The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00044

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
wJewisti Flondli'^ti
OF GREATER FORT LAM'RERRALE
Yr'ume 4 Number 23
Friday, November 14, 1975
'nrp 25 c?nt3
EXPERIENCED CAMPAIGN LEADER PREDICTS LAUDERDAIE "WILL MEET THE NEEDS'
Federation Sets UJA Goal At $19
Leo Goodman Accepts Chairmanship
The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
. .dale has set the 1976 goal at $1.9 mil-
lion, according to Leo Goodman, chairman of
the campaign.
Goodman explains the increase in this
ir's t" pectation over last year's realization
"1 $1.4 million as due to Israel's serious eco-
nomic problems causing the Israeli pound
devaluation as well as increas.-d local ser\-
ices and programs.
Allan E. Baer, president of the Federation,
ted the 1976 challenge: "We must work as
n sver before, for the crisis and needs of Israel
and here at home loom larger than ever''
Goodman, who recently returned from
Israel with a first-hand view of the critical
I n, said "For a free people to remain
!.e must constantly reexamine the past
icdjic the future. The problem in 1976 is
: : BEING. The dilemma the challenge
lor the Jewish people is HOW to be.
"Two years have passed since the sanc-
tity oi Vom Kippur was shattered lest we
: t that our freedom was achieved by
oic sacrifice and our rights were founded
i a duties," he continued.
"For 1976 the motto "We Are One" de-
gg for all time that we stand as a
; sople united, indivisible."
the local Federation leader, however,
Goodman also stresses the importance of con-
ing to build a strong Jewish community
n the Port I.auderdale area: "We must note
significance of the Jewish spirit as exem-
plified by our local Federations many pro-
a us such as the Family Services, and
HOLTZMAN SPEAKS OUT
the Chaplaincy Program for those confined in
1 ] itals, nursing homes and institutions. Ad-
ditionally, we at the Fort Lauderdale Federa-
tion sponsor the Hebrew Day School and other
programs in Jewish education, community re-
ns as well as Jewish community center
programs for the young and old."
G dman brings much experience to his
i idership of the Fort Lauderdale Federation
ca npaign, having been Chairman of the UJA
in Teaneck, N.J., his home town.
He is a lifetime board member of the Tea-
neck Jewish Community Center, which hon-
ored him as "Man of the Year." A noted phi-
lanthropist, Goodman was chairman for
Brandeis University in Bergen County, and
was named "Man of the Year" by this or-
ganization as well.
Goodman, known for his work in civic as
well as religious organizations, is a past board
member of the Englewood (N.J.) Hospital. He
served on the Teaneck Board of Adjustments
(Zoning Board of Appeals) for seven years and
as a board member of the New Jersey Builders
ciation.
Noting that the '76 campaign is already
under way. Goodman feels confident that his
ft How citizens in Fort Lauderdale will meet
the needs. Citina the campaign's unusually
strong o-ganizattoha>"*'st. uctirre and base,
Goodman prophesies: "We will meet our goal
of $1.9 million. The people of Fort Lauderdale
are cognizant of the Jewish peoples' needs,
both here and abroad. And they will answer.
Red Carpet Rapped
NEW YORK (JTA) Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman
. N.Y.) has criticized the "red carpet" treatment
g given to Egyptian President Anwar Sadat dur-
ing his visit to the United States.
In a statement to the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
just before she was to address the 2,000 delegates at-
ending the national convention of the Women's Amer-
can ORT at the New York Hilton, Holtzman said:
"I THINK that President Ford can meet with him
Sadat), but to roll out the red carpet for a man whose
ntry voted for an anti-Zionist resolution at the UN,
., man who denies (by his vote) the legitimacy of Israel,
-.his is going to create a problem."
Continued on Page 11 _____
LONG-DELAYED
Ford Asks
1.5 Billion
For Israel
WASHINGTON (JTA)
President Ford has asked Con-
gress to appropriate for Israel
$740 million in "security sup-
porting assistance" and $1.5
billion in military credits for the
V.-S. fiscal year ending next
Continued on Page 5
Dr. K. to Continue Battle
Against Anti-Zionist Move
WASHINGTON (JTA) Secretary of State Henf/
A. Kissinger declared here that the United States "will work
to defeat" passage by the United Nations General Assembly
of the resolution adopted by its Third Committee.
He said the resolution "undermines the United Nations'
necessary and valuable campaign against racial discrimina-
tion and it threatens the United Nations' capacity as medi-
ator in the Middle East."
KISSINGER made that state-
ment in the course of a toast
during the United Nations Day
dinner at the Statler Hilton Ho-
tel. Declaring that if the UN is
to fulfill its promise, the Secre-
tary said its member states must
conduct themselves in a spirit
of mutual respect.
"We have seen a disturbing
contrary trendideological in-
tolerance, procedural abuses,
bloc majorities, one-sided vot-
Continued on Page 10-
Sunrise Lakes VJA Breakfmt
Honors Mrs. Schlegman s Work
Irving Glatzer, chairman
of the VJA-1EF breakfast,
with Mrs. Beatrice Schleg-
man, honored guest.
The first annual Sunrise
Lakes Phase II United Jewish
Appeal breakfast, held on Nov.
9 in the Phase II recreation
room, was a huge success, ac-
cording to Irving Glatzer. chair-
man. Dr. Meron Levitats was
the guest speaker, and Mrs.
Beatrice Schlegman was pre-
sented with a United Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
plaque for outstanding Jewish
communal service.
Seated (left to right): Louis Koch, Ber-
nice Davis, Lou Walfman, Irving Glatzer,
Beatrice Schlegman, Ben Kravitz, Char-
lotte Weisbrod; standing (left to right):
Rocco Natteo, Izzy Haber, Ben Goldstein,
Abe Yurman, Paul Thaler, Dave Rosof.


Pa?e 2
The frmsh Floridian of Greater-Fart ixtoderdcde
Friday. Novenrr*.- .4
Communitv Relations Committee Plans Program
At a recent hm t::e
t-e- of the J
i
:
rir.t (


<{ the Federation
Cfcfre Mfteftei wt? df*ec-
M Council.
:
; r. : .--',- J the ]/y.
latiott
-
r -- bee .-."
Jfcm

CRC to >*;r..- a- a cLaring
h.Mi^e ior all Jewish commu-
n.-y rotation* actr Um
In relation to the goals of
dealing With speiJfic issues
.- flic Co. >
monity on rSBires of concern.
iii.iv. nq .vc-mim mlution;
for committee acti pre-
sented:
l. Kepre< ntati'TS from t--;ch
Jewfa lion ir. |>ortn
BrmrarJ should he obtained
("PC
Federation Engages New Jewish
Community Center Services Director
Khun Gotdstehi became di-
rect r 'i Jewish Community
' i rod N'"' 2. He
nll.I. GOLDSTEIN

pro-
In
.; Ulan E.
the Jewish
iti n rreater
dale.
i v i ish I
Center s are
:_ j in ou area, and we oHn
..-( Ion a:'' it's Dpoun fie
.rid inr r its of ou; I wal
Jewish CMMDUttfey."
'! >\'i'j :;~< IV'II fOCt'8 On
jreattiynunajaten and teeMK-
| wi'l comnliment and
i datsnt Jowish
i il acti iti >.
. ;:i of I
" ......':.!
I d
,.. OrafT pro-
's enriehrnjt th cmaHl
h an 'fleral cnmtn
-n in
.,<>- i i ion classes
itent! il. find avenu of
< If. ion. and 1 -am abou
nil i valu s. h'fwv
M a< -;- i'i 4
|| I.., ^ .' ,. ,;.- lnr.T.-ri!
, f < ...'. ,' i in ;i- I '
" ri <>.....ivfniti ;s for ,Tnw-
j'S idMtifleathxi. wnwrnm
I eontintri
a -,/!,! worhe-1 who aawd
.
J K.
Jewish
(ivili/alion
h"~ ;tl! ili#r* n lhc
&\t!<-*-|i)f*a**<{tLt
litilai(M.
For fret* color
Itrnrhure.
Mil (3(>.">) r>.'i J2">1
or wrh>: B. J ShMp SOS.
4?o I !n-r.ln Rd.. MB "IW
PAYMENT ACCEPTED
IN ISRAEL BONDS
Yes"i' a Unr-ersitv. Cr!.' :
eo-r. i to *"-); t Liud rda! from
Stamford. Conn *1r?re he '.ras
executr c (M let to
fdrd JewJsn Cewiwnmftt Gfenl r.
He hns held nostS ns w^ll in
BBKtewebd, N.J.. and At
NY
1!-j Cent t is eoi'iVfltl* em-
Bir+i"; HBUU i '.'.ide-rana^d
few of ha rrimiinshins ani
aernttrms so thai it mnv
sf (h eawamflitv. i',c
sujfe'-t i waleawe
sho or by e -t>-. ; r. ,i-'
Flaridians Parlicipote In
Mount Scopus Dedication
(i : 2 linent Florida
-.-sidents traveled to Je.^.isaleni
en Oct. !9 to oartieioate in the

nioni'.-s oi Hadaasah's hoaoit il
on Mount Scooua. Among those
attending the event c -re Jos
nhin.- Newman, on tidenl i Ft
Lauderdale Chanter, CeBa
I reed, member of Tamar Grouo
and Edythe Ztlckei -. n. presi-
dent of Srrit>m GeeafD.
C,o\ Rubi'! Askew nresented
Heti '' 'sb ,p on '
of the Florida P.-.&jon of Hadas-
sah. with tho Qafl of the State
of Florida, to be carried tc Jeru
salem in his n
Constance Cohen, Janice Salit
ISametl Campaign Associates

'
camp
. |
- Pbl I I-':
:'{ :'.
. i
to our DTOi
a! J.
CoBseance J. Cohen, a n
of W M?is-... is a erad-
>.f the Bine-''" School in
th :t citv. She
with Honors
in Knglish rod historv frol l.'o
i:-i. i.',') r -n Pained III
i> io bk h Ma-*
credlti itw-i'x! a Ph ;i in 1
|i h from New Yoil Univ jrsity
She has studied and lived in
Fotm nMcen pnd Haifa, and
sneal s French an I Hi br. w.
She brings to the Fort Lid-
erdale Federation a strong
vend in J<."'. ish wo '' as
;-.* in public i lations. ha.....
;/ n.- oubli: r htions nr ifes-
jionallv i >" Nation il UJA in
lav leader she
retive i
it local Federations, in
B'rith
Sj-.
gre to ach emotionally dis-
n at ths Junior
I oil b >nn an
.: State College ol
NY
O' er two vears .=go she join '
the st id at Miami Federation
as a pn)f"-siorial fund-raiser.
In the short time Janice has
b sen the F 'deration she-
has arranged a successful fund-
raieina baeakfast at Sunrise
Fares Phase n
On cund Nov. 23, at 10 a.m.
Hawaiian Gardens Phase V will
host rn entertain nent break-
fast featu ine the Habimah PI
ers; on 6undav, Dec. ". 9ti n
bridge Gardens will lwc the
Honorabl Ben Essen as a guest
' er for t1' .i'- United J
Anneal fund-rahrinfi bn?akfast.
Rossmow
Vf GOCOWT CRKKK
">
iKlilll coiiiloiniiiiini)
<*oiuiiiniiii\.
In mi i SIK.800...
IM^Illllll \VIW
uovvcveixUuu \vi\sv.
Take Turnpike exit 24
West on Rte 814. Phone (305) 971-3510.
Frcm Miami TOLL FREE (305) 947-9906.
and conveyor of i -portant in-
formation from it to thci. re-
spect] acgatuzaiMns. The rep-
;:;.: es will kept Up to
o?tt on m?- of cm>.tm to
the heal and Brttion I Jewish
com'.mnnirt. an
the concerns nf '
tions to the CRC.
2. A progi a......'' -
of concen in
in bj pres
intanf*at:on ieeHngs a*^d
fund
Beth Israel Plan.s
Chanuknh Festival
Jewish e'er er B
Deeri holl itc
i. han i'
No\". ''' at 7:30 it I .-
|i ;- _
Foil'
nJ re-
irf
...

. "' B c'
i; in cha
ths I o id
com iti"1
The progr
""
an '
ist.
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
C7
3. A Com:
1 ? -.. -
mcem, a

ati-rrn mn in

' ly.
.. -
i
-- .
A i
Ke
-
u
>
I
" to
I
C&Tmun'ty lecde- Nt-H
Detlicaticr C!ai ncn
p LiB

of the Jei > Ft
of a -
.... .

I
be
-
i '- ........
' al ,

NOTICE
Jev .'.: Na .
dii ner
n
I een
.
"
776-6272 '
OWARD
Iaper a
AC ; AGING
1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT LAUOEROALE
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood and Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
ilhnehh ineos
5801 Holiwood Bouk'vard. HoH\AVOod.
920-1010
" eFon I on irea
1171 Noniiv.ejt hist Ave.(Sunset Strip) ,Sui
5846060
RIVERSIDE
matOtmipiJ
Othei K .vn-ii.il' Lii.i|x':s in South Florida dneJoc/iin'
"^":": M MtonMBeachantfMtomi
ii niiii nb '
Ft. L11-14-75
Ft. L11-14-73
Ft. L11.14-75


November 14, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laudcrdale
Page 1
Dr. Lclirman To Speak At Dedication

i
In -mi will be
ai


'
"
nv.-Kl In Miami
Bi ach.
Ami pro-
Did

[ion of United !
icbnl
Gr ;:( r Fort 1
ish F dcral i n
TN iral uo of
,i, ,n School,
Adult Education
Course; un '

it the (
i
i
:
T.
nd i ;'en-
zer
pre-
! D i
ledicl aver
I Keynoter ot Dirtier
Mu
:;.: i i
; mi .i."
IS, at the Si' iraton Hotel.
it' / 1 ,i. (< I t '. it i JOl
Council of Jewish Federations a Ifare Funds, em-
sizes several points during a session at th
Young Leadership retreat. He ervt I as schol
i this un\
Plantation Young Leadersliip
Holds Retreat On v
I





ILYN MOdSNICK

;i itel V
.i to
I '

i true-
iil of the
". Unh
in
ivers i
i

aJe ( tiring

from 6
B reeep-
1 :i cash bar.
i! .... the
I
lin Meosnicl.
Mrs. Ralph ( '

i Schw rl:, fi
ts during the
I

a id Ai
of the
We do
business the
right way.
1700 WH1 Oakland Pin Bld..
Ft l audaiitala. Fla 33311
Phont: 735 1330
OAKLAND TOYOTA
Coral Springs
Breakfast Plans
chair-
Melvin
uder-
ii Coral

Romam Ff's '- I
on Nov. 16 at 9:30
Attorney A!- in Cann i
rton will he the mi
Romanoff says the '
me* tin" ws "ca
numose
ideas nml tho
ihould be the best am :h for
I......! to de il with the man1
munitv proble
aware of."
Gerber and Ron
new area to the Fi
is an excellent ti t n the

as part i
of G Fo 1 T I
I lans
for making l
pi ..i | un" '
, ild ""'
'Ct of

w' in Ite all
Spnnes I
.
Id -
l
i Cool
R
11 on
tin
ings :

}\ i! I I in !
I
to Hoi
osuect
l".'
Tuition Changes

:.:
lal
11
II
.
those
ing.
' ool.
i

insi I
Rep. Williamson To Address
Blue Star Lodge ?-o. 29*2
i. vie
dent, has arm -
sen M
, Blu
. | ; r,n sund
tiCen
ter.
lent 1 Zui!
intro
VV'llia
talk i
ist b.
Chel '
LAS VEGAS MIGHT
PLANTATION JEWISH C0H6JSG/
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 72. ? P.M.
JEWISH FEDERATE 2999 N.W. 33rd AVE.
HiDAlE LAKES. FLA.
Donation $5 Per Ppr Coffee Cake
FOR TICKETS CALL
W STARR 702-6366 M- ARDMAN 791-0311
2! WOHRIE 792-3612 A. WALDER
1



v to si
lewis! our
. !;
OUR
28th
YEAR
MURPHY
PAINTS
BROWARD PAINT
and WALLPAPER CO.
212 North Andrews Av.
523-0577, Fort Lauderdala
Attm
CcmnT'fee
men
_________________. Attention:
ODYSSEY TOURS t*C.\ social
./

Directors
,v TOURS v ill CUSTOM DESIGN tours for your group at
.our o>r;. charity can benefit
finai
YSSEY si w!
6*3-4703
r

i
r
V
MMM.I


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 14, 1975
That Old Song
President Sadat said in a speech in Washington
that he comes by his anti-Zionism because, as a return-
ing home soldier, a Jewish store keeper refused to sell
him a radio. From this small anecdotal phenomenon, he
has concluded an ideological determination.
This is not hair-splitting; it is making a whole wig
out of one strand. At the same time, there is an insidious
danger in his little tale, and it smells of Hitler.
Hitler claimed the Jews were capitalists and con-
trolled the economy. To pacify capitalists, he claimed
the Jews were also Communists and would take away
their affluence. He wanted his cake and eat it at the
same time. And for him it worked.
Now, what Sadat is saying, after having also made
Egypt Judenrein, is that the Zionists (read Communists)
wish to expropriate the proper ownership of the land
from the Arabs. He has his capitalists, to whom he real-
ly does not object, as neither did Hitler, and he has
his Communists in the form of the Israelis, to whom
everybody except the Soviet bloc objects. Except that
the Soviet bloc has not welcomed Zionists.

Back on the Track
Less sophsticated people will see the Jew as evil,
because there is no distinction any more between a
Zionist and a Jew. They are one and the same, both
owner and taker-away. Sadat will come away smelling
of roses and the Jew (read Zionist) as the evil cari-
cature that Hitler's Streicher cartooned in his paper
Der Stuermer.
Lenin once said when the locomotive of history
takes a sharp turn many people fall off. History is tak-
ing a sharp turn now, and we, in whose interests the
truth must work, should see that the locomotive is right-
ed and put on the proper track.
It is not Israel, Zionism or Jews who must fall off.
It is Sadat who must start smelling more like what he is.
Mr. Schlesinger Deposed
Ousted Defense Secretary James Schlesinger will be
the first one to tell you he is not Jewish. And, by his
own choice, he is not. Mr. Schlesinger is a convert to
Lutheranism.
Still, Washington must see his deposition as a bat-
tle between the two Jewish monoliths including, of
course, Henry Kissinger.
In the ferment of political change these days, reli-
gious affiliation is an unhappy factor to take into ac-
count. That does not mean it is not there.
The "Jewish question" is, for example, certainly a
part, and a very real part, of President Ford's punitive
approach toward New York City's fiscal crisis.
So it is with Schlesinger. How it will be interpreted
by the pundits remains to be seen.
'Obscene Act' Answered
South Florida's Jewish community, under the lead-
ership of the American Zionist Federation, was among
the first in the United States to announce a mass protest
meeting denouncing the recent United Nations action
equating Zionism and racism.
All segments of our community should require little
urging to participate in the community-wide rally Tues-
day night at Temple Emanu-El of Miami Beach.
With the visit to Florida of Egyptian President An-
war Sadat an Arab public relations success, the size
and spirit of an organized Jewish and Zionist re-
sponse to the UN's "obscene act" equating Zionism with
racism must be of no less magnitude.
Arab War Against the West
Jewish Flondian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
OFFICE an<1 PI,AN'T 120 N.E. 6th St.. Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone 373-4n5
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1-373-4605
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O. Rox 01207s. Miami, Florida 33101
FRED K. PHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SEI,MA If. THOMPSON
, Editor and Publisher Exerutlve Editor Assistant to Publisher
The Jewish Floridian Doe* Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised in its Columns
Published Hi-Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Miami, Fla.
All P.O. 3571" returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Fla. 33101.
The Jewish Floridian hat absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Associa-
tion of Engliah Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year $5.00. Out of Town Upon
Requeat.
Number 23
10 KISLEV 5736
Volume 4
Friday, November 14, 1975
'T'HE SADAT visit was pure
bunk. It confirmed in our
minds what of course isn't
truethat we're finally getting
the handle on the Israel-Arab
impasse.
Finally, it seems to our es-
teemed politicians, we are tak-
ing what Sadat himself stomp-
ed for at his National Press
Club appearance an "even-
handed" view of the Middle
East.
IF SADAT is right, his Yom
Kippur attack fractured the
myth of Israeli invincibility. If
he is right, his visit here last
week fractured yet another
myth American dedication
to Israeli survival on Israeli
rather than Arab terms.
And so, what we have con-
firmed in our minds is that,
for the first time since 1948,
we're gravitating away from
the wrong side of the Israel-
Arab impasse, which is to say
the unprofitable side.
For the first time since that
emotion-laden era, we are
gravitating toward the right
side.
ISN'T IT, for example, down-
right politick that Henry Kis-
singer's lie to Israel was un-
masked precisely during the
Sadat visit?
All along, the Israelis had
been told that part of the spe-
cial benefit that would accrue
to their account for acceding
to the abomination called the
Kissinger Sinai accord was a
$1.5 billion U.S. military sales
credit to them, with no more
than some $500 million sched-
uled for Egypt.
Now, the ugly truth is out.
Only one-third of the $1.5 bil-
lion credit is, in fact, credit.
The rest is a loan which puts
the Kissinger "special benefit
to Israel" in exactly the same
"even-handed" $500 million
category reserved for Egypt.
NO WONDER Sadat never
complained more than formally
about it. Henry must have told
him we're no longer afraid of
two-timing the Zionists.
The trouble with all of this
myth-fracturing is that it con-
firms our passionate dedica-
tion to yet another myth
that the struggle in the Middle
East is between Israelis and
Arabs, Zionist and Arabs, Jews
and Arabs.
Now that we are liberating
ourselves from our arranged
marriage with the Israelis
(Jews, Zionists), things are
just going to be ducky over
there for us.
NOTHING COULD be fur-
ther from the truth because
the terms we have been using
to define the Middle East strug-
gle are as inherently untruth-
ful as any diplomatic conver-
sation Henry Kissinger is like-
ly to have on any ordinary day
with just about anybody, in-
cluding conversations with his
own secret Bismarckian soul.
The struggle is not between
Israel and the Arabs but be-
tween the Arabs and the West.
Any astute observer of the
current crisis in Lebanon will
understand thisexcept those
committed to still another
myth, who see it as a religious
war between Christian and
Moslem or as an adjunct to
what is loosely called "the Pal-
estine problem."
THE MODERN struggle be-
tween the Arabs and the West
began with the Israeli ascend-
ancy in the Middle East follow-
ing the War of Liberation. It is
being fought on the machine-
gun-splattered streets of Beirut
today.
Except for Lebanon, where
a rapprochement had been
reached between Moslem and
Christian, and which hence
made Lebanon a "western" na-
tion in Arab eyes, the Arab
contempt for the Christian is
as profound as his contempt
Mindlin
for the Jews. That is why Leb-
anon, in the spirit of the "new"
Arab Middle East, is doomed.
The best example of the Arab-
West facet of the struggle we
have been fooled into thinking
of in exclusively Israel-Arab
terms is the OPEC choice of
gathering place whenever the
oil-producers meet for another
one of their oil-hike hatchet
jobs on us.
YOU WOULD think that Ku-
wait City would be a suitable
choice. Or Muscat in the Sul-
tanate of Oman. Or Teheran.
Or Riyadh.
Or, even though they are not
significant oil-producers. Bei-
rut, the Switzerland of the
Middle East; Cairo, the seat of
Arabdom's most militarily pot.
ent Israeli opponent; Amman
whose monarch publicly relin-
quished all claim to a Palestin-
ian hegemony so that the Ara-
fat! and Habashes could mas-
querade on the world staye of
fauduhnt revolutionary libera-
tion movements.
The fact is that it is
of these places the A iba
choose.
Over and over again,
choose Vienna.
TLEY CHOOSE Vienna u
the very incarnation of wesl
cultural, intellectual, scientific
and political achievement.
Vienna b the city of M
and Beethoven and Brahms
Freud. Of Metternich and Tat-
Continued on Page 13
1 "i"1
> As...'
lax Lemer g
Sees It
..i*.*;....^
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
TACOMA, WashI caught a
glimpse of Justice William O.
Douglas on TV the other
day, in his wheelchair, on his
way to his Supreme Court du-
ties. He seemed very frail, but
gallant in his courage, as he
told the old Justice Holmes
story: Holmes and Brandeis on
a street corner in Washington,
the wind whipping a pretty
girl's skirt around her knees,
Brandeis going on in earnest
conversation, the 90-year-old
Holmes sighing, "Oh, to be 70
again "
I took it as Douglas' way of
pointing to the "Yankee from
Olympus" who stayed on the
court until a later age than his
own.
I WRITE this in Douglas coun-
try, in the shadow of Douglas'
youth. A half-hour drive from
here is Yakima. where this
extraordinary man grew up and
had his early life struggles be-
fore he heeded the call to "Go
East, young man" and invaded
Columbia and Yale law schools
and the corporate life of Wall
Street.
He brought his rugged hon-
esty and his knowledge of cor-
poration finance to the chair-
manship of the Security
Exchange Commission. Then he
was one of the remarkable band
of Roosevelt judges who turned
the Supreme Court around, and
became a militant mainstay of
the liberal Warren Court, and
has carried over into the Burger
Court as its oldest member.
The tenacity with which he
holds on to his court post, in
the face of his partial paralysis,
and the ups and downs of im-
provement and relanse, is one
of the dramatic stories of court
history.
CLEARLY Douglas wants his
tenure on the Supreme Court to
outlast Gerald Ford's in the
White House. President Ford is
damned in his eyes for a dou-
ble reason. He inherited the
Presidency from Nixon, and
when he was in Congress he
led the Nixon Administration
effort to impeach Douglas.
These would seem reason
enough for Douglas' enmity. But
in addition he seems convinced
that the judge Gerald Ford
would pick to succeed him
would be one more vote added
to Nixon's four court ap-
pointees, to provide a five-judge
majority for conservative deci-
sions.
This is political reasoning,
but it isn't the first time the
judges have reasoned political-
ly when they had to decide
about retiring.
POLITICS is never very far
from the Supreme Court, from
the time a President starts to
pick a new judge right up to
the time he gives way to an-
other. In the case of Justice
Douglas his refusal to retire
just happens to be more naked
ly political than usual.
But it is also something more
Douglas doesn't want to give up
his self-image easilv. He is frail.
he must get phvsical therapy
he sits silently through the Su-
preme Court sessions when once
he asked barbed questions from
the bench.
But he still sees himself as
he once wasthe daring young
man on the flying Washington
trapeze, defying the Establish
ment to the end.
He has done everything.
been everywhere. He has brok-
en whole clusters of rulesin
his marriages, his activisms, his
flirtations with presidential
politics, his walking tours, his
travels, his mountain climbing
his lecturing, his myriad of
books. Like Tennyson's Ulysses.
he feels strongly about "how
dull it is to nause/to rest un-
burnished, not to shine in use."
There is an often-told Su-
preme Court story about Justice
Stephen J. Field, a West Coaster
like Douglas, but unlike him one
of the court's most committed
conservatives.
JUSTICE Robert Grier was
not only getting old. he was also
a man of confused mind, who
showed some of his confusion
in the historic Legal Tender
cases. Field headed a commit-
tee of his brethren to persuade
him to retire.
Years later, when Field was
old and sick and his fellow
judges reminded him of his role
in the Grier retirement, Field
shot back. "Yes. and a dirtier
dav's work I never did in my
life."
None of Douglas' colleagues
will do a Field on him. not his
liberal friends who treasure
him. not the Burger group which
feels it best not to intervene.
Continued on Page ?


Friday, November 14, 197S
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
Mesivta Senior High School
15 Anniversary Dinner Nov. 15
F bbi -T'!c:>u Weinberg. dean
of the Ner brae] Rabbinical
< olU gs in Baltimore, will be the
ial er at a dinner cele-
ng the 15th anniversary of
:. Si nior High School
Merwitzer Hinh School)
in Miami Beach. The di'inr is
duled For Saturday evening,
r IS, at the Saxony
>: '.
Joseph Bistritz, president of
; Mesivta, said that Rabbi
Weinberg is well known in this
area "because many of his
former students are currently
teai hing at the Mesivta here as
well ;>s at the Talmudic College
i: Florida."
bbi \v !',..-, wns dean of
graduate studies at Nor Israel
n 1961 to 19-S4, nd was the
i n rael Yeshiva College in Toronto.
i re he was tb-1 dean until
1970. In 1970 Rabbi Weinberg
returned to Baltimore and re-
Bssumed the nost of dean of
graduate studies at Ner Israel.
"The dinner will emphasize
our growth in IS years and the
MesivtVs nlans for the future,"
Bistritz said.
Chairman of the dinner is
Jerry Bienenteld. a director of
the Mesivta and secretary of
the Hebrew Academy. Bienen-
feld, has been active for many
years in Jewish and Israeli in-
stitutions. Before moving to Mi-
ami Beach, be was a founder of
the Hebrew Institute of Long
Island, N.Y.
Cochairmen of the dinner are:
Ben Stern. Peter Goldring. Rab-
bi Zev Leff (an alumnus of the
Mesivta), Robert Entin and
Howard Kokayer.
Also working as associate din-
ner chairmen are: Gabriel
Deutsch, Murrav Berkowitz, Is-
adore Spolter, Melvin Feit, Os-
car Schapiro.. Dr. Joel Dennis,
Dr. Aaron Katz, Albert Muskat.
Julio Grossfelt, Sam Reinhard
and Moses J. Grundwerg.
The Mesivta Hieh School h-s
a program leading to a high
school dinloma and is oriented
to the college-bound student or
one who plans to attend a Rab-
binic college. In addition to its
COOK UP A
FREE TRIP TO
PUERTO RICO
send us your favorite recipe
using Sweet Unsalfed
Mazoia
Margarine
Contestants must be 18 years
or older.
Send recipe and proof of pur-
chase (green flag with words
contains liauid corn oil' from
front panel' with your name,
address and nhone number to:
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Box 012973, Miami 33101
MAZOLA CONTEST
SPECIAL CONTEST
FOR OUR READERS
The winner of our special
contest will win $100.00
and all entries will be elig-
ible for the grand prize
a trip to Puerto Rico.
ENTER NOW!
RABBI JACOB WEINBERG
regular curriculum, it has an
after-hours program with stud-
ies under the direction of the
dean of the Talmudic Colleee of
Florida. Rabbi Yochanan Zweig.
Curriculum at the Mesivta
includes study of the Talmud,
Bible, Prophets, Jewish history,
customs and ceremonies, and
Jewish philosophy. This is in
addition to the general program
of academic studies program-
med by the State of Florida.
Principal of the Mesivta is
Rabbi Mordecai Blumenfeld,
who joined the high school this
year after six years of teaching
at Yeshiva high schools in To-
ronto and St. Louis. Executive
director of the Mesivta is Ba-
ruch Fleischman, and Mrs. Rose
Koppler heads the general
studies program.
Lauderhill Congregation
To Dedicate Sefer Torahs
The Hebrew Congregation of
Lauderhill will dedicate their
Sefer Torahs on Sunday, Nov.
16, at noon.
Processisn will commence
from Camelot Hall. 21st Street
and 49th Avenue, headed bv a
color guard of Jewish War Vet-
erans under the leadership of
P. C. Paul Zimmerman and fol-
lowed by religious and commu-
nity dignitaries and guests.
Officiating at the ceremony
will be Rabbi Schenk. Rabbi
Gross and Cantor Marchant.
Representing the City of
Lauderhill will be Mayor Eu-
gene Cipoolini, Commissioner
Moss and Representative Avon.
A choral performance will be
given by the Chosen Children,
a chorus made up of youngsters
aged 9 to 13.
Refreshments will be served
by the Sisterhood. The dedica-
tion chairman is Joe Welsh.
Iran's Jews Barely Holding On
By CONG. WILLIAM LEHMAN
"For over 2.500 years," was
Ben lyeri s reply when
I asked how long he'd been in
n. He v snl on to explain
his ance* I I .1 in Iran be-
fon the < ra. V.t during
all those c niuili his family,
like all Jews in [ran, have
never become a part of the
mnitj o the nation.
"Even n w, wad lien, as his
wife o fer J iia tea and sweets
in their c i Unit .1 home and
metal can workshop, "I have
craftsmen who have worked for
me for o< er 20 years who have
never saiJ good morning to
me."
'WHEN MY wife or I go to
tiie bazaar," he went on, "we
must not I "'-:] any food before
we buy. f Jew touching a pear
will nate it as Moslem
food.'
"How is
we asked.
"He is a wonderful man! We
wish only a long and healthy
life for him. We are so much
better now under the l'ahlavi
family than ever before, espe-
cial'.;, in my lifetime. But from
the Shah doing?"
REP. LEHMAN
the masses of people we have
the same hostility."
BEN'S FAMILY lives and
- in homes built of .
woodframe, and with wal
for>t thick of cow dung. Of
se, the inside Is plastered.
In the c mrtyard among the
stalls he had erected a
Succor h tabernacle of grape
vines and branches filled with
? tes where traditional
services were held family-style.
Ren is the \icc chairman of
the Isfahan Jewish community
which now numbers less than
Ford Proposes Aid Package
For Israel and Egypt
Continued from Page 1
June 30.
At the same time, in submit-
ting his long-delaved Middle
East aid program, the President
also asked $750 million in mili-
tary and economic assistance
for Egypt, and including $253
million for Jordan and $90 mil-
lion in economic aid for Syria.
In ADDITION, the President
recommended a special fund for
this fiscal year for $50 million
to "reinforce the peace process"
in the Middle East and parti-
cularly to defray the costs of
stationing American civilian i
technicians in the Sinai area.
Security supporting assist-,
ance was described at the State
Department as meaning both
loan and grants. In his state-
ment to the Congress, Ford said .
that he believed the "hone for1
a lasting solution to the Arab-'
Israeli dispute is stronger to-
day than at anv time in the
previous quarter century. A
new era also is opening in our
relations with Arabs and Is-
raelis. "This securitv assistance:
program will give substance to
these new relationships and
help preserve the momentum
toward peace.''
THE PRESIDENT also said
that the "basic purpose' of his,
proposals to the Congress are
"first, tQ provide Israel with the
assistance needed to maintain
security and to persevere in the
negotiation process."
Second, he said, it is to give
"tangible expression to our new
and fruitful relations with the
Arab nations most directly in-
volved and to encourage those
which are seriously prepared to
work for peace."
Third, it is "to encourage the
peaceful development of the
area, therebv reducing the in-
centives to violence and con-
flict." Ford noted that fullv 70
percent of the U.S. aid program
for the current fiscal year is to
be concentrated in the Middle
East.
vn from the 15,000 be-
: establishmi nt of the
1 I- 1.1. A brother now
in New York. The May-
children will prob-
ate as th mature.
B "' grandfather during his
: ade i iree journeys to
ilem walking the peri-
lous 1 lies s deserts
and through hostile country.
tl has ne' er been to Is-
rael. He is a successful artist;
dwindling community needs
him; he is not young.
BEN v LYERI will live out
days in Iran. 1 hope the
i i sts long fcnougn for
those days to be spent in his
own place and in peace.
In the meantime, tourists and
ricans and other foreign rs
ing in Iran go to Ben's
I craft shop. His customers
range from U.S. Ambassador
Helms Lo Elke Sommer.
His largest orders now are
for engraving liani.ni designs
on Ameiican hard hats that be-
long to the oil field workers
that bring their construction
hats up from Abadan and other
Persian Gulf fields.
On tables are elaborately de-
d metal hats with names
like Tex and maps of Oklahoma
engraved into ancient Persian
designs.
Congressman Lehman re-
cently returned from the
Aspen Persepolis Sympo-
sium in Iran where he dis-
cussed the world oil sit-
uation with American and
Iranian leaders..
'Rhineman Exchange' Review
The National Council of Jew-
ish Women, North Broward Sec-
tion, will present a review by
Marcia Levy of Robert Ludlum's
"The Rhineman Exchange" on
Wednesday, Nov. 19. at 12:30
p.m. at the Wilton Manors Wom-
en's Club.
The MULTI-MILLION
J^ KOSHER
Citoum
ON THE OCEAN At 41st STREET
THANKSGIVING
WEEK-END SPECIAL
4 DAYS 3 NIGHTS
$M f" per person
i k double oce.
plus lax & lips
Miami Beach's
Number ONE
KOSHER HOTEL
MIAMI BEACH
THANKSGIVING
DINNER (only)
45
$10
plus III
and tips
Check in Thurs Nov. 27
Check out Sun. Nov. 30
INCLUDES: STRICTLY KOSHER
TRADITIONAL THANKSGIVING DINNER
3 MEALS ON THE SAl 5ATH
FULL HOTEL FACILITIES and ACTIVITIES
Served From
5:30 to 8 P.M.
For Reservations
Phone
1-538-9045
ZkanlcsgiviHg Week-End Special
5 DAYS-4 NIGHTS I 4 DAYS-3 NIGHTS
per person
double occ.
plus lax & lips
Check In Wed. Nov. 26
Check out Sun. No*. 30
65
per person
double occ.
plus la* A lips
Check In Thurs. No*. 27
Check out Sun. No*. 30
51
INCLUDES:
TRADITIONAL KOSHER THANKSGIVING DINNER
3 MEALS ON THE SABBATH-NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT
IN THE KOSHER STEAK HOUSE
SPECIAL THANKSGIVING DINNER
Including Our Famous SALAD BAR go gr *
Served from 3 to 9 P.M. vw.*v p
STEAK HOUSE MENU AVAILABLE
For Reservation. Phone 1-5M-6631 Of 1-531-4114
ON THE OCEAN AT 7 1st STREET. Ml The Air-Conditioned
KOSHER
Tlfe&ny
OCEANFRONT 32nd to 34th Stt. MIAMI BEACH
THANKSGIVING WEEK-END SPECIAL
5 DAYS 4 NIGHTS _> 4 DAYS-3 NIGHTS
STH pe'p8,*n W'i sen
* / double occ V?** J) Jl
*# plus tax & tips J^
Check in Wed. Nov. 26 "*
Check out Sun. Nov. 30 |NCLU0ES
STRICTLY KOSHER TRADITIONAL THANKSGIVING DINNER
3 MEALS ON THE SABBATH SHOW IN THE IVORY TOWER
PLUS FULL HOTEL FACILITIES and ACTIVITIES
TRADITIONAL THANKSGIVING DiNNER (only)
STRICTLY KOSHER DINNER
pei person
double occ.
plus tax & tips
Check in Thurs. Nov. 27
Check out Sun. Nov. 30
$10
phit tai and tips
Served From
5:30 to 8 P.M.
INCLUDES:
SHOW IN THE IVORY TOWER
PLUS 1 DRINK
For Reservations Phone
1-538-6811


r.nr-e 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November
Oriole Gardens Unit Owner's
"Exceptional Devotion" Praised
A bc 51 ite if Israel Bonds
Solidarity Award will be pr -
r ti j i the unil owners of
1 Oriels Gard ins Ph mi. in
ition cf exception-
' ;:! devoti m and b 'rvice in a I-
vancing Israel's progress and
1 w ;lfar i a "Night in Israel"
m 'etinff. Sri:' iv, Nov. 23 nt 1
P m. ."! th 0 iol (Sard -'is Phas3
III Recreation Hall in Marg I
According to Charles (Chuck)
Zelman, chairman, and Shirley
Freehof, oochairnerson, "This
event is of special significance
to the people of Israel at this
critical time in their history,
and it gives us, the men and
i or Oriole Gardens Phase
III. a chance to help them con-
ir vital economic de-
made DOS-
E l>le through the aid of State
oi Israel Bonds."
Eddie Schaffer, Amei ican. w
ish folk humorist, will highlight
the evening's program. A not-
able success at the Diplomat,
DeauviUa and I ontuinebleau, he
has performed on the Kd Sul-
livan Show, the Amen Andrews
Show and (TV-London Televi-
sion. His credits include apoear-
ances in such films as "The
Bellboy" with .lorry Lewis and
"Hole in the Head'* with Frank
Sinatra.
Members of the Oriole Gar-
dens Condominium Organization
Phase III Include: Harry Har-
riets, president; Emanuel Gold-
ring, 1st vice president: Harry
Freehof. 2nd vice president; Al
Kerker, treasurer: Shirley
Craim, cretary; Milton Berk,
Men's Club president; Stella
Resnick, Women's Club presi-
dent pro tern; Lou Brown, Elsie
Frankel, Sonnj Prankel, Marion
Goldring, Nat Hochhauser, Dan
Kaufman, Morris Solomon, Al
Tcndler and Max Wci.sman.
EDDIE SCHAFFER
Ford Opposses PLO Approval
JACKSONVILLE (JTA)
President Ford has firm-
ly reaffirmed opposition to
Palestinian participation in
Middle East peace nego-
tiations until they recognize
te oi Israel and has
repeated his condemnation
the anti-Zionist Resolu-
tion adopted by the United
Nations General Assembly's
'.bird Committee.
In a news confeience tap-
ed Sunday in Jacksonville,
Kla., with reporters from
Florida television stations,
Ford was asked his view
about the attacks in the UN
on Zionism as a form of
racism.
THE REPORTER who asked
the question also noted that
Egvptian President Anwar Sa-
dat haJ made "similar allega-
tion." Ford, who had met with
Sadat in Jacksonville Sunday.
The honor of your presence is requested at the
formal dedication of our new Sanctuary on
Sunday, the sixteenth of November, two in the
afternoon, at 132 S.E 11th Avenue, Pompano
Beach.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
N.E. Broward's Conservative Synagogue
PUZZLED hy: Nonna A. Orovitz
A 7 P T) p A B T N 0 M
R 5 'T H A z Z A 'I 0 U I
D 0 E 3 3 5 T L E G M M 7
S 7 B T I P L U P F R T Y
S -1 V J M I G I EH K A
0 S Z L S R X K S P S H !f
M H D C U Y L B TAG L J
M C G D I U -1 M 0 J R R G
A A D G M E N 0 RAH Q B
H I R R E A V L A G J T M
S J A 3 V Z B Y H I Y C A
J Y L S H U I *J IBB A R
K N E R T A M I D W U D D
There are 16 words and phrases related to the syn-igue hidden in this puzzle. How many can you find? The answers are placed vertically, horizontally, diagonally, frontwards and backwards. Answers are on
page 10-B. PEW MKNORAH PULPIT CHAZZAN YAD SHUL SHAMMOS l'ORAH SERMON \'ER TAMID i \1-LIS RABBI ARK MINYAN YARMULKE SIDDUR All rights reserved. Variations in transliterations
1 and spelling ,nay occur.
did not mention the Egyptian
President, but said, "we are do-
ing all we can nossiblv do in
the United Nations to defeat the
resolution" which will be
brought up before the general
assembly.
He added that. "1 am getting
more and more optimistic that
the possibility does ->xist to de-
the resolution because it is
fundamentally contrary to the
United Nations charter."
What the U.S. will do if it
loses, Ford said, "is a matter
that I will nass judgment on at
that time. But I thiuk on sober
reflection that a majority of the
members of the United Nations
will recognise that is not in con-
sonance with the charter of the
United Nations."
WITH REFERENCE to the
Palestinians whom Sadat has
urged that the United States
back for inclusion in the Mid-
east talks. Ford said that "these
Palestinians do allege that they
have certain rights, and they
are insisting on participating,
for example, at a Geneva con-
ference or any overall confer-
ence but they have refused to
recognize the State of Israel,
and we. of course, strongly back
the State of Israel in its attitude
that there must be recognition
before there can be any contacts
or any participation bv the
Palestinian in any negotiations."
A reporter asked whether, if
recognition were forthcoming,
this could be found to create a
Palestinians ir, any negotiations."
replied "that of course would
have to be decided In any over-
all settlement." He also said
that "the parties who will ac-
tually do the negotiating are
those parties within the area in
an overall settlement, and it
would certainly be inappropriate
for mo under these circum-
stances, to make anv commit-
ment. That is for them to nego-
tiate."
The Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization was not mentioned
at the news conference.
THE PRESIDENT said that
he did not fear for the civilian
technicians who will monitor
stations in the Sinai because
"I can't imagine any actions
taken by either Egvnt or Israel
that would jeopardize the Amer-
icans in that United Nations
zone."
Ford confirmed that negotia-
tions are taking place between
the United States and Egypt for,
"an American-made nuclear I
power facility," but he said the!
negotiations "have not at this'
point reached a final decision."
ROBERT ADLER
SAMUEL LEBER
Adler Expects Woodlands' 1976
Campaign To Be The Best Ever
Robert Adler. active worker
for the Jewish community and
dedicated to tlie cailM of the
State of Israel, has accepted the
general chairmanship of the
Woodlands Federated UJA-1976
campaign.
He has recruited Sydney
Brumberger, Edmund Entin.
Samuel Leber. Bernard Libros,
and Clarence Obletz as his co-
mhairmen. All arc now assunv
RSfl responsibility- for somfl
phase of the campaign and are
recruiting workers for theix
respective committees.
In accenting the responsibility
of the Woodlands general chair-
manship. Mr. Adler said: "This
:s the third year of Woodlands'
involvement in the Federated
campaign, and based on reac-
tions so far received bv those
who have come forward to as-
rume peonaibiMty, I expect
this vcar's campaign to be the
best."
Mr. Adler added that a suc-
cessful campaign woul I d
to a large derive on the num-
ber of people who want to work
and on the abilitv of the organ-
ization to reach every resident
in the Woodlands area. Coverage
this vear is expected to be bet-
ter than fc<0 oer cent.
"A recent series of newsnapet
articles from Tel Aviv," Mr
Adler ohftexi ed. "stressed that
the Israeli citizen will again
have to tighten his belt: his
taxes are increasing. Israel's in-
flation is the highest in the
world, and the needs of the peo-
ple are mounting."
On the other hand articles
from Washington. D.C t.i >l
i >. aid to Israel s ;
billion. Bat Mr. Adler c nt Is
that the figure is "mi
first, becauss all of '
is not an outright n !.
s.v-ond. because it will be -d
for the Purchase ol
hardware to strength)
security, despite the so-c d
peace atmosphere."
'- the:
rael's metal an Ueconi
are greater todr
And the cost ot briii i
- out of th* So
and into Israel still i.
total responsibility of US
i -.
Xfae Woodlands I I
has deemed it esseni
Mtton be ma tie tu
residents. Knowleds
ho can give, it i.....
so when they know
Host chainnan Samu i I >
has anaotmsed a ft
rmati n il cockt
to be held on Nov. 15
6 p.m.. at the countr clu i
;..'l> stre ised thai this is
a. solicitation or fund- a
meeting, it will be devoted to
a gpv-anj-take disc ssioo n
Israel's current needs and v
needs of tlie American Je
people.
Mr. Adler reported thai
ether commute s I egil to I
for the campaign, :1
will l>e distributed ouicklj
There will be a Spe<
dinner party on Dec. 2 at -.
home of Mr. and Mrs Edn ind
Entin.
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5149 N.W. POWERUNE RD. Phone 776-0371
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DELIVERY
Serving Broward County Since 1955
LUDWIK & JACOB BRODZKI, Owners
.
-I. uI t- l./9
Ft. t_11-14.75
Ft. L11-14-75


Friday, N" -.ember 14, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pa^e 7
"Night in Israel" at Hawaiian Gardens
To Honor Dr. and Mrs. Morris Wassermaii
i.. ii
[. the ta:<
i
h
day, N i
i
r im II-
llcld r
76 -oik'.
aJll- I. Ft
I c-n i :
. b ;lI to r ;c i
is.. .. I
i n be-
ill bs :.
a [srtM
j ., :..
'..,;. Phase I Rcc-
1975-
' I vrida Isra I Bond
meeting
F-rture i rican
:i !..I:" humorist at Gros-
!' tel and Count ;
('! ib. I' ther is a well-
l n ; canto i per-
. and he
ma So ''i :: i
i itres throughout
i chai man VVil-
i ie men and
women of our comple* will
taki this special occasion to
; ih'it" to our fI'.ihv ii 'igh-
Mends Dr. and Mrs.
and to
ou : rael I i
nerous pui chaws to help tliat
counti'. rntinu tier gi ntly
needed economic id pro-
I).-. Wat w ho ". oi ke I
i lively on oehalf of Israel in
his synagogue in Brooklyn, is
a graduati of New York Uni-
d School and a
member of the Dental Society
in New York.
Frances is president of the
Wine Tasting Highlights
Costa Lines S/S Federico C
A "Win : Italy" is the I' a-
hire Oi tMtt I. lie's s s
Federico sailing Emm Fort
I. iderd Port Everglades,
November >
A series : three of four semi-
nars on It ilian wines, of about
40 mil"1" jach, will be con-
ducted d" -- "lie course of the
cruise. '(' leminars. which
will, of course, be optional for
a ngers ill include discus-
sit as on wines of Italv bv
n palel o (its. consisting of
......st Lter and repi e-
sentatb thi It ilian Trade
Commission is well as films on
it lian w nd questions an i
answer '.
There v ill at 1 ;ast thre
tastings '" '-'>"
of the craise, DrefereWv four
if sche^ul pjits. Th e tast-
ings will a I be stand-uo tastings
at which passengers will taste
wines in relaxed, informal
manner
On one
tasting con
ed during
guests' enj
wi'l be giv
tie of win
Bame tye
table
I '
id- ntii
< ening. a blind ivine-
I will be conduct-
the dinner for
oyment. Each table
. '. an unmarked bot-
not w fssarily th
>! wine for each
issengers at th '.t
i :ide the
in writing th
FEDERATION BOOM RENTALS
he ne< Jewish Federation bu Lding has rooi
: We for rent to Jewish organizations and groups in
comn during the n and evenii
The remal charges which reflect the basic co
ine Federation for opening up the building, incli
electricitv, maintenance and securitj are:
AFTERNOONS: S40 per ro i
F.\ i:\i\C.S: S50-S7S, depending on she of roe
Interested groups are i"-ged to contact Cher
Le<-'-- Office Manager, at the Federation office
Women's Club at il haiian
(!ard( ns rhase I, a me ber ol
f n..... education
chairman of Hadassah and a
matron of East n She is
also a past nl of the
Convalescent Home in New
York.
Worl ing on
Gardens Phase
Committsi a i
Max Denner,
Leon Friedman,
the Hawaiian
I Israel Bond
I adore Cohen.
Louis Dickert,
Walter Grud-
becg, Morris Kaplan. .lack La-
'ir and Morris Schulberg.
UK. & A;KS M. WASSERMAN
Hiv-i- oi the wine on the blank
label affixed to the bottle. The
table which most correctly iden-
tifies its wine will receive pome
wine as a prize.
To encourage passengers to
approach the seminars and
tnstinas more leriouslv, a wine
quiz will be given to all partici-
pating passengers tcward the
md oi the crui
who -in'-. -.. llj complete this
i n ceh :> din oma from
the iian Trade Commissioner,
c nil ,'ins i they have com-
; i .....: the Cost i Li ie Italiao
Wine course, and will also re-
ceive a cooj of the book "Dis-
ring Italian Wines." These
t ii lomas wiU be awarded at
special ceremonies on the final
evening aboard the ship.
B'nai B'rith Women To Meet
B'nai B'rith Wor irac
Chapter No. 1479, will hold a
t 12:30 p m.,
rhui >v. 20 at the Ta-
marac Jewish Cen
Irs. Fran ''.' tair-
ia ... ograi i
. | -i I, ague
to be highli .V- .1 '>- a ami-
:. n1 I -' al
"Dolls" Is Subject ol Talk
Alice VVaxrruu) has announced
that Mrs. Shirley Miller, execu-
tive director of Retired Senior
Volunteer Program, will ive a
talk on 'Dolls for Democracy,"
illustrated with dolls demoting
famous figures In world history,
at a general meeting of the Sis-
terhood of the Hebrew Congre-
gation of Lauderhill on Monday,
Nov. 17, at 12:30 p.m.
Later in the week, on Thurs-
day, Nov. 20, at 12:30, Mrs. Mil-
ler will present her talk on
"Dolls" at the November meet-
ing of the Chai firouD of the
North Bcoward Chapter of
Hadasaab at the Pomrjano Re-
creation Center. Mrs. Irwki
Stenn is president of the Chai
Group, and Mrs. Morris Schlei-
! o'li i_. nrogcam chairman.
Dec. Opening
Rossmoor's
Planned For
Phi
ise
The first residents in Nassau
Village, the second construction
phase for Rossmoor Coconut
Creek, will be completed and
certified for occuoancy bv mid-
December, according to director
of construction Orion J. Smith.
Rossmoor Coconut Creek, a
"total environment" condo-
minium community for adult
residents only, is beinc de-
veloned near Pomnano Beach,
at Florida Turnpike exit 24 and
state road 814.
Rossmoo:' Coconut Creek will
have 24 "villages" all in a Carib-
bean theme, and a variety of
recreation features and facili-
ties. Security is emphasized,
with security personnel on duty
24 hours a day.
Nassau Village will have 2"*6
condominium apartments in 19
two-storv viihs. and offered in
seven floor nlans. The village's
site is primarily waterfront,
overlooking waterways, canais,
and opposite the social and re-
creational complex.
Larry Ucbin, Roosmoor sales
and marketing vice president,
has projected immediate occu-
pancy for the first completions
in the second phase. Nearly 100
Nassau Village units have been
sold pre-construction. Bahama
Village, the first construction
phase, is almost comoletelv sold
out. v,'h most of its 304 resi-
dential units r.lreadv completed.
DAZZLETHEMINM1NK
Wrap yourself in a cozy bundle of mink
designed by Fabiani.
A spectacular partner with pants or skirts.
A beautiful alternative for whatever your lifestyle
Just one from JM's collection of trotter coats
in frosty brights or glamorous darks, $899,
Fur Salon, at all jm stores except lauderhill.
It's to your credit to say "charge it" at jm.
f]
y
cftcW Wv
FLORIDA
DR. MARTIN J. DIAMOND
DR BARRETT E. SACHS
TAKE FLEASUrtE IN ANNOI
THE OPENING OF THEIR NEW C
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
PODIATRY
MERCEOE ARCADE SHOPPES
1808 N. UNIVERSITY DR.
PLANTATION
581-2500
M 5121 S.W. 90th AVE.
COOPER CITY
434-1443
DR. ROBT. GRAS5I
PODIATRIST
Announces the
Relocation of his
offices to .
Ocean Medical Center
Suite 201
4001 Ocean Drive
Lauderdale-By-The-Sea
491-5880
Custom Ttonogianiing *nd storage '")
Al lu Uoeted to show country ol ongin of
Kitponud lut.


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 14, 1975
Beth Israel Celebrates
Anniversary and Dedication
Slater Named Chairman for
Over 400 peoplj attsn led
Temple Beth Israels aimiver-
- anJ dedication celebra-
!! n en Sun lay, Oct. i". an 1 en-
norable evening.
The Nation .1 pn id nl t>i
r United Synag : N thur
J. Levine, pres nt :. a plaque
i appr vi.ri -n t
i I for its contributions in
fo taring Conservative ideals.
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz
t >'k an active part in the pro-
honoring ra^t presidents,
( ntor Mau ice Feu and
I is choir pr nt -' a choral
li an rl ths i*v
! !z!i rj .' .i short
i : i iui the [\ ipl
Inverrary's Dinner of State
Mishkin accepts a
\W from Arthur J. Le-
vine.
The Committee (left to right): Mesdames
Sylvan Goldin, Jacob Brodzki, Paul Fries-
er, Maurice Berkowitz, Sanford Leach,
Jack Morris,
Block.
George Berman, Gerald
Ron Mishkin, Temple president; Joseph
Golden, Southeast Region President; Ja-
cob Brodzki, chairman; Arthur J. Levine,
National President United Synagogue of
America; Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz.
JEWISH FILM SERIES
The next presentation in the Jewish Film Series will be
on Sunday, Nov. 30, at 8 p.m. at the Fort Lauderdale
Hi?h School. The movie is "The Fixer," which is based
on Bernard Malamud's novel.
ONLY SERIES TICKET HOLDERS WILL BE ADMITTED
NO TICKETS WILL BE SOLD AT THE DOOR
WANTED
The Fort Lauderdale Jewish Com-
munity Center is accepting appfi.
cations tor part-time children's
spec .il interest group leaders
personnel skilled in teach nq crafts,
creative drama dance sc"!""" *ni
woodworking Ca'l Bi1' Goldstein
at the Federation office.
Lauderhill community and ci-
vic leader Harold Slater has
been named chairman of the
Inverrary Country Club Com-
munity Israel Dinner of State,
on behalf of the 1975-76 South
Florida Israel Bond Organiza-
tion campaign, to be held Sun-
day, Nov. 30, at 6:30 p.m. at the
Inverrarv Country Club in
Lauderhill. The announcement
was made todav by Robert M.
1 '. Lauderdale,
chairman. North Broward Coun-
ty Boar I of Go1 ernors.
| -. who has served on
,\is com "' i and ors. mi-
zntion v is V 'A chairman
from 1965 to 1973 an 1 serve I
.I. chairman of various Israel
Rondi divisions. He ha reciv-
pi numf^is a w a r d s an i
plaques from thos? orpaniza-
tions. He is a'so a founder of
Had ssah Hospital in Israel nnJ
of Einstein College of Medicine.
He is a member of the bna-d
of governors ot Temole Beth-EI
and vice Dresident of P'nii
R'rith in Long Beach. N.Y.,
where he also received a scroll
of honor from the Temnle.
Milton M. Parson, executive
director of the South Florida Is-
rael Bon! Organization, pointed
out that sine? the Vgmnin< of
the Ts>"i"l Pond rMve in 1951,
more than S3 billion in Israel
Bond proceeds have b" m rro-
vided for the development of
Isra !'% industries and agricul-
tural production, the pyoansion
of *-t BTTVtrt t-v'^ ^vKiit-i; -^
of her natural resources, im-
..... "* *"ansprvtatir*n nd
r-ommuni'*i,ti'>na. an-! "anv
Otl'Pr frr*f**S '' ''* r^^rjo",
Parson said. "The Israel Bond,
campaign in which we an; cur-
rently eneng?d will helo to im-
plement nnnv n*W dvlon*vn j
,...-,:,..,. ,t,,.;n^ a critical t'lrn-
ing noint in Israel's historv
when its people are shouldering
unparalleled financial burdens
to assure their security and sur-
vival. They look to us to help '
Bat Yam Group Activities
Bat Yam Group of Fort Laud-
erdale has announced two
events. On Thursday, Nov. 20,
at 1 p.m., Vice-Mayor Virginia
Y -un-j will be presented at the
o->-n meeting at Gait Mile Hotel.
And on Tuesdav, Dec. 9, from
10:30 a.m., there will be a gala
white elenhant bazaar and cake
sale, also at the Gait Mile Hotel.
HAROLD SLATER
them through Israel Bonds for
maintenance of economic sta-
bility which is of major impor-
tance in the continuing search
for peace."
Margate Israel Bond Drive
On Sundav. Nov. 16. at 7:30
p.m. there will be a special pro-
gram in-hidins entertainment,
refreshments and, above all. t
drive to surpass last vear's pur-
chases of Israel Ronds.
Guet of Honor of t^e eve-
ning is Cantor Max Gallub.
D tails and arrangements for
this rally are under the direc-
tion of Irving Resnikoff and his
cornmittee.
If you can spend wmc time,
even a few hours, with someone
who needs n hand, not a handout,
call your local Voluntary Action
Center. Or write to "Volunteer."
Vteshinfiton.D.C 20013.
' fhe National Center tor
Nfoluntary Action.
V
ft
MlkkMkl'l
PERFECT CHANUKAH GIFT-delicious reading-
recipes, customs, and
stories from Jewish
communities in China,
India, Africa, Europe,
South America, and
elsewhere!
JS
itl*fc**-i**~"
baf. N
Jewish
Cookery
from Boston
to Baghdad
By Malvina W. Liebman
270 pp., illus.; cloth, $9.95
ORDER FROM: to E. A. Seemann Publishing, Box K, Miami, Fl. 33156
Please send me___JEWISH COOKERY FROM BOSTON TO BAGHDAD
by Malvina W. Liebman @ $9.95 plus %4 sales tax ($.40, total $10.35)
? Check or M/O included for $____.__________________________._
?Charge my Master Charge (fill in number. Master Charge-also T
interbank number, exp. date, and sign) 4*' beJo^LLLJJ
Name----------------------------------------------------- E7pTrtToV6ate~of Card
Address______________________________
City, St. Zip__________________________ Signature of Cardholder
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WINES OF ITfl
CRUISE
FEDERICO C. SAILING FROM PORT EVERGLADES
ON NOV. 18 FROM $580 TO $990
vou Spa. ba^te! Air/Sea packages available from most ma,or cn.es.
OOSfa Ll/ie Kalian R.gi.,rv
1 Biscayne Tower, Miami, Fla. 33131
Toll free number Tel: (800) 327-5704
(Rales based on per person, double occupancy and availability, plus tax)
tr


Friday, November 14, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
Cantor Max Gallub Will Be Recipient
Of David Ben-Gurion Award at Margate
>
Cantor Max Gallub, cantor
iritual leader at the Mar-
Jewish Center, lias been
named the recipient of the
ted State of Israel David
Gurion award to be pre-
I .; at the M i gate Jewish
. [srael Bond Recon-
;, ,. ,\o- 16 at 7:30
< i mnc "' v
itt >e ai "man i
i ,. ol Israel
North Broward c
I TS.
,,, b -half of t ie 1975 76
i Floi ids !ond Or-
i/ati m campaign will be I
v s.itil: t-ntort:iin_: Milt Moss WM
. has appeared with Eddie jfy
r, Abbott and fostello. ^
hil Silvers. Kite
I YVhiteman.
Resnikoff. Manttte
mith and
first vice president, chowitzer Benevolent Society.
Jewish
CANTOR MAX GALLUB
said, "It is indeed fitting that
the Stats of Israel sleet him
for this highly coveted honor.
I! is deeply concerned with
his brethren in Israel."
Cantor Gallub lias been call-
ed oi i church '- and org in-
! ai us evi .- race,
I and c l i rai i ur-
1 n ide I .: for the
.: I ie 1 t o 1
. < nd
"
aid of : t its of 1
| i: Hinder, c 'ntor and spir-
itual intil his retire-
i 19 of the Ronkon-
I.Y.) J wish Center, he
is a mi iber I the Knights of
P s an i Cppg-egiti >n Pu-
Broward Area Chairman Named
if
Community loader Israel Res-
r.ikoff of Marfjat", first vice-
; -esident of t'ie Margate Jew-
'. Center, has been named co-
chairman of the North Brow-
area for the South Florida
1 Bond Cash Mobilization
sign.
rhe announcement was made
Jack M. Bash, Cash Mobili-
chairman, South Florida
! Bond Organization.
nik< .i has been Involved
.! Bond campaigns since
i s ino pti m 25 yea s a jo, and
ser ing as the chairman of
Margate Jewish Center-Is-
11 Reception to be held
lay, Nov. 16. at the Center.
A tireless worker in the Jewish
c immunity, he is trustee of
ample Bah El and co-presi-
dent of he Hillel Day School
in Utica, N.Y.
Bash announced that the uiea
cochairmen will be responsiole
for procuring campaign cap-
tains who will recruit volun-
teers to work on two "Cash
Sundays," Nov. 23 and Dec. 7,
in a "Phone-A-Thon." Cam-
paign headquarters will be es-
tablished throughout the North
Broward area and a battery of
telephones will be manned
from 9 a.m. to noon.
"Cash Sunday" is part of a
nationwide cash drive taking
rlace throughout the United
States and Canada during No-
vember and December. The
rv began on November 2,
anniversary of the Balfour
Declaration, which laid the
oundwork for the creation of
I ie State of Israel.
The objective of the special
day-long Israel Bond cash drive
is to help provide Israel with
a maximum amount of Invest-
mt capital with which to
maintain the momentum of her
nomy and speed up her in-
dustiialization to prevent a
p rise in unemployment. A
I aior goal of the cash cam-
n is the collection of all
outstanding commitments to the
purchase of Israel Bonds made
earlier in the year.
In stressing Israel's vital
need for cash, Bash declared:
"The recent interim agreement
between Israel and Egypt is a
step towards peace, accomplish-
ed as a result of Israel's
Flea Market Sale
Hadassah is holding a super
flea market sale of items do-
nated by over 150 homes on
Sunday, Nov. 16, from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. at 2410 N.E. 24th St.,
Pompano Beach.
strength, it is our responsibility
to give Israel the economic
Btrength to achieve a full peace
settlement.
The projected $2.3 billion
in U.S. aid, which is to be ear-
marked almost completely for
defense, will cover only two-
thirds oflsra l'i defense budget.
"As a result of huge outlays
for defens*," he stated, "Israel
is facpd with a Bhortage of fi-
nancial resources fr develop-
ment oroiects which are essen-
tial for the eon >mic health of
the country, and that is why Js-
ril Bonds are so important at
this time."
Bash said that Israel must
receive an accelerated flow of
Israel Bond dollars in the com-
ing months to exDand Israel's
industrial and agricultural pro-
duction for exnort in order to
improve her balance of trade
and nro'ide ;ob opportunities
fo- immigrants from the Soviet
Un; -> and elsewhere.
"Through the purchase of Is-
rael Bonds on 'Cash Sunday,' we
ISRAEL RESNIKOFF
not only show our solidarity,
with Israel in this critical period
of its history but we also en-
hance the chances of peace by
keeping the country's economy,
strong." he concluded.
2*
jnr
m
K&K CATERERS
- A CUT ABOVE THE REST -
"KOSHER CATERING"
HERB KAY
IS MINGING HIS FAMOUS CATERING SERVICE
TO SOUTHERN FLORIDA
formerly of:
Inverrary Country Club
Jam Caterers of Long Island
Leonards of Groat Nock
catering fo:
Tomplos o Homes o Off ico Portias
Platters for All Occasions o Waddings
BarMitzvahs
SPECIAL CONDOMINIUM RATES.
am HERB KAY at:
D*de 940-0197 Browird 561-3500
Palm Beach 842-2889
Among his many honors are
the esteemed State of Israel
Plaque of the Western Wall and
a special Appreciation plaque
presented at a testimonial din-
ner in his honor at the Kon-
konkoma Jewish Center.
M mb irs of the Margal Jew-
ish Center : r i Bon I Re
tion inc'.ud : S i In iy Bn vvn,
president; Max Gallub, Cantor;
! : sniki I I
ident; N ith i Bod id
. i i [j
\ ice president; Molli
r icording s David
Klempner, correspond
retary; 'v,in Pomerance, finan-
cial secretary; Dr. Samuel I"> t-
nick, treasurer; Sidney Koslow,
sergeant-at-arms; Meyer Weiss.
Men's Club president; Hazel
Falk. Sisterhood president;
Samuel Singer, president ex
officio; David Klampner, pub-
licity chairman.
Trustees: Jack Smolin, Gret-
chen Winn, Nathan Scher.
Members of the Board of Di-
rectors: Martin Brown, Louis
Davidson. Samuel Glickman,
Charles Kallos, Louis Katrosar,
Herman Katz, Henry Pier.
Israel Bond Committee: Is-
rael Kesnikoff, chairman; Henry
Kessler, Benjamin and Annette
Carp, honorary chairpersons;
Nat Bonder. Ben and Annette
Carp. Alfred Cohen, Louis Da-
vidson, Hazel and Jack Falk,
Max Gallub, Sam Glickman,
Lillian Guy. Harry Hirsch,
Charles Kallos. Henry Kessler.
David Klempner, Moses (Moe)
Levenson, Florence and Morris
Posner, Berte Resnikoff, Sara
and Jack Simonowitz, Bebe
Zektzer.
Broward 0RT Activities
Women's American ORT,
Broward Region, announces the
following chapter activities:
HiUcrest Hills Chapter will
show "L'Chaim To Life," a
documentary on Jewish life nar-
rated by Eli Wallach. on Tues-
day. Nov. 18, 8 p.m., at the Hill-
crest Playdium. Call. 961-2767
for tickets, or buy them at the
Playdium between 7 and 8 p.m.
Hollywood Hills Chanter will
snonsor a rummage sale begin-
nin-.! at 8 a.m. on Friday, Nov.
14. at Publix on Taft Street.
Wearing aooarel for men, wom-
en and children will be sold.
Pine Hill Chapter's hayride
lb Inprompt-
p.m. on Saturday. Nov.
15 at the Bar-B-Ranch, Griffin
!: |, and 128th Ave. Davie. Res-
ervations are required.
Lerner
Continued from Page 4
Douglas must himself decide
just when the point will come
at which his tenacity is no
longer a symbol of courage and
will but begins to hurt the
(court's image as well as its
work.
HE HAS had a longer service
on the court than any judge in
its history. He knows that the
next 15 months, until a newly
elected President is inaugu-
rated, will be a hinge of history
in deciding who will take his
seat and retain its power, per-
haps for decades.
He feels that to yield this
power now to the wrong person
would defeat the purpose of his
whole judicial life.
So he hangs on in anguish,
and the nation waits and won-
ders about the lonely debate he
is caught in.
Marsh offers
the ideal gift
for Chanukah.
From the ruins of King Achem's ancient temple
came the beautiful carving reproduced in this
handsome piece. Hebraic letters carry a heart-
felt message: "WITH ALL THE LOVE IN THE
WORLD." Gold letters on silver background or
white enamel background. Priced at $22.
MAIL ORDERS INVITED
Fine Jewelers & Silversmiths since 1908
265 Millburn Ave.. Millburn, N.J.
American Express BankAmericard Master Charge


age in
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 14, 1975
Protests Continue as K.
Works to Defeat Resolve
Continued from Page 1
.' in ;i one-way
alii th it cle i untie
n< nl of concili
-,;i i.
j ... zion-
f.m .as is an
it in' t'i
I nite ions" nee < an l
nst t u I
I it thr ;ater -
id Nations' capacity ;;
, Middle East
'". uil! v rl to d Feat its nas-
bj .' General Assembly;
call on ;:ll nations to recon-
cile their vote with universal
onal orindoles"
MEAKU mil", si inn: protests
: om both the Cona "ess an 1 th
.' d :iir-"-ti;:tion :\<- continuing
. gainst the Unit -I Nations
ii -d ( n ii littee's draft.
TheStat < Departmsn: hassug-
-. d to four Latin .s*nerioan
. oveni n< nts th t voted for t'i
I \ dr tt resolution to recon-
thfcif positions when nn-l
the issue, conies before the
>-eire-nt Assembly in plenary
session.
The State Denartmnt has
' the is. Ambassadors in
I '. Me ico, Chile and titiy-
-s the L'.s. govern-
tit's disappointment with
them for approving the BJlti-
: action.
Bj lie tion, a Department
aid, it is askin
: thsii
thei countries in the West-
ern nisohere had either or>-
posed or abstained or were ab-
sent when the vote was taken.
"Humor !n Dentistry"
D Jacob Himber will speak
on "Humor in Dentistry" at the
monthly meeting of Work-
men's Circle Branch 1046. The
me ting, oi iginally scheduled
f r W dn s'ay. No". 19. will be
Thursday, Nov. 20, at 7:30 pjn,
in the courtroom of the new
Latt-VvMIl Police Station on
NW 56th St.
A discussion will follow Dr.
Himber's tall.
The Workmen's Circle gala
75th anniversary dinner dance
will be h II on Saturday. Nov.
29, at 6:30 p.m. at William-
8 Across, 10 Down
by Irv Brechner
Almost eveiy word in oar crossword
pertains directly to some facet of
Judiesm, Israeli histoiy and life.
ACROSS
2 Minister in Israeli
Embassy
3. Hebrew word for
luck
4. Eve's leading man
6. Yiddish writer
Aleichem
7 Bet. : Biblical
Court
8. Youth Group (abbr)
9 built ancient Temple
11 an historical scribe
12 read every Saturday
15 founder of Zionism
16 AI
17 short for Mother
19 former Israeli
Premier (2 wds)
20 Ki'ppur or T'ruah
DOWN
1. current UJA slogan
(3 wds)
2 Israel's foreign
minister
3. Scopus or Car me I
(abbr)
5. the Psalmist
6. women's Temple
organization
7. marriage word: I
9 Israeli Independence
Day: Yom
10. sound of jets
13. closing Liturgical
song: Adon
14. Kissinger
18. Yiddish word for
taste
BICENTENNIAL BIOGRAPHIES
Touro Family
Significant
Contributions
to U.S.History
The oldest existing synagogue building in
North America memorializes the Touro Fam-
ily tin- father Isaac, the sons Benjamin and
Judah. It stands in Newport, Rhode Island, and
houses the Joshuat Israel Congregation.
Touro Synagogue was dedicated as a Na-
tional Historic Shrine on August 31. 1947, by
the National Park Service of the U.S. Dept. of
Interior. A bronze tablet is inscribed with a
few highlights of the sanctuary's history:
". it was dedicated on December 2,
176.. Hire 1781-84 the Rhode Island General
Assembly met, and during Washington'* visit
:> Newport in 1781, a town meeting was held
here. The State Supreme Court held sessions
here at that period ... in 1790 George Wash-
ings ii wrote that happily the government
UniMd Man gives to bigotry no
s:iuti>!i. to persecution no assistance."
I.-. VAC TOURO was the first hazzan and
spiritual leader of the new s; nagogue. Born
in Holland circa 1737, he came to America in
17(h). lived in New York, then Boston and
came to Newport when its new Sephardic syn-
agogue was opened. Among his many friends
was Ezra Styles, president oi Yale, whose
diary noted considerable data about Touro's
life.
In 1773, Isaac married Reyna Hays, sister
of Moses Michael Hays, the wealthy and so-
cially prominent Bostonian. Their two sons.
Judah and Benjamin, were born in 1775 and
1777. When the Revolution forced the closing
ol the synagogue in 1780, Isaac took his fam-
ily to New York, later to- Kingston, Jamaica.
when he died in 1784. His widow and sons
reti tied to Boston where their affluent uncle
saw to their education ami training in com-
je.
BENJAMIN TOURO prospered and. true
i thj ["ouro tradition in Newport, was gen-
erous in charitable gifts. Benjamin left a large
part i' hi fortune for the upkeep "I sites of
Jew ificance in that ci'
Oi :ifu bequest, for example, was
$10,01 I I i the State of Rhode Island for the
upkeep 11 the sj nag< g e his father
officia j $5,000 for the iction of
rig from there to the cemeterj
Ben ied in 1S22 at the young age of 45.
Touro Synagogue, Newport, K./., is the
oldest existing synagogue building in
the United Stales and a national shrine.
Had he lived as long as his brother, his char-
ities would have been far greater.
tY tr
JUDAH TOURO lived to the ripe old age
of 79 and became the first Jew In America to
achieve the status of great philanthropist. Ex-
ample: In 1839. Boston blue blood Amos Laur-
ence offered to contribute half the $20,000
eobt of a monument that would memorialize
the Battle of Bunker Hill. No one responded,
and the project seemed doomed. One day a
letter came from far away New Orleans, con-
taining a check for S10.U00, sinned by Judah
. .11110.
'Who was this man Touro?" they asked
in Boston. On checking him out, Judah was
found to be a merchant and philanthropist
of the "first eminence." He had gone from
Boston at age 23 to New Orleans to seek his
fortune, where he arrived in 1802, penniless.
But the times were fortuitous. The Louisiana
Purchase, Ely Whitney's cotton gin and rice
crops from the delta country brought sustain-
ed and expanding prosperity to New Orleans,
and to one of its most astute merchants, Judah
Touro.
IN THE war of 1812, Touro joined Gen.
Andrew Jackson in the historic defense of New
Orleans. He was seriously wounded and dur-
ing a long convalescence, decided to share
his wealth as he made it. Touro grew richer
and richer, and his gifts multiplied. When a
Church, for instance, fell deeply in debt and
bankruptcy, Touro bought it for $20.00.) a.id
returned it to the congregation. He I mnd \\
the great hospital in that city which h.a.s hi*
name. He helped build synagogues and built
a home for orphan boys. And he founded the
first free library in New Orleans.
After his death, every exisii i.\
every Hebrew school. e\e: ril and re-
lief society in America I v. !i, I h istian
and non-sectarian shared in hi fo tune. In-
cluded were gifts of $73 I0G the S nagogue
and cemetery in Newport and $13,000 to the
city for a park and libra;
Thli> eplw ill i m 'Hoi orti a 177*
i m >u> Jev i \ "> m 111 lory." wpoimored
i} m.-i\u.;i ii. ii. i.i:.. ami copyrighted by the
ill. .!.,.: in KaniMtion. In .. IP7S.
READERS INTERESTED in receiving :i copy,
i.i with Ihe ilhiKtrailont i n inj no thi
. may .- ml ili.ii ii.iii. and ,,.i,ii..~ with "." centi
Ii v i-: Ii ..ii Poll loir Hox 44S8, Grand
'. i.ii..I Htuiin, Ne York, NY, I0OI7.
(SOLUTION TO PUZZLE ON PAGE 14)
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Synagogue Answers: PEW, CHAZZAN, SHAMMOS,
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____laud by the Sea


Friday, November 14, 1975
TJxe Jewish FJnrSflitn of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Rajje
2 Terrorist Infiltrators Killed Hohzman Critical of Red
Carpet Treatment for Sadat
Continued fro*n Pa ill'. Congresswoman was also critical ol the pres
U e the State Department has reportedly applied oi
or Abraham Deame to attend a ceremony honoring
Sadal when be visited New York last Wednesday. She
i she thought Beame should not attend the ceremony
By YITZHAK SHARGll.
TEL AVIV (JTA)
An army spokesman an
: lunced that Israeli forces
idled two armed terrorist
infiltrators from Syria and
captured five others in a
clash oil the central Golan
(hts. There were no Is-
raeli casualties.
The incident is believed
to be the first known armed
infiltration across the Is-
Syrian disengagement
s with the full support
and guidance of the Syrian
military authorities.
An official report was
made to United Nations
headquarters and to U.S.
authorities. Israeli circles
nave not yet determined
whether the infiltration was
n isolated incident or the
inn:- of a new phase of
hostile activity by Syria on
thf Golan line.
THE INFILTRATORS were
carrying kalachinkof rifles, re-
volvers, explosive charges, tim-
ing devices and a 6ynaBmnde
Documents in their pos-
session indicated that they
on a sabotage mission
i Israeli targets in the
- for which they
I at Suweida, a \il-
[e in southern Syria.
I'hey were apparently in-
structed by military personnel
.it the Syrian General H sad-
quartan on how to infiltrate
Israeli lines.
Jerusalem police, meanwhile,
have rounded up a terrorist
p belie ed responsible for
the explosion of a booby-trap-
ped ear which injured eight
people outside the Eyal Hotel
in downtown Jerusalem on Oct.
26.
According to reliable sourc-
es, the suspects include two
E ist Jerusalem Arabs, one of
than a woman, and five Arabs
from Irtas village near Bethle
hem aged 20 to 30, who report-
edly joined in a Fatah cell and
prepared the booby-trapped
car with explosives in their
possession.
SECURITY FORCES mean-
while have arrested nine per-
sons in Gaza suspected of mem-
Senior Youth Groups Plan
Dance Featuring Live Music
On Saturday Nov. 22. at 8
p.m.. the Temple Emanu-El Sen-
ior Youth Group of Fort Laud-
erdale. in conjunction with the
Senior Youth Croup of Temple
Beth-El of Hollywood, will hold
a dance featuring the live music
of an outstanding group called
Sunrise.
In order to attract youth
from Miami. Hollywood BJ1 I
Fort Lauderdale, we decided to
hold the dance in a central loca-
tion.'' said Youth Group presi-
dents Sharon Rad/ivill of Tem-
ple Emanu-L'.l and David Jacobs
of Temple Beth-El. "It was
agreed that Temple Beth-El ol
Hollywood would be perfect."
Sports Day and Barbecue
The Senior Youth Group of
Temple Emanuel will hold a
Sports Day on Sunday. Nov. 16.
from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Members
and their friends who plan to
attend should meet at Temple
Emanuel before 1 p.m. Trans-
noration to and from the park
will be provided bv the Youth
Group. A late lunchbarbecue
ribs and trimmings will be
served.
'This will be a fun day." said
Miss Sharon Radzivill, president
of the Youth Group. "We are
looking forward to a good turn-
out of our members and their
friends." '
bership in a terrorist cell or-
d to parra'
sabotage against the n wl] -
ekseti d c.\ I U. Council I
ed bv the recently
May.,i Raah'd
the I roris! regard i
lahorator with I
[ .'
. d .,- mi mb( i one
clan. "'- includ
Tamar Hadassah
Tamar Grot p of Hadsssah
will meet en Th Nov.
20, at 1 !:30 p.m. at the Fed< ra-
li in Buil
I' s. Josephine N wman,
! .! >nt of the Fort La
( barter, will give e
: c?re-
moni 's of H idas ah I
Mount Scopus in Jeru alem.
i give
a report on this progr
Vice president of educati in,
P' B ta 1 in will speak on
"the Past, Present and Future
of Jerusali m."
i all ivlati wa
I i a lai Abu
office.
: ex-
r i- ) ) se -
t i i i
sed th it ; -
.'.- to infill .i. Ii
:; bor I '
: weeks, all | then thv i
l \ Israeli fore s
Chaiiukah Sale
Plans for a i 'hanu! ah sal to
ld al Te npl E nanu-El on
Sund iv, \'o\. 16, and Sun lav,
13, Ii.t been comple
acco lins to 'Vnn Sigel ('latr-
person of the Judaic i Shon
Hou of the i1 v ill be I om
" to no ii ,-s
will he on disH iv ii th
ol T smple Emanu-
El.
\: .. hSi c ,,v'l ;g, (japl (8,
ns. d >i i.;-. (
u It. records, h io -. Rifl wrap
;.l>) -.-!,. ijl |- I tilflbl '
Temp'e Em&nu-E! To Payt:c
'i
in il I to po tici th
.. ..
Cl \ Iti n
tai :' i
:e al HA in' i al
< in In id i) i "
No'. 26, at 8.
M ib s E lann-El c mg : in
pa ticipate in th
Cantor J sroi 11 Kl m ail < ill
se\eral litui tuc 1
/un : i'1
S| .- ill i U ban
tries for their progra ns ou ia-
cism conducted in six arcs
I,is. their crir inal
task force and th- i- nrhr ae-
ipafc In IntwfmtH Service
.i v-ll Wltll
a i ; i '.
Consumer Affairs Is Topic
Cf Wen's Ciub Breakfast
: i nu '. M
will hold is fi i ;-
th a-ion '>
at 10 a. n. ii I I ile
; am lave <
n : .' -' l : award C
F Consu \
addn nsun
.. in ird Coun
! :ich -' ord-tc
am p.' c ; liniu
;. > aga nst i
, j. ,.,,, ,j,. .. ,- ,.;,;i {tore p '
<'' h discussed
i.

j
ill

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rnooF


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 14, 1975
srij*
^RabMwcai Page
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Lioschitz kaobi Robert J. Orkar.d
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
?QUESTION BOX?
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Why is it that some tradi-
tional synagogues will not al-
low funerals to be held in the
sanctuary?
Some sources base it on a
general rule which stated that
only "public eulogies" (e.g. pub-
lic funerals) could be held in
the synagogue but not "private
eulogies" (private funerals)
(Tosefta Maeilah, Tractate Me-
gilah 28:B). Generally speaking.
public eulogies would apply to
the spiritual leader of the con-
gregation or the sage who is
mourned bv the entire commu-
nity, and not onlv by a select
number of people. Actually,
taking the matter further, the
people were criticized for even
bringing the body of the famous
Goan of Vilna into the syna-
gogue. This was based upon an-
other contention which claimed
that in our age of diaspora there
A BICENTENNIAL COMMEMORATION
Washington And The Jews
George Washington's associa-
tions with Jews, according to
available records, were pre-
dominantly official and formal,
both as commander in chief of
the Revolutionary forces and as
the first president of the United
States. David Salisbury Franks
(c. 1742-1793) and Solomon
Bush (1753-1795), as lieutenant-
colonels, became the highest
ranking Jewish officers in the
Continental Army. During the
yellow-fever epidemic of 1793,
Washington rented the German-
town house of Isaac Franks
(1759-1822) a cousin of David
S. Franks. Isaac Franks, an en-
thusiastic patriot, played a
heroic role in the Continental
Army.
Probably the most complete
and best known records of
Washington's relations with the
Jews of America are the letters
of felicitation addressed to
Washington bv the Jewish con-
gregations and the president's
replies. Following Washington's
inauguration on April 30, 1789,
six congregations inscribed and
delivered to the president warm
sentiments of felicitation. From
Washington, in turn, the conere-
gations received replies no less
warm in their expressions of
hope for the well-being of the
Jews of America.
The first address to reach
President Washineton was sign-
ed by Levi Sheftall as president
of the newlv-reorganized con-
gregation of Savannah.
The congregation's address
read in part:
"Your exampled liberality
and extensive philanthropy have
dispelled that cloud of bigotry
and superstition which has lang
as a vail shaded religionun-
rivetted the fetters of enthusi-
asmenfranchised us with all
the privileges and immunities
of free citizens, and initiated us
into the grand mass of legisla-
tive mechanism. By example
you have taught us to endure
the ravages of war with manly
fortitude, and to enjoy the bless-
ings of peace with reverence to
the Deity and benignity and
love to our fellow-creatures."
President Washington's reply
read in part:
"I rejoice that a spirit of
liberality and philanthropy is
much more prevalent than it
formerly was among the en-
lightened nations of the earth,
and that your brethren will
benefit thereby in proportion as
it shall become still more ex-
tensive; happily the people of
the United States have in many
instances exhibited examples
worthy of imitation, the salutary
influence of which will doubt-
less extend much farther if
gratefully enjoying those bless-
favor of heaven) have been at-
tained by fortitude in war, they
shall conduct themselves with
reverence to the Deity and
charity toward their fellow-
creatures.
"May the same wonder-work-
ing Deity, who long since de-
livered the Hebrews from their
Egyptian oppressors, planted
them in a promised land, whose
providential agency has lately
been conspicuous in establish-
ing these United States as an
independent nation, still con-
tinue to water them with the
dews of heaven and make the
inhabitants of every denomina-
tion participate in the temporal
and spiritual blessings of that
people whose God is Jehovah."
In June 1790, the New York
congregation invited *he con-
gregations in Philadelphia,
Charleston, Richmond and New-
port to join in an address to
the President. Newport declined
as Rhode Island had not yet
ratified the constitution. (The
address of the four congrega-
tions, excluding Newport, is
covered in the medal portray-
ing Manuel Josephson who sign-
ed the address for these con-
gregations.)
When Washington visited
Newport on August 17, 1790,
an address signed by Moses
Seixas as Warden of the con-
gregation was presented to the
President.
The address read in part:
"Sir:Permit the children of
the stock of Abraham to ap-
proach you with the most cor-
dial affection and esteem for
your person and merit, and to
join with our fellow-citizens in
welcoming you to Newport.
"With pleasure we reflect on
those days of difficulty and dan-
ger when ths God of Israel, who
delivered David from the peril
of the sword, shielded vour
head in the day of battle; and
we rejoice to think that the
same spirit which rested in the
bosom of the greatly beloved
Daniel, enabling him to preside
over the provinces of the
Babylonian Empire, rests and
ever will rest upon you, en-
abling you to discharge the
arduous duties of the Chief
Magistrate of these States.
"Deprived as we hitherto have
been of the invaluable rights of
free citizens, we nowwith a
deep sense of gratitude to the
Almighty Disposer of all events
behold a government erected
by the majesty of the people
a government which to bigotry
gives no sanction, to persecu-
tion no assistance, but generous-
ly affording to all liberty of
conscience and immunities of
citizenship, deeming every one
of whatever nation, tongue or
language, equal parts of the
are no real sages, even th
there are great scholars 01
from time to time. Therefore, no
one can be classified as the per-
son for whom all Israel mourns.
The activity of the synagogue
is sunposedly limited to public
functions shared by the com-
munity and not private func-
tions limited to a certain group.
In a sense it was for this reason
that some authorities even for-
bid private weddings from tak-
ing place in the synagogue.
There are some authorities who
will not officiate at weddings
or funerals in synagogues.
Some of them might make an
exception in the case of the
funeral of the spiritual leader
ol the synagogue since the en-
tire synagogue is involved with
him. A further consideration is
made to the extent that if syn-
agogue funerals are limited to
important people, many will
claim that thev are important
and ask for the same privileges.
This regulation, therefore, also
serves the purpose of preserv-
ing the equality between the
various people in the commu-
nity so as not to hurt or embar-
rass anyone. Furthermore, it is
sometimes claimed that certain
behavior in the course of wed-
dings or funerals might not be
in consonance with the atmo-
sphere of the synagogue.
a -tr -a
Why are many prayers cast
in the form of benedictions
(i.e. Berakoth)?
The rabbis in the Talmudic
period considered the bendic-
tion the "coin" (Matbea) of
prayer. Even though in some
sources "benedictions" and
"prayers" are seemingly two
different categories of expres-
sion, the basic body of the pray-
ers is, nevertheless, composed
of the famous "Nineteen Bene-
dictions" (Sh'moneh Esreh).
The fundamental idea of the
benediction is that the Almighty
is the source and the owner of I
everything there is to be had I
in life. This applies to both I
material things as well as intel- I
lectual and emotional life with- I
out acknowledging its rightful
owner is considered as having I
committed a theft. The Almighty I
wants man to enjoy and to par- I
take of all that life has to offer; :
but he asks man to first I
acknowledge the ultimate I
source of that object. The basic \
form of the Benediction I
acknowledges both that the Al- 1
mighty is the ultimate Creator
of all and that he is at the same \
time the provider who wants i
to share all that He created with "
man. He thus allows man the
privilege of using everything |
and also the license to commu- j
nicate with Him.
ings of peace which (under the great governmental machine."
CANDLELIGHTING TIME j
UJ j
10 KISLEV 5:12
w
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Bar/Bat Mitzvah-
Wlien? Why?
B> RABBI NORMANMUSSMAN
Beth Torah Congregation
All of us. I am sure, are fami-
liar with the following expres-
sion in regards to Bar Mitzvah
"in recent years there has
been an overemphasis on the
Bar rather than on the Mitz-
vah."
As a Jewish Educator for over
twenty years, I would like to
express some thoughts, prob-
lems and questions concerning
the Bar Pat Mitzvah syndrome
apropos Jewish Education.
a) Are Bar Bat Mitz"ah per-
formances indicators of a child's
ability and commitment?
b) Bar Bat Mitzvah should
be postponed from thirteen to
at least sixteen.
c) The most important vnars
of Jewish education are during
the teenag vears when students
begin questioning and under-
standing what life is really
about.
d) More often than not, if
parents are not interested in
Judaism, their children will fol-
low the same pattern of dis-
interest.
e) Religion is caughtnot
taught.
f) Why do some parents not
wish to buy a pair of T'fillin and
yet spend thousands ot dollars
on a reception?
g) No one can guarantee a
child's Jewish identity. Only a
home's influence can possibly
determine what type of Jew he
or she will become.
RABBI NORMAN MUSSMAN
h) Should a Religious School
use the public school as a mo-
del?
i) Why don't parents take
their Bar/Bat Mitzvah child to
Israel in place of a grandiose
party?
j) Why do parents inform us
that it is the child's decision
whether he/she remains in
school after the Bar/Bat Mitz-
vah? Do their children have
the same privilege to be a "drop
out" from public school at the
age of 13?
Yet with all these questions
and problems still unresolved,
I am still amazed at the success
we do have in spite of the indif-
ference of parents.
i li" I :!.'.!|i|i''ii.h:im ':''.'..,.'! i tmii'iiii
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Vayetze
Jacob's dream.
"And he dreamed, and behold a ladder set up on
the earth, and the top of it reached to heaven; and be-
hold the angels of God ascending and descending on it"
(Gen. 28.12).
Vayetze On his way to Haran, Jacob lay down to
rest at a place where God appeared to him in a dream,
promising to be with him and to give the land to him
and his seed after him. Rising the next morning, Jacob
lifted the stone on which he had slept, and set it up as
a pillar. He called the place Beth-el, meaning "house of
God," and vowed to serve God there when he returned
to his father's house. The Lord would be his God.
In Haran Jacob worked twenty years as a shepherd
for Laban seven years for his first wife, Leah, seven
years for his second wife, Rachel, and six years for the
sheep. His wives gave him their maid servants Bilhah
and Zilpah as wives. Jacob's four wives bore him 11
sons: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad,
Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, and Joseph; he also had one
daughter named Dinah. At God's direction, Jacob re-
turned home to his father's house. On the way he met
the angels of God.
This recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted
and based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage,"
edited by P. Wollman-Tsamir, $15. Publisher is Shengold, and
the volume is available at 27 William St., New York, N.Y.
10005. President of the society distributing the volume is
Joseph Schlang.
j ii. ;.,..
*


November 14, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
ill MJNDIIN
rob War Against West Waged in Vienna
Continued from Page 4
^rand, the Frenchman, re-
[mbered almost exclusively
his achievements in Vienna,
the OPEC potentates do not
bn choose, say, Lagos or Car-
ts, among the most vocifer-
ous spokesmen for repeated
stiff price hikes. Outside the
circle of Arab self-interest,
these meeting places might
well serve to boost the Arab
propagandistic ploy that there
is no such thing as an exclu-
nited Way Pledges Increase
Jnited Way pledges made to
Ite by 1,H3 businesses, pro-
^sional people and residents
an average of nearly 18 per
nt higher than last year, with
htributions totaling $453,000,
27 percent of the $1.69 mil-
goal.
[of 1,096 small businesses, 274
ire reported, for a total aver-
increase of nearly 48 per-
nt.
Residential pledges have in-
based an average of 32 per-
pt, but onlv 174 pledges of a
fcsible 19,866 have been re-
ved.
Major Rroups in the nonprofit
fision show an average in-
fcase of 26 percent, while
[jor profit erouos, the largest
pa in the United Way cam-
Jgn. show an average increase
14 percent, or a total of
k7,180 with 102 accounts of
possible 795 reporting.
Some of the latest increases
fclude employees of Jordan
rsh. Fort Lauderdale (up 150
rcent from $2,644 last year to
L598 this year), and employees
Broward National Bank (up
j percent from $1,900 last year
|S2,290 this year).
Other recent contributions in-
clude a $4,000 corporate pledge
from Coral Ridge National Bank,
a $3,300 corporate pledge from
Winn-Dixie Stores, and a $1,000
corporate pledge from Xerox
Corp.
Pharmacy Alumni To Meet
The Florida Chapter of the
Alumni Association of the
Brooklyn College of Pharmacy
will meet on Sunday, Nov. 16,
at 9 a.m. in rooms A and B at
the Washington Federal Savings
and Loan, 699 N.E. 167th St.,
North Miami Beach. A con-
tinental breakfast will be
served.
Frank Toback, president of
th State Board of Pharmacy,
will report on the "status of
Ph.G. in the State of Florida
pertaining to Board of Phar-
macy registration."
Vernon Bell, inspector for
State Board of Pharmacy, will
discuss recent changes in state
laws pertaining to pharmacy.
A question-and-answer period
will follow the talks. One hour
of continuing education credit
will be issued to those request-
ing it.
8Td/l.&tet-
THOMAS M. RALPH. OWN( ANO OIICTO
7O0I N. W. 4TM *Tf T PLANTATION. FLORIDA JM17
5876888 ___.
Serving the needs of
tie Jewish Community
in our three locations
5915 FARK DRIVE MARGATE
6800 W.OAKLAND PK. BLVD.
SUNRISE
441 S. FEDERAL HWY.
DEERFIELD BEACH
ENORAH
CfcapcCs
Mark Weissmin
Broward County's first
Jtwish Funeral Director
TELEPHONE
MARGATE -DEERFIELD 971-3330
SUNRISE 739-4000
sively Arab oil cartel.
BUT LAGOS, capital of Ni-
geria, is Black African for
which, if it is possible, Arab
contempt is even deeper than
the contempt Arabs harbor for
Christians and Jews.
And Caracas, capital of Ven-
ezuela, bespeaks a nation in a
hemisphere Hitler described
in "Mein Kampf" as the prod-
uct of a culture "where the pre-
dominantly Latin immigrants
often mixed with the aborigines
on a large scale" resulting in
"lower peoples."
No, it is Vienna, always Vien-
na where the OPEC petrobil-
lionaires strut to demonstrate
that once again Saladin and
Suleiman the Magnificent reign
supreme in the precious gar-
den of European, meaning
western, achievement.
VIENNA IS the perfect city
for their purpose. It is not only
symbolic of a powerful past but
- PALMES'S *
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY/1
I
ELKIN
PERSONALIZED MEMORIAL!
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUK WORKSHOP
4440921 Broward 525-5941
3279 S.W. 8th ST.. MIAMI
of a decadent present a pres-
ent that is weak, infertile, liv-
ing on the memory of what was
and not on the promi.ie of what
is to be.
There, OPEC can paraphrase
Nasser in his warning when
he seized and nationalized the
Suez Canal, with nary a peep
out of us: We may, if we wish,
choke on our western fury, but
the forces of world economic
might are shifting eastward
precisely because western tech-
nological and technocratic (oil)
needs demand that they do,
and there is no way we can
stop them.
We are in the process of be-
ing bested because we are best
a paradox being played out
a second time in their history
by the Arabs. How can they
help but recall those glorious
days when the Moors last slam-
med upward into Europe to
reign supreme in the Mediter-
ranean world?
IEVITT
memorial chapels
IWI r.mb.ol. *4 IJJJ5 w Di.i. Hwy.
M.Hyw^d. II. North Miami. H.
5244497 9494*14
Sy Uvfn, IB Atort ia,,.n. I a.
THESE THEN are the terms
of the Middle East struggle, not
the narrow-minded view we
are taking of it in Washington
and the other western capi-
tals except for a James
Schlesinger, who couldn't tol-
erate the Kissinger "Judenrat"
mentality any longer, the fear-
ful spirit of the phrenetic toad.
Sadly, if we are to judge by
the calibre of the politicians
who presume to speak for us
these days, they are nowhere
near such awarenesses as these.
Hence, the bunko Sadat visit,
the bunko Ford speeches of
greeting, the bunko Kissinger
intrigues, the bunko congres-
sional "even-handed" cuts in
aid to Israel.
It will take at least a genera-
tion before these awarenesses
emerge, and there will be many
battles fought in the meantime
before the war itself is even
understood.
( JEFFER "
FUNERAL HOMES, INC.
DIRECTORS
ln*in Jettei Mlwin JeHef Alvm JeHM
IN NEW YORK*
18811 HILLSIDE AVE. HOLLIS. U. NY.
1 283 CONEY ISLANO AVE. 8KIYN. N Y.
212/776-8100
IN FLORIDA
OAOE COUNTY- 13385 W DIXIE HWY.
947 -11 8 5 Rep by Soon, levin I 0.
BROWARD COUNTY I92I PEMBROKE RO.
925-2743 Rep bySwnvlev.rt.FJJl
PALM BEACH COUNTY-625 S OLIVE AVE.
1-925-2743 Rep byPWe,nsli>;n,f.D.
Seivices available in all com-
munities m New York and Ihcoughout
Ihe&eaiet Miami aiea. ,
V
> :^i v. iMtrOK*?: Weak.
.. r .*VM^!o*vtr4X^.
Star
of.
David
Memorial Gardens
AS BEAUTIFUL
AS THE SYMBOL
IT REPRESENTS.
The staff of the Star of David Memorial
Gardens would like to invite all members
of the Jewish community to visit this
beautiful Jewish cemetery and to inspect
our new open-air Memorial Chapel. The
Star of David Memorial Gardens has been
carefully designed to comply with Judaic law
and tradition and has been dedicated by the
Broward Board of Rabbis.
We at the Star of David Memorial Gardens
feel it is important that every prospective
purchaser visit the cemetery prior to making
a decision. For additional information call Rabbi
Milton Gross at the Star of David Memorial
Gardens office or at his home, 739-4952.
We invite you to see our bronze memorials by
Gorham, Master Craftsmen in Silver and Bronze
Star of David Memorial Gardens
7701 BAILEY ROAD TAWARAC, FLORIDA 305-721-4112
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1577 Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33302


e 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, November 14, 1975
South Florida Delegates To
Attend Nov. 16-20 Convention
i

I !
15,70 at
Fews to /
. i e fii hi n of
n :ti "

,incrl in iati "-
.
I seal r I an w
I in the
h
| i
-
Irwin Fine Is Chairman of
Temple Emami-El Dinii
Land
i

to nm
.. .m; i that the
| In v
, .,., |
R ,h !' Il
said.
..]-. .. futU
the / .....
: "j '.
''
hows 1
-
,
I I
:

community
calendar
R 14
S tolom Dedication Weekend
>AY, NOVEMBER IS
dm Dedication Weekend Dinn D nee
7 p.m.
Hi Ha i. tsah Art Auction 8 p.m.
blea al Invei rai >
DfiR 16
n Dad cation Weekend 2 p.m
'. i .- Greco Show,
9 p.m.
1 Senior youth G Daj and
l p.i
'. R
nil---10
a.m. 2 p.m.
. 12:30 p.m.
el eting, Singles

I -
:I

4
I
the ton .. ond
IRW1
.
Dinner of Stal l
I
n Ft. La
The dim
I
Bond 0
nk of i nple
: I) slated: "Il A I
honor and n I
serve as our
".nuishcd human
n Fine. Hi
of his fellov n a
strength to his fellow con
nl
Financi
pie Emanu-El, 1 .
ee
. ecuth el
ol
:)ie pas! 15
25-yoai n
. '"M i : |
dale, and has held
president tcial
etar
He served on tl '
llpligiouf*
Service
Wat lAUDCRO/""
St. (Cor>--e'.'
-
BETH ISRAEL T- i !.; I | 711
--.I Part- Blvd r.ibbi Phiiit
lar. Cntor M>UriO< Neu
I
EL (Ttmele) 3J48 W Oil
Park B'vd Reform. C
VOUNC ISRAEI H iLi.WOOD
lOrthtfctttfl '"' "' -<] Rd.
PLANTATION
\l rA-T >N JS H '.ti .CONGRE
... -i s..u,h N t> Hin Road
ation. Rabbi Arthur J. Abrama.
PUMP A NO REACH
5HOLOM (Temi)lf). 132 St V.th Av.
rvativ. Rabb' Morria A. Skori
Cantor Jacob J. Renter
----
MAROAff
NARRATE JEWISH CiNTER. iCon
-rv vi 8101 NW Bn St.
',TICIN BETH Hll LEL
Il 7640 Mar
trial D^i
COMl SPMJ<:
BS HE Bl i
' N. w
i.... n

'

can ol '
:
...

I


i
ild WIDE da;
MAI ("V. All
CHI
.5-7660.
Die! *
| W. On' : Ivd.,
Ft. Lai Fla. 3.5311
I
\ t 21
rsral Assembly
. Hi
EMI ER 22
, '.. AaMMy
I
n Club i l-Rai ir -- 7 p.-
wish Cdnerfgation Fun.' Raiser 7iM p.m.
( Conptw Social 8 p m.
I young Couples (lub Boa d Meeting
El and Temple 1 Youth
Dame s p.m.
IBR 28
I'.J.l pal A mbly
lens Phase V Fund-Raiser 10 a.m.
:.'- fl rial Pane 7 p
. .. is 7 p.i
. El BER 74
Division Leadership Training Program 10
p
Dhisioi Wo idlands M 2:30 p.m.
Israel Men2* I ting 8 P-m-
' n Gro ip, Hi.!!' wood 8 i
DAY, NOVEMBER 25
hi Bet I Meeting 9:45 a.m.
B GrOtip 12:7.0 p.m.
aior Y, I : iketball 8 p.m.
I Israel Jowor us.v. Basketball 8 p.m.
BER 26
Ahavah I Mara-
7 r
..liny 9:30 a.m.
al Meet-
'! 8 p
v., ball 8 p.m.
> ;M mmm 28 (Huh-v*-.**
.....:ial 7 ;
79
36 p.m.
P irty 8 p.m.
R 30
i lub Community*Bond Dinner 6 p.m.
Federation Film Set Lea 8 p
erary Chapter, Chanukuh Party for
Childn aT "8 p.n.
indeis Women Theatre Party 8 p.m.


J
Bullet Proof
Vests (or All
" m
THAT Squeaky Fromme and Sara Jane Moore both have
l-tunatelv fumbled in attempts to shoot down President
Ithe plague f eun-wielding is up near the top of the
of unfinished business again.
Resident Ford, who was getting ready to present his own
views on pun control ("rather protective of the sun
when Fnuesky tried to shoot him with a cumbersome
IS, has taken to wearing a bullet-proof vest.
RESIDENTS have a way of setting fashion in America:
suggestion has been made that we all set corseted up
jy Mr. Ford is so we won't be listed among the predicted
victims of handguns in 1975. But even a vest leaves our
and underpinnings vulnerable. Besides, the price of all
)g. vests included, is going up.
irntloxes abound in the hunt for a solution to this legal
ss of the guns. Thus Presidential-aspirant George C. Wal-
mains firm in his opposition to gun-control efforts de-
'> M.....;- jvnerience ol 1Q71 in Laurel, Md.
|T BY four bullets then and paralyzed since, the Alabama
continues to believe it is far more important to cut
government in Washington by placing howitzers on
leouvrs of our capita] than it is to risk incurring the
[of the powerful mm lobby of America by trying to de-
effective gun-control law.
pnuspnds of police officers the nation over will have to
their heads In amazement at this absurdity.
HAT HAS brought us to this gun madness, the wild-
i" lawl ssn-'ss which has resulted in more homicides per
Han there were American deaths in Vietnam? Well, the
merican settlers found guns essential as they pushed
u istward.
Civil War and our love of hunting intensified interest
Ipon In our own times, rum-running, gang warfare, and
I affair with the bang-bang scenarios have all
i Hie pile-up cf guns, reliance on guns, preoccupation
| i the ti' ie of our nation's beginnings, officialdom
'' i' e of gun control.
LONG "'.. as 1692, Massachusetts Colony had a law
toting offensive weapons in public places. State laws
led weapons abound. Today, there are more than
and local laws dealing with regulation of fire arms.
I> our urban centers erupted viol nth- in the late 1950s
1960s, one presidential commission after another ad-
begged for. insisted on the expansion of gun control
on.
it the energetic gun lobby, which boasts it can scare the
Its out of Congress by pouring 500.000 letters on to con-
|nal desks within three days, has up to now pretty much
way.
r ILLUSTRATION of that lobby's strength was its recent
in dissuading all but one advertiser to pull away from
CBS nut on the air "The (kins of August,'' a timely
Concerned with hunting.
ills now repeal that two in every three Americans favor
ptrol. President Ford offers the oblique approach of try-
limit the number of gun dealers, cutting the list down
foflOO.
rnej General Edward H. Lerl would abolish handguns
k.-fnie areas, except in homes and businesses; he wo;ld
Ike ownership of pesky Saturday night specials prohibi-
ts KENNEDY, who knows too well the toll of destruc-
i.n. advocates gun registration. After painful study
jun menace, the American Jewish Congress has appeal-
Washington to pass a law banning the manufacture, sale,
kidr&bip oi all types of handguns and handgun ammuni-
;p| for iav enforcement officers.
a hMtv, energetic power bloc eealeseing around the
bora of the National Rifle Association appears able
I to paralyse legislators into a continuing Si
lion.
November 14, 197 ***;*# fhrkUam PaSe 15

Vail in Spotlights
Discovery of Citadel
YADIN, YIGAEL. Ha/or: the Rediscovery of a
Great Citadel of the Bible. New York: Ran-
dom House, 1975. 280 p. illus. $20.00.
I.IAZOR RHYMES with "makor" "makor" in
Hebrew means source, and "The Source''
by James Mich mer. is the popular and his-
torlcally accurate novel which recreates layer
bv layer the story of this unique city in the
Galilee of Israel.
Yadin was drawn to Hazor as a PhD can-
didate in archaeology researching the art of
v.- -tore in b:blic,l lands. (This thesis was nub-
lished in 1963 in a very attractive format which
his later works uch as "Masada." "Bar-Kokh-
ba" and now "Hazor" duplicate.)
It was an enormous city spanning a large
geographical ana with unusual features. Yadin
knew that Hozor played an important role in
the history of Canaan in biblical times. There-
fore, he anticipated a fruitful dig.
THF. EXCAVATIONS at Ha/or. which span-
ned the summers of 1968-58. were carried out
as a classic arcbae'ogical dig: uncovering over
20 strata at the "tell" fan ancient mound)
which covered a span of 3.000 years.
As altars, tunnels, vessels and fisurincs are
discovered in every strata. Yadin recreates for
US the cultures that must have used these ob-
ject*. Because of earlier excavations elsewhere
In ferael, the Hazor team is able to compare
findings and arrive at fascinating conclusions.
It is found that one of the strata was a city
built by King Solomon. This is confirmed aftei
comparing mason marks on the stones from the
Meglddn /- with those at Hazor.
THF. '.'ELL" provides the archaeologists
with seine extraordinary insights Into ancient
Palestinian life. Numbers of jars are found
beneath most of the floors (beaten-earth) in
stratum 3. Upon opening several of these |a -
they are seen to be infant burials.
Originally thought to be child sacrifices
these burials were common practiceburyi ig
dead infants under the floor of home-; so the)
might continue to live Bear their families.
Archaeol'iical terminology in "Ha/or" is
slmplv r\pt.:ined. Drawing* and photographs
are clearly marked next to the appropriate test
A colorful table of strati and chronology at
the end of the book is an ^excellent reference
tool with which to follow the dig.
YADrN'S ENTHUSIASM is contagious. Like
bis previous wwr'-s. this book is written for die
lev person. Yadin uses a variety of literarj
techniques and an engrossing! format through
r.-.'t the text to encourage the reader to par-
ticipate in the dig. and to empathize with th
team in the unfolding drama!
Th^ dig at Hazor confirmed a number of
hypotheses with which the team began: Joshua
not Deborah, destroyed Jabln, the l naanite
Kfni 'r; Solomon rebuilt Hazor: and the
biblical account of the citv In, the
history of Hazor during the rule ol t:
it Israel.
A Seng Thai May hi
Make Israel's Hi) Parade

_-- if per l
-----------------
Haifa
t MBIT sons written by Nomi Shemer almost
inevitably bed for the ton of the Hit
Parade, the ponutar wrif-r, who usuallv does
both words and music for her hits, has a
knack for capturing the mood and spirit of the
peonle of Isra-1 and translating them into tunes
and verses which reflect the times.
Perhins best known of her song* is "Jeru-
salem of Hold." which almost overnight became
.-. nation il anthi m and will lone he identified
with a thrilling episode in the history of the
j, w\gh people, H was the ijight sone. at the
right time. Vet N'o-m Shemer has written so
m my other $od favoritjs-rsojgs that are on the
lips of c- erv Israelithat it is clear she is a
erpnfb'c and talatjted artist.
HAYING SAID all this. 1 must renort that
her newest sone. nlthoiwh widely discussed,
nnri the. s''h'>et of critical articUs in the press,
is not perform >d on Israel radio, is not in the
repeitoire ol any popular singers and is not
'!-hl- on records or tapes anywhere in Is-
raelyet.
The controversial son': is entitled "The Sar-
r?in an the Sha*"! r I :' nil : irical r fr-
enc to the present Middle Eastern situation
is all too clear.
In catchy verse, the ballad tells of a little
sardine swimming off the shores ol Eilat, or
-; ..>, ''! Ariel sharl a id ol
coil i lil ..... '>' "U-"
On thing lords tn n >ther, and to placate
the shark, the sn din ~- tin his tail, some
. from his b"lly, some scales from Ins back
but not'*in" h
IN DESPERATION, the sawHn tells ''is foe
that for a real and lasting peace he is prepared
to give evetvthJng. Hteafing this, the shark
rel Tits, utters the magic word "peace," bares
his tonr'i and swaHevsithc sardine whole. At
last, flowers, peace and lave; hot a wave nor a
rirnle in the water. The shirk s\vim peace-
hilly on the shores of Eilat, or El Arish, and
there is nor.: to disturb him.
If it i; tft'e that we are indeed a sardine,
then w are to t anyhmf In this world of sharl s
The en*"rmrison of Ism >1 to a vl nerable little
pnMic has not yet heard the song.
A NEW i I '"s from \ >"ii Shemer should
by now already have achieved considerable
popularity. We investigated.
\i record store here in Haifa, or in Tel
\\'w, hi- the song. "Not available" they say.
I'! recording companies are tight-lipped.
But _i Hew of our inouiry, and indication
that her public would Welcome her music, she
. roue herself and put the song on the
market, The Sardine and the Shark" may yet
e the '.lit Pa.....Ie,
OFtsnian Brothers and \to (Medirftl) Cord Thai Binds So Tightly
.....__.....f il. |l .,-.- naIhII iiimvt \l ii il .'
[MAY have missed the rather sensational story
Iton Blakeslce, science editor of the Associated
carried in his column last month. Blakeslce,
1 the fore-nost lay authorities on medicine, de-
a Dew discovery for umbilical cords.
Associated Press science editor is writing on
Wet based on a renmt presented to the Inter-
la! v'aidiovaseul.ir Society irr Edinburgh, Scot-
t>\ the brothei s Drs. Irving and Herbert Dardik
iv Jersey.
P1- DARUIK brothers are not unknown flames
column since both of them have served in
Bl eapaeitk.8 r^rtaining to the welfare of Mac-
and Hapocl Games teams over the past dec-
[a matter of fact, while Dr. Herbert was mak-
presentation on the umbilical cord graft in
s_/l.?*^r//i
C-llCIl
Scod&ndi brother Ir\ ini was embart-.mg from Pliila-
delphia for Mexico City where he is to be stationed
for the nexi few \> "eks .is a member of the United
States medical stafl accompanying the United States
Pan-American team.
IRVING DARDIK was one of the finest sprinters
to ever attend the University of Pennsylvania, and
was a number <>f tlm Pcnn rclav quartet which won
the I-y League championship in 1956.
In 1957, representing the United States in the
International MHotaWan Saiijes in Israel, Dr. Irving
won his Hrsl gold medM in the -100-meter run.
l>r. rrftns Dardik is stHI a "jock" at heart, but
he has be n working asaiduoualy in the d svelopment
of a :'<< which Alton Rtniesfee, the famous medical
writ for th Aasociai -' Pii ss, gnnt 's the brothers
il,;.o--i.-iiv stating that the ambilical cord, the
unborn bnby's life-line^ alter birth is discarded along
with the "..frcr biuh" inattri?l called the placenta.
Mihunkie aaya that aooorrhng to the report given
by Dr. Herbert Dardik at the International Car-
diovascular Society meeting In Scotland, that his
brother, Dr, Irving, the athl te of the family, con-
ceived the idea while removing a natural graft that
had failed.


Face U
The Jem* Fk^dicn C G'ece- Ten LaJerdde
Fndaj. Ncrmbe:
II
You are about to find out
why a tire you never heard of
is the best tire for these times.
Radically new. Radically different.
Tbe only radial with steel side-walls.
The IJLL Al-Sted Rad*! is the
i" a:; re '-.- ..-:- rs It ; the
t: -. ti.*.:. ;i" : r. E*:a ->e ::'
the rac-a inriga pea get MM B*a per gaBon
f gas thai Frew ether : ;: :r be. ted
t.res Beca.se of the esc asm I ? I V -Sted
trod m pea get thousands ti am
c.- : the tire tse I We bdieve ibe result
is tbe lowest cost per mOe of driving from any
kind or any brand of tire on tbe market today.
Our enj mots be eve the I Rl AD-Sted
Pa: a drives safer rides more comfortably,
steers more pit nd responds sorer
that tire hi car. ;.;. at a
We UMMilr* them Ear "'. ':: nOa What s
rr. t.-.e :' --' = -
n not wttsfied a- =--..
we v. in price n fail
No tricks No haddea .,:res.
But, boil it all down and
you've got three basic
tire types to consider.
1. BIAS 2. BELTED 3. RADIAL
t BIAS TIRES
Tao :.:'.:-?.*.'tsfces for
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2. BELTFD TIRES
.j-',: >as ::
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3. RADIAL TIRES
*.... -- :- ;;*'*<-*. ::-:i 0*
rr-a -.-':- v'.fi ::: :".::-;-
tread f JC serees ": : -:'* :*": :' -;* <
i.- ::::' t '. :*>
Buying tires is tough enough.
Ton s OH BO*d a- engineers education to
understand t:re advertising these da>s There
are bias and belted and radial types F-71 s
and FR-": I tad 7 73 s -a- :': -r..;h fit the
ame car And nylon and rayon and polyester
ar.C :'.De-glass ar.3 stee. And p..es on piies.
AVAILABLE ONLY AT
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S'^CE 1924
TIRE CO.
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The strongest radial is an all-steel radial.
The I.RI. is the only all-steel radial
automobile tire.
Conventional so-called steel -a:all pal steel
to work beneath tbe tread only. One or 1
belts of sted run the cBoanfercace of the t.-e
and fabric cords are -it- -a; a ; -
sidewali to side--.a.. Tbe conventional steel
radial tire is only a ued-bdied radial. This is
important in understanding tbe superiority of
an I.RI- All-Steel Radial.
An lulwiir design and e-.z meting r-jcess
put more sted m tbe I R I radial than a any
ether i.---.-. '. t-.-e Tan brers or belts of
sted cables (30 per -:.-. Make sate the I.RI.
tread stays open for ansai an -^ad contact
a all ends of weather This also reduces
friction, which is the biggest single cause of
tire vear
A third barrier of sted cables -erlares the
fabric (polyester, fiberglass etc used in tbe
sidewalls of all other automobile tires Tbe
result is 100 per cent sted strength and
protection.
Rated Load Range D.
I R 1 All-Steel Radia'.s meet government stand-
ards equivalent to an eight-jr Of and it s
stamped on the side of every I R I t.re Most
passenger tires ever, steel-belted radujls
earn, oar} jBt: four-pl) rating Load Range D
means an extra margin of strength and safety
for all vehicles, e-.er. the heaviest of loxary
a.:c.mobiles station wagons or pick ops
Improved steel cable design means extra
comfort, too.
The I R I All-Sted Radial uses a special;.
des g-ed sted cable engineered exclusive!) for
us Each cable is wound of seen strands of
BUDGET URHS AVAILABLE
CtHTHALlllAMMWSW 5-*>*V"!'&!
CO"AU GABLESB:H DoocUa Rc*dI4-I.0l
HOUTH M\AtiIXiM S W Tlh. AJ -"'
N. MIAMI BEACM-1TW N E. 1U St--SS-T4M
MIAMI BEACM14S4 Alton Bwl-7:-SJM
SOUTH DAOEM*l S Dim Hwy.-7-.S.S
WIALEAM.PALM S*IWGS MILE-irTS ith St.-?
WEST MtAMS-BM <**?? ^-*SiSt
W. HOLLYWOOD-Wl B. *t*i* R*. T*tl-*
rV the Srt ntmtH Yt* Ce* 43J4635
1. 'kf :', :-=*r STEEL
: -* s:::s:'-r" "-
f*x.5 -:-. :::?::-
2. "a: :?: .!:?: '5-e-t
stee :;: r :' ~: _-~ "ti:
v.'-.'" y. stw ^2>6S :r "i*
Total i Three layers o! sled
beneath the tread.
3. I:-:-:-:--:---
The :-. wssengettore* sted
M :: : :-.: :' the bad
fcf :.t 'f 'fi::": >-.'-.'-:
4. -i:-r- ::-:.:-:- : r.
tread
three-fl;-r-- re That s a total rf 21 strong
sted f.li-e--; oead '" 5
strenrtn :-< cab e is as fi k- The
res_: I I I **
The new year-round tread.
A special ccmruterriesigned tread configura-
t>or. was deseloped to make m^\.~ _- -;;
of the strength boilt into the I Rl Ml-Ssed
Radial Kom the combination of atari and
tread de*.;- pioaidea sc.id road-holc.-i
perform ar.ee u r nds of dr. i f
conditions we: or dry snow or navacr heal
The IR.I. is an all-weather, all-vear ure-
Why you haven't heard about I.RI.
* Ail-Steel Radials till now.
Compared with the giants of tbe t re aiattr)
I R 1 is a rdativdv small company Vie
are growing steadily on a market-by-market
pian now reaching vour city F;*e .^ea^s
ago we set out to produce a tire that was as
good as the finest imported tire available
Because we had no conventional iHll IMlinf.
equipment ue -^ere free "to try anv-.h ;
We did And came up with a totally new idea
thai produced a tire even better than the one
we had set out to make The 1 R 1 All-Stee.
Radial has been tested and re-tested Subjected
to literally millions of miles of road-handlir.g
experience Sow us available here Backed r.
a 5C.00C-miie guarantee Sold and servicec
by proven leaders in the business.
I.R.I.
MTBOUTIONAi RUBMR INDUSTtIIS, IMC
Extra safety. Extra comfort. Extra miles-
The finest tire you can buy. The I.R.I.
Ail-Steel Radial.
ti,i.i;.;i;.i:.
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TMIWPIMIIJ
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