The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00050

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
^Jewish Florid tin
OF GREATER FORT LAWJRERRALE
Volume 5 Number 3
Friday, February 6, 1976
Price 25 cents
Palm Aire UJA Drive Is Largest Ever
Resnikof f Named Chairman
Of Margate's UJA Drive
Israel Resnikoff, Jewish com-
munity leader and president of
the Margate Jewish Center, has
accepted the general chairman-
ship of the United Jewish Ap-
peal drive for 1976 for the
greater Margate area.
In accepting the chairman-
ship, Resnikoff pointed out the
urgency of this year's cam-
paign, noting that "the survival
of the Jews is at stake" and
complimenting an audience of
40 local Jewish leaders and
workers at the Jan. 29 meeting
who had pledged their coopera-
tion and support.
Resnikoff said, "It's no mere
acckicnt that the United Na-
tions recently nassed a resolu-
tion equating Zionism with ra-
cis"," and suggested that "it
means an attempt to slowly de-
stroy the State of Israel and
Jewish life in general."
Resnikoff has asked the en-
tire Jewish community to step
forward and b? counted. "We
need your help." he says. "Ev-
ery Jew in the greater Margate
area must be sjlicited and we
must have an a--my of workers
to ever pledge cards and also
Dint ni.nv new residents." To
vol :.; -r, call the local chair-
in your own complex or
call Resnikoff at 974-0511.
Resnikoff also requested that
i h nts and th -ir boards
the Unit :d (wish Appeal
in and speak at their
and present the full
facts of t'le appeal. "It is hu-
manitarian," he says, "it is the
decent step to take to allow in-
formed men and women to
present a program at your next
function for the purpose of rais-
ing the needed dollars for the
State of Israel. Some of the com-
plexes have graciously accept-
ed us," Resnikoff went on. "and
we ask that you give this mat-
ter your utmost and speediest
consideration. To do less means
that we are helping the Arab
ciuse. Please consider our plea
for the Jews of the State of Is-
rael."
Resnikoff also reminds the
community to attend report
meetings at the Margate Jew-
ish Center on Tuesday morn-
ings at 10.
I.....ir,;'M'l,!!l'li CM I'll:.
Community Drive Leaders
TEDDY SALL
DR. SIDNEY JENNES
AL LEVIS
Gora Announces Plans for The
Palm Aire-UJA Feb. 22 Party
ISRAEL RESNIKOFF
Capacity Crowd Expected At
Pacesetters Fashion Show
Nat Gora, chairman of the
Harry Levin Affair, has an-
nounced that a 1976 Ford Gra-
nada will be the door prize. He
further stated that "everybody
that attends this affair will be
eligible to participate for this
prize." He made it clear that
"the campaign committee is not
paying for the car: it is being
contributed to the committee
by friends of Harry Levin."
The committee has develop-
ed elaborate plans for the par-
ty, including an open bar with
hot and cold hors d'oeuvres.
The entire community will be
invited.
Dr. Sidney Jennes, chairman
of the Community Drive, who
has reviewed the plans of the
Palm Aire-UJA 1976 Drive, says
he is "elated over the extent
of participation and the amount
cf coverage. Never before has
Palm Aire been organized in
this fashion. It is quite appar-
NAT GORA
ent that many people are con-
cerned not only with the plight
of Israel, but with their own
personal stake in this matter."
Jennes is "very confident.
based on the early response of
pledges, that the original goal
of $200,000 set for our area will
be surpassed."
In giving his report to the
special committee, Jennes
stressed that "people are be-
ginning to realize that our own
security is meshed with the
State of Israel's and that ac-
tually giving through the Unit-
ed Jewish Appeal Federation
Drive is an added insurance
policy for living."
Leo Goodman, chairman of
the Greater Fort Lauderdale
UJA-Federation Drive, will pre-
sent an award to Harry Levin
"for his outstanding philan-
thropic and humanitarian work
for Jewish and non Jewish
causes."
Allan E. Baer, president of
the Jewish Federation of Great-
er Fort Lauderdale, will bring
greetings from the Federation
Board.
Resi.vations for the Women's
Di.isbn Pacesittjrs (minimum
conti ib ition $15 0, payable
through 1976) Fashion Show
on Wednesday. Feb. 11, at the
Bahia Mar are continuing to
conic in. A full capacity crowd
is expected, according to Edith
Levine and Maxine Hess, chair-
men of the Pacesetters Divi-
sion. Mrs. Levine and Mrs. Hess
urged that all women who wish
to attend fill out the reserva-
tion card on Page 2 and mail it
Into Federation office. 2999
, 33rd Avenue, Lauderdale
Lakes, Fla. 33311, with a lunch-
eon check ($7.50 per person).
L,According to Mrs. Levine and
Mrs. Hess, it will be a "retro-
spective fashion show of incom-
parable designer fashions from
l"e magnificent Hannah Troy
collection." Hannah Troy will
pro' ide a commentary on the
fashions, which will be modeled
by local women. Guest speaker
for the luncheon is Bernice
Brand, a prominent community
leader.
Mrs. Levine and Mrs. Hess
praised ail the area and com-
mittee chairmen for their help,
especially Anita Perlman, pres-
ident of the Women's Division;
Terri Baer, general campaign
chairman; and Rebecca Hodes,
campaign cochairman. They
said that "This is the first fash-
ion show in the Greater Fort
Lauderdale area in such large
scope. But it's just the begin-
ning of something we hope will
be an annual event to benefit
the Jewish community here
and Jews throughout the world."
Addiction, Pushers
Rampant in Israel
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
And TUVIA MENDELSON
. JERUSALEM (JTA)
evidence of widespread and
increasing drug use and ad-
diction in Israel, especially
among children and high
school youths, is causing
a'arm among parents, teach-
ers and government offi-
cials.
Attorney General Aharon
Barak has just submitted a
report on the drug problem
to the Cabinet with recom-
mendations that the author-
Continued on Page 11*
U.S. HOPEFUL
Lebanon:
A Political
Solution
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The United States looks to "a
political accommodation" in Le-
banon which will "preserve the
security of all the Lebanese
communities."
Under questioning, State De-
partment spokesman John Tratt-
ner said, in reference to the
Syrian government's mediation
with the warring parties, that
"we would, of course, be en-
couraged by a successful out-
come of what appears to be
a serious effort to achieve a
ceasefire that sticks and a po-
litical accommodation in Leba-
non which would be acceptable
to and preserve the security of
all Lebanese communities."
TRATTNER later stressed
that "we are assuming that any
arrangement reached has to be
acceptable to the Lebanese gov-
ernment and leadership and has
to preserve the security of all
L Continued on Page 10
Palm Aire Names Levin Its
Initial Gifts Honoree
Harry Levin, a Palm Aire res-
ident, has been designated the
honoree of the second gala ini-
tial gifts cocktail party sched-
uled for Sunday, Feb. 22, at the
Palm Aire Social Center at 4
p.m.
Leo Goodman, chairman of
the Greater Fort Lauderdale
UJA Campaign, said "The Palm
Aire group could not have pick-
ed a better man for this hon-
or. I have known Mr. Levin for
the past three years and dur-
ing this period assumed the
leadership of the many UJA
Campaigns at Palm Aire."
Dr. Sidney Jennes, chairman
of the Palm Aire Community
Campaign, stated that "the rec-
ord speaks for itself. Harry has
been the most outstanding, ded-
icated and committed leader,
not only for Jewish causes, but
many of our non-Jewish char-
ities."
As a native of Herkimer and
Utica, N.Y., Levin had been an
active leader in many Jewish
organizations, and before long,
was one of the outstanding
workers and philanthropists in
the area.
In Jewish community affairs
he was a trustee of Temple
Beth-El, the advance gifts chair-
man of the United Jewish Ap-
peal of Utica for several years.
and an active campaigner for
the new Jewish Center Build-
ing Fund. '
Before the Lvins left Utica.
thv made a eift nf more than
$100,000 to the Jewish Com-
munity Council of Utica to be
used *nd distributed among the
Jewish Community Center, the
Charles Sitrin Home for the
Aed. Temple Beth-EI and the
United Jewish Appeal.
Coming to the Palm Aire com-
munity about four years ago,
Levin continued his activities,
becoming known as "Mr. Phi-
Continuetf on Page 9-

HARRY LEVIN


I

Page 2
Th Jewish Ftorkban of Greater Fort FViday, February 6,
Allon To Be Honoree and Keynoter At
Israel Bonds Inaugural Conference
Yigal Allon, Israel's Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister for
Foreign Affairs, will be guest
of honor and keynote speaker
at the International Israel Bonds
Inaugural Conference at the
Fontainebleau Hotel, Feb. 26-
28.
More than 1,000 Jewish com-
munity leaders from through-
out the Western Hemisphere
will pay tribute to Allon as he
launches the 1976 campaign for
State of Israel Bonds and de-
scribes the economic develop-
ment programs it supports in
Israel.
Gen. Allon, who began his
military career in the Haganah.
served as commander-in-chief
of the Palmach, which played a
major role in Israel's War of
Liberation. He was a member
of the Prime Ministers' mili-
tary advisory committee, which
formulated the strategies and
as Minister of Labor and was
responsible for public works
policies during the Six-Day War
of June, 1967.
In 1954 Allon became a mem-
ber of the Knesset. He served
and other development proj-
ects, many of which are financ-
ADL Appeal Names Mrs. Levine
Women's Division Chairperson
Mrs. Samuel Levine of Fort
Lauderdale and Hewlett Har-
bor, L.I., has been elected gen-
eral chairperson of the Wom-
en's Division of the Anti-Defa-
mation League Appeal. She suc-
ceeds Mrs. Theodore H. Silbert
of New York, who served two
terms in the post.
Mrs. Levine was for six years
chairperson of the Appeal's Five
Towns, L.I., Women's Division,
which honored her at a dinner
dance at the Glen Oaks Coun-
try Club in Old Westbury, L.I.,
"for outstanding leadership and
the dedicated concern she has
given to so many humanitarian
and philanthropic endeavors."
Her community activities in-
clude service on the boards of
Hadassah, the United Jewish
Appeal Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies and the Jewish
Hospital at Denver. She is a
member of the Hewlett ast
Kockaway Congregation.
Nationally active in the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'riih, the ADL Appeal's par-
ent organization, Mrs. Levine is
vice-chairperson of the ADL Bi-
centennial of Freedom Award
dinner, which honored Edgar
M. Bronfman on Feb. 5 at the
Breakers Hotel in Palm Beach.
Mrs. Levine is a free-lance \
interior designer. Her husband
is chief executive officer of
Par Plumbing Co., Inc., of Lyn-
brook, L.I. They are members
of the Woodlands Country Club
in Tamarac and of the Seawane
Country Club in Hewlett Har-
bor. They have three sons and
four grandchildren.
YIGAL ALLON
*WW'W*W'W'WA,^'W'W'WA~
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MRS. LEVINE
We do
business the
right way.
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'< tl<'H"l*
Take Turnpike exit 24.
West on Rte. 814. Phone (305) 971-3510.
From Miami TOLL FREE (305) 947-9906.
-
ed with proceeds from the sale
of Israel Bonds.
Allon, who was appointed
Deputy Prime Minister rn 1968,
is a member of the Cabinet's
defense and economic affairs
committees. He has previously
served as Minister of Absorp-
tion and Minister of Education
and Culture.
Wnai B'rith
Women, No. 345
B'nai B'rith Women of Fort
Lauderdale, Chapter No. 345,
will-hold its annual election of
officers on Tuesday, Feb. 17
at 12:30 p.m. at the Gold Key
Recreation Center in Sunrise.
The guest will be Burnett
Roth, a life member of the Na-
tional Commission of ADL and
the national board of B'nai
B'rith Foundation, vice chair-
man of National Civil Rights of
ADL anJ formpr Florida state
commander of Jewish War Vet-
erans.
,
At the recent Advance Gifts luncheon of the Women's
Division were (from left) Evelyn Gross, chairman of
the Advance Gifts Division; Rebecca Hodes, general
campaign cochairman; Anita Perlman, president of the
Women's Division; Sylvia Hassenfeld, national UJA Wom-
en's Division campaign chairman; Terri Boer, general
campaign chairman of the Women's Division; Jean Sha-
piro, cochairman of the Advance Gifts Division. Mov-
ed by Mrs. Hassenfeld's remarks, the more than 75 wom-
en who attended the luncheon pledged a record amount
in the Greater Fort Lauderdale area.
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood and Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
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In the Hollywood andHafiandale anas:
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In the Fort Lauderdale area:
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9tii*\ i


Friday. February 6, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
Israel Bonds New LeadersHp Delegation Health and Fitness Expo j
%o Make Fact-Finding T
1 her people and her
needs is the focus of the Is-
rael Bond Organization's plans
for the young men and women
in the President's Israel Bond
New leadership Delegation to
Israel, April 26 May 6. The
announcement was made by
Milton M. Parson, executive di-
rector, South Florida Israel
Bond Organization.
Parson stressed that this fact-
finding mission, which is limit-
ed to people between the ages
of 25 and 34, will help that gen-
eration of Young America see
for itself what Israel faces dur-
ing this time of negotiations
and agreements.
He emphasized that "Now is
the time to become an impor-
tant delegate representing your
community, whether you live
in Dade or Broward County, and
understand the conflict, meet
the defenders, live in a kibbutz,
experience the emotion, and
witness the country's industrial
growth. And then relay this in-
formation to your friends,
neighbors and colleagues."
Parson said that anyone in-
terested in attending or wanting
more information should con-
tact him through an Israel Bond
office.
The two-week program will
include a reception by Israel's
President Ephraim Katzir, meet-
ing with cabinet ministers,
round table discussions with
Members of the Knesset, brief-
ings on the country's security
by top military leaders and ses-
sions with mayors of major ci-
ties.
The delegates will explore
Masada with Israeli archaeolo-
gists, climb the Judean Hills to
Jerusalem, wander through the
Biblical Old City and descend
via Jericho to the Dead Sea.
They will aiso tour the Weiz-
mann Institute of Science and
Ben-Gurion University, and will
travel to Tiberias, Sefad, the
Galilee. Caesaria, Haifa, and
Tel Aviv.
"This is the opportunity for
these young future leaders of
the Jewish community to come
to the source," said Parson.
"The time is now now we
must call on our young people
and stress 'youth power' for
Israel. Israel needs the help of
these fresh and vibrant men
and women."
The delegates will be urged
to speak at community meet-
ings after their trip and stress
the importance of Israel Bonds
to Israel's economic life. Parson
said, "With Israel facing grave
Political end security problems
this year, the State of Israel
Bond program is of more cru-
cial importance than ever be-
forem its 25-year history of
building up Israel's economy.
new sources of oil must be
aunl^V massive P"Bnmi
launched for the development
energy to prevent a slow-
down in industry and a rise in
J^nployment. "Israel Bonds,"
^1
*-#
.
*4 FULL
SERVICE
SHOP
he continued, "which have help-
ed finance Industrial and agri-
cultural projects, the construc-
tion of highways and public
housing, the exploitation of nat-
ural resources and the creation
of job opportunities for new
immigrants, are needed to pay
for creating new sources of en-
ergy for Israel's growing indus-
trial machine, to counteract a
high inflation and to increase
rip in April
manufacture of exports to
reduce the hugs deficit in Is-
rael's balance oi payments.
Robert L. Siege! is t' c gen-
eral campaign chairman. Great-
er Miami Israel Bond Organiza-
tion; William Littman is chair-
man, board of governors, South
Broward County, and Robert
M. Hermann is chairman, board
of governors, North Broward
County.
At Convention Center, Feb. 6-8
Histadrut Honoring Dinitz
At Final Conference Session
Over 50 nationally known
speakers have been scheduled
to appear .at the International
Health, Diet and Physical Fit-
ness Exposition at the Miami
Beach Convention Center, Feb.
6, 7 and 8.
The exposition program will
include authorities in nutrition
and food, health supplements,
phvsical fitness and exercise,
ecology and pollution, physical
appearance, sex rejuvenation,
and protection as a means of
survival.
"It's an exciting format," said
Jerry Levine. coproducer of the
exposition. "The show covers
so many facets for healthier liv-
ing that a person could spend
an entire day at the show and
never hear the same speaker
twice!"
"One general daily admission
price for the exposition will al-
low a person to attend the in-
formative and educational meet-
ings and the exhibition on the
main floor," Levine says.
Simcha Dinitz, Israel's Am-
bassador to the United States
and a major participant in Mid-
SIMCHA DINITZ
die East peace negotiations, will
receive the Israel Histadrut
Foundation's Forty Million Dol-
lar Award on Wednesday, Feb.
18, at the closing session of the
Histadrut Economic Conference
for Israel at the Fontainebleau
Hotel.
In making the announcement,
Dr. Sol Stein, national president
of the Histadrut Foundation,
said Ambassador Dinitz was
being honored for "his brilliant
service to the State of Israel
and his consistent encourage-
ment and support of the Israel
Histadrut Foundation."
The award marks the achieve-
ment of the IHF's $40 million
milestone, the cumulative to-
tal of commitments since tiie
foundation was organized 15
years ago to provide financial
support to Histadrut's vast net-
work of social, educational,
health and welfare institutions,
serving the needs of more than
70 percent of Israel's popula-
tion, Dr. Stein said.
The first recipient of IHF's
highest recognition was former
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ar-
thur J. Goldberg, the first na-
tional chairman of the Hista-
drut Foundation until his ap-
pointment as Secretary of La-
bor in the Kennedy Adminis-
tration. Goldberg received the
Twenty Million Dollar Award
m 1971.
Other recipients have been
Rabbi Leon Kronish of Miami
Beach, IHF national board
chairman (Twenty-Five Million
Dollar Award in 1973), and the
late Pinhas Sapir, former Is-
raeli finance minister and chair-
man of the Jewish Agency
(Thirty Six Million Dollar
Award in February, 1975).
Woodlands Israel Bonds Dinner
Is Scheduled for March
I
The second annual Woodlands
Country Club Community Is-
rael Dinner of State will be on
Tuesday, March 23. at the Wood-
lands Chapter of Women's
American ORT.
Mrs. Frankel announced that
"this year's dinner on behalf of
the South Florida Israel Bond
Organization campaign will fea-
ture a prominent guest speaker,
internationally renowned enter-
tainer and distinguished honor-
ees."
Announcements of the dinner
have been mailed to Country
Club Community members, ex-
plaining the significance of this
year's program.
"In 1976 Israel Bonds for
economic development will be
bonds of Jewish solidarity to
meet the unprecedented politi-
cal and economic Arab offen-
sive against Israel," said Rob-
ert M. Hermann, North Broward
County board of governors
chairman.
Fort Lauderdale Attorneys
Head Plantation UJA Campaign
Fort Lauderdale attorneys
Alvin Capp, Joel Reinstein and
Harry Lembeck are heading the
1976 Federation-UJA Plantation
campaign.
Plans for a hard-hitting ef-
fort are now underway. Parlor
meetings have been set for Feb.
5, 12, 19 and 26. Additional de-
tails and rosters of campaign
workers will appear in the next
issue.
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, Febraary 6, 1976
/
High Level Schizophrenia
1 here seems to be a profound schizophrenia in U.S.
foreign policy, particularly as it relates to the United
Nations.
On the one hand, there is Ambassador Daniel P.
Moynihan, whose acid tongue is a welcome refresher to
the otherwise groveling stance we took at the UN before
his appointment.
Into the bargain, there is the recent statement by
President Ford affirming the administration's total sup-
port of the substance and method of Moynihan's debate
as if he would be empowered to say anything there
with which the White House were not in total agree-
ment in the first place.
On the other hand, there is our foreign policy as
enunciated by Henry Kissinger or at least as it was
enunciated by Henry Kissinger up until the recent past
and his several demotions in rapid order.
And that policy is to continue to grovel at the
United Nations before the Soviet Union, the Arab bloc
and the Third World as if Ambassador Moynihan were
not there representing us at all, using that tongue of
his like a rapier to expose the hypocrisy and crass ex-
pediency not only of our opponents, but also of our
allies.
We note with satisfaction the presentation to Moy-
nihan of a high B'nai B'rith Award for his service at the
United Nations. Certainly, the Ambassador deserves it,
but increasingly, we are not quite sure for whom he
speaks in those jaundiced halls along the East River.
The Mania for Secrecy
Israel's sharp response to information leaks and
those who leak information is to be deplored.
The government has moved to make "offenders"
subject to prosecution and imprisonment. Abrogation of
the right of free speech and a free press is a step toward
totalitarianism and would seem alien to a Jewish State.
Somehow, the move comes uncomfortably close upon
the heels of an allegedly angry communication from
President Ford to Prime Minister Rabin about the "leak-
ing" of "top-secret" information to the press.
The angry communication has since been denied
both in Washington and in Jerusalem, but the Rabin
government's proposed legislation to deal with "offend-
ers" speaks for itself.
It seems like a century ago by now, but it was only
on August 9, 1974, that President Ford took office un-
der the most unusual circumstances in American his-
tory. Oh that occasion, addressing-JrimseHr.to the cause
of the change over in mid-administration of the Nixon
presidency, Mr. Ford vowed to keep an open door and
to run an open government.
It did not take long for the American people to re-
cognize that they were being hoodwinked once again.
But what does seem strange is that Prime Minister Rabin
should permit President Ford to extend the growing
White House mania for secrecy from Washington to Je-
rusalem.
Who is governing whom?
Demand for Quid Pro Quo
Despite these and other tensions, Prime Minister
Rabin's visit to Washington this week suggests that all's
well on the surface at least.
The invitation to Rabin to address a joint session
of Congress magnified that impression.
There is no doubt that top on the list of priority
subjects discussed between Israel and the U.S. was Is-
rael's boycott of the United Nations debate on the Mid-
dle East.
That can mean little more than a Ford demand for
quid pro quo what Israel would be expected to "pay"
in return for the privilege of American assent to the
boycott.
In turn, that can mean essentially one thing: the
first step toward an Israel-Syrian interim accord and
just what concessions Israel would have to pay for that,
too, especially considering the U.S. veto of a separate
Palestine State Monday.
He Opposes Teachers' Union
'T'HE FACULTY of Miami-Dade
Community College voted
last week on whether or not
they want a collective bar-
gaining agent to represent their
interests in contractual and
other business matters with
the college's administration
and board of trustees.
If the majority of the facul-
ty approves, then a teachers'
union will be coming to the col-
lege's three campuses.
I DREAD that possibility.
Every instinct tells me I should
be for a union. My earliest
childhood memories are imbu-
ed with the spirit of the work-
er's struggle against entrench-
ed big business interests.
In those formative years of
Jewish Floridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
OFKTCK and PLANT 120 N.E. 6th St., Mlan-i. Fia. 33132 Phone 373-4finn
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1-J73-4606
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FRED K. PHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
The Jewiih Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kathruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised in Ita Column!
Published Bi-Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Miami, Fia.
All P.O. M79 returns are to be forwarded: to
The Jewish Flo-'dlan. P.O. Box 012973, Miami. Fia. SUM
Mindlin
my life, mostly I heard of Da-
vid Dubinsky. And beyond him,
on a Parnassus all thei~ own,
were William Green and John
L. Lewis, before the American
Federation of Labor and the
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate.
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Associa-
tion of English Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
Number 3
1 ADAR 5736
Congress of Industrial Organi-
zations merged, who were the
truly divine heroes of the op-
pressed proletariat.
Although it had nothing in
the literal sense to do with
unions, the veterans' march on
Washington became the flam-
ing symbol of the indifference
of the privileged classes to the
suffering of the "masses," when
unemployed and hungry World
War I servicemen came to the
capital to ask for their veterans
b nefit b.fore it was due, and
President Hoover ordered the
army to fire on thtrn.
WE WORE that ag-ny like a
radge in the samt way that
jome of us wear a bieeding Star
of David today with the He-
brew word. "Z'kor""Remem-
ber" on it.
In my own house, there was
a schizophrenia about unions
because my father was neither
oppressed nor a proletarian,
and he would surely have been
incensed to be consider*-*' one
of the "masses"
Still, as a Russian emigre,
he coulu hardly conceive of
voicing opposition to the con-
cefit of union union against
religious persecution, union
against political oppression,
union against racial discrimi-
nation and, yes why not?, union
against economic exi loitation.
BUT THAT was ail theoret-
ical, especially because in his
experience (and therefore in
my own) moat of these things
did not exist for him in any
meaningful way in this coun-
try.
And so, I heard about things
like the Farband, Workmen's
Circle, Sholem Aleichem schools
and Ikuf only years later when
they could no longer have
meaning for me at least not
in the same way that they were
organizations embodying flam-
ing Yiddish and proletarian
| :m Continued on Page 13
it Town IriHhe Future
For Port of Eilat?
Volume 5
Friday, February 6, 1976
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Fear
continued to mount in Eilat that
Israel's southernmost city and
sole outlet to the Red Sea would
become a ghost town after the
Timna copper mines are closed
down and its dismissed employ-
es are forced to find jobs else-
where.
Minister of Commerce and
Industry Haim Barlev, who flew
to Eilat Jan. 5 after a general
sttike protesting the shut-down
paralyzed the town, told the
Knesset that there was no hope
of getting the money-losing cop-
per works out of the red for the
next five years.
THE TIMNA mine workers
won a reprieve of uncertain
duration when Barlev promised
that the copper mines would
not be shut down until alterna-
tive jobs are found for its 700
employes. But he hedged his
promise on further consultation
with his colleagues on the min-
isterial economic committee
which had recommended to the
government that the deficit-rid-
den indusa-y h* shut down.
New job prospects are also
uncertain. Labor Minister Mo-
she Baram promised that the
dismissed mine workers would
be employed building a new air-
port seven miles north of Eilat,
a project already approved by
the Cabinet but not scheduled
to start for three months.
Israel Aircraft Industries was
reported planning to locate a
new metal plant in Eilat, but
that will not be ready for at
least three years. Baram con-
ceded that even those projects
would not provide jobs for all
of the laid-off mine workers.
MOREOVER, those projects
are in the construction field and
Eilat residents were wondering
what would become of the sci-
entists, engineers, lab techni-
cians and copper specialists em-
ployed in office jobs at Timna.
They cannot become tractor
operators or construction work-
ers overnight, it was remarked;
and what of the wives of these
white collar employes, many of
whom teach at Eilat's schools?
They would leave if their hus-
bands have to find jobs else-
where and the local school sys-
tem would suffer from a short-
age of teachers.
BARLEV told the Knesset that
the government had no choice
but to shut down the mines in
view of the continuing depres-
sion in copper, nrices on the
world market. HcMoserved that
in other countries, better mines
than Timna had been closed
down for the same reason.
He estimated that if the works
were kept going they would lose
IL 67 million in 1976 on top of
an IL 60 million deficit last year
and that the outlook for 1977
and 1978 was even worse.
Meanwhile, a special comit-
tee has been set up in Eilat with
the participation of Histadrut's
Trade Union Department and
various government agencies
to explore the job problems
with Eilat authorities.
THE HOPE is to find em-
ployment in the Eilat area for
as many of the laid-off workers
as possible. But the outlook was
not good. Apart from the cop-
per mines, Eilat's chief sources
of jobs are the port, the oil pipe-
line to Ashkelon and tourism.
The town has already suffered
a decline in ocean-borne com-
merce since the Suez Canal was
reopened last June and, as the
Egyptians are allowing Israel-
bound cargoes though not Is-
rael-flag ships to use the
waterway, the importance of the
pipeline may diminish.
Although it enjoys an excel-
lent climate Eilat was sunny
with temperatures in. the 70s
while the rest of Israel was near
freezing the town cannot de-
pend solely on tourism because
of its isolation from central Is-
rael.
%
The highway trip is long and
tedious, and Israel's internal
airline, Arkia, has limited ca-
pacity. Transport Minister Gad
Yaacobi is planning a Beershe-
ba-Eilat railroad but that proj-
ect, not yet begun, will not be
completed for several years.
l
k
m


Friday,
February 6, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
Sunrise Lakes Phase II residents attended a "Night in
Israel" program on Tuesday, Jan. 6, on behalf of the
1976 South Florida Israel Bond Organization campaign.
Helping to make the presentation of the Israel Solidar-
ity Award to Morris L. Weber (center) were (from left)
Rocco Matteo, cochairman; Mrs. Weber; Leonard Gold-
man, chairman; and Ben Goldstein, cochairman.
Samuel M. Soref (left) presented the Outstanding Lead-
ership Award to Louis L. Perlman at the Regency. Tow-
ers Annual United Jewish Appeal function. .
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To Receive Israel Solidarity Atvard
Unit Owners of Hawaiian Gar-
dens Phase VIII will receive the
State of Israel Solidarity Award
at the South Florida Israel
Bond Organization "Night in Is-
rael" on Wednesday. Feb. 11,
at 8 p.m. in the Hawaiian Gar-
dens Phase VUI Recreation Hall
in Lauderdale Lakes.
Special guest will be enter-
tainer Eddie Schaffer, a long-
time resident of Miami Beach
whose humor reflects his Jew-
ish background and his love of
it.
Chairman Hank Gutterman
announced that this year Ha-
waiian Gardens Phase VTJI is
repres2nted in Buildings T, U,
V and W, each with committee
representation, to emphasize the
importance cf attending the
"Night in Israel."
Gutterman explained that
"1976 is the year of energy for
the people in the Jewish home-
land, and only through the pro-
found generosity of the men
and women of our condominium
can Israel continue to live in a
state of progress. State of Israel
Bonds aid in advancing Israel's
progiess and welfare through
the economic development and
agricultural programs."
Uris to Talk
On Mideast
Leon Uris, author of "E-:o-
dus," "Miln-18" and other best-
selling novels, will sp*ak on
Wednesday, Feb. 25, at 11 a.m.
at the Gateway Theatre. Doors
will open at 10 a.m. His topic
is "Israel and the Middle East."
The program is sponsored by
Women's American ORT. Addi-
tional information will be pub-
lished in a later edition of "The
Jewish Floridian."
Leo Goodman (left), general campaign chairman for the
1976 United Jewish Appeal Campaign of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, goes over plans with the honoree of Regen-
cy Towers, Louis L. Perlman, and the Regency Towers
chairman, John Streng.
r EMmiiiMii warn \
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^j


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, February 6, 1976
American Friends of Hebrew U.
Plan Two~Day Founders Event
Dade and Broward County Reform rabbis
are planning the centennial celebration
of the Hebrew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion. Seated (from left) are
Rabbis Herbert M. Baumgard, Temple
Beth Am; Samuel Z. Jaffe. Temple Beth
El; Joseph R. Narot, chairman, Temple Is-
rael; Ralph P. Kingsley, Temple Sinai.
Standing (from left) are A. Harold Mur-
ray, South Florida director of develop-
ment. HUC-JIR; Rabbis Robert P. Frazin,
Temple Solel; Robert J. Orkand, Temple
Israel; Michael B. Eisenstat, Temple Ju-
dea; and Chaim H. Friend, national direc-
tor of development, HUC-JIR.
No. Broward-So. Palm Beach Hadassah
Is Launching Youth Aliyah Campaign
The North Broward South
Palm Beach Chapter of Hadas-
sah has initiated plans to launch
its Youth Aliyah campaign
with individual fund raising
events sponsored by each of
its ten groups during the latter
part of February and in March,
according to Mrs. Ralph Can-
non, president, Mrs. Sam
Schwarts, fundraising vice pres-
ident, and Mrs. Oscar Simdell,
Youth Aliyah chairman.
Hadassah, the world's largest
single contributor to Youth
Aliyah, has contributed over
$70 million to the rescue, re-
habilitation and education of
more than 150,000 youngsters
since 1935. Until now, new im-
migrants have been the largest
group of children cared for. But
for the first time in the pro-
gram's 41-year history the ma-
jority are socially and cultur-
ally deprived youngsters from
disadvantaged Israeli homes.
Youth Aliyah has, therefore,
embarked on a five-year effort
to rehabilitate and educate
thousands of youth who are
school dropouts, not working,
many wandering the streets.
Funds are needed for dormito-
ries, schools and workshops,
and for the provision of suit-
able manpower, psychological
services, and enrichment pro-
grams all with large maint-
enance costs.
A viva Group plans a Youth
Aliyah luncheon at the Boca
'iV-eca Auditorium, Boca Raton,
on Tuesday, March 2. at nooa.
Guest speaker is Mrs. Irving
Marks, national Hadassah board
member. Mrs. Alfred Saxe is
president, Mrs. Ben Eppel-
baum is Youth Aliyah chair-
man.
Ben-Gurion Group had a
successful movie party and will
hold a thrift shop sale on Feb.
22 and 23. Mrs. Sidney Gerber
is president, Mrs. Lillian Krovo-
net ia Yeutta Aliyah chairman.
Proceeds will be directed to
Youth Aliyab.
Btyma Gxonp is sponsor-
ing individual miuyon luncheons
and dessert parties in homes te
benefit Youth Ahyah. A Chai
Circle is being formed for con-
tributors of $1* for the same
project. Mrs. Harry Krimsky is
president, Mrs. Charles Rudin
is Youth Aliyah chairman.
Chai Group will hold its
annual Youth Aliyah luncheon
at Bahia Mar Hotel and Yacht
Club on Seabreeze Ave. in Fort
Lauderdale on Thursday, Feb.
26, at noon. A gala fashion show
by TjBjo Rubin is planned and
Mrs. Irwin Siena, president,
will speak. Mrs. Lawrence Tan-
nenbaum is Youth Aliyah chair-
man and Mrs. David Strome is
coc hair man.
Herzl Group is sponsoring
rainyon discussion groups in
homes to benefit Youth Aliyah.
Mrs. Harvey Erlich is presi-
dent, Mrs. Albert Blank is
Youth Aliyah chairman.
Kadimah Group will hold
its Youth Aliyah luncheon at
the Chamber of Commerce
'iuilding. on Htllsboro Blvd. in
Deerfield Beach on Monday,
March 28,- at noon. Guest speak-
er will be announced. Mrs. Sam-
uel Pavomy is president, Mrs.
Irving Bernstein is Youth Ali-
yah chairman.
Golda Meir Group has
planned its Youth Aliyah lunch-
eon for Wednesday, Feb. 25, at
noon at the Gait Ocean Mile
Hotel in Fort Lauderdale. There
will be a gala fashion show by
Milgrim's. Guest speaker is
Mrs. Morton Eluah, a member
of the national board of Hadas-
sah. M. Charles Ruben is
president. Mm. Howard Silver*
man is Youth Aliyah chairman
Orly Group will hold its
Youth AKyah luncheon and cari
party at the Holiday Springs
Auditorium on Holiday Springs
Blvd. in Margate on Thursday,
Feb. 26, at noon. Mrs. Joseph
Baker is president, Mrs. Charles
Charloff is Youth Aliyah chair-
man.
Rayua Group has two Youth
Ahyah projects: Beat the Clock
and names embroidered on ta-
blecloth. A Youth Aliyah event
will be held at Taraarac Jewish
Center on Tuesday, Feb. 24, at
12:30 p.m. A new Youth Aliyah
film will be shown. Mrs. Pearl
Goldenberg is president, Mrs.
Samuel Bressler is Youth Ali-
yah chairman,
Sabra Group will hold its
Youth Ahyah luncheon at Poro-
pano Fashion Square in the
Community Room on Thursday,
Feb. 19, at 11 a.m. Mrs. Alan
Goldberg is president, Mrs.
Malcolm Ginnis is Youth Ah-
yah chairman.
An historic National Foun-
ders Dinner and Academic
Conference of the American
Friends of the Hebrew Univer-
sity will be held at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel on Feb. 21
and 22, climaxing the world-
wide celebration of the 50th
aniversary of the establish-
ment of Israel's oldest and
largest university.
Announcement of the two-
day session, which will bring
together education, govern-
ment, business, civic and reli-
gion leaders from throughout
the United States, Canada and
Israel, was made by Morris
Messing of Palm Beach, Flor-
ida State president of the Amer-
ican Friends of the Hebrew
University.
A highlight of the confer-
ence will be the acceptance by
American novelist Saul Bellow
of the S. Y. Agnon Gold Medal
Award from the Hebrew Uni-
versity.
Herbert Buchwald of Miami
Beach, president of the Great-
er Miami Chapter of the Amer-
ican Iri-nds; Otto Stieber of
Hallandala, president of the
Hollywood-Hallandale Chapter,
and Dr. Fanford F. Kuvin,
president of the Palm Beach
Chapter, are working closely
with Messing in planning the
sessions.
Former New York State At-
torney General Nathaniel Gold-
stein will present a report on
the Harry S. Truman Research
Institute, one of Hebrew Uni-
versity's most important divi-
sion and the only facility in
Israel authorized by the late
President to bear his name.
Dr. Max M. Kampelman of
Washington, D.C., national
president of the American
Friends, and Seymour Fish-
man, executive vice president,
were in iMami Beach this week
to confer with Messing and
other Hebrew University lead-
ers.
Albert A. Dorner, Southeast-
ern regional director of the
American Friends, will coor-
dinate the Feb. 21-22 confer-
ence from the organization's
new offices in the City Nation-
al Bank Building.
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Friday, February 6, 1976
The Jewish Floridkm of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
Abba Ebaii Will Speak At
Dinner Honoring Bronfman
Temple Shotom Activities
,
Abba Eban. Israel's former
foreipn minister and its first
>assdor to the United Na-
tions. Will deliver the major
addrtss at the Anti-Defa-nation
League of B'nai B'rith's Bicen-
t r.nial of Freedpm Award din-
ner honoring Edgar M. Bronf-
l on Tbursda" Feb. 5, at
6 30 r-m- ll the Breakers Ho-
t.l.
Robert Cumminj*f, dinner
chairman, made he announce-
ment and said that the Bicen-
tennial of Freedom Award will
be presented to Bronfman,
chairman of the board and chief
executive officer of the Sea-
gram Company, Ltd., fc. "his
significant contributions to
freedom and its institutions in
three nations the United
States, Israel and Canada."
The Award dinner open* the
League's 1976 National Execu-
tive Meeting in the same hotel
and inaugurates the nationwide
ADL appeal for funds to con-
tinue the programs and cerv-
ices of the human relations
agency.
Descib:n^ Eb?ji as "one of
the world's most respected
statesmen." Curlings said that
it is .particularly fitting that he
speak on this occasion because
"all of us who are committed
to the ideals and values of in-
dividual liberty and national
independence remember him
with pride as one of freedom's
most eloquent advocates in the
United Nations."
Tamar Group
Hadassah
Tamar Group of Hadassah
will present a Bicentennial Cele-
bration on Sunday, Feb. 15. at
7 p.m at Temple Beth Israel,
7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
The program will feature the
Bnai Sholom Singers. Guests
and friends are iuvited, and re-
freshments will be served.
6 & "&
There will be a g -neral meet-
ing on Thursday, Feb. 19, at the
Jewish Federation building at
noon. A film will be shown and
awards will be presented for
Youth Aliyah and for Cancer
Seals.
Uer%l Qranp
Hadassah
The Herzl Group of Hadassah
in North Broward will hold its
next meeting on Wednesday.
Feb. 1, at the Tamarac Jewish
Center, 9101 NW S7th St.
The group has announced that
"Der ShKtz" a musical based
on "H.M.& Pinafore" will be
presented at Fort Lauderdale
High School on Feb. 8 to a sell-
out audience. All proceeds go
to Israel.
bOn Tuesday, Feb. 24, there
will be a brunch at Pumpernik's
at 11:30 a.m., with proceeds go-
ing to Youth Aliyah.
Publicity chairman Rose Feir-
stein has announced that depar-
ture time and other pertinent
information about the Florida
West Coast trip will be avail-
able in mid-February.
;
BOCA RATON
Condos For Sale
On golf course appr. mil*
to Beach. 2 BR + den / 2
full Baths. Walking distance
to Club restaurant for din-
ing and dancing, lighted
tennis, 36 holes of golf, bil-
ards, sauna, whirlpool.
Easy access to 1-95. Financ-
es available.
For Sale Same Location
1 BR + den / 2 Baths and
others. Prices range from 31
thousand.
HOGELAND B. BARCAL0W
REALTOR
4799 N. Federal Hwy,
Boca Raton -391-9963
i.V
i i r
Declaring that Eban "is one
cf th? great figures of our
times." Cummings said that "he
is a man prodigal gifts who is
kmwn for his scholarship and
literary ability as well as his
statesmanship."
Cummings went en to say-
that the award to Bronfman
and the presence of Eban had
excited great interest through-
out the Palm Beach community
and that he expected a capacity
attendance at the event.
Temple Sholom. at 132 SE
11th Ave., Pompano Beach, has
announced the following activi-
ties duiing February.
The executive board will
hold its monthly meeting on
Tuesday, Feb. 10, at 8 p.m. in
the temple library.
The Sisterhood's regular
monthly meeting on Tuesday.
Feb. 17, at 11:30 a.m. will fea-
ture Yiddish monologist Ann
(Mrs. Irving) Bloom and a bake
sale for donor credit.
There will be a general
meeting for the entire member-
ship of the temple on Tuesday,
Feb. 24, at 8 p.m. in the tem-
ple social hall.
PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED
GLASSES DUPLICATED
ONE HOUR SERVICE IN MOST CASES
LCNSES THAT CHANGE WITH
SUNLIGHT
"NEW YORK'S COUNTY OPTICAL"
COUNTY OPTICAL CO.
1858 N. UNIVERSITY DR. PLANTATION
Mercede Arcodo Shops 581 -1117
ESCORTED TOUR
ISRAEL & LONDON APR. 26-MAY 17
SUPERIOR FOUR STAR HOTELS
16 NIGHTS IN ISRAEL, 4 NIGHTS IN LONDON
Local transfers to and from Miami Airport, Round trip air via
British Airways, Full sightseeing in Israel and London by air-
conditioned bus, including entrance fees, Breakfast and dinner
in Israel, breakfast in London, All transfers and porterage.
per person, dbl. occupancy,
C100O plus $3 tax
J 1007 Above rate baaed
on 36 passengers
AVENTURA TRAVEL BOUTIQUE, INC.
2962A Aventura Blvd., North Miami Beach, FL 33180
Telephone: Dade 9314600 Broward 525-0675
SKY LAKE TRAVEL, INC.
750 N.E. 195th St., North Miami Beach, FL 33179
Telephone: Dade 653-1010 Broward 525-3163
.<.v.<*v
Established
1957
Jfaltefoultrpfr
TODAY'S WEATHER
Perfect lor
Chicken Dinners
Published by Falls Poultry Corporation, South Fnllsburg, N.Y. 12779
CONSUMER PRAISE SWAMPS
FALLS KOSHER CHICKEN
Kosher Clean Story
Scores With Consumers..
The overwhelming
praise Falls Kosher
Poultry has rscalvsd
front pubHc la proof
that Kaahruth quality
and wholesomsnoss
are of '1 Importance to
the consumer.
Falls Kosher Poultry's
double guarantee of
quality and wholesome-
ness has duly impressed
the consumer public.
Few consumer prod-
ucts are put through the
rigorous testing every
Falls Kosher Chicken
must go through in or-
der to reach your mar-
ket Full-time Federal
Inspectors are con-
stantly on the premises
making sure that every
chicken meets the high
standards of the United
States Department of
Agriculture.
The highest stand-
ards of Kashruth are
guaranteed under the
exacting supervision of
Rabbi H. Solnica. Every
chicken is individually
examined inside and
out before, during and
after slaughtering, in
accordance with the
strict laws of Kashruth,
by qualified, trained
and observant Shoctim.
BUBBA'S SOUP BACK
BY POPULAR DEMAND
Bubba is kvelllng (yiddish
for very happy) everyone
is raving about her chicken
soup recipe.
Mrs. Anne Qlickman of
New York writes: "My hus-
band and I just moved here
from California and in all
our travels we have never
tasted a better soup."
Because Bubba feels
that some of you might
have missed her recipe, we
decided to offer it once
Wiore. Bubba's soup made
With a Falls Kosher Chick-
en is not only wholesome
and nutritious, it tastes
flood. Keep Bubba kvelling
writ* now for your free
recipe._________
FREE! Saatf tir Buhka't Mfasfc-
Falls Peertry Cere. Se. Faflsfcwf.
M.T. 12771 Beat 48
REPORT
TO THE CONSUMER
Jewish law requires that
continuously flowing cold
water be used Huring -ul
processing, soaking, salt-
ing, draining and the three
rinses.
Health experts consider
it highly praiseworthy that
every chicken Is examined
for any sign of disease or
any other pathological
condition.
The two aeala on every
. Falls-United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture ap-
proved Kosher chicken
means unsurpassed qual-
ity and wholesenjaness.
Ask far ytir Fans Kasktr I
at yatr HcaUojktr Market


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, February 6, 1976
Brands Wh*i, Emanu-EJ i ^^ferdale
Hadassah
Sponsoring Bible Lectures
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee and Tem-
ple Emanu-El have announced a
joint venture in adult educa-
tion.
Leo Guzik, an attorney with
an extensive bacVground in Bib-
lical and Jewish history, will
speak on Tuesday, Feb. 24, on
"Who Wrote the Five Books of
Moses?" and on Tuesday, March
2, on "The Talmud and Jewish
History."
Both lectures will be given at
th2 Temple Emanu-El Auditor-
ium, 3245 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.. at 8 p.m. A question-and-
answer period will be included.
Guzik is a member of the
board of governors of the He-
brew University and vice pres-
ident of the Jewish Publications
Society of America, and past
member of the executive com-
mittee of the Zionist Organi-
zation of America. His wife,
Pearl, is a life member of the
Brandeis University National
Womens Committee.
The Fort Lauderdale Pom-
pano Beach Chapter of Bran-
deis University National Wom-
en's Committee and Temple
Emanu-El invite members and
friends to attend.
'Danish V Dogma' at Beth Israel
Includes a Golden Years Class
Temple Beth Israel's "Danish
'n' Dogma" classes began on
Tuesday and will continue
through March 23. A new class.
"Making the Golden Years
Count," is being offered by
Janet Liedeker, a social work-
er specializing in geriatrics.
Ms. Liedeker has worked with
the Hartford (Conn.) Board of
Education, Jewish Family Sen-
ice, and Jewish Federation as
well as with various social wel-
fare, drug rehabilitation and
geriatric counseling agencies.
She will focus her Beth Is-
rael course on such aspects of
advancing years as coping with
loneliness, consumer education,
health and safety education. Ms.
Liedeker said. "It can be a rap
session, with the group finding
its own level."
The other "Danish 'n' Dog-
ma" classes, open to temple
members and to the commun-
Rabin Hails Role
Of Soviet Jewry
TEL AVIV (JTA) Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin hailed So-
viet Jewry as the largest res-
ervoir of Jews willing to come
to Israel and participate in
building the State.
Addressing 540 delegates and
several hundred guests at the
opening of the third annual con-
vention of the Association of
Russian Immigrants in Israel at
Kibbutz Shafayim, Rabin de-
clared that the struggle of So-
viet Jews to emigrate to Israel
was the most important sign of
Jewish vitality at a time when
Zionism is under attack in many
parts of the world.
ABSORPTION Minister Shlo-
rao Rosen offered statistical
evidence that the integration of
Soviet Jews into Israeli society
is succeeding. Josef Almogi,
chairman of the World Zionist
Organization Executive, drew
applause when he declared that
the WZO planned to improve the
absorption process by placing
it in the hands of the olim them-
selves.
According to Rosen, more
than 110,000 Jews have come
to Israel from the USSR since
emigration from that country
was made possible on a com-
paratively large scale.
HE SAID that while Israel was
not prepared at the time to ab-
sorb such numbers properly, 95
percent of the newcomers found
employment within three years
of their arrival.
Rosen reported that 40 per-
cent were absorbed in industry,
6,000 work as scientists and en-
gineers, 2,000 are physicians
and 42 percent of the Russian
olim were academicians.
This type of aliya is not a
burden but an asset to the coun-
try, he said.
ity-at-large, are Survey of Con-
temporary Jewish Thought, Ul-
pan Hebrew Conversation, In-
ternational Folk Dancing, Slim-
nasties, Psychology Workshop,
Creative Stitchery, Judaism in
the Home, and Jewish Gourmet
Cooking.
Danish pastry and coffee are
served during class intermis-
sion.
The Fort Lauderdale Chapter
of Hadassah will present an Ed-
ucation Day Program on Thurs-
day, Feb. 12, at Pumpernik's,
Lauderdale Lakes, from 10 a.m.
to about 3 p.m. Lunch is includ-
ed.
The theme of the day is "The
Jewish American Connection"
in honor of the Bicentennial.
Members of the ten Hadassah
groups will present dramatic
episodes and a film will be
shown.
All Hadassah members are
invited to come and bring a
friend. Reservations are being
taken by group vice presidents
of education.
Hebrew Day Children
At Federation Sabbath
Children of the five-month-
old Hebrew Day School of Fort
Lauderdale participated in the
Federation Sabbath Service at
Temple Beth Israel. The chil-
dren, from kindergarteners to
fourth-graders, led the con-
gregation in prayer and recited
the kiddush.
The children, whose teacher
is Mrs. Tilva Silverman, had
previously appeared at the
dedication of the North Brow-
ard Jewish Federation's new
building.
Morris to JJe Ksymrt^r \t
Pioneer Women Bond Lunch
Yaakov Morris, the spokes-
man of Israel** Permanent Mis-
sion to the United Nations, will
keynote the South Florida Coun-
cil of Pioneer Women Bond-
With-Israel Luncheon on Mon-
day, Feb. 23, at 11:30 a.m. at
the Eden Roc Hotel, it was an-
nounced by Mrs. Milton Green,
president and luncheon chair-
man.
A member of Israel's Foreign
Ministry for the past two de-
cades, Morris served as deputy
director of the Information Di-
vision in Jerusalem and has
represented Israel as the head
of the missions in India, as
counselor in Stockholm and as
counsel in New York.
The Irish-born diplomat is
author of the best-selling "Mas-
ters of the Desert," which ha
an introduction by David Ben-
Gurion. Morris was active in
the Pioneer Zionist Youth Move-
ment and served in the Haga-
nah.
Mrs. Green announced that
Clara (Mrs. Sidney) Leff will
receive the State of Israel David
Ben-Gurion Award at the lunch- ,
eon. Mrs. Leff, former national *"*
president, is national building
fund and national Israel Bond
chairman for the Pioneer Wom-
en. She was a delegate to the
World Zionist Congress in Jeru-
salem and to the 25th anniver-
sary conference of Youth Aliyah
in Israel.
Lauderhill Hebrew Congregation
Installs Officers at Dinner Dance
The Hebrew Congregation of
Lauderhill held its first annual
dinner dance and installation
of officers at Camelot Hall,
Lauderhill on Jan. 11.
Commissioner Jack Moss in-
stalled the officers of the con-
gregation and the Sisterhood
before an audience of about
500 members and friends of the
congregation.
Also participating in the cer-
emonies were Rabbi Emanuel
Schenk and Cantor Jack Mar-
chant.
Les Wsjgman's orchestra pro-
vided entertainment. Joe Welsh *
was chairman in charge of the
affair.
Hon. Ze'ev Sher
Economic Minuter of Israel
in the USA
"ISRAEL'S ECONOMIC
CRISIS'
William H. Sylk
I'romincnt Zionist and
Community Leader,
CONFERENCE CHAIRMAN
Sol C. Chaikin
President, International Ladies
Garment Workers' Union.
Wll I t'XUTICIPATE
IS THE TRIRUTE
TO AMBASSADOR DIN IT/.
Judge
Herbert S. Shapiro
Slumber. Board of Directors,
Israel llistadrut Foundation
"ESTATE PLANNING FOR
NEWCOMERS TO FLORIDA'
ISRAEL HISTADRl
ECONOMIC CONFE
[ February 15-18,1976 ^
Sunday, Febr
7 P.M. INAUGURA
Keynote Address: Dr. J
Musical Salute to Israe
Monday, Febi
7 P.M. YIDDISH SPEAl
featuring Shimon Webe
The Jewish Dail>
Tuesday, Fej
lOA.M.ECONr
CONTINENT]
Hon. Ze'ev Sher, Judge Herb
4 P.M. RECEPTION FOR CANADIA
All Above Sessions Free
irrrrraTB'irrrrrrrinrrirrir^
Moe Levin
Vice President,
Israel llistadrut Foundation
' CHAIRMAN,
HOST COMMI1TEE


Dr.
Morton Malavsky
Ambassac
Wednesday
$10.00 per p
fo..JJUJUUULOJUUULft^^
CO-CHAIRMAN.
HOST COMMITTEE
For reservations and in
ISRAEL HISTADRUT FOUNl


Friday, February 6, 1976
W =======
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9

Russian Tenor and Labor Zionist Leader p^Aire
Will Headline Histadrut Conference
n*
A tenor with the Metropolitan
Opera in New York who emi-
grated from the Soviet Union
and one of the nation's leading
Labor Zionist figures win head-
line the opening session of the
tenth annual Histadrut Eco-
nomic Conference for Israel,
Sunday evening. Feb. IS.
According to Dr. Sol Stein,
national president of the Israel
Histadrut Foundation (MF),
Dr. Judah J. Shapiro, president
of the National Committee for
Labor Israel, will deliver the
keynote address at the inaugural
session. Russian tenor Misha
Raitzin will present a musical
salute to Israel.
The four-day conference at
the Fontainebleau Hotel marks
the IHF's $40 million milestone,
the cumulative total of commit-
ments since the organization
was founded IS years ago.
Highlight of the conclave will
be the awards banquet on Wed-
nesday, Feb. 18, in tribute to
one of Israel's major diplomats.
Participants throughout the eco-
nomic conference will include
Israeli officials, Labor Zionist
movement leaders and delegates
from the United Mates and
Canada.
Moe Levin, a national vice
president of the Histadrut
Foundation and chairman of th<*
South Florida Advisory Com-
mittee, is host committee chair-
man for the Feb. 15-18 con-
clave. He will welcome dele-
gates at the inaugural dinner.
Dr. Morton Malvasky, rabbi of
Temple Beth Shalom, Holly-
wood, and chairman of the
South Broward Council of IHF,
is host committee cochairman.
Raitzin. who emigrated to Is-
rael from the Soviet Union in
1972, was a star performer
with the Moscow and Lenin-
grad opera companies as well
as an acclaimed soloist with
the Moscow Philharmonic. He
made his American debut at
Town Hall in New York in Feb-
ruary, 1975. Raitzin will be ac-
companied by Israeli composer-
conductor Shmuel Fershko.
Dr. Shapiro, educator, lec-
turer and author, was elected
the first president of the Labor
Zionist Alliance in 1971. The
editor of the monthly Labor
Zionist publication "Jewish
Frontier," Dr. Shapiro is lor-
mer national director of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations
and past president of the Na-
tional Conference of Jewish
Communal Service.
Names Levin
Continued from Page 1-
lanthropist" of the Palm Airo
area. He became an active
trustee of Beth Israel, took the
lead in raising considerable
funds for the nonsectarian Hen-
derson Clinic for the Mentally
111, assumed chairmanship of
the annual charity balls in Palm
Aire and became an active
worker for United Way.
The Levins have three chil
dren; a son, Stuart, who lives
with his family in the Fort
Lauderdale area; and two (laugh
ters: Cynthia, who is married
and lives in Rockville Centre,
N.Y., and Andrea, who is a grad
uate of the University of Mi
ami and will attend law school
in Washington.
Civil Rights and Liberties
Are NCJW Foruni Topic
a
An open forum on "Chil
Rights and Civil Liberties" will
follow the regular meeting of
the National Council of Jewish
Wrwen. North Broward Section,
on Wednesday, Feb. 18, at 12:30
p.m. at the Women's Club of
Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21st Ct.
The guest speakers will be
Elaine Bloom, a member of the
Florida Legislature; Ray Rus-
sell, an attorney and member
of the American Civil Liberties
Union; Dr. Douglas Gatlin.
chairman of the political sci-
ence department at Florida At-
lantic University.
Alvin Capp, an attorney and
civic leader in the community,
will be moderator.
Area Community Leaders Participate
In Conference with Yitzhak Rabin
A contingent of Jewish com-
munity leaders from the South
Florida and Caribbean area are
participating in a conference
with Israel's Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin and other Cabi-
net leaders on the country's
economic needs and problems
in 1976. The opening session
was in Brussels on Jan. 11.
About 250 Jewish leaders
from the United States, Canada
RUT FOUNDATION
FERENCE FOR ISRAEL
Dr. Judah J. Shapiro
1'nr.ident,
I tlhlil '/.iollist \//ldll I'roidrtif. \titiondl Committee
Itir Labor Israel
WILL OKLIVKR
kl YNOII. AOPIU.SS
JL
Fontainebleau Hotel
)

'ebruary 15th
JRAL ASSEMBLY
Dr. Judah J. Shapiro
Israel: Misha Raitzin
February 16th
EAKING RECEPTION
Veber, Editor-in-Chief,
Daily Forward
February 17th
symposium &
i/JTbreakfast
Herbert Shapiro, Dr. Sol Stein
DIAN FRIENDS OF HISTADRUT
Dr. 'Leon Kronish
Climrnuin.
\titional Hoard of Directors
Israel llistatlrut Inundation
nil. macic spell 01 mi
Dr. Sol Stein
president.
hracl Histadrut Iounil.itmn
"FINANCIAL PLANNING
I OR Ol'R
MATURING YKARS"
*">:
ee By Reservation Only
Yaacov Cohen
I .irinif Director.
Histadrut ,\rah Department,
\\ ILL m: ui icomi n \s NEW
US. IIISTAimUT EMISSARY
rirorinrvvriryTirriroTirrrv^
ERENCE AWARDS BANQUET
Presentation of the
1 MILLION DOLLAR AWARD
to
UENCY simcha dinitz
ssacfor of Israel to the United States
dan, February 18th, 6:30 PM.
*r iterton R.S.V.P.
UJULUULLUI 8 t 9 8 B fl o poo 0 00 0 0 0 8 Q 8 8 91 Ml 8 JLtfl
d Information, contact:
NDATION 927-1656
Shimon Weber
Editor in Chief,
I, in'i Daily I orvard
klSSIVGI It MIDDLt: KAST
POLICY-WHLRL TO?'
[i
Misha Raitzin
Recent Emigre horn Soviet Russia
Tenet, Metropolitan Opera
MUSICAL SALUTE TO ISRAEL
and the Caribbean are partici-
pating in the Prime Minister's
Israel Bonds Conference. The
purpose is to plan a program
to increase *\-z participation of
foreign Jewish communities in
alleviating the pressures on Is-
rael's economy resulting' from
a record high defense budget
and a $3.5 billion balance-O
payments deficit, according to"
Robert L. Siegel, general cam-
paign chairman, Greater Miami
Israel Bond Organization.
The local leaders will m*-t
with the Prime Minister Rabin,
Deputy Prime Minister and Ft i -
eign Minister Yigal Allon, Fi-
nance Minister Yehoshua RaK-
nowitz. Defense Minister SI \-
mon Peres and other Isra*
leaders.
For the first time in the 25*
year history of the. Israel Bond
program the conference is metf-
ing in Europe, focusing atten-
tion on the opportunities for ex-
panded Israeli trade with Eu-
rope as a result of the 1975
tariff agreement with the Com-
mon Market that win lift H
barriers on Israeli goods by the
middle of 1977.
The principal objectives of the
conference are to demonstrate
Israel's urgent need for exports
and energy and to maintain its
deterrent strength to prevent
any new outbreak of war, sji>4
Siegel.
Needed: Books
The Fort Lauderdale-Pom-
pano Beach Chapter of Brwi-
deis University National Wom-
en's Committee is having a bock
sale on March 19 and 20 .it
Lakes Mall. Used books (hard-
bound and paperback) and mag-
azines are needed. Call 527-0792
Jwine and cf
Broward headquarters for
Israeli & American
Kosher wines.
WINE ft CHIME TASTING
PARTIES
Come in ana* browse
or caff...
587-2345
Plantation Community Plszi
266-B So. University
PLANTATION


Pape 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, February 6, 1974
Clara Leff Will Be Honored At
Pioneer Women Bond-with-Israel Luncheon
Metric Teen Tours Director / J
Clara (Mrs. Sidney) Leff.
former national president of
Pioneer Women and the current
CLARA iXIII
national building fund and na-
tional Israel Bonds chairman.
U.S. Hoping
For Political
Settlement
In Lebanon
Continued from Page 1
the Lebanese communities."
Questioned about the com-
ment by Undersecretary of State
Joseph J. Sisco that an inter-
national settlement is needed in
Lebanon, Trattner said that
"while efforts are underway to
resolve the crisis we have to
wait and see" the results of the
discussions between the Syrians,
the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization and the Lebanese Chris-
tians and Moslem groups.
While the impression has been
.hat the U.S. has been in contact
with the PLO on the Lebanese
civil strife. Trattner indicated
that Wshington has not been in-
communication with the organ-
ization.
ASKED by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency whether the
PLO was among the "parties" to
which the U.S. had addressed it-
self on the preservation of Le-
banon's integrity, Trattner said
the U.S. had been in touch with
the "governments" concerned,
the Arabs, Israel and European
countries.
He said he did not have '"spe-
cifics" on what had been agreed
upon in Lebanon so far nor what
Lebanese leaders have consent-
ed to the Syrian proposals.
Earlier this week, Syria as-
sured all parties to the conflict
in Lebanon that it would respect
Lebanese sovereignty. This was
tantamount to a Syrian promise
that it would withdraw all
troops of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization as soon as
"security allows."
THE CONTINENTAL
ASSURANCE CO.
is now looking for several ag-
gressive and talented career
minded individuals, who en-
joy independence, selling and
hard work, and the opportun-
ity for unlimited earnings.
Complete fringe benefit
program
Please reply by resume only
to:
CONTINENTAL
ASSURANCE CO.
3471 N. Federal H'way
Suite 200
Ft. Laurfertkrfe, Ha. 33306
has been named the recipient-
elect of the David Ben-Gurion
Award.
Presentation will be made at
the Pioneer Women Bond-With-
Israel luncheon on Monday, Feb.
23, at 11:30 a.m. at the Eden
Roc Hotel. The announcement
was made by Mrs. Milton Green,
luncheon chairman and presi-
dent of the South Florida Coun-
cil of Pioneer Women.
The luncheon, opening the
1976 Inaugural Conference for
the State of Israel Bonds, will
hear an address by Yaakov Mor-
ris, spokesman of Israel's Per-
manent Mission to the United
Nations.
An internationally known
Jewish leader and lifeling Labor
Zionist, Mrs. Leff, a member of
Pioneer Women for over a quar-
ter of a century, serves on the
board of the American Zionist
Federation and the board of
directors of the National Com-
mittee for Labor Israel, and is
honorary national vice chair-
man of the Jewish National
Fund.
She has represented Pioneer
Women at international gather-
ings and on trips throughout the
world, serving ;ix times as a
delegate to tu Cong-ess in Jtmsal^m and to
the 25th anniversary conference
of Youth AMyah in Israel.
Aftr ioininR Pioneer Women
in 1934, she served as president
of the Greater New York Coun-
cil and has held many positions
on the national level.
Is Interviewing in Florida
9nd all-inclusive fee. Special de-
partures for compatible age
igroups are another specialty.
Teenagers from Florida bav
. gr.na. oo- Mataic Teen Tours for
21 years. Last summer 87 area
teenagers traveled with them.
Special departures from the Mi-
ami area are available.
All the tours are featured in
the 1976 summer brochure,
which is available to anyone in-
terested as are home interviews.
Allen N. Rich, owner-director
of Metric Teen Tours, will visit
the Florida am* during the next
few weeks to inten iew prospec-
tive members- ofj their summer
tours.
Metric Teen Tours specializes
in hotel, camping, and bicycle
tou.s of the United States, Ha-
waii, Europe and Israel. Special'
features include experienced
tourleaders, registered nurses
Sheffield Plating Co. ^j
ELECTRO PLATERS
SILVER SMITHS
SILVER PLATING GOLD PLATING
BRASS COPPER POLISHING
I.ACOIERING LAMPS RESTORED
Come See our ANTIQUES DISPLAY We Boy & Sell
EXPERT REPAIRS & RESTORATION TO
STERLING, OLDSHEFFIELD& PLATE.
3581 N.W. 9th AVE.,p...r....,d, 565-0162
THIS AD
COULD
SAVE YOU
$1,000
WHENYOU
/
If you are one of the thousands
ofJews who came to Florida
to live but still own a cemetery
plot up north, your death could
prove very costly to your
survivors.
Consider the cost of ship-
Cinq the casket and remains
ack. Consider the long
distance phone calls. Consider
that one or more family
members will fly back for the
funeral. The cost of accom-
modations while they are
there.
Your inexpensive burial
plot could become very
expensive.
There is a much more
sensible alternative.
You could buy, outright, a
plot at Lakeside Memorial
Park for a mere $250.00.
This is what you will get
for that $250.00:
1. A beautifully serene
memorial garden setting with
an eight acre reflecting lake.
Most northern cemeteries
are old and depressingly
unattractive.
2. Perpetual care at no
extra cost. Practically all
northern cemeteries charge
an annual fee for care. In a
few years, the cost of this care
could exceed the price of a new
plot at Lakeside.
3. A place your family,
friends and relatives can visit.
Lakeside Memorial Park is a
short bus ride from anywhere
in the Miami area.
See Lakeside Memorial
Park for yourself. It's the kind
of decision you should not
put-off. We're located at
N.W. 25
m>
Miami.
1
thSt.atl03rdAve.,
Phone 305-592-0690.
In Broward:
305-525-9339.
I

. .

*. m *...i i .\_/ x y *A*0 Ai-.-
M i.


^iday, February 6, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
North Broivard Sisterhoods
Plan Joint Meeting, Feb. 24
There will be a joint meeting
of all North Broward County
Sisterhoods at Temple Beth Is-
rael, 7100 W. Oakland Park
Blvd., on Tuesday, Feb. 24, at
10 a.m. under the sponsorship
of Jewish Federation of Great-
er Fort Lauderdale.
Featured speaker is Bill Gold-
stein, director of the Jewish
Community Center at 2999 NW
33 Ave., Ft. Lauderdale. He will
describe the Center's different
activities for everyone from 7
to 77.
Goldstein will describe the
teen s-en. the different swing-
ing-singles g otips (there is
more than one), folk dnncing,
crafts, films, trips for adults as
u 11 as children. Other group
activities, Gold: tein says, will
be staited as peoj.le request
them.
Reservations tor the meet-
ing and luncheon can be made
through the reservations chair-
man of each Sisterhood. Invita-
tions will be mailed out soon.
Dr. Schenk to Lead May Tour To
England, Israel and Holland
Inverrary resident Dr. Eman-
uel Schenk, interim rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El, Fort Laud-
erdale, and rabbi emeritus of
Beth Sholom People's Temple in
Brooklyn, will lead a tour to
London, Israel and Amsterdam.
The direct overnight flight
leaves Miami on May 16 for
London, where a three^iay stop-
over has been arranged. There
will be opportunities for sight-
seeing and theatre- and concert
An overflow group of Cypress Chase As-
sociation B neighbors met on Jan. 28, to
hear Joel Hoch, guest speaker for the
United Jewish Appeal, on behalf of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Laud-
erdale. "The magnificent response of my
friends and neighbors' was overwhelming,"
said Sam Goldstein, breakfast chairman.
Shown above are (seated, from left) Mrs.
Shirley Maiman, cochairman; Irving Geis-
ser, executive director of Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale; Joel
Hoch, guest speaker, campaign cabinet
member; Sam Goldstein, chairman and
president of Cypress Chase. Standing
(from left) are Saul Rosenblatt, past pres-
ident of the condominium, and Al Poretz,
cochairman.
Addiction, Pushers Rampant
Continued from Pa#e 1
ities adopt a national policy
with respect to both the le-
gal and medical aspects of
drug procurement and us-
age.
The Cabinet is expected
to discuss the matter short-
ly, possibly at its next ses-
sion.
BARAK NOTED that narcot-
ics use increased conspicuously
after the 1967 Six-Day War and
has permeated all segments of
Israeli society. According to
Health Ministry estimates, there
are over 1,600 drug addicts in
Israel and the number of ad-
dicts persons who regularly
use drugs is believed to be
increasing at a rate of 150 a
year.
Barak's report said that a
1971 survey showed that five
percent of Israeli high school
students, used drugs, mainly
hashish.
He said no data were available
on the number of student drug
users now.
The Attorney General's re-
port coincided with complaints
of drug use at high schools in
Jerusalem, south Tel Aviv,
Herzhya and. Yahud. Three stu-
dents at the Rehavia Gymnas-
sium in. Jerusalem, one of Is-
rael's most prestigious high
schools, have been questioned
by police about their alleged use
of "pot" marijuana and
three other students were re-
ported under suspicion.
IT WAS- learned, meanwhile,
that police have detained five
youths as alleged drug pushers
at the Rehavia high school.
Planning A Trip?
COUNCIL'S MEW AND
EXCITING TRAVEL
PROGRAMS FOR 1974
EUROPE, ISRAEL CRUISES
NATIONAL COUNCIL
Of JEWISH WOMEN
Call
ULUAN ZALKIN-73S-S7SS
LIVE ONSTAGE-EVERYDAY ,
NEW SHOvV EVhRY FRiDAV
SRAELI INTERNATIONAL
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+ + MAX
PERLMAN
and his International Revue
Plus: EXTRA ADDED ATTRACTIONS
WOLF ORCHESTRA and A FEATURE FILM
DIM SCREEN- "THE MAD ADVENTURES OF RABBJ JACOBS"
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ROWS.
The trip continues to Israel,
where there will be seven days
of visits to many points of in-
terest from the Golan in the
north to Masada and Beersheba
in the Negev and six days for
relaxation, optional tours or
visits with friends and relatives.
The return trio to Miami will
include a two-night stopover in
Amsterdam as well as a side
trip to The Hague.
JEWISH FEDERATION TEEN TRW TO ISRAEL
JUNE 24 JULY 29
For all area Jewish teens, Grades 9-12
ESCORTS: BARRY AND SHOSHANA AXLER
COST: $1,554 PER TEEN, WHICH INCLUDES:
All air fares and transfers, Fort Lauderdale to Tel Aviv
(round trip), and transportation from airport
Three meals daily
Private-bath accommodations in three-star hotels
Sightseeing by private coach with private English-
speaking guide
EXTRA FEATURED ATTRACTIONS!
Ton days living and working on a kibbutz
Meetings and functions with Israeli teenagers
Meetings with Israeli government leaders
Space is limited. If you are interested in signing up or want
further information, please contact Barry Axler, 484-8200, or
fill out the enclosed form and mail to Jewish Federation, 2999
NW 33 Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, Fra. 33311. ____
I am interested in participating in the Jewish Federation Teen
Trip to Israel
Name ....................................................................................................
Address..................................................................................................
Telephone No......................................................................................
Age ....................... School Grade..........................................
FLORIDA'S FINEST
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r\------/
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, February 6, 1976

tWj*
^afrfruraal P^e
co-orclinated by tfte
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz Raobi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
GREAT AMERICAN-JEWISH PERSON AUTIES
Rabbi Isaac Leeser
By RABBI DR. DAVID RAAB
Temple Beth Solomon
Rabbi Isaac Leeser was born
in Westphalia, Germany, on
Dec. 12, 1806. He had attended
the Gymnasium of Muenster,
where he received a good foun-
dation in Latin, German and
Hebrew. In 1824, at the invita-
tion of his uncle, Zalman
Rheine, he came to Richmond,
Va. He worked there at the
business of his uncle, who was a
rich merchant. On Sat'.irday and
Sunday, however, he assisted
the Hajzan in the Synagogue
to teach religion and Jewish
history.
It was while answering an
anti-Jewish article in the "Rich-
mond1 Whig," which had ap-
peared in the "London Quar-
terly,'] that brought him to the
attention of the congregation in
Philadelphia. In 1829 he was
therefore invited to become the
Hazzan at the prestigious Con-
gregation Mickve Israel of
Philadelphia. His articles of de-
fense of the Jews (a prelude
to the Anti-Defamation League
of Bnai B'rith) were published
in 1833 as "Jews and the Mosaic
Law" and "The Claims of the
Jews to an Equality of Rights.**
Leeser was referred to as
"Orthodox" by proponents of
Reform and looked upon as a
reformer by his congregation.
He was definitely in favor of
change and modernization, but
change within the framework
of tradition and Mosaic prac-
tice. One of his great changes
was to introduce into the
Sephardic Synagogue preaching
in the English language.
IN THE BOOK "The Jews of
Philadelphia" by Henry Samuel
Morais, we read that "in the
year 1829 a man who became
the most distinguished of He-
brew Spiritual Guides in this
community; a man who in fact
was the pioneer, levelling the
way and arranging the system
for organization among the
Jews in the United States, was
invited to become the Pastor
of Congregation Mickve Israel.
This man was Rev. Isaac Lee-
ser."
From 1830 till the end of the
Civil War in 1865, American
Jewish history was really
known as the "Age of Leeser."
He contributed a great deal to
Judaism and to the religious
and cultural life of the com-
munity, and th eentire Amer
ican Jewish populace. Materials
and books on Judaism in Amer-
ica were limited, and Leeser
supplied most of these needs.
Indeed, he was the greatest pio-
neer in the progress of Judaism
and Jewish knowledge In the
new land of opportunity.
Truly, he was an all-around
personality and scholar. He
wrote textbooks for children,
prayerbooks for the synagogues
and translated the Bible into
modern English. Known as
"The Leeser Bible" and com-
pleted in 1854, it was the stand-
ard English translation until
1917, when the new Jewish Pub-
lication Society translation of
the Bible was published.
LEESER was also the one
who published the first nation-
al Jewish magazine in the
United States, "The Occident"
and "The American Jewish Ad-
vocate." Concerning the maga
zine, Dr. Bertram Korn in his
book "The Early Jews of New
Orleans" wrote that 'The Occi-
dent" publication "was perhaps
the greatest contribution which
Leeser made to American Jew-
ish life. He edited it single-
handedly, and always lost
money on its publication. If he
had married, and needed to
support a family he could never
had carried it eff."
What is most important about
Leeser's work was his great
dedication to Jewish education.
With the famous Rebecca Gratz,
he founded the first congrega-
tion religious sunday school,
which has served as the proto-
type of our present religious
schools.
He was also successful, to-
gether with Solomon Solis. in
founding a secular school, the
Hebrew Education Society. To
serve a great need in America,
he founded the Maimonides
College, to train rabbis for the
American rabbinate.
One of his most lasting and
influential contributions was
the Jewish Publication Society,
which has published more
books on Judaica than any
other publishing firm and con-
tinues to publish and distribute
books of Jewish interest
throughout the country.
After setting the foundation
for the basic institutions of
Jewish life in A^^nc*. Lee"r
died on Feb. 1, 1868, at age 62.
He will continue to occupy an
important position in the his-
tory of the American Jewish
community, especially as we ob-
serve the Bicentennial of Amer-
ica.
The American Jewish com-
munity is richer for having had
the great pioneer of Judaism in
its midst. Orthodox, Conserva-
tive and Reform Judaism have
been enriched by this giant of
the Jewish spirit.
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Russia's Historic Hatred of the Jew Continues
As America Begins Her Bicentennial
RABBI NATHAN H. ZWITMAN
Congregation B'nai Zion
When Malik walked out on
Moynihan's speech on behalf of
Israel in the UN General As-
sembly's closing session, I saw
the present inherit the past.
Back in 1563 Yuden-rein Rus-
sia lost its distinction as Ivan
the Terrible conquered Poland
and its Jewish population be-
came a part of Russia.
"What will be do with the
Jews?" asked the Czar. Quickly
replied the "religious" Ivan,
"Baptize them or drown them
in the river." They were drown-
ed.
Thus began the history of the
Jews in Russia. New Jews came
and continued to be eradicated
and to reappear. For over 400
years they were forced to seek
shelter in a land where pogroms
and terrible Ivans waited for
them.
Today over 2 million are
stranded there and not allowed
to leave. The new Ivan may no
longer attack the Jew, but oh!
how he strikes at Judaism. The
blood accusations of old are
reflected in such distortions of
fact as "Zionism is racism," and
in spreading such venomous
falsehoods into the bloodstream
of Jew-hating nations of the
world.
Not only do I seek to show
that Malik the Russian is heir
to his past, but also that Moyni-
hari the American is heir to his.
America was founded on He-
braic Biblical principles. The
Psalms of David filled the pages
CANOLELIGHTING TIME
1 ADAR 5:48
m
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
What are "selichothf"
"Selichoth" are penitential
prayers whose theme is to seek
forgiveness from the Almighty.
They are particularly in order
when a person or community is
confronted with matters of great
concern. It is for this reason
that "selichoth" are recited be-
fore the holiday of Rosh Hash-
anah and between the holidays
of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kip-
pur.
Since these holidays are days
of judgment when a decision for
life or death hangs in the bal-
ance, it is certainly in order to
offer prayers for forgiveness to
insure a positive judgment for
life.
Some communities begin
these prayers a month before
Rosh Hashanah, others begin
the prayers at least four days
before Rosh Hashanah, starting
with the midnight after the Sab-
bath before Rosh Hashanah.
Why is it that in many com-
munities such as ours, the be-
ginning of the selichoth pray-
ers takes place after midnight
f the Sabbath before Rosh
Hashanah?
There are several motives for
this practice. In the first place,
the rabbis ordain that selichoth
should be chantede at least fout
days before Rosh Hashanah.
This is because the law of
sacrifices required that a sa-
crifice be prepared at least four
days before its offering to make
sure that it had o blemish.
On Rosh Hashanah, accord-
ing to the rabbis, man himself
is the sacrifice whose very life
is "at stake." He therefore pre-
pares himself at least four days
before Rosh Hashanah to make
sure he is free of the blemish of
guilt.
The rabbis farther felt that
selichoth cannot be chanted on
the Sabbath and that the spirit
of the Sabbath persists until
fnidnight. Thus, the moment
after midnight is the first occa-
sion to chant tne selichoth.
While the Sabbath is not the
occasion for selichoth because
It is a moment of complacency
as compared to the occasion of
selichoth which disturbs the
mind, it does serve as a day of
clearing the mind. It is, thus,
after the "rest" of the Sabbath
that man has a clear mind, espe-
cially in the quiet hours of in-
trospection after midnight. It is
an ideal time to examine one's
self with the "rested" mind so
that one can be both clear and
objective as well as hopeful.
of the first book printed in this
country.
John Elliot, Isaac Addington,
Ethan Allen, Increase and Cot-
ton Mather spoke Hebrew. Wil-
liam Bradford published the
first Hebrew grammar in Amer-
ica. The Seal of the newly foun-
ed United States, drawn up by
Franklin and Jefferson, shows
Pharaoh and his men in pur-
suit of the fleeing Israelites,
who reach the dry shores of the
divided waters which close upon
Pharaoh and his warriors, and
on the bottom appear the words
from the Bible, "Resistance to
tyrants is obedience to God."
At the beginning of our 200-
year history every sophomore,
junior and senior at Harvard
University had to recite a verse
from the Hebrew original of the
Old Testament at morning pray-
er.
In 17X1 Ezra Stiles delivered
the Commencement Address at
Yale in Hebrew. As far back as
1660 the study of Hebrew was
required in the Public Schools
of New Haven.
Great has been our role in
every area of American life. We
constructed skyscrapers and
subways in New York. We built
bridges across the Golden Gate
in San Francisco. We raise stock
in the blue grass country in
Kentucky. We operate mines in
Colorado. We grow wheat in
Kansas.
There is no sector of the
commercial, industrial or artistic
life of America which Jews have
not benefited. We take pride in
these accomplishments, but we
lose the true purpose of our
Bicentennial when we fail to
recognize our spiritual contribu-
tion as our greatest gift to this
country.
In the truest sense America
is a spiritual rather than a
material entity. Russia is larger
in extent of territory, popula-
tion and natural resources. But
it is not, and never will be, as
great as America unless free-
dom to earn a livelihood, re-
ceive an education and vote
freely are given to-all citizens.
Remove these freedoms and
America is no longer America.
May this never happen. May
this land always be heir to its
past.
Inside Judaica
Q. How does Judaism feel
about hospitality?
A. In ancient Israel, says the
authoritative Encyclopaedia Ju-
daica, hospitality was not mere-
ly a question of good manners,
but a moral institution which
grew out of the harsh desert and
nomadic existence led by the
people of Israel. The biblical
customs of welcoming the weary
traveler and of receiving the
stranger in one's midst was the
matrix out of which hospitality
and all its tributary aspects de-
veloped into a highly esteemed
virtue in Jewish tradition. Bib-
lical law specifically sanctified
hospitality toward the stranger
who was to be made particular-
ly welcome "for you were
strangers in a strange land"
(Lev. 19:34 and Ex. 12:49)
The Bible is replete with ex-
amples of pious hospitality. The
extreme to which hospitality
was taken is shown by the
stories of Lot and the old man
of Gtbeah who were prepared
to sacrifice the honor of their
daughters in order to protect
their guests, who were to them
complete strangers (Gen. 19:4-8
and Judg. 19:23-24).
Rabbinic literature widened
the scope of the virtue of hos-
pitality, which it called "bring-
in of guests." One of the virtues
for which one enjoys the fruits
in this world and obtains the
principal reward in the world to
come, hospitality is, according
to R. Johanan, even more im-
portant than prayer or, accord-
ing to R. Judah, than receiving
the divine presence. The Mid-
rash relates that even at the
height of Nebuchadnezzar's
siege of Jerusalem, mothers
would deprive their children of
the last crust in order to grant
hospitality to a mourner. Chil-
dren were taught to be hospi-
table by instructing them to in-
vite guests to dine when they
answered the door.
On the other hand, the E/J
reports, the rabbis denounced
the parasitical guest, especially
if he were a scholar. Two extre-
mes were avoided through a
clear definition of the duties of
host and of guest The host was
forbidden to make his guest un-
comfortable either by appear-
ing miserable or by watching
his guest too attentively, or by
neglecting to serve his guest
himself. The guest was instruct-
ed to show gratitude to recite
a special blessing for his host,
to leave some food on the plate,
and to comply with his host's
wishes. Some six centuries
earlier, Ben Sira (1st century
C.E.) had already defined the
table manners which were to be
practiced by the guest, and had
condemned the parasite, who
took advantage of hospitality.
The tradition of hospitality
was particularly apparent among
Jewish communities in the Mid-
dle Ages and a separate chari-
table association called Hevra
Hakhnasat Orehim was estab-
lished for that purpose. Me-
dieval European Jewish com-
munities instituted a system of
pletten or "meal tickets" for
travelers and itinerant scholars,
and in the 15th century, estab-
lished student hostels. Nor was
individual hospitality neglected;
among Polish communities, it
was also the custom to billet
students with members of the
community for their daily
meals. This custom, known as
essen-teg, later spread to Ger-
many. In modern times, chari-
table institutions have assumed
most of tne responsibility oi
communal hospitality.
* -w


"-^
F( bruary 6, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Louder dale
Page 13
0 MINDLIN

allege Teachers9 Union Slap at Freedom
Continued from Page 4
eals for those who so pas-
lonately belonged to them.
I TheoreticaUy then, my father
las a union-sympathizer. It
las a part of his Jewish na-
\re and the Jewish search for
kstice.
[BUT AS a businessman, he
Led unions. He did not want
ople telling him what to do
nd what not to do in his own
usiness affairs. That to him
tyranny and oppression,
,T suppose that's where my
Iwn schizophrenia with respect
|o unions comes from. I am as
Passionate about justice as I am
Egainst people telling me what
to do.
In this context, I can never
shake from my consciousness
Jefferson's insight that "man-
Kind are more disposed to suf-
Ifer. while evils are sufferable,
Ithan to right themselves by
[abolishing the forms to wnich
|they are accustomed."
APPARENTLY, not so the
union-bent at Miami-Dade. For
e\eral years now, they have
een telling me and everybody
Ise, by memo, all about the
[evils I suffer at the hands of
the college administration and
board of trustees, although I
have never really been aware
of these evils.
Obituaries
I COLLINS
CLAIMS, 7.".. of Pompano, passed
sway Wi clnesday. January 28th. For-
merly of N'cw York, she wan a mem-
Temple Shalom In Pompano
lusih and active In Hadaaaah for
10 y.Hrs She is survived by a son,
Knhraiin, of Pi'moano; brother Mau-
ri, -i Singer of New York; three step-
brothers. Mas Friedman of Connec-
ticut. Sum and David Friedman,
both i'f New York; a stepsla.ter, Mrs.
I'auHin Hum, of New^''York< 1t'i>
sraiuli hililren. Steven HmF Wlan.
Servleei- were held at The Riverside,
l'Tl N.W. Slat Avenue, Sunrise,
Fla Interment In Mt. Sinai Ceme-
tery. Miami.
My opinions, they tell me,
are not solicited with respect
to wages, hours, promotion,
fringe benefits, retirement
plans. While that is not alto-
gether true, I suppose some of
it is true.
But a more important truth
is that I do not solicit the opin-
ions of tne administration or
board with respect to what or
how I teach, nor do they voice
any. This is of far greater sig-
nificance to me than any of the
other considerations, and it is
a separation of powers I must
enjoy, or I could not teach at
all.
I AM more interested in
teaching than in the business
of teaching. In fact, I am not in-
terested in the business of
teaching at all. I am content to
let those whose business is the
business of teaching engage in
that business.
If I were interested in busi-
ness, I would not be a teacher
and a journalist. As a teacher,
If I do not like the business
methods of those responsible
for the business of teaching,
then I am free to leave.
In the spirit of Jefferson on
man's capacity to endure and
prevail, if I dislike a room in a
house, I need not burn the
house down. I can try to redo
the room to my liking or I
can move.
For this freedom of choice, I
pay some price, which is to say
that I am not an equal negotia-
tor in contractual matters.
BUT IT is, in my opinion, far
smaller than the price I will
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have to pay if the union-bent
win.
Then, I will have pretender-
teachers over me in the busi-
ness of teaching, whose skills
neither in teaching nor in the
business of teaching I will be
able to trust. And I say "over
me" advisedly, since I have no
one "over me" now.
I will be required, for exam-
ple, to pay a fee (dues) for
services rendered to me which
I do not want. I pay nothing
now.
I WILL have even less to say
in my contractual matters than
I have now I am already be-
ing told by the union-bent, even
before they have won, that it
would be "advisable" for their
representatives to have both
the right and the power to be
present at every slightest oc-
casion that I may want to dis-
cuss with some chairman or ad-
ministrator the business of my
teaching. This is not true now,
either.
In fact, I am informed, it
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would not be "advisable" to
seek out such an occasion in
my own behalf without first
contacting them so they can de-
cide whether the meeting is ne-
cessary at all, or whether or
not they should be present if
they approve the meeting.
In the end, I will not be able
te speak for myself, which I
find hateful. I have already
been told, even before they
have won, that this will be nec-
essary to the preservation of
the integrity of the union whose
primary interest is, after all,
my own best interest.
I CAN not help divorcing this
sense of "obiter dicta" from
Marx's view in the Manifesto
that totalitarian proletarianism
is prerequisite to all revolu-
tions if they are to be success-
ful but that, ultimately, the to-
talitarianism wanes in the same
proportion as revanchism
wanes.
I have yet to see the waning
of totalitarianism in the guise
of proletarianism anywhere on
earth not in Moscow, not in
Peking, not in Havana, not in
Kampala. Nor do I see it in a
single union yet, American or
British, where the pride, and
the responsibility, of individual-
ism are dead.
The truth is that I don't even
know who is issuing these
union memoranda to me. And I
already feel a sense of pro-
found oppression by these
anonymous, selfless souls so de-
termined to speak for me.
THIS IS not a matter of the-
ory, nor possibly even a matter
of fact. It is a matter of feeling:
The union be damned.
Totalitarianism revulses me.
especially when it waves the
flag of humanity. In this, I sup-
pose, I am truly my father's
son.

THOMAS M. ALPM. OWNER AND OtHCCTON
7401 N. m. 4TM STREET r-lAWTATION. flOHIDA 33317
Iw/'DuwJ
ife oh'
^.tmr*v *<<'*-

nvitoiaa i*iii iBW i
Star
of
David
Memorial Gardens,
AS BEAUTIFUL
AS THE SYMBOL
IT REPRESENTS.
The staff of the Star of David Memorial
Gardens would like to invite all members
of the Jewish community to visit this
beautiful Jewish cemetery and to inspect
our new open-air Memorial Chapel. The
Star of David Memorial Gardens has been
carefully designed to comply with Judaic law
and tradition and has been dedicated by the
Broward Board of Rabbis.
We at the Star of David Memorial Gardens
feel it is important that every prospective
purchaser visit the cemetery prior to making
i decision. For additional information call Rabbi
Milton Gross at the Star of David Memorial
Gardens office or at his home, 741-9218.
.
We invite you to see omr brom* memorials by
Cor ham. Master Craftsmen in Silver and Bronze
Star of David Memorial Gardens
7701 BAILEY ROAD TAMARAC FLORIDA 305-721-4112
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1577 Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33302


in
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, February 6, 1976
community
calendar
SATURDAY, tBRUARY 7
Temple Beth Israel USY Dance8 p.m.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8
Temple Beth Israel Artist Series: Aliza Kashi Show9 p.m.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9
Adult Art Class, Jewish Community Center10 a.m.
North Broward Hadassah Board Meeting10 a.m.
Adult Gourmet Cooking Class, Jewish Community Center
1 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Men's Club Board Meeting8 p.m.
Women's ORT Sunverary Chapter General Meeting
Alpha Omega Dental Fraternity8 p.m.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood Board Meeting9:45 a.m.
Jewish Community Center Senior Citizens Meeting1:30-
4 p.m.
Tween Lounge and Game Room (Grades 7-8), Jewish
i Community Center7:30 p.m.
Temple Sholom Executive Board Meeting, Temple Library
8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Senior and Junior USY Basketball8 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11
Brandeis National Women's Board Meeting10 a.m.
Federation Women's Division $150 Fashion Show, Bahia
Mar11 a.m.
Woodlands ORT Regular Meeting1 p.m.
Senior Adult Movies, Jewish Community Center7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah Education Day10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Jewish Community Center Senior Citizens Meeting1-4 p.m.
Kensington Royal Coast Condominium UJA Meeting4 pm.
Teen Israeli Folk Dancing, Jewish Community Center
7:30 p.m.
, Plantation UJA Parlor Meeting8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Board of Directors Meeting8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Senior and Junior USY Basketball
8 p.m.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14
Temple Beth Israel Young Couples Club8 p.m.
Cantor's Concert at Temple Emanu-El8 p.m.
Women's ORT Sunverary Chapter Monte Carlo Night
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY IS
Temple Emanu-El UJA Meeting4 p.m.
Tamar Hadassah Fund-Raiser7 p.m.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16
Adult Art Cla6s at Jewish Community Center10 a.m.
Federation Teacher Enrichment Program10 a.m.
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah Aviva Group12:30 p.m.
Adult Gourmet Cooking Class, Jewish Community Center
1 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood General Meeting8 p.m.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17
Federation Women's Division Area Affairs
Temple Shalom Sisterhood General Meeting11:30 a.m.
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah L'Chayim Group12:30 p.m.
Jewish Community Center Senior Citizens Meeting1-4 p.m.
Tween Lounge and Game Room (Grades 7-8)7:30 p.m.
Jewish Federation Board of Directors Meeting8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Senior and Junior USY Basketball8 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18
Federation Women's Division Area Affairs
National Council of Jewish Women General Meeting10 a.m.
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah Shalom Group12:30 p.m.
Sea Colony-Geison UJA Meeting4 p.m.
Senior Adult Movie, Jewish Community Center7:30 p.m.
Jewish Education Committee Meeting, Federation Office
8 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El Men's Club Meeting8 p.m.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19
Federation Women's Division Area Affairs
Plantation Women's Division $52 Luncheon
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah liana Group12:30 p.m.
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah Tamar Group12:30 p.m.
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah Bat Yam Group12:30 p.m.
Jewish Community Center Senior Citizens Meeting1-4 p.m.
Teen Israeli Folk Dancing, Jewish Community Center
----- 7:30 pirn.
Waterford Point UJA Meeting8 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El Executive Board Meeting8 p.m.
Plantation UJA Parlor Meeting8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Youth Committee Meeting8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Senior and Junior USY Basketball8 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Women, Tamarac Chapter No. 1479, Regular
Meeting
Religious
HJT LAUOlttOAll
TAMARAC JIVV'SH CENTER. 10
N.W. 57th St. (Conservative).
BETH ISRAEL (Temple) 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvo. Rabbi Philip
A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice Neu.
EMANU-EL (Temple) 3245 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Reform. Cantor
Jerome Klement.
YOUNG I8RAE.L of HOLLYWOOD.
(Orthodox). 3W1 Stirling Rd.
PtANTATION
Plantation. Rabbi Arthur J. Abramm.
Friday 8 p.m.
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION, 400 South Nob Hill Road.
OMPANO MACH
HOLOM (Tempi*). IIS SB 1 Ml Ave.
Conservative. Rebbl Morrta A. Skoe,
Cantor Jacob J. Ranzer.
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. (Con
servet-ve) 0101 NW ttn St
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL
(Conservative). 7640 Margate Blvd.,
Margate. Cantor Charles Parlman.
COtAl SPRIIMS
CCRAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. Reform. 3721 N.W.
100th Ave Rabbi Max Weitz. 44
Friends for Life
Book Fair
The Friends for Life Book
Fair will be held on Feb. 27
and 28 at the Coral Ridge Shop-
ping Plaza, Federal Highway
and Oakland Park Blvd.
Proceeds from the Book Fair
will help provide medical loan
scholarships for the University
of Miami Medical School.
"A Better Life that Lasts
Longer" is the slogan of Friends
for Life and they need your
help to reach their goal.
If you have books to donate,
hardbound or paperback, call
733-0336 or 739-2144 and they
will be picked up.
Bar Mitzvah
MIICHAEL BRAVERMAN
Michael, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Don Braverman, became a Bar
Mitzvah on Jan. 30 at Temple
Beth Israel.
tr
REBECCA SALAME
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Salame's,
daughter, Rebecca, will be Bat
Mitzvah at Temple Beth Israel
this evening at 8 p.m.
a a a
MITCHEL SLATER
Mitchel Slater will be Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday morning,
Feb. 7, at Plantation Jewish
Congregation. Services will be
held at Deicke Auditorium in
Plantation.
LOREN TOBIN
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Tobin's
daughter, Loren, will be Bat
Mitzvah at Temple Sholom on
Friday, Feb. 20, at 8 p.m. Mr.
and Mrs. Tobin will host the
Oneg Shabbat in Loren's honor.
'Midrises' Under Construction
At Rossmoor Coconut Creek
I
Rossmoor Coconut Creek,
Jrlt community,. being vt-loped in the Poi'ipano Ueach-,. n -*^M
Margate area, continues hus betf-JfcoliTMartinique Vil-
constructiDn and sales pro- lag.: will consist of midrise
gress. and is now one of Brow- apartments in five basic floor
IU1, according to
I '- president of
s, response
ard county's most popular de-
veloping communities.
The 304 units of Bahama
Village. Rossmoor's first con-
struction phase, are almost sold
out. Construction of Nassau
Village, the second phase, is
complete and residents have
been moving in since early
December.
Development of Nassau Vil-
lage West is under way. A pre-
const ruction sales offering has
been made for units in Martini-
plans, f om studios to two-bed-
room, two-bath apartments.
Martinique Village villas, the
first "midrise" apartments, will
be in the area of the 16th, 17th
and 18th holes of the 18-hole
Rossmoor golf course.
Uchin said, "We have had
many requests for multistory
units with elevators. Residents
want higher elevations with
imposing views and they do
NOT want to climb stairs
not at all."

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Trips by Canoe Horseback Riding Special Teen Program
Reading and Math Clinics Traditional Friday & Sabbath
Services Bar Mitzvah Lessons All Dietary Laws Observed
M.D. I> 2 R.N.'s Staff our Modern Infirmary at ALL Times.
Accredited Member American Camping Association
Your Camp Directors:
COACH J. I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS & SHEILA WALDMAN
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P.O. Box 402888, Miami Beach, Florida 33140
SIGN UP NOW
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SUNDAY, FEB. 22nd FROM 4 P.M. TO 6 P.M


BfeoBee.


y, February 6, 1976
The JewUh Floridum of Greater Port LauderdaJe
THE JEWISH
Page IS
2999 NW 33rd Avenw, Tort lauderaol, -:-
BILL GOLDSTEIN, Director
GLORIA KATZ, UHor
HARRIET PERE& Coedifor
CENTER
PHone: 4*4-8200
A WOffD F*OM THE D/KCrOR
fie More We Get Together,
lie Better Off We'll Be...
Someone asked me a while ago exactly what we did to
luse our children with Jewish content. It really got me
Inking in terms of expectations people have about us (the
3) and what it is we do.
Our overall goal is to help individuals and thus the
lal community to realize their 'potential and to enjoy and
Iw within our capabilities; to expand continually and to
[just successfully to current society. Essentially this is
aim.
To this we add the dimension of "Jewish Community"
i that we Jews are related, or an extended family, if you
(l, and we have a very special culture to preserve and
which to identify.
How do we accomplish all this? Through what we
U "program." We bring people together in groups. That
where much of our life is spent in small groups. Ac-
(wnplishment, recognition and involvement can only oc-
ir within the context of group activity.
So we bring Jews together in group activity with
ier Jews. We feel our goals are substantially accom-
lished by doing this: Jews getting together with other
ewssocializing, learning end accomplishing; feeling com-
frtable with one another and enriching their lives through
Dal-oriented activities.
Bringing Jews together from all parts of our large city
courages the feeling of community togetherness and of
lily" which is essentially what we all are.
We also try not to lose sight of the fact that people
a need in our complex society for fun and a pleasant
This release from the tension of everyday living is
iportant for successful adjustment.
Calendar
ebruary
7 8 10 11 Teene Guys and Gals Guys and Oak Senior Adults Tweena Senior Adults
12 Senior Adults
14 17 Guys and Gals Tweens Senior Adults
13 Tweens Senior Adults
19 Senior Adults
21 22 22 24 Teens Guys and Gals Tweens Guys and Gals Shalom Sociables Senior Adults
25 Tweens Senior Adults
8-11:30 p.m.
Hidden Harbour Lounge 9 p.m.
Car Wash 11:30-3:00
Crafts, Games, Dancing 1-4 p.m.
Jean Scene Lounge 7:30-9 p.m.
Movie: "The Best Things in
Life Are Free." Refreshments
7:30 p.m.
League of Women Voters:
Election Issues I* p.m.
Sadie Hawkins *arty 8:30 .p;m.
Jean Scene Lounge 8-11:30 p.m.
Continuation of 1-4 p.m.
Jean Sceae fcotmge 7:3W:p:m.
Movie: "Woman Times Seven"
Refreshments and .Social Hear
7:30 p.m.
Harry Appel on
"Consume* Affairs" l4.w
Jean Scene Lounge 8-11:30 p.m.
Hay rid*.and Barbecue 8-p.m.
Bowling Party and Picnic
Softball Game and Barbecue 2 p.m.
CAFE SHALOM 7:30.p.nv
Continuation of
"Consumer Affairs" 1-4 p.m.
Jean Scene Lounge 7:30-9 p.m.
Movie: "Sunflower," starring
Sophia Loren and
Marcello Mastroianni. 7:30 p.m.
[Elementary After-School Programs
To register, call Sandy at Jewish Community Center, 484*209.
Programs, conducted at JCC Building, are 48 sessions. Cost: $3.
IHy
Monday
Tuesday
P^hursdsy
3il5-5 pm
3:15-5 pm
3:15-5 pm
3:2aa
K-2
3-5
K-2
3-5
K-2
3-S
Programs
All.American Sports
Artsy and Crafts*
"Young T*icassos Art Class
Creative Dancetastru*tso
Hammer and Nails
Chef and Hestese
T-appeU r anfrStoryTfour
Singles To Open ( hiMpen's Cultural Arts Series
Cafe Shalom
The Shalom Sociable Singes,
organised just a few months
ago for men and women 45
years nd over, plan the (grand
o^enwt* nf Caf- Srmlom m the
JCC building for Sunday, Feb.
22, at 7:30 p.m.
Entertainntent will be. pro-
vided by Chet Savage, with
il 'n'-'nt; to follow. Admission:
members $1, guests $2.
"Ft 4s expected that the cafe
will become the social center
the answer to a need for
such a meeting place, judging
from the resnonse since Novem-
ber when the Sociables was
founded," siid Mrs. Hilda Rob-
bins, coordinator of the club.
Cafe Shalom wilLbe a month-
ly function featuring a show and
dancing.
Children in Fart Lauderdale
have long been Ignored when it
came to entertainment at their
own level. Parents usually
search'for a good movie, a spe-
cial-interest program once a
year,- or depend on a school
program- At last, through the
concentrated efforts of several
parents in the community with
Suzanne Mellin and Linda Stew-
art as chairwomen, quality pro-
grams have been put together
for the benefit and easy acces-
sibility of parents and children.
One Sunday a month during
Marcki April and May a pro-
gram geared to children's inter-
ests will be presented in Fort
Lauderdale High School's audi-
torium. Several programs are
being brought in from Miami
and all are well known locally.
Descriptions of each program
will be published in subsequent
issues of this paper. A second
Cultural Series will be planned
for next year.
Registration Is Open For
Pompano After-Sehool Program
Shalom, the after-school pro-
gram has been extended hit"
Pompano. Kindergarteners and
first-graders will be offered an
Athletics and Crafts 'Outreach'
Is Successful in Plantation
More than 123 children are
participating in an outdoor ath-
letic program and crafts studio
each coordinated with the
child's abilities, not school
gradeon Monday and Thurs-
day afternoons at Tropical Ele-
mentary School.
Instructors for the program
include Gary Coleman, the
South Plantation football
coach; Jeanne Johnson, Planta-
tion Park Physical Education;
Gary Souter, Seminole Middk-
School art instructor; Bob Hard-
er, Pompano Middle Physical
Education; and Kathleen Mar-
dan, gymnast.
They are professionals inter-
ested in helping children be-
Seniors'
Movies
Coming attractions for the
Senior Adult Wednesday eve-
ning movies include:
Feb: 11: "The .Best Things
in Life Are Free."
A rollicking, colorful musical .
with Gordon MscRae and
oneree North shout 'the iis*l
to prominence of the team of
DeSylwi, Brown and Hender-
son whose songs were the owt-
stsadtag-hife of the 1A2Q.* and
30*s. Interspersed in the story
are 20 of their most popular
soags as well as the aVmcmg -
then in vogue.
Feb. 18: "Woman Times
Seven."
A plain young housewife,
Shirley MacLnine, feels loasly
and -neglected *y the -husband,
she.adores (Aten Arkjo). When
she tries to involve him in con-
versation, he sneaks only of his
latest fictional heroine, Sfmone,
a wild creature who capitivotes
men. The mousy wife's behav-
ior, becomes increasingly
starfltrigas she resolves to turn
herself into a "super-Simone."
Shows begin at 7:30, and a
socsal hour warn rsArestiments
fotlswa.
Admission: $1.
Jewish
, iiuys and Gals
Made up Of singles between
18* and 30 years of age, the
groun has a varied program of
activities including car rallies,
baseball games, barbecues, hay-
rides and weekend ttias.
AH interested in joining this ,
dynamic, growing singles group
should corgaattfibew-v Hod*c t
523-8618, Barb I*ynn at *W-
come involved creatively dur-
ing after-school hours.
Some of the highlights so far
have been use of the five-foot-
diameter "gang" ball, football
clinics, pyramid-building, dodge-
ball games, running and jump-
ing and gymnastics.
athletic and recreation program
which can be defined as move-
ment, use of large muscles aad
the use of the body in the con-
text of games and skills learn-
ing.
Second- through fourth-grad-
ers will have the opportunity to
try their hand at such arts-and-
crsfta projects as decoupage
and macrame.
The programs are scheduled
for Wednesdays from 3:45 to
5:30 p.m. at 132 SE 11th Ave.,
Pompano Beach.
To register, call Sandy at the
JCC office, 484-8200.
Children in the after-school program at Tropical Ele-
mentary School enjoy games during the athletics part
of the afternoan.

M^m^Tjn&l.
JCC
proudly presents
"ESPECIALLY FOR CHILDREN"
The Fort Lauderdale Symphony Quartet
2 p.m.
March 28
Ann Le van's Puppets in
"'OO-long the Sea Dragon"

April 16
2 p.m.
Ruth Forman's Pied Piper Players
May 23
2 p.m.
At Fort Lauderdale High School
Series Ticket: $5
clip and mail
Name
Address
Number of Tickets ....................
Amount Enclosed............................
Please include stamped self-addressed envelope.


n--------*A
Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, February 6, 197J
DEVELOP
OUR
NATUR AI,
R ESC *tW m
Our strongest natural resource has always been people.
And the most precious part of that resource is our children.
They are our future doctors, teachers, scientists and leaders.
Each one needing care...an education... help to grow strong.
In Israel today, the job of educating and caring for the
children grows increasingly more difficult. The effort to
protect their lives leaves little money to develop their futures.
And right here, in our community, there are children who need
the same attention, the same help.
Our children's future will determine our future.
We Are One
Make Your Pledge Now
to the Jewish Federation's
1976 United Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign
JEWISH FEDERATION OF G REATER FORT LAUDERDALE
2999 H.W. 33rd AVENUE FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 33311 *
Telephone 444-3200
I
i


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