The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00045

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
T*
wJemsti Floridfer/
OF UttEATER FORT LUOFJtttlBJ:
Volume 4 N'umber 2'
Fridav, November 28, 1975
3 Sections $1.00
UJA Leadership Mission Members Meet
With Israel's "Fonn
Lei C nan, general chairman of the 1976 Campaign
. i leration ol Greater Fort Lauderdale, re-
st ha to The Jewish Floridiarion some of the won-
n and felt en the mission he recently led to Israel:
"\V 'urod ,:i '''! m Heights
elation"-The Peonk
nd cli 'I1.'-' I i sn observation
nost wMch overlooked the Syr-
ian border. W. could see the
l'.\ personnel st the buffer zone
between no-man's land and the
Syrian border.
"Then we visited a Malben
home in Richon I'Zion where
they had over 100 elderly resi-
dents mostly in their 80's and
ol ler, ;il! of wh m ;re pi o-
ductive. The..- ha I their own
workshops, manufacturing arti-
crafts and ban lie ifts and thes i
very bright, productive, ani-
mated peo"le were thrilled to
have American Jews come see
how they live. Many of them
were new'y arrire^ from Rus-
sia and Rumania. We saw how
our dollars w;re working and
providing.
"We visit.'d an absorption
cenl sr, where a grouo of newly
arrived doctors and d sntist"
were being taught Hebrew an-'
certain technical courses s'
thev cot:ld bt integrated int:
Israeli societv, Thev wr* intel
ligent and hig'ily trained pro-
Continued on Page 8-A
Goodman reports on Fed-
eration Mission to Israel
and needs of '76 campaign.
The director of Malben speaks to members of the mis-
sion group.
Sylvia Geisser, Rovi Faber, and Sarah and Herman Blum
chat with a youngster.
Baer Leads Federation Action
~ Asrainst UN Resolution
Allan E. Baer, president of
the Jewish Federation of
Greater. Fort Lauderdale,
denounces the UN resolu-
tion equating Zionism with
racism.
Allan M Baer, president ot
the Jewish Federation of Great
er Fort Laud-rdale. has de-
nounced the recent UN resolu-
tion equating Zionism with
racism.
In a statement to The Jewish
'''> Idian. Baer said: "Let me
state categorically that anti
Zionism is but a euphemism f'U
anti-Semitism Subsuiliug 10 a
resolution condemning Zionism
means an endorsement of anti-
Semitism and the legitimization
of aggression against Israel.
"It is painful to me to see a
group of nations, many of whom
were recently liberated from
colonial rule, deriding one ol
the most noble liberation move-
ments of this century. A move-
ment which not only gave an
example of encouragement and
determination to the peoples
struggling for independence, but
also actively aided many ot
them during their period of pre-
paration for independence and
immediately thereafter.
"What is the essence of Zion-
ism?
"Zionism is the redemption
pression of the ancient Jewish
heritage.
"Zionism is the national libe-
ration movement of a people
e- iled from its historic home-
land and dispersed among thc-
nations of the world.
::Zicnism is the redemption
of an ancient nation from ;
tragic lot and the redemption
of a land neglected for cen-
turies.
"Zionism is the revival of an
ancient language and culture
in which the vision of universal
peace has been a central theme.
"Zionism is the embodiment
of a unioue pioneering spirit, ot
the dignity of labor, and of en-
during human values.
"Zionism is creating a so-
ciety, however imperfect it may
Continued on Page 3-A
CONTEMPT CHARGE
Expect
Morton To
Beat Rap
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Secretary of Commerce Rogers
Morton is unlikely to be formal-
ly held in contempt of Congress
for refusing to disclose informa-
tion to a House subcommittee
that he has received from Amer-
ican companies related to Arab
boycott. Morton has resigned
from his Cabinet post and will
leave office by the end of the
year.
It is believed, Capitol sources
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, that House and com-
mittee actions remaining to
execute the legislative proce-
dures for the citation cannot be
completed within the six weeks
remaining before Morton's de
parture.
MORTON was cited as being
in contempt on Nov. 11 by a 10-
5 vote of the House Subcom-
mittee on Oversight and Inves-
Continued on Page 13-A
Angry Reaction Voiced
To State Dep't. Reversal
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The cabinet's strong public
protest Sunday at the content and tenor of the "Saunders
I'aper" on the Palestinian issue testimony presented last
week by State Department official Hal Saunders on U.S.
policy on the Palestinians found firm support Monday in
local press comment.
Several newspapers wrote indignant editorials taking
Washington to task for the apparent lurch towards the PLO
in American policy thinking.
THERE WAS little credence given to Kissinger's claim
that he had not seen the testimony in advance. Commenta-
tors pointed out that Saunders is one of the Secretary's clos-
est aides.
The Premier announced at the Cabinet meeting Sunday
that Israel's "reservations" at the paper would be conveyed
"in full" to Washington. The Cabinet communique said the
ministers had found "errors and misrepresentations" in the
paper.
SAID THE Histadrut daily, "Davar," in a leader Mon-
Continued on Page 13-A
W. Europe Sizzles UN Resolution
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) West-
ern Europe is practically
unanimous in branding the
United Nations vote equat-
ing Zionism with racism as
"unfortunate," "ill advised"
and "encouraging extremist
elements."
Holland has already an-
nounced that it will no long-
er cooperate with the Unit-
ed Nations anti-racist pro-
gram, and Luxembourg is
considering similar steps.
DUTCH FOREIGN Minister
Max Van Der Stoel. who an-
nounced his government's deci-
sion, said the resolution "is a
danger for the United Nations
itself." He said under "these
circumstances, the Dutch gov-
ernment will no longer be able
to cooperate with the anti-
racism program."
In Luxembourg, government
circles said the government will
consider "concrete steps" as a
result of the resolution vote. The
sources said a final decision will
be taken only after the return
home of Prime Minister Gaston
Thorn who is also President of
the General Assembly.
In West Germany, where Is-
rael's Foreign Minister Yigal
Alton was visiting, the Associa-
tion of Roman Catholics de-
scribed the resolution as "ill
advised" and encouraging "to
extremist elements."
THE ASSOCIATION'S presi-
dent, Bernhard Vogel, said "It
will help those forces which
aim at Israel's destruction.'
Holland, Luxembourg, West
Germany and France were
among those nations opposed to
the resolution.
In Paris, the influential eve-
ning paper, 'Le Monde,' in a
front page editorial described
the resolution as "regrettable
for both moral and political rea-
sons." The paper added "moral-
ly, it is shocking that the people
who has suffered most as a con-
sequence of racism should be
charged with this offense."
The paper stressed that the
vote was reached "by a coalition
which includes Saudi Arabia,
which disseminates anti-Sefiitic
forgeries, and Uganda, whose
President praised Hitler."
In Eastern Europe, official
press aencies p:aised the reso-
lution. The Soviet news agency
"Tass," in a two-paragraph dis-
patch from New York, said it
was "a major decision taken by
the international community in
spite of inadmissible pressures
to which it has been submitted
by Zionist and international im-
perialist elements."


Ta
-
t
1


Page 2-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, Novemoer 28. 19~S
Korey Is Guest Speaker At
.
Woodlands Cocktail Party
D-
cf B'nai B'ril

DR. WILLIAM KOREY
and Soviet Jewrv. was the guest
speaker at the Woodlands DJA
campaign committee cocktail
party. Dr. Korey is a visiting
professor of Russian History at
B~ande:s and Yeshiva Univer-
sities and Brookline College.
Dr. Korey defined Israel's
Is in specific terms, hieh-
lighting the sotuitry's economic
and dispellir thai
ecu ite the Un ted Stil
it i [si cro-
... -1.
le set aside 1
Chaplaincy Group
Service Cited
At a recent lunche->- -
bv the i'hntati^n Xur^ine H'>-i'
the Castle Gardens Sing!""
Group, which ass-s's Rabb
Pichter an^ the Chaplaincv Pro-
gram, receiv.jo a certificate of
appreciation.
According to Rabbi R'chfr
Broward Conntv r^anlain. th
proun. headed by LilPan Scho-n
provides Jewish services to the
Plantation Nursing Home even
tNr'J Fridav. A Chamifcah cele-
bration is planned for Dec. 7.
Any group wishing to dr
" similar work with North Brow
ard area mirsin? ho-ne? shouV
c >* RabH Richter at th"
Federation office.
Religiow*
Services
0T lAUDED't
TAMAPC JEW5H CENTSR. t'O
Nw *7'* St rConaervatlvti
------ _
eT. ISRAEL 'TVmoln 7'00 VS
C'br-i Oirk Blvd POb: Wt'lil
A I ihowili C-:"'0' ".utfi ?*
EMANUEL *Tmole^ ?"*5 W O"
l-_ >*. o' i Reform Carr-v
Jerome Kltment.
YOUNG SRALL of HOLi fWOOT.
'Or!hr:oirl J1< Stirling PLANTATION
pi T t r> f, JEW'S" C 0 N ". Q fc
CATION' irr c...-h !-. ii o-,i
Plantation. Ra9b' Arthur J. Abrarr.i
./
ow**o fArv
|Hf)L(iM iTemi.ii 13? SB ^ .'th *vi
Cortirvil v- PhrM(l Morrlg A. 8*or
Can-i' Jarob J. Henier
--------
MAPGAT*
n r-,- e jrw?r' csN'-ff ,r;e'
CONQREOATION BE""- HILLEl
Conrva,'v 7Si Mt'ga!> Blvd
Margate Carter Charles trln III
COAt ffMtSH
Cri' S"""*.1"' "E3't'V CON
r,"rr,fl"'ON -' N '
1V>- Av- Rabbi Va v.- It
CANDLELIOHTING TIME
III
ill
24 KISLEV 5:09
ill
.-.
sraeli
of ,u

..... ...

'
ingathering of Jews" is a
mitment r, it only f
cf Israel but of -very Jew ir
this world as well.
Dr. Korey spent so-ne time
discussing the political, socia'
rnd rconOTiic implications of
the UN resolution e'.'uatin
Zionism with racism, stressing
that the wording of the resolu-
tion is not the important issue.
The intent of the resolution, he
suggested, was to stir up inter-
national anti-Semitic feeling
that could ultimately destroy
Israel. What Hitler did net
finish, the UN with its Soviet-
inspired motive! hopes to com-
plete For t*" lws m America
this has serious implications the
Jews of America are powerful
in exerting influence for free-
dom and itistice. hence they too
must be destroyed.
It become^ obvious that the
Jewtsli people 1 Mica h-1-
work c-v.

n->n-:- ;'
Jewi
lidaril 1 show
H
Rob chairman the
Hands 1VS drive -
that this lind of meeting, at
which rvople are given the
facts, will be helrf'jl in rais-
ing the 1976 nuota. He stated
further "I hik forward to a
most successful campaign in the
Woodlands communitv."
Ao Foreign
Aid to'Yes9
Voters
:
i
i
ten the
I I '
that voted for the

One-half of I
- that aooroved the
. entt of '-.
iean ecoaomic assistance. anJ
not aid and abet their
racism"' with US. aid. Ja.
said.
THE WASHINGTON l-cdsla-
to*- was one of a number of
political, civic and religious
leaders of all faiths who ad
dressed a "Rally of Reaffir*^a-
tion"' '" sunnort of Is'a"! an orf>r*ririon to the anti-Ztonis*
resolution which drew more
t^an 5 <^00 persony to Boston
Common.
The rallv was cosoonsored
by the New England Zionist
Federation, the American Zion-
ist Youth Foundation and the
Jewish Communitv Council of
Metropolitan Boston.
It vas chaired bv Bernard
r. president of the Ne".
Zionist Fe I

' i
or.
5. of Mas

that the anti-Zionist draft
; m ol 1 irl' turned ut>-
?iie down." H_- -.. I that
this country doesn't begin to
stand for somefhin? Hi inter-
national circles, we will be faced
with this thina over ar.l ovei
again."
Continued on Page 13-A
Palm Aire Sets $200,000 Goal
For 1976 VJA Campaign
FEDERATION ROOM RENTALS
The new Jewish Federation building has rooms avail-
able for rent to Jewish organizations and groups in the
community during the afternoon and evening.
The rental charges which reflect the basic cost to
the Federation for opening up the building, including
electricity, maintenance and security are:
AFTERNOONS: $40 per room
EVENLNGS: S50-S75. depending on size of room
Interested groups are urged to contact Charlotte
Lessler, Office Manager, at the Federation office
liossiiioor
Vf cocoxut creek
>
the m;isf ;t comnmiiiiy.
from S18.800...
no hinl icasc
noirm'ttfion l Take Tu'npike exit 24.
West zn Rte 814. Phone (305) 971-3510.
Fr;m Miami TOLL FREE (305) 947-9906.
At a meeting to eval
year*! : '
mine i the 1976
Palm A: 0

'
as for the s
val 0! the s' i"
resolution was ei
through the L'N over the si
est protest orthe United States
and European delega-
indication of the extent to which
the L'N has been taken over by
the Soviet influence and the
Third World powers. The
lution has two main objectives:
To undermine the strength
of American Jewrv an i its in-
fluence on American policy as it
affects world Jewry.
0 To line up a formidable
political and social bloc of the
Soviet Union and its allies alons
with Third World oowe-s with
the hope of e\-entually isolatinp
and destroying the State of Is-
rael.
The meeting discussed the
latest information on Israel?
economic plight, and stressed
th? additional burden rw. on
Israel to rehab I'tat
d the So- i '
lies get till
Uni
-
1

'


a c1
and V.'-. Fred
asked to assu*i
ship of Condo Ph dm S
The next four t
will be spent in O" .
of the condo buildings irrj
nine for the funi-ra sing
after the new yeiir
OUR
28th
YEAR
MURPHY
PAINTS
BROWARD PAINT
and WALLPAPER CO.
212 North Andrews Av.
523-0577, Fort Lajde-ca 3
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood and Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
fa the Hollywood and Ha wear.
5801 Hollywood Boulevard. Hollywood."
920-1010
In the Fort Lauderdale area:
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.(Sunset Strip).Su;
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
OtherR ted in
''



Friday, November 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian o) Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3-A
Baer Leads Federation Action
Against UN Resolution
Young Leadership Groups
Plan Chanukah Celebration
Continued from Page 1 A
still be, which tries to Imple-
ment the highest ideals of dem-
ocracy political, social and
cultural for all the inhabi-
tants of Israel, irrespective ot
religious belief, race or sex.
"Zionism is. in sum. th con-
stant and unrelenting effort to
realize the national and univer-
sal vision of the Prophets of
Israel."
Baer further stated that the
Jewish Federation took the fol-
lowing action in response to the
resolution:
Was responsible for arti-
cles and editorial comment in
the Fort Lauderdale News and
Miami Herald;
Served to put into motion
the resources of the Tel-.sram
Bank;
Conducted workshops on
Zionism in several area Hebrew
schools;
Gathered signatures from
non-Jewish leaders on a state-
ment condemning the resolu-
tion;
Supported the nationally
sponsored "Sabbath of Protest."
The Young Leadership Group
of Plantation, Northeast, and
Coral Springs will hold a family
Chanukah celebration on Wed-
nesday. Dec. 3, at 6:30 p.m. at
the Jewish Federation office.
A Chanukah candle-lighting
ceremony is planned, as well as
a special children's program.
Refreshments will be served.
Young Leadership families
were sent a Chanukah hand-
book prepared by Barry Axler,
assistant director of the Jewish
Federation, and Bill Goldstein,
director of the Jewish Commu-
nity Center Services.
Families interested in att-nd-
ing the celebration should call
Barry Axler at the Federation
office.
Federation Office Dedication Plans
Are Announced for December 21
Adult Ed Courses Are Still Open
Mrs. Louis L. Perlman, presi-
dent of the Women's Division,
and Mrs. Ludwik Brodzki, chair-
man of the dedication commit-
tee, have announced that the
dedication of the New Jewish
Federation office will take place
on Sunday, Dec. 21, 5 p.m. at
2999 NW 33rd Ave., Lauderdale
Lakes.
According to Mrs. Perlman
and Mrs. Brodzki, the ceremony
will include greetings from the
Jewish Federation President, a
reading by Mrs. Perlman from
the Bibtej songs by the chil-
dren of the Hebrew Day School,
and the putting up of a mezzu-
Nursery School
Has Openings
The Beth Israel Nursery
School still has a few openings
in the morning four-year-old
and all-day classes. Mrs. Sheila
Grenitz, who made this an-
nouncement, added that she is
considering opening an after-
noon three-year-old class. Call
the Temple office for informa-
tion.
The Temple Judaica Gift Shop
has many gifts suitable for new
homes, Bar/Bat Mitzvah, wed-
dings and other celebrations.
There is.also a selection of Jew-
ish ceremonial objects, greet-
ing cards and records. The shop
hours are 9:30 to 4:30, Monday
Through Thursday, and Wed-
nesday night.
The Temple Credit Union'
meets every Thursday night,
"30-9:00 p.m.
Bingo is sponsored every
Wednesday night, with an Early
Bird at 7:30 p.m.
We do
business the
right way.
I7W Win Oiklir.d Park Blvt.
f I LwWWt. Hi. 33311
Pfton.: 7M-1J3*.
OAKLAND TOYOTA
JF.
Jewish
Civilization
It's all there in the
Encyclopaedia
Judaica.
For free-color
brochure,
fall (305) 53-1-8251
or wrftK.E..J., Suite 505,
420 LiaMfaLRd., M.B. 33139
PAY^Kjyr. ACCEPTED
IP*ISRAEL BONDS
zah. Refreshments and a tour
of the Federation office will fol-
low.
"The new Federation build-
ing will enable to Federation to
expand its vital services to Jews
of our community, Israel and
throughout the world. It is an
important event for our com-
munity, and we hope everyone
will make a special effort to
attend." Mrs. Perlman and Mrs.
Brodzki said.
Members of the Federation's
Dedication Committee are Allan
E. Baer, Marilyn Berk, Paula
Brodzki, Alvin Colin. Maurice
Felt, Bess Freeman, Faye Gero-
nemous, Robert and Ann Her-
mann. Dorothy Re snick. Ron
Schagrin and Mrs. Sam Selig-
man.
Some registrations are still
available for the Temple Beth
Israel Tuesday morning Adult
Education Series.
Courses include Hebrew Con-
versation, Beginners' Hebrew,
Jewish Life Cycle, Parent Ef-
fectiveness Training, Slimnas-
tics, Jewish Gourmet Cooking,
Pathways through the Prayer-
book, and Israel Folk Dancing.
Classes meet on Tuesday morn-
ings, 9:15 to 10:30 and 10:45 to
noon. Call the Temple office
and sign up.
Daily Minyan meets Monday
through Friday mornings at 8,
and Monday through Thursday
evenings at 5:30.
Rising costs, slowed cash flow and
high accounts receivable are
squeezing profits for a lot of
companies today.
Now is the time for Symmers
Insurance Services to help your
company protect its profits We re
firm believers in insurance
economy That s why. in spile of
inflation we offer superior
insurance programs, most with
substantial premium reductions.
Plus minimized premium
prepayment Which can make a
significant difference in your
company s cash position and profit
margin
A free preliminary survey of
your company s insurance overhead
THE PROFIT
PROTECTOR.
525-5171.
is available by simply calling us.
You ve gol nothing to lose And
profits to gain.
At last, an insurance man en
your side.
SYMMERS INSURANCE
SFRVICES. INC.
1923 S. Andrews Ave.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33316
Broward (305) 525-5171
Dade (305) 945-6655
Marine Commercin r-**i&onal
Lite Health Comparative Analysis
Consulting
JEWISH FILM SERIES
The next presentation in the Jewish Film Series will be
on Sunday, Nov. 30, at 8 p.m. at the Fort Lauderdale
High School. The movie is "The Fixer," which is based
on Bernard Malamud's novel.
ONLY SERIES TICKET HOLDERS WILL BE ADMITTED
NO TICKETS WILL BE SOLD AT THE DOOR
JANEE DE. STEINBERG, M.D.
Announces the opening of her office
for the practice of
DERMATOLOGY
AND
DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY
AT
LAUDERDALE LAKES MEDICAL CENTER
North Bldg. Suite 206
4900 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Lauderdale Lakes, Florida 33313
Telephone: 739-3178 By appointment
DR. MARTIN J. DIAMOND
DR BARRETT E. SACHS
TAKE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING
THE OPENING OF THEIR NEW OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
PODIATRY
Wx TRADITIONAL^
JEWISH LIFE
AWAITS YOU IN
SOUTH FLORIDA
MERCEDE ARCADE SHOPPfS
1808 N. UNIVERSITY DR.
PLANTATION
581-2500
MINI MALL
5121 S.W. 90th AVE.
COOPER CITY
434-1443
of Mb
Uounq OtiaLi
/J rip i
WILL WELCOME YOU
AND WILL HELP YOU SETTLE
SYNAGOGUE RABBI IN RESIDENCE
COMPLETE RECREATION FACILITIES
EDUCATIONAL & SOCIAL ACTIVITIES
KOSHER PROVISIONS NEARBY
A GROWING JEWISH COMMUNITY
IN THE CENTER CF SOUTH FLORIDA
THE OAKS
condominium
present home of
^Ijouna Otxail of cMoftyivood
Moshe Bomzer, Rabbi
A limited number ot modestly priced
1.2&3 bedroom
condominium apartments are available.
For an appointment or further information
write or phone.
THE OAKS
4111 Stirling Road
Fort Lauderdale. Florida 3314
Broward: 791-1870 Dade: 944-0416
DR. ROBERT GRASSI
PODIATRIST
Announces the
Relocation of his
offices to .
Ocean Medical Center
Suite 201
4001 Ocean Drive
Lauderdale-By-The-Sea
491-5880
DOES YOUR CHILD WANT
TO BE A MEMBER OF
THE MARCHING BAND?
We have the largest staff of f\
degreed and professional
music instructors in South
Florida.
Sale* Rentals Repairs
I'iano ami Organ LeMOHS
BROWARD BAND
INSTRUMENT
131 N E. ttl AVE.. FT. L*UOEDALE
THONE MS-377



Page 4-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 28r 1975
About Jewish Refugees
Anti-Israeli propagandists have shed a^great deal
of crdcodue""tears over the years about the plight of the
Palestinian refugees. But little has been heard about
another group of refugees, the Jews from Arab lands
who had to flee their homes leaving behind most of their
possessions.
Their plight has not been taken up by international
bodies perhaps because, unlike the Palestinians, most of
whom were forced to stay in refugee camps by their
fellow Arabs, the Jewish refugees sought to make a new
life for themselves in Israel, France and elsewhere.
But now, with the intensified assault on Zionism
and Jews in the United States, the time has come to
remind the world that the Palestinians are not the only
ones to have become refugees as a result of a Middle
East conflict.
That is why it was good news to hear from Paris
that Jews from Arab countries will meet there at the
end of the month to form a new group, the World Organ-
ization of Jews from Arab Countries (WOJAC).
Case of Similar Due
WOJAC's organizers stress that the group's objec-
tive is to strive for peace in the Middle East by recog-
nizing the legitimate rights of Jews from Arab countries
in the spirit of the UN Security Council Resolution 242
which calls for "a just solution of the refugee problem."
As the organizers point out, 800,000 Jews fled the
Arab countries of the Middle East and North Africa as
compared to 590,000 Arabs who left Israel. There has
been much talk about Israel's responsibility for compen-
sation to the Palestinians. But no one mentions that the
Arab states might have a similar obligation to the Jews
who were forced to flee leaving most of their possessions
behind.
Bond 'Phon-A-Thon'
On Sunday, Nov. 23, and again on Sunday, Dec. 7,
volunteers throughout South Florida will conduct a
"Phon-A-Thon" in behalf of a special nationwide cash
campaign for State of Israel Bonds.
Severe economic measures, including four devalua-
tions of the Israel Pound in the past year, higher taxes
and increased prices for fuel and imported goods have
forced Israelis to tighten their belts in an austerity re-
gime that is likely to last for a long time/
Israel' seconomy is in greater difficulty than it has
ever been in before. The economic slowdown caused
by a fall-off in investment funds may grow worse and
bring in an even higher rate of unemployment unless
Israel Bond receipts become available on a large scale
to help overcome all these problems.
Let's Pitch in Again
A popular misconception about the new Sinai in-
terim accord is that the projected $2.3 billion Israel is
to receive from the U.S. according to the terms of the
accord will help to take care of these problems.
What must be understood is that, in the first place,
not all of it is grant-in-aid as originally understood.
Secondly, almost all of these funds, if they are forth-
coming, will go for Israel's defense. At best, this sum
will cover no more than two-thirds of Israel's defense
budget of more than $3 billion.
Set these considerations against the fact that Israel
must immediately cover the cost of building a new de-
fense line in the Sinai and new oil storage facilities
needed as a result of the withdrawal from the Abu
Rodeis oil fields and the Gidi and Mitla Passes, and the
economic needs are monumental indeed.
One fact stands out for South Floridians and all
American Jews Israel Bond dollars are urgently
needed.
South Florida has consistently participated in the
Israel Bond program which has passed the $3 billion
total in sales since the Bond program was founded a
quarter of a century ago. On the occasion of this week-
end's "Phone-A-Thon," let's pitch in again.
Afraid of Our Political Being
Jewish Floridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
OFFICE and PI.ANT 120 N B. 6th St.. Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone I7S-4MI
ADVEKT181NO DEPARTMENT 1-37S-460S
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O. Box 012*73. Miami, Florida 33101
FRF.D K. PHOCHBT SUZANNE SHOCHET SEI.MA M. THOMPSON
Edl'or and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
Ths Jewish Floridian Doet Not Guarantee The Kathruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised in its Columns
Published Bl-Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Miami, Fla.
All P.O. 3S79 returns are to be, forwarded to
The Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 0128ZJ, Miami. Fla. 331M.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Associa-
tion of English Jewish Newspapers, and ths Florida Prsss Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year $5.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
Number 24
24 KISLEV 5736
A GM>L'frof .Arab- students
from various Middle East-
ern countries, professing sym-
pathy for the "Palestinian
cause." burst in on a dean at
Miami Dade Community Col-
lege the other day and demand-
ed permission to hold a rally
on campus replete with polit-
ical banners and placards.
I say "demanded" because
they informed the dean that, if
he refused, they would hold
their rally anyway.
THE DEAN, a Jew, promptly
acquiesced, but not before Mi*
ami-Dade's security police were
beefed up by a whole squadron
of special servicemen at a cost,
I might add, of thousands of
dollars for a few extra hours of
duty in a year when college
faculty members failed to re-
ceive so much as a single cent
increase in salary to meet the
inflationrry rise in the ^ost of
living.
Jewish students on campus
promptly met the emergency
caused by an "even-handed"
dean by erecting falafel stands
at the periphery of the Arab
gathering a sort of gustatory
counter-attack to a growing
political phenomenon: the
emergence of Arab savvy in a
world attuned to Arab incom-
petence.
ONE MIAMI-Dade official I
know, who is not Jewish, had
some unwind things to say
about his Jewish colleague
with adjectives for obsequious-
ness 1 reserve for Henry Kis-
singer.
His main complaint was that
there is a large contingent of
Jewish students on the M-DCC
campus and that Arab politick-
ing might have led to "beating
up on them."
He meant that the Jewish
.Students would not fare well
particularly, as he put it, be-
cause so many of the Arabs
"aren't really students, but pro-
fessional and semi-profession-
al terrorists."
OF COURSE, I agreed. How far
can a falafel go in self-defense?
This is not meant to be amus-
ing. It is a symptom of the
times, in which Jews find them-
Mindlin
selves particularly exposed and
vulnerable if for no other reas-
on than that suddenly they
em bewildered by the course
of their changing fartjnes.
At a Bicentennial regional
githering of Hadassah the oth-
temporary Jewish experience
in these very terms.
The East European emigra-
tion into the 20th century is
long behind us. although my
genera*i?n remembers it fond-
ly as he taproot from which
w? ourselves sprang.
Through the '20's and up to
the Hitler era. American Jews
ente.'eJ. into the age of Jewish
an inymity. In the melting pot,
they s"Right vigorously to iden-
tify with the nation to as-
sume its language, characteris-
tics ani to participate in the
Dourgeois drive toward the
American dream.
IN THAT period, all of us
tried to forget the terrors of
our ghetto parents. We main-
tained an uneasy truce with
the need to keep the Jewish
cultural and religious experi-
ence alive, and mainly saw our-
selves as Jews to the extent
that we were not permitted to
forget it by a nascent social
and economic anti Semitism
that kept us on our traditional
toes.
The emergence of Israel in
the wake of the Hitlerian Ar-
mageddon brought us out of
.he era of our anonymity into
the age of positive Jewish iden-
tification.
Israel gave us spine. The
Judaism we privately profess-
ed before, we now openly re-
velled in. We finally bested the
Gentile on his. own terms. We
demonstrated that we could
light, too. We hurled back into
his teeth the anti-Semitic can-
ards about Jewish "cowardice,"
Jewish "intellectual- pacifism"
brought on by a singular'defect
in the Jewish gene ^a primary
Hitlerian "sociological" princi-
ple).
THE 1967 war strengthened
our sense of exposed Judaism
even more. The Israeli achieve-
ment spawned a generation of
young Americans proudly
ing mezuzahs and .Stars of Da-
vid a.'0-.ind their necks in the
sime way that Christians near
crosses.
My generation wbul 1
have dreamed of this. Mj
eration, in its era of anon;
1 new not the pride of b
Jewish b:;t the agony bl h ling
Jewish when it was torn from
its anonymity on the iviv
f-om school calico "Christ-
killer" or "dirty Jew" and beat-
en bloody.
It was not what our ghetto
fathp-s had suffered, but it was
crtainly strong enough, n
cin.- to make us all the more
determined to become doctors,
lawyers, accountants, success-
ful businessman to prove our
a.istocracy despite the aliena-
tion imposed on us.
THE MEZUZAHS and the
Stars of David became the open
challenge to the pogrom Amer-
ican-stvle. They served as a
warning that Jews had come
of age on Gentile terms: Dnn't
tread on me, or you'll get it
like the Arabs got it.
But the Arabs aren't getting
it anymore. The 1973 War put
a new light on the new expos-
ed Jew. The psychological-emo-
tional impact of that, war on us
has yet to be documented.
Still, there is one ithing we
from it. Suddenly, the exposed
Jew is no longer so much proud
as he is pained. Israel's emer-
gence in 1948 brought us all in-
to the political consciousness
of the American mainstream
for the first time, ft was a
heady experience to which
Continued on Page 13-A
U.S. Won't Punish Nations That
Voted for Zionist Resolution
Volume 4
Friday, November 28, 1975
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger has indicated
that the U.S. has no inten-
tion of taking economic re-
prisals against the countries
that voted in favor of the
anti-Zionist resolution in the
General Assembly, despite
statements by himself and
President Ford deploring
that resolution.
"We have made no final
decision. We must keep the
American reaction in some
balance," Kissinger said at
a press conference in Pitts-
burgh where he had ad-
dressed the Foreign Affairs
Council. He termed the anti-
Zionist resolution an "emo-
tion of the day."
KISSINGER told the press
conference, "I believe it is im-
portant in the present world
situation to keep an eye on fun-
damental issues that must be
solved and those issues will not
go away One of those issues is
the relationship between the de-
veloped and developing coun-
tries. We cannot have the world
divided between those who have
advanced industrial know-how
and those living on the edge of
poverty."
The Secretary warned that
such a situation could lead to
"chronic civil war" in 10-15
years and "therefore we have
to conduct our foreign policy to-
day, whatever the immediate
irritations, in such a manner
that the possibility of a coopera-
tive world remains open."
Kissinger's remarks seemed
to raise the likelihood of a con-
frontation between the Adminis-
tration and Congress where the
mood is one of anger and bitter-
ness over the General Assem-
bly vote.
Several key members of Con-
gress, notably Sen. Jackson
(D., Wash.) have already pro-
posed curtailing American aid
to the Africa, Asian and Arab-
bloc countries that supported
the resolution equating Zionism
with racism. Rep. Philip Crane
(R., 111.) introduced a resolution
in the House that would reduce
U.S. funding of the United Na-
tions from the present 25 per
cent of the world organization's
budget to 5 per cent.
KISSINGER spoke out strong-
ly against the anti-Zionist mea-
sure in the UN. He said it was
"really a form of moral condem-
nation of the State of Israel
and not simply an abstract vote
on Zionism," and that "the link
age of Zionism and racism
smacks of some practices that
it would be better for mankind
to forget."
But while he asserted that
"the UN vote has certainly
added to the tensions, the rifts
and the distrust" in the Middle
East diplomatic situation and
was "extremely unhelpful and
highly irresponsihle," Kissinger
said the U.S. will "have to de-
cide on the votes on an in-
dividual basis before deciding
what specific action we will
take toward the various coun-
tries."
KISSINGER'S views were
echoed by other Administration
officials here who strongly de-
fended the $4.7 billion military-
aid program and warned that
it would be counter-productive
if the U.S. were to cut off aid
to countries that voted for the
anti-Zionist resolution.
Seventy per cent of the Ad-
ministration's aid package is
earmarked for Israel and other
Middle Eastern countries. Ad-
ministration spokesmen noted
that military and military-
related aid was aimed at pro-
tecting American interests, and
one official was quoted as say-
ing, "Our own interests are the
ones we are concerned abdu't.


^fiGjay, ;Noyember 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5-A
I
Lane Evans Will, Axkdress
rt 'Temple Emanu-El sisterhood
v//orT Thursday?'Dec. lUTwat
: 10:30 fl:m.' the Sisterhood of
Temple Emanu-El will hold a
1 CTMWiffttf-was aw#f3ed
a Woman of Achie"ement cita-
tion by the Federation 6f Jew-
ish Women's Orgarri7at:ons in
New York for her service n
national and international
causes, was one of seven Jew-
ish delegates at the World Con-
ference on Religion ana" Pes^e
held in Kyoto, Japan, in 1970.
In 1974 in. Lnuvain. Belgium.
she was delegate at the sec-
ond World Conference on Re-
gion and Peace and a memh'
of the drafting committee that
v/rote the "Declaration of Lou-
vain." the official statement of
religious leaders on crucial
world issues.
HaIassali to Hear
Of Mfc Scopus
Rededieaiiofi *
Mrs. Ralph Cannon, president
of the North Broward Chapter
of Hadassah. has announced an
open board meeting, Thursday,
Dec. 4. at 10 a.m. at the Pom-
pano Fashion Square "Commu-
nity Room. The subject will be
* >Mtn>l.fihl rawi of the re-
cent Mt. Scopus Rededication.
Mrs. Adeline Moll will serve
as rjiderator, and the panel
will include board members
Molly Fraiberg, Betty Gerber,
P>a-1 Ooldenberg, Gloria Hirsch
p" 1 LHv Schwartz who attended
the ceremonies.
.'.'* '1 iM*
, t
A
i
Discussing a point at the recent first meeting of the Coral
Springs Young Leadership Group are (from left) David
and Dottie Gross, cochairmen; Hanan Sher, guest speak-
er; and Marlene and Bruce Weitz, cochairmen. More
than 35 persons attended.
JANE EVANS
special open board m-t:n. t-
guest speaker is Miss Jane
EVans, executive director of the
National Federation of Tempi"
Sisterhoods, who is recognized
as an authority on community
organisation and international
affair.'.
During the San Franisco con-
ference at which the United Na-
tions Charter was drafted. Miss
Evans served as a consultant to
the U.S..:Delegation. She is a
.'former..president of the Na-
tional Peace Conference and a
former vice chairman of the
conference Group of U.S. Na-
tional Organizations on the
United Nations for which she
once headed the Committee on
Technicar Assistance and the
Committee on the World Court.
Senator Lauds
Hadassah Chapter
At the annual Hadassah Medi-
cal Organization dinner, Nov.
.19, sponsored by t he North
Broward Chapter of Hadassah,
Sen. Richard Stone sent to Mrs.
Ralph Cannon, president, rep-
. resenting the more t^an 2.100
members of the chapter, the
following.message:
"I wish that I could b- with
you whe.nj'pur chanter w:U hM1
its thir| ajnual dinne'- for th<*
Sehifit Zof nhe Ha, ass ih Medi-
cal Organization. Unfortunately,
the Senate will be in session at
that time an! it is my respon-
sibility r# be in Washington
during tUfc-wiek to be "*-"sont
for any votes which miqht oc-
cur on the Senate rVw.
"" "This is-'an exciting v*>f- f">
Hadassah, On Oct. 21 th- H d"
.sah University Iios'it' o"
. .Mount "Scopus was fisdictH
" to "again provid" h'/*-"nHtjl
care to thousands nf nv*l in
. Jerusajen? and t^1 -v~-m1ing
area Also, as a m->;'-.-->' hos-
pital, it will pw*i-id f"-ilities
'.'for. jeacWng an1 r-sonrc*! for
'^'s'tudihts and vientists from all
;'ovcr the wo-''
. "This is orj'v >r nf ''lo many
contribution; : '> Hadassah
3Sa$ majje "*' "idn the
quality rc inlividuals.
Since lp".' -i organiza-
tion ''> Miss Hen-
rietta''* >ss in tL *>' m of efforts to
pron- -*?.. ,cv '' "ghts. liberties
?."$ b:,man.. '''".it" for individ-
ual^rbr'f. in t*e United States
and in ira' Your contribu-
tion's .'tow i-' '.he advancement
. of, medic.u programs, the
achievement of a i'it and last-
ing peace in the Middle East,
and :)> enri'hment of Jewish
living in t'ic United States have
rmajfe Hadassah a highly re-
'.ispQjjtej1 .teadiw in both domestic
*nd itvvL'iun affairs.
"Your :dedic?tion and sacri-
fices have made these achieve-
ments possible and you deserve
the highest of oraise for them.
On behalf of all Flo-Hians. I'm
honored to commend you for
your service.
"Warp, personal regards,
Mosj- Cordially, Dick Stone."
North Broward Hadassah
Thooilo-o -' ''
hold its next meeting on Wed-
nesday. Dec. 10, at 1 p.m. at the
Tamarac Jewish Center.
The Bermuda Club Chn-a!
Group will sing in celebration
of Chann'ah. Th" group's con-
ductor is Hadassah member "il
Bermuda Ciub president Mrs.
Bca Zeidman.
ft. it *
Rayus Group will hold a rum-
mage sale at 3471 NW 19th St.,
Bldg. 7, Ft. Lauderdale, Dec.
1-11, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
To All Our Friends In South Florida
Chanuka Greetings And Best Wishes
American National Bank, and Trust Company
of Fort Lauderdale
1415 E Sunrise Blvd.. Ft. Lauderdale. Florida 33304. Telephone (305 763-6300
A First Bancshares Bank ijg
>


.
4^appy
airtikart

.
from the
DIRECTORS,
OFFICERS AND STAFF
of

u
./
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION
Main Office:
401 Lincoln Road Mail
Miami Beach.

. -_
Offices mrougnout Uade, broward '
and Palm Beach Counties
mmmrottm*.

-t


Page 6-A.
The Jewish Floridian cff Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 28, 1975
Resiiikoff Comments On
Israel Bonds Cash Mobilization

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Israel Resnikoff, chairman, North Broward County
South Florida Israel Bond Organization, has made the fol-
lowing statement about Cash Mobilization Month and Israel's
serious need for funds.
cost of building a new defense
line in the Sinai and new oil-
storage facilities needed as a
result of the withdrawal from
the Abu Rudeis oil fields and
the Gidi and Mitla Passes.
"There are certain miscon-
ceptions about the new agree-
ment with Egypt that require
correction. First of all, it is be-
ing overly optimistic to inter-
pret a one-step interim agree-
ment as a major leaD toward
peace, which, regrettably, ap-
pears to be far off. Therefore,
it is totally unrealistic for Israel
to relax or to lesson her defen-
sive strength or deterrent pos-
ture.
"Second, it is a serious mis-
take to assume that the $2.3
billion Israel has asked in U.S.
aid will materially reduce the
enormous pressures on Israel's
economy. It should be made
very clear that almost all of the
U.S. funds will go for defense
and that at best they will cover
no more than two-thirds of Is-
rael's H*f""* budget of more
than $3 billion.
"Israel must also cover the
"In many respects the Israeli
economy will be in great diffi-
culty in the coming weeks and
months. The economic slow-
down caused by a fall-off in in-
vestment funds may grow worse
and bring on a higher rate of
unemployment unless Israel
Bond receipts become available
immediately on a large scale.
Bond dollars are urgently need-
ed to expand industrial produc-
tion for export as a means of
reducing the staggering deficit
in the country's balance of pay-
ment.
"Severe economic measures
__ including four devaluations
of the Israel Pound in the past
year, higher taxes and increased
prices of fuel and imported
goods have forced the Is-
raelis to tighten their belts in
an austerity regime that may
last for a long time.
"It is against this background
that we must ask ourselves what
we can do to help speed the flow
of economic development funds
which are indispensable for Is-
rael's strength in this critical
period.
"The answer which addresses
itself forthrightly to the needs
of the hour is the special na-
tionwide cash campaign for Is-
rael Bonds, which began Nov.
2 and will end Dec. 21.
"On Sunday, Dec. 7, campaign
volunteers from throughout the
Greater Miami and South Flor-
ida area will conduct a second
Phone-A-Thon,' at headquarters
throughout Dade and Broward
Counties to call for checks in
payment of pledge commit-
ments. The first one was on Nov.
23. In addition, new purchasers
of Bonds will be asked to sub-
mit their checks now in order
for Israel to have the us of the
funds as quickly as possible."
Inverrary Country Club Community
Will Honor Rabbi and Mrs. Schenk
The interim spiritual leader
of Temple Emanu-El, Rabbi
Emanuel Schenk, and his wife,
Evelyn, have been named the
recipients of the State of Israel
David Ben-Gurion Award. Ac-
cording to dinner chairman
Harold Slater, the presentation
will be made at the Inverrarv
Country Club Community-Israel
Dinner of State, Sunday evening,
Nov. 30, at the Inverrary Coun-
try Club in Lauderhill.
Keynoting the event on be-
half of the South Florida Israel
Bond Organization will be
Michael Arnon, nresident and
chief executive officer of Israel
Bonds, who served for six years
as secretary of the Government
and Cabinet of Israel.
Rabbi Schenk, a member of
the Greater Miami Rabbinical
Association, Central Conference
of American Rabbis, Broward -
Board of Rabbis and B'nai
Brooklyn. He is a past president,
B'rith, is the Rabbi Emeritus of
Beth Sholom People's Temple,
RABBI AND MRS. SCHENK
Brooklyn Board of Rabbis and
Association of Reform Rabbis,
New York City.
Evelyn Schenk organized the
Hadassah Chapter at Inverrary
Country Club.
Coral Springs Congregation
Plans Chanukah Events
To commemorate Chanukah
the Coral Springs Hebrew Con-
gregation will hold Havdallah
services, led by Rabbi May
Weitz, on Saturday at 3:30 p.m
at the new building site on Riv-
erside Dr. at Royal Palm Blvd.
A candle-lighting service by
the child^n of the Religiour
School will follow. The Sister
hood plan to serve the tradi-
tional latkes to all participants
There will be candle-lighting at
5:30 each evening until Dec. 6
COOK UP A
FREE TRIP TO
PUERTO RICO
send us your favorite recipe
using Sweet Unsalted
Mazola
Margarine
Contestants must be 18 years
or older.
Send recipe and proof of pur-
chase (green flag with words
'contains liquid corn oil' from
front panel) with your name,
address and phone number to:
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Box 012973, Miami 33101
MAZOLA CONTEST
SPECIAL CONTEST
FOR OUR READERS
The winner of our special
contest will win $100.00
and all entries will bo elig-
ible for the grand prize
a trip to Puerto Rico.
ENTER NOW!
PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED
GLASSES DUPLICATED
ONE HOUR SERVICE IN MOST CASES
LENSES THAT CHANGE WITH
SUNLIGHT
NEW YORK'S COUNTY OPTICAL"
COUNTY OPTICAL CO.
1858 N. UNIVERSITY DR. PLANTATION
Mercode Arcade Shops 581-1117
Happy Chanuka
5654912
t.*-i .illMvr HrrpJhi ihmer
H-liil.it. Rr*urt and Cruise Wear
ul R320 >ortlieat itth Street
Cah Plata. Fort Lauderdale, Florida
"Negativism" in
Editor, Jewish Floridian:
We always see ads for "our
people" "we are one"
"united in love and Judaism."
etc. But are we? Or is it more
truthful to say. "Where there
are three Jews, there are three
Synagogues" or "three differ-
ent opinions" or "even though
I'm Jewish. I'm anti-Semitic"?
Those of us who are support-
ing the Hebrew Day School of
Fort Lauderdale have found
negativism among some of our
people. Why? What could be at
all distasteful or offensive about
excellence in secular education
and a rich, meaningful Jewish
education? I think it's the Jew-
ish community that doesn't sup-
port us in any way that needs
the education.
I can remember ten years ago
in Fort Lauderdale when "Jew
and dogs were not allowed,"
clubs and hotels were "private."
Now this same community has
three synagogues and the He-
brew Day School. The Jewish
Community has arrived!
Those people who have nega-
tive feelings toward us or sim-
Ft. Lauderdale
ply don't suDport us have no
idea what the inside of our
school looks like. That alone
would amaze peoole to see
fifty happy children learning
and creating in an atmosphere
of love. 4"
If we had just $1 from every
Jew in this community, we
would be in great financial
shape. We are partially funded
by the Jewish Federation
every penny counts. We have
seven beautiful people so far to
take part in oar Chanukah
candle-lighting ceremony at our
dinner dance. Nov. 20. These
people have contributed 51,000
or more.
Please help us to have the
miracle of light and reach our
"Chai" goal of eighteen candles
We're all in the same boa:
being asked to suoport every
Jewish cause. Certainly the edu
cation of our children is mos:
important. Thank you.
Pearl Reinstein,
Cochairmin
Board of Education
Hebrew Day School of
Greater Ft. Lauderda!
FOR THE FIRST TIME...
SV mtmi June* earn <" fuM*Aa*6a
new c* late nwdef lxt nenteU' for (>/<'< />>"/>",/ f/o/Zo-Ki over deafen
iJudeuM eeU. %/ Ji/f-, (4>/to/ea/en fry MW 3C yean.
UwU new M-// dryer/ f< uou, lie** 6a rd
to find, located at 517 -%dA J'-'te
JftyAtcatf 6aJ. $>nfan< 'AeacA ff/U
in Me Aeartcf' l/ieindaJyiat waneAou*
d dotentm<
. //, ,;<, '//'/ rJ. 'Mu* if<,<
in finding as mil /* uHtvmtt&M*.
( y yeta*/ agent a t //y Vw. >/ey. .77n.nr
Cfo*a*t) w-sm (QadJm-effl
READ THIS!!
Personalized leases We specialize in leasing Cadillacs and
Mark IV's to business and professional peopleprivate
individuals who drive low mileage, sign a two-year lease.
and have a new car every few months. For information, call
Mr. Ross or Mr. Smith. 943-3777. ____
ifyy... Qm/.A, f?Wrfr JSLmm 4h-


Friday, November 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7-A

THE JEWISH COMMUNTY CENTER
Yw liuve made it possible and now ifs here, The Jewish Federation has opened the new Jew sh Community Center L'Chaim! Look over these
mittai activity o,fenngs and register for the pro-rams by returning the handy registration form; below. Classes and activities are continually be-
ing developed according to our community's nee is. Cell us with your suggestions it's YOUR C:nler and we warn tc serve YOU. We will be lis-
tening to your requests.
WHAT IS THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER?
can find a common ground to work together and <
share common experiences. It is the Jewish Com-
munity's "home base."
The JCC is a nonprofit voluntary agency. It <
is affiliated with and receives all its financial
support from the Greater Fort Lauderdale Jew- <
ish Federation. It is guided by a Committee of ,
. It is a Jewish agency, dedicated to encourag-
ing positive Jewish identity and developing Jewish
experiences for the Jewish Community as a whole.
The Center will seek to strengthen Jewish cul-
tural identity, the feeling of being Jewish and
pride in being Jewish.
It is a Community agency, serving as a func-
tional arm of the Jewish Community to provide community men and women who give"voluntarily
educational, recreational, and social services to of their time, energy and devotion,
ail age groups in the Jewish Community. OUR OBJECTIVES:
It is a Center of Jewish communal life, a The Center will strive to offer every individ-
place where all Jewish individuals and groups ual the opportunity:
ELEMENTARY PROGRAMS
Open to Children from Kindergarten through fifth grade
PROGRAMS AT JCC BUILDING begin Monday, Jan.5. $3. iee for 12-week session.
4-5 p.m.
All American Sports
Artsy and Craftsy
Creative Dance Instruction
for boys and girls
Young Picassos
Paper Bag Dramatics
Leathercrafts and Woodworking
Guitar Class
Story and Play Hour
Day Grade 3 4 p.m. Grade
Monday K-2 All-American Sports 3-5
3-5 Artsy and Craftsy K-2
Tuesday K-2 Young Picassos Art Class K-2
- 3-5 Creative Dance Instruction 3-5
. Wednesday K-2 Hammer and Nails K-2
3-5 Chefs and Hostesses 3-5
. Thursday K-2 Puppetry 3-5
. 3-5 Guitar Class (3-5 p.m.) K-2
ELEMENTARY AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAMS Offered at TROPICAL ELEMENTARY
SCHOOL IN PLANTATION, beginning Jan. 5, 3-5 p.m. (kindergarten 5th grade)
Monday 3 4 p.m. 4 5 p.m.
Outdoor sports program (coed) Outdoor sports program (coed)
group games, basketball- group games, basketball fundamentals,
fundamentals, volleyball volleyball
Outdoor sports program
Thursday Outdoor sports program Woodworking and handicrafts, leatherwork, etc.
Arts and Crafts
0 "SPECIALS" $
!. TUESDAY, DEC. 23, 10 A.M. 3 P.M.: Trip to Crandon Park Zoo in Key Biscayne. Bring lunch we will
pro\iJe drinks and snacks. For children in kindergarten through eighth grade. Bring cameras. Fee: S3.
J II. MONDAY, DEC. 29, AND TUESDAY, DEC. 30, 1 ) A.M. 3 P.M.: Kindergarten through sixth grades:
: "Winter Vacation land." Bring lunch (we will supply drink and snacks) and join your group of friends
tot 8 Eull da; ol activity, crafts, athletics, and wat :!i the film classic "A Boy Named Charlie Brown."
:-A*\ttttIdei'ful way to add a new dimension to the children's vacation. Fee. S5 for both days, includes
" f.-.:. tl ing.
SENIOR ADULT ACTIVITIES
t Si.-:.- .' will ieet every Tuesdaj and Thurs ay, 1 4 p.m. A special event is planned for Tues-
day, D;c. .. w |uainted Chanul ah party -it 1 p.m. Five Latkes and gifts for al! .
i... .. sday plans include arts and c .. ts cards, ectures, trips far and near, dis-
> cussion
Wednesday nights at 7:30 are movie nights, s. ii a will have theii m weekly film series with
discussion and fi^eshments to follow.
Film Da I i 10, "1 Love You. Aiice B. Toklas"; Dec. 17. "1 1 for My Father"; Dec.
I 24, "Luv". Jan. "'. "A Majority of One."
Admission to fi Bl; which includes refre

REGISTRATION FORM
Mail To: JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
2999 N.W. 33rd Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
484-8200
GRADE
NAME
TOWN ....................... ADDRESS
CHECK DAYS; Elementary Activities (Fill in Program and Time)
Monday -----------------......................................
D
D
D
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
TWEEN TRIPS
O Mystery Trip
D Rowling Party
D RoHer Party
O oat Ride
D All $12
O Vecationland (2 days)
D Trip to Zoo
To develop his potential and find self-expres-
sioi; through group participation in the Cen-
ter's many-faceted activities.
To learn about Jewish culture, values, history
and tradition for a guiding life philosophy.
To take part in programs for the family.
To learn new skills and widen one's intellec-
tual horizons.
To contribute to the Community, in the largest
sense, by helping in planning and conducting
of the Center's program.
MIDDLE-SCHOOL PROGRAM
(6th 8th grades), "Tweens"
I. Lounge Program, Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m., designed to
bring "tweens" together and develop their inter-
ests and become socially active with other Jewish
youth. Lounge will be staffed Jukebox, ping-pong
table and other table games. Tweens will decorate
and develop "their" lounge.
Opening Night, TUESDAY, DEC. 23rd, 7 p.m.
Make-your-own sundaes to follow program. No
charge.
II. "Trips for Tweens"
1st TRIP: "Mystery Bus Ride Destination Un-
known." Meet at Center Saturday, Dec. 20, 11:30
p.m. Cost: $5.
2nd TRIP: "Roller Party." Bring lunch, we'll sup-
ply the rest. Meet at Center. Sunday, Jan. 11th,
noon 5 p.m. Cost: $3.
3rd TRIP: Boat Ride. Sunday. Feb. 1. 1 5:30 p.m.
Cost: $3.
4th TRIP: Bowling Party, with picnic lunch. Sun-
day. Feb. 22. Cost: $3.
III. A "Saturday Night Social": "Heart and Soul"
Dance. Guess when! Watch for details.
IV. Club Program, after school, classes to start
Wednesday, Jan. 7, and to run 12 weeks. Cost: $6.
Wednesdays
Guitar class, 3 5 p.m.
Jewelrymaking and leathercrafts, 3 5 p.m.
(coed).
Baton-twirling class.
TEEN-AGE PROGRAM
(9th- 12th grades)
I. Israeli Folk Dance Group: Monday, 7 9:30 p m.
Begins .Monday. Jan. 5th. Cost: S7 for 12-week
session.
II. Drama Workshop: culminating in produi
Monday nights.
III. Lounge Program: .Monday nights arc teen
at the Center. Meet friends, listen to music,
speakers and de\clop other programs that suit
tne interests of those teens who plan them.
iY. First Saturday night of each monih, beginning
Saturday. Jan. 3, will be reserved for teens Your
place to be on that night. For the first event we
are planning a "social live band" (to be anno
ed) to welcome 1976. (A new year, a new Center.)
Each month will be a different "happening" cus-
tom-designed with you in mind. Some will be so-
cial, some educational, some recreational, some
cultural. Always a night you will enjoy and look
forward to.
V. Teen Council: comprised of teens representing
all teen youth groups in city. Call Bill Goldstein
tor details.
SHALOM SOCIABLES
A new group of singles, 45 and over. Varied programing
and a wonderful opportunity to develop your interests and
widen your horizons. The recently organized group has had
a number of successful programs. Activities include theatre
trips, luncheons, socials, and activities that bring us together
to learn as well as to have fun.
Next program is Sunday, Dec. 7, at 7 p.m. at Jewish
Community Center. For information, call Hilda Robbins,
941-1294.
JEWISH GUYS AND GALS
(Singles, age 18-30)
An active group of young adults involved in planning
social and recreational activities for young singles in Brow-
ard County.
Next program planned is for Dec. 7; a koad Rally. Group
will meet at Hollywood Jewish Center. That night will
also be the first rehearsal for a Talent Show. For further
details, call Nina Perry, 792-5566.
For any additional information about Singles 18-30, call:
Sherry Hodes, 523-8618; Nina Perry, 792-5566; Barbara
Lynn. 776-0285.


Page 8-A
'>< Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdal*
UJA Leadership Mission Members Meet
With Israel's "Foundatf onw-Tlic People
Continued from Page 1-A
fessionals who, when we ques
th 'in about why they
to [g -,, 1 b 'causa they
"innq th" S">" "-s^''1 'i "'
pie practicing in Rumania an'
Russia. amon>; nth^r plac
said, 'because it is nr ho-"-
pnd becavsa w could not b~
free peorb where we were."
And t^is. nnv I add. is ever
though life in Israel economical-
ly and financially might be
harder than in tneir form?!
residences. We all felt it too1
a great deal of coiKag: for the~
to make the decision they did.
but just the fact that they coul'
be free to live as oth^r Jew-
was worth even' sacrifice X:
them.
"We visited an A-mv bis
where they ware rebuilding
armored tanks. We had a chanc-:
to talk to the soldiers and asked
how they felt. At age 18 all the
boys are required to serve three
years in the service .and all the
girls are required to serve tw
years. And even after their ton;
of service, every male up to
55 in Israel is required to
1 90 days in the Reserves.
"We visited a place called
Kay, a convalescent home
for severely wounded soldi srs.
There they are given a sp scial
kind of training and psychol-
! uplifting. Many of them
severely burned and maimed
from the Yon Kippur War, ari
now holding jobs b*causo a'
Beit Kay they are mad? to fep'
like normal hu-nan beings again.
It is a sad but true fact that
almost wary familv has beer
ti,-h.j bv one of the wars in
Is-al touched by death or
maiming.
"One of the truest and most
touching highlights of the trfr
mi 1 '"'S't to Yad V'shem. ;.
memorial to the 6 million dead
from the Holocaust. There I
was honored to say a soecial
prayer at the memorial site. As
we stood amidst the monuments
marking special concentration
camps, we vowed that we must
never forget that 6 million died.
We said Yizkor services trere,
and we mourned, but we left re-
el ir. our Judais and
.wnisc t: never forget 'We are
One."
"We also visited a museum
made from a ship which hid
tried to bring in illegal immi-
grants b it ns forcsd bar'-
when th"v t i -d to bn I ir
('..,,: \>-, Si,v how him l'-"ii'
of Jews had been crammed to-
gether on this s^ip and lived ir
tinv littb bunks so close to-
gether that it ws like the con-
centration camps.
"P"t we also remiced at r
Shabbat Service at the Western
Wall, and reioiced in seeing
thousands of J" Wall some from right out of
th shftl novt to others from
all over the free world Jews
from India. Jews from Janan,
Jews ... And they all put little
paparpe with their nrnv-s into
te Wall. 1* was th fulfillment
of the 2.000-year-old yearning
come true.
"We also visited a collective
farm, a Moshav, near the Le-
banese border, where peopb
live their everyday lives as
farmers but then do guard duty
at night natrolling for their
very survival.
"Also we went through the
Knes.t whre some of the most
beautiful works of art in the
world were seen. Then we visit-
ed Mt. Scopus and saw the
Hadassah Hospital ws ware
there just after the rededication
of Mt. Scopus.
"We also shopped and at* in
many different places, rod-*
camel* and went to the Ortho-
dox Quarter.
"Still another highlight was
the visit to the Masada which
reminded us of the heroic sa-
Fran and Milton Nowick visit with an Israeli soldier re-
cuperating at Beit Kay.
Herman Blum and Leo
Goodman at an armv base.
Carole and Leo Goodman
in the Men Shearim.
crifice of the Jews in Roman
ind rededicated us, as
American Jews, to sacrifice and
give with our money and time
those Jews gave with their
lives.
"isom' 'he v sople WS met
with a" Ntensd to and will
never forget were Joseph Al-
mogi, the Mavor of Haifa; Rabbi
Chinif. the UJA repre-
sentative in Israel; and Justice
Haim Zadok of the Israeli Su-
preme Court.
"And a truly memorable occa-
sion was our mseting with Gen.
.and M s. Moshe Dayan in their
beautiful home in the suburbs
of T-l Aviv. How we thrilled
to sit li'mine to one of the
p -abst f n-rals and statesmen
of our tb'e amid his collec-
tion of so-n of the finest
archaeological wonders of the
world. .
"Altog-thm- we soent about
t"n days tourinu. And this trin
was reallv a highlight- in the
lives of manv of the oeoHe on
the ""ission. "nd because it was
a UJA mission, w* war" able
to see so manv thins and snoke
to so many neople. lik govern-
ment officials and averaga Is-
rali citizens things which
noip( -i-ists do not have an
Orwnt-tiinlrv to do
. "^ne fez'tint w= all had was
that no rnattm- hoa '"'fflrnlt
times are and the burdens
are so very severe there is
an undaunted spirit.
"So. w ho-o s~cn and snoken
with the ^-"P'3tion of Israel
her neople. From eery corner
of the earth they ha> co-^e.
Some of us have, visited with
them in Hhhubim to the east,
I\!v-hal s-'^bments in the north.
bti s in rh w~t mid ou'nosts
V ''12 south. We. ha-a spoken
.th on- Jewish brothers from
'"' Soviet Union and Eastern
Europe, from Moslem lands,
f-om India and from South
America. We have met with
some whose fathers arrived
generations past, and with those
who wre about to step, for the
fbst time, unon ihe soil of Is-
rael ->s they disembarked at
Friday, November 28, 1975
"We gladly accent th respon-
sibility that is implicit in the
exodut oi t iei Jewry, as we
have .ice:!".1, ths responsibili-
tles inherent in th; pas- migra-
ti :ii i of Jews bom countries
,..M>i- -' >n. T Jews of the So-
viet Union, and the Jews of the
Moslem world, and tha Jews
from other lands often arrive
in Israel orlv with hope, deter-
mination the clothes they wear
and perhaps with a small piti-
ful parcel of. personal belong-
ings. Their sacrifice is incon-
ceivable. They should be re-
quired to look no further than
to us, their brothers of the free
world, to help make possible
their absorption into a new so-
ciety. In accepting, ir. living,
our traditional ideal of Mother-
hood, we have made a promise.
and we shall keeD that promise.
"We have seen the desperate
need for housing decent hous-
ing for new arrivals, adequate
housing for the arrivals of past
years. We have" seen jarge
families crowded into: trny
rooms, rooms which ware the
best available at -the time "of
their Airyah. but woefully in-
adeouMe for the healths growrtv
of a vigorous family. W have t
heard the appeals of t'^e young.;"
the children of immie-"Us who.
cannot marry and.s'i^ their.
own families, becausa thers is -
o- a-- ~m '" wHi^h'tbev cajB.
live. All this must be recognised
and our npflwita* to fh>- >niist
be kept. And If will he "t This
the Jews of Greater F-t I.-nd-
erdale swore on the soil of our
people under bloodied-.^'Jid'ku
heavens and wiH'#nc"."*' -f^o*
the sunny skies -or \\^odlnds.
the Gait, Inverrary and all of
North Broward!"
THE FOLLOWING is a list of
the participants from the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale on the UJA Oct.
?6-riov. 1 Leadershio Mission to
Israel: Mr. and Mrs. Herman
Blum Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J"a-
ber, *'r. and Mrs. Tning <-els-
n B^ *-, m0- :s Cold-
en. ^T. "nd Ms. Leo Goodman.
Ms. Paula Grp^nber". Mr, and
Mrs. Ocil Henschel, Mr. and
^^rs. ft-*- I"-. v\\ Mrs.
Sam Lebar. Mrs. Ros" Mensch,
^fs. Ha'*i^ Moreanstein. Mrs.
Richir^ Ros"n. Mr. and Mrs
Malvin New-nan. Dr. and Mrs.
Milton Nowick. Mr. a" 1 Mrs.
Wm. Schantz. Mr. an-i Mrs Wil-
liam Slawsky and .Mr, ->n,i Mrs
Sidney Spitz.
( ecu Henschel in contem-
plation at Yad Vashem.
Svlvia Geisser at the ielm
of refugee museum
Sylvia and Sam Leber watch a Malben resident at his loom.
Leonard Bell, UJA national chairman, discusses mission
itinerary with Irv Geisser, Federation director, and a re-
cent Malben arrival from Russia stands nearby.
v*?*n 4. -

Max and Libby Katz mount- Bill and Terry Schantz at
ed an armored car. Yad Vashem Monument.
Arthur Faber gets affec-
tionate with a Malben res-
ident. '
r>



. r
Friday, November 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9-A
December "Nights In Israel"
Planned By Are a Condominiums
At Yad Vashem (fron left): Paula Greenberg, Carole
Goodman, Faye Hcnschcl, Sylvia Leber and Rose Mensch.
William Slawsky, Libby Katz, and Mrs. Slawsky at JDC
Malben home.
Residents and guests of four
Ft. Lauderdale area condomini-
ums have announced "Night in
Israel" campaign events on be-
htlf of the 1975-76 South Flor-
ida Israel Bond Organization
campaign drive for $20 million.
The announcement was made
by Rob.\t M. Hermann, chair-
man. North Broward board oi
governors.
The fi'-t event, W 'dnesdav.
Dec. 3, at 8 p.m., will be Ha-
waiian (iardens Phase II held
at the Phase II clubhous;. ac-
cordinu to Chairman Joel Hoch.
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Ostrow will
receive the Israel Solidarity
Award and evening entertain-
ment will be provided by song-
stress Rita Green.
On Thursday, Dec. 4, Israeli
singer and actor Danny Tad-
more will be the featured en-
tertainer at the Sunrise Lake?,
Phase I campaign event. Unit
-----------------------------1
Friendship Clubs
Are Successful
Max Cohn, membership vice j
president of Temple Beth Is-
rael, has set up a network ot\
Friendship Clubs, Havurot, with-1
in the Congregation.
"The concept of the Havu-
rah,'* explains Mr. Cohn, "is te
divide the Congregation into
smaller workable units." These
proiins, determined by age.
family units and other similari-
ties, are intended to enable
smaller numbers of people to
share and experience religious
and social happenings.
A Havurah group led bv
Gerald Block recently attended
Friday evening services, then
went to the Blocks' home tc
celebrate the Sabbath eve. "This
kind of joint program can only
help to get new members of our
Congregation into the main-
stream of synagogue life," says
Mr. Cohn.
Owners will receive the State
of Israel award for their solidar-
ity and support of Israel's eco-
nomic development programs.
Chairmen Herman Sirota and
Sam Loev announced that the
event is under the auspices of
the South Florida Israel Bom*
Organization and the Sunrise
Lakes Condominium Committee.
Margate residents Morris
Kushner and Harry Survis have
been named to receive the State
of Israel Solidarity Award at
the Oriole Golf and Tennis Club
event. Monday, Dec. 8, in the
clubhouse. Mickey Freeman will
provide entertainment, accord-
ing to cochairmen Clarence
Hourvitz and Herman Smizik.
Condominium developer Jo-
seph H. Singer, vice president
and director of Jefferson Na-
tional Bank in Sunny Isles on
Carole Goodman (left) and Malvin Newman (right) view
Holocaust scenes at Yad Vashem Museum.
Temple Emanu-El To Honor
Imans at Dinner of State
Temnle Emanu-F-1 will pre-
sent the State of Israel David
Ben-Gurion Award to congre-
gants Dr. Stanley S. and Pear'
C. Goodman at the Tempi'
Emanu-El Israel Dinner of
school teach r and on th? Tern-
pis Emanu-El Religious School
Committee.
Heritage Theater
The Heritage Theater of Tem-
ple Emanu-El, plans to present
a production of Tennessee Wil-
liams' Pulitzer Prize winning
play. "A Streetcar Named De-
sire" on Dec. 13 and 14 at 8 p.m.
The announcement was made
by Belle Hubert, publicity chair-
man. Tickets are now available
and reservations are now being
taken by the Temple Office.
BROWARD
r*
DR. ANli ..' GOODMAN
F-ndav. Dec. 7. at Pie'
6f Hotel m Ft. Luuderdal tin
announcement was made b;
dinner chairman Irwin Fin?.
Dr. Good-nan serves on the
board of directors of Temple
HU-E1 anJ is a cochairman
Israel Bonds Professional Divi-
sion. He is a former board mem-
ber of the United Jewish Appea1
campaign, a past president of
the Heart Association of Brow-
ard County, and a member of
the Broward Citizens Counci1
for the University of Miami. Dr
Goodman is the chief of staff of
Plantation General Hospital.
Mrs Goodman, a member of
the Temple Emanu-El Sister-
hood. Hadassah and B'nai
B'rith, has served as a Sunday
Mine Convenient Locations
FORT LAUDERDALE (2 downtown locations)
25 South Andrews Avenue
! t Las Olas Boulevard
CORAL RIDGE 12 locations)
2626 East Oakland Park Boulevard
Cn-the-Beacb N. E. 33rd Avenue & 5Cth Street
LAUDERDALE LAKES (2 locations)
3649 Vv'est Oakland Park Boulevard
Branch-in-the-Mall. 3351 North State Road #7
PLANTATION
8200 West Broward Boulevard
BOYNTON BEACH
1920 South Federal Highway
WEST PALM BEACH
2608 North Dixie Highway
Miami Beach, will be honored
at the Cypress Tree Condomini-
ums Israel Bond program, Wed-
nesday, Dec. 10, at 8 p.m. in the
Cypress Tree clubhouse. Ac1-
cording to chairman Abe Gold-
berg, the evening will incluc'e
an entertainment segment h.'
American Jewish humorist Ed-
die Schaffer.
Hermann says the "Night i
Israel" campaign events pi; y
an important role in helping a 1
Israel through the advancement
of her progress and welfare.
"We must all remember th; t
the only aid Israel receives fi r
their entire economic and de-
velopment and reconstruction
program is the State of Israil
Bonds. They need us even morj
in 1975 than they ever did.'
Milton M. Parson is the execu-
tive director of the South Flor-
ida Israel Bond Organization.
NOW OPEN
OUR HEW DM VE IN AND WALK UP FACILITIES AT
3899 BIRO ROAD. (JUST OFF PONCEde LEON BLVD.)
FOR YOUR C0NVEMENCC.
MAIN BANK HOURS
Monday Friday
Friday Evening
DRIVE IN-WALK UP
Monday Thursday
Friday
9:30 AMID 200 PM
5:00 PM to 7:00 PM
8:30 AM to 4:30 PM
8:30 AM to 7.00 PM
THE FLORIDA NAFL
MOTOR BANK
3899 Bird Road
WALK UP & DRIVE IN
Monday Friday
BANKING
7:30 AM to 6:30 PM
Honda National Bank
at Coral Gables im mm l," **
Ph. 446-3181 Member FWC.
Give your family
a cold wet nose
for Chanukah

Merryfield Kennel*
it in business to
sell puppies.
Bui we alo
want to makt
lure you'll
always love
yourpuppy
as much a*
you did the
first day you
bought him. That* why
we insist on this policy:
WE'LL SELL YOU JUST
THE RIGHT PUPPY .. .
OR NONE AT ALL
I We'll Id >" ,r> >'m,r P'W
1 at home for .111 Hay* to make
lire you l>e him. (If w*M
goofed we'll exchange him.
I for anolher puppy of equal
value, or fjive you a
; refund.
HELL LIVE 10 YEARS
OR WELL HELP PAY
livery one of our
puppiel i a purebred.
2 Ever} our ha* received
* hi puppy ihoM and
undergone an extensive
health program. If
your puppy dne*n
live at lea*! 10 years, we'll
contribute Inward the
ptinha*e of a new Merry -
field puppv.
And
When
he's r.
mos. old
you gel a
10 week
obedience
courae
hike:
MERRYFIELD KENNELS
5010 N.E. I3lh \ve. r'l. lauderdale
1 Block >orlh of t.ommrrrml BM. Hrow. 771-4030
Dade 944-2835
Hours: (8::0-6 Mon.-Snl.) (12-3 Sun.)


Page 10-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 28, 1975
Rabbi and Mrs. Labowitz To Receive
Award at Temple Beth Israel Dinner
Rabbi Fbillip A. and SHfM
Labowit? have been named "the
recipients of the State of Israel
DaviJ Ben-Gurion Award. Dr.
; (7r"nif, (]tnn... c'iair.
cocbairman. have pnnnin;"'
that : prA?*ntithn '.'il1 bs
ma: ? at *h T2~> 1 -th tsra~l
Israel D'nn-r f ct '<> '"m-i
evening. Dec. 14, at the Temple.
Keynoting t'le dinner m>=t.
ing on behalf of th South Flor-
ida Is-ael Honl O-qani'at^i
campaign will be Max I. Di-
mont s'ttho- and lecturer on
Jewish history.
Before coming to Ft. Lauder-
dale. Rabbi Labowft w> a
chaplain at Shepherd Pratt Hos-

RABBI AND MRS. LABOWITZ
pitQl in Bnltimorrand Religious
Consultant to WYDD-FM in
Pittsburgh. He is a mstnber of
the Greater Miami Rabbinical
Association and a member and
former secretary of the Rrow-
ard Boa-H of P^i* R"VM !*
b'nurtz has received citations
and honors from the Israel Bond
and United Jewish Appeal or-
ganizations.
Shcni Labowitz of the Temple Beth Israel Sis-
terhood and a founlsr and
boa-d "i-mber of the Ft. Liul-
erdale Hebrew Dav School anJ
the Ft. Landerdal^ M"<5'i-n.
She has been acri ih and B'nai B'rith organiza-
tions.
Four Area Men Named
1976 United Way Chairmen
Four area men have bsen
appointed to cbairm'nships in
the 1976 United Way Ca-rrogn.
Arnold R. R*-"s and Edward
A. Huegele will b section chair-
men, and Dr. James B. Perry
and Hyman Indowsky division
chairmen in their professions.
Annouacement of the appoint-
ments was made by Larry
Abrams. campaign chairman.
Ramos, vice president, com-
munity developments, of Gulf-
stream Land and Development
Corp., will be chairman of the
development and construction
section, as he was in the 1975
campaign.
Huegele, chairman of the auto
dealers section, is executive
vice president and general man-
ager of Ft. Lauderdale Lincoln
Mercury. He is a member of
the 1975 Minutemen, the board
of directors of Junior Achieve-
ment of Broward County, the
Executives Association and
Chamber of Commerce of Ft.
Laucerdale. He was named first
in sales of the Used Car Club
of Lincoln Mercury.
A neurologist. Dr. Perry will
coordinate medical doctors. He
is chairman of the Florida Medi-
cal Association Council of Legis-
lation and Regulation and an
associate editor of the Florida
Medical Association Journal. He
is former chief of staff of Holy-
Cross Hospital and past presi-
dent oi tne Broward County
Medical Association.
Indowsky, a partner of Peet,
Marwick, Mitchell & Co., will
head the CPA*s division. He is
president of the Broward Coun-
ty Chapter of the Florida In-
stitute of Certified Public Ac-
countants, and a member of its
board of governors and State
Taxation Committee. He is chair-
Menorah Chapel Dedication
An overflow crowd of resi-
dents from the community at-
tended the dedication cere-
monies of the Menorah Chapel,
6800 West Oakland Park Blvd.,
Sunday, Nov. 9. Among the
many dignitaries attending were
the Jewish clergy, leaders of
government, civic and other or-
ganizations, and representatives
of many Jewish religious and
secular groups throughout
Broward County.
Mark Weissman, the first
Jewish Funeral Director in this
area, who has been operating
Menorah Chapels in Margate
and Deerfield Beach for almost
two years, welcomed the guests
to the new facility, and stated
that "this, the finest chapel of
all, will enable us to better serv-
ice the continued growth of our
Jewish community."
Weissman complimented th=
parent company, which spared
no expense in building and
furnishing this chapel, and
which was represented at the
ceremonies by Cy Case, presi-
dent, and Phil Morgaman and
State Sen. Jon C. Thomas, vice
presidents.
With the growth of Menorah
Chapels, personnel has increas-
ed. Joe Rubin, funeral director
is associate to Mark Weissman
and both are active in many or-
ganizations.
Herman "Hy" Sirota, master
of ceremonies for the dedication
program, is public relation: :
representative of Menorah Chap-!
els. Sirota, president of Sunrise i
B'nai B'rith Lodge and dele-
gate to Broward Palm Beach
Council of B'nai B'rith, was re-
cently appointed chairman of
Bonds for Israel for Sunrise
Lakes Phase I and is active in
many organizations in Broward
County.
The pledge of allegiance toj
the flag was led by Sen. Joni
Thomas and County Commis-
sioner Jack Moss. Others par-
ticipating in the ceremonies
were Rabbis Arthur J. Abrams,
Phillip A. Labowitz. Israel Zim-
merman. S. Dan Herman.
Emanuel Schenk, Morris Skop
and Harold D. Richter.
JDC Council Elects Golden
Alfred Golden, prominent in
South Florida community af-
fairs, has been elected to the
National Council of the Amer-
licart. W>.'ib.Joint Distibitiot
Committee.
Mr. Golden, vice president of
Riverside Memorial Chapels of
Florida, is a member of the I
board of directors of Greater j
Miami Federation, of the Dade
County Personnel Advisory
Board and a national commis-
sioner of the Anti-Defamation
League. He has been chairman
of the Hillel Community Board
of South Florida.
Hy Indowsky Arnold Ramos
man of the National Affairs Task
Force of the Ft. Lauderdale
Chamber of Commerce and'
member of the Estate Planning
Council of Broward County.
ALFRED GOLDEN
Women's Division Sponsors
"Institute of Awarenessr
The Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale is sponsoring
a leadership development pro-
gram, "Institute of Awareness,"
according to Anita Perlraan.
president of the Women's Divi-
sion, and Cheryl Levine. vice
president of leadership devessp
ment.
The Institute began on Nov.
17 with a session of Sensitivity
Training, led by Dr. Arthur Bur-
irhter. head of the College of
Education at Florida Atlantic
University. The feelings and
hesitancy of workers toward
themselves and others about
fund-raising were examined.
The session served to build con-
fidence and understanding in
the volunteer about solicitation
and other areas of campaign
work.
On Nov. 24 Dr. Bernard Reis-
man. Director of the Lown
Graduate Center of Contem-
porarv Jewish Studies at Bran-
deis University, led a group
dvnamics session on Jewish
identity. Reisman examined and
explored the roles and meaning
their Jewish identity has on
these leaders today.
The final session, on- Dec. 1,
will be on campaign structure
>nd techniques, led by Reva
Wexler, a member of the board
of the national Women's Divi-
sion, and Alvin Capp, a Fort
Lauderdale attorney.
Mrs. Perlman and Mrs. Le-
vine, in commenting on the In-
stitute of Awareness stated: "We
have in the institute an excel-
lent leadership development
program for the leaders of our
Women's Division. A successful
campaign depends greatly on
knowledfiible and well-trained
leaders, and we are certain that
these three sessions will provide
cur leaders with the background
and skills necessary to have the
kinti of campaign we need to
raise the money for vital pro-
R-a"is for Jews in Israel, at
home and throughout the
world." .
i/lSoxi Kadar film about one family's joys and
sorrows and a love all
families will want to
^n share. A
Qaldrcn believe in ndractes
Grandfatlicnmake diem come true
163"St.lOADElANQ
TWIN ONI
Been framed lately?
FRAME
SHOP
Art Classes
#FI
Custom Framing
Done on Premises
Retail & Wholesale
1332 EAST
COMMERCIAL BLVD.,
FT. LAUDERDALE,
FLORIDA 33334
(305) 771-7010
Needlework
Expertly
Framed
Water Colors
Graphics
Oil Paintings
Prints
Lithographs
Reproductions
Graphics & Water Colors
Holiday Sale Dec. 5-6-7


ol '-
[rida^yfoiamber 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11-A
?A/Arf^**WA/''W^W*W,'W'A/''WA1^A

\ c c
orner
By CONNIE COHEX
Beth Israel's Youth Program
Sponsors Many Activities
k.
v~v~v
r^-\^/V^\^y\^***
Bill Goldstein, executive di-
rector of the newly created
[Jewish Community Center, cur-
rently establishing relationships
I with marry Jewish groups in the
[city through speaking engage-
ments, recently spoke at a well-
received program at the North-
jeast Young Leaderhship group.
The group pledged their suo-
porf'ajid-encouragement to the
I JCC."
Goldstein intends to meet as
many people-as he can and tell
the Center Story its objec-
tives, goals and methods of
achieving them. He states that
[theoretically he is selling the
pconcept oT "community." He
equates community with "love,"
j saying one of the objectives is
["to create a caring, sensitive
Icammunity one in which peo-
Iple truly care about each other
. Isn't that really the es-
sence of Judaism?" he con-
cludes .
Pichard RomrWf h^t1"*
iighly successful planning
breakfast and meeting at h'f
rhome -on Nov. 16 along with
cohost Melvin Gerber for Cora1
springs residents in behalf of
the Jewish Federation of Great-
er Fort Lauderdale. Over 30
Iguests enjoyed listening tn
(speakers, Atty. Alvin Capp oi
lantation who discussed the
Federation's role and local serv-
ices, and Allan E. Baer, presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation
af Greater Fort Lauderdale.
vho spoke on ths impo-ianci
of Coral Springs' contribution
to the 76 campaign. Clearly
Toral Springs is gearing up for
highly imaginative, success-
ful campaign .
Echoes of "I'm o.k.. you>e
lo.k." were heard throughout the
[corridors of the new Federa-
Jion building as the Women's
iDivislon held their first in a
[series of Leadership Training
[courses. The Nov. 17 course
[centered on sensitivity training
[and transactional analysis and
[was led by Dr. Arthur Burrich-
[ter of Florida Atlantic Univer-
sity .
Mrs. Louis (Anita) Perlman
I expertly "mans" the helm of the
[Women's Division for the Fed-
eration. The Perlmans have just
come back from Chicago and
have already become deeply in-
Ivolved in Federation wel-
come back to the ship, Perl-
Imans .
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Levine
(he chairman of the cultural
committee for the Federation
and she leadership training vice
president) announce that the
Jewish Federation of Great"'
Lauderdale will soon have still
another young leader con-
gratulations to the Levines .
It is with pleasure and pride
in our communitv that we an-
nounce that the Federation Film
Series is sold out and that, un-
fortunately, no tickets will be
available at the door. AM 750
of our series tickets have been
sold. However, we do promise
that next year we'll move to an
even larger facility .
On that note, let us add that
over 2,200 people enioyed the
Chassidic Festival held on Nov.
2 .
Cm Sunday, Nov. 16, Tempi''
[Sholom in Pompano Beach
held a ddication ceremonv. Al-
lan E. Baer, president of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, was there to
give congratulations and greet-
ings on behalf of the Federation.
I Mr. Robert M. Hermann. 1st
[vice president of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
[Lauderdale, gave best wishes on
ehalf of the Federation and
reetings as chairman of the
ard of governors of State of
fsrael Bonds. Mazel Tov, from
ill1 us at lite Federation .
Nov. 16, was indeed a busy
y for the Jews of Fort Laud-
erdale and the Jewish Federa-
tion. Tue Ta":""ic .'-"*' Pw.
ter held a protest rally against
the infamous UN resolution
condemning Zionism with an
overflow crowd of more than
500 people. Irving L. Geisser,
executive director of the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, was among several
dignitaries lending support to
the rally .
The Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Federation was well
represented at the general as-
sembly recently held in Miami
and sponsored by the CJFWF.
Attending the various sessions
were Mr. and Mrs. Allan Ba-r.
Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Gross, Mr.
and Mrs. Alvin Capp. Joel Rein-
stein, Mrs. Florence Straus,
Mrs. Maxine Hess, Nat Halpern,
Mrs. Deanna Blafer. Mrs Joan
T. Samuels, Mrs. Edith Levine.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Perlman,
and Martin J. Kurtz. The pro-
fessional staff of the Federation
i-is also a^nly represented by
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Geisser,
Mr. and Mrs. Barry rtxler, Ms
Janice Salit, Miss Connie Cohen
and Rubin Lefkowitz .
The L'Chayim Group of Ha-
dassah met on Nov. 25 at the
Plantation Community Center.
Refreshment* were served bv
Mrs. Ben Glass and h"- c"-"
mittee upon arrival. Mrs. Sol
Becker, present at the rededica-
tion of Mt. Scopus in Israel on
Oct. 21, reported or. the momen-
to'is occasion. Mrs. Milton Mar-
golius, president, presided .
We're pleased to announce
the Fifth Annual Antiques Show
and Sale sponsored by Sister-
hood Temple Emanu-El is being
held in the Temole auditorium,
3245 W. Oakland P-V Bl "*
Fort Lauderdale. Dec. 2-4.
Thirty quality dealers from all
over the U.S. will be exhibitina
a wide variety of antiques.
Home-cooled lunch, dinner and
snacks will be available. Plenty
of free parking. Hours of the
sale will be 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
on Tuesday and Wednesday,
and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Thurs-
day ... i
The Rayus Group of the
North Broward Chapter of
Hadassah held a regular meet-
ing on Nov. 25 at the Tamarac
Jewish Center. The program was
a dramatization of the novel.
"Jordan Patrol," a stirring nar-
rative. Live characterizations
spoke through seven readers
excellent .
Do you play bridge? Would
you like to improve or sharpen
your game? If you answer Yes.
then you won't want to miss an
exciting new course. "Modern
Bridge," held at Temple Emanu-
El starting on Monday. Dec. 1.
The course, designed for inter-
mediate players, is taught by
Richard Pavlicek. well-known
area bridge instructor. Mr. Pav-
licek will cover all phases of
standard bidding including five-
card major openings, Stayman,
Gerber, overcalls, doubles, etc.
Individual lessons consist of ap-
proximately 15 minutes for go-
ing over quizres, 45 minutes of
lecture and 60 minutes of play
and analysis of specially pre-
pared hands. Donation for the
8-week course is S35 including
a $5 donor credit. To register.
call Janice Starrels. 563-6726.
or Harriet Fine. 5S3-1900, m
soon as possible, for space is
limited .
To conclude our first column,
please let us make clear that
all items of interest are wel-
come. Please send them to me
at the Federation office. Till
next time .
Shalom,
C.J.C.
ZENOLL'S
FURNITURE AKO KDMN0 ON VO***** ID., """j*
5149 N.W. POWERLINE RD. Phone 77641371
OPEN SEVEN
DAYS
FREE
SAME
EUVERY
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Back Supporter MATTRESSES
As Advertised on the "Tonite Show**

. k
Serving Broward County Since 1955
LUDW1K ft JACOB BRODZKI, Owners
Under the direction of Eitan
Grunwald, youth coordinator of
Temple Beth Israel, the youth
program has grown and now the
activities are scheduled tor a
full seven days a weak.
A typical day for Grunwald
starts early, with the "busy-
work" of arranging trips and
processing registration forms.
progresses to an afternoon of
meetings with the mv&v vn
involved in helping plan the
programs, and finally ends in
an evening of programs, trips,
and activities.
The Beth Israel Youth Pro-
gram sponsors programs for
fifth througth twelfth grades,
including athletics, arts and
crafts, music, trips, weekend
conventions, study groups, serv-
ices and dances.
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By Apoointment: G.G. Allen, President
i


1
Page 12-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, Noyfafeb&, lg75,
* EaWritt al$fo#e <
coordinated by the
mm m
devoted to discussion of themes
/5rater.Miami Rabbinical Association *w
. Max A. Lipschitz KaoDi I
and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz Kaobi Robert J. Ork.and
.:' n.i-.n.>'
u
Issac Harby
Isaac Harby (1788-1828).
grandson of the royal lapidary
of Morocco, made a mark in the
history of post-revolutionary
America in the cultural and
religious life of the young na-
tion. Author, teacher, play-
wright, essayist and drama
critic, he also played a major
role in the pioneer effort to
establish reform Judaism in
the United States.
Isaac Harby tells in the fami-
ly bible that his great ancestor,
Isaac ben Solomon, was distin-
guished by the appellation of
herab (a swordsman), whence
Isaac believes came the family
name "Harby," literally "my
sword."
His ancestors. Isaac wrote,
fled to Spain, then to Portugal
and once more to escape "the
pestilence of the Inquisition,"
to Morocco. Isaac Harbie (sic),
his grandfather, fled to Eng-
land about the middle of the
18th century. Isaac's father,
Solomon Harby, emigrated to
America, lived in Jamaica from
1778-1781, then moved to the
thriving American port city of
Charleston, South Carolina,
where Isaac was born.
Isaac's study of law was end-
ed almost before it began when
his father's death in 1805 left
the 17-year-old youth to sup-
port his mother and younger
brothers and sisters. By his
father's will, Isaac received his
books, they "having been orig-
inally purchased for him in the
Pursuit of his education."
Isaac opened a school on
Cdisto Island and transferred
it to Charleston in 1809. His
announcement in the Charles-
ton Courier, January 1, 1810,
throws light on his own attain-
ments as well as the curricu-
lum of the time:
The subscriber has open-
ed an Academy in Bedon
Alley No. where will be
taught the usual branches of
an English Education, viz.
Elocution, Arithmetic, Pen-
manship, Grammar, Geogra-
phy also the Latin and
Greek Classics, Composition
and the first books of Eu-
clid's Elements.
He pledges himself, not
only to pay every attention
to the routine of his Pupil's
improvement, but also to in-
struct them in the principles
of virtue and patriotism. To
instill into their minds hon-
our and morality; and so far
to effect the wish of the no-
ble Spartan as to teach Boys
those things WHEN THEY
ARE YOUNG, as will prove
most useful to them, WHEN
THEY BECOME MEN.
Isaac Harby.
Newspaperwork interrupted
Harby's teaching after some
years but he resumed teaching
in 1822 and was elected a
teacher of one of Charleston's
free schools in 1825. In 1828
he moved to New York follow-
ing the shock of his wife's
death the year before. In New
York he opened a school in
cooperation with his sister who
continued the school after
Isaac's sudden death the same
year.
Harby wrote his first play at
17. His most successful, "Al-
berti," was performed in
Charleston in 1819. As a jour-
nalist, Harby wrote for several
papers including one he pur-
chased. In both Charleston and
New York he contributed liter-
ary articles and dramatic criti-
cism, particularly to the New
York Evening Post.
In American Jewish history,
Isaac Harby is best known for
his major role in the pioneer
effort for Jewish religious re-
form in the United States."
In Harby's time, services in
Charleston's Congregation Beth
Elohim were conducted in He-
brew and Spanish. People sat
or stood at will. There was no
sermon, wrote one observer,
and people walked in and out
of the synagogue as they
pleased. In 1824, forty-seven
members of the congregation,
Harby among the leaders, pe-
titioned the board to allow var-
ious reforms in the service.
The petitioners wrote:
We wish not to overthrow,
but to rebuild; we wish not
to destroy, but to reform and
revise the evils complained
of; we wish not to abandon
the institutions of Moses, but
to understand and observe
them .
It was requested that prayers
be translated into English, that
the service be abridged by the
omission of some of the pray-
ers, that money offerings dur-
ing the service be abolished
and that there be a sermon in
English based on the portion
of the week.
The petition was rejected.
This led to the formation of
The Reformed Society of Is-
raelites. Isaac Harby was se-
lected to deliver the Society's
first anniversary address and
became president in 1827. His
anniversary address of 1825
was printed and was said to
have attracted wide attention.
In 1826, when the membership
of the Reformed Society of Is-
raelites had increased to about
fifty, Isaac Harby wrote: "The
Jews born in Carolina are
mostly our way of thinking on
the subject of worship, but act
from a tender regard for the
opinions and feelings of their
parents in not joining our So-
ciety."
Harby's departure from
Charleston for New York in
June, i828, left a void in the
reform movement. By 1833 the
Society had dissolved.
In announcing Isaac Harby's
sudden death in his 41st year,
The New York Evening Post,
December 15, 1828, spoke of
him as "distinguished as an
eminent scholar and writer of
no ordinary taste and intelli-
gence." The New York Mirror,
the leading New York literary
paper of the day, wrote that as
a critic, Isaac Haroy was "con-
sidered unrivalled in this coun-
try." The Charleston Courier
wrote, "Our own citizens .
were justly proud of him; by
the inhabitants of the whole
State his talents were felt and
admired not only as an editor,
but as a scholar of taste and
learning."
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Kohler. Isaac Harby, Jawish Reli-
gious Leader, American Jewhth His-
torical Society Publications. Vol. 32.
1931.
Stern. Rabbi Malcolm H. Harby,
Isaac. Kncyclopedla Judaica, Jeru-
salem 1S71. Vol. 7.
Tarshish, Allan. Tha Charleston Or.
gan Case. American Jewish Histor-
ical Quarterly. Vol. 54. 1985.
Courtesy of
The Judaic Heritage Society
*Isaac Meyer Wise, the father of
Reform Judaism In the> United
States, did not arrive In the country
until 14.
"It Tolls For Thee"
By RABBI S. T. SWIRSKY
Recently, the news media car-
ried the specious declaration by
Anwar Sadat that he opposes
onlv Zionism which he equates
with racism but is not against
the Jewish people. A local daily,
in a lead editorial, called for a
warm reception for him as he is
only a "moderate" nationalist
and has kept his commitments
Vis-a-vis Israel. Consequently,
the U.S. should extend him the
hand of fellowship and the cof-
fers of economic aid.
A knowledge of history and a
good memory are a rare pro-
phylaxis. Let us compare and
contrast racist Zionism with
moderate Arab nationalism. In
May, 1939, Chamberlain issued
a White Paper which repudiated
the Balfour Declaration. In es-
sence, the White Paper severely
restricted Jewish immigration
for a ten year period after which
Palestine would become an in-
dependent state with the pop-
ulation frozen permanently in
the ratio of 2 Arabs to 1 Jew.
AS HITLER began his dia-
bolical "final solution" of the
Jews through their deracina-
tion. Dr. Weizmann pleaded with
Chamberlain to keep the doors
of Palestine open to the up-
rooted Jews. The Prime Minis-
ter remained obdurate and in-
tractable, adding, "I am a friend
of the Jews," to which Weiz-
mann retorted icily, "You were
also a friend of the Czechs." For
a people living in the shadow
of the Holocaust it was gratuit-
ously brutal to place them at the
head of the queue to the gas
chambers.
Despite this devastating set-
back, when the calamitious war
broke out. David Ben-Gurion,
the Jewish leader and Zionist
architect, immediately pledged
the support of his people to the
Allied war effort. Thirty-thou-
sand men and three thousand
women, an extraordinary pro-
portion in relation to the total
eligibles in Palestine, enlisted as
distinct Jewish units in the
British fighting forces. At the
same time Arab leaders remain-
ed hostile and antagonistic.
GENERAL John Glubb. in
command of British trained
forces in Transjordan, said:
"Every Arab force mutinied
and refused to fight for the Al-
lies or faded away In deser-
tions."
THE GRAND Mufti, who
headed the Arab League, though
of Semitic stock, was made an
honorary Aryan, took up resi-
dence in Germany as the per-
sonal guest of Hitler, and as a
rabid partisan of the Nazis di-
rected Arab opposition to the
Allied war effort. One of the
officers of the Egyptian army
was Nasser, who with Anwar
Sadat, was in constant commu-
nication with the Nazi command
and worked feverishly for the
Axis victory. So much for racist
Zionism.
Nasser once observed: "With-
in the Arab world there is a
role that is wandering aimlessly
in search of a hero." He as-
sumed it was his destiny to fill
that role; now, his successor,
Sadat, with an aura of charis-
ma, believes that it was ordain-
ed that he respond to the search
with abrasive" egocentrism.
There is an ambivalence to
the President of Egypt's oscil-
lation between displaying states-
manship and succumbing to piti-
ful hallucinations. A new shib-
boleth has been injected in the
Middle East to obfuscate the
real intent of Egypt and that is
the term "moderate" as opposed
to Zionist extremism and bel-
ligerency. Moderation is the
successful line that Egypt is
pursuing to win approval, and
even moral acclaim, for her po-
sition.
THE ACRIMONIOUS realty
of moderation is poignantly re-
vealed in the ceasefire conceiv-
ed by Egypt and caustically im-
plemented by a mordant Sec-
retary of State and an un-
helmeted President. In his ap-
pearance before the National
Press Club, President Sadat
shrewdly stated his oMactO
recognition of Israel; he did not
amplify his treacherous int 'nt
that defacto existence really
means Israel's intrusion in the
Arab world and that it must be
eliminated.
The perfidy and improbity of
the Egyptian stance is the grave
determination to declare a "ji-
had" against Judaism. I have
maintained in puloit and class-
room that the ultimate objec-
tive of the Arabs is not only to
crush the State of Israel but es-
sentially to foist the dominance
of Islam on the world and bring
Judaism to an ignominious end.
The Egyptian ambassador to the
U.S., Astraff Ghorbal, in an in-
terview in Argentina, stated
"the extermination of Judaism
in the Middle East is the point
of departure for the process of
liberation of the Arab peoples.
It is our irrevocable decision to
destroy Judaism."
DRAWN to a logical conclu-
sion, the end of Judaism would
entail the obliteration of many
Islamic institutions. The holy
period of Ramadan is based on.
and inspired by, the stay of
Moses on Mt. Sinai for 30 days
plus ten days ending on Yom
Kippur with his bringing down
the Torah and intercession for
the Children of Israel.
The Ramadan is mentioned
only once in the Qoran. in Sura
2, where it is preceded by the
bringing down of the Law by
Moses on the Fast of Atonement,
cided with Yom Kippur which
Mohammed arrived in Medina
;- i. .
', .
$ciad .:;,
in September, 622, which coin-
was explained to him aA"The
Dav of Moses."' ^' ./
Further, the Moslem Friday
worship originates in Medina
which had a large Jewish pop-
ulation of priestly descent and
where, therefore, "Friday was
the day when the Jews bought
their provisions for the Sab-
bath." Friday was the weekly
market day of the oasis of
Medina; everybody was-' present
and when merchants and buyers
assembled it was a pro;itious
time for the purpose cj pi aye t
and admonition.
Sura 62 sneiVs of "yawn a!-
junta,' i lentical with the
Aramaic "yom hakenis".." the
day of assembly or market day
Alas, the end of 'Judaism would
remove the foundations for the
Moslem Holy Day and holy
Ramadan.
THE NEW approach of Mod-
eration is designed to weaken
Israel. Her borders will shrink
and the truncated remains will
result in eventtrardlSsbTtrtion.
What four wars, could not ac-
complish the chimera of mod-
eration will bring about, No
clash of armies, no tanks and
guns, just whittle .away Israel
to a vanishing point in time. In
the new terminology, when Is-
rael will become "secure'"'by
agreement, she will at the same
time become a political.'mirage
an-* fade out into pb.liyie*),
Israel stands alone In/ the
world with only God as her pro-
tector and ally; her future is
assured as Lincoln once re-
marked: "God and I are always
in the majority." There had
never been a severance of the
living connection between the
Jews and the land of their
Biblical ancestors.. The divine
assurance has been. fulfilled
and in grace He will continue
with His covenant of immortal-
izing His people in their .eternal
homeland.
For the first time in 2.000
years, the fate of Jews does, not
denend on the suiferance.of out-
siders; it will be 'determined "by
the will and stamina of the Jews
themselves. .!.,.'
-;.
'
l --.
SYNOPSIS Or THE WFtXLY TORAH PORTION
Vayeshev N
The brothers strip Joseph and throw him into the
pit. A caravan of Ishmaelites is seen in the background}
"And it came, to pass, when Joseph was.come unia
his brethren, that they stripped Joseph of his coat''
(Gen. 37.23). .
VAYESHEV Jacob and his sons dwelt in the land,
of Canaan as shepherds. Of all his sons, Jacob loved
Joseph best. His obvious favoritism, and Joseph's ac+
count of his grandiose dreams, produced ..hatred antj
jealousy among the brothers. Joseph's brother! sold tH
hated favorite to some Ishmaelite merchants/ -who toqnj
Joseph to Egypt with them. There Potiphar, an/officer of
the Pharaoh and captain of his guard, bought. Joseph as
a slave. -The Hebrew lad quickly rose to a position of
responsibility in- his master's household. However, Joj
seph rejected the advances of Potiphar's wife; (he slan;
dered him, and he was imprisoned. But in prison, tool
God was with Joseph, and he won the confidence of ttt
jailers. He became known as an interpreter of dream
by correctly reading the significance of tjie dreams p
the Pharaoh's butler anil baker when thtey were h
rjtrison-mates. ^
This recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extract*
and based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage,"
edited by P. Wollman-Tiamir, $15. Publisher is Shengold, and
the volume is available at 27 William St., Now York, NT
10005. President of the society distributing the volume H
Joseph Schlang.
o
I
|bm
BJ sbsjbji | a
'.. 'LI ..,
i,*f-


November 28, 1975
The Jewish Flortdian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13-A
MINBLIN
pre Afraid of Our New Political Being
tinued from Page 4-A
non-Jew^ responded with
sympathy if not open
asm.
TODAY, we are begin-
see our status as poin-
tings as dangerous. It is
dividing the mainstream of feel-
ing over the Jew as a political
animal so that the mainstream
is no longer as sympathetic (if
not openly enthusiastic) about
the "new Jew" as before. The
rising cost of gas, the prospect
of war between Israeli and
Arab with the possibility of
American involvement in it
all this spells the nature of the
dividing mainstream in threat-
ening terms.
Those Jews who don't res-
pond well to the threats fail to
do so because the threats are
taking the form of the ancient
anti-Semitic challenges to our
safety and survival.
FOR EXAMPLE, the United
Nations condemnation of Zion-
ism, in itself a meaningless ges-
ture if you refuse to take apes
seriously, is nevertheless a
igry Reaction Voiced To State Dep't. Reversal
Continued from Page 1-A
L'A whole series of indications in the paper attest to a
ling gap between the positions of the U.S. and Israel.
For instance, there is the assertion that the heart of
roblem is the Palestinian issue rather than the Arabs'
ecognition of Israel, and the distinction between 'mod-
i' and 'extremists' in the PLO at a time when the or-
ation as a whole continues to oppose the existence of
vereign state of Israel within any borders whatsoever."
Morton Expected
ill Beat Senate
[ontempt Charges
;inued from Pare 1-A
ns headed by Rep. John
Calif.).
group has been trying
flast July to obtain docu-
on American companies
ed to have complied with
[jycott. Moss said that Mor-
jrefusal to provide the in-
Ition left him no choice but
fn for contempt. With-
the papers, Moss said,
not.'be tolerated by the
>. James Scheuer (D., N.Y.)
lally introduced the motion
pie subcommittee against
an. If he is cited by the full
st. it is believed Morton
Id be the first Cabinet of-
to be held in contempt.
SUBCOMMrTTEE action
be approved by its par-
ty, the House Committee
Interstate and Foreign Com-
ce, and then adopted by a
Jrity vote in the House.
Itol Hill sources also told the
. that should Morton not ? ub-
[the information before leav-
office his successor will be
pn an opportunity by the sub-
littee to provide it.
would like to reiterate my
onal opposition to the Arab
boycott and my full accord with
the policies and laws of the
United States," Morton said in
a statement to the subcommit-
tee. He observed that Attorney
General Edward Levi had told
him he need not respond to the
subcommittee's subpoena for
the information.
IEVITT
memorial chapels
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in our 3 locations
ENORAH
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Mark Weissman
Broward County's first
Jewish Funeral Director
DEERFIELD
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MARGATE
5915 Park Drive Phone 971-3330
SUNRISE
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J
NRP's "Hatzofeh" recalled the American pledge to co-
ordinate on Mideast policy with Israel a pledge that has
been flouted.
AND THE large afternooner "Maariv" writes:
"It is not possible to relax as Kissinger advised Is-
raeli newsmen in Washington and to believe his asser-
tion that nothing has changed in U.S. policy towards the
PLO .
TVo Foreign Aid
Continued from Page 2-A
ANOTHER speaker. Rep. Wil-
liam Cohen (R.. Me.), said, "This
kind of resolution is not con-
sistent with the principles of the
UN Charter. We were have to
seriously reevaluate our parti-
cipation in the UN."
Humberto Cardinal Medeiros,
of the Boston Archdiocese, is-
sued a statement in connection
with the rally in which he de-
scribed the anti-Zionist draft as
"not a clear and precise expres-
sion of reality."
The Cardinal's message said:
"I am afraid that this resolu-
tion will be used for propaganda
which will confuse rather than
clarify the tangled knot of prob-
lems which marke the Middle
East."
CARDINAL Medeiros was re-
presented at the rally by Msgr.
Edward Murray.
Other speakers included Ed-
ward Redd, executive secretary
of the Bostor. branch of the
NAACP,
hallmark of the times, making
a serious contribution to tho
growing indisposition toward!
Jews.
,> <
Zionism IS political what-
ever balderash Jews may jab
ber about Zionism as spiritual
and religious.
Zionism is political it is
dangerous and painful politics
in 1975. In the national and in
ternational arena in which we
have been struggling to coun-
ter the growing indisposition
toward Jews since the 1973
War, it is clear that we have
been doing worse than an ama-
teur in subduing our sudden
sense of fright at being expos-
ed our sudden awareness
after 2,000 years that it wa?
after all easier to be a slave
who is obsequious and absurd
than it is to be free.
INDEED, ;here are signs
that too many of us are flag-
ging in the struggle. The Jew-
ish dean's easy submission to a
bunch of rowdy Arab students,
the Jewish students' falaftl
counterattack all of this
shows there is more than a
subtle weakening of purpose.
There is a wearying, deca-
dent need to go back. The
problem is that there can be no
going back to Jewish anonym-
ity in the chrysalis of the
American dream.
The American dream is dead
for all of us, Jew and Gentile
alike. So is anonymity dead for
the Jew. If we flinch from the
challenge of our new political
status, then what are we but
Jews in a world of growing
anti-Semitism?
That makes no sense.
The staff of the Star of David Memorial
Gardens would like to invite all members
of the Jewish community to visit this
beautiful Jewish cemetery and to inspect
our new open-air Memorial Chapel. The
Star of David Memorial Gardens has been
carefully designed to comply with Judaic law
and tradition and has been dedicated by the
Broward Board of Rabbis.
We at the Star of David Memorial Gardens
feel it is important that every prospective
purchaser visit the cemetery prior to making
a decision. For additional information call Rabbi
Milton Gross at the Star of David Memorial
Gardens office or at his home, 739-4952.
We invite you to see our bronze memorials by
Gorham, Master Craftsmen in Silver and Bronze
Starof Dayid Manorial Gardens
7701 BAILEY ROAD TAMARAC. FLORIDA 305 721-4112
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1577 Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33302


Page 14-A
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 28, 1975r
community
GQienoor
MONDAY, DECEMBER 1
Women's Division Leadeishin Training Program10 a.m.-
2 p.m.
Woodlands ORT Board Meeting10 a.m.
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah Armon Group12:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood Board Meeting8 p.m.
Temple Sholom Couples Club8 p.m.
Dolphins Home Game8 p.m.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2
Temple Emanu-El El Sisterhood Antique Show10 a.m.-
9 p.m.
Temple Sholom Sisterhood Board Meeting10 a.m.
Northeast Women's Division Planning Meeting10 a.m.
Temple Beth Israel Senior USY Basketball8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Junior USY Basketball8 p.m.
JCC Senior Citizens Chanukah Party11 p.m.
WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 3
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood Antique Show
S1.000 Women's Division Meeting10 a.m.
National Council of Jewish Women Board Meeting 10
a.m.
Young Leadership Chanukah Celebration
National Council of Jewish Women North Broward Sec-
tion Paid-Up Membership Luncheon
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood Antique Show
B'nai B'rith Women Ahavah Chapter Bowling9:30 a.m.
North Broward Hadassah Board Meeting10 a.m.
All-Day Community Relations Day Luncheon
Federation Senior Singles Meeting JCC Committee Nights
Federation Office Jewish Committee8 p.m.
JCC Senior Citizens Meeting1 p.m.
Board Meeting B'nai B'rith Women Tamarac Chapter No.
1479
Temple Beth Israel Senior USY Basketball8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Junior USY Basketball8 p.m.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7
Temple Beth Israel Men's Club Brunch
Temple Emanu-El Bond Dinner, Pier 666:30 p.m.
Temple Sholom Fund-Raiser7 p.m.
Hebrew Day School Dinner Dance8 p.m.
Dolphins Home Game4 p.m.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 8
Federation Teacher Enrichment Program10 a.m.
Temple Beth Israel Men's Club Board Meeting8 p.m.
Women's ORT Sunverrary Chapter General Meeting
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood Card Party10:30 a.m.
Temple Sholom Board Meeting8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Senior USY Basketball8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Junior USY Basketball8 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10
Brandeis National Women's Board Meeting10 a.m.
Woodlands ORT Meeting1 p.m.
JCC Senior Citizens Film Night7:30 p.m.
Plantation ORT Mah Jongg and Card Party8 p.m.
Coral Springs Young Leadership8 p.m.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11
B'nai B'rith Women Ahavah Chapter. Bowling9:30 a.m.
Temple Emanu-El Executive Board Meeting8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Board of Directors Meeting8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Senior USY Basketball8 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Junior USY Basketball8 p.m.
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Ft. LAUDERDALE
Assembly Opene r Attracts 3,000
Five American Jewish communities will be presented
with the 1975 William J. Shroder Awards, the highest serv-
ice honor bestowed by the Council of Jewish Federations
and Welfare Funds upon Jewish communal agencies at the
banquet highlighting its 44th General Assembly on Satur-
day evening at the Deauville Hotel in Miami Beach.
The communities to be hon- home, overseas and in Israel.
ored include Los Angeles in
the large city category; Dallas.
Tex., among the intermediate
cities; and Waterbury. Conn.,
in the small city group. A spe-
cial citation will be presented
to St. Louis to be shared by its
Federation and Jewish Com-
munity Centers Association;
and an honorable mention will
go to Flint. Mich.
AN ESTIMATED 3.000 com-
munal leaders and Federation
executives from the United
States and Canada are partici-
pating in the five-day General
Assembly which opened on
Wednesday, and will conclude
on Sunday.
Recognized as a central fo-
rum of the North American
Jewish community, the Assem-
bly's encompassing program of
forums, plenaries and more
than 100 workshops are being
devoted to an intensive assess-
ment of the critical social wel-
fare needs facing U.S. and Ca-
nadian Jewish communities, at
The Bureau of Jewish Edu-
cation, a constituent agency of
the Jewish Federation-Council
of Greater Los Angeles, is be-
ing honored "for its creative
and intensive involvement of
Jewish youth in a dynamic Jew-
ish living and learning experi-
ence, the establishment of
"Havurat Noar."
MRS. LAWRENCE J. WEIN-
BERG is president and Alvin
Bronstein. executive vice pres-
ident, of Federation Council;
Herbert Glaser is chairman and
Dr. Benjamin L. Yapko, direc-
tor of the Bureau of Jewish
Education.
The Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion of Dallas, of which Stan-
ly C. Pearle is president, and
Walter J. Levy, recently retir-
ed executive director, will re-
ceive the award "for the ex-
cellence of its program of lead-
ership training for Jewish
communal service."
THE JEWISH Federation of
Waterbury, with Burton Albert,
president, William H. Walzer,
chairman, Regional Services
Program, and Burton Lazarow,
executive director, will be the
recipient of the Shroder Award
"for its initiative in helping the
neighboring Jewish Federation
of Danbury to achieve signifi-
cant advances in serving its
own community and Jewry."
A special citation is being
given to the Jewish Federa-
tion of St. Louis and to the
Jewish Community Center As-
sociation for "the excellence of
their joint efforts through 'Is-
rael Expo 75' in interpreting
to people of all faiths the sig-
nificance of Israel as a vital
and democratic reality." Julian
Meyer and David Rabinovitz
are, respectively, president and
executive vice president of the
Federation; and Isaac Goldberg
and William Kahn similarly
serve the Center Association.
The Jewish Community Coun-
cil of Flint, under the direction
of Michael A. Pelavin, president,
and Richard Krieger, execu-
tive director, will be honored
"for its initiative in developing
an educational program for ad- '
vanced leadership on the rele-
vance of Jewish values in
strengthening the community."
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* How to Choose Your Ship
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YO i WONT WANT TO CRUISE WITHOUT
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A tilable wherever better books are sold or send $4.95 to
Travel Publications, Inc.
Of LINCOLN ROAD No. 214, MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 33139

^YllBh


November 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
t'age 15-A
[uth Dayan To Speak At
Advance Gifts Meeting
Dayan. president of Ehud, is a farmer at Nahalal.
Israel's largest crafts where the family lived for -
jy, will speak at a hostess long; and her young n
Assaf. is an actor who h
formed In a number of
and fi! ns. incluiiing "Pro,ni;
at Dawn."
At the time Of ; of
.''
Ruth Dayan .
Instructor fo* th settlers in -d-
and transit-camps Hei
primary concern wis i <
age and help them utilize their
traditional crafts an i Ills
which she recogni7ed as having
a tremendous potential, as a
way of giving them a s'lojj'.e-
mentary means of livelihood
and by keeping alive some of
the trades and crafts that were
in danger of extinction.
c, |jwi") j\ fr^ouent visitor
in the isolated villages, travel-
ing the hot, dusty roads to of-
fer advice, suggest a new d*sqT
or material,- choose samoles.
The Dayan home in Jerus'lr"
became a kind of unoffic'-*'
showroom for the arts and crafts
of Israel's immig-ants from
Yemen. Morocco. Bulgaria. Po
land and Kurdestan.
v*

RUTH DAYAN
of the Advance Gifts
on Wednesday, Dec. 3,
lub Inrsrnationa'. The
cement was maJe by
Jaer. gMi^ral -a noaign
Rebecca Hod?s. co-
; and Evelyn Gross.
an of the Advance Gifts
-
attending the hostess
will finalize plans and
lires for t' n1
pe Cifss Division or. Wed-
laq, 21. i he gja., -
t i M"- Gross '
I n ,-. -.
thisrdn ision to n>-
I!
i.-t"' Multi
b' i jyish persons in our
nmtmity, i i '<
V' ii th w irld. W <*vi
th! fesMution of Zion-
r,< :is1 in rMti"* "*sy
Is. a meaningful contribu-
pur campaign, which will
Israel, our own com-.
land Jewish communities
here."
Dayan, who was born
l. spent her early child*
London. where her
tudied law. On the fami-
irn, they settled in Jeru-
wheje Ruth attended
lool. In those pioneering
tlement of the land took
and she switched f "i
iral school at Nahalal.
first co^muna' fT^m?
rwhere she settled and
^er family. Her eldest
lei, a writer, is married
Zion. Israel's Military
I in Paris. Her first son
Government officials soon
realized th' imnortanc1 and
value of Ruth Dayan's wr* i-
tai- r,f imtffvant ,"*-;r\'-"tion
iv, mro cht ,vjit to London to
study handicrafts and art. and
on he'- return !n "53 <'- wv
na*"f>d h-
nartment in (he Ministry of La-
bour.
In 1954 Mas1 't w n^ -I fftvprriTO p* i m t
sine t'i m Rut1- D iv m's
been Intimatelv involved w'th
it, h < imag'n rtion ar :. drive
hi'-., -riade it vtcss'i'' H '"'',-
moting traditions! skills an;*
crafts, and as a business.
Mrs. D*"sn extend""1 tu
scone of Mas'nt M in-l''^^ T
rael's Arab and Druze popula-
tion, encouraging home indus-
tries in their villages. Since th?
Siv-Dav War she has been ac-
tive in the towns on **>. ",n:
Rank and the r-aza ct-n" ?"*
me markets for Arab hn4|.
crafts and suggesting new mate-
rials and lines.
Ruth Dayan has ^tres't'5
Israel at many international
conferences, one of them a re-
cent ILO conference for d-
veloping countries in India and
Ethiopia. Several weeks ago she
accepted an imitation to i"
a number of lectures in Ire-
land. She is active in welfare
work for Jewish and Aral) chil-
dren and is vie* ''^i-man of
the Israel Variety Club.
DO YOU
KNOW?
IS AVAILABLE FOR
NQUETS & WEDDINGS
* BAR MITZVAHS CARD PARTIES
tt!S!0US RETREATS BUSINESS SEMINARS
TOURNAMENTS ..* OUTINGS
'*& SUPERB FOOD in
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__________FROM $3.95____________
1800 Hollywood Blvd. PHONE
llywood, FI. 3302S. 981-8800
1976 Initial Gifts Dinner
Is Planned for December 2 *
Edmund Pntin and 9<"y*
F Sorrell will h l 1976
Initial Gifts D'nnsr I Mr, En
tm's ne in D i >.m.
Mr. I ensile
,,....
presidei I of tins*
i | i ] | | | jnit 1
board
;.i Hf-
t-n' nan of the
Init; -l rjr, < th
] Fed--n: m ice president of the
p-i.,l-n,cs H'lls C^"ot C\\\h -n
Wayn i Countv. N.J., ani vice
P>--";idppt of th- O'Havas Israel
Synagogue in Passa'c.
Seymour S. :-) reii has been
active in Jewish philanthrooic
ci>-cls in h^s home town of
Elizabeth. N.J.
The men stated that "The
Jewish people of the world are
faced with serious problems
witness the United Nations resr
lution on Zionism and th* rash
of local anti-Semitic nrooagand-
put out by the United Klansm- :
EDMUND EN11N
of America." Thiy a led th?t
"all of thes"" anti- are financed with Arab ol
m^n"". Thnnah it is accepted
that World Jewry cannot mitch
it, we can, through our energies,
efforts and organizations destroy
that which has b^-m start 'd be-
fore it take* h"11."
Tne guest speaker at the Ini-
tial Gifts Dinner i~ Vt.--- \!i--
Temple Beth Israel Junior Congregation
The Junior Cong-egition ot
Temple Beth Israel is beetming
a spechl -'lice for the Relig:OUS
Schoc.l Student-. M 'eting e e
Saturday from 10:1S to 11:45
a.m., th? Junior Cong
off*rs th' c'v i
pa "
singing. Those students who at-
tend regularly will participate
in an incentive program that
will award a ::;. ,., :.u ur.J
ol e.cli month.
The Junior Coua ;ution lad
part of the Sabbs i on
Nov. 15.
SEYMOUR SORRELL
ris. who is Minister of Informa-
tion of Israel's permanent mis-
sion to the UN and an authority
on the problems and ne -'ds of
Israel. Born and educated i I
Belfast. Irehnd. in 1946 he join-
ed the political department of
the Jewish Agency for Pain-
tine. He served in the Hagar.ah
b to-e and da tng th; 194S War
of in1^-i''"*~ >. A forign cor-
respondent will versed in the
world political, econo-ric -mi
so"iil situation. h is also an
author: in 1951 he published
"" ste- nf the Deaert ^,093
Years in the Negev."


'


i m v -I'gious Sc'.i di"i u
of usic
the students to attend. Mo
Lid SJ.MOe is do" > f'-i'io1!
How I V Voted
The following Is tne roll call
on the UN General Assembly
vote approving a r9Sn>">:^i
equating Zionism with racism,
according to Alvin Capp, chair-
man of the Community Rela-
tions Committee.
For the resolution C72):
Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria,
Bahrain. Bangladesh. Brazil.
Bulgaria. Burundi. Byelorussia,
Cambodia, Cape Vsrde, Chad.
China. Congo, Cuba, Cyprus,
Czechoslovakia. Dahomev Dem-
ocratic (Southern^ Yemen.
Egvpt. Equatorial Guinea. Gam-
bia. East Germanv. Grenada.
Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Guyana,
Hungary. India. Indonesia. Iran.
Iran. Jordan, K'twiit, Laos. Le-
banon, Libva. Madaeascar. Ma-
laysia. Maldives. Mali. Malta.
Mauritania. Mexico. MoneMia.
^'o"-occo, Mozambioue. Nicer.
Nigeria. Oman. P land. Portugal. Oatnr. Rwanda.
ct" "Tome and Principe. Saudi
Arabia, Senegal. Somalia. Sri
Lanka, Sudan. Syr-a. Tunisia.
Turin.- Ug",r"'a L"'rain So-
viet Union, United Arab E~: -
v .< (>>-o'>n. Tanzania, Ye-
mpn. Yugoslavia.
fi a *n^t t^rt **otiol'it'^"^ ^^"^;
Australia, Austria. Bahamas,
Barbados, Belgium, Canada,
Central African Remiblic. Costs
Rica. Denmark. Dominican Re-
rub'ic. El Salvador, Fiji, Fin-
'.J TT..nr,,, \Va*?* Ha.-TT-
Haiti. Honduras. Iceland. Ire-
land. Israel, Italy. Ivory Coast.
H. I -iveSri' law!
>-. ,..i.. .. v 7 ,'-,-, | HJi
caragua. Norway, Panama. Swa-
.' fui| 'i U-:' -" -
> Un'td ct->"s. Uniynv.
AU,"nining (32): Argentina..
ma. Chile. Colombia, Ecuador.
-I) Gabon. Ghana, '.'"
''"ivi. Lesotho. Mauritius, Ne- |
pal. Pa"ua N^w G"inaa, '
g'jav. PHl, Pbjlip"ine. Cjo-\
i ^^, ^insapore, Thailand, To-
go. Trinidad "i T-^->a-
\oiT. Vpnezuela. Zaire, Zambia.
Absent Africa, Spain. I.
'tens Club Is
Youth-Orienti
The Temple Beth Israel \i n'
Cluo is yout'n-ori nl ; as many
recent acti' ities I "'
;'!-; year the M i s ib-
sidized three dances for the
junior and senior United Svni-
gogne Youth g:oup. Recently i:
allocafd money to the '.< ligi-
ous School for setting up ar
incentixe program for the Jun-
ior Congregation, and now it i"
considering allocating funds to
enlarge the USY athletics pro-
gram.
YAACOV MORRIS
Zionists Consider
Big Info Offensive
NLw r'OKK (JTA) Declaring that "Zionism
is under attack." Mrs. Faye Schenck, president of the
American Zionist Federation, has announced plani for a
major offensive to bring the facts about Zionism to the
American public. Jews and non-Jews alike.
"To attack Zionism is to besmirch one of the most
noble movements ever created," Mrs. Schenck said at
d press conference at the AZF headquarters.
SHE SAID Zionism, which is the "Jewish national
'iberation movement," is "replete with only the most
positive id.?s and ideals."
Mrs. Schenck called the UN draft resolution whi :h
xiuates Zionism with racism "an act of blasphemy ani
ireachery."
She said the attack on Zionism, "which is also I
attack on Judaism, Jews and Israel," will result in
ihe strengthening of Zionism and the weakemnq of the
UN r< sh(> eoid a'^eadv has happened to UNESCO.
THE AZF will try to reach as large an audience
is possible through the new information program. M
Schenck said. Special emphasis will be (riven *" educa-
tional "i'ies throughout the U.S.
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Page 16-A
The Jewish Ftorufuzn of GreatefTort LaiJe^SIe
Friday Noteaber
SHARE
CHANUKAH
WITH THE CHILDREN
SPP.-Ai
PI W P^Ylbur Pledqe
We Are One
Jewish Federation of G reater Fort Lauderdale
2999 N.W. 23 Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311
Telephone: MU-8200


-
Jewish Floridlan
Friday, November 28, 1975 Section B
Of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Menorah is the Oldest Symbol of Judaism Chanufcah
Is Quite Naturally Illumined in its Ancient Glow

"The miracle of the Chanukah lights has been reenacted for over 21 centuries by the
lighting of candles or oil wicks for the eight-day period from the 25th of Kislev to
the second day of Tevet. From the simple Roman clay burners fashioned by the early
craftsmen were developed Chanukiot in myriad forms and media."
By MIRIAM RABINOWICZ
WHEN THE State of Israel was reborn "
w years ago, nn one had any doubt what the
emblem of the young State would be.
The Menorah. the seven-branch candela-
brum which was the oldest symbol of Judaism,
became almost automatically the national sym-
bol of the Jewish State, continuing a chain that
traces back tc the time of Sinai.
FROM THE very beginnings of the Jewish
faith, the menorah, as the symbol of the holy
light, has h:ld an important role. It was in the
wilderness that God commanded Moses to make
a seven-branch candelabrum for the service of
the sanctuary.
The Divine injunction (Exodus 25:31) reads:
"And thou shalt make a candlestick of pure
gold; of beaten work shall it be made, even its
base and its shaft; its cups, its knobs, and its
flowers shall be of one piece with it."
One Bezalel, the son of Uri, the son of Chur.
was commissioned to carry out the assignment.
The Talmud gives us the dimensions of this
menorah. It stood, in our measurements, about
72 inches high with a spread of 36 inches. Its
central shaft and six branches were of the same
height, so that all seven lamps symbolize the
perfect life. Another interpretation regards the
menorah as the symbol of the tree of life, and
its branches as representing the planets, the
firmament and the days of creation.
FROM THE Sanctuary, the holy menorah
was subsequently transferred to the Temple.
No on? knows what happened to Moses'
menorah, which disappeared without a trace.
According to legend, it was hidden by the
pri sis before the Babylonians destroyed the
I irst Temple and sent the Israelites into exile.
!,;r.;.ge, persecution, dispersion>n the cir-
cumstances surrounding the loss of the firsl
menorah, one of the earliest-recorded works
of Jewish art, we have in microcosm a history
of the fate that overtook countless ritual ob-
jects in the centuries that followed. Of the ten
great candelabras that Hiram of Tyre wrought
for King Solomon, of the holy menorah that
stood in Herod's Temple, no trace is left. In-
deed, of all the works of Jewish religious art
created in ancient and medieval times, a mere
handful still exists.
AFTER THE disaster of 70 CE, the rabbis
placed a ban on exact reproductions of the
Temple menorahin particular proscribing its
use in synagogues. As a result, relatively few
examples of the seven-branch candlestick are
to be found although it is frequently repre-
sented as a decorative or symbolic device. The
rabbinic interdiction thus brought into general
use the eight-branch candlestick, which had
become important during the Second Jewish
Commonwealth as a reminder of the Macca-
bean victory over the Syrians in 165 BCE. It
is this verson, known as the "Chanukiah," that
is widely used today during the festival of
Chanukah.
The miracle of the Chanukah lights has
been re-enacted for over 21 centuries by the
lighting of candles or oil wicks for the eight-
day period from the 25th of Kislev to the 2nd
day of Tevet. From the simple Roman clay
burners fashioned by the early craftsmen were
developed chanukiot in myriad forms and me-
dia.
WHAT IS believed to be the oldest repre-
sentation of the menorahthe seven-branch
versionappears on coins of the Hasmonean
Lings, many of which can be seen in New
York's Jewish Museum.
The earliest actual menorah which has yet
to come to light is one dating from the Second
Century, excavated from a synagogue sit" near
Tiberias. This menorah, which may well he the
eldest ritual object '.n existence, is now in the
possession of the Israel Museum. More recently,
fragments of a beautiful stone menorah were
discovered in the ruins of an ancient synagogue
at Sards in Asia Minor. Beyond these rarities,
we are faced by the vast chronological gap in
Jewish art that is a consequence of the vicis-
situdes of Jewish existence in the diaspora. Re-
latively few surviving menorot were made be-
fore 1500.
Creations of artisans from the 16th Century
and later have fared better. Chanukiot exist
from communities in every part of the world,
in a fascinating range of styles and shapes.
SINCE THE miracle took place in Jerusalem.
Jewish artisan-craftsmen of both East and West
often took this geographical fact as the point
of departure of their designs, with results that
strikingly illustrate regional influences.
Thus we have from 14th Century France a
Continued on Page 6-B


Page 2-3
The Jewish Florittian oj Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. November 28 19-5
The Jews in Northern Ireland's Struggling Community
By MARK SEGAL
Belfast
4 TELLING anecdote now g>
:ng around in I
of a local Jew out for a stroll
suddenly confronted toy a mask-
ed gunman whether of the
Protestant or Catholic extreri-
-- inclear). The B_-'fa>t Jew-
heard the menacing voice query.
I are you. a Catholic or a
it?" He d im-
liately, "Neither. I an a
to which the masked
- -naer responded impatiently.
"OK. but which are you. a Prot-
nt Jen or a Catholic Jew'"
This anecdote, more than any-
thing else, sums Up the delicate
situation in which this tiny Jew-
ish community finds itself since
the outbreak of the civil strife
in 1969. This city of churches
and pubs is the focus of what
has become the almost intract-
able Irish Question.
JAMES JOYCE in his early
work, "Dubliners." save the fol-
ng dialogue between a bish-
op and a priest. The priest
talking of the fate of persecuted
Jews said, "but we in Ir-
never expelled them, did we?."
to which the bishop retorded:
"Of course not. for we never
let them in."
Since the partion of Ireland
after World War I. the Jewish
communities of Northern Ire-
land and Eire have gone their
separate ways. Dublin's com-
munity of over 3.000 strong and
the much smaller Belfast one
have flourished until the re-
crudescence of civil violence
six \ears ago.
The smaller communities have
pix-apsd or dwindled to
tanM nothing fW is the case
..... rry in the no-th
where the. e ire a* no
and Cot* in I
has declined to a handful of
Jewish families Tt is. cf caur*-?.
1- in keeping
trend throughout the BTh" >
I
SO F\R Bel
commur..: as such, has raan-
nged to stay out of the eroas-
fln between the Protestant< and
Catholic: and they hope- thev
can carry on that way The civil
and sectarian hatred are
mainly a phenomenon of the
Protestan* and Catholic workini.'
classes in Belfast as can be
from the gaping holes in
their neighborhoods from bomb
attacks
The more sedate middle class
ares- Big H far free of this
snecter of atavistic hntreaY and
the Jews being mostly middle
class, manage tO stay out 'In.
big ques'i'-n marl, however.
hanging OVO*" everyone, and th*-
ot course includes the Jews, is
whether, it the Northern Ireland
situation ejeto out of hand alto-
gether, the middle classes can
maintain their relatively unin-
volved position
AS THE president of the Bel-
fast Hebrew Congregation.
11 mold Smith, told the IT V
"The Jews react to the environ-
ment in which they live. We do
not accert the idea that the
Jewish community exists in a
crossfire, for the Jewish com-
munity as such has no position
on this matter."
Smith, and other members of
his small community of 280 fam
Best Wishes To All
For A Happy Chanukti
Arnold Palmer
Cleaning Center
T5
701 WEST LANTANA ROAD
LANTANA 33462
TELEPHONE 586-9567

Best Wishes To All For The
Cha n u ka 11 olid a v.s
111
Sea Banks Motel
75 MOTEL & EFFICIENCY UNITS
2000 SOUTH OCEAN DRIVE
HAllANDAlE BEACH 33009
Telephone fW-2646
They have no experi-
n; i j'udic? aeainat Jews.
If Je o de-
. :i borr b
is a ". dm I the
men tit" but bee
the ihcgM hap;'*" to be in the
deniar a> sa chosen for the
st 60. is a
who runs
fu mitu re
factory, vvlio v. us bosn in Du
ban. South Africa He served sis
paem In the lagnl Nnay where
he rose to the rank of Captain
aaing convoy action in the wet
Medite^Tane-an m WoW War II
Like man- other leading
members ot thai community, he
Mated in Bjribni aflm marry-
ing a local gi'i Her family has
bean hj NoUhfili Ireland fo
severe! {vnerar*ons.
BaaHli awtajl thai "all sorts of
weH-< people, Jews and
non-dents hnae asked us to he
medial kc aw an decided ggnt
wc will not get involved and will
not take sidaa."
IF ANYONE was cr.pable of a
mediating roleif that was at
all possibleit would be Smith
He vv.- i incillo: on the Bel-
fast Court*' Borough
(ouncil
He also ssful
- | is t Pi t .".nd;-
i moderate, his po-
I nit Ml viotHi ii lacal
i pfcpnents. 3; tol I he was
in ?; I atd Mayor.
Thi "de him Bel-
' L Mayor
_ t1- first wis Si Jaff3
ithd beaded the city in the early
cmi'. i- hi on* a->a
. mMdl !
nor* i; a- .
Belfast Educati m
mittee. which direct; a 12 mil-
lion Pound ed ication b
ariss are paid b\ the central
p- tent
His com*mttevs deli il
is to run a dual i! I si -
schools and maintained schools,
the tetter being B
for tfi "
is the only Jsw on a committee
divided betv een Protesi ints
and CathoUcs anl he en
their fullest confidence
MOST intereatin dj
tH h.th Christian com luniti^s
are to be found on social oc-
casii -
ptcial.v A --
with tl
c ouns
ish les
Appieior.
graadfatr
the B. :
He ii
Jer-
attain d the
sion er : a= *sod I
stag
s -
two otht Jewish b
Belfast ':
ed pro
and the j : imuj led
judgesb '" I id son.
AN ENTIRELY
ampl I Jen g
in the
Londoi phot
ried t-.'-' i
"ias Ii' J
War U
Tht F his !fl
gret |
b-isin' luch ol ')'
do wit) Wwddi t
it
olij and .-:. tioia,
TO THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
/V SOITH FLORIDA
JEMACO
DISTRIBUTORS
INCORPORATED
584 NORTHEAST 20h STREET
FT. LAUDERDAIE 33305



iday, November 28, 1975
7J
V
The Jewish Floridwn of Greater Fort Lauderdale ~
Page 5-B
he
ia!d
and being a w u n figure,
love around 3eifast v.ith-
ear of ram jck

llE VERlf a more
knit immunity,
higl re of involve-
: lairs than
e immunities
njoy conditions
r parl e United
, m, Bui [uestiOli mark
ival .:- community
v -them -is
. ot the specifics of local
^. ,.-. naturallv
Igravate
en in B sing aloud che possibility
..I!- :ommunity may
It even further, and they
ting up special trust
order tt insure the or
operation ot communal
ttions should that unfor-
eventualit:- transpire.
nan
. a

U
rid
In spite of its ;solated geo-
,ical position the Belfast
Jewish commun;:;,- :s well-inte-
d into the organizational
map of Anslo-.Iewry. It has
three members on the Hoard of
Deputies of British Jews who
regularly attend Board meet-
hl London. They are in
to sh ; 'the office of
the Chief '< obi and the con-
i-J ".v.'..
i i ,; gue
THKY WERE very plei
when the president nr |
Lord isher of C imden, .
on -in offfc At the com-
munity's luncheon in honor of
i:^ former spiritual liead. Rabbi
Dr. Alexander Carlebach, every -
one received a small leaflet con-
taining prayers suitable for
such occasions and grace after
meaU>
In it were printed special
prayers to be recited in the
presence of the Chief Rabbi and
the Ambassador of Israel. Ac-
cording to my hosts, neither of
the incumbents have even visit
ed them.
The chairman of the Congre-
gation Council. John Kay, told
this reporter of the immediate
icsponse of Belfast Jewry to the
Board'1- anneal for a voluntary
levy o! at feast one Pound Ster-
ner capita, Thus, the Bel-
imuntty should raise
' o00 Pounds for this pur-
pose
THE JOINT Isra 1 V"- sal is
a highly active oi n i in
this community under the chair-
manship of Richard Bloch. His
family and rel BS make up
the tiny Jewish outpost in near-
by Portadown. They reached
Ulster in the late 1930s, after
fleeing from Hitlerite Europe,
and like many other Jews, the
only nlace thev were allowed
to settle in the United Kingdom
was Ulster.
Jewish entrepreneurs like Mr.
Bloch have contributed towards
the industrial development of
the province.
Rabbi Carlebach paid tribute
to Mrs. Bloch's devoted work
and noted how well the JIA was
doing in Belfast despite local

naurf? rpivm
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difficulties. Bloch told me:
"We have a 100 per cent turn
out for the JIA. Though a small
community, we are completely
wil i i- ael
THIS WAS evident from a
recent copy of the Belfast R<
ord, the communal
which printed a list of
tributors embracing most 0
household
Many of the committees and
groups found in other British
communities are to Sound h
But due to the local communi-
ty's small numbers, the si
names appear frequently on dif-
ferent committees and execu-
tive bodies. Thus Harold Smith.
the congregation president, is
also chairman of the local asso-
ciation of Jewish Ex-Service-
men and and Women.
While Frank Daly, secretarv
ol the local Shechita Board, is
n of the Bi
JNF and is involved as well in
ish youth activities,
THE LOCAL Jewish Qneens
Ronald Appleton.
vvhosi grandfatm
[ the communirj
don to hit vartou
the Belfast I
of the H< br >w Univenit) o-
cal Jewish women have a hi
organized life too.
1 re is the Women's : I
ol the Synagogue, while I
atively high number 0 150
women belong to the three v om-
en's Zionist societies: the
Daughters of Zion. Ziona an i
Young V.'IZO. as 1 learned
one of their leaders. Mrs. '
Kay, wife of the Congrej.U in
Council chairman.
The Belfast Jewish Ins'
is the focus of Jewish social life
Continued on Page 11-B
Chanukm Greetings To The
Jewish Community
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tatiHf
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Page 4-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale

Friday, November 28, 1975
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
ALTHOUGH THE trial of
Adolf Eichmann in 1961 was
world news followed by mil-
lions, the details of the events
preceding itthe location, cap-
ture and transportation of the
high executioner of the "Final
Solution" to Israelwas known
to only a select few.
Exciting Story Behind the Heroic Capture
Of Butcher Adolf Eichmann
One of them, the only one in
fact thoroughly familiar with
every aspect of the operation
because he conceived it and per-
sonally directed it from obscure
beginning to startling conclu-
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Best Wishes To All
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DELRAY BEACH 33444
Best Wishes To All
on Chanuka
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sion, is Isser Harel, former
Chief Executive of Israel's
secret services.
NOW LONG in retirement,
Harel during the outgoing year
wrote a first-rate detective
drama ("The House of Gari-
baldi Street," Viking Press)
describing Operation Eichmann
and the teams of specialists
drawn from Israel's intelligence
and counter-espionage agencies
who carried it out with brilliant
success.
As an undercover operation
it was a tour de force. As a
story told some 15 years after
the events, it still generates
excitement and suspense even
though the outcome is part of
history.
Two factors stand out in
Harel's account which make an
ironic contrast. One was the
meticulous care, the long, ex-
haustive, almost unbelievable
attention to detail that went in-
to the planning and execution
of the mission.
THE OTHER was the rela-
tive ease with which it was
carried out. Hardly a hitch de-
veloped at any stage, although
ADOLF EICHMANN
in his heyday
Harel and his associates had
many a tense day and sleepless
night worrying over contingen-
cies. The potential for foul-up
and just plain bad luck was
enormous.
The character of Eichmann
that emerges in the book should
afford the reader some grim
satisfaction. Stripped of his
uniform and baton and the pow-
er of the Third Reich, the arro-
gant SS officer turned out to be
a groveling nonentity, obsequi-
ous toward his captors, visibly
trembling with fear that they
intended to execute hira on the
spot.
EICHMANN WAS-.a "model
prisoner," Harel relates, totally
s'irmissive and cooperative once
in Israeli hands though.still on
the soil of his adopted country
H "rohssed admiration for
the skill that led to his expo-
sure and downfallperhaps no!
altogether a pretense. He even
seemed to take an objective in
terest in the success of the
operation, offering his guard]
"advice" from time to time.
The man who dispatched mil-
lions to death camps in cattle
cars was also very much con
cerned for his physical com-
fort; and he worried over the
future of his wife and children
he left behind.
OPERATION EICHMANN had
three phases: the location and
identification of the war crim-
inal; his capture and detention,
his secret transportation out of
the countryArgentinawhere
he had lived since 1950. Each
phase posed its own problems
we
send
you
Oaaimffari
GREETINGS
DURING THIS HAPPY
FESTIVAL SEASON
BRUSCOS
-: i!
u IV-
:>t. ">
[1 U
. !

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.....


7
Friday, November 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian 0/ Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5-B
and required the deployment
and coordination of a large force
of Isr${. imdercover agents.
The" entire operation was
complicated by the fact that it
was an unabashedly illegal un '
dertakijifj: en- the soil of a na-
tion Triteffdly to Israel. Once in
motion, Harel and his agents
were a self-insulated unit with
no recourse to aid from any
governmental authority, includ-
ing their own.
THERE WAS not the slightest
shadow of doubt in the minds
of Harel and his accomplices
over the moral rectitude of
their actionsthough Harel ad-
mits that before embarking on
the mission he had a mental
struggle over its ethical and po-
litical implications.
Israelis had ample reason to
belief that Eichmann, who
twice escaped from American
POW camrs in Germany thus
etadiny trial at Nuremburg, was
alive 15 years after the war
ended in.Europe. His location
was another matter.
The bst probabi'ity was that
n had found refuge in South
America, a favorite haven for
other Nazi hich on the wanted
list. Just where and under
what disguise was a problem
that was-not mads easier by the
continuous flow of rumors and
false leads'-filtering in over the
-years. '"-
.AS ft turned out, the man
who almostbut not quiteput
' the "finger" on Eichmann was
a. bljndjialkJew Lothar Her-
; mann. an impecunious resident
of Buenos Aires who harbored
both a grudge against the Nazis
ami- an expectation of financial
tc wa rd."
- As early as 1958, Hermann
became suspicious of a young
man. paying court to his daugh-
ter .'- one "Nicky" (Nicholas)
Eichmann and communicated
his suspicions to legal authori-
ties in West Germany where
Adolf Eichmann was wanted for
war crimes.
Hermann's evidence was ten-
uous and circumstantial. Al-
though "Nicky" was reportedly
secretive about his family and
their whereaboutshe exchang-
ed letters with his girl frind
throurV the address of a third
party his open use of the
Eichmann name was regarded
as a negative point.
NEVERTHELESS, the Public
Prosecutor of the province of
Hesse, West Germany, Dr. Fritz
Bauer.^ a Jew, communicated
Hermann's information to Is-
raeli sources and it eventually
reached the desk of Har<>|. It
was no more substantial than
earlier leads.
But Bauer was highlv r-'?"' vi-
ed in Israel and, as it Uiti1
out, he had other confidential
sources of information he
steadfastly refused to disclose
their identitywhich pointed to
- Argentina as the probabla hid-
ing place of Eichmann.
Acting on these facts, and
possibly on a flash of instinct,
Harel dispatched his first re-
connaissance teim to Buenos
f Aires. His expectations, he ad-
mits, were not as high as his
jj hopes.
HIS ACCOUNT of the ex-
' haustive manhunt that finally
traced Adolf Eichmann alias
: Ricardo Klement; the surveil-
' lance and identification of the
: quarry that preceded his cap-
ture; his subsequent detention
in a rentetF house to the heart
' of Buenos Aires; and the final
! removal of Eichmann from
3 Buenos Aires' main airport in
3 the midst of a national festival
j should be required reading for
- the CIA KGB and every other
\ organization engaged in clan-
\ destine activities.
For the ordinary reader, hu-
man aspects of the story may
be even more interesting than
.the technical expertise of the
Israeli manhuntere. The Eich-
mann menagethe "house on
Garibaldi Street"was a non-
descript brick and plaster build-
ing lacking" srich basic ameni-
ties as electric lights," telephony
and running water.
. It was located in San Fernan-
do, a bleak, distant suburb of
Buenos Aires. If some top
drawer Nazis had managed to
smuggle fortunes of loot
abroad after the war, Eichmann
got out of Europe with little
more than-his skin.
HIS WIFE and three chil-
dren preceded him to Argen-
tina; a fourth; child was born
there. Eichmann supported his
family by working et"*a minor
job (Harel does not make its
exact nature clear). One of his
sons enKsted in the navy.
Another worked at a menial job
in a garage.
The Israeli agents who first
spotted Eichmannor Klement
-had a surprise in store. THG
strutting Gestapo martinet ot
Berlin who once held the power
of death over millions had be-
come a faceless wage slave,
alighting wearily from his com-
muter bus at precisely 7:40 p.m.
each evening; trudging the few
hundred yards from the bus
stop to his house; making an
inspection of his yard before
entering (A security check? No,
simply to see how his plants
were doing, Hare! reports):
and holing up for the night.
Sometimes the house remained
dark; sometimes dim lights
shone through the windows
Continued on Page 7-B
Chanuka Greetings
O.P.B. FARMERS
MARKET
3159 WEST OAKLAND PARK BLVD.
OAKLAND PARK 33311
Telephone 731-4711
Chanuka Greetings
BLACKWELL
MACHINE SHOP
& WELDING SERVICE
P.O. BOX 411
BELLE GLADE 33430
Chanuka Greetings & Best Wishes
BOB CARROLL'S
TIRE SERVICE
20 S.E. 9th STREET
DEERFIELD BEACH 33441
Telephone 421-2856
Greetings for Chanuka to our
Jewish Customers and Friends
BERTA SAWYER
3666-68 WEST COMMERCIAL BLVD.
Telephone 739-0057
Health and Happiness to our
Jewish Customers and Friends
at Chanuka
CULLIGAN -
FOR FINEST WATER
112 S.W. 12th STREET
Phone 522-2846
CHANUKAH GREETINGS TO ALL
AMIRA
AIR CONDITIONING
& APPLIANCES INC.
4824 NORTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
OAKLAND PARK 33334
.; SCI
iji
' CHANUKAH GREETINGS
PWEHURST GARDEN CENTER
PLANTS ... SHRUBS AND TREES
8862 LAWRENCE ROAD
LAKE WORTH 33462
Best Wishes To All For A Most
Happy Holiday Season
Hanuka
Greetings
RINKER
MATERIALS INC.
2000 GRIFFIN ROAD
FT. LAUDERDALE 33315
Seasons Greetings to the
Jewish Community in
South Florida
MR. BOB CASTEELl
3116 ANDREWS AVENUE
FT. LAUDERDALE 33316


Pape 6-B
"The Jewish Floridran of Greater Fort LaudcTdalc
Friday, November 28, 197;
$
CHANUKA GREETINGS TO ALL
Cordie-Radun Construction Co. Inc.
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
117 S.E. 3rd STREET
DEERFIELD BEACH 33441
Telephone 781-8955
$
'f
BEST WISHES AND
CHANUKA GREETINGS TO ALL
MALL THEATRES I & II
DIPLOMAT MALL
HALLANDALE 33009
May the Lights
You kindle during the
Chanukah Festival
Shed the light of
Freedom and Liberty
Throughout the world
A Joyous Chanukah
toallowfriends"
NATIONAL
CAR RENTALS
371 N.E. 6th AVENUE
DELRAY BEACH 33444
I
Chanukah is Illumined by the Menorah
Continued from Page 1-B
menorah whose facade resembles a medieval
French cathedral, one from northern Italy
(Icsigned with the crenellated towers of a cas-
tello and from 19th Century Algeria, a Chanu-
kiah in the style of a two-story Moorish palace.
topped by a star and crescent. The lamp made
200 years ago in Poland has a temple which
looks like a rural synagogue, complete with
chimneys.
One of the most extensive collections of
Chanukah lamps in the world is to be found
today at the Jewish Museum in New York. The
Fifth Avenue mansion, former home of the
Warburg banking family, and now under the
sponsorhip of the Jewish Theological Seminary
cf America, unquestionably constitutes the
greatest archive of Jewish religious art in the
Western hemisphere.
HERE WE find such rarities as a four-foot
high braM menorah which stood in a synagogue
in Poland nearly 300 years ago. Three lions sup-
port the heavy cr.st base, and its arms are
elaborately adorned with bird-heads, leaves,
flowers and figure eights. The great construc-
tion is topped by a bird with outstretched
wings.
Another Chanukah lamp from 17th Century
Hamburg has the figure .of jTjfas Maccabee as
a finial. Judith is a popular subject with Ger-
man craftsmen, and one 18th Century silver
menorah from Frankfort-or.-Main has not onlv
a statue of the Jewish heroUM flourishing her
sword and triumphantly bearing, aloft the head
of Holofernes, but also feature Biblical seen s
with Jacob and Rebecca in red and white
enameled medallions on the base.
Mjnorot designed for the home were nab
urally on a smaller scale than those intended
for synagogue use. Household menorot we
also frequently designed with a back wall ;is.
a safety precaution.
DO THESE historic menorot with their live-
ly, often ornate embellish;ents. GOBStiti
great art? Perhaps the majority would fail this
classification. Jewish craftsmen, usually the
subject of discrimination and barred from
guilds, were often behind the mainstream of th<
art of their times. Stylistic;.::; and technically.
the purist can find many lectures to fault in
these treasured works.
Yet they are treasure.- :- the finest sen-..
works of ait made with love and enthusiast
and expressing a deep n commitment,
a living art responsive to a living religion. No
truer symbol of the undying Bpiril of Judaism '
could have been chosen ;:- the emblem of the
state of Israel.
MM-MIt
To All Our Friends In South Florida
Chanuka Greetings And Best Wishes
BRYSON & HICKS INC.
GENERAL CONTRACTORS

Residential Commercial .
Specializing in Condominiums
1241 OKEECHOBEE ROAD
WEST PALM BEACH 33402
Telephone: 833-4441


The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
"f i ^---------------i----------- _____
Page 7-B
Eichmann
' Old-European t'ttrnh "Kesser" (Crown) is among beautt-
liU artifact* In J4msh tradition serving both artistic and
religious purptetff
Continued from Page 5-H
from vintage oil lamps.
WHAT HAD the Israelis ex-
pected to find? Haiti, who went
to Buenos Aires to direct the
operation, writes: "When 1
actually saw Eichmann for the
lirst time, 1 was amazed at my
reaction ... My first thought
was, well now, doesn't he look
just like any other man! 1 don't
know how I imagined a man
who had massacred millions
would look. All I know is that
I kept saying to myself, If I
had met him in the street 1
would see no difference be-
tween him and the thousands
of other men passing by."
The isolated .nun where
Eichmann lived had both pluses
and minuses for the task at
hand. Strangers could be easily
spotted and suspicions aroused,
yet surveillance of Klement-
Eichmann had to be maintained
constantly to establish his rou-
tine and make positive iden-
tification.
THIS POSED a severe strain
on the agents assigned to keep
the vigil. The long drive from
San Fernando to Buenos Aires
where Eichmann was to be kept
under detention al'tei his cap-
Continued on Page 10-B
U!
v_
HANUKAH GREETINGS
WALTER B. SILLER
FURNITURE REFINISHING AND REPAIRING
972 SOUTH DEERFIELD AVENUE
DEFRFIEID BEACH 33441

CHANUKAH GREETINGS
PALM SPRINGS AMERICAN
General Automotive Repairs .
Air Conditioning ... Tires ... Batteries
3750 10th AVENUE
LAKE WORTH 33460
Telephone 967-4411
.
we
send
you
CFranuRaR
GREETINGS
DURING THIS HAPPY
FESTIVAL SEASON
UNIVERSITY SUNOCO
2185 UNIVERSITY DRIVE
SUNRISE 33313
Telephones: 731-9826-735-8987


Page 8-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 28, 1975
-
What is the origin of the
"Haneros Hallalu" ("these
lights") which is recited ifter
the benediction of the Chanu-
kah lights?
The earliest text we ha this is one of the so-cnlled minor
tractates of the Talmud (Masse-
chet Soferim) which some critic?
claim is from the Guonic rterioi
Its final redaction was from that
neriod althoueh the material
may well be from the Talmudic
period. This generally Rives the
meaning of the candle ligl
and proclaims the miracle. M in)
pronounce this formula after
the first caiA'le is lit and be-
fore lighting th-? rest (on those
nights when more than one
candle is lit).
Some claim thit this D
c^aoh has 36 words and that
this represjnts the number oi
candles that are lit in total op
the eight days of Chanukah.
Fome carrv this number value
of 36 further and COnnCt it to
the account in the Midrash
(Genesis Rabba 11) where it is
told that Adam had 36 hours of
uninterrupted light after he was
created. Thereafter, the world
grew dark and Adam was fright-
ened lest his punishment cast
him into total darkness. He later
understood that such is the pro-
cess of nature. Later, when ihe
dav started growing longer, he
frit as if he were once again
C -ins into the good graces of
the Almighty.
The Chanukah festival COi
at iust about the time when the
shortest day is reached and the
day starts to grow longer. The
Chanukah lights thus serve as
a svmbol that it is possible for
Max The Blessings Of The Chanuka
Holiday Be Yours At This
Happy Season
GUIDAS ITALIAN
MEAT MARKET
& DELICATESSEN
1611 NORTH STATE ROAD 7
LAUDERHILL 33313
Questions
About Marking
Chanukah
Holiday
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Jewish families in the military are increasing. Their chil-
dren need a Jewish education and Jewish experiences.
That's where JWB comes in. These children at Fort Ord
watch the Jewish chaplain, endorsed and served bjf JWB.
litfit Chanukah candles. JWB also has a Unified Jewish
Education Curriculum, which makes it possible for chil-
dren to move from base to base without having their Jew-
ish education interrupted.
. i
*

HOVNANIAN
FLORIDA INC.
COVERED BRIDGE & VILLA DEL TRIO
. WEST OF LAKE WORTH
P.O. BOX 1414
LAKE WORTH 33461
Telephone: 967-6050


MAY YOUR LIFE BE FILLED
WITH JOY THIS HANUKA

_


. *
Friday, November 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9-B
observe certain basic Jewish
rites and the Hellenistic form
of paganism was sweeping the
country. Thus, the victory of
the spirit is celebrated in mat-
ters of the spiritby offering
praise and thanksgiving to the
Almighty.
Some have allowed themselves
the liberty of feasting on Chanu-
kah because the Hebrew version
of the Mcgillah of Antiochus
(originally written in Aramaic
an having no allusion to feast-
ins) .oes contain a statement
like that found in the Book of
Esther which alludes to 'feast-
ing and gladness" as the keynote
of Chanukah. While undoubted-
ly this is the victory, in the
episode of formal expression
from the canonical Book of Es-
ther in order to give the Megil-
lah of Antiochus a book of ca-
nonical authenticity (which it
never had and never attained),
some people used to take this
as an authorization for a Chanu-
kah feast.
Responsible rabbinic authori-
ties always ooposed such a prac-
tice and regarded anv feast that
took place on Chanukah as an
optional one without any real
religious connotation. Among
the Sephardic (Oriental) Jew-
ish communities, the custom de-
veloped of having a special holi-
day feast for children on Chanu-
kah. In Algiers, a special meal
was made for the school chil-
dren in which a special delica-
cy containing meat, wine and
sweets was served.
In Jerusalem, Sephardic Jews
conducted such feasts for
school children on the last day
of Chanukah. Transferring the
feast to children indicates that
feasting was not an official adult
.'. .sir.h Community Centers and YM and YWHAS affibat-
with JWB emphasize creative Jewish programming
related to Jewish holidays and to other aspects of the
mean Jewish experience. These Center nursery
school children in costumes liave come out of a house
shaped like a giant dreidel to reenact the Chanukah story
cf Judah Maccabee. JWB publishes a Chanukah Manual,
plays, candle lighting ceremonies, and other program ma-
terials for the use of Jewish communities in the U.S. and
Canada.
man to be restored to the orig-
inal bright light of Crentior
which he lost, hist as the Jews
restored the light unto the Tem-
ple after it had been lost and
defiled at the hands of oppres-
sors.
' Why is there no special
festive meal associated with
Chanukah as there is with
other holidays?
The Tahnud contrasts the ob
iectives of the observance of
Chanukah-with that of Purim
Purim is -classified as. ".davs of
feasting and Iadneas" (Esther
9:22) while Chanukah is classi-
V .id. as "days, of praise and
thanksgiving," (Talmud Bavli,
Shabbat 21a).
The commentators explain
that the differenc? between
Chanukah and Purim in this
rosr-ect lies in tha nature of
what was at stake in the crisis
anJ what was saved in the vic-
tory. In the enisode of Purim
the bodilv existence of the Jew-
ish population was at stake be-
cause Haman had ordered their
evte*-mnation bodilv. Therefore,
thQ festival is en'oved in the
bndil" nteaave of e^ina and
drinving. In the e.nisode which
brought about Chanukah. the
spiritual e*istena.df the Jewi9h
nei"!; -was ,"H st*ke since Anti-
genus -had forbidden them to

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4460 CARVER STREET
LAKE WORH 33460
Telephone 965-2184

tf


I agg 10-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Landerdale
Friday, November 28, 1975
Happiness to the Jewish Community on Chanuka
LORD'S JEWELERS
19J8 EAST SUNRISE BOULEVARD t
In Gateway Shopping Center
Highest Prires Paid fo- your Precious Jewelry
Phone JACK MiNTZER 764-6750

CHANUKAH GREETINGS TO ALL
BILL NALL INC.
BUILDING SPECIALTIES
238-'ROYAL-PA4M WAY.
PALM BSACH 33480
Best Wishes To Our Man v
Friends at This
Holid ry Season
a*
Wilkiiisoii-Cooper
Produce hie.
MIXED VEGETABLES
P.O ROX 880
BELLE GLADE 33430
Phone 996-7189
Best Wishes to tlte Jewish
Community in South Florida
at the Holiday Season
Foreign Cars
Unlimited
r
1355.SJW. 1st WAY
DEERFIELD BEACH 33441
Telephone 421-7574
Adolf Eich mann
Continued from Page 7-B
Hire was mother disadvantage.
1 On the other hand, it was
infinitely easier to take the
man on the poorly lighted) quiet
street near his home than it
would have been in a more
heavily trafficked, better po-
liced area
On the night of his capture.
May 11. I960, which is late
autumn in South America, the
assault team waited in two cars
near the house of Garibaldi
Street. Tension heightened to
near trust ration as Eichmann
a creature of habit, failed to get
off his usual bus. Several more
buses passed and still no Eich-
mann.
The leader of the group was
prepared to wait only a short
while .lo^erthe presence of
two strange cars on a deserted
street was sure to arouse sus-
picion. Here is Harel's account
of tlie capture as related to him
by the men who carried it out:
"ALL OF A sudden Kenet
noticed someone walking at the
side of the road. It was too dark
to make out who it was. 'Some-
one is coming.' he said to Gabi,
'but I can't see who it is.' A few
seconds later, in a whisper that
sounded to him like a shout, he
exclaimed, it's him! Kenet
hissed in Gabi's ear, 'He's got
one hand in his pockethe may
have a revolver. Do I tell Eli?'
'Tel him,' Gabi answered. 'Eli,'
Chanuka Greetings
JUCKSON BODY SHOP
COMPLETE AUTO BODY REPAIR
1408 AVENUE E
RIVIERA BEACH 33404
BEST WISHES ON CHANUKA
KENS DAGAM OIL
3690 DAVIE BLVD.
FT. LAUDERDALE 33312
Chanuka Greetings To All
FARTHING PLUMBING
COMPANY
2301 S.W. 57th TERRACE
HOLLYWOOD 33023
Telephones: 983-2641 983-2653

Best Wishes
From
JAMES D. CARLTON
ADOLF EICHMANN
in Jerusalem *
Kenet whispered, 'watched out
lor a gun' Element was
standing right in front of the
car. 'Momentito,' Eli said and
sprang at him. Panic-stricken,
Element stepped back ... He
(Eli) pounced on Element to
bring him down, but because
Klement stepped back, Eli's leap
brought them both crashing to
the ground. As he fell. Klement
let out a terrible yell, like a
wild beast caught in a trap.
Zev darted around the car and
grabbed his legs. Klement lay
as if paralyzed."
He was pulled into the car
"The whole action had taken
less than a minute."
ACCORDING TO Harel. the
most difficult ordeal for the
captors lay ahead. It stemmed
from the almost palpable loath
ing they felt for their prisoner
who they bad to guard 24 hours
a day, whose every personal
need they had to attend to.
A doctor was attached to the
group. He found Eichmann in
physical good health >- I it was
the strict duty of hi- '.....Is I i
keep him fit to st t i tl i;i
Israel. Harel writ !
". How coul It' '*' Itfo!
themselves dnv aft d They
had to shave th '' b'CVJse
he couldn't ba a"o' hive
a razor. 1 lev hi' m h -'i him
because h<..... '"'' '">" permit-
ted fivd '" "f '"' r "'' They
even h-ui *> v'-rtn1 hi n to
the t ill '. I '."'"I :'i it all
thev had to CO n nan I their rag
ing hearts to be still. They had
to forget their fathers and
mothers, their brothers and
sisters, who had been turned
into heaps of bones and piles of
ash by their prisoner's exter
mination machine. Of all the
phases and hardships of the
operation this was the most dif-
ficult."
IT WAS also prolonged be
yond expectations. Arrange
mantt had b-^n made to spirit
Eichmann out of Argentina
aboard an Israeli commercial
airliner, a turbo-prop Brittania.
which was bringing an official
Israeli delegation to Buenos
Aires to participate in celebra-
tions marking the 150th anni
versary of Argentine inde-
pendence.
The event was fortuitous
since it provided an excuse for
the presence of an Israeli air
liner in a country which had
no commercial air connections
with Israel.
At the last minute, Argentine
officials advised the Israeli gov-
ernment to delay the arrival of
its delegation until May 1 for
certain reasons of protocol.
THAT MEANT that Eich
mann would have to be kept
under detention in Buenos Aires
for nearly two weeks longer
than originally planned. Obvi
ously, the Israeli government
could not make an issue over
the matter without arousing
suspicion. It was the only seri-
ous setback to the time-table of
the operation. But in fhe end it
,4'


Kiuday, Novem.ber 28,. 1975
The Jewish Florjdian of Greater Fort Lcnoiaxiaie
Page .:i-a
had no effect on the mission's
success.
During Eichmann's detention,
Harel was cominced that his
family would not report his
dL ppenrance to the police be-
cause they would have to dis-
close his true identity. But there
was concern that the family
might turn to the large colony
of other Nazis- and ex-SS of-
ficers resident in Buenos Aires,
some of them with influence in
high places. Would they con-
duct an undercover manhunt of
their own? Harel surmised that
they would not and Eichmann
bore him out.
""He didn't hang any hope on
his friends lie was positive they
wouldn't exert themselves par-
ticularly in trying to find him
for fear of endangering their
own safety. ... He spoke about
them with unconcealed scorn
He even hinted that he was con-
Jews Of
Northern
Ireland
Continued from Page 3-B
in Northern Ireland. Its two
floors are always ful" of people
attending the various activities,
which include a drama circle,
various societies, a youth club
and indoor sports. A major
drawing point is its dining ioomi
which opens four times weeklv
and is the onlv kosher restau
rant in Northern Ireland.
THE MOST popular outdoor
sport of the younger set is, of
course, golf. Their own club is
I at the Institut". but ttv.-v
play at the Fort William golf
course one of the meeting
ilac is For the middle classes of
'II religious denominations, Last
year, the club captain was a
Jew.
There are serious thoughts
about moving the Institute
probably to the synagogue and
Wolfson Community Center
complex. The neighborhood
around the Institute is on the
decline) and the Jews have mov-
ed further up Antrim Road to
the city's northern boundaries.
The Institute now lies between
a dog track and a fortified army
camp. Its once popular tennis
courts now lie in ruins.
SOME OF the Jews consider
their community's isolation as
its greatest bane, while others
regard it as a blessing in dis-
guise. Mrs. Tamara Selig, wife
of one of the communal lead-
ers, comes from Whitley Bay,
near Newcastle.
She says: "In Whitley Bay
we, have never had more than
50 Jewish families, but our iso-
lation was always offset by the
proximity of the larger com-
munity inNcv*catie."
'ftie contrary view came from
Henry ~Solomo, secretary of
th comgregation. He says that
he misses the warmth and in-
timacy of his Belfast congrega-
tion when attending services in
London er elsewhere.
A Happy Chamika To All
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vinced they had a hand in be-
traying him to us." Harel wrote.
So much for solidarity among
criminals.
the primary objective of
Operation Eichmann was to
bring the man to trial in Israel
which regarded itself as the
sole legitimate representative
of his victims and the country
with the greatest moral and
legal right to prosecute him.
The Kichmann trial was to re-
open the agony of the Holo-
caust IS years alter it occurred.
That was precisely what Israel
wantedfor the benefit of its
post war generation, for forget-
ful world opinion and possibly
as a catharsis for the sur-
vivors. Had they simply wanted
Eichmann dead, he could have
been disposed of easily, with-
out international repercussions,
bv any one of Harel's agents on
any number of occasions during
the course of the mission.
T*re is a brief epilogue to
Harel's story. Through Eich
uiann he learned ot the probable
whereabouts in Buenos Aires of
Dr. Josef Mengele, the notori-
ous Auschwitz physician who
arbitrarily selected Jews for the
gas chamber.
HAREL FOR a wh.'e enter-
tained the hope of tracking
down that war criminal and re-
turning him to Israel with Eicn-
mann,
But the stress of guarding
Eichmann and arranging for his
flight out of Argentina left too
few agents at Harel's disposal
for such a mission. A house
where Mengele almost certainly
had lived was found.
But the suspect had moved
out a few weeks before and dis-
appeared. If alive today, the
death camp doctor is still at
large.
Happiness at Ghaniika
ALDEN HOUSE
NURSING HOME
1800 EAST OAKLAND PARK BLVD.
Happiness at Chanuka
LIVING REFLECTIONS
261 East Commercial Blvd 772-8006
ARCADE SHOP
Sunrise Shopping Center 564-0446
Happiness to the Jewish Community at Chanuka
RALPHS CLEANERS
897 N.E. 62nd STREET
(Next to Li'l General)
Cash & Carry
PHONE 771-1785
TO ALL
CARIBBEAN PAINT & BODY SHOP
4906 GEORGIA AVENUE
WEST PALM BEACH
CHANUKAH GREETINGS
ROYAL MANOR
8779 LAWRENCF ROAD
BOYNTON BEAGH 33435
i4
Chanuka Greetings
SUNSHINE EXXON
1601 SOUTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
BOYNTON BEACH 33435
8?
Best Wislws to all at the
Holiday Season
CANADA DRY
BOTTLING CO.
OF FLORIDA INC.
1649 AVENUE L
RIVIERA BEACH 33404
miRAculously the sACReo horns
li.wc off ihcip woftCiQOUS p.ws
on one lone CRUse the oil tuipneo
(OP tlC,IU iOllli RIQlKS Atlf- CANS
)M! t M M
thAls whv cu'ti v*".vr At h.vnukltth
the menoPAh buriis so ppic.iu
to symaolKc this mipAcle
of fAith that conqueRec- mioht
*>..*.,, ..v_..........,,. >. .*,
Chanuka Blessings To
The Jewish Community
in South Florida
DIXIE ELECTRIC
INC.
1030 E. COMMERCIAL BLVD.
FT. LAUDERDALE 33308
Telephones: 947-2802-771 -0424-659-1597


Page 12-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 28, 1975
1 RESPITE THE growing inter-
** est in the evolving role of
the woman in the Jewish com-
munity, little discussion has
been, generated about the pro-
fessional status of Women and
the opportunities open to them
in the field of Jewish communal
service.
A recent inquiry into current
practice, in seven fields of serv-
ice which represent the constit-
uent member groups of the Na-
tional Conference of Jewish
Communal Service, has revealed
that while many women have
attained positions of consider-
able responsibility, few have
achieved top echelon posts in
the agencies, institutions and
organizations of their respective
fields.
AN AD-HOC committee with-
in the Conference appealed to
a number of leading profes-
sionals, in each of the groups
associated with the Conference,
to share their impressions of the
current condition of women in
their agencies, identify areas of
inequity and point out the im-
pediments to the progress of
it
CHANUKAH GREETINGS TO ALL
LU'S DRAPERIES
Manufacturers of Custom Made Draperies
3655 NORTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
FT. LAUDERDALE 33334
Telephone 565-7033
GR
TO ALL
LAKE GAS COMPANY
COMMERCIAL AND DOMESTIC
620 S.W. 16th STREET
BELLE GLADE 33430
CHANUKAH GREETINGS
6. & 6. RADIATOR SERVICE
2248 EAST PALM BEACH ROAD SOUTH
BELLE GLADE 33430
Telephone 996-3107
CHANUKA GREETINGS TO ALL
SPECTRUM INTERIORS
816 S.E. 9th STREET
DEERFIELD BEACH 33441
Telephone 421-3600
i
i
y>
A HAPPY CHANUKA TO ALL
McCOY PLUMBING SERVICE
3071 N.W. 64th AVENUE
SUNRISE 33313
-MJ*
'i i i
persons of achievement who
happen to be women.
The groups approached were
the Association of Jewish Com-
munity Organisation Personnel
(A3POP1!" rh 'A9SodariofiKlof
Jewish Community Relations
Workers (AJCRW. Association
of Jewish Center Workers (AJ-
CW), National Association of
Jewish Family, Children's and
Health Services (NAJFCHS).
National Association of Jewish
Homes for the Aged (NAJHA),
National Association of Syna-
gogue Administrators (NASA),
National Council for Jewish
Education (NCJE) and Voca-
tional and Rehabilitation Serv-
ices (VRS).
Three basic questions were
posed:
What is the status of wom-
en in your specific field of serv-
ice within the organized Jewish
community and what has led to
this condition?
What is the current prac-
tice with respect to hiring,
promotional opportunities, sala-
ry differentials or special treat-
ment of women in your field,
in comparison with other areas
of Jewish communal service, or,
the professions generally?
What recommendations do
you have to heln rectifv unjust
situations if such exist?
IN RESPONSE to these ques-
tions several loading Federation
executives affiliated with the
Association of Jewish Com-
munity Personnel indicated that
very few women have reached
the position of executive di-
rector in a Federation. Those
who have reached that level
have done so in very small com-
munities.
Top women executives have
been found in secondary posi-
tions only. While in some Fed-
erations women hold top jobs,
such as comptroller, fund-rais-
er, personnel manager, most
serve in supportive roles to the
male executive.
Among the realistic factors
responsible for this condition,
the following were cited:
Women have not sought
top professional leadership on
the assumption that such posts
were closed to them. It is wom-
en's timidity or reluctance to
work under conditions of se-
vere pressure, rather than dis-
crimination on the basis of sex,
that has kept them out of these
positions.
As long as Federation
leadership is largely in the
hands of men, who tend to car-
ry over prejudicial attitudes
from the business world in deal-
ing with women professionals,
this situation is not likely to
change. As changes occur in the
general society, the field of Jew-
ish communal service will bene-
fit as well.
While more and more
women have been gaining ac-
cess to decision-making power
in boards of Federations, these
women, by and large, are not
as hospitable as one would ex-
pect to the idea of a woman in
the position of Federation ex-
ecutive director.
MOST OF the respondents in
this group felt that leadership
in the Jewish community must
not wait for change in the gen-
eral social conditions, but an-
ticipate it by recognizing appli-
cants for positions of major re-
sponsibility on the basis of
ability to do a job.
They pointed out that there
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Dr.
Sara Feinstein, director
of Jewish Education and
Culture, Jewish Federa-
tion of Metropolitan Chi-
cago, delivered an ad-
dress at the 77th annual
meeting of the National
Conference of Jewish
Communal Service at
Grossinger's Hotel last
June. The following, are
some excerpts.)

] Opportunities
I For Women
In Social Work
% DR. SARA FEINSTEIN

"





is a growing awareness that to
sacrifice the level of skill for
some archaic notion about role
of differentiation, on the basis
of sex, is foolish and wasteful.
"It is not a matter of justice or
injustice" said one Federation
executive, "but relates rather to
an evolving democratization of
our society and the field of
Jewish communal service in
particular."
THE JEWISH community
must go at a faster pace than
other professional fields, he felt,
so as to encourage women of
leadership potential to gain the
qualifications and experience
so they can be available wher
the opportunities arise.
Leading professionals in the
Association of Jewish Communi-
ty Relations Workers reported
that while the condition of wom-
en in this field is improving
steadily they have a longer
road to travel, than their male
colleagues, as they move up-
ward.
THE STATUS of women pro-
fessionals who are evceptionally
talented and highly dedicated
has risen substantially in this
field. However, salary differen-
tials appear to exist, despite in-
creasing promotional opportuni-
ties, because of their particular
employment history;
"A relatively large percent-
age of women." said a top wo.tj-
an executive in this .field, '.'.do
not seek positions with heavy
hanukah
esfiual
MR. WILLIAM BARAN
Extends Best Wishes To
All Jewish Families
In The State For A

Peaceful And Happy
Chanuka...
fi'l *r I

1

I



Friday, November 28, 1975
responsibility because they
simply want to supplement their
husband's income vith a mini-
mum pressure job. Thus, having
started at a lower salary level,
even when promoted to top
echelon positions in their re-
spective organizations, women
may not command salaries
commensurate with their male
counterparts."
On the other hand, states
another leading woman execu-
tive in a major Jewish organiza-
tion, "women today who seek
top management jobs are pre-
pared for long hours and diffi-
cult pressures. They have so ar-
ranged their marriages and
their relationship with their hus-
bands, and families that this ar-
rangement is an acceptable life
srvle for them."
SHE POINTS out that in the
agency she heads, women often
work harder than their male
counterparts, merely because it
is harder for them to establish
their reputations, as competent
professionals, without extra
work.
In the 35 years as a profes-
sional in the field of Jewish
Community Relations, one re-
snondent reports, the employ-
ment and promotion of women
in executive positions has im-
proved "from slow progress to
considerable change."
But current practice varies
from agency to agency and of-
ten within agencies. In some
agencies women command top
jobs and top salaries, equal to
men jua similar positions.
In other instances there is no
.quesmrf*utthat a man occupy-
; ing jfelf:a important position
vould receive a significantly
$ gher ^lary. Generally speak-
ing, many fine opportunities
exist for fwomen in this field.
Some servijths department heads
and otheri;iaregional office di-
rectors. I
UNTIL $t$CENTLY, women
merited the posts of department
heads primarily in research, of-
fice management, personnel, of-
fice administration, or intercul
il^education programs and
curriculum development. Those
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13-B

jobs that require policy develop-
ment, majpr contact with lay
leadership, supervision of other
professional staff, or contact
with police, were customarily
reserved for men, and this ap-
pears to be changing.
Currently a very small frac-
tion of CRC top executives are
women although the president
of this associate group is a
woman. The" proportion is slight-
ly higher for assistant executive
directors.
"WHILE OSTENSIBLY any
position is available to a quali-
fied woman in the community
relations field, subtle indica-
tions of sex discrimination do
persist." said the respondent
who saw hopeful signs in that
more and more women are com-
ing into CRC fund-raising.
At second and third levels of
management and professional
employment, it is reported that
there is a steady expansion of
opportunities for women. "While
not totally eliminated, the bar-
riers hav<*. been reduced and
salary differentials narrowed,"
several have indicated.
In identifying the major
factors leading to change, the
following were cited: "The Law
of the Land" and "women them-
selves." are probably respon-
sible for this awareness.
SLOWLY BUT surely, as more
and more qualified women de-
mand equal treatment in Com-
munity Relations, the "old
guard" leadership will move
over and make way for the new
generation.
Reports on the status of wom-
en in the Jewish Center field
appear to indicate that women
have achieved a high degree of
equality in terms of opportuni-
ty, responsibility, recognition
and compensation, with the ex-
ception of the executive director
level.
Twice as many women than
men serve in "line" or direct
service positions. An equal
number serve on sub-executive
levels. There are no women
executive directors of JCCs ex-
cept in small communities,
where very small facilities are
in operation, or in branches of
large "Js" in large metropolitan
areas.
An executive director of a
major Jewish community report-
ed that on the basis of a staff
survey, women prefer jobs that
do not call for evening and
weekend work. "As women be-
come more prepared to meet
demanding schedules they are
likely to move into top execu-
tive positions.
"Thus, the Jewish Center field
appears to be faced with a self-
selection factor, in regard to
professional goals, rather than
unjust exclusion of women
from desiied positions," he
stated.
THERE APPEARS to be no
preferential treatment of men
with regard to hiring, promo-
tion and pay in the Jewish
Center field. Equal pay for equal
work is generally regarded as
standard operating procedure in
this field. Salaries are differen-
tiated, however, on the basis of
MSW degrees vs. academic de-
grees.
The major factor, to affect
the potential of women adverse-
ly, is the question of long-term
career goals. The possibility
that because of marriage a
woman may choose to defer her
own career plans in favor of
her husband's often tips the
balance toward selecting a man
rather than a woman for a top
position.
Despite some feeling that
"chauvinistic attitudes" on the
part of boards of directors per-
sist, there appear to be rela-
tively few obstacles in the way
of v/omen who seek to achieve
any professional status which
they desire in the Jewish Center
field.
AMONG THE recommenda-
tions made for correcting the
iniquities that do exist was the
suggestion that discriminatory
practices be exposed in the pro-
fessional association and that
the associations, in turn, set and
Interpret standards to the lay
leadership.
It may be of some significance
that this group had the highest
teiiiii
K*
p


URDL'S CONCRETE
SPECIALTIES

SPECIALISTS IN HANDIWORK
3386 GERMANTOWN ROAD
DELRAY fcEACH 33444
number of respondents and the
greatest consensus between
their replies. Based on long
years of experience in this field,
leading professionals reported
noticeable shifts since the mid-
dle 30's, from a preponderance
of women in top executive posi-
tions to their present status of
middle to lower levels of em-
ployment, in Jewish Family
Service agencies. .
Several outstanding women
have given professional leader-
ship to this field in the past but
as they retired they were in-
variably replaced by men.
PROFESSIONAL opportunities
for women in family case work
Continued on Page 14-B
Best Wishes At This
Chanuka Season
Bill KimmeFs
Colonial Kitchen
Restaurant
7478 LAKE WORTH ROAD
LAKE WORTH 33460
Telephone 965-9964
May the sacred lights ofChanukah
Bring peace and joy that last,
Not only through this blessed time,
But after it has passed,
And may each candle's constant flame
Servt as a symbol, too>;
Of all the happiness that's u
Fbr those you love and yoit,
CITY BANK
OF LAUDERHILL
If 0 ? y fit r- ,
4200 NORTHWEST 16th STREET
LAUDERHILL 33313


14-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 28, 1975
Best Wishes At Chamika
ARGO UNIFORM
COMPANY
1000 SOUTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
HALLANDALE 33009
ill
Best Wishes To All For
A Happy Chanuka
Nordic Cabinet
CUSTOM DESIGNED ...
CONSTRUCTED AND INSTALLED
335 MOCKINGBIRD LANE
LANTANA 33462
Telephone 582-1039
S
\jj,1
Biest Wishes To All
At The Chart****: Holidays
Fffmws
Service Center
GENERAL AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS ..
AIR CONbTTTORlNST.. TIRE?'* "BATTERIES
3300 WEST LANTANA ROAD
LAKrWORtH 3346*
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AIR CONDITIONING ... AUTOMOTIVE
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LANTANA 33462
Telephone 586-9564
Opportunities for Women
Continued from Page 13-B
"are still' excellent except with
the possible exception of the
top executive jobs. On a sub-
executive level, on the super-
visory level and on the practi-
tioner level (here are far more
women than men.
On these levels there appear
to he no differentials In pay.
Men In th dently more successful in ne-
gotiating for. and e Mutually
petting, a higher salary. Out of
a sense of "selfless dedication"
women in one specific instance
were reluctant to support de-
mands for progressive action
with regard to advances in pay.
a ton executive reported.
AMONG THE factors cited as
impediments to women's up-
ward and onward moves such
items as lack of "career mo-
bility." "hang ups about self-
worth," "reluctance to compete
with male counterparts." and
"irrational male biases" were
mentioned.
There was a strong- feeling
that the under-representation
of men on the practitioner level
hai placed this field at a dis-
advantage. Men are perceived
mainly as the agency chiefs
and their virtual absence from
the vital components of direct
human contact with clients is a
serious deprivation of an im-
portant Value in this field of
service
"Women who have been the
architects of this field, having
served as theoreticians, pro*
gram planners and administrat-
ive j lelded way to men.''
v r;'-x one woman executive.
"MUMPS IN a psychological
seme, this proves the verv thf
sis v.-'iich seems to be challene-
now, namely, that social
work, particularly family and
child welfare service, has the
i. .iii.u to society as a
mother- has to her family, yet
who can denv that motherhood
Involves decision making, stand-
ard setting, discipline, goal
constructionideas usually as-
sociated with the man's role."
As we begin to see more In-
terchangeability of roles in our
society, women may again as-
sume the positions of profes-
sional leadership that have
made Jewish Family and Chil-
dren's Health Service such a
flourishing field.
The issue of women has led
to the development of many pro-
grams dealing with this very
subject. Among the recommen-
dations stated were the need
for sensitizing agency and Fed-
eration boards to distinct ad-
vantages to be gained from in-
terchangeable professional roles
in this field, and for alerting
> nung and capable women to
[he fact that this appears to be
a promising field for women
and that no serious barriers to
their seeking their maximal
challenge exist.
PERHAPS THE younger wom-
en will be less fearful to try to
overcome the obstacles that
are still there.
The status of women in the
geriatric field is probably
somewhat better than in other
fields. Because services to the
elderly are becoming increas-
ingly health related they draw
hi avily upon fields that are
i iionally women oriented,
that is, nursing, occupational
and physical tli, rapy. recrea-
tion
However, women also appear
to hold such positions as comp-
troller, mental healt!' adminis-
trator, research project direct-
or, department head.
"At present, women have a
large number of positions the
one area that still remains some-
what limited, however, is the
area of administration." states
an executive director of a major
geriatric center.
ONE REASON given for this
lag in professional opportunity
is that boards of directors tend
to feel more comfortable with
male executive dhwetors. An-
other reason given is that pro-
fessional schools do not gradu-
ate too many female specialists
in health administrationa re-
quirement for top executive po-
sitions in this field.
It is reported that there does
not appear to bo discriminatory
practice in regard to hiring
women, or in the rates of pay
offered to them. In geriatric
centers more and more women
are employed in all professional
positions. Strong feeling was ex-
Best Wishes for a Happy Chanuka
SUMMER SEAL
INDUSTRIES
PATIO FURNITURE .
SCREEN ENCLOSURES .. PATIO SHADES
137 E. HILLSBORO BOULEVARD
DEERFIELD BEACH 33441
i

A }\>ry Happy Gluinuka Ti> Alt
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MECHANICAL
CONTRACTOR CORP.
PLUMBING-AIR CONDITIONING-
HEATING-SHEET METAL WORK.
2001 SEVENTH AVENUE NORTH
LAKE WORTH 33460


-

i"


Iday, November 28, 1975
The Jewish Flnridian o) Greater Fort Lauderdoie
Page
15.
Irccsed that as more and more
|o' len become interested in
i.ilih fields they will also be-
in tn qualify for top executive
options.
| Becsuss of womin's snecinl
redilec'ion for being in d-roct
toman contact with dMetRs, and
acause she tends to nut just a
itle extra of henuK into her
oik, she may not be as ready
* set into "I'rantmanship."
irlq -t i-'nlnnt:ition.'* "fund
psing," "budgeting" and aver-
"administration."
"THE OPPORTUNITIES mav
i then;, but progress is a rela-
te jrm," s lid oiv experienced
JeciiH"?. "Homes for the ag?d
utilize women more fully
knn other fields. Do women in
lis fi I want fh" resnonsibility
Bt comes with the demand of
pstitutional administration?
ientlv not much." h-. added.
[The fields of Jewish Fduca-
pn pnd Svnaeos'te Administra-
te I'C far behind other fields
terms ol opportunities for
!J"V'l.
|".\- teachers and consultants.
L\ Fmd oppoitun'ti-s arc
kal," writes a director of a
[i ni Jswish Education,
Y> "tha<*e hns b^n -m incraaae
mmber ni wo*nn nrin-
inis of synsjr^cje scbo^is.
-. th sy often p t their
If >s b?C1U0* th1'' will ac-
\r\ this responsibility for less
an a man would work for."
I in some instances a woman
Hncipal of a religious school
bul I I th it she is mating a
kiv iVjtion \-> th" school by ac-
rfing a minimal salary.
IW .} dominated boards ol
bias "-'' 's often tend to regard
m Jewish Education profes
pn:il as a part volunteer. This
refbetod in attitudes toward
.> promotion and pav.
[Is' attitudes, combined
ith the usual male biases
?\:il.nt in synagogue sittings,
ace tha women professionals
|J.-wi.-h Education and Syna-
le Administration at a dou-
disadvantage. There are no
directors of Boards of Jewish
Education who are women in
the entire United States or
Canada.
WITH THE rising feminist
ferment, among young scholar-
ly women who seek to act upon
fi ir Jewish and feminist in-
pulses, a stronger push by wom-
en into positions of decision
making, executives and practi-
tioners, may be expected.
Women currently studying
for the rabbinate are already
expressing a preference for
teaching rather than preaching.
There is now full consensus to
the idea that the more lav wom-
en elected to synagogue boards
Of directors the more likely are
the barri ms to come down. How-
ever, while manv women may
tend to reject a woman in the
pulpit, they will more readily
welcome her in the study and
the administrative offices of the
synagogue.
Ii\ CONCLUSION, while there
still are considerable impedi-
ments to the progress of women
into the top executive positions
in various fields of service in
th Jewish Communal Service
profession, the Ad Hoc Commit-
tee of the NCJCS, based on its
informal inquiry, confidently
Btate that there are fine oppor-
tunities in the Jewish communi-
ty for able highly trained and
experienced professionals who
are women.
Younger women seeking to
define their identity, as women
and as Jews, can look to the
Jewish Communal Service field
tor more personal satisfaction
and prolession.il reward than
in many other pursuits. It may
be a struggle to reach the top
but it may well be worth the try.
Best Wishes To All For A
Happy Chaniika
ART CENTER
WORKSHOP
1401 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
FT. LAUDERDAE 33304
Holiday Greetings to the
Jewish Community
RITA OLWELL
TRAVEL SERVICE, INC.
1828 EAST SUNRISE BLVD.
Phone 764-1570
rKumkif
May this Festival of Lights
Bring Peace and Joy,
Health and Happiness
To Every Home
KEELER'S DRAPERIES
3415 SOUTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
DELRAY BEACH 33444
'
WE WISH YOU A
HAPPV
"ma
,
T
Herbert Willard
EXPERT TRUCKING ... INSURED
P.O. BOX 4016
LANTANA 33462
Able Rent All
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414 WEST LANTANA ROAD
LANTANA 33462
Telephone 582-9994
Best Wishes And Channka
Greeting's To All From
WESTROAD
FLEET SERVICE
4180 WESTROAD DRIVE
WEST PALM BEACH 33407
Telephone 842-8821
Best Wishes on the
Channka Holidays
DAVE'S PAINT & BODY
SHOP
1847 ARAGON AVENUE
LAKE WORTH 33460
Telephone 585-5188
*
Good Health and Happiness at Chanuka
LILLI JEANNE BOUTIQUE
717 EAST LAS OLAS BOULEVARD


Page 16-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fart Lauderdale
Friday, November 28, 1975
CHANUKAH
GREETINGS
FROM
AIR BY J.B. INC
24 HOUR SERVICE
2030 N.W. 29th STREET
OAKLAND PARK 33311
Telephone 739-1820
Happiness at Chanuka
MARY G'S
Beauty Salon
2669 E. COMMERCIAL BLVD.
771-5761
Happiness at Chanuka
FELIX ECKER
JEWELERS
606 E. Las Olas Blvd.
524-8292
roun
ttfc* ttttt
H&toifc
Best Wishes to the Jewish
Community on Chanuka
BROWARD
COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
225 EAST LAS OLAS BLVD.
FT. LAUDERDALE 33301
Best Wishes From Bloods Hammock Groves For A Peaceful
And Happy Chanuka ...
1 1
BLOODS HAMMOCK
GROVES
CITRUS FRUITS .. ORANGES
AND GRAPEFRUITS
4549 UNTON BLVD.
DELRAY BEACH 33444


MODERN ISRAEL: Arab farmer astride a donkey breaks through a military
convoy. The near-garrison state and the enemy of a Jewish State mix daily
as Israel seeks to replay the ancient Chanukah miracle of the temple cleans-
ed of alien occupants and Jewish life reborn.
IN DEFENSE: A soldier reminded of his religious duty by two Orthodox
youths who help him bind his phylacteries and don a yarmulke.
Secret I
Mission
To
Jordan
By BORIS SMOLAR
/~)N ONE afternoon, during a
pleasant chat at the Jew-
ish Agency headquarters in
Jerusalem with Dr. Emanuel
Neumann, who was at that time
a member of the Jewish Agency
Executive and head of its Eco-
nomic Department, Dr. Neu-
mann asked me:
"Would you like to accom-
pany me on a secret mission
tomorrow?"
Dr. Neumann, like other
members of the Jewish Agency
Executive, often confided in me
matters of secrecy. His ques-
tion, naturally, intrigued me.
"Where to?" I wanted to
know.
"To Transjordan."
HIS ANSWER came as a com-
plete surprise to me. All traffic
between Palestine and Trans-
jordan had to pass over the Al-
lenby Bridge which was the
border between these two ter-
ritories under the British Man-
datory Government. This bor-
der was heavily patrolled for
Continued on Page 2-C


r.
Pase 2-C
The Jewish Florulian of GreaUr Fert Lauderdaie
Friday. November 28, 1975
Secret Mission
.. ... ,.....;
Continued from Page 1-C
the purpose of preventing Fales-
tinian jews from entering
Transjordan.
Emir (later King) Abdullah
o( Transjordan was one of the
fju Arabs who believed in Jew-
ish-Arab co-existMM. In ti^ne
be was to pay for this belief
with his life, liut when in; was
titular ruler <>f Transjordan. the
Mandatory (io\ eminent kept
him under heel.
He had to follow its policy
ise his income consisted
of a yearly subsidy from the
ish Government and also
because British military officers
were in charge oi his small
army, the Arab Legion.
BRITAIN'S policy was that
Jews should not set toot in
Tnuisjordan or buy land or
other property there.
"Do you really think we can
K-'t into Transjordan tomor-
row?" I asked Dr. Neumann.
"I'm quite serious." he re-
pUed. "Another member of the
Jewish Agency htocutie and
I are going to Jordan tomorrow
before dawn. Our mission is so
secrel that even the Mandatory
Governmentto say nothing of
the Arabsmustn't hear a word
abjut it Wj are travelling
incognito as business guests of
Emir Abdullah.
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is
une of the chapters of
Boris Similar's forthcom-
ing book in which he rc-
lcics hithereto unreported
experiences in contempo-
rary .Jewish history which
can now be revealed.
I

".Ve'io going to make a secret
agreement with Emir Abdullah
aiu tfl buy land from him." he
said "This will be the first time
!ai. will be sold to Jew- in
TransyOtiian aiui by no less a
person than the Emir himself.
The British won't like itto say
nothing of the Mufti and his fol-
lowers. This will go anainst
their wishes and the Emir has
therefore bound us to silence."'
"BIT WHY should the Kmir
want to ?Ii iand to the J. j,h
Agency if the Mandatory Go*
emmem and even more%o his
own Arar-> will be viol.rr
posed to it? 1 asked.
BORh> mm***
Arab uu-existence
"We're to leave Jerusalem
before dawn, v.-hen flour's not
a suul on the street, and we'll
be mat by one uf Hie Emir's
confidante* Vnu'i: be the nnfj
outsider to ticuumpjiny and
of course wont be able to write
dbnm our mission. You'll sot
why yourself."
EARLY THE next da*, when
the sim barely had come over
tite horizon. I was already at
Jewish Agency Headquarters,
ready for the sttcret trip.
"We'll be away for iust a few
hours." Dr. Neumann said. "You
dun t hire t take anything
with you."
W- were watting for the other
member of the Jewish Agency
Executive who was to accom-
pany us. and in the meantime
'Dr. tttuimunn briefed me about
our mission.
AtlanticFederal
Savings and Loan
Offices serving
Dude. Broward and
Palm Beach Counties

PEMBROKE PINES
Oi
SERVICE CENTER
50 NORTHWEST UNIVERSITY DRIVE
TELEPHONE 987-1747
PEMBROKE PINES 33024
-
MAY YOUR LIFE BE FILLED
WITH JOY THIS HANUKA
t ir
-.:r.r.

W- M.
V-'-,n.J>'-'


T
Friday, Novembet 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3-C
It's simple," Dr. Neumann
splained. 'He needs money.
[is budget is met with funds
rom the British Colonial Of-
ce. He now wants, to make a
,p to London and he wants to
3 as befits a Kingwith pomp
nd in luxury. But he doesn't
ave enough moneyeven if he
ent as a guest of the British
overnment
"It would cost him at least
25,000. and he doesn't have it.
e can't borrow either because
his wouldn't be proper for a
erson of his stature. So it oc-
lirred to him that he could se-
letlj sell land to us for
8,000.
THROUGH a Jew in Jcru-
jaiem whose family has been
for generations and who
[ at home with the Arabs,
ith whom he's been doing
jusiness since the time Trans-
[ordaii and Palestine were part
..Turkey, one of Emir Abdul-
II iid- isois informed
ie Jewish Ag.ney that the
_ir.ii- I iUin | to sell land in
\..i c mntry to a Jewish buyer
ooo Pounds Sterling (at
alent to $25,000).
;wish ng ncy, of c >urse,
jeeepted the offer immediately.
e still don't know whether the
iiftish will approve the deal
fhen they tind out about it,
10 we're co-anting on them to
Jrain from going againbt Emir
ibduilah's wishes," Dr. Neu-
lann said.
"At any rate, it's Important
or us to get it down on paper
hat the ruler ot Transjordan
i selling us land," he went on.
{That's why we're going on
his secret mission to meet an
uthorized representative of
lifiir Abdullah's somewhere in
transjordan' not far from the
lalestine border and go through
Jie formalities. Getting Jewish
f::. in Transjordan will be an
Greetings
LAURY LEE
ELECTRIC
5115 S.W. 64th St.
791-3490
GREETINGS
To Our Customers
and Friends
KITCHENS
By FAY
15060 N. Dixie Kwy.
Phone 772-2229
Holiday Greetings to Our
Customers and Friends
MAHNKE'S
PROSTHETIC-
IRTHOTICS, INC.
'915 N.E. 45Hi STREET
SUITE 108-110
Best Wishes to All
^ this Holiday Season
L&J. RADIATOR
f34 N.W. 7th Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale
763-8808
historic achievement."
THE OTHER member of the
Jewish Agency Executive who
was authorized to accompany
Dr. Neumann to Transjordan
to make the secret deal turned
out to be Dr. Heshl Farbsztejn,
a Mizrachi leader, who had been
prominent in the Orthodox
Zionist movement.
He came to Jewish Agency
headquarters before dawn ready
for the trip and with a cane
in his hand. I'd never seen him
with a cane before and II teased
him about it. "Do you want to
protect yourself from the Arabs
in Transjordan with a cane?"
I asked him.
"This is not for protection,"
he answered in all seriousness.
"I've brought this cane in order
to follow one of the statements
in the Bible."
"What is the statement?" I
wanted to know.
"Ki bemakii avani et hayar-
den (for with my staff I nave
crossed the Jordan -Gen. 32:-
11)." ne reminded me.
DR. FARBSZTEJN had not
yet been in Transjordan and
since he was very Orthodox, he
w inted to cross tlft Jordan for
the first time in the traditional
manner. He later kept the cane
as a treasured memento.
A car was waiting for the
three of us in the courtyard of
the Jewish Agency. I had never
seen the man at the wheel
among the other Jewish Agency
chauffeurs. He was, in fact, the
Arab-speaking Jew from Jeru-
salem who was the intermediary
between Emir Abdullah and the
Jewish Agency. He, of course,
spoke Hebrew too. He looked
at his wristwatchit was about
six a.m.
"We'll be there in three
hours." he told us.
HE DIDN'T say another word
until we got to the Allenby
Bridge. There were Palestinian
policemen at one end of the
bridge and Transjordanian po-
licemen at the other. We crossed
the frontier without any dif-
ficulties.
Dr. Naumann and I had
American passports and Dr.
Forbsztejn had a Polish one.
We were foreign citizens and
the Palestine border guards did
not care about our destination.
After about a quarter of an
hour's drive on the Trans-
jordanian side, our car came
suddenly to a halt in an empty-
field.
Neither Dr. Neumann nor Dr.
Farbsztejn could understand
why the car suddenly stopped.
Mothing was wrong with the car
Its li that would force us to
stop. The only person who ap-
parently did know the reason
but said nothingwas the Jew
from Jerusalem who was at the
the wheel.
BORN IN' Palestine into a
family that had been there for
generations, he was doing busi-
ness with Arabs for many years.
Aft :r keeping us in the field for
about ten minutes, he finally
revealed his secret:
"I agreed to wait here for the
Emir's confidante, who will
guide us from here," he said.
"I myself don't know where to
Continued on Page 4-C
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Mr#c
The- newHh
m tiria'i i"i iS-%
Secret Mission

.:
Cmtme go from here or where we have
to meet "to Slfen the agreement.
Only the man who has to meet
us here knows where. He should
be Here any minute now. He
knows the approximate time
*e'd %' waiting for him."
""The sun was coming up over
the +ttfls of Moab. The air was
fresh and-eool. The area was
ettrfpWfely at>Oid green. In
coWrasf to'Palesfine, where the
crth was yellow and sandy.
the earth here was completely
covered with grass.
BUT THERE wasn't a soul in
Bight. There were, no houses,
not even any tents belonging to
Arab nomads who Wander un-
der the open sky from one place
to another in Transjordan. Lat-
er, however, we were to see
nomads in the erarity- fields.
As long as we had to wait for
the Emir's representative, we
decided to leave the car and go
out into t*e "Tfefeh 'early morning air.
Waiting for nini also made the
trip more mysterious. *Nc didn't
know whether the emissary
would come in a car Won a
donkey or on foot.
We now knew from the Jew-
ish intermediary who brought
us here that he would be
dressed in Arab garb and would
have to give a secret password
in Arabic.
After about -a -'.quarter of -an
hour's *Mft> "We new a figure
in the -distance coming closer
and cIosrT*oute. 'VfltaaVs prob-
ably the man we're waiting for,''
said the Jew from Jerusalem.
NONE OF us noticed -how he
had gotten -tu where he was
when ^etpOtted htm. 'As lar as
the eye could see there Were
no houses and he had therefore
apparently come in a ear until
a point where he coirfd see "us
through his field glasses.
The car apparently turned
back a little and he started com-
ing towards us on foot.
He was coming etosCr nd
closer and bef jre long we could
see a tall Arab in a long white
freshly washed Arab rose ttifch
typical Arab headdress. He bow-
ed to us courteously and greeted
us in fluent English. To our
chauffeur, however, he began
speaking TftrsWt.
He told him something we
did not understand. Otfr feur smiled amiably and fold us
we could get back inte'the***.
"He says he'll go withAfc to
our car and take us to Hhe^pTace
where we're expected,"tWe Jfew
from Jerusalem explained.
WE GOT back into Hie c'aY.
The Arab sat down newt'tfa fh'e
driver and we continued our
Journey.
The mission became more
and more interesting. The dusty
road was lined by grassy fields
on both sides. Gradually we
started to see Arab tents. Arabs
riding on donkeys, and here
and there dusty little Arab
houses. _
Veiled women with baskets
of vegetables on their heads
passed us by and soon we saw
Arab children in the streets.
May was dawning in this primi-
tive corner of the country. Al-
though the soil was better here
than in Palestine, it was poor
and much less developed.
After an hour's ride, our car
came to'a halt somewhere on
the road to Amman, the capital
of Tmnsjordan. There was only
one small house in the whole
-arsarTHis Was the place where
the secret Agreement was to be
signed.
THERE WERE no guards
around the "house; ttot a -soul.
Dr. Neurnann and Dr. Farbsz-
tejn went into the house to-
gether with the Emir's repre-
sentative and the Jewish inter-
mediary to sign the agreement.
I remained outside with my
camera'and took pictures bf the
house in which the historic act
of selling 13rid in "Transjordan
to Jews for the first time was
to take place.
The rrrrm~ity irf Hignian the
agreement did **#cause -everything had -%een
previously negOifated m top
(*creey, both-sides wefe eager
(o sign the agreement as quick-
ly as possible. And everything
had been prepared m advance.
In Ttss Than a half hour, we
were back in the car Tor the
return trip--to Jerusalem. Dr.
Neumann 'was beaming with
satisfaction' and Dr. Farbztejn
gleefully plwed with his cane
and kept on repeating the
words: "Hi bemakli avarti ei
hayarden: For with my staff I
have cttissrd the Jordan."
TTI1-: SECRET deal was too
good, however, to remain con-
fidential. The Mandatory Gov-
ernment -- which was against
Jewish acquisition of land in
Transjordanwas bound to find
out about it sooner or later and
the Jewish Agency was unsure
what action the Mandatory Gov-
ernment "would take. The chanc-
es were that it would declare
it fluff and Void or that it would
"lend" Emir Abdullah the five
thousand Pounds Sterling he
needed to repay the Jewish
Agency and thereby cancel the
ajyfeerrMnt.
The chances were also good
that Arab leaders in Palestine
the Emir's deadly enemies
would find out about the deal
too and use it against him by
causing an uproar in the Arab
world, accusing him of selling
land to Jews in Transjordan
where Jews were prohibited hy
the British Administration to
acquire land.
Sure enough, the story broke
one-day-in-a Lebanese news-
paper. Every-detail of the secret
deal was revealed in the article
and the Emir was warned that
it would be wise to cancel the
weeks after the deal was closed.
IT ~WAS "Clear "that soTrTeTJBe
close to Emir Abdullah had
leaked the story to the news-
paper, in order to create an
excuse that if' the agreement
were implemented, the Emir's
deal. This Wok piece about two
life might be in danger since the
Arab^press. tfa* iifthtafros ever,
it.
I do not know whether the
Emir returned the 5,000 Pounds
Sterling he had gotten from the
A Very- Happy Chanuka to our
Jewish Customers and Friends
EVELYN COORDINATED
INTERIORS
3413 GALT OCEAN DRIVE
566-4400
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
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4220 N.W. 12th St.
791-6370
Best Wishes
fbt the
Holiday
Season .
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4256 PETERS ROAD
584-8540
-
- .-.VMM
*
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1420 BETA COURT
LAKE CLARKE SHORES 33406
Best Wishes To All For
A Happy Chanuka
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TM8 WESr 45th STREET
WEST PALM BEACH 33407
Telephone 84448*2
in
Jewish Agt-ncy; but I bcl
that the Jrvish Agency q
got then- -or aid. The secrd"
agreement remained, however
aiihis*>*c afid important docu
ment. It "is now in the archive
of the Jewish Agency topethe
with other historic document
relating to Palestine.

A HAPPY CHANUKA TO ALL
CORAL RIDGE INSURANCE AGENCY
2631 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Telephone 564-0548
A VERY HAPPY CHANUKA TO
OUR JEWISH CUSTOMERS AND CRIENDS
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KtAL ESTATE
4040 GALT OCEAN DRIVE
565-4831
A VERY HAPPY CHANUKA TO OUR
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Phone 566-6854

Best Wishes To AH For
A Happy Chanuka
Hanuka
Greetings
United Plumbing
& Heating
2501 N.W. 1st AVENUE
BOCA RATON 33432
:


*
5
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WE WISH YOU A
HAPPY
IMPERIAL
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1500 EAST COMMERCIAL BLVD.
*hone 771-5815

I
! I Ml"



Friday, November 28, 1975
Th&. Jewish Fhridtan of Greater Fort Lauderdale
=
Page 5-C

Modern Chanukah Miracle:
Philanthropist
Touro And
Bunker Hill
By LEO SHAPIRO
. T
.

r
\
I

I
a*
tiAO IT not been for the in-
tense patriotic fervor of a
merchant philanthropist mem-
ber of a distingu shed Jewish
famil which early settled in
the United States, the Bunker
Hill Monument the famous
historic Boston landmark
might never have been com-
pleted.
Construction of the monu-
ment, lonnncnioratinu t'ie Bat-
tle of Bunker Hill. June 17
1775, whose 200th anniversary
was recently eel orated, was
actually giwn up at one point,
according to data on file at the
headquarters of the American
Jewish Historical Society in
Waltham. Mass.
THIS WAS in 1840. Work
had stopped some years before
on the memorial, whose cor-
nerstone was laid by Lafayette
on the 58th anniversary of the
battle.
In 183>, .-mhos :.awrence of
Boston had offered, to give
$10,000, half., thfr amount need-
ed, provided that the balance
was subscribed, "btlt there wss
no response Ajsoite the elo-
quent ph*a-of*E*vai. Kwarett
and Daniel Webster."
The shortage came to the at-
tention of Judah Touro in. New
Orleans- A forme; resident of
Boston, bora ii* Newport, R.I..
June 16, 1775,- he had- always
been proud of the fact that he
had been born- on the eve of
the great! battle.
HE responded immediately
but with the stipulation that
tin donor's name remain anony-
mous. That was not possible,
however, and the fact that the
funds were at last available was
the cause of general rejoicing
throughout the country.
Touro was so unhappy that
lu\ name had been published
thai he is. reported to have told
friends that lie would have re-
voked his gift "had it not been
for the apprehension that his
real motives-.would have been
misunderstood^'
V.'hen tho finished monument
as dedicated June 17, 1843,
there was a banquet in Faneuil
Hall honoring Lawrence and
Touro. Daniel Webster war the
oritor. President John Tyler at-
tended and Gov. Morton, who
could ,iot be present, wrote a
special poem for the occasion.
THEIR GENEROSITY was ex-
tolled in the following, general-
ly attributed to Olhei Wendell
Holmes:
"Amos and Judah- venerated
names, Patriot and prophet.
press their equal claims,/ Like
generous courses, running 'neck
to neck'/Each aids the work
by giving it a check,/Christian
and Jew, they carry out one
plan.'For though of different
faith, each is in heart a ftan."
On Touro's death, the Banker
Hill Monument Association, on
the motion of Richard Frothing-
ham, the historian, adopted a
resolution stating:
"In the death of Judah.Touxo
of New Orleans the Bunker
Hill Monument Association has
lost an early, liberal arid de-
vote, friend, whose- memory
wi'l ever be hold In high- es-
teem and wHose noble contri-
butions to caritable and patrior
c Purposes will never b* for*-
fotten."
TOURO, descrtwd as a- great
American, patriab who1' pW ioite
of cougj^.ahojfa.-alL^Jae.iD,.
time of danger, joined the mi-
litia in the defense of New Or-
leans during the War of 1812
and was one of 13 Americans
wounded in that engagement
He repeatedly showed his
public spirit by assisting civic
and patriotic movements when-
ever they were brought to his
attention, observes Leon Huh-
ner in his "The Life of Judah
Touro "
Judah Touro quietly and
honestly amassed a fortune
which he used, largely in his
will, to relieve distress and mis-
fortune, without regard to race,
color or crcd
THE STORY is told, in Morris
Continued on Page 6 C
First Israeli troops to cross the Suez Ca-
nal in the October, 1973 War confer on
strategy. Extreme right is the Israeli dip-
lomat who served as a consul in South
Africa and was later killed by a. terrorist.
in Johannesburg. Middle is Eli Gil-Bar
who saw the trooper standing next to hliu
killed by a mine within an hour after the
crossing. Gil-Bar was uninjured.
Holiday Greetings- t0"our Customers and Friends
fforrr.ED STRICKLIN
UNIVERSITY HEARING AH)
6507 SUNSET STRIP
484-3240
Chanuka Greetings
BOB'S STANDARD SERVICE
5850 OKEECHOBEE BLVD.
WEST PALM BEACH 33409
Telephone 686-9723
Best Wishes To All For A
Happy Chanuka
THE PRINTER
BROCHURES ... MENUS... OFFICE FORMS
j LETTER PRESS & OFFSET
2525 OLD OKEECHOBEE ROAD
WEST PALM BEACH 33401
TELEPHONE 683-3929

min.M ulouslv the iMMaM I Kiln*-
iiA\t oii iruio wonftreu* p-.\y
o* one lonv. CRUM the oil ffireiwft
(oa tuiht ioiu, niiihis .\no Cuys
that's why each yean .u h.\nuitoh
the menoQ.xh auans so Mtioht
to symeolizt. this rmo.uu-
of faith thai conqucccO micnt
.*.*.
United
federal.
United Federal Savings t Loan Association
3600 North Federal HighwayFoil Iaui'orda e 583-33t1
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u.....-wo ,>-><*
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Late Teller Windows BAM-fcPMf
D'.ve-up windows ope" SatuCa.&AMMl 12 noem
a* Mam Office and laude'dalf Late* ("Ace
-"''.....^^
-t


Page 6-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
liday, November 28, 1975
1975 "t
Philanthropist Touro
Excavation Predates Masada >

Continued from Page S-C
A. Gutstein-s book. "Aaron
Lorxz and Judah Touro," of
some poor missionaries from the
Christians of Palestine who met
with deaf ears when they ap-
proached several rich men of
New Orleans for help in re-
building their church in Jeru-
salem.
"A frivolous gentleman, in
derision suggested that they
turn to Mr. Touro.
"He subscribed S200 and they
soon returned to thank that
'frivolous gentleman" for di-
recting them to 'so liberal a
Christian.' "
When a Presbyterian, later a
Unitarian church in a growing
business section of New Or-
leans was forced to sell its
property because it could not
raise required funds. Touro out-
bid every prospective buyer,
turned the keys over to the
minister, and paid for the addi-
tional expense of keeping the
building in repair.
THE MINISTER, thp Rpv.
Theodore Clapp, said that Touro
had been urged several times to
tear the building down and
build a block of stores and that
on one occasion he told a man
who had made a very liberal of-
fer for the property that there
was not enough money in the
world to buy it and that if he
could have his way there should
be a church on the spot "to the
end of time."
Touro continued for a period
of 28 years to give money, in
small sums, to the tune of $20,-
000 and when the church burn-
ed down he came to its aid
again, purchasing a small Bap-
tist chapel for the use of the
congregation until he could put
up a larger building.
ACCORDING TO Pastor
Clapp, "With generous profu-
sion he scattered his favors
broadcast over the wide field of
humanity," although, he added.
Touro "knew well that many of
the recipients of his bounty
hated the Hebrews and would,
if possible, sweep them into an-
nihilation."
Touro died Jan. 13, 1854, at
the age of 79. Funeral services
were held in the Yeshuat Israel
Synagogue, now a national
shrine and commonly referred
to as the Newport Synagogue.
Church bells tolled as the
community's dignitaries attend-
ed and throngs were outside
who couldn't get into the house
of worship which his father,
Isaac Touro, had served as Ha-
zan minister more than 80
years before.
And when he was buried,
earth brought from Jerusalem
especially for that purpose, was
scattered over his grave.
AN EARLY Zionist, he was
one of the first Americans to
contribute to the colonization of
Palestine, through Warder Cres-
son of Philadelphia, who estab-
lished a Jewish agricultural
colony near Jerusalem about
1850. He also was instrumental
in founding in Hebrew Foreign
Mission Society in 1853 to help
Jews in foreign lands.
Touro established the infir-
mary-hospital in New Orleans
which bears his name and was a
co-founder of an "Aim House"
in that city. balieved to be the
first of its kind to be erected
in this country.
Touro's will, which distribut-
ed some $500,000 to Jewish and
Christian institutions and some
individuals, included a total of
$143,000 to congregations, re-
ligious schools, benevolent so-
cieties and Jewish hospitals in
17 cities: Boston, Hartford, New
Haven, New York, Philadelphia,
Baltimore, Richmond, Charles-
ton, Savannah, Mobile, Mem-
phis, Louisville, Cincinnati,
Cleveland, St. Louis, Buffalo
end Albany.
HE LEFT $50,000 "to ameli-
orate the condition of our un-
fortunate Jewish Brethren in
the Holy Land and to secure to
them the inestimable privilege
of worshiping the Almightv ac-
cording to our religion, without
molestation."
He bequeathed another S'O
non to the North American Re-
lief Society for the Indigent
m of Jerusalem.
TOURO ALSO left $15,000 to
local benevolent societies "
N-w Odeans. including
utonian effort to send assist-ic i
t.i t'-> dwindling Jewish com-
munity in China," according t,i
ram W. Korn in his book.
The Early Jews of New
ns.'' published by the
American Jewish Historical So-
ciety.
One of the bequests was $5,-
000 to "the Hebrew congrega-
tion 'Ohabay Shalomc' of Bos-
ton. Three institutions named
in the will of his brother,
Abraham Touro of Boston, also
received gifts. The Asylum for
Orphan Boys, Boston, $5,000;
the Female Orphan Asylum of
Boston, $5,000; and the Massa-
chusetts Female Hospital, $10.-
000.
His brother, who died in 1822
in Medford at the age of 45 as
the result of an accident, left
the sum of $10,000 to the Mas
sachusetts General Hospital.
Boston, among other legacies.
Judah Touro, the extent and
size of whose benefactions re-
vealed by his will, stirred the
countrv, was described as fol-
lows by G. W. Warren, in his
history of the Bunker Hill
Monument:
By RICHARD OESTERMANN
JERUSALEMThe oldest Jew-
ish ritual baths ever found
by archaeologists, predating
those at Masada by 150 to 200
years, were uncovered in the
Hebrew University's third s a-
son of excavrtions, concluded
last May. at the Hasm
winter palaces lite, south of
Jericho, a: ;!' h oi WaJi
K.lt.
The excavation con-
duct -d by the Uni ersity s In-
stitute of Are1' y with the
aid of the militarj imenl
of JuJea and Samaria, th<
partment of Antiquities ri the
E lucation and Cul-
ture, and the Israel Exploration
ty.
ASSISTANCE was also
by the America-Israel Cultural
Foundation. Supervisor of the
dig is architect Ehud Netzei
(Menczel), of the University's
Institute of Archaeok.s;.
This season saw the c n-
tinued uncovering of the Has
monean palace complex north
of Wadi Kt:t, and in particular
the surroundings of the larg;
swimming pool in which, it is
conjectured, the Hasmonean
high priest. Aristobolus the
Third, was drowned by orn. -
of King Herod.
To the west of the pooi, a
block of buildings inching
bath, showers and ritual bath?
was uncovered. This block ap
parently underwent numerous
changes and transformations
luring the Hasmonean period,
a fact attesting to the prolonged
existence of the palace.
THE RITUAL baths found
here are the earliest known in
any archaeological fina. Of spe-
GPEETINGS
TO OUR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS
LES TROIS
MOUSQUETAIRES
RESTAURANT
2447 SUNRISE HWY.
PHONE 564-7513
C 3
70 GZ
Season's Greetings to the
Jewish Community in
South Florida
Smith's Grocery
THE FAMILY STORE
142 WEST HILLSBORO BLVD.
TELEPHONE 427-1270
DEERFIELD BEACH 33441
Ancient Jewish oil lamp.
cial intercut i-, a luxurious bath sion poMs within it. In son
p obably us d by the Has- the pools there were found con-
monean kings and f aturing ojaled hundreds of articles,,
devices for h-aiiug the immer- mostly of pottery, from the end
hanukah
esfiual
# A ? i
'.<5
Chanuha Blessings To
The Jewish Community
in South Florida
R.G. WALLEN
CO. INC.
AIR CONDITIONING CONTRACTORS
BUILDING S-431
PALM BEACH INT'L AIRPORT
WEST PALM BEACH 33406
1
I

A


Friday, November 28, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7-C
of the Haswonean period.
AmoQg them is a rare vessel
resembling a horn of plenty.
The excavators this season
finished uncovering the large
reception hall in Herod's mag-
nificent winter palace, uncov-
ered last winter. The founda-
tion of the ornamented marble
floor which had graced this
hall (and was stolen) is pre-
served almost in its entirety.
Under it, a decorative mosaic
I ; belonging to a villa was
; iled. It too is from the
Herodian period, and was there
. the palace was built.
THE REMNANTS of a 1
ling from the -1nd Century
i were i icovered in their
entirety in the course of the
e .taxations. This house was
;: I'arently destroyed by fire
hieing the Bar Kochba revolt.
Outstanding among the fixtures
' pottery found in it is a
round oil lamp with 17 aper-
tu es, decorated with a grape-
vine motif.
The first step was taken dur-
ing this season's dig in inves-
tigating the system oi ancient
aqueducts which in the Second
Temple period extended all
over the Jericho basin and was
the basis of Jericho's flourish-
ing prosperity in that era.
It now appears conclusively
that the initiators of this net-
work of aqueducts were the
same Hasmonean kings who
built their palaces at the mouth
of Wadi Kelt.
A SERIES of soundings car-
ried out at Tel El-Samarat,
located near the ancient Jeri-
cho tel, revealed the hip-
podrome that Herod built in
Jericho, mentioned in the writ-
ings of Josephus Flavius. It
turns out that Samarat is an
artificial tel which served as
the foundation for a magnificent
building standing upon it.
The southern part of the tel
functionea as a theatre from
which viewers could watch
horse and chariot races on the
adjacent track. Parts of the
wall surrounding the 320 by 80
meter race track were uncov-
ered. This hippodrome is one of
the few of its kind to have
existed in this country in the
past, and is the earliest among
them.
The more the study of the
Jericiio basin expands, the
more apparent becomes the
might of this city at the end of
the Second Temple era. It was
a Jewish city, based mainly on
agriculture and substantially
surpassing the Jericho of to-
i!:iv in its size.
Best Wishes for a Happy Chanuka
BEE-J'
DISCOUNT
s
Examining pottery at digs.
OF NATIONALLY ADVERTISED BRANDS
Bed and Bath Shop
Linens and Accessories
1523 LAS OLAS BLVD.
Phone 764-4763
II
I
II
*
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Best Wishes For A
Peaceful and Happy
Chanuka
IIMJUH
ITT SEMICONDUCTORS
3301 ELECTRONICS WAY
WEST PALM BEACH 33407


rage tS-G
The Jewish Floridian q/ Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday < Novm*m>.280175
^6 .SOME of yew know. I had
tl; opportnnity to visit Is-
.ie-1 last month and would like
to share with you today some ot
my perceptions, feelings and im-
pressions on the American-ls-
tael relationship.
That topicthe American-Is-
r.ieli relationshipis especially
important today in light of the
ikdowa in Secretary Kissin-
i 's shuttle diplomacy bel
rael and Egypt President
> ord's call f)-' reassessment of
American policy in th? M
East, and the talk of a more
poilcj toward
Israel,
DOUBTS HAVE sprung up re-
cently aboul whether there is
v intinuiiv support of Israel in
<'nit."<| Writes. When we add
allowing is the text of re-
> iarks delivered by Con*
. resswoman Cardiss CoWns
t Chicago, one of four
:lack women members of
I \e HoiiM of Rcptestinta-
lives and of the Cbttgres-
sional Black Caucus, at a
May workshop pit" "Israel
< nd the Arab World"- spon-
sored by the American Jew-
Uh Congress at Sptmik* Chi
l4ge. Ms. Collins is a mem-
I cr of the House Committee'
to that question the very real
economic and political muscle
iJUtt the" AratTsMles have "hi
learned to flex, it becomes evi-
cent that now more than ever
the American commitment to
lrael needs to be reemphasi/ed.
To quote Abba Eban, "The
American Israel friendship
heeds intense and careful cul-
tivation at this hour."
Why after 25 years of unwav-
ering American support for Is
rael is there a need for reassess-
i lent?
There has been no change in
the mutuality of interests
f bared by the United States and
Israel; no change in the har-
nony in democratic values and
ideals; no change in the strate-
gic location of Israel; no change
in the fact that there has Peeu
f,o loss of American life in the
defense of Israel.
YET THE rcevaluation is oc-
curring. Is it because of the col-
lapse of Israeli-Egyptian nego-
tiations and the so-called failure
Of American efforts to achieve
peace? .While the administration
is quick to say there is no point
in blaming either of the parties,
the reassessment itself implies
*> finding of fault with Israel and
there is a great deal of thought
; moilc my colleagues that some-
where along the line Israel
changed its position and policy
without making Secretary of
State Kissinger aware of what
its new stance would be at the
hhuttle peace table.
Unfortunately, many myths
feem to have lately surfaced. I
. am very much concerned about
those which address themselves
to American failure in the Mid-
dle East and Israeli intransi-
gence, however, and think that
only after the facts have been
laid bare will it be possible to
determine the best way to get
about the business of assuring
that the American-Israeli friend-
ship will remain strong.
IT IS safe to say that all of
's who are concerned with the
continued existence and via-
bility of Israel... as well as
ith peace in the Middle East
. were disappointed with the
collapse of Secretary Kissinger's
efforts to arrange a further
; greement between Israel and
Egypt on an Israeli withdrawal
from occupied territory. This
setback, though serious, does
mot mean that American policy
'ras failed.
Our policy under the leader-
ship of the Secretary of State
Shuttle Repaired Nxnv:
But Israel Still
Seen As
'The Heavy'
By CARDISS COLLINS
has been successful since th"
Yom Kfppur War In arranging
8 ceasefire .nd maintaining the
balance of ixwr which is a
prerequisite fm discouraging
further hostilities We have ar-
ranged the disengagement
agreement with Egypt and Sy-
ri-1, and have created a situation
in which even the collapse ot"
negormrions does not lead in-
evitably to war. America's status
and image in the Arab world
have improved tremendously
sine? the 1<,73 war. even though
daring that tame period there
has been a massive reenforce-
ment of "Israel by the United
States.
IN FACT, American military'
and economic aid has been
greater during the past 18
months than it was-during-the
preceding 25 years. While the
atmosphere remains tense, and
theyiemwd'-of'hosHthtes is'ni*"
ways possible, I do not believe
that the American attempt at
mediation should be labeled as
a failure because the United
States is still the nation that
both sides trust and are willing
to use as a mediator.
Some of the people who are
meat dismayed over the collapse
of negotiations have blamed Is-
raeli intransigence for the cur-
rent imoasse. It would be a
eo>re mistake to allow this mvth
m rtecume a popular notion in
hHiccnntrv. because Israel has
erven up territory west of the
Snew. Canal has pulled back
from territory in the Sinai that
Kfcypt never occupied during
the 1973 war, has retreated from
trw approaches to Damascus,
and has givon up Kuneitra and
surrounding land that Syria was
unable to tike militarily.
These concessions have been
made in the absence of the one
act from the Arabs that would
be truly meaningful: a perma-
nent, negotiated peace settle-
ment.
DURING this latest round of
negotiations (supposedly scut-
tled by Israeli intransigence)
what did Israel offer?
Israel offered to pull back
from the strategic Gidi and Mit-
la passes which (1) command
the approaches to the southern
Suez Canal, (2) guard the large
Continued on Page 9-C
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i{J
BEST WISHES FROM STANLEY AND GALE
ROBfcPSQN THE CHAMUKA HOLIDAYS
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ltd:
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DEERFIELD BEACH 33441
M VERY HAPPY- CHANVKA TO ALL .
EG. SHERMAN & STAN SCHMIDT
SOUTHERN FORMAL
MWS FORMAL ATTlRE
1311 IAS CHAS BIVO. 525-1171
i
Happy
Chtinuka
To All Of
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and
Customers
SOUTHEAST BANKS
'I "he
Maximum
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SOUTHEAST BANK
OF DEERFIELD BEACH
1007 SOUTH FEDERAL HWY.
421 2200 947-7724 MIAMI
Drive-ln
LIGHTHOUSE POINT
4820 NORTH FEDERAt HWY.
ir
- *" >
l LM .%Ltr-
.M
Best Wishes to All at Chanuka
BODEL
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COMMERCIAL PRINTERS ... 4 COLOR
PROCESS SPECIALIZING IN NCR FORMS
ALL COMMERCIAL WORK
460 NE. 5th AVENUE
DELRAY BEACH 33406
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m
Charlie Frymyer
Paving Contractor
DRIVEWAYS AND PARKING LOTS
509 N.E. 43rd STREET
FT. LAUDERDALE 33334

*
L I' "'


JSr'
m
-Frtaay(KTTOT,5lirefer!"28, 1975
The"le\r'^h'VTnr~diati"of CfeaTer' Forf TaulJercidle
~Fa*ge 9-C
Israel as 'The Heavy9
Continued from Page 8-C
Israeli'base t Refidim, and (3)
Control the road south to Abu
Rodeis.
As you well know, these
passes serve as a defense line
not just for Sinai, but all of Is-
rael. It is interesting to note
that, because of natural bar-
riers in the Sinai. Israel's de-
fense line is only about 95 miles
long if it retains the passes, but
about 220 miles long if that ter-
ritory is ceded.
Once beyond the passes there
are no natural strong points to
serve as barriers between the
Egyptian Army and the ftop-
ulated areas of Israel. The fact
that Israel has spent over $150
million to fortify the passes at-
tests to their strategic signifi-
cance
WHILE I 'was in Israel I had
the opportunity to visit the
Golan Heights. By jnst standing
there on those heights- and look-
in? down into the valley, it be-
came painfully clear in just one
moment why it would be ab-
solutely suicidal for Israel to
give up those heights and to
take even the slightest risk of
having Svria swoop down on the
people who live in the kibbut-
zim.
There is no doubt in my mind
that a stable peace can never
*)c achieved until Israel has
reached a political conciliation
with her neighbors.
There has been a great deal
of talk lately about the oil fields
at Abu Rodeis which Israel has
agreed lo surrender even
though they supply her with
100,000 barrels of oil per day-
60 per cent of her domestic
need.
r commend Israel for the will-
ingness to give up so much of
the territory occupied in the
1967 war for the sake of perma-
nent peace yvhile Egypt was un-
Bonni,'formerly of Regis Beauty Salon
and her Staff
wish the Jewish-people a Vry Happy Chanuka
BONNFS COIFFURES
3025 NORTH OCEAN BLVD.
Phone 566-6534
I j
&l ^fs'ftra At This
'- Holiday SM.-M
I
Arrow Electric of
The Palm Beaches
501 PALM STREET
Vfc"ST 1*L*A %EACH $3402
,,-.-: .-. -......' '
willing to make' even* a public
pledge of "non-belligerency in
return for these concessions.
IN /Aqr, the Arab, states
don't appear ready to make any
compromise. I see no change in
their rhetoric, the terrorist at-
tacks have continued (while I
was in .Jerusalem a bus was
bombed) and they waged anoth-
war. Thus from these facts, it
cr highly successful propaganda
is easy to see that the impasse
was not caused totally by Israeli
unwillingness to compromise or
by faihnc of American policy.
The mere fact that there is to
be a reassessment of U.S. policy
in no wav heralds-a crisis in
American-Israeli relations. 1
think it is understood that we
will not be dictated to in the
formation of our oolicy und that
we wiH hot be blackmailed
- <-cononiicalI\ or otherwise.
Support for Isvael remains
strong with the American jvo-
ple and in the Congress even
though there is an isolationist
movement afoot. Inasmuch as
the American commitment to
the sovereignty of Israel re-
mains a cornerstone of Amer-
ican policy In the eastern Medi-
terranean, the task before us is
this:
WE MUST make it evident
once Again in Cairo, in Damas-
cus, in Baghdad, as well as in
Moscow, that we stand behind
the legitimacy of the Jewish
nation. Any uncertainty about
the American attitude toward
Israel may caq.se Arab govern-
ments to imagine a weakening
of American support and thus
make it highly unlikely that the
Arabs will offer genuine steps
of conciliation. As I have stated
before, I fully believe that there
will be no settlement until there
is compromise on both sides.
As a member of the House
Committee on International Re-
lations, I shall do all that I can
to see that the maintenance of
Israel's strength will be an ab-
solute and unconditional im-
perative, and that Congress will
reemphasize the fact that Is-
rael's final boundaries must be
determined by negotiation, and
not by military action, economic
blackmail or anv other medns.
WILLIAM KELSH INC.
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS .
RESIDENTIAL .' CONDOMINIUM .
COMMERCIAL
7*T6 SvE. FIRST STREET
TELEPHONE 732-6706
BOYNTON BEACH 33435
AAMCO
TRANSMISSIONS
517 NE. 5th AVENUE
BOYNTON BEACH 33435
' Telephone 737-5350

^df^t^c^l^infC^mukah
Bri^ffactand'joy tltet last,
Nofvfify ikmgbihisilissed time.
'B/tWtfttr* it-hitspoised,
And may *tikx*ftdi(?s~constant flame
Sert*%$*a'}ymbol, too,
Of all tke"happtness that's wished
"For those yon love and you.
Mr. William L. Ilealy Jr. and Staff
Extend Best Wishes to aU Jewish
Families in Broivard and State
for a Very Happy Chanuiai
SOIJTHPORT
AMERICAN
NATIONAL SANK
1491 SOUTHEAST 17rti STREET
FT. tAUOCROAlE 13315


Page 10-C
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 28, 1975
U.S. Leaders Slam Anti-Zionist Resolution
NEW YORK (JTA) Amer-
ican Jewish leaders all over the
nation are denouncing the anti-
Zionist resolution adopted by
the UN General Assembly,
branding it an act of cynicism
and anti-Semitism, a distortion
of fact and falsification of his-
tory that has dealt a mortal
blow at the principles which
the UN is supposed to represent
rather than to Israel, Zionism
and the Jewish people against
which it was directed.
They also praised the U.S.
delegation to the UN, the Ford
Administration and Congress for
their unequivocal opposition to
the resolution. -*-
MRS. CHARLOTTE Jacobson,
chairman of the American Sec-
tion of the World Zionist Or-
ganization, said that the two
pro-PLO resolutions and the
anti-Zionist resolution were a
form of racism that represented
"a black day in the history of
the United Nations."
Addressing an emergency
meeting of the WZO-American
Section Executive here, she ac-
cused the Assembly of "flying
in the face of both logic and
history" in what was its "day
Best Wishes to the Jewish
Community on Chanuka
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Best Wishes To All At This
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HOLLYWOOD
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of infamy."
B'nai B.'rith-> President. Payid.
M. Blumberg called on govern-
ments "which respect truth and
decency" to suspend financial
support of the UN "until the
General Assembly "breaks the
stranglehold of the Arab bloc
and undoes the shameful ac-
tion" of equating Zionism with
racism.
Blumberg said the vote will
"undermine the JN just as sure-
ly as the failure to condemn
Fascist aggression in the 1930s
led to the collapse of the League
of Nations."
ELMER L. WINTER, presi-
dent of the American Jewish
Committee, termed the anti-
Zionist resolution "the most
shameful of all anti-Israel reso-
lutions adopted by the UN
bodies and committees to date."
Frank R. Lautenberg, United
Jewish Appeal general chair-
man, said the resolution "is a
moral outrage against humanity-.
Anti-Zionists are anti-Semites
bigots in mind and heart. Today,
we are all Zionists. Today, who
threatens Israel, threatens not
only every Jew, but all who cir,
for the future of decency, inte-
grity and democracy."
Raymond Enstein, pmsidpnt
of the Council of Jewish Fed-
erations and Welfare Funds,
said that "An unholy alliance
of totalitarian and barbaric dic-
tatorships has attempted tc
equate the existence of a dem-
ocratic Jewish homeland found-
ed in social justice, with the
very evils which it was created
to help eradicate. This action
will redound only to the shame
of those who have perpetrated
it."
RABBI ARTHUR Hertzberg.
president of the American Jew-
ish Congress, charged that "the
United Nations has become a
willing tool in the Arab cam-
paign against the territorial
integrity and legitimacy of the
State of Israel."
Seymour Graubard, national
chairman of the B'nai B'rith
Anti-Defamation League, de-
clared that the UN "is now the
crucible for anti-Jewish hatred
and no longer deserves the sup-
port of the American people and
the American purse."
THE AGUDATH Israel of
America, at its 53rd national
convention in Atlantic City,
N.J., adopted a resolution con-
demning the UN action which it
said, is "an attempt to deny the
divinely-accorded rights of the
Jewish people to the Holv Land,
and as such an abominable act
against the entire Jewish peo-
ple."
Rabbi Mordecai Waxman,
president of the Rabbinical As-
sembly, said the Assembly vote
is "almost a reversion to Hit-
lerian Nazism," and that the
resolution itself "is an indict-
ment of the moral state of the
world today."
MRS. SARAH Shane, Dresi-
dent of the American Mizrachi
Women, said that by adopting
this measure, the UN commit-
ted an "obscene and anti-
Semitic attack against the Jew-
ish people and men of good will
everywhere." Harold Ostroff.
president of the Workmen's Cir-
cle, called the anti-Zionist reso-
lution "a victory for the fifth
column infiltrators of the UN."
In Montreal, the Canada Is-
rael Committee said that the
"despicable event at the United
Nations on Black Monday, Nov.
10, may well be the beginning
of the end for the noble dream
of a United Nations founded as
an alliance against Nazism 30
years ago.
"The UN today has become
a forum for anti-Semitism. The
Canada Israel Committee is
proud of the Canadian govern-
ment's opposition to this viru-
lent attack on the Jewish people
and religion."
BUT THE committee viewed
reassessment of its relationship
to and participation in the
United Nations."
In New York, the Student
with dismay Canada's abstention Mobilization for Israel an-
,on the JJN resolutiQn.calh'ng for .rmmccd it was sponsoring ral-
SSJ^JtifSfS? S* ** -2-
"We will call upon the Canadian the country to protest the reso-
government to begin a serious lution.
*
Best Wishes To All
At The Chanuka Holidays
ZIP PRINT INC.
3030 SOUTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
WEST PALM BEACH 33405
TELEPHONE 832-1787
iliijjlii
feast of '66e Ca/x//es
May the Lights
You kindle during the
Chanukah Festival
Shed the light of
Freedom and Liberty
Throughout the world
A Joyous Chanukah
toail ourfriends"
CONSOLIDATED
CHEMICALS
INC.

P.O. BOX 699
PAHOKEE 33476
I..



*l" wr"mp-;A
< i I m
'II SCI M
aiien
i's Latest Book
Leaves Us Breathless
l\ KOSINSKI. Cockpit. Boston: Houghton
jitllin. 1975. $8.95.
"ockpit" brings ua to the outer reaches of
experience. Kosinski. author of "The
ec! Bird" anil "Steps" (1969 National Book
\-.\ winner), presents us with a frightening-
mate view of a depersonalized Individual,
en who f" "Is no remorse at imposing
ai life situations upon unwary prey.
nn imaginative and daring scheme, he
M from his birthplace, a totalitarian East-
European nation. He flees to the West, and
Inu's an intelligence agent.
fARDEN SOON tires of this vocation. His
edy. is shrewdly to erase his presence from
frnment files. Throughout the rest of the
[l he moves about sans his real identity.
tarden cannot survive with one identity as
ke rest of us. The control over others that
irives on necessitates chunking his modus
jndi according to the type of person he
is to control.
|E DOES so with eae. Nothing is predict-
He prrpot>.-!r< s uiillppsj undrn- liis unex-
bd demands of perverse and indulgent
|tv.
jrden's obsession with control locks him
into a world of his own making. Ho constantly
fine tunes his faculttes, from flawless photo-
graphic memory to unbelievable physical con
coitions.
He maintains several apartments, each fitted
with numerous locks and expensive surveillance
equipment. He becomes a victim of his own
barbarity. A human beiug so completely out
of touch wilh normal human emotion that he
survives only from one atrocity to the next.
THE MOST shocking aspect of the book
is that we are one with Tarden. the narrator.
Kosinski glues us to his side, brings us inside
his mind and asks us to react as he does
Lacking Tarden's detachment, we emote at what
he cannot.
"Cockpit" may be Kosinski's ovcrreaction to
those controls exerted upon him throughout
his own life with its anguished Jewish be-
ginnings. Like the child in "The Painted Bird"
and the young man in "Steps." he suffered
enough physical tortures, political pressures
and military strictures to destroy most men.
Brutality, sex and violence have become
Kosinski's trademarks. He leaves us breathless
and speechless as he races from climax to
climax assaulting, rapine and killing.
Inclinable Statistics Detail
rhite Collar (rime Increase

'HE past few months, President Ford has
ken two hard swings at America's hor-
lous crime problem. In April, speaking at
he came down heavy for mandatory mis
ntences for those guiltv of various violent
pnd tool? a strom.' stand against pl~a
lining. In June, he urged Congress to act
lathelv on his docket of proposed court
s with special stress on the need to com-
te victims.
cupying that powerful pulpit in the White
. Mr. Ford is quite right to pound it as
pression of his own and his countrymen's
sh over the perennial crime wave that
go away. He is mt the first modern
lent to take aim at this monster and likely
ie l-.s'.
^.CK IN 19^7, President Johnson warned
crime had grown into a public malady
he called on Congress to pass his "Safe
ts" bill. The nation at thai tfol was hav-
s'.d harvest, reaping the growth sown by
nands for human equality and by
|v il ferment proliferating from despah
Vic'ii -"M.
kn iv.'si.lent Nixon moved ahead tow rds
1 Id mcj, h b >os1 d to top pri h
to wipe out crime in the streets. Attor-
Ben ii John Mitchell imed up with
Rowing to earn out thai promise. Lei us
the" curtain of charity over that now.
NOW PRESIDENT Ford, free of domestic
disaffection over Vietnam and not held respon-
sible for crimes committed in the name of
Watergate, is trying vigorously to advance his
proposals for stem measures. But his projected
remedies are not well received by many who
have wrestled for years with the legislative,
judicial, and social aspects of the disease.
Mr. Ford's critics maintain that mandatorv
sentences block correction programming with-
out accompanying gains for a society in need
of protection. Moreover, the President was tak-
ing aim at federal crimes whereas intrastate
criminality appears to be the heart of the
problem.
One wonders, also, whether recent Presi-
dents grasp the magnitude and seriousness of
outrages branded as "while-collar crime" by
Ralph Nader.
IN A STUDY of cases Invoking some 150
corporati ins. liw corporal ewec itives, 4n
rice1 brokers. 168 government employes, and
a host of political figures and lawyers, Nader
has tcld the Senate Subcommittee on Criminal
1 iv : nd Procedures that the m w.lia hiah-
li-'-t bank robberies as major events, vet tbfi
whit--collar criminal inside the bank, through
i ,\t pnd embeariement, tool siv times mo:x
in fiscal l"7-' than did the holdup nun.'
li;^ run over ?50 billion a vear,
s6V,
\~jallob
Orthodox Eve

Television
Coverage
rfWONEW YORK Orthodox Jews, agreeing that Orthodox Jew
ry. ;is a community, is generally ignored by radio and tele
vision, have expressed toiallv opposing vi-w- .about the proposi
tion that steps should be taken to correct the situation.
The debaters u'r Dr. Bernard Fcvshman. chairman of th.
com^'srimi on legislation and ci- ir- a<-tion of keudath ls**el
n Martin Wavman. a gradint- of M< siftn Torah Vodaath. idpn-
tiflcd as a freelance lournal'*t mid "'vorHslna corivwriter. The
presented their view* in "The Jewish Observer," the publics
tion of Asudath Israel.
DR FRYSHMAN cited the remilN of a survev nf Jewis
interest Programming on radio and TV stations in the New Yorl
Metropolitan area made bv the commission. He reported tba-
in a week of more than 12S ho>"-s of broadcasts and flecasts
"programs of interest to the Jewih communltv tvnlcMlv avei -
age n" more than 15 mjnutss a week per station (with a few
significant evecptions)."
He concluded that "to mapv radio and television station
in the area, the Orthodox Jewish community is virtually un-
known."
ONF RESULT, he asserted, lias been that "sclt'-anpointed
snekesmen. without any constituency or following, have often
brrn able t0 totally misrepresent the attitudes of tH- Orthodo-.
,Iewih communiy on issues of romnelllns. public interest."
In an apparent reference to Orthodox Jews accused of abus.
of pati-nts and theft of public funds ip nursing hjw- operations
Dr.-Fryshmpn declared that "stories reprdfeg 'malefactors nvtu
happen to be Orthodox have given the winvmiv an extreme!
bad image as a result of the absence of any positive exposure
of the Orthodox community.
HE ALSO contended that StVles and modes of behavior of
young people, as nortraved on television, "never mirror thd
sedate behavior of Orthodox Jewish younv" and that there WM
"ample evidence that this has a negative impact on some of
our young people."
Mo-said that radio and TV.offtoiolg, in iummno to c^ on the problem, have said there w-s no sine' rmwentative (,/
the +rtb<*hnter--groups n.
Orthodox Jews would demand "eo";'l time" fo- fi^ir viewpoints
and that, tn tba.degree that the Ortho'ioy Jewish annrowch wa-
religi'iis. as well as cultural, other religious groups also would
demand eoupl time.
DR. FRYSMMAN contended that grouns vieh as .Vmd.it'
Israel could use their "good offic-s to establish an umbrelh
(fOun that would ensure that the nict'ii* of th? Orthodox Jew-
ish community" for media projection "is both realistic and urn
versallv acceptable."
Commenting that "the homo"vna| has become acceptably
at a subject of tcl"visjon programs." he asked "is it not time
that the religious also becomes acceptable?" He said one star
that could be taken would b" under the Federal Communications
Commission pubhes"''ice rule for ren-vvi' of licenses of ,-adi
anJ TV stations, adding that virtually the onlv public grmfr
which has not assarted its rights under tht rule has been tlu
O-thodox Jewish community.
D-.-Fryshnttm stressed that he did not menn to encouraCc
the- -, lowing of T\" among Orthodox Jews, declaring he wi>
"v.lII a'v.ne". of the danp "
HE SAID the purpose of hi- statement was "to stimulai
di i --mi and action" to indue the media to .' cogoi ana
of iiu str<"grh, numbers nn-l ''t-iii" of the Toh < irld ,:|i
in ;'..- beli.-f that "th wild, animal-like beha' lor" n :ted '
the rad n an.! 1 V i>- !ia should ba "moderated by cv ilizir
.....al."
FriUcv,
vember 28, 1975 *Jf**Ulffrr#ffrr Page 11-C
Itcr MaUhau: Humble Beginnings, to Heart Attack, to Stardom
Hollyw >o I
1-iFK MA0THAU portrays the tragicomic role
il Morris RuttTmaker, former league-nitebsr
j i.,..... has*V>ush d rtmvn to s'ich m ":''' ch'orps
jpl m-iiTUenine in th*; motion picture "The Had
Hc-p-s." new com^lefd at Paramount studios.
'f p bv 26-vear-old RiH Lancnster. son of th-
;n e'-'T "us a Rroim of bumhlins ''"isfit
rh .-i^.^ molded b" f'-i'- drunken "coach" Mor-
l* ,., \>- lurflikclv Intshot pipers as pint-sized Tatum
1.
M)DUCER STANLEY R. Jaffe, who in 196^
k1 with Larry Peerce tn make 'he controversial
re, "Goodbyo. Columbus." at the age of 30. fo-
rt while was president of Paramount, now again
independent, selected the script bv Lancaster.
Jae the theme about winning or losing intrigued
one way or another,
tof- Michael Ritchie comments. "You don't have
fa baseball fan to respond to 'The Bad News
v
Mcrbcri
fi

Hears.' In fact, you don't hive to know .anything
about the game. It is tlie story about loners over-
coming their handicaps."
MATTHAU, in spite of his athletic bearing suf-
fering a severe coronarv a few years ago. all his life
had to overcome being a loser. Rom in N?w York
some St yarns ago. the son of poor Jewish immi-
grants he grew up under dire circumstances, with
his mother the sole supporter of the family after the
father had deserted them.
Unable to pay the rent, mother Rose moved with
. chn from tenemenl to tenement to keep alive
. another Jay.
Walter started t earn a living when h
. s< lline soft drin1 a during intermission al
t i becoming a n liter or even actor, he was jj
snail part in a hrce entitled. "The Dish
washer." ntting him 50 cents a performance.
AT SEWARD Park High School, he performed in
I s and simultaneously scored in basketball, soc
C?r, track and swimming. After graduating, he sti
gled to make a meager living until Uncle San hiro
Mm as an army air force man in World War II.
Serving as radio-gunner in bombers over Europe
netted him six b-utle stars and the rank <>t staff
rgeant. Discharged from the service late in 1945.
Matthau enrolled at Erwin Piscator New School in
New York, with Rod Steiger. Tony Curtis, Harrj
tiuardino end Gene Pcks among his fellow Btudents
in the dramatic worl mop.


Page 12-C
The Jewish Flcridian of Greater Fort Lauderdali
Friday, November 28, 197^
Butz in 2-Day Israel Visit
To Make Big Grain Deal
Calling the resolution "tragic, sus racism, but an attempt
insane and ridiculous beyond the Arab bloc to totally *
belief," Dr. Hyatt viewed the is- nounce and negate altogethe
sue as "not really Zionism ver- Israel's existence."
TEL AVIV Secretary of
Agriculture Earl Butz arrived
in Israel Monday for a two-day
visit that ended with the signing
of an American-Israeli agree-
ment by which the U.S. will
supply Israel with grain and
soya beans during the next few
years.
Butz, who was greeted at the
airport by Agriculture Minister
Aharon Uzzan and Minister of
Commerce and Industry Haim
Barlev. said U.S. production was
sufficient to assure grain sup-
plies mostly wheat and soya
beans to Israel for several
years.
According to reliable sources,
Israel will receive 250,000 tons
of U.S. wheat in 1976 and a
similar quantity annually there-
Best Wishes to the Jewish
Community on Chanuka
CALYCO MARINE
200 NORTH OLD DIXIE HIGHWAY
JUPITER 33458
after. Barlev said he was great-
ly encouraged by the assurance
of these basic lood supplies
from the U.S.
Butz, the guest of his Israeli
counterpart at the latter's home
in Moshav Gilat, visited Israeli
agricultural centers and pack-
ing houses during his brief stay
in the country.
NCCJ Epresses Shock
NEW YORK Epressing his
shock and dismay, Dr. David
Hyatt, president of the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews, has denounced the UN
General Assembly Resolution
equating Zionism with racism
as "a blatant, obscene and nau-
seating outburst of Nazism,
fascism and medieval religious
bigotry that is shocking almost
beyond belief in the 20th cen-
tury."
A VERY JOYOUS CHANUKA TO OUR
JEWISH CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS
Now Open for the Season
FRANCES BREWSTER
3500 N. OCEAN BLVD.
566-7401
*
Chanukah Greetings To All
Bird Painters
& Decorators
Residential... Condominiums ... Commercial
851 N.E. 30th STREET
OAKLAND PARK 33334
Telephone 566-2077

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