the fighting.
As former deputy chief sci-
entist to the Ministry of Defen-
se, General Horev was respon-
sible for the development of the
weapons, armor and self-pro-
pelled artillery that were used
so effectively in the Six-Day
War of 1967.
I BRUSSELS (JTA) For-
er Israeli Premier Golda Meir
^scribed the Sonet govern-
lent's Jewish policy as irra-
Uil. il'ogical and defying un-
derstanding. Mrs. Meir, who
Bs honorary' president of the
cond World Conference on
viet Jewry, told a press con-
ence here that she fails to
_erst ind what prompted the
Ivi'.'t Union to turn the Jewish
esti'-n into a major interna-
nal issue.
he said she was certain that
eels tn nub!ic opinion can
Id will h"!o. "When I hear
trnl' saving that this (the
pnferenc) provokes cold war,
cinnot heln Hindering what
arm peace is l;ke," Mrs. Meir
id.
[THE FORMER Israeli Pre-
stressed. however, time
Id a?iin, that Jewish action
Vest Bankers
\ister
To Vote
I JERUSALEM (JTA) More
|ian 84.500 West Bank resi-
ents have registered to vote
) the municipal elections which
rill be held in Judaea and Sa-
paria in April.
In 1972, when municipal elec-
lons were held for the first
Regi
"is not directed against the So-
viet Union or anyone else. It is
directed towards and for the
benefit of Jews."
She said. "What we want is to
have the Russian Jews given
the possibility to leave and to
return to their country."
Asked about those Soviet
Jews who leave the Soviet
Union, but prefer to go else-
where, she said, "This certain-
ly does not make me happy.
They are free to go where they
want, but I think it is good for
them and good for us if they
come to Israel."
SHE ADDED. "In any case,
no one can expect us to give up
three million Jews, the Jews of
Russia."
Asked to sum up her thoughts
on the Brussels conference,
Mrs. Meir said: "I believe that
as long as Jews don't give up
the struggle, the world will not
give up the struggle on their
behalf. People say the Jews are
an obstinate and confident peo-
ple and maybe they are partial-
ly right.
"As long as we Jews stand
uo and stand together, there is
hope."
750,000 Want to Leave Russia
By EDWIN EYTAN of the Soviet government the
BRUSSELS (JTA) strength of our identification
Three-quarters of a million ^^^jSASSl
Soviet Jews want to leave
the Soviet Union and emi-
grate to Israel, Stanley H.
Lowell, chairman of the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry, one of the conven-
ing bodies of Brussels n, said
here.
Lowell, in reply to ques-
tions from newsmen, told a
press conference here that
this figure "was discreetly
indicated to us by the Soviet
authorities themselves in one
of their calmer moments."
LOWELL said the situation
of Soviet Jewry "has definitely
become part of the relationship
between the U.S. and the Soviet
Union." He said the issue of
Soviet Jewry has resulted in
changes between the two coun-
tries. He listed three major pur-
poses of the conference:
"To make clear to the leaders
the USSR and of our determina-
tion that they will win their
struggle: to tell the Jews of the
Soviet Union that they are not
alone, that their cause is our
ctuse and that we continue to
take fresh inspiration from their
incredible courage: and to serve
as a signal to the fr*e world of
the unity of all those who have
joined the Soviet Jewish strug-
gle."
LOWELL said a major pur-
pose of Brussels n was to draw
attention "to the ever harsher
Soviet policy towards Jews seek-
ing to emigrate and to the So-
viet government's failure to live
up to the 1976 Helsinki agree-
ment on the free movement of
people and ideas."
Continued on Page 13
Anti-Semitic Cartoon
MEXICO CITY (JTA) In a reaction to the
boycott of Mexico by American and Canadian Jewish
tourists, one Mexican daily has printed an obvious anti-
Semitic cartoon aimed at the tourists.
A cartoonist, Helioflores, in the newspaper El
Universal, drew a Jewish figure in the style reminis-
cent of Julius Streicher's Stuermer during the Nazi
period. The figure was shown painting on a wall the
word "Vaca-Sionismo," an apparent pun on the words
vacation and Zionism.
The "S" was in the shape of the symbol for the
American dollar. ^^^
VJA Campaign Passes $11 Million Mark
* ___._____ ...o^ "rnmino nntn thp man and
coming onto the map and
as one
Ian only 31,700 voters regis- two months of its 1976 campaign ***J*^ of the oceanfront Gait. gT saiSTe'expeTed "signifi-
Appeal the Israel Emergency Fund and local needs, me
actual dollar amount has topped $1.1 million.
Leo Goodman, general chair-
man of the campaign, in re-
l
bred.
THE INCREASE is attributed
1 a growing interest in local
lovernment and the recent de-
cision by the authorities to ex-
lend the voting rights to all
amily members and not just
fage-earners.
The Jordanian election law,
Men still applies to the West
ank, had in the past restricted
ie franchise to the head of the
[amily. The current voters' list
low includes 30,000 women who
ill be voting for the first time.
However, most of the women
jave reportedly registered on
foeir husbands' initiative rather
(nan their own.
SOME 2,000 women have
gistered in ultra-conservative
ebron where 10,000 men have
* right to vote. In Tulkarm,
women have registered
khe
B.0O0
gong with 7,000 men, and in
?lnnus the 'oters' list contains
P.5W women and 18,000 men.
porting these figures, express-
ed "keen satisfaction" that the
1976 effort seemed headed to-
ward attainment of its goal.
A "further advance in the
campaign's progress was ex-
pected to emerge from the Fed-
eration's first annual Man of
the Year dinner, which is slat-
ad for Sunday, March 7, at
Pier 66. A capacity attendance
of contributors in the $1,000
and over range is expected to
attend.
Samuel M. Soref, of the Re-
gency Tower on the Gait Ocean
Mile, will be honored as the
Man of the Year. The guests
will hear from Maj. Gen. Amos
Horev, president of the Tech-
nion-Israel Institute of Tech-
nology in Haifa and chief tech-
nical advisor to Israel's Minis-
try of Defense.
IN REPORTING on the cam-
paign'a first two months of
1976 activity, Goodman noted
that "progress and increased
giving were evident in virtual-
ly each of Fort Lauderdale's
many districts."
"In some areas," he said, "we
have made the Federation and
campaign presence felt for the
first time, an i the response to
the needs and programs of the
UJA and the Federation has
been exceptional and praise-
worthy."
Goodman noted that the Fed-
eration campaign has been mak-
ing important inroads in such
places as Woodlands, Inver-
rary, Plantation, Margate, Ta-
"We are making excellent
progress in these places" he
added, "and we plan to keep it
going as long as there are Jew-
ish needs to be met in Israel,
Europe, Latin America or Fort
Lauderdale."
Goodman had praise for the
many people who have come
forward over the past two
months to serve as chairmen
and committee members of
campaigns in high-rise build-
ings, phase units of condomi-
nium complexes, and residential
sections.
"IT IS NOT only a matter of
major capital in dollars and
cents that is being put toge-
ther in this year's campaign,"
he declared. "We are also build-
ing a stranger Federation and
Jewish community leadership."
Goodman said he was "warm-
ly optimistic" that the Fort
Lauderdale Jewish community
He said he expected "signifi-
cant additional progress to be
made in the campaign during
the spring months.
"Far more persons live here
on a permanent than on a tem-
porary, winter or snowbird ba-
sis," he stated. He estimated
the size of the Greater Fort
Lauderdale Jewish community
as "over 60.000 and growing
from one six-month period to
another."
Allan E. Bacr, president of
the Federation, commended
Goodman and his entire cam-
paign organization for their
tireless, devoted, and dedicated
leadership. "The results to date
speak for themselves," Baer
said.
The campaign calendar will
be marked by special events
for Purim, Passover, Israel In-
dependence Day and the Amer-
ican Bicentennial.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laiiderdale
Friday, March 5
Eban: Hebrew Academy's ^Voice'
HARVEY JEFFERBAUM
IRVING LEBOW
HUCJ'IR WiU Honor Lebow
At Academie Convocation
Irving S. Lebow, chairman of
the Floriaa area of the Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions and past president of
Temple Emanu-El of Fort Laud-
erdale, will be honored at a
special academic convocation of
the Hebrew Union College-Jew-
ish Institute of Religion on
March 7. He will receive its Dis-
tinguished Jewish Sen'ice
Award, given to men and wom-
en for their leadership in the
community and their congrega-
tions.
The academic convocation,
which will be addressed by Dr.
Alfred Gottschalk, president of
the College-Institute, is one of a
serbs of year-loug..vents mark-
ing the Centennial of the spirit-
ual and educational center of
Reform Judaism
It will take phce at Temple
Beth Sholom in Miami Tiear.h at
2 n.m. and will be followed by
a dinner at the Konover Hotel
with Ambassador Chaim Her-
zog. Israel's Permanent Repre-
sentative to the United Nations,
as the speaker and guest of
honor.
A large delegation from the
temple will be headed by Rabbi
JopI S. Goor, president Harvey
Jfferbaum, and M'-s. Estelle
Wagner, representative of th
temple on the Centennial com-
mittee. Lebow is chairman of
h's temple's task force, which,
vith the seven other Reform
congregations in the area, is
coordinating the convocation.
The Temple Emanu-El hon-
oree is among fourteen Flor-
i Hans and out-of-state notables
who will receive the Distin-
guished Jewish Service Awards
Hw others arc:
Aim B. Kessler, Temple Bath
Am, Miami; Harry B. Smith,
Temple Beth Sholom, Miami
Beach; Arnold P. Rosen. Tem-
ple Israel, Miami; Jude and
Mrs. Morton L. Abram. Temple ;
Beth El, Hollywood; Mr. and
Mrs. Walt-r Deutsch, Temple
Solel. Hollywood; Burton M j
Joseph, Temple Israel, Minnea- ;
pol's: Max Orovitz, Temple Is- I
rael, Miami, chairman of th"
Flonda State Centennial com-
mittee; Maxwell M. Rabb. Whift
House Assistant to Dwight D.
Eisenhower and president of
Temr-h Emanu-El. New York;
Sol Schreiber, Temple Judaa
Co^al Gabl-s; Mr. and Mrs. Ken ,
nsth Schwartz, Temple Sinai of
No-th Dad"; and Harry P. nn- '
n-r. Temple Israel, West Palm
Be.aeh.
Founded a century.ago by
Rabbi Isaac Mayor Wise in Cin-
cinnati the College institute,
has .grown into a major Jewish
Academic Institution as the Re-
form movements canter for
bighar learning.
1 lie oldest Jewish -Seminary
in America, because of the Holo-
caust, which virtually-wined out
European Jewry and their in-
stitutions, it is now the oldest in
the world.
A Harold Murray, the College-
Institute's director of develop-
ment for South Florida, and
Chaim H. Friend, national di-
rector of development, are in
charge of the academic convo-
cation and dinner.
Breakfast Date
Is Changed
Louis Colker, chairman for
the 1976 United Jewish Appeal-
.I.uish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale Campaign, has
announced a change in date for
the annual Water Bridge Con-
dominium UJA breakfast.
The new date is Sunday,
Mareh ?1, at 10 a.m. at the
clubhouse.
Former Israel Foreign Minis-
ter Abba Eban is the narrator
of a new film on the Greater
Miami Hebrew Academy which
will be released this spring, it
was announced this week by
Judge Norman Ciment, presi-
dent of the Miami Beach school.
Eban, former Israeli Ambas-
sador to the United Mates and
the United Nations, first visited
the Hebrew Academy 25 years
ego when he came here to help
launch the tate of Israel drive
for South Florida. He and Rab-
bi Alexander S. Gross, princi-
pal of the Miami Beach school,
have maintained a close rela-
tionship since.
Judge Ciment said the Tech-
nicolor film will be shown
throughout Florida and the
South to "better acquaint the
commitn;ties of our entire re-
gion with this focal point of
Jewish education in the South-
eastern United States."
Interviews with Hebrew
Academy alumni who have as-
No. Broward
NCJW Activities
There will be a general meet-
ing of the North Broward sec-
tion of National Council of Jew-
ish Women on Wednesday,
March 17, at the Wilton Manors
Women's Club at 12:30 p.m.
The nominating committee
will present the slate of officers
for 1976-77. and Pearl R. Guzik
will present a selection from
Verdi's "Aida."
The section has begun a new
program of entertaining at area
nursing homes each month. The
group is led by Jenne Grad and
includes Ruth Fragan, Evelyn
Levy, Lisa Rudin and Irving
Katz of Lauderdale Oaks.
Rossmoor
V# COCONUT CREEK
We do
business the
right way.
1700 Wai! Oakland Pa> B -d .
Ft lau4 Pnont 73b 1330
OAKLAND TOYOTA
I lw nuistvv planned
adult <-oml< hiii ii in m
community
from SI&800...
no land knM'
no ircmilion lease.

Take Turnpike exit 24.
West on Rte. 814. Phone (305) 971-3510.
From Miami TOLL FREE (305) 947-9906.
V
sumed leadership roles in the
business, religious and civic
worlds will be featured. I>""~-
tors, dentists, lawyers, engi-
naera, businessmen and rabbis
will reflect upon their experi-
ences at the school, a benefi-
ciary agency of the G ea^ f i-
ami Jewish Federation and its
CJA-IEF campaign.
Former students will discuss
such topics as nio\ ing to Israel,
studying at \arious Israeli uni-
versities and yeshivot, and ear-
n-in;; on their heiitagj in adult
life.
All of the Hebrew Academy's
facilities, from nursery school
and kindergarten through sen-
ior high, a-e being O
Such acrriries as
drama, speech. Junbr an tor choirs anJ athletics will
shown together with studies
tUftww: AM** *nd the
jor departments of R n .,.',
Jewish stud;
Students chhing old .
homes, Shabbat and holi,(
programs f.>r the sick, tout
faointias in South Miani
will also be inched in"--
fil-i, the most ambiti >us unde
tilting in the Hebrew Actv
emy's community-relations ,
public-rcktions programs in
28-year history.

#*
'4

K

fhowgraphed while looking over the script of a color
film about the Greater Miami Hebrew Academy which
will be narrated by former Israeli Foreign Minister
Abba Eban (center) arc Judge Norman Ciment and Rab-
bi Alexander S. Gross (right). Eban, who first visited
the Hebrew Academy 25 years ago, when he was Israel's
Ambassador to the U.S., agreed to become "The Voir,
of the Hebrew Academy" for the film, which is being
produced here for use throughout the South.
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood and Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In (he Hollywood and HaHmndoie ureas:
5801 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood.
920-1010
In the Fort Lauderdale area:
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.(SunsetStrip),Sunrise
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc /Funeral Directors
Other Riverside chapels in South Florida-are looatcd in
North Miami Beach. Miami Beaoh aodMianu.
Rivtvsid* wrves trta NnwYork MiWopoSun r Brooklyn. Bronx. Kr Rociwuvy *fMlW*>vhMMi
Murray N Rubin. KD
L-*-67t
*.-**%.n
L3-5-7S


iday
March 5, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
"*1
jVortfi Broward Hadassah*
To Fete Hadassah Associates
Hadavih Associates will be
Lopcrcd by the women of Ha-
l ah at a traditional cham-
r?n. party on Sunday. March
I to i P-"i- at tne norne
f Mr an I Mrs. Abraham Fine.
cnensored bv the North Brow-
VChapter, the event will pay
'ibute to this group of men
,hU have aligned themselves
1 ,jtn the cause of Hadassah by
1 joe-time lifetime affiliation
j. ad Mrs. Maxwell Weis-
g will bs guests of honor,
|. m,. Weisberg. president
the Florida Region of Ha-
sah. will speak on the Asso-
ciates' unique contributions to
K Hadassah Medical Organi-
ation.
I
According to Mrs. Ralph
Cannon, chapter president,
thetc are now more than 5,500
Harass ili Associates throughout
the United States.
Their one-time payments are
invested in a special fund to
yi Id grants for specific needs
of the Hadassah-Hebrew Uni-
versity Medical Center in Jeru-
salem, such as the life-saving
Trauma and Intensive Coronary
Care Units.
Other important programs
will be aidwd by Hadassah As-
sociates grants. For these it is
hoped that more area men will
join in this project. For fur-
ther information and/or reser-
vations, please call Mrs. Fine,
chairman, at 721-1295.
a recent meeting sponsored by the Bicentennial com-
ttee of the Community Relations Committee of the
-,h Federation were (from left) John Roibinson, for-
Finer Congressman from Kentucky; Paul Epstein, discus-
sion chairman; and Paul Zimmerman, commander of
'the Jewish War Veterans. Under the direction of Dr.
Albert E. Kaufman the group will discuss foreign-policy
issues for eight Monday evenings at the Federation of-
/ice.
.ta*'*
I Lauderdale West Condominium residents paid tribute to
fellow residents Anne Margolius (center} and Harold
\Hale (2nd from left) at the South Florida Israel Bond
{Organization "Night in Israel" Helping to make the
{presentation of the Israel Solidarity Awards at the Jan.
126 campaign event in Plantation were Jack Grebler
\(left), chairman, and Danny Seitmen (right), chairman
' the board of directors of Lauderdale West.
Purim at the Hebrew Day School
The school is located at 7100
W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise.
he Hebrew Day School of
Lauderdale will hold a
urim celebration on Monday,
parch 15.
The children will present **-
)ral playlets and participate in
|he festivities associated with.
|he holiday. Everyone w**V be
costume. Parents have been
and visitors are wel-
Federation-UJA Campaign Progress
Over 50 residents of Parlia-
ment House in Pompano Beach
turned out on Feb. 24 for a
reception in the home of Joseph
M and Reba Shotz to inaugurate
the Federation-UJA campaign
there as an annual event.
Shotz served as chairman of
a committee that included Mrs.
Lee Eiseman, Mel Osterman and
Bernard Resnick. "Everything
about the event was good," one
of the guests remarked, citing
"the food, the liquid refresh-
ments, the camaraderie and the
dollar result for the Federation-
UJA."
to -to -to
Temple Sholom's second an-
nual campaign effort on behalf
of the Federation-UJA took
place at a Sunday brunch on
Feb. 22. Guests were unanimous
in remarking on the high quality
of the food, the speeches and
the financial result.
Martin Kurtz, president of
the temple, presided, with Rabbi
Morris Skon and Oscar Sindell
sharing honors in introducing
speakers and acknowledging the
help of campaign volunteers.
The catering committee of
the temple Sisterhood, led by
Mrs. Beverly Hersher, set out a
sumptuous bagel bialy lox -
pickled herring- and Danish and
coffee buffet.
to -to -to
Century Village at Deerfield
Beach took a long step forward
on its way to actual campaign-
ing with the naming of chair-
men and cochairmen for each
of the Village's 11 building com-
plexes.
Heading the complexes are
Ben Berchedsky, Ashby; Tillie
Fried, Durham; Emily Nathan
and Ben Miles, Berkshire; Al
Fishman, Cambridge; Mr. and
Mrs. Mandel, Ellesmere; Abe
Rosenblatt, Farnham; Ted Ros-
off and Mr. Buxbaum, Mark-
ham.
Also Ada Serman and Julius
Nadel, Lyndhurst; Evelyn Den-
ner and Rose Finck, Keswick;
Marc Nusbaum and Mike Gor-
don, Harwood; Evelyn Denner,
Grantham.
Tillie Fried is chairman of
the telephone squad. Irving
Friedman is chairman of the
Century Village campaign cabi-
net.
tr -to -to
Mr. and Mra. Ernest Weich-
sel were the hosts for a Fed-
eration-UJA reception on Feb.
26 in their Pompano Beach
Christopher House home.
The Weichsels have played
prominent part in Pompano
*&

When a nurse meets our
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muatlUetoahlghataadardebelor.w-|
lathr meet youra
Phone us, when you want tie ****"
ordaywneeuty.
IMDICAL PERSONNEL POOL 5*4-4333
if A FULL
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..*
y4A
NOW OPEN
TOM'S FRUIT & VEGETABLE MARKET
OKN 6 DAYS M0N. SAT. 9-6
3309 NE 33rd Street
Phone 564-8831
FRESH PRODUCE DAILY
Beach Jewish cultural and Is-
rael-cormected activities. Both
have been supporters of the
Federation-UJA campaign since
arriving in the Greater Fort
Lauderdale area over four years
ago.
it to it
Pompano Atlantis residents
will come together for the Fed-
eration-XJJA at a coffee-and-
cake hour in the building's so-
cial hall on Wednesday evening,
March 10. Abraham Levinthal is
the building's Federation-UJA
chairman.
to -to -to
There will be a coffee-and-
dessert hour for residents of the
Island Club in Pompano Beach
on Thursday, March 18. Irwin
Stenn is chairman, and Sanford
Canarick as a member of the
campaign committee.
Stenn selected the date be-
cause, he says, "next to one, 18
is probably our most cherished
number."
JEWISH FEDERATION
TEEN TRIP TO ISRAEL
June 24 -July 29
FOR ALL AREA JEWISH TEENS, GRADES 912
COST: $1,554 PER TEEN, WHICH INCLUDES:
All air fares and transfers, including Fort Lauderdale
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All sightseeing in private coach with private English-
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EXTRA FEATURED ATTRACTIONS!
Ten days living and working on a kibbutz
Meetings and functions with Israeli teenagers
Meetings with Israeli government leaders
Space is limited If you are interested in signing up or want
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I am interested in participating in the Jewish Federation
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Name
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State............................ Zip
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 5, 1976
The Issue Squarely Stated
The charge by some that it is Israel that is prevent-
ing a solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict was proven
to be wrong by Premier Yitzhak Rabin's visit to Wash-
ington. In his public statements, especially in his ad-
dress to a joint session of Congress, Rabin explained
Israel's position in a clear and forthright manner.
He told Congress that the "driving goal" of Israel's
policy is that "however difficult the road, however hard
the challenge and however complex the process, Israel
will strive with all its being to contribute to the peace
of the world by pressing ahead with its efforts for peace
with the Arab countries."
The Israeli leader soundly stated his government's
stand when he declared "I am ready to meet with any
Arab head of government at any time and at any place
for the purpose of peace talks." He made a telling point
when he noted that when President Anwar Sadat ad-
dressed Congress last October the Egyptian leader said
there was no substitute for person-to-person contacts.
"I wish that he would direct those words to me as well
as to you," Rabin told Congress. "I would then know
that the work of true peacemaking has finally begun."
For as Rabin correctly pointed out the real issue
is not the Palestinians or territory although Israel is
ready to negotiate on both issues for real peace. The
real issue is the refusal of Arab leaders to recognize
the existence of the State of Israel.
Not Just Words at Brussels
The second World Conference on Soviet Jewry held
in Brussels last week must not only result in a torrent
of words but real action to help the Jews of the Soviet
Union.
The conference comes exactly five years after the
first Brussels Conference which resulted in putting the
plight of Soviet Jewry in the world limelight and of mob-
ilizing Jewish communities throughout the world to aid
Soviet Jewry.
But the second Brussels Conference came at a time
when the condition of Jews in the Soviet Union has
worsened. Emigration which reached a high of 35,000
people in 1973 dropped to only 12,000 last year. The
repression and intimidation of Jews seeking visas has
increased. The condition of Jewish "prisoners of Consci-
ence'' and labor camps is critical.
The world attention that the Conference has brought
is important because every Soviet Jew who does leave
the USSR has pointed out that' public epfnXon in the
West does afftct the Soviet authorities as well as help
uplift the morale of Jews still in the Soviet Union.
The Administration must also be firm on the Jack-
son Amendment and, instead of attacking it, should point
out to the Kremlin that detente is a two-way street.
Modern 'Chad Gadya9
The Golan Heights issue is no more settled than
the West Bank issue as Prime Minister Rabin knows
only too well, particularly if we are to judge by his on-
again, off-again stance vis-a-vis the recent Gush Emu-
nim.
It was, in fact, Gush Emunim that was involved in
one of the big "leaks" that angered President Ford in
the first place whether or not religious settlers are
to be allowed to establish homesteads on the West Bank.
Equivocating, Rabin originally took the position
that how could a few "unnoticed" settlers do any harm?
Ford saw the danger to the administration's quid pro
quo how do you demand of a nation that it withdraw
from settled lands even ex-post facto?
The answer would have been easy enough: You
make the nation withdraw if no one knows that the land
has been settled at all. But the Israeli press found out
about the "unnoticed" settlers and, worse still, the Ford
explosion that they had settled there.
Hence, the proposed Rabin attack upon a free press.
Astonishing Proposal for Israel
Jewish Floridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
OFFICE and PI.ANT 120 N.E. 6th St.. Mlairl, Fia. 3S132 Phone 373-4KOS
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1-371-4605
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Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Ksshruth
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Published Bl-Weekly
P.rone] rinss Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
All P.O. SS79 returns are to be forwarded to
Th.- Jewish Flr-'dlan. P.O. Hox 012973. Miami. Fla. 33101.
Fred K. Shochet March 5, 1976
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate.
Worldwide News Service, Nstional Editorial Association, American Associa-
tion of English Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year06.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
Number 5
3 2 ADAR 5736
pLORTOA'S Sen. Richard Stone
speaks with a passionate en-
thusiasm about Israel that sug-
gests he is turned on by that
s abject more than by just about
any other.
"There have been losses of
ground," he says, evaluating the
year or so he has been in Wash-
ington.
"The real struggle for Israel,'*
he explains, "is not being wag
ed in the Middle East, but in
the U.S.A." And, as he sees it
since winning his Senate seat,
Israel's position here has been
diminish**'.
THE PRIZE is American pub-
lic opinion. The combatants are
Israel, the Arabs and American
Jews in behalf of Israel.
"The fact is," Sen. Stone be-
lieves, "that the Israelis are no
longer necessarily favored to
win it."
There are two misconceptions
that need correcting. One is
that oil governs American for-
eign policy in the Middle East
exclusively. Sen. Stone does not
minimize the power of petro-
diplomacy.
But he dops criticize politi-il
observers (including me) who
discount the rower of p'iblic
opinion over the power of re-
t-n-dinlomacy or any other kind
of diplomacy.
CERTAINLY the public is
concern0*! about the rising cost
of en*rgv generally and that oil
srecifically is being used bv t^e
Arab and other oil-exporting
nations to blackmail our do-
litical decisions. And so far,
they have been able to do little
to counter either.
"But toe overriding public
oninion issue in the Israeli-Arab
struggle todav," siys Sen. Stone,
"is the refigees." And in this,
tHMf influence may likely be
critical.
The second misconception
needing correction is the fals*-
x iew of Am^ncan Jewish lobby
po*#rthe kind of view which
for example, former Sen. Ful-
bright advanced so ardently
that American Jews and Zion
ists. a term he used peiora
ti" ely, carrv the whole Con
gress in their hip-pocket.
WITH RESPECT to the fi's
of these. Sen. Stone believes i'
is purposeless to recount the
history of the 1943 War of In
dependence that no one ir
Israel forced the Arabs lrinr
there to flee; that, in fact, they
fled at the encouragement of
the British, expecting to return
shortly after a butchering of
the Jews, when they would b*
able to reclaim not only theii
own property, but also to steal
whatever Jewish property they
could in the bargain; that this
in effect, is what the British
promised them.
Above all, it does no good
to emphasize that the original
number of refugees who fled
exceeded hardly more than
250,000, and that not a single
Arab nation did so much as to
lift a finger in their behalf since
then as their numbers prolifer-
ated in stagnant camps of rage.
Or that a United Nations plan
for dealing with the refugees
after the 1948 war based on
either of three possibilities
repatriation, restitution, com-
pensation was sabotaged by
the Arabs themselves.
WHATEVER NUMBER they
claim today a million or less
is what American public opin-
ion hears and understands. And,
" *n. Stone sees it. this is an
Volume 5
Friday, March 5, 1976
IEVITT
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1*11 Pens**!,. M.
HellyweW, fU
5J4-*7
(my levin, f J>.
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overwhelming consideration.
In effect the American sense
of fair play is being shaped by
a big lie. but being shaped it
Is. and both Israelis and Amer-
ican Jews must come to under-
stand tbis.
With respect to the scon^ of
the misconceptions: the Ful-
bright-type fraud about Jewish-
Zionist influence may infuriate
111 as an example of classical
anti-Semitsm of which the
Arabs, themselves, have made
great capital.
BUT IN Sen. Stones view,
we must do more than just be
righteously furious.
' The truth comes much clos-
er,*' he says, "ti a ratio of 5-1
in tseir fa- or. They're all over
Washington, all over 'the Hill,'
in Congressional chambers, in
the Sencit: dinirgroom, loaded
with muney and smooth-talk-
ing."
Sen. Stone makes much of
this last: "Time was when the
Arabs were unshaven, half-hid-
den in their exotic desert garb,
barely able to speak English
perfect portraits of brooding,
malevolence and mystery."
NOT SO today. Today, they
wear western clothing, are out-
ward-going and speak articu-
lately. Today, they give the im-
pression of being friendly, effi-
cient and earn"ist.
It is this combination, says
Sen. Stone, the "new Arab" iQ
large numbers in Washington,
that has given them the opl
portunity U sway public opin-
ion on the refugee is
EVEN IF most Americans
don't swallow the Zionist-racist
hyphenation, the g -eatest tri-
u-nph of the "new" Arab look
tli^y certainly are sitting down
U an Arab-concocted menu
featuring Israeli "indifference"
to Arab claims on "Palestine"
as the main course, a term not"1
e-en the Arabs, except perhaps
for the Arafat PLO, are them-
selves willing to define.
"All of this erorion," observ-
es Sen. Stone, "has increased
visibly and significantly during
the past year."
On the other hand, the Sen-
ator is not pessimistic. In addi-
tion to hims'-lf as an antagonist
of eroding public opinion, he
mentions the other two Jewish
fenators in Congress Jacob
Jaits (R.. N.Y.) and Abraham
P.i'jicoff (D., Conn.) and the
efferti'-e rebuttals they are
maVing.
STONE HOLDS Sen. Clifford
Crse (R., N.J.I in particularly
high resard. citing Case's role
in fhe attemrt to return to the
h-idget a ha'f-billhn Gerald
Fo d cut in arms to Israel for
1977.
Sen. James Abourezk (D.,
Cont'nn-d on Page 14
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J


^Friday, March 5, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laudeniale
Page 3
o
MILTON SHAPP IS BREAKING
THE GROUND.
Here's what ISRAEL TODAY, the respected voice of California's
Jewish community: says about Governor Shapp's candidacy:
"We have waited 200 years for Governor Milton Shapp of
Pennsylvania. It has taken our country some time to accept a
Jewish candidate for President and it has taken someone with
experience and guts to take such a step. Milton Shapp has taken
that step.
"It is befitting that in the Bi-Centennial year there be a
Presidential candidate who is a qualified, respected government
leader, won his gubernatorial re-election by over 300,000 votes,
engineered one of the country's most sound state economies,
settled heated strikes, loves this country and its people and also
is a Jew.
"Milton Shapp is a longshot in 1976 but Milton Shapp deserves
a chance. He is setting a precedent which could allow your son,
daughter, grandson or granddaughter to become President of the
United States of America. Years from now you will be able to tell
your grandchildren and great-grandchildren that you voted for the
first Jewish Presidential candidate... Governor Milton Shapp, or
will that be President Milton Shapp?"
As Pennsylvania's first two-term Governor in over 100 years
-elected by the biggest Democratic majorities in the state's
history-Milton Shapp has demonstrated a capacity for leadership,
a grasp of economic realities, and a concern for human needs.
-In 1970, he inherited a state $800 million in debt from the
previous administration. In less than 1 year, using sound business
management, he turned the red ink to black.
-Since then taxes have been cut in Pennsylvania by $360 million
and last month he presented a budget which heto next year's
spending to a 3.97% increase-half the national rate of inflation.
-He inaugurated the nation's first statewide system of free public
transportation for Senior Citizens at no cost to taxpayers.
-He turned his Governor's Mansion into a school for brain damaged
children and a Late Start Center for the elderly. In the State
Capitol, he and his wife rent their own home.
-He implemented a program of rent and property tax relief benefits
for the elderly and handicapped.
-As President, his proposal for a National Education Trust Fund
offers the hope of improving the quality of education in this
country from day care through post graduate studies, while
eliminating the need for property taxes and cutting the cost of
college tuition in half.
-His National Investment Policy will trigger private sector invest-
ments to produce millions of new jobs in a growing economy.
Milton Shapp for President. He's got more executive experience
-more government ability-than any other Democratic-candidate
for President. And these times cry out for just such a man. He's
not fancy. He's not famous. But there's not a better man when it
comes to understanding your problem, rolling up his sleeves and
getting the thing solved.
The candidate you vote for in this primary has got to have the
answers. The quality of your life is in question.
H* for Sh.pp for FMM Commm... A copy of our moor. M M wr* M FtdMl El*** CmmHs-or. and MM for purch*. in W..r,nton. DC.
has answers for America.
i i i


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. March 5,

SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Histadrut Foundation Sets $50 Million Goal
The tenth annual Economic
Conference of the Israel Histad-
rut Foundation (IHF) closed
with a gala banquet at the Fon-
taineblcau Hot "1 Bl which a new
goal of $50 million was set.
Dr. Sol Stein, IHF national
president, reported that the
cumulative total of commit-
i", nts since the foundation was
established 16 years ago reach-
ed the S40-million mark at the
end of 1975. Another S2.5 mil-
lion had been committed so far
this vear toward the additional
target of $10 million in be-
quests and annuities to help
provide low-cost mortgages for
young Israeli couples, he said.
Simcha Dinitz, Israel's Am-
sador to the United States,
d the foundation's Forty
Million Dollar Award at the
closing sessions, and told some
1.250 guests that "This outpour-
ing of understanding and sup-
port was a source of encourage-
ment, not only to Israel, but to
all Americans involved in the
struggle for human freedom."
Ambassador Dinitz continued:
"The defense of freedom does
not begin in New York or in
Miami Beach, but wherever
men fight for their liberty.
Never before has there been
greater solidarity between Is-
rael and the American people
than in these very days."
THE ISRAELI diplomat cited
the American trade unions as
staunch friends of Israel "who
in 'he front of everv battle
on behalf of Israel." He told
the American and Canadian
guests that "nobody can prom-
ise that the Yom Kippur War
I be the last one, but every
Israeli representative can prom-
ise tint should another war
come, Israel will win it because
the fate of Jewry itself is at
stake."
He assailed the admission of
the PLO to United Nations
forums, but even more, decried
"the acceptance and spread of
PLO propaganda for a secular
Palestine" bv the media and by
countries which should know
better. "The Arabs will negotiate
only with an indestructible Is-
rael, and it is the task of her
friends to help strengthen her
infrastructure, to make sure
that the country is strong
enough to cope with the total-
itarian regimes bent on her dis-
solution."
Sol C. Chaikin, president of
the International Ladies Gar-
ment Workers Union (ILGWU),
breaking away from sessions of
the AFL-CIO Executive Coun-
cil meeting in nearby Bal Har-
bour, made the Forty Million
Dollar Award presentation to
Ambassador Dinitz.
A VICE president of the Na-
tional Committee for Labor Is-
ra.'l. Chaikin stated that "the
14 million members of the AFL-
CIO. most of whom are not Jew-
ish, are staunch friends of Is-
rael because she represents a
decent, humane society. Since
Histadrut the General Fed-
eration of Labour in Israel
was founded in 19?9, American
labor lias hm among its fore-
most supporters."
Yaacov Cohen, Histadrut's
representative in the U.S., salut-
ed the American people who
"share the human values of His-
tadrut and support the practical
work of Histadrut which bene-
fits all of Israel. In these days,
when the UN denounces Zion-
ism as racism, our response is
to proceed with our construc-
tive work that benefits Arabs
as well as Jews in Israel, in the
administered areas, and even
the newest refugees, the Chris-
tians fleeing from Lebanon."
William H. Sylk of Philadel-
phia. IHF national campaign
chairman, who presided at the
dinner honoring Ambassador
Dinitz. announced that contri-
butors of at least S^.500 to the ,
Hictsda* Mortgage Fund would
be eligible for participation in
the second annual Histadrut
Potok to Speak
In Hollywood
Chaim Potok. author of "The
Chos.-n." "Mv Name Is Asher
Lev,.....rhe Promise" and "In
Beginning,'' will speak at
Temple Sinai, Hollywood, on
Sunday, March 21. at 7:30 p.m.
Tickets are available at the
temnle office, 1201 Johnson St.,
Hollywood.
Solidarity Conference in Israel
in November.
Dr. Leon Kronish, rabbi of
Temple Beth Sholom in Miami
Beach and IHF national board
chairman, conducted the appeal
for mortgage units that would
aid veterans of the Israel De-
fense Forces to acquire homes
at low cost.
Ze'ev Slier. Israel's Economic
Minister to North America,
speaking on Tuesday, Feb. 17,
at the economic seminar break-
fast, said that 1976 is "Israel's
self-help year." He emphasized
that there is "no crisis in Is-
rael, but its problems are se-
vere and require more than reg-
ular corrective measures." He
said that Israel would try to
achieve self-sufficiency by the
mid-1980's, when she would no
longer require America's eco-
nomic assistance.
ISRAEL'S economic problems
stem from two sources: her
heavy military needs and the
impact of the Arab boycott
which has made it difficult to
find foreign markets, Sher said.
In these circumstances, he
u I'g id, oonf e rence delegates
should promote the sale of Is-
raeli floods m the United States.
The Economic Minister re-
ported on a series of measures
being, taken by iarael's govern-
ment this month to overcome
a $700-million residual deficit
in her balance of payments, in-
cluding the imposition of a 15
percent tax on foreign ex-
change purchased for use
abroad, reduced subsidies, lim-
itation of imports- and rebates
to stimulate export.
Sher notxl that Histadrut is
a major factor stimulating pro-
duction and efficiency. The
tee
of <
insti hoi
the
Chi
7
drastic economies beins
4ted by the government wj
result in the closing of l,ooiJew
l8JSCOoms hi the public schoo We
system and a budget cut of l( at
percent in institutions of highe
learning. Subsidies to Kup84
Holim for hosnital services -
being cut and fees for med:ne
uiil be ehargsd. Construction
new hospitals is beinu ha?ps
and the -program for housiil
will be reduced.
Or, Monday. Feb. 16, nearly!
1 .OO persons attended the Yid-
dish-soeaking session' of the
eonfereor"*-. Shimon Weber, edi-
tor of The Jewish Daily For-
ward, discussed the noliticall
asnectS Qf tW Middle East and
critki''c-rf the Ford Ad-ninistra-l
(tan t Ptfick Mwnihan
United Vatiuns.
out Daniel Mei
from the R
eon
IHF MOST IMPORTANT ISSUE
wil
a
cap
tb -
witl
V
for
Jackson: 4I Won't Retreat Fron
My Free-Emigration Position'
or
Passover Seder
At Beth Israel
Temple Beth Israel will spon-
sor a Seder on the second night
of Passover, April 15. Rabbi
Philip A. Labowitz and Cantor
Maurice A. Neu will lead the
seder, which will include a
four-course traditional meal,
catered by Temple Caterers of
.Hollywood, along with the com-
plete Haggadah Service.
Arrangements can be made
for special tables and set-ups.
The Sisterhood of Beth Israel is
sponsoring the Seder. For ad-
ditional information, contact
the temple office, 735-4040.
Sen. Henry M. "Scoop" Jack-
son said this week that he will
"never retreat" from his deter-
mination to promote freer emi-
gration from the Soviet Union
and the Eastern European na-
tions.
"If we back down on the
Jackson Amendment now," Sen.
Jackson said, "we lose all right
to call ourselves the leaders of
the free world. If we back down
now we betray the principles
of the founding fathers of our
own nation."
Sen. Jackson, speaking to a
New York Council on Soviet
Jewry, declared:
"Mv concern in this political
year is that politicians seeking
votes will ask that we abandon
our commitment to free emigra-
tion.
"They will say that the Amer-
ican people don't give a damn
about what happens to Sakha-
rov or what Happens to the
Soviet Jews or what happens
to the opressed in fhe Ukraine,
Lithuania. Latvia. Estonia and
the othe*- countries under So-
viet domination.
"All candidates for the Presi-
dency should be required to
take a specific stand on this
specific issue." Sen.' Jackson
said. He if n candidate for
President in Florida's March
primary.
"There is no issue mere im|
portant t the cause of freedon
around the world than this one,)
"It is time we face the facts: j
"Tens of thousands of peop*i
Jews and "non-Jews alike"
eseaped from captivity ber*
of the Jackson Amendment.
"It was only after Dr. Kis
singer pledged that the Admin-
istration would destroy the
Mnendntt-nt that the Kremlin!
tightened, the screws once again.
4Approaches to Aliyah' Is
AACA Convention Tlieme
Idealistic and practical ap-
proaches to Aliyah (Jewish im-
migration to Israel) was the
theme for the seventh national
convention Sponsored by the
Association of Americans and
Canadians for Aliyah (AACA)
this month at the Lido Beach
Hotel in New York.
Approximately 200 delegates
attended the convention as did
Aliyah shaliachim (Israeli rep-
resentatives). Delegates includ-
ed chu (group chanter) lead-
ers and other AACA members.
The chairperson of the South
Florida branch of the AACA,
Mrs. Ora Zipper, advises that
the local Chug Aliyah meets
regularly, ana has more than
60 members, all planning to set-
tle in Israel within the next
SMI or two.
"You..can be sure of this if]
Scoou 4ak*OB is elected Presi-
dent:
"There will be no more one-l
way.trade--d^als with the Soviet
Union t no more giveaways to
privileged Soviet customers who
buy at cut-rate prices.
"And if the Soviets want some
of the trade benefits .from the
United States that other co
trie* enjoy let them at v
honor the right to emigratt^
"On this matter of princip.
and human life I will neve
retreat."
W
Lon
'an
Besi
f
Iwi
eci
T
py
on.
:hai
ires
he
Tamarac Vice Mayor and Councilman Morris Glicksman
(left) was recipient of the State of Israel Solidarity
Award at a "Night in Israel" event sponsored by the
South Florida Israel Bond Organization at the Tamarac
Jewish Center. Making the presentation was George
Morantz, chairman, at the Jan. 20 meeting held on be-
half of the Israel economic development program.
All smiles at a reception honoring U.S.
Sen. Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson are
these supporters of his bid for the Demo-
cratic Presidential nomination in Flor-
ida's March 9 primary (from left): Goldie
(Mrs. Sol) Goldstein, South Florida fi-
nance committee chairman for Jackson;
Sen. Jackson; Miami Beach Mayor Har-
old Rosen, a Jackson chairman in Dade
County; and Mrs. Helen Jackson, the
Senator's wife.


[day
March 5. 1976
The Jewish Floridwn of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
'Exodus' Captain to Address
Poinpano Beach Women
The P-'-'itvm B'?*8h c1>r^rn^-
t*. of the Jewish Federation
of eSfit F^ Liu*H"W ~m-
,; hfil 1 a I'-nchPOB on behalf of
fhe "ewi^h Fe '.eration-United
3 J *K Yacht
Club.
nouncenWPR was made
Rin. chairman of
mo Beach Women's
iteering committee.
committee members are
5, \n Begehnaa Berenice
1 Helen Shield
and Fran Sindell.
n boon
M.j'i' v> ''" 5 Orauel,
a |j. in. legend Re' Granel.
captain halds
the F-' f Me<*a1
tHh-rw. Ho
.! by
I t" Golda
Ifeir.
]...... lunch-
eon can bj 1 calling
1?R.
Berenice Schenloerrnan at 4^.,
3147. Fran Shidell at S63-.S2.so,
o<- the- Federarfmi office, 484-
8200.
Arthur Finkel To Be Honored At
Carol Springs Night in Israel
.~
KEVEREND GRAUEL
Arthur Fintoel. a founder of
the Coral Spitngs Hebrew Con-
gregation", will receive the State
of k.ael Solidarity Award at
the "Night in Israel" on Sun-
day, March 7, at 7:30 p.m. at
the Coral Springs Golf and
Tennis Club. The announce-
ment was made by Gary Fagel-
man, Coral Springs Hebrew
Congregation Israel Bonds
committee chairman.
At the meeting, held on be-
half of the South Florida Israel
Bond Organization campaign,
special guest will be entertain-
er Eddie Schaffer.
The congregation's first vice
president in 1V72-73, Finkel has
received five Exceptional Mer-
it Awards from the New York
City Police Department and
H mbar of Young Israel
of Par K-.?ckaway and the Shom-
rim Soci.-tv 01 tr.e Police De-
partment in New York. He also
AKlMLK FLNKEL
served as journal chairman for
the Hebrew Congregation.
According to Fagelman, "The
members of Coral Springs He-
brew Congregation will show
their concern for Israel when
they cttetf* this important
event. Urael needs our help es-
pecially now because of the pro-
grams iMrected against her by
Third World' nations and be-
ca'ise of the growing threat of
terrorism."
Robert M. Hermann is North
Broward board of governors
chairman an.! Milton M. Parson
is executive director, South
Floridi Israel Bond Organisa-
tion campaign.
The Roismans to Receive Ben-Gurion Award
Woodlands Israel Bonds Dinner of State
Lauderdale. Robert M. Her-
mann, North Broward board of
governors chairman, said, "It is I
fitting thrt Ben and Pauline I
Roisman recerve the highly
coveted wavd. whiefi was nairK|
ed for the founder of the Is-
rael Bonds program."
LOW PRICES
HOME IEUVEAY
DISCOUNT
PfJCtSlY
MO *
CONtlACl
rouCAii *
wtttuvn
the
filinl
tin.
esi
viet
s to
ivho
ome
the
1
BEN and PAULINE ROISMAN
Woodlands Country Club
Community residents- Ben' and
if 'aulino Roisman hav* been
lesignate 1 n recehe the State
f ftrael Dri.1 Ben-Gartd'n
\ward f r ; Km uV (Mien* te* the
* >ecnle of Israel
The announcement taJ made
y Len:>rc Frankel. chairper-
on, and Dr. Murray E!Vihs, co-
ihairman, who said: thaf the
resc-ntati-.ii will be made at
he Second Woodland* Country
lunity Israel Din-
i i lay March 23
p.m. at the Woodlands
V Club in lamarac.
-. on behalf
)e South Florida Israel
Organization campaign.
iond
>ar Mitzvah
MINDY LFATNE
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Lnine's
laughter, Mindy, will- celebrate
fcer Bat Minvah this evening
It $ at Temple Beth knl, *un-
jse.
- llA.'l) HKi*H
Da\id, si 11 of Mr. and Mrs.
Hersh, will become a Bar
'ah on Saturday at- 8:45
Temple Beth Israel.-A
will follosr s-jrwoes.
will bt addressed by Dr. Irving*
Lehrman, spiritual leader of
Temple Emanu-El in Miami;
Beach and chairman of the*
board of governors of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond
campaign.
Ben Roisman. chairman of
the Israel Bond North Brow-
ard Country Club Division,
served as cochairman of last
year's Woodlands Israel Bond*
Dinner. A former vice presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation
of Fort Lauderdale and mem-
ber of its board of directors,
he was chairman of the Wood-'
I in Is Di> ision UJA-IEF cam-
paign in 1973-74.
Pauline Roisman is a mem*
ber of Friends for Life Auxil-
iary, Miami University Hospi-
tal. Women's American ORT,-
the Woodlands Country
Women's Division and the
ish Federation campaign.
The Roismans are members-
of T-mirle Emanu-El in Fort
THE CASE
^uummwi(sim iftffi
- *gmM-ttMBiri&t%mM\
\tum w. us. -12 M-i$ mi vim;
iWWBalT- tt MR '_<&> M VIM*
'ns -11 Mil if tri----- Mi ttui*
nu tx *
CNVEIUIHT MM ULWUT GSir *
I
4

211-9128 121
WlMIWllllWll
ttmttumi
ikr IMPORTANT AmOUJSCEMEJST
KEEP THE DATE
for
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
FT. LAUDERDALE ANNUAL
TRIBUTE BANQUET
DR. & ivms. AL.vii> iv. cOLiN
Sunday, March 28,197$ 6:30 PM.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
7100 W. Oakland Park IM
ft. lauderdale, Ho.
LUDW'K BROOZKI
Chairman
BERNARD OSH1NSKY, ROBERT HERMAN ^|
Co-Ckwrmen- n
SHOW YOUR SOLIDARITY WITH ISRAEL
STRENGTHEN THE JfWISH NATIONAl. WND
.
in;
jr-
de
he
IS YOUR CAR
RUSTING?
We Specialize la
Rust, Dint & Scratch
Removal, free Estimtt*
* Pickup 1 Delfctry.
|1 -Day Auto Ram
4551 NE 11th Ave.
77MJ70
w off with this ad.
i
Jwine ood cheeje
Broward headquarters for
Israeli & American
Kosher wines.
WNE & CHEESE TASTING
PAR7T15
ComeHR and browse
or call...
587-2345
Plantation Community Plaza
266-B So. University
PLANTATION


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdait
Friday, March S, 1976
Nobody, but noboc
to help Israel than Sen;;
In Praise of
Scoop Jackson
by LEON URIS
Author of "Exodus"
After the Six Day War in 1967 I was
approached by ranking Israelis to consider
undertaking a book based on the hypothesis
that the Arabs had won the war. The
prospect, even as fantasy, was so abhorrent,
I declined.
I recalled those discussions and my
vivid reaction during the Yom Kippur War
of 1973. At the onset of that conflict,
with the issue gravely in doubt, the
massacre of Israel became a vision of ter-
rifying reality. It turned into a days-Ions
tghtmare in which my own world had been
destroyed. I rather doubt that any Jew
ao>where would have lived a single day
again as a whole person beyond an Arab
victory.
Conversely, my most fulfilling moment
as an author came several years back
when my wife and I visited the Schoenau
transit camp outside Vienna, a way station
spiriting Soviet Jews to Israel. I met and
wept with a woman who risked twenty years
of penal labor to work on an illegal under-
ground translation of EXODUS.
It was at Schoenau that the name of
Senator Henry M. Jackson first captured my
imagination.
The group in transit was potpourri
from all over the Soviet Union, workers for
the most part, and certainly unsophisticated
regarding knowledge of America. Yet, to
a person, they all knew the name of a
single man.
"Do you know Senator Jackson of
Washington?" I was asked over and over.
I answered that I didn't.
"If you meet him, tell him that his name
is spoken with reverence by our people
and he is blessed in a million prayers."
LEON L'RIS
A MATTER OF JUSTICE
Henry Jackson's traumatic involvement
with the holocaust came when he visited
Buchenwald three days after its liberation
as a young Congressman. He never forgot
what he saw.
It would be a disservice to t'/iis man
to consider his pro-Israel stance as an
isolated quirk. He deplores tyranny. Henry
Jackson deplores tyranny in his own country.
He deplores tyranny in mankind.
The Jackson Amendment to the 1974
Trade Act demanding the free choice
"Israel does not have a better
friend than Senator Jackson
from Washington."
Sen. Abraham Ribicoff
Senate Floor
November, 1971
of people to emigrate was highly unpopular
with Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Honry
Kissinger and those in the business
establishment who stood to turn a profit. "^
They branded it as undue interference in
iet internal affairs.
Why was it overwhelmingly carried by
Senate? If we examine its logic it
s a masterpiece of common sense.
The bottom line of Jackson's foreign
is to secure an enduring world peace.
Ihe major instrument for ascertaining
peace in this age is a genuine detente
en the Soviet Union and the United
AN EMBODIMENT OF THE
AMERICAN DREAM
We Jews who are the custodians of the
ashes of our people and for whom the gas
chambers were likewise intended are
obviously thfe ones *st sensitive to the issue
of Israel's survival. This is as it should be.
In no way does it conflit with our allegiance
to our country. Indeed, the Jewish commu-
nity of America has contributed to the
greatness of this nation far beyond its small
numbers. We have the right and the sacred
duty to fight for the survival of our people.
Despite this understandable preoccu-
pation with Israel's well being, we cannot, in
all conscience, support a man for the
Presidency on this issue alone.
The more one leaves this question and
looks at the entire man, evetf more thrilling
the nrospect becomes of Henry Jackson
leading our nation. In the coming weeks
the puulic will have the exciting prospect (^
learning what the voters of the State
of Washington have known for'over a
generation.
No candidate for the Presidency in this
century is more a product of the common
people and is more dedicated to the cause
S
\
I
Now
to he
i
^^^iHMBEl
Senator Scoop Jackson with his wife, Helen, and children, Anna Marie, 12, and Peter, 9.
PAID FOR BY
JACKSON FOR PRE
Walter T. SkaUerup


Friday, March 5, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
jtfa has done more
i|tor Henry M.
of the common people.
Henry Jackson is of a rare species,
a political purist who has never been tainted
by scandal and whose overpowering
motivation is to help ordinary human beings.
For two decades he secretly donated
his outside speaking and writing earnings,
half of his income, to help students in
his s.ate. These anonymous gifts were
revealed only after enactment of a public
disclosure law.
COMPASSION, COURAGE, AND
COMMON SENSE
On the domestic side Henry Jackson's
tenure has been a textbook of liberal
progress for the common man, minorities
itrusnling for civil and social equality,
for women's aspirations, the poor, the ag?d,
the infirm and the student. His ability to
gras? an issue in the making has been
nowhere better demonstrated than in going
to the forefront of two of the most demand-
ing problems of our time, energy and
environment. He understands that there has
to be a median, a way that use of the Land
and industrial and economic growih cm
live side by side. He is as knowledgeable
about conservation, land use and resources
inyone in this country. He has developed
programs designed to leave a legacy of
.continued natural wealth and beauty
r future generations.
A GREAT LEADER FOR AMERICA
Henry Jackson is an acknowledged
expert on national defense.
Henry Jackson is an acknowledged lead-
er in civil rights.
Henry Jackson is an acknowledged
leader for social progress.
He served as Chairman of the Demo-
cratic National Committee at the behest of
John F. Kennedy.
He has been named in the leading poll
as one of the ten most admired men in
the world.
He is rated by almost everyone in the
Capitol as the nation's most effective Senator.
He has been overwhelmingly chosen
by a poll of fellow Senators as the Senator
st qualified to be President of the United
States.
l offer my hand and my heart to
Senator Henry Jackson of Washington,
for America and the world.
it's time
Senator Henry M. Jacksm introduces his wife, Heten','fo
former Israel Prttfie' tillhister Golda Meir, a trusted friend.
i he senator enjoys the same warm relationship with
current Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
I V
Florida will be Proud
of Scoop Jackson
as our President
Senator
. JACKSON
)MMITTEE
surer DEMOCRAT
Endorsed in the March 9th Primary by:
SAMUEL N. FRIEDLAND
MRS. SOL (GOIDIE) GOLDSTEIN
MAYOR MAURICE FERRE
V.'CE MAYOR ROSE GORDON
MAYOR JACK BLOCK
COUNCILMAN PHIL SAHL
STATE REP. PAUL STEINBERG
STATE SEN. SHERMAN WINN
WILLIAM SCHNITZER
ROSE RUBAN
MAX SERCHUK, PRESIDENT, NATIONAL COUNCIL OF SENIOR CITIZENS
JOSEPH D 'APICE, PRESIDENT, CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION
HARRY A. (HAPPYfLEVY
MAYOR HAROLD ROSEN
MAYOR STEVE CLARK
COUNCILMAN MILT LITTMAN
STATE SEN. GEORGE FIRESTONE
COUNCILMAN DR. SIMON WIKLER
ALFRED AND LILLY STONE
STATE REP. ELAINE BLOOM
GEORGE SIPKIN
ANNE ACKERMAN





Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 5, 1976
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
BILL WLIISTEIH, Director
GLORIA KATZ, Editor
HARmCT FERflt Coerfifor
2999 NW 33rd Avenue, Fort Lauderdale

Phone: 484-8200

New Afftev Begins -Horn* in PI init at ion
Iln response to popula-
-wand, the elementary after-
i 1 enrichment program will
Mfhe anothe- ten-wick session
opical Elementary School
. t 1 Jo children wer
1 in a recreation and
_>V.!t.- tliut comple-
mented their school activities,
a the r. w session will include
cts and activities.
n is offered on
Monday and or Thursday after-
ao n i i i), 3:15 to 5 p.m.
int 'rested parents
'v at JGC, 4S4-3200.
call
Wednesday ftites at the Movies
' March 10: "Hotel" with
d Taylor. Ka 1 Maiden and
! i.is.
nn hi stion of
nd intrigue in our
n world tilmed in New
i I ins.
ipens the d>o.s to the
rst suites, peeks through d>i
holes and takes the viewer
up the back stairs from sail
10 penthouse as it lays bare the
i ound-the-clocl excitemen*
March 17: "The \
with Dean Martin. E
Sommer and Sharon Tate.
Matt Helm goes to Denmark
ts a debonair commercial photo-
grapher who prefers the de-
lights of bachelor life to the de-
inands of wo'-k as an ICE agent.
When a billion dollars in gold
hijacked, Matt is assigned to
recover it. Along with the fun.
! suspense, there is the
ic splendor of Den-
Karate Class
For Teens
d karats class is open to
sted. The classes
: :t on Mondays at 7:15 p.m.
and ar given by A lev Hoffman.
-;-"> eharg jeans
F-shirW.
Yiddish
Lorna" To -ml ins teaches con-
i" 'nmtfonal Yiddish" classes on
Mondflvs from 10:.10 a.m. to
noon. The fee is $3 for ten ses-
sions:
Tournaments Anyone?
The JCC'of Fort Lauderdale will Sponsor its First
Annual Table Tennis Bumper Pool Air Hockey Tour-
naments. Trophies ififill be awarded to winners and fi-
nalists in each category. The categories are:
1. Boys and Girls singles and mixed doubles in
Table Tennis.
2. Boys and Girls singles in Bumper Pool.
3. Boys and Girls singles in Air Hockey.
Let's see if you can stand up to stiff competition.
Can you win that shiny trophy? Tournaments will be
held at the JCC in March Please register as soon as
possible, so that we can begin. Call Sandy at JCC,
4S4-8200.
Jean Scene Lounge1
DATES TO REMEMBER
Saturday, Mar. 6: Hustle N'ite. Free instruction and
demonstration by an Arthur Murray dance teacher.
Saturday, Mar. 20: Bump and Hustle Contest. Prizes to
the winners.
Especially for Children
Sunday, March 28: The
F4rt Lauderdale Symphony Or-
estra Qaartet
it
Sunday, April 11: Anne
Laven's Punnets in "Oo-Loong
ue Sea Dragon"
Che Misfess of Ceremo
saen-. with a Chinese Fan Dance
)43 escort, the seven toot-tall
\fng and Dancing Queen into
he audience to the iccompani-
;nt of Chinese music. All the
irarters are introduced and
Ijf). play begins.
T^he grandmother, Chai- Ting,
Iks the magic peach pic. Wolf-
ieart the robber steals the re-
Se and sells it to Oo-Loong the
ifa Dragon.
But they are outwitted by the
ily grandson, Wong Su, who
ilso helps to break the spell
>ver the Fairy Princess.
Halfway through the story
hildren are invited up to the
tage and asked to try to finish
he story. This is very' exciting
for children.
Sunday, May 23: Ruth
Forman's Pied Piper Players
The cost of the series is $5.
">:';<.
Teen Classes-Offered
Sand Painting. Designing
scenes and patterns with col-
ored sand. Can be used-aa plant-
ers. Mondav. Students pay for
materials only.
Tie-Dye and Fabric Paint-
ins. Tie-dye T-shirts and, using
acrylic paint, paint readymade
or original designs on shirts and
jeans. Monday. Students pay for
materials only.
Macrame. Make wall hang-
ings and plant holders. Monday.
Students pay for materials only.
Ceramics. Thursdays at
Plantation High School with ce-
ramic wheel. $9 for 9 sessions.
Theatre Group. Act in a
play before a live audience. In-
struction bv experienced drama
taeh*r. Day to be announced.
No fee.
Additional classes offered.
A minimum number is re-
quired before a class can open.
If vou are interested, please
register quid lv. so that we can
scheJule the class. Call Sandy
at JCC, 434-3200.
MIRIAM LASKER
Mimi Lasker
Joins Staff
Mrs. Miriam Lasker has join-
ed the staff of the Jewish Com-
munity Center as activities co-
ordinator. She works primarily
with senior citizens' classes,
holiday celebration*, special
events, Wednesday Nite Movies,
and many projects planned
especially for the retired cow-
muntty;
She also coordinates the ac-
tivities of- the children's divi-
sion1, working *reCtly with1 the
outreach programs in Planta-
tion and POmpano Beach*.
Mimi, as she is affectionately
known, comes to the JCC with
extensive experience in social
agency administration having
been director of the Delaware-
Raritan Girl Scout Council in
New Jersey.
She has been a valuable and
capable worker during" the ini-
tial weeks of JCC program and
has already made a substantial
contribution to its development.
Mimi lives with her husband.
Lester: in Oakland Estates. We
all wish her success.
Bridge
Bridge for Beginners, taught
by Aaron Burstein, formerly of
Brooklyn, began Tuesday,
March 2. Burstein has lived in
Florida for eight years and
has taught bridge for several
vears here in Fort Lauderdale.
Fee for the ten sessions, from
10 to 11:30 a.m., is $5.
JCC Gal Friday
Sandv Jackowitz is the JCC
"Gal Friday." We thought you
would like to see and meet
S;indy. who tak"s such diligent
care of our office work.
In addition to her reception-
ist duties, Sandy handles all
registrations, keens our flyers
nvntq^, do< and does everything to keep our
operation running gmo^tM \
Her pleasant tHeohon0 --"-
onlv hints at her wonderful,
warm personality.
Sandv and 'David Jackowitz
and their two children, Hillary
and Lawrence, live in Planta-
tion.
Three cheers to Sandy for all
her fine worfc.
Bea Rubin Statnick, certified instructor, will lead two
Around the World" folk dancing classes beginning
Tuesday, March 23. Beginners will meet from 2:45 to
4 p.m., intermediates from 1 to 2:15 p.m. All are wel-
come. Registration is required, however, so mail your
check far $7.50 (ten weeks) to the JCC.
THE VINTAGE TOUR TO ISRAEL
May 24-June 7
sroHsona sr
JEWISH FEDERATION OF
GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
TEL AVIV HAIFA GALILEE JERUSALEM
COST: $1,151 PER PERSON (SINGLE SUPPLEMENT St 10)
INCLUDES
Round-trip air fare
Assistance and transfers on arrival and djpature from
Tel Aviv Airport
Accommodations in five-star hotels, breakfast and dinner
daily
Service charges imposed by hotels
Sightseeing in air-conditioned coaches with English-speak-
ing driver and guide
Entrance fee and a drink at Club Amar in Tel Aviv and
Club Khan in Jerusalem
Admission to the sound-and-light show in Jerusalem
Tour escorts are Lester and Miriam Lasker.
To secure a reseixation, send a dep ;rit of $100 per per-
son to Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Full payment is due one month prior to departure.
Each person will be allowed one piece of luggage.
March Calendar
March
6 Teens
8 Senior Adults
9
10 Senior Adults
11 Senior Adults
15 Senior Adults
16
17 Senior Adults
18
20 Teens
22 Elementary
23 Senior Adults
Hustle Ni^ht. Instruction
Yiddish Class
Continue last week's activities
Bridge Class
Movie: "Hotel"
8 p.m.
10:30 a.m.
1-4 p.m.
10-11:30 a.m.
7:30 p.m.
College
Talk by the Kaplans on "Jews in the
South Pacific," Social Bancing 1-4 p.m.
Yiddish Class 1-4 p.m.
Purim P*i tv with comedian
George Stone 1-4 p.m.
Bridge 10-11:30 a.m.
Movie: "The Wrecking Crew" 7:30 p.m.
Sam Axelrod will tell you how to
make these years the bsst
Bump and Hustle Contest,
albums to winners
Plantation After-School Program
Spechrt Bicentennial Salute, Choral
Speaking, Readings and Music 1-4 p.m.
Intermediate Folk Dancing 1-2:15 p.m.
Beginning Folk Dancing 2:45-4 p.m.
Bridge Class 10-11:30 a.m,
College Student Mixer 8:30 p.m.
1-4 p.m.
8 p.m.
"!ne"
.e
ld.
V


Friday,-March 5, 1976
The Jewish Flortdian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
f / Women?s Division Pacesetters Fashion Show
Among the leaders &f the Women's Division of the Jew-
ish Federation ef Greater Ft. Lauderdale at recent Pace-
setters Fasth ion Show were (from left) Anita Perlman,
president of the Women's Division; Edith Levine, chair-
man of the Pacesetters Division; Terri Baer, Women's
Division general campaign chairman; and Rebecca
Hades, campaign cochairman. Over 85 peruons attended
the luncheon.
Maxine Hess, cochairman of the Pacesetters Division,
and Edith Levine, chairman, display a lithograph by
Italian artist Lazzaro Donati, which was the door prize
at the luncheon.
Charlotte Sherman modeled a handmade Christian Dior
wedding gown, one of over 50 fashions modeled at the
luncheon.
Community wide Celebration
Of Israel Independence Day
Sunday, April 25
Poster Contest
Dear Family:
It is time for our first annual Israel Independence Day poster
contest!!!
We hope you will encourn^e vour child to participate.
RULES
1. Parents mav suggest ideas only!!! Children must do their
own work. Open to all children.
2. The overall theme of the day will b I "Is-ael: 28 America:
200, Proclaim Liberty Throughout the Land."
3. The poster must be on at least 11" x 14" paper.
4. The child's name and fcddress must be on the back of the
poster.
5. Posters are to be turned in to school or mailed to the
Federation office between March 10 and IS. All posters must be
n by 9 a.m. March 15. .
6. Posters will be judged for creativity of ideas, eye appeal
and relevance to theme.
7. No posters will be returned as we will be using them as
posters in stores and shops.
8. Winning poster will be reproduced as the rea' official
announcement of "The Day."
Festivities on Independence Day will include a children s pa-
rade, a program of entertainment and Israeli food.
Members of the reservations committee pern and Ann Schneller and (standing,
who assisted at the luncheon were (seat- from left) Connie Abraham, Ruth Ported
ed, from left) Estelle Halpern, Ethel Hal- and Selma Streng. f
Also instrumental in the large turnout at
the luncheon were (seated, from left)
Gladys Daren, Lil Spilken, Mitchie Libros,
Tola Messing and (standing, from left)
Hazel Sharenow, Fay Henschel, Shirley
Rudolph and Gert Siegel.
BB Pompano Lodge 2941
Annual Dinner Dance
Pompano Lodge No. 2941 B<
nai B'rith has scheduled ix$l
third annual dinner dance for
Saturday, March 13, at 7:30
p.m. in the Venetian Room of
Pier 66. Cocktails will be served
at 6:30.
Lou Shor, comedian and after-
dinner speaker, will entertain.
Cafe Shalom
The grand opening of Cafe
Shalom, sponsored by the Sha-
lom Sociable Singles of the Jew-
ish Federation, was on Feb. 22.
All attending had a delightful
time dancing to the music of
Chet Savage. As always, a few
more gentlemen are urged to
join in the fun.
With the success of the Cafe
Shalom opening behind them,
the SSS hope to continue hav-
ing the dances more often. It
will be a place to drop in, see
old friends and meet new ones.
The new officers are making
plans for fun-type activities,
trips etc. The program commit-
tee will have a bulletin out soon
with coming events.
Shalom Sociables is open to
Jewish men and women 40 years
and over.
For further information con-
tact Sandy at 484-8200.
Anita Perlman (right) president of the Women's Divi-
sion of the Jewish Federation, presented an award to
Hannah Troy Meyer. The fashion show, a retrospec-
tive showing from the magnificent Hannah Troy collec-
tion, featured members of the Women's Division as mod'
els.

HH


^MMMMMHMMBMMM

Page 12
The Jewish FloridUm of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. ManML*"*?
Palm-Aire UJA-Federa tion Harry Levin Affair
On Sunday, Feb. 22, at the
Palm-Aire social Center the
Palm-Aire community honored
Harry Levin for his outstanding
humanitarian work and commu-
nity leadership.
The response was excellent
and contributions made in Lev-
in's honor topped last year's fig-
ures. The spirit generated at
the meeting not only assured a
successful completion of the
campaign but put the UJA goal
within reach.
Nat Gora and Al Levis, who
cochaired the planning and the
organization of this event, said
they wish to thank all of the
members of the planning com-
mittee for making this affair a
success.
THEY POINTED out that no-
thing was left to chance, the
publicity was well coordinated
and the coverage was extensive
and excellent.
Ted Sail, the Master of Cere-
monies, did an excellent job in
keeping the program of the
meeting within limits and at the
same time accomplished the de-
sired results. His stirrine ap-
peal on why we as Jews should
give to the United Jewish Ap-
peal was outstanding.
Allan E. Baer, president of
the Jewish Federation of Great-
er Fort Lauderdale, commended
Sail on his ability to put into
capsule form a message so ef-
fective that it brought the pro-
per response. Further thanks
should be given to Louis Miller,
t"*ic1 .cchwart7. Joseph Kran-
berg and Abe Hersh.
Leo Goodman, general cam-
paign chairman, presented a
scroll to Levin and in glowing
terms spoke about Harry and
Shirley Levin's contribution to
the community.
Goodman noted that Levin
had been a leader in the Utica,
N.Y., communitv, but did not
come here merely to retire. He
came here to continue his work
because the needs of the local
Jewish community are still with
us.
IN ACCEPTING the award,
Lvfin thanked those present for
their generous response and
stressed that "we are all faced
with the same problems and we
must pull together to be able
to meet successfully the current
problems."
Dr. Sidney Jennes Palm-Ai-e
overall chairman of the UJA-
Federation 1975 drive, said that
"The Harry Levin Affair was
only the kick-off for the 1976
campaign. Our original goal of
$">00,000, which was set b3ck in
November, 1975, has now been
revised upward to $250,000.
That goal is still obtainable if
we all assume our responsibility
and become an army of soli-
citors. We are convinced that
with intensive coverage, very
few Palm-Aireans will be over-
looked this year."
The committee received a
i.
%i umM
*:?*WM W m ^B
Al Levis (left) and Harry Levin
letter from Harry and Shirley
Levin's children too late to be
read at the affair. Because of
its sentiments, however, and its
emphasis on the Jewish family,
we take this opportunity to re-
print the letter.
February 22, 1976
Dear Mother and Dad,
United Jewish Appeal at Palm
Aire has chosen tonight to hon-
or Harry Levin. We hope they'll
forgive us if we choose to honor
Harry and Shirley Levin, fcr we
never separate the two.
It has been said that children
should be a constant source of
pride to their parents; however,
in our family it works both
ways. Tonight, as always, our
hearts are full. Although we
can't all be here you know
we really are together. For no
children could be prouder than
we.
Growing uo at home was
probablv as typical as in any
other home, yet we learned so
manv imnortant values. And, of
course, we hone we are walk-
ins in your foosteps and can
miVe you equally proud.
What el can we say? We
lo"e you. W-*'re bursting with
pride, and of course, we know
vou deserve this beautiful hon-
or.
Mav vou have everything you
wish for vourselves.
All our lo"e,
Stuart, Donna. Robert
Cindy, Andi. Jill,
Shari and Stephanie
Harry Levin (left) and Tel Sail

1 1 B '"^^H ^B / JU
* Hfr B
1 li HBV'< i
I
Marvin Orleans (left) and Harry Levin
Response to Planned Israel Bond Tour
Is ^Overwhelming J Says Parson

The response to the May 24-
Juoe 3 Florida Israel Bond Dele-
gation Tour has been over-
whelming, according to Milton
M. Parson, executive director,
South Florida Israel Bond Or-
ganization.
Parson announced that people
from Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach Counties have made res-
ervations to participate in the
fi'st Florida areawide fact-find-
ing mission to Israel.
"Since I led my last delega-
tion in 1970. I have felt it im-
portant for the leadership in our
communitv to meet with the
high-ranking government offi-
cials. militTv leaders and the
peorle," said Parson.
Th" co-onlet* nacVag", which
includes round-trip transporta-
A Gift to Temple Sholom:
Classical Music Library
On Friday, March 12, at 8
p.m. Mrs. Mildred Weinstein,
scloist in the temple choir, will
present a compl.te classical li-
brary of historic synagogue
music in memory of her hus-
band, Sydney.
The sets of out-of-print clas-
sics include works of Cantors
Sulzer, lewandowski, Wein-
traub and Naumburg and corn-
positions of A. W. Binder and
Bloch.
Rabbi Morris A. Skop and
Cantor Jacob J. Renzer will
gre the historic bac'g-ound
cf the music and compose!?.
M my of the omposi'iins
w re chanfd in synagogues in
Vienna, Odc.sa, Paris, and Ko-
nie^burg and h"e b--en sung
by ch. i's and cho-uses under
the auspics of the Hebrew
Union College and the Jewish
Theological Seminary of New
York SchDols cf Sacred Jewish
Music.
The Library of Jewish Mu-
sic will be housed in a separate
sjcti-on of the temple library.
I Leo Goodman (left), Harry Levin and Dr. Sidney Jennes
tion costs from New York to Is-
rael, hotels, meals, .ImkI costs
and all Israeli translation cm '
taur days is $995. Parson stated
that the entire cost can be paid
with State of Israel Bonds.
The tour members will stay
at the Tel Aviv Hilton, the Jeru-
salem Hilton and a special ac-
commodation at Kibbutz Ayelet
Hashacher in the Northern Ga-
lilee. The activities have been
rlanned to allow considerable
freedom and flexibility so the
participants can see "everyday
Israel" and visit with families
and friends.
Among scene of the experi-
ences will be meeting newly ar-
rived Russian immigrants, visit-
ing the oil ports of Ashdod and
Ashkclon, lunching at the Knes-
set and a session with univer-
sity students. Those interested
in making reservations should
call Parson at 531-6731.
Women's- League
Spring Fair
The Margate Chapter of the
Women's League for Israel will
hold a Spring bargain fair on
Sunday. March 7. from noon to
6 p.m. at th David Park Teen
Center in Margate.
Nw and nearly new clothing,
white elephant merchandise,
iwelry, household items, home-
baked cakes, plants, pictures
and frames, assorted fabrics,
coffeerand-cake bar.
For further information, call
974-7876.
i_.
Harry Levin (left) and Ted Sail
Joseph Kranberg (left) and Abe Hersh
Workmen's Circle
To Meet
The Thursday. March 1,
meeting of Branch 1046 of the
Workmen's Circle will be held
at the Fort Lauderdale Jewish
Federation Community Center
at 7:30 p.m. A string quintet
will present a program of cham-
ber music.
Albert Golden of the River-
side Chapels will present a
Workmen's Circle banner to
the branch.


'March 5, 1976
TheJewish Floridian of Greater Fort LauderJale
Page 13
alm-Aire Women's Division Luncheon
\Cnairmen of the Palm-Aire Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, with
Iguest speaker Rabbi Henry Sobel (center), were Shirley
Levin (left), chairman, and Dorothy Resnick, cochair-
hmn. Over 100 women attended the successful lunch-
\em on behalf of the Jewish Federation-United Jewish
\Appeal at the Country Club of Palm-Aire on Feb. 23.
>

lira Perlman, president, brought greetings on beh(Af
the Women's Division of the Jewish Federation. She
jessed the importance of the Palm-Aire Women's Di-
vision as an integral and important part of the total
'immunity.
American Savings Relocates
wo Broward County Offices
[American Savings and Loan
fsociation of Florida has mov-
two of its Broward County
IJces, Hallandale and Pom-
Beach, to new locations,
Brding to an announcement
Thomas R. Bomar, presi-
Hallandale office is in
f50,000 Want To
Lave Russia
Continued from Page 1
recent Soviet immigrant to
ael, Dr. Alexander Voronel,
med that official Soviet anti-
nitism has increased "sharp-
and alarmingly" since the
" Kippur War.
foronel, who was granted
Mission to emigrate to Israel
ear after a three-year wait,
of "growing pressure on
who apply to emigrate, in-
ug the use of enforced
ry conscription, arrest,
fl and prison sentences."
HRTY recent Soviet Jew-
immigrants to Israel attend-
the conference.
^mong them was Mery
|och. whose husband is serv-
a 10-year prison term for
ason. and Sylva Zalmanson,
[ose husband, Eduard Kuznet-
is serving IS years on the
. charge.
the front plaza of the new
American Savings Building at
2500 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
The Pompano Beach office is at
2551 E. Atlantic Blvd., adjacent
to the Publix supermarket.
Each office has been doubled
in size to provide improved
and additional facilities and
services for its customers. A
major new service in both fa-
cilities is safe-deposit boxes,
and in the Pompano Beach of-
fice, a payment station for elec-
tric bills.
Manager of the Hallandale
office is Emanual Grossman, an
assistant vice president of
American Savings. Grossman
joined American Savings in
March, 1975, and served as
manager of the Deerfield
Beach office before moving to
Hallandale.
Mrs. Jane Williams was ap-
pointed manager of the Pom-
pano Beach office when it
opened in December, 1975. Mrs.
Williams has been associated
with American Savings since
1972 land has been assistant
manager of the Deerfield Beach
and Fort Lauderdale offices.
American Savings was found-
ed in 1950 by Shepard Broad,
who is chairman emeritus.
Morris N. Broad is chairman
of the board.
American Savings ranks
107th of 5,000 savings and loan
association in the United States.
Members of the committee who assisted in planning
the luncheon were (from left) Leona Fribush, Ruth
Kurtz, Ida Stein, and Louise Freed. Also on the lunch-
eon committee was Lorraine Fine. Condo chairmen are
Lucille Kesner, Corrine LeVine, Rose Podolsky, Ethel
Golde, Helen Harmelin, Ruth Portes, Freida Goldstein,
Millie Slosberg and Joan Nathan.
Hadassah
Florida Region annual con-
ference is scheduled for April
26-28 at the Deauville Hotel,
Miami Beach.
tt Herzl Group met on Feb. 11,
and 12 new members were spon-
sored, bringing membership to-
tal to 212.
A luncheon, including a fash-
ion show by Elsie Gorin, is
planned for April 8 at the Holi-
day Inn West on U.S. 441, north
of Commercial Blvd.
ir tr 6
liana Group meets on the
third Thursday of each month
at the Lauderdale Lakes City
Hall at 12:30 p.m.
The next meeting, on March
18, will be a Bicentennial pro-
gram.
A- ft iV
The Gilah Group in Inverrary
will hold their next regular
meeting on Monday, March 15,
at 12:30 at the Manors of In-
verrary.
Mrs. Elaine Ellish, national
expansion and development
chairman for Hadassah, will
sneak on "Hadassah: Yesterday,
Today and Tomorrow."
Mrs. Ellish was Hadassah
president for the Lower New
York iState Region for three
years and represented Hadas-
sah at the 23rd Zionist congress
in Israel.
Her mother, Mrs. Helen
Hecht, is president of the Gilah
Group.
Rabbi Sobel addressed the women at the luncheon. He
is rabbi of the Jewish congregation in Sao Paulo, Brazil,
the largest in the world.
in..
United Way Welcomes New Counseling Agency
United Way of Broward Coun-
ty has put out the welcome mat
for a new agency.
Consumer Credit Counseling
Service of South Florida offi-
cially opened its Broward Coun-
ty office in the United Way
Building, 1300 S. Andrews Ave.,
Fort Lauderdale on March 3.
CCCS is a free counseling
service for people in debt and
for those who want to keep their
credit slate clean. In addition
to providing advice on budget-
ing and family money manage-
ment CCCS acts as a middleman
between debtor and creditor.
AUTO INSURANCE
1Q0 HIGH
CALL
PRUDENTIAL AGENT
LEE R0SENBAUM
972-3986
NURSING SERVICE
HOME HEALTH CARE
Competent, Considerate car*
for the elderly, sick, convales-
cent patient. Pleasant, capable
nursing aides screened, bond-
ed, insured. Home kept tidy-
shopping, cooking. Patients
kept clean, comfortable. Flex-
ibel hours. Moderate rates.
HOME CARE FOR HEALTH
920-4555
and 925-2444
Frances Weiser, Director
FLORIDA
SCHOOL OF
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COMMENCING CLASSES -
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Call today for information
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944-3*


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 5, 1976
LEO MINDLIN


S
In the End, Stone Proposal May be Right
Continued from Page 4
S .').), of Arab extraction, Stone
considers a particularly vocal
opponent.
. Still, and this is why Stone is
not pessimistic, he believes the
tide can be turned by skill even
if the power of numbers and
public opinion at this moment
are missing.
"PUBLIC OPINION," reasons
Stone, "is a two-edged sword."
Once, it was sharply pro-Israel.
Now; it is not so much ant i-Is-
rael as it is weary of the on-
going Middle East conflict and
looking to Israel as an old ally
to "do something" about what
k has latched onto as the "in-
humane" refugee condition.
What Americans do not be-
lieve is the precai iouswusu of
the Israeli condition today, and
so the natural American sym
patiry for the underdog, which
has been irumolirhically for Is-
rael sine- 1948.'began moving
t )waid the Arabs after the Tom
Kippur War and is now de-
manding action from the Is-
raelis for similar humanitarian
reason*.
Sen. Stone repeat* himself: It
does no good ro point to the ftp
accuracier, in history leading to
the absurd parallel many Amer-
icans are drawing. "If we want
to win. we must deal with Amer-
ican public opinion as it is cur-
community

SUNDAY, MARCH 7
UJA Meeting. Margate2 p.m.
UJA Man of the Year Dinner, honoring Samuel M. Soref.
Pier 666:30 p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH 8
Adult Art Class, JCC10 a.m.
Telethon
MONDAY, MARCH 8
Adult Gourmet Cooking Class, JCC1 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Men's Club Board Meeting8 p.m.
Women's ORT Inverrary Chapter General Meeting
TUESDAY, MARCH 9
Senior Citizens Meeting, JCC1-4 p.m.
Tween Lounge and Game Room (grades 7-8), JCC7:30 p.m.
Temple Shalom Board Meeting8 p.m.
Alpha Omega Dental Fraternity
Telethon
Temple Beth Israel Junior and Senior USY Basketball8 p.m.
Beth Israel Adult Education
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10
Telethon
Brandeis National Women's Life Membership Luncheon 11
a.m. .,
Woodlands ORT Regular Meeting1 p.m.
UJA Parlour Meeting, Atlantis4 p.m.
i Temple Emanu-Ei Sisterhood Card Party8 p.m.
Senior Citizens Movie Nite, JCC7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, MARCH 11
Telethon
Senior Citizens Meeting. JCC1-4 p.m.
Teen Israeli Folk Dancing Group, JCC7:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Junior and Senior USY Basketball8 p.m.
SATURDAY, MARCH 13
Plantation Jewish Center Art Event7 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Young Couples Club8 p.m.
SUNDAY, MARCH 14
Temple Emanu-El and Temple Beth Israel Purim
Carnivals
Brandeis Dutch Supper, Federation Building
Inverrarv Fund-Raising Cocktail Party4 p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH IS
Federation Teacher Enricliment Program10 a.m.
Adult Art Class, JCC10 a.m.
Hadassah Aviva Group12:30 p.m.
Adult Gourmet Cooking Class, JCC1 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood General Meeting8 p.m.
TUESDAY, MARCH 16 (FURTM)
Temple Shalom General Sisterhood Meeting11:30 a.m.
Hadassah L'Chayim Group12:30 p.m.
Lauderdale Oaks Federation Women's Division Fund-Raiser
Senior Citizens Meeting, JCC1-4 p.m.
Tween Lounge and Game Room (grades 7-8), JCC7:30 p.m.
Federation Board of Directors Meeting7:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Junior and Senior USY Basketball8 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17
Federation Women's Division Hawaiian Gardens Fund-Raiser
Women's Division Pompano Beach Fund-Raiser Luncheon
National Council of Jewish Women General Meeting10 a.m.
Hadassah Shalom Group12:30 p.m.
Senior Citizens Movie Nite, JCC7:30 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El Men's Club Meeting8 p.m.
THURSDAY, MARCH 18
Brandeis National Women's New Books For Old
B'nai B'rith Women Tamarac Chapter No. 1479 Regular Meeting
Federation Women's Division Cypress Chase Fund-Riser
Hadassah liana Group12:30 p.m.
Hadassah Tamar Group12:30 p.m.
Hadassah Bat Yam Group12:30 p.m.
Senior Citizens Meeting, JCC1-4 p.m.
Teen Israeli Folk Dancing Group JCC7:30 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El Executive Board Meeting8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Youth Committee8 o.m.
Temple Beth Israel Junior and Senior USY Basketball8 p.m.
FRIDAY, MARCH 19
Brandeis National Women's New Books For Old
rently constituted."
SEN. STONE does more than
theorize. To counter the pre-
sence of so many Arabs on
Capitol Hill, he has taken every
opportunity to meet them, dine
with them, talk with them that
he possibly can.
They are surprised, "but they
warm op despite themselves" to
this kind of treatment. In short,
to be an unrelenting antagonist,
and you find unrelenting anta-
gonism in return.
When Stone lunched with
Ambassador Said Ahmed Gho-
bash, of the United Arab Emir-
ates, m the Senate diningroom
at Ghobash's invitation to con-
gratulate him on his election
as Senator from Florida, Gho-,
bash couldn't wait to order the
world-famed diningroom's de-
lectable navy bean soup.
"THAT IS something neither
you nor I can eat," Stone re-
marked casually, meaning that
the soup includes bits of perk,
whieh is prohibited to Jews and-
Moslems alike.
Ghobastr was -stunned. He
didn't know Stone was Jewish
''and I don't know whether
or not he woukf have invited
me to lunch if he did know"
but the meal and their discus-
sion "proved delightful" after
Ghobastr got over the initial
shock:
Also a "delight" to Stone is
Nahed Ghorbal, the daughter of
the Egyptian Ambassador here.
"She reminds me of my own
daughter, Nancy. It is the Sem-
itic warmth we share, and it
can be a strong tie if only we
try."
STONE DOES not elaborate
on what meetings he may have
had with Ashraf Ghorbal, whose
past, including an allegedly an-
ti-Semitic stunt in Argentina, is
legion. One can only speculate
on what this and other of his!
personal contacts with Arabs
has led to other than "delight."
The person-to-person polit-!
icking with Arabs on Capitol
Hill apart. Sen. Stone talks oi
his meetings with Israel's Prime
Minister Rabin, Foreign Minis-
ter Allon, Defense Minister'
Peres, Gen. Aharon Yariv.
The issue is a pointed one:
"A solution to the Middle East
dilemma will not come from the
Israelis."
THAT IS a stunning state-
meat "The Israelis could have
dealt with the refugee issue
from 1967 onward, and essen-
tially on far more favorable
terms than now. They could
have spiked the Palestinian
movement in the making. They
didn't, and that is when things
were going Well for them, and
they were sitting on top of the
world."
New, in Stone's view, the Is-
raelis are beleaguered by Kis-
singer-Ford diplomacy, detente,
and mainly that old American
public opinion he keeps coming
back to.
"It must come from us," he
says,. "We've get te move them
toward some astonishing act."
SIMPLY, I ask, "What?"
Americans, he says, are Irri-
tated by Israeli military needs.
They respond to the propagan-
da that the Yom Kippur War
depleted our defenses. They
Planning A Trip?
COUNCIL'S NEW AND
EXCITING TRAVEL
PROGRAMS FOR 1976
EUROPE, ISRAEt CRUISES
NATIONAL COUNCIL
Of JFWISH WOMEN
Cfft
ULUAN ZALKIN-73S-S7S5
keep wondering why we should
give tht-m more and more.
"I have talked to (Defense
Minister) Shimon Peres about
Israel's offering an arms limi-
tation proposal for the Middle
East. If the Arabs reject it,
then Israel's military needs
would at least be clearer to our
public opinion."
STONE insists Peres was in
te rested and promised to get
back to him.
"Did he?" I ask.
"No," he admits.
"And what i6 the -astonish-
ing act we must come up with
in Israel's behalf?"
Sen. Stone is silent. If hi
has no answer at this time, the
suggestion is astonishing in it-
self a turnabout of the dias-
pora-Israel relationship which
has from the beginning forbid-
den diaspora political involve-
ment In Israeli government po-
licy affairs.
"PERHAPS YOU can co-
up with it." he observes quiet-
ly, "anybody." meaning that ha
hasn't yet himself. He speaks
not to joke, nor even to be des-
perate despair 4s not a part
of Ms emotional political con-
dition. He speaks from the
heartfelt need- ro do more than
talk; he speaks from the need
to implement even if it is not
yet quite clear what the sub-
stance of the implementation
will be.
"That's where it must come
from TtO'Vi" the Senator insists
again because time, he suggests
ominously, is growing short.
Peres' failure to get back to
him argues for the case that the
Senator may be right.
-'
For Boys & Okie 6-16
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SIGN UP NOW
9
The President and the
Board of Governors of
HEBREW UNION COLLEGE-
JEWISH INSTITUTE
OF RELIGION
Dr. Alfred uottsckolk Invite you to share in the honor te
PrasMaarf, HK-M fellow South Neridiens
and nafionat leaders who Witt receive the coveted
DISTINGUISHED JEWISH SERVICE AWARDS
for their dedication to Judaism, their community
and cent rotations, at a special
CENTENNIAL CONVOCATION
marking the 100th anniversary of the academic
and spiritual center of Reform Judaism
Judge and Mrs. Morton t. Abram Mr. A Mrs. Walter Deutsch
- Harry Denner Alan 6. Kassler Burton M. Joseph trvmo 5.
Lebow Max OrovHz Maxwell M. Raab Arnold f. Rosen -
Set Schreiber Mr. A Mrs. Kenneth Schwartz Harry B. Smith
SUNDAY, MARCH 7, AT 2 P.M. at
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
CHASE AVENUE AT 41 STREET, MIAMI BEACH
followed by a
CONVOCATION DINNER
of 640 p.m.
K0NOVER HOTEL, MIAMI REACH
mi honor of the award ees and
His Excellency
CHAIM HERZOG
ISRAEL'S AMBASSADOR TO THE
UNITED NATIONS
for information and tickets, call
576-6860
Aisassadar
Cheim Manet
*M


today, March 5, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Landerdale
Page 15
T""
Wp
^gbbutfcgl ^Jage
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz Kaebi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
JEWISH TRADIHONS IN AMRKA
Burial Societies
In his simple yet eloquent
statement of the Jewish faith.
Simon the Just (ca. 300 or 200
B.C.E.) is quoted as saying,
"Upon three things the wrld
(the social order) i# based: Up-
on the Torah, upon Divine serv-
ice and upon the practice of
charitv" (Sayings of the Fa-
thers. I. 2).
"Charity," or loving-kindness,
came to be interpreted aet "pro-
vision for the poor. Ae sick, the
dying and the -dead."*
Thus many of the burial so-
cieties which were organized in
Europe in the spirit of this fa-
mous quotation called them-
selves "The Brotherhood of
Loving-Kindness."
IN THE earlier centuries,
when so many of the European
Jewish communities were .small,
the community itself, acting as
him to be given Jewish burial
in the congregation's cemetery
at Chatham Square.
HUNDREDS of burial so-
cieties came to be organized in
the United States. In the early
years, the members themselves
fulfilled their societies' pur-
poses, to "attend our brethren
in their last moments, and .
perform the rites end cere-
monies respecting the -dead."
About the end of the 19th
century, with the development
of Jewish undertakers and fun-
eral parlors, these services be-
came professionalized. The so-
cieties became the forerunners
of the Jewish relief agencies of
today.
Care of cemeteries, "to keep
the ground dean aad in proper
order," was one of the purposes
of the societies. In July, 1789,
a body, provided for all the reli- when Congregation Shearith Is-
gious and social seeds, welfare,
care of the sick and burial.
This was the caae in Colonial
America when the 23 Jewish
refugees from Brazil landed at
New Amsterdam in September,
1654. to establish Jewish som-
munity life in what was to be-
come .a national community of
nearly six million Jews, the
largest in the world.
But as in the Old World, the
growing complexity of Jewish
community life subsequently
led to a desire for "a more per-
f"ct soiritual and social tech-
niaue" for th** care of the sick,
the dying and attendant mat-
ters.
In 1735. there was organized
in New York the "Hebra Ge-
miluth Hasadim" (Society for
the Dispensing of Acts of Kind-
n-ss). Its purposes were to give
genera] relief in the form of
money, fuel or medical assist-
ance, and more especially to
visit and sit up with the sick,
superintend funerals, and at-
It-md and if necssarv aid the
bereaved in the Shivah. the first
seven days of mourning. ,
IN RECOGNITION of tfce -per-
sonal service given by the mem-
Ir- is of the Hebra, Congregation
Shearith 4srae4- gave -the society
permission to set up ite awn
Icharity box both intthe syna-
Igogue building.and at the ceme-
Iteryjin order to supplement its
[income received fnm initiation
|fees, membership dues, -taxes
|and fines.**
The Hebra oorved .the -Mew
fork community until 1796.
In 1802 fthelUtaaifltpboejvas
faken by the YHobra ttasod %-
rAmet" (Kindocssuaod Truth .So-
ciety) with the Reverend Ger-
shom Mendes Seixas of Congre-
gation Shearith Israel as its first
president.
The story is told that the im-
mediate stimulus for its organ-
ation came early in 1802, when
Ephraim Hart and Naphtali
Philips saw a funeral pr/yyfff*""
joing toward potter's field. .
On learning that the one to
buried there was a Jewish
trang=r who had died, they
the proceedings stopped,
immediately arranged for
rael's Chatham Square Cemetery
was in danger of destruction
through sinking of its soil, the
Hebra advanced 30 pounds to
help meet the threat.
Hebwa Hased Va-Amet issued
a number of publications. In
1827 it published the ''Compen-
dium of the Order of the Burial
Service." This contained the
general rules for the prepara-
tion rf the dead for burial, laws
and customs for mourning, as
well as the service at interment.
A 135 -PAGE book, "Mekor
Haim, the Mourner's Hand-
book," published in 1959, gave
the prayers- for the dying, the
mourner's grace, afternoon and
avening services in the house
of mourning, selected Psalms
and Bible readings, a chapter
on immortality in Jewish life,
jtni the regulations, customs,
.*nd -observances incumbent on
-.tnourners.
An indication of on society's
services to the New York com-
jnunity is provided in a -report
of '^Charity A*ndath Aehim
Chessed Shel Emeth." This so-
eietv in the five -years -from
<--*390 to '1894, .provided free
rburtal for*826 Jews. Later burial
figures shown were 1895255,
1896 303. 1897 395. 1898
435. a total of 2,216 free -burials
from 1890 to 1898. Jn the same
period there were also 2,484
burials for which contributions
were made.
-!fhm the brotherhoods-brought
into being by the Jews of Amer-
ica followed the theme of care
rfor .one's fellow .man as an act
of love in .the spirit of the in-
junction given in Levitteus 19:
bow as thyself."
Question
Box
Food for Thought
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why is It cus-
tomary to masquerade on Pu-
rim?
Answer: Traditionalists of-
fer a variety of reasons for this
practice. Some claim that this is
done because Jews who were
basically religious inwardly
seemed to appear like Persian
idolaters outwardly. In front of
their Persian neighbors, espe-
cially at the King's feast, they
seemed to masquerade as fel-
low Persians.
Likewise, the Almighty dis-
guised his role as the savior
inwardly so that the events of
Purim seem to look like an
ordinary develooment in the af-
fairs of men white the Almighty
was directing the sequence from
a hidden vantage point.
This is one of the reasons
why the name of God does not
appear in the Megillah. In a
similar vein some commentaries
derive this practice from a
verse in the Bible (Deuteron-
omy, Chanter 31) where the Al-
mighty threatens "I will hide
my face."
TO COMMEMORATE the
events, which at first seemed
as if the Almighty was conceal-
ing his presence behind the
stage of history, Jews hide their
faces behind masks on Purim.
A third explanation for this
practice relates it to the original
case of hatred between a Jew
and his brother. Jacob seemed
to have incurred the wrath of
his brother Esau by disguising
himself in order to receive the
blessing of bis father who had
intended to give it to Esau.
Bv masqoemding. Jews in-
dicate that Jacob's masouerade
was not a case of winning his
father's btessiro? bv false nrc-
t*ns';; ro*hr. tle blessing be-
lng'*d rightf"ll" to him and
thus his o- was iustified.
'J&WS roasouerade in ord9C
to show that sometimes, in the
cou"s* of events, masauerading
is f"Hv lust'fted in ord^r to ac-
<""* something which is right-
fully ours. \
RABBI DANIEL J. FINGERtR
Beth Moshe Congregation
One of the most compelling
themes of Judaism is its goal of
bringing holiness into our every-
day lives. The Torah or a ''mez-
nr/ah" or "tefHlin" ar of course
holy-, but Jewish tradition teach-
es that it is man's .task to bring
holiness to everything about
him.
In the Torah we are taught
that a man's labor, bis honor.
the love between himself and
his wife and between himself
and his fellow man are all holy.
Even inanimate things like food
or wine or oven clothing must
be treated as. holy gifts from
God.
So man's acts of life are, in
Judaism, preceded by a bene-
diction. This hiidone to empha-
size our desire to extend sanc-
titv to all w do.
THE RABBIS knew that holi-
ness is a concept that is not
easilv understood. It is simple
enough to think of priests or
prophets as being holy. But
which of us considers himself
or the world around him as hav-
ing holiness?
For this reason our sages
prescribe a daHy routine which
points up the holiness that is
on earth. Cleanliness, eating,
working, achiaving, loving
all of these seemingly secular
or ordinary things the rabbis
and their rituals made into holy
things, objects of wonder, ap-
preciation and gratitude.
In attributing holiness to the
things about us, we ourselve's
become more holy, less ordin-
ary, l^ss commonplace.
SINCE POOD Plays such an
imoortant role in the life of
each human being, it is not
strange that the entire -process
of finding, choosing, preparing
and ratine food should b sur-
rounded by special discipures,
procedures and benedictions.
Those who do not tnihr un-
derstand the purpose of Jewish
customs lik* to think that the
rh -'tarv laws (kashruth) wn-e
primarilv sanitary and health
codo<=. Thtv arsue that, in view
of government supervision ove
the quality of food and the sci-
ence of nutrition, special re-
strictions on dietary practices
have become unnecessary.
In their reasoning, however,
they miss the point. God com-
municated more than laws and
practices of nutrition and health
when he declared, in Leviticu-
11:44-45: "For I am the Lord
your God: Ye Tghall therefore
sanctify yours .-lves, and ye shall
be holy: for I am-holy: neither
shall you defile yourselves with
any manner of creeping things.
etc."
The Torah was not concerned
with fcealth or with diet when
it directed (B.-utappnomy 15:21)
"Ye shall not et of.'anything
that dieth of, itself: -thou shalt
.give it uiUA. the^ptflpger tlur
is in your gates, that he may
eat it; or thou mavest sell i
unto an alien: for thou art ar
holv people unto the Lord fflj
God. Thou shalt not seethe a
kid in his mother's milk."
It had in mind rather, thar
a human being should be sensi
tive enough to refuse to be so
h-ntiil as to cook an animal .in

If
the milk of its mother.
IN DEVELOPING the dis-
dolines of restraint and care in
so etementary an act as eating,
a Jew trains himself in the ar-
of becoiiiing a more sensitive
human being. The laws of kash-
rush teach that all life is sacred.
M.n. as the crown of crea-
tion, has special responsibilities
to build his life on a higher
phm than that of God's lesser
creatures. Before man can hope
to control his environment, he
must first learn to control him-
self. Kashruth is one of the
maior wavs in which the Jew
trains himself in self-d'scinline
Its nurnoses and implications
go far beyond the single act of
ptinB. The Torah accompanies
its dietary demands with one
admonition: "Ye shall be holv."
Holiness is not something
reserved for Heaven or for a
f"w elite h'.tman beings. It is no
a sfte of bving. It is a way of
Unking at the world.
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION w
Pekude
lOUf
Service*
fO*T lAUOCRPAtt
rAMARAC JKW8X CfNTI*. >
N.W. 57th t. (ConaacvaWvpt.
8ETH ISRAEL /Templet 710P W
Ooklary! Rark SI*!. Ja>bl PhlfU
A. Labowlta Ca/itor Miur-ci N
rthen shalt love thy neigh- ^manu-el (Temoiei s?s w oak-
Und Park Blvd. Reform. Cant**
J#*#fw^' MffffiiVfit.
5UftGRAPHY
Marcus, Jacob Rader. "Com-
munal Sick-Care in the German
Ghetto." Cincinnati, 1947.
**de Sola Pool. David and
> Itemar. An Old Faith in the New
World. Kaw York, J0S5.
VOUNO ISRaVLL f *OLi *WOOr.
'Orthodox! 3891 Stirling Hd.
PIANTATION
Plantation. Rabbi Arthur J. Abrama
p, I4av n m.
PI ANTATION JEWISH CONGO*
GATION. "0 South Nob Hill RgawJ
OMPANO MAO
aHOLQM ("fconaolai. tu II t*
Cpneertatlv*. Rabbi ManMa A
Ban'or '* J. Raaiw
bar
CtmtMMWG TIME
3 2 ADAR Ai05
MAROATt
rlROATI gWI*H eMTHt 'Cor
ur,.lV<|l#1 NW J M
BTW IUUL
Margate Blvrt
CJaaM-lea Perlman.
COAIORJiOATION M
/4CIUMtlva). 7640
ftlAAaalc Cantor CA*
CCRAL 8PRINOS HEBREW CON
ORBOATrON. Raform. 8721 N.W
100th Ava Rabbi Max Waits. 44
The cloud covers the completed tabernacle as the
Israelites stand in the distance.
"Then the cloud levered the tent o/ meeting,
and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle"
(Exnd. 40:34).
PEKUDE "These are tbe accounts of the Taber-
nacle, even -the Tabernacle of -the testimony, as they
were rendered according to the commandment of
Moses, through the service of the Levites, by the hand'1 I
of Ithamar/, the son of Aaron tbe priest" (Exodus
38.1). "AlMhe goWthat was used-for-the. work was
twenty .and nine talents, aad seven hundred and thirty
shekels, after the shekel of the sanctuary. And the sil-
ver of theoi that Mere numbered of the congregation
was a hundred talents, and a thousand seven hundred-
and dbree-score and fifteen shekels" (Exodus 38.24^.
25). "And of the blue, and of purple, and scarlet, they
made plaited garments, for ministering in the holy
place' (Exodus 39.1).
With the conclusion of the Tabernacle, Moses
I blessed the children of Israel.
On the first day of the first month in the second
year since the departure of Jhe children of Israel from
I figypt the Tabernacle ivas set up. A cloud covered it
And the glory of God filled the Tabernacle. When the
s cloud xose, the children of Israel continued on their
; journey through the desert toward the Promised Land.
'aiiiiiiiiinianiHi ^mmmmmmmmmmmmm^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmammtmmrmmmmmmmmmm


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, March 5, 1976
I
:
.
<
i
t
i
I
I
Allow Jews Vitalized Religion
BRUSSELS (JTA) Rab-
bi Alexander M. Schindler,
chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, called
here for a new international
drive to permit the free emigra-
tion of Soviet Jews and, at the
same time, urged the Soviet
Union to allow the revival and
revitalization of religious and
cultural life for those Jews who
remain in the USSR.
He said the latter could not
be done unless the Soviet au-
thorities permitted Western
Jewish scholars and teachers to
come to the USSR to help create
centers for the training of
rabbis, educatan and teachers
to assure the survival of Soviet
Jewry.
SCHINDLER, who is presi-
dent of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations and a
leader of Reform Judaism in
the United States, made his ap-
peal before 1,000 Jewish and
non-Jewish leaders from 30
countries attending the Second
World Conference on Soviet
Jewry at the Salle des Congres
here.
"We must widen our demand
beyond emigration, insisting on
"the inalienable right of Russian
Jews to live as Jews, as a dis-
tinctive religious, cultural na-
tional entity," Schindler de-
clared.
"Whatever our success in the
fight for Soviet aliya, millions
of our fellow Jews would live
on in the Soviet Union. What
meaning has their physical sur-
vival if they do not survive as
Jews?"
Schindler specifically called
for the creation by-Soviet au-
thorities of a new, modern rab-
bincial seminary, "not the pres-
ent charade of a Soviet-style
geriatrics center but an acad-
emy rich with the experts of
our faith."
s:
a
vs
Si
si
Tt
W
Have your income tax
done by a friend instead of
astran
This year, there's no need to turn over
your personal income tax information
to someone who doesn't know you, or
sees you perhaps once a year.
If you're a customer of
American Savings, you can come to
us for tax help. We're the people who
know you and are concerned with
your finances every day of the year.
And if you don't have an account
with us already, you can take advantage
of this new service just by opening one.
What we've done at American
Savings is start a whole new consumer
service subsidiary, the Can*Do
Consumers Corporation, so that we
can take a more personal interest in
you, with services such as income
tax preparation.
Our specially-trained staff will
handle every detail of your taxes in
complete confidence. And our fees are
comparable with other income tax
preparation firms.
n
This service will be available
until April 9 at all of our 11 offices.
Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday
through Friday. In addition, some
offices will be open evenings until 7:30.
If you're a customer of
American Savings, simply call for an
appointment. Phone 673-9054 in Dade,
764-5934 in Broward.
If you don't have an account
with us, just stop in at any of our 11
convenient locations to open one.
* Barter
FJ
FRICAN SAVINGS
u Corner of Lincoto and Washington (Main Office): Comer of Lmcoln ai*i Alton Roach; Comer of 71m Street and Coins
5581 Waal Oakland Park Boulevard at the Main Entrance to btverrary / Dtt^MttrnkiMauMt^MBiMtmuO^n^mt^^
" 100 S. Stale Road 7 (Comer of HoBywood Boulevard and 440 / town. Beach: 2551 Ea Atlantic Bird.
W 3316 N.E. 34th Street ootbaGaK Ocean Mie / to Dade phone $73-9054, in Broward phone 764-5934.
Caa*D Consumers Cotpoobooiaa whoDy-oamsd
ownad aafcaidiary of Aaoericaa Savings
fHariaa. /Var Sarfcaja Insured to $40,*
00


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