The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00038

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
0Uewisti Floncliai m
Volume
2 4 Number 17
OF GREATER FORT LU DFRIPXLE
Friday, August 22, 1975
Price 25 cents
Baer Reviews 1975 UJA Campaign Effort's Results
Allan E. Baer. president of
he Jewish Federation who
served as general chairman of
the W5 United Jewish Appeal -
Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
recently reviewed the
Jesuits of the fund-raising ef-
\. the drive wound down to-
, us conclusion, Mr. Ba*r
d the campaign as highly
successful, particularly in light
ot the economic situation. He
said that the results have sur-
d the record-setting 1974
drive, which included the gifts
made during the Yom Kippur
v. i
"Great strides were made in
the organization of new areas
dt the community," he pointed
which helr-id produce a
record total of 4500 contribu-
tions, an increase of 16 percent

ALLAN E. BAEK
over the 1974 totals. I am par-
ticularly pleased that over 2000
of these gifts were from new
contributors, an increase in
this area of over 50 percent,"'
he added.
Mr. Baer said that campaigns
were conducted in almost every
section of Greater Ft. Lauder-
dale. although there is still
great potential within all of
these areas for future develop-
ment.
Lauding the campaign lead-
ership of both the Men's Cam-
paign and the Women's Divi-
sion. Mr. Baer said that the
hundreds of campaign volun-
teers deserved the credit for
the success of the drive.
Plans are now underway to-
wards the organization of the
1976 United Jewish Appeal, Mr.
Baer said, and a herculean ef-
fort will be undertaken to make
the 1976 drive even more suc-
cessful than in 1975.
"The unmet needs in Israel
and in our own community are
monumental. We simply must
greatly enlarge our fund-rais-
ing to meet these needs," said
Mr. Baer.
BUILDING COMMITTEE ORGANIZED
Search On For New Quarters
To House Federation Offices
Israeli -U.S. Officials Begin
Economic And Political Talks
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
'. \SH!.\T.TON (JTA) A
. to the negotiations for
ond Israeli withdrawal in
inal and the reopening of
i let's case for financial sup-
p >rt from the United States are
i ike place this week at the
- ite Department.
TWO TOP officials met Toes
da) with Undersecretary of
St ite Joseph J. Sisco to put what
amountt to the finishing touch-
es on the legal aspects cover-
ing Israel's expected return of
the Gidi and Mitla Passes and
the Abu Rodeis oilfields to
Egypt.
U'ednesdav. another Israeli
team presented Israel's requlre-
ments for economic and mili-
lary financial support in the
coining year. Sisco led the
v>
fr
American officials in these ses-
sions too.
Ambassador Simsha Dinifz
headed both Israeli delegations,
including Mordechai Gazit. di-
rector general of the Premier's
Office, and Meir Rosenne, legal
advisor to the Foreign Ministry.
THE FOUR-member economic
team will make its presentation
beginning Wednesday. Thus.,
once the political arrangements
are discussed, the economic sup-
port phase will begin.
The Israelis outlined their re-
quiretnents totaling about $2.5
billion early last winter but it
was put on ice by American
authorities pending an Israeli
agreement to retreat further.
The Israeli economic team
includes Ephraim Dovrat. eco-
nomic advisor to the Ministry
b nomic advisor to the Defense
Ministry; Yitzhak Elrom, the
Defense Ministry's budget di-
rector; and Arnon Gafni, direct-
or general of the Finance Min-
istry who heads the quartet.
STATE Department spokes-
man Robert Funseth. said that
officials of the U.S. Agency for
International Development
(AID) began technical talks sev-
eral weeks ago with Israeli of-
ficials regarding Israeli "pro-
jections" for the coming year.
They would be used, he said, to
provide a basis for recommenda-
tion to Coneress.
Specific military requirements
will not be part of the talks but
financial military needs as part
of the "overall financial situa-
tion" will be, Funseth said.
Continued on Page 9
6 -fr
Alvin S. Gross, a past presi-
dent of the Federation, has been
appointed chairman of a com-
mittee to search for new quar-
ters for the Federation, accord-
ing to Allan E. Baer, president.
"The rapid expansion of Fed-
eration in offering vitally need-
ed services such as Family
Services to the community, and
filling the recreational and cul-
tural needs of the community,
simply necessitate the search
for more adequate housing for
the Federation," Mr. Gross ex-
plained.
Members of the committee
serving with Mr. Gross are
Martin Fridovich. Albert Gar-
nitz, Howard Miller, Jacob
Brodzki, Ludwik Brodzki, Al-
vin Capp, Mrs. Ira Boris, Ron-
ald Mishkin and Clarence Ob-
letz.
ALVIN S. GROSS
'Hawkish'' Ministers Question
Officials' Undue Optimism
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Sev-
eral ministers queried the "op-
timism" that has been reflect-
ed by Israeli media this past
week in connection with the
interim settlement negotiations.
At a five-hour Cabinet ses-
sion Monday, the ministers
mostly of the "hawkish" wing
of the Cabinet said the op-
timism was not borne out by
the facts as they heard them,
furthermore, it was tactically
unwiaa-, to evince optimism
when the talks were still un-
concluded.
THE CRITICISM of the media
was by implication a criticism
of Premier Yitzhak Rabin and
the ministerial negotiating team
since it was apparent to all that
the media's optimism had been
guided by official briefings.
Some "doveish" ministers, on
the other hand, seemed com-
fortable with the expressions
of optimism and indeed felt
confident that the settlement
talks were nearing a successful
conclusion.
The Cabinet unanimously ap-
proved the Israeli responses
forwarded earlier by the nego-
tiating team through Washing-
ton. But Cabinet sources warn-
ed that the differences over
tactics could become differenc
es over substance as the talks
BOTH "Hawks" and "doves"
moved into their crucial phase,
predicted, however, that if
there were a split. Rabin and
the Cabinet majority would side
with them. They noted, too. that
at yesterday's session no differ-
ing positions had explicitly
been adopted, either by mem-
bers of the negotiating team or
by other ministers (beyond the
criticism of the undue "opti-
mism.")
Israel and Egypt are still tar
apart on the question of an
Israeli presence at Umm Ha-
Continued on Page 3
No Action Taken \
On Policv Statement
HOUSTON (JTA; The JTA has learned that the
B'nai B'rith board of governors here took no action on the
right of its professional staff members to disagree publicly
with B'nai B'rith policy on controversial issues.
Lawrence Peirez, chairman of the B'nai B'rith person-
nel policy committee, said that a "clarifying resolution" was
being "routinely formulated" along with other personnel
matters for future consideration by the board.
A STATEMENT on B'nai B'rith official stationery was
mailed out last month to various newspapers, including the
JTA, which claimed that the organization had urged dis-
ciplinary action against any professional staff member who
took a public stand in opposition to any lodge policy.
B'nai B'rith issued a disclaimer and termed the state-
ment "fraudulent."
Moss Elected President Of
Broward County United Way
Israel Applauded By Miners
DURHAM, England (JTA) An estimated crowd
of 100,000 coal miners gathered here for the annual gala of
this north England town gave a resounding ovation at the
mention of the State of Israel, when Israel. Ambassador
Gideon Rafael was introduced. He was one of the few for-
eign guests at the colorful event, together with U.S. Am-
bassador Elliott Richardson.
SOME OF the miners later came up to shake the hand
of "The Ambassador from the Holy Land." They recalled
Continued oa Page 2
In accepting his new post,
County Commissioner Jack
Moss, who was elected presi-
dent of the Broward County
United Way last week, said the
United Way board must assume
a greater leadership role in the
community.
Moss, who succeeds Harold
Walker, partner of Ernst &
Ernst, in the post, said he sees
a move away from the board's
participation in the day-to-day
operations of the United Way
and more into the total commu-
nity and its needs.
"One of the first reviews,"
he said, "will be of programs
supported by United Way to
make certain there are no dup-
lications and that they are de-
livered as economically as pos-
sible. The United Way assists
more than 40 local and national
programs.
"I have always been inter-
ested in agencies that meet hu-
man needs." Moss added. "I
feel we must strive to see that
services are delivered in an
economic manner and in such
a way as to not be degrading."
In addition to the county
commission. Moss also serves
as chairman of the Broward
Continued on Page 7


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 2? l97J
HadaSSall Conclave Ambulance Israel Applauded By Miners
To Begin Sunday
The 27,860 member? of the
Florida Region of Hadassah will
be represented when the Na
tional Hadassiah Convention
opens at the San Francisco
Hilton. Sunday.
"Florida will have over 100
delegates," said Helen (Mrs.
Maxwell L.) Weisberg, president
of the Florida Region, in dis-
cussing the arrangements for
the Pre-Convention National
Board Meetings with Gloria
(Mrs. Harvey) Friedman, pres-
ident of Miami Chapter; Jean
Feinberg, president of Miami
Beach Chapter; Charlotte (Mrs.
Leonard) Wolpe, elected mem-
ber of the National Board; Gus
(Mrs. Emanuel) Menu, and
Ellen (Mrs Bernard) Mandler.
National Service Committee
members.
These meetings prior to con-
vention will consist of discus-
sions with other region presi-
dents and "Big Twelve" chap-
ter presidents concerning or-
ganization, structure, expan-
sion, conferences and chapter
servicing.
"In depth reports on Hadas-
sah projects and proposed plans
for the future Will take top
priority." Mrs Wjisberg said.
>tcially the rededic?tion and .
reopeninn of Hadassah Mount
Scopus Hospital on October 21.
1975.
The current sitnn'ion in the
Middle Bast will b.- refl -ct -.<
throughout the National Boar'
discussions which begin at 9
am daily except Saturday and
continue until midnight or
later."
A Shabbat dinner for all th
National Board members will
be sponsored bv the San Fran-
cisco Chapter. Shabbat services
and the Presidents Kiddush is
open to all del.'gites.
Speakers at the convention
will include Simcha Pinto. Is-
rael Ambassador to the United
States; Beate KlarsfelJ. famed
hunter of Nazi war criminals
Ar.ushka Freiman. a survivor of
concentration camps; Sen. Dale
McGee (D., Wyo.); Dr. Aaron
VYildavsky. Dean. Graduate
School, Public Policy. Univer-
sity of California at BerkeLy.
Dr. Kalman J Mann, Director
General Hadassah Medical Or-
ganization; Rabbi Harold Schul-
weis, spiritual leader of Valley
Beth Sholom, Encino, Calif.;
Aaron Rosenbaum. research di
rector. American Israel Public
Affairs Committee and Joseph
Klarman. World Head of Youth
Ah yah
The Florida delegation will
consist of members of each of
the 20 Chapters in the Region
including Puerto Rico. Florida
Region will host a reception fo-
its delegates and the National
Board Tuesday ni?ht after th.-
banquet in the Region Sute
Delegates, their guests and
friends are invited.
Founded in 191 } H
is the ItfVMl women's \olunrar\
organization in the country I
is also the largest Zionist bio;
in the vv,nld today anJ v>nJ
more than $20 million inni
for its health, educational, vo-
cational, social welfare and land
redemption programs in Israel
'and foT'irs edncaHon and ytnith
programs in the United States
Josephine (Mrs. Matthew)
Newman, president of the Ft.
Lauderdale Chapter and Esther
(Mrs. Ralph) Cannon, president
of the North Broward Chapter,
will lead their chapters' delega-
tions at the convention.
Itcture Far Hearing-Aid
Users Scheduled Tuesday
The Broward County Hear-
ing and Speech Association, a
United Way Agmcy. will spon-
sor the third free lecture by
Lennon G. Adams Jr.. C.C.C..
d signed to proude useful in-
formation for the new hearing
aid user Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
in the Community Room at the
BMtsd Way Building. 130J So.
Andrews Ave
The b:Li informal lecture
will be followed by a question
and answer period. Refresh-
ments will b.- served.
Dedication
A new ambulance for Israels
official Red truss and Coil De-
fense agency, the Magen Daud
Adoni. \\iU be dedicated Sun-
day at Phase I. Main Recrea-
tion' Hallof"0nhrise"Ls*e$ Con-
dominium complex.
The 1 p.m. ceremonies are
free and open to the general
public, according to Jack
acheer, a leader of the success-
ful fund-raising campaign to
purchase the 1975 General Mo-
tors rescue vehicle.
David Coleman ot Miami
Beach, Florida state chairman
of the American Red Magen
David for Israel and Mayor
John Lomelo Jr.. will be the
principal speakers at the am-
bulance dedication.
Others participating will be
Harry Gerber and Max Bezozo.
who along with Scheer initiat-
ed the drive "to show the soli-
darity of the American paople
with the people of democratic
and freedom-loving Israel."
Stat headquarters for the
American Red Magen David
for Israel are maintained at
the Greater Miami Hebn h
Academy, 2400 Pine Tree Dr.
Mi r-i Beach. Samuel Reinhard
of Miami Beach is Florida
chairman.
*e Dur.
Continued from Page 1
the warm friendship for the Zionist cause of the la
ham miners leader, Sam Watson.
Later, at a reception attended by Prime Minister H
Wilson. Foreign .Minister James Callaghun and leader f?^
House of Commons Edward Short and Mrs. Short -qm^
with the Ambassador and Mrs. Rafael in the rendit
"Hava Nagila." on *
Rafael also met with the cnaifman of the Na'-onai:"r
Board. Sir Derek Ezra. Loal
Temple Emono-EI Sisterhood Commemorates Bicentennit'
Temple Emanu-El will com-
memorate the Bi Centennial
Birthday of the United States
at its Sisterhood Luncheon
Tuesday. Sept. 9, at 11:45 a.m.
The members are grateful to
the Public Relations depart-
If you want your children to have rrore than you rad
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Lday, August 22, 1975
Rabbi Milton Gross To Conduct
Beth HilleVs Inaugural Services
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
'Haivkish' Ministers Question
Rabbi Milton Gross, adminis-
trator of the Star of David
Memorial Garden in Tamarac.
ha5 volunteered to conduct the
inaugural services for the new
I Beth Hillel Congregation, lo-
cated at 7640 Margate Blvd..
Margate. Fricay at 8:00 p.m.
land Saturday at 9:00 a.m.
Kabbi Gross has also con-
sented to officiate at the first
[siicoth service Saturday, Aug.
[30 at midnight. Cantor Charles
[Pearlman. formerly of Utica.
In.Y.. and now a resident of
[paradise Gardens, will officiate
|at the High Holy Day services
Ifor the Beth Hillel Congrega-
tion
Kosh Hashanah sen ices will
|be Friday evening, Sept. 5, and
iturday, Sept. 6, and Sunday.
ept. 7. Yorn Kippur services
be Sunday evening. Sept.
4. and Monday. Sept. 15.
Rabbi Gross will conduct the
Bhemini Azeret Sen ice. which
(his year falls on Saturday Sept.
I', services will commence at
1:00 am. with the Yiskor serv-
ce to be held at 11:00 a.m.
Rabbi Gross, a graduate of
he Rabbi Jacob Joseph Yeshi-
ra. was ordained as an Ortho-
Rabbi in 1965. Prior to be- .
lining a rabbi, he was an ac- I
complished cantor who studied
undor the late Cantor Moshe
Kousevitsky.
Rabbi Gross, a resident of
the area since 1973. was the
first rabbi for the Tamarac Jew-
ish Center.
All members of the Jewish
community are welcome to at-
tend the first service Friday,
and every day thereafter.
'Milk And Honey' How In
Rehearsal At Phase II
Rehearsal! arc rrnu in prog
r?ss f.-^r th- Phas.' II Hau Uan
Gardens Theatrical Group":
present in -n of the Broadway
musical "Milk and Honey" un
der the direction of Irene Un
tennan.
Perfoiman.es are scheduled
at 8:30 p.m. Oct 17, 18, 19. 22,
24, 25 and 26. Tickets will go
on sale to all residents and
friends Aug. 27 and 28 and will
be available every Wednesday
and Thursday thereafter from
10 a.m. to noon at the Phase
11 Clubhouse.
Officials9 Undue Optimism
Continued from Page 1
shiba, the main Sinai listening
station. Egypt still rejects Is-
rael's proposal for a substantial
American force at Umm Hashi-
ba and other stations; it prefers
a small American contingent
with severely limited functions.
Egypt insisis on a small force
f its soldiers being stationed
inside the Mitla and Gidi Pass-
es. It demands that its front
NOW Book Review Sept. 3
Arthur H-iiley's book "The
Moneychangers" will be re- (
viewed by Mrs. Mildred Stern
Wednesday. Sept. 3. at 12:30,
p.m. in the Wilton Manors
Woman's Club. 600 NE 21st Ct.
Husbands ami r. lends are in-
vited to attend the rcy icw spon-
sored by the National Council
of Jewish Women.
line be advanced several kilo-
meters east of the present buf-
fer zone (which Israel has re-
jected), and that it be given a
wider corridor along the Gulf
of Suez coast than Israel has
offered.
THE CABINET did not discuss
Secretary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer's widely reported desire
to begin a shuttle trip to wind
up the negotiations on or about
Aug. 20. There was apparently
some concern that the talks
would not yet have reached the
"ninety percent certainty"
Stage by thpn that Kissinger
has demanded before he under-
takes a shuttle.
One well-placed observer
noted that if Kissinger decides
to come. Israel can hardly de-
mur. But officials here stress-
ed that the assessment of the
situationin percentage points
of success likelihoodmust be
the Secretary's own.
There is plainly a sense of
apprehension here lest Kissin-
ger come, shuttle, depart with-
out an agreement, and again
blame Israel for the failure.
[ADVERTISING SALESMAN
DADE BR0WARD
I Telephone, Personal Contact,
|and/or Both.
Sand resumo to S.T.,
Bok 012973, Miami 33101
ALL REPLIES HELD IN
STRICT CONFIDENCE
We do
business the
right way.

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MARGATE JEWISH
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610 N.W. 9th STREET MARGATE, FLORIDA
it Temple is proud to announce that
HIGH H01YDAY SERVICES
will be conducted at 2 Centers, with highly qualified
Leaders and professional Cantors. New members and
worshippers are cordially invited to pray with us.
| Our Ticket Committee will be glad to meet you on
Tuesdays and Thursdays 7 to 9 P.M. at the Center.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
N.E. BROWARD'S CONSERVATIVE TEMPLE
High Holy Day Services
TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW
124S.E. 11th Ave.
fompano Beach


or Phone
Temple Office
942-6410
Jewish
Civilization
It's all there in the
Encyclopaedia Judaica.
For free color brochure,
Call (305) 5344*251
or write: E. J., Suite SOS, 420 Lincoln Rd., M.B. 33139
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FLORIDA


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
^day, August 2?
Criminals at Crime Meet
The Canadian government is to be applauded for
refusing to admit representatives of the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization into Canada to attend a United
Nations conference on crime in Toronto next month.
Prime Minister Trudeau's government took the sim-
ple expedient of following Canadian law which bars en-
try to members of terrorist organizations.
The Canadian decision came as a consequence of
the heavy opposition to allow the PLO into the country
a decision an immoral world led by the nose by
pistol-packing Yasir Arafat could not seem to reach at
the United Nations just about a year ago now.
It is true that until the Canadian decision was reach-
ed, it had been a political football, with the opposition
Conservatives calling for the PLO to be barred, while
Trudeau blamed the Conservative provincial govern-
ment in Ontario for having arranged the conference in
its capital, Toronto, in the first place.
But expedient politicking did not win out. What won
out was a nation's sense of morality and decency, when
opposition to the invitation came not only from the
Conservatives but from the entire Jewish community in
Canada as well, leading members of Trudeau's own Lib-
eral Party and many of Canada's major English and
French-language newspapers.
As we have indicated, the real blame for the dilem-
ma lay with the UN to begin with, which gave the PLO
observer status and which now threatens to oust Israel
the international "peace" organization once again be-
ing led by the nose by Arab power and the toady African
nations.
How could anyone explain the presence of the PLO
at a conference on crime unless the conferees wanted
their expertise as one of the leading perpetrators of
murder and destruction on an international scale?
To have admitted the PLO to a crime conference,
which is now shifted elsewhere, would have been a crime
in itself.
A Different Case Altogether
The efforts of the Arab countries to bracket Israel
and South Africa as international outlaws is one of the
more scurrilous examples of anti-Zionist propaganda.
The Arabs and their aHies are attempting to use the ex-
pulsion of South Africa from the General Assembly of
the United Nations last year as a precedent for their
attempt to expel Israel when the Assembly opens in Sep-
tember.
There is no justification whatsoever for linking Is-
rael with South Africa. Israel is a democratic state based
on the principles of equality, justice and freedom. The
idea of apartheid as practiced in South Africa is repug-
nant to Israel as it is to Judaism.
Although there are certain security restrictions, Is-
raeli Arabs, both Moslems and Christians, enjoy condi-
tions unprecedented in any other nation in a state of
semi-war. Israeli Arabs vote for and serve in the Knes-
set and the government. Needless to say Jews in Israel
represent all the racial hues.
VN Could be Wrecked
Israel has always sought good relations and co-
operation with the Black African countries until these
countries, under Arab pressure, rejected Israeli friend-
ship. Regardless, Africans continue to come to Israel
for training and education.
In fact, it is the Arabs who are carrying out a po-
licy of racism in their fight against Israel. The Arab
states today are the chief sources of anti-Semitic propa-
ganda in the world.
The late King Faisal of Saudi Arabia enjoyed noth-
ing more than handmg out anti-Jewish propaganda, in-
cluding the long-discredited "Protocols of the Elders of
Zion," to visitors including the Jewish newsmen who
accompanied Secretory of State Henry A. Kissinger to
Saudi Arabia.
Should the Arabs attempt to expel Israel from the
General Assembly, i* could wreck the UN itself. It will
certainly endanger attempts to bring peace into the
Middle East and perhaps the rest of the world as well.
Converts to Judaism on Increase?
By BEN GALLOB
A CALIFORNIA Reform rabbi'
who is active in efforts to
convert non-Jews^jO Judaism
has estimated that aF current
rates of conversion, between
100.000 and 150.000 Jewish
families in the United States in
the next 20 years will have a
convert as husband or wife.
Rabbi Allen S. Mailer of Cul-
ver City coupled his estimate
with a warning that "if these
Jews and their children are not
actively welcomed by all Jew*,
including the Orthodox, a ter-
rible split will divide the Jew-
ish people."
RABBI MALLER, writing in
"Davka." the quarterly student
journal published by the Hillel
Council at the University of
California at Los Angelas, noted
the widespread concern over
the growing rate of mixed mar-
riages.
But. he declared, "another
statistic of even greater signifi-
cance has been almost entirely
ignored. The number and per-
centage of Mitzvah marriages
has been growing even more
rapidly than that of mixed mar-
riages."
He said that by Mitzvah mar-
riages he meant those in which
the non-Jewish spouse converts
to Judaism which he said was
a Mitzvah for three reasons, one
being that "the loyalty and ded-
ication of the Jewish partner
was strong enough to influence
the non-Jew to become Jewish."
THE SECOND reason, he as-
serted, was that "the very high
divorce rate in Jewish Gentile
marriages is substantially re-
duced by the unification of the
family's identity."
He said that in Mitzvah mar-
riages, "the divorce rate is only
half as high as fn mixed mar-
riages." The third reason, he
asserted was that unlike mixed
marriages, "where only 15 to
20 per cent of the children re-
ceive any Jewish education, in
Mitzvah marriages almost all
the children are giflpp a. Junta
ish education and the average
level of involvement of con-
verts to Judaism and their chil-
dren is higher than that of a
majority of Jews "
Rabbi Mailer estimated that
in the five vears between 1970
and 1974. between 25.000 and
35.000 Gentiles have become
Jewish in the United States
alone "
HE USED that figure for his
20-year projection of up to 150,-
000 Jewish families in which
one of the spouses will be a
convert, "about ten per cent of
the total number of Jewish
families" in the United States.
In rUsmrrirn the possibility
of a split in the Jewish people
developing from reiection by
Jews of converts and would-be
converts. Rabbi Mailer asserted
that "the vast majority" of
Orthodox rabbis "are still guid-
ed by the legal and intellectual
norms of the medieval ghetto"
and therefore will not accept
a convert "who is planning to
marry a Jew."
He contended that "this is
one of the best reasons for a
Gentile to convert."
He also noted that Orthodox
Jews "will not accept a convert
as Jewish who is an active Re-
form or Conservative Jew.
while at the same time the
Orthodox declare that an apos-
tate who is a believing Chris-
tian is still Jewish."
HE CHARGED that the re-
fusal to accept a convert as
Jewish because the rabbi who
performed the conversion was
not Orthodox, even if the pro-
cedure was according to Hala-
cha. Jewish religious law. "is a
political and not a religious
position."
He declared that sin,.
great majority of jews Z
32ii*fMd since '
Hs refuse to comer
mlw they commit".
serves to the full ranReoil
dox practice it js not
that many people would *Tj
Orthodox rabbi as their n^J
Those whodoareusua^
lected or put off by the net,
attitude of most Orthodof
bis toward Don-Jewi inten
in learninc about Judaism"
result, he asserted, ij ".L3
the United States, "only Zf
three per cent of all com
sions to Judaism are done
Orthodox i
RABBI MAIl.ER co^
"it is too si pie" to m
an Individual convert! m\
the sake of marriage Cm
ly. he del ree-qu
of all Jewish Gentile mar
are mixed marriagH in
neither part) convent Hm
sorted that it was cleii
25 P*'r Jewish-d.
romances thai result ir. alU
vah marriage" Jo not hgM
"just for the sake of ir.amgtf
He also rernmed that
studies Indicated that from i
to 20 per cent of the in Reform and Consent
conversion classes in Los
geles are already
"They are not converting ti|
married but more probably:
the future unity and identity (
their family." he argued.
If the Jewish peaple |
remain strong in the i
conversion to Judaism mist I
strongly encouraged," be
HE NOTED that only i
have there been attempts I
aeek converts to Judaism I
Americans in an organized t
CoatlmnH oa Page'
20 Years of Masters, Johnson
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Tunes Syndicate
How free can the new sexual
freedom be without hurting the
marriage or love relationship
and the sexual balance m the
society? This has become the
central question in the sexual
debate of our time.
Over the past decade I have
maintained, in writing and con-
versation, a dialogue with Drs.
iVilliam Masters and Virginia
Johnson.
LUCKILY WE were able to
resume it when they came to
New York as visiting cohosts for
the TV show, A.M. America. In
their wind-up session of the
week we talked all too briefly
about some of the things that
trouble many Americans, in-
cluding fidelity, privacy, wom-
en's liberation, sexual therapy
and human fulfillment.
It is 20 years now since
Masters and Johnson started
their work in what was first
known as the St. Louis Project,
and then became familiar
throughout the world simply
under their combined names.
Their two major volumes
first "Human Sexual Response"
and then "Human Sexual In-
adequacy"have revolutionized
our knowledge and perception
of sexuality.
For better or worse the world
will never be the same after
Masters and Johnson as it was
before th
THIS NEEDS saying now, be-
cause the toasters-Johnson re-
search has carried our thinking
along with it. changing it so
drastically that what once seem-
ed shockingly radical, even out-
rageous, is now pretty well
taken for granted
They have becomeGod help
themalmost respectable, and
I hear some foolish people say-
ing there was never really any-
thing original about them.
Mostly they have brought
this about by their success,
pillars of the temple down and
sent them crashing The danger
they ran is of being buried in
the ruins they made.
But they won't stay put. They
are still pushing ahead with new
research. Even if they ended
here, some of the massive
questions they have raised about
sexuality would go on provok-
ing torrents of controversy for
manv -Wades.
OF THE five major areas of
questions, as I see them, the
firstthe laboratory question-
has largely been resolved. Was
it ethical to study human sexu-
ality in the laboratory? This
had doctors, psychiatrists and
university circles in a dither a
decade ago.
The answer now is pretty
clear. It is perfectly ethical,
among consenting adults. But
the results vou get in the I
oratory' a onl>' buef
They don't tell you the
story of what sexuality is i
in daily life, outside the r
tory
Then there is the
function question. Dr
feels strongly that seiu'
Americans cant stand
but neither can they '
success. They make p*n*'
the failed.
THEY ENVELOP the I
ful in a hurricane of pubJ
make best sellers and WJ
symbols out of them, adopt
as their own problem oo<
propriate their lightfflj
thunder, bring them tW
of the sky onto tne
earth, and end by making.
part of the ^nven!l0?L
rents of thought and their
almost banal.
Like Samson in his
_ but without his buBL
Masters and Johnson pu"
Continued on ls|W
Jewish Floridian
of oratr fort tAUoajo*1-1^ ^^
HIT!
OFFICE and PI^ANT IM N.BJ. St* St.. anarai. n
4Dvbrtisi.no department
miami addrb8k
fred k shoohet 81'
Editor and Publ Inner
The Jnh FloHdian Do** Not ---------- ..,_
Of Th. Mereh.nd.ee Advertleed In IU Column.
Published El-Weakly
All PO ISTI uin |l
Tl .'
n'po bo. mi. ng^EffX uVsa
7.ANNE HHOTHET SH ,^,jMI
Eievutlve Editor A* KhfVtK
in Don Not ewarantee Tna *
The Jowltn Fir<*n hit akaorftod Mm Jewiah 0"'* "irt, rtt
Member of tht twith Telegraphic Aoency. 5*V ".ition. A'
tete. Worldwide Kki Service. National Editorial prtt$
ciation of Inglnh.Jevih Neweoepere. and the f
jew.*'
tic*
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) On
Viueet
,v.....'"T'*"
Volume 4
Friday. August 22, 1975


v, August 22, 1975
The Jewish F1orid:an of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5

No Frills is back*
Save 35% Starting Sept 3
When National Airlines first introduced the
No Frills Farer we thought it would be a success.
And we were right. No Frills is a complete and roar-
ing success. So as of Sept. 3, No Frills will be back
in effect again. National's No Frills Fare saves you a
big 35% off the regular daycoach fare. So instead oi
paying $94 one way to New York/Newark, you pay
just $61 including tax, plus a nominal security sur-
charge.Thats a savings of $33 each way.
The Plane Facts
Here's how Nationals No Frills Fare
works.You must purchase your tickets and make
reservations at the s'ame time, no later than 7 days
in advance. You fly only on Monday,Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday in a special section of
our nonstop flights from Miami/Ft. Lauderdale to
NewYork/Newark. Since the number of seats is
limited, you should act as soon as you can. It's tirst
come first serve. And children 2 to 11 with an adult
fly for about 1/3 off the No Frills Fare.
These fares are good from Sept. 3 thru
Dec. 16,1975. You can stay as long as you like but
all travel must be completed by Dec. 16.The fares
will not be in effect Nov. 25 thru Dec. 1,1975.
Should you have to cancel dr change your flight,
10% of the fare or$10 (whichever is higher) is non-
refundable.
The Frill Is Gone
On board, we wont serve you a meal. No
Frills means just that. If you like, we'll sell you a
cup of coffee or a soft drink for a quarter or a cock-
tail at the usual charge. When you consider how
much you save on airfare, that 254 cup of coffee is
about as big a bargain as you can find today.
Tbfi-iilOrNotTb Frill
Of course we'll still have our fabulous First
Class service, and regular coach service too. So you
can fly Frills or No Frills.The choice is yours. And
we think you deserve to have that choice.
For more information or reservations, call
your travel agent or National Airlines. In Miami
call 874-5000. In Ft. Lauderdale and Hollywood
call 525-6601.
Newibrk/Newark.
Onty*6l.\
25* for coffee,
35% off the fere.
National's I^NoFrilkEare;
Call your travel agent.
ttotcmlhoMh AmrnAn Epr* BankArnrncard. One Blanchr. Dinm dub. Manet Charge/Interbank L'ATP. our own card and cnh.


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
jgjfg^August 22,15
Israel Pound Devalued 2$
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israel Pound was devalued two
percent again which means that
the U.S. dollar is now worth
IL 6.24.
It was the second two per-
cent devaluation since June 17
when a special ministerial com-
mittee was given the authority
to devalue the Pound two per-
cent every 30 days.
ISRAELIS HAD expected the
devaluation and many feared it
would be as high as 10 percent.
Importers earlier this week
were making a special effort to
obtain foreign currency needed
to clear goods from customs,
and people who expect to trav-
el abroad were trying to 8et
foreign money earlier than
they would otherwise need it.
In addition, there was a rush
for dollar-linked bonds on the
Israeli Stock Exchange, pushing
up their prices. The announce-
ment was seen as a measure
against speculators who antici-
pated a larger devaluation.
TODAY'S announcement was
seen as a measure against spec-
ulators who anticipated a larg-
er devaluation.
THERE WAS some opposition
to the deval.iation from both
manufacturers and the Hista-
drut The Ministry of Finance
said it expected the two per-
cent devaluation to be absorbed
by industry.
But Avraham Shavit, presi-
dent of th-: Manufacturers As-
sociation, said
0
iISS
* 5 W a hiRhS?rf
mg bonus to ^Ze?^\
SETof ,he &
He said (here was no
evade
items.
price hike
or.
wit.
Moss Elected President Of
Broward County United Way
YERl'HAM MKSHEL .
tary general of the JJJI
took the government to tjski '
not consulting the labor fJ
ration before deciding J
devaluation. However fe
he was satisfied that'it
not affect the price of *
commodities including hjeL
The first to fed the rffec,
the devaluation were *
passengers who were told
had to add two percent oo u
already-bought tickets ni
equivalent increase on
travel tax.
Honey is a traditional Rosh Hashana favorite symbolizing
a wish for sweetness In the New Year. Shown here is
delicious Honey-Nut Pastry made with Planters Peanut
Oil, the favorite oil of Jewish cooks.
Honey-Nut Pastry...
For Rosh Hashanah
Continued from Page 1
County Energy Conservation
Committee and vice chairman
of Broward Manpower Council.
A Broward resident for 20
years, he is a member of the
board of the New River Coun-
cil, th-: YMCA and a member
of the American Academy of
Political anu socnl Science.
He is presently a candidate
for a doctorate degree in pub-
lic administration at Nova Uni-
versity.
WELl KNOWN CANTOt
la looking for a positio, J
the High Holidays. >>mbJ
Hotel or Condominium
Call 1-94!-SMS after t tM.
On Sept. 6 Jews around the
world will be celebrating Rosh
Hashanah. the Jewish New Year.
This marks the beginning of a
ten-day period of profound re-
limous observance It is IMM
time of revelry but one of sol-
emn prayer and quiet joy.
Although there are few food
restrictions during this season,
Jewish cooks will serve honey
at every opportunitysymboliz-
ing the wish for sweetness in
the New Year.
In past days, it was customary
to exchanee New Year's greet-
ings and gifts of homemade con-
fectkNM Hid cakes. Today this
practice largely has been re-
placed by cards and flowers but
homemade goodies still are con-
sidered the most thoughtful
gifts.
Honey cakes and dessorts arc
traditional Ro;h Hashanah eift--
Cakes frequently are frosted
and decorated with the Hebt
legend "L'ahaoa tova tikatevu"
or "May you be inscribed for
a good
Suggested Vre is Honey-Nul
Pastry, luscious dessert stanl-
nuts, lemon
pec] and cinnamon are lave
Ki oi strudel dough
and drizzled with a honey syrup
Pei
nut Oil. a favorite among Jewish
cooks for its light, oelicate
flivor.
HONEY-NUT PASTRY
1 cup g"ir.:) Planters or
Southern Belle English
Walnuts
'j tap, g.-af-d lemon peel
\ tsp. g-.-ound cinnamon
1 pkg (2-oz.) strudel dough
afasi
CUp 1 inters Peanut Oil
OUp water
l 3 cup boose
vanfMs evtract
bine Planters or Southern
Belle English Walnuts, lemmi
peel and cinn.imon. Mix well;
set aside.
Cut ndel dough sheets in-
to quarters. Overlap 2 quarters
to cover bottom of an oiled 13
X 9 inch baking pan. Drizzle
with some of the Planters Pea-
nut Oil. Repeat with 2 more
quarters. Sprinkle 13 cup wal-
nut mixture over dough.
Combine to form layers of
strudel dough drizzled with oil
and walnut mixture until 4 quar-
ter sheets strudel dough remain.
Form last layers of dough and
brush each with oil.
Cut pastry into 4 lengthwise
strips. Cut each strip into 4 dia-
mond shares. Pour on any re-
maining oil over all.
Bake at 350 degrees F. about
20 minutes, or until golden.
Meanwhile, combine water
and honey in a saucnan. Care-
fully bring to a boil. Remove
from heat. Stir in vanilla ex-
tract. Pour over nastry as soon
as it comes out of the oven. Cool
thoroughly before serving.
Makes 16 servings.
Wish Your Friends and Neighbors
the Very Best for the Coming Year...
SEND IN YOUR
NEW YEAR GREETING NOW!
(Use Coupon Below)
STYIE A tS 00
STYIE B $10.00
Mr. m4 Mrs. fc*rt Chm
I fririji
A Htpp i P N 1' "
MR. AKD MRS. ROBERT COHEN
and FAMILY
with their relative* and friei
A Happy and Prosperous Nev
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
c/o P.O. BOX 012973, MIAMI, FLORIDA 33101
Gentlemen: Please list my greeting in your Rosh Hashona issue as :hec>rd below:
Enclosed is $ to cover payment. Cash Check
Name
'Please Print)
Street Apt. No
City State Zip
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1015 North Amer.can Way -Miami Florida 33132 305 373-550Z


idav, August 22, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lander dale
Page 7
Bfi To Test Soviet Intent By Sending Delegation
HOUSTON (JTA) B'nai
B nth s board of governors vot-
ed here to test Soviet sincerity
for the Helsinl.i declaration
calling for the "free now of
peoples, ideas and information"
K seeking to send an official
delegation to the Soviet Union
to meet with both Jewish ao
rjvists and Soviet officials.
B'nai B'rith "resident David
M. Rlumberg. who introduced
the proposal at the organiza-
tion's board ol governors' bi-
annual meeting here, said the
purpose of the delegation would
be to establish regular religioni
and cultural ties with Soviet
Jews and consult with Soviet
authorities on liberalizing emi-
gration policies, accelerating
"reunion of families" and re-
Chaplain's Schedule
The Jewish Federation of of South Rroward, Inc. an-
r uncea that Rabbi Haiold RJchter, Chaplain for South Brow
ard County, will be visiting the following
hospitals on a regular bite:
Mondays Doctors, Community and
South F'oiida State Hospitals.
Wednesdays Hollywood Memorial
Hospital
Fridays Golden Isles Hospital.
The Rabbi will also \ isit nursing
homes and penal institutions in the South
Brovard area. In addition, he will visit
institutions in Fort Lauderdale on Tues-
days and Thursdays.
For further information, please visit Th" Jewish Federa-
tion Office at 2838 Hollywood Blvd.. Hollywood or phone
921-8810 or 966-7751.
Kabbi Richter
-
storing Jewish communal life
under Soviet law.
"IF HELSINKI is a step to-
ward genuine detente, then
there should be a parallel step
forward for Soviet Jews."
Rlumberg said. His proposal
was endorsed by a large ma-
i^-itv of thp 102-membcr board
of governors.
Objectors to the move, a small
minority, arc-d that even if
Soviet authorities agreed to a
formal delegation, th- efforts
nf the troun would likely be
futile in view of past Soviet
behavior on human rights is-
sues.
But proponents urg?d against
"mciudgments," maintaining
that the action, while a test of
Sovfcf sincerity, also demon-
strates continuing concern for
the right of free emigration and
for the survival of a Jewish
cultural life in the USSR.
BLU.MRFRO SAID that the
proposed delegation would also
include leaders of R'mi B'rith
affilhtes from countries outside
the United States.
A senior B'nai B'rith official
suggested here that the Helsinki
agreement offers the Soviets a
face-saving way of liberalizing
its emigration policies-
"The Soviets can ascribe the
relaxation of their arbitrary re-
strictions to the voluntary multi-
lateral agreements concluded in
Helsinki and continue to reject
claims that they are bowing to
the Jackson Amendment," he
said.
IN A RELATED development,
the B'nai B'rith also called for
"aggressive diplomacy" by the
West to resist a Third World
takeover of the United Nations.
Such a takeover, they said,
"could mean finish to the world
organization M a viable insti-
tution."
They endorsed recent moves
by Congress and the State De-
partment pointing to a possible
American withdrawal from the
next General Assembly and a
cutoff of U.S. funds if an Arab-
prompted campaign to suspend
Israel succeeds.
But Blumberg said such "last
resort" action "would likely di-
minish the UN beyond repair."
He noted that "despite its de-
fects and weakness, the UN is
too valuable as an instrument
for international exchange to be
Converts to Judaism on Increase?
Continued from Page 4
He cited tne recent creation
I of the National Hospitality Com-
ttee, of which he is a found-
er, as "an outreach program
which is particularly concern-
led with reaching couples in-
|vo!vcd in mixed marriages."
In a communication to the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
Rabbi Mailer said he agreed
that there was rejection of
would-be converts from Jewish
sources other than the Ortho-
dox and that he had cited the
practices of Orthodox laity and
Orthodox rabbis as the basis for
dramatizing "the much wider-
spread attitudes against con-
verts that is found among a
large minoritv of non-Orthodox
Jews, especially in the oldei
generation."
HE ADDED that his argu-
ment*: against Jews prejudiced
about converts "applies to ev-
rrvnno w'"o holds those views
regardless of denominations."
In his "Davka" article, he il-
lustrated that point by declar-
ing that frequently family and
friends treat a Gentile planning
to marry or already married to
a Jew with either hostility or
with indifference.
He said Jews may interpret
such attitudes as representing
"a benign neutrality but non-
Jews usually interpret it as be-
ing a cool and subtle exclusive
ness."
surrendered by its founders to
a Third World cabal engaged in
irrational diplomacy."
BLUMBERG SAID that pubi;c
disillusionment with the UN
should be expressed "in efforts
to make it more responsive to
its avowed purpose" rather than
abandoning it to a "meaningless
majority of small nations who
would suffer most if it col-
lapses."
He said that the capacity of
Western power to apply "diplo-
matic strength" had to be shown
before the foreign ministers of
some 70 non-aligned nations
convene for a conference th'S
month in Lima, Peru.
Sisterhood Membership Tec
At Home Of Rhonnie Leder
Tuesday at 1 p.m. a Temp'i
Emanu-El Sisterhood member-
ship tea will be held at the
home of Rhonnie Leder, mem-
bership vice president, 1924
NE 31st Ave, Fort Laudev
dale.
The tea will provide an op-
portunity to meet the board of
directors. For further informa-
tion call Rhonnie Leder or
Anne Hermann.
HEROLDS
GULL'S *N BUOYS TOGS
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I
I
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The cost of labor and materials are rising need we say m<
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be eligible for the 5% tax credit. After September 1st it will be too
late to make these substantial savings.
FEEL YOUNG AGAIN
So many fun things to do at Kings Point, it's like turning back
the clock. There's golf, tennis, shuffleboard, billiards, swimming in
indoor and outdoor pools and a magnificent whirlpool* Roll
back time with dancing, clubs, shows, concerts, card rooms. Express
yourself in hobbies, woodworking, jewelry making, ceramics, paint
ing, sculpture, arts and crafts, sewing and much more.
SEE KINGS POINT..,
So easy to reach. Take
Florida Turnpike to Exit 32.
On Atlantic Avenue,
one mile East of Exit.
formation, coll'
Broward County: 524 4367
Dade County 947-1491
Palm Beaches: 737-2580
Delray Beach: 278 7751
Toll free number
(most states east of the Rockies)
1 8003272471
["-H
PAIM
BEACH
Ktatshtfl
DURAY
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i
FORT LAUOlRIJAlt
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MIAMI


MIAMI
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w

FLORIDA TURNPIKE ONE MILE EAST OF DELRAY BEACH EXIT 32
BETWEEN PALM BEACH AND FT. LAUDERDALE


Page R
The Jexvish Floridian o1 Greater Fort Uuderdale
Friday, Au-^r 22 ioJ
Echeverria Tries To Promote Heart Attack Fatal 10
Face-To-Face Negotiations
By rftlA MEND!
MENDE1.SON
D(W -
JERUSALEM (JTAW- Mex-
ican President Luis Echeverria
climaxed a four-day visit to Is-
rael by apparently confirming
a report that his goal in sud-
denly dispatching his Foreign
Minister. Emilio Rabaso, to
Cairo Friday was to try to pro-
mote a face-to-face meeting be-
tween Israeli and Egyptian lead-
ers.
THE REPORT was carried in
the Jerusalem Post Sunday.
Echeverm. speaking at a
press c 'nfTen'''. said he had
KM K.i^v -o to Cairo in an ef-
fort to take a step forward ...
ion* that
blf between Israel and Egypt."
Pabaso flew from Israel late
F:i.1ay on the Mexican Presi-
dent's special jet which return-
ed to Israel later without him.
Rabao met with Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat and
Echeverria met with Rabaso in
Jordan later to get Sadat's re-
sponse.
ECHEVERRIA told newsmen
here that he had found a "very
I orable. positive attitude" on
the part of Premier Yitzhak Ra-
bin and Foreign Minister Yigal
All^n with whom he held po-
':l tnlls Thursday evening.
Rabin. Allon and Defense Min-
-istar ShimoQ Peres are-Israel's
team for the negotiations for a
second Sinai interim accord.
The Mexican President also
told the press conference that
he had found Rabin open to
negotiations, open to dialogue
and to the exchange of ideas."
HE SAID it was as a result of
his political talks with Rabin
and Allon that he had sent Ra-
baso to Cairo to see if a similar
attitude existed there.
Israeli officials confirmed
that Rabin had reiterated to
Echeverria his readiness to
meet with Sadat "any time, any-
place."
Pinhas Sapir At 67
Pinhas Sapir. chairman of the Jewish Agency and V.'ory
Zionist Organization and former Finance Miniver ot is^
died Aug. 12 after suffering a heart attack near Beersh^
Kissinger Seeks Quiet Diplomacy
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA) In the second of two major
foreign policy speeches in less than 24 hours. Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger stressed here that the United
States pursues a moral policy in the interesti of human
rights but does so "quietly, keeping in nrnd the delicacy
of the problem and stressing results rather than public
confrontation."
The Secretary made these remarks in his address be-
fore the Upper Middle Wegl Council at the Madison South
Hotel in Minneapolis.
Earlier, in an address in Milwaukee. Kissinger warned
gains: any moves by the UN General Assembly to oust
]srael. countries to their emigration
IN HIS address here he de- practices with regard to Jews
ciared "We ha' e U ed and e and others; and the Si lenson
will continue to use our influ-
ence against repressive prac-
tices. Our tradition^ and our in-
terests demand it. but truth
compels also a recognition of
our limits. The question is
whether we promote rights
more effectiw ly by counsel and
friendly relations where this
serves our interests, or by con-
frontation and discriminatory
legislation."
His remarks were seen as a
direct reference to the Jack*
son-Vanik amendments incor-
porated into the 1974 Trade Re-
form Act which links U.S. trade
benefits to the Soviet Union
and other Communist bloc
Amendment which lei a 0
million ceiling on Export-Im-
port Bank credits to the Soviet
I nion.
THE SECRETARY d-dared.
"We must also assess the do-
mestic performance of foreign
governments in relation to their
history and to the threats they
face."
He said. "We do not and will
not condone repressive prac-
tices."
But. he said. "The attempt to
deal with those practices by re-
strictive American legislation
raises a serious problem, not
because of the moral view it
expresses which we share
but because of the mistaken
Impression it creates that our
lecurit] ii an acts of charity.
"AM) BEYOND that, IUCB
acts, bacaus I are too pub-
he too inflexibl io much
a sti nulus to nationalistic re-
g >ni i ni-'\ itably
to fail."
He said that "painful cxpe-
riencs should have taught tu
thai we ought not exi
our capacity to I let
alone to shape, Mdal and po-
litical change in other socie-
ties."
The Secretary outlined the
"principles that will guide our
action
These are: "Human rights
are a legitimate international
concern, and have been so de-
fined in international agree-
ments for more than a genera-
tion; the United States will
speak up for human rights in
appropriate international fo-
rums, and in exchanges with
other governments; we will be
conscious of the differences
between public postures that
satisfy our self-esteem and poli-
cies that bring positive results,
we will not lose sight of either
the requirements of global se-
curity or what we stand for as
a nation."
Bentsen Urges Trade Concessions
To Israel to Counteract Boycott
HOUSTON (JTA)
Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D ,
Tex.), a candidate for the
Democratic Presidential
nomination, called for U.S.
trade concessions to Israel to
counteract the Arab boycott.
Addressing a public forum
at the biannual meeting of
B*nai B'rith s board of gov-
ernors. Bentsen made his
proposal after Arnold For-
ster, general counsel of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. had charged
the Administration with "ac-
tively opposing" measures
to strengthen the resistance
of American business firms
to the boycott.
FORSTER SAID that despite
public denunciations of the boy-
cott by President Ford, spokes-
men for State. Treasury. De-
fense and Commerce Depart-
ments had consistently testified
against Congressional proposals
to illegalize the practice.
Bentsen warned against So-
viet encroachment in the Mid-
dle East by strengthening Israel
"our counterbalance to the
Soviets" through an expan-
sion of trade, enactment of
stiff laws against the Arab boy-
cott, military aid to Israel and
' I SEN. LLOYD BENTSEN
a reduction of American de-
pendence on Arab oil.
These measures. Bentsen said,
would prevent a tilt of the bal-
ance of power in the Middle
East toward the Soviet Union.
BENTSEN, WHO with Senate
minority leader Hugh Scott (R..
Pa.), introduced legislation
authorizing the President to
withdraw the U.S. from the Gen-
eral Assembly and cut off U.S.
funds should the Arabs succeed
m ousting Israel, said that the
U.S. would not "tolerate the ex-
pulsion of Israel. Let no one
doubt our commitment on
that." he declared.
"The future of the United
States and Israel will not be de-
termined by blackmailers or ter-
rorists. It will be determined by
our own ties and friendship."
Forster criticized Administra-
tion opposition to an anti-boy-
cott lawwhich it has explained
as interfering with Middle I
peace negotiations and harmful
to American-Arab trade rela-
tionsas "specious rationaliza-
tions."
HE ADDED: "Experience has
shown that when American com-
panies firmly reiect the boycott
and continue to trade with Is-
rael, their Arab customers, who
need American products, goods
and technical know-how. Ml
at the bovcott."
The B'nai B rith bov d of --
ernors praised the action of t^e
Canadian government in cancl-
ling in Toronto a UN conference
on the prevention of crime, be-
cause the Palestine Liberation
Organization would have been a
participant. It expressed appre-
ciation "in a practical way" by
voting to convene the 1978 con-
vention in the same city
He was 67 years oid. Mr. Sapir was guest of honor
Kibbutz Nevatim in the Negev which was inaugurating
new synagogue when he collapsed during the ceremonies
Sapir was immediately put into an ambulance whj*
was on standby because of the large crowd and a nursey
Sapir's spokesman, Yoef Harel, took turns applying artific*
respiration during the ride to Beersheba At Bcershebi
Hospital open heart massage was attempted but all effort
failed and he was pronounced dead.
A LEADING statesman since
the establishment of the State
of Israel. Mr Sapir played a
decisive role in Israels great
industrial development He was
also well-known throughout Mi-
ami s Jew ish community, hav-
ing visited this city to address
leaden <>f the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation as recently
as August lg~^-
Mr. Sanir was a well-known
ire throughout the world as
a re| stive of Israel's gov-
ernment opte. One of his
moat i" Miami
.. place in October, 1973,
outbreak of
th< '
MR. SAPIR the Cab-
i MS,
as Mir. I"* an'i
Industry, after serving
tor General of the Treasury
for two yeai
in June, 1963, he
t,t Minister of
Finance, which tune va-
cant with the unent of
Lev! i Minister.
In 1968, Mr Sa| Ir began serv-
ing in the additional capacity
ot Secretary General of the Is-
rael Labor Party.
Mr Sapir l career has been
marked by outstanding accom-
plishments in the fields of farm
settlement, water development,
defense and finance. His gov-
ernment service bcRan during
the War of Liberation in 1948,
when he was Deputy Quarter-
Master-General of the Israel
Defense Forces, in charge of
fortifications, housing and
transportation. In that post he
playad a major role in sending
relief convoys into besieged Je-
rusalem.
LATER THAT year, he was
sent M Europe as a special rep-
resentative of the Ministry' of
Defense, in e.iarge of purchas-
ing arms and equipment, which
helped turn the tide of battle
in the last stages of conflict,
particularly in Negev.
In 1949. Mr. Sapir was nam-
ed Director-General of the Min-
istry of Defense Two years
later he was appointed simulta-
neously as Director of Develop-
ment in the Treasure He serv-
PINHAS s\piR
ed in the* ( I
1953. wn< n I
post I
A natJvi
: ed h
"
Ir In 19
Hehahii

cultural :
of the org
tive in 07$..
illegal immigration Into Fas]
tine
AFTER SETTLING
country to which
ed send many oth
Mr. Sapir beca
er in the oran
tah Tik\
was st:!'.
the local
weu i
ed to m ii a- tsei
time, h -"r '
reel I
Breakfast
Social Held
By Emanu El
A continental breakfast was
held .it rempl i.manu-Ll. Ft.
derdtdc s first established
Jewish Congregation, and pro-
\ided a social atmosphere for
new members and those inter-
ested in affiliating with the
temple. The guest- were wel-
comed by Mr Michael Gora,
membership chairman.
The temple officers as well
as the presidents of the Men's
Club. Sisterhood. Youth Group.
tile Temple Administrator, the
Religious School Principal and
Issuance Oi
Visas To PW\
Protested
LONDON (JTA) -
teats are mounting h
following ^"/'Ll
that re rtvei of n
ion Organ
jved entrj visai '"*]
British Embass; i" *j
East to arteiu! the Inter*
mentary Onion ainfereno
next month
The visas
spite pt '
Son-Jewish p -onaliws
organizations
The British
the visa- *f*
it [a presumed mat it
Embassy in Lebanon.
One hundred Mi's of aDJ
leading parties ^ signed a petition P**1"1"
,he House ot Common.
ing the British mene.
The Home Off*
that the P&*toL*t
chairman of the Young Cou- proached the Br,t nsl
pies. Senior Citizens and The- ment about the entry -^
atre Groups, introduced the -while this approacn ^ ^
guests to the multi-faceted serv- ing looked at. some ^j
ices, programs and privileges pie were granted
offered by the temple. get,
For information concerning
membership in Temple Emanu- The visa gram ^
El. please contact Mr. Morris here as i
Watkins. Administrator. roriets.
a_a_aaBaaaaiaav


, August 22, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
Page 9
Israeli U.S. Officials Begin
Economic And Political Talks
Continued from Page 1
Asked by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency if the meetings
mark the end of the "reassess-
Lent" that President Ford
I ordered last March 24 after
Secretary of State Henry A
per had failed to bring
abou: a second Israeli-Egyptian
agreement in the Sinai. Funseth
said. .No. this is all part of the
U process we have been
lenp.ved in"
ASKED BY the JTA if the
[US. also had "hard decisions"
[to make. Funseth replied smil-
From time tc time."
ieth Mid he did not know
! U S. Ambassador to
i Hermann Eilts. will re-
> Washington with Egyp-
tian views on the Israeli-US.
Imeet
AID program still does
inot have allotments for Egypt,
ind Jordan whose US.
, imic support exceeded that
[given Israel last year.
ONE AMERICAN official when
asked what the three Arab
countries sought, told JTA "you
have to ask Henrv (Kissingec).
ister-minding the thing."
Independent sources here
aur.oned that the economic
seetinga are "technical consul-
not more." and to at-
ach political indications would
an exaggeration. The pur-
Released;
iird Receives
[is Exit Visa
TEL AVIV(JTA) Former
?nsoners of Conscience" Las-
il Kaminsky. 34. and Lev Yag-
an. 44. have arrived in Is-
after spending four years
Soviet labor camps following
heir convictions in the second
eningrad trial in May 1971.
THE TWO men. who Mid
being in Israel was like a
earn, were greeted by their
liliesYagman. by his wife
nd son. Daniel. 12. and daught-
er I'.ana. 8: and Kaminsky by
lis wife and two daughters.
(yuba. 22. and Meira. 15.
Abo at Ben Gurion Airport for
tie moving reunion Friday were
epresentatives of the Prisoners
Zion Organization, the Public
ouncil for Russian Jewry and
hembers of Kibbutz Nir David!
phich had adopted Kaminsky.
David Chernoglass. 3d, of {
eningrad has been given an j
Kit visa to rejoin his family in I
?reel, the Greater New York
onference on Soviet Jewry re-
Drted Friday.
CHERNOGLASS was released
une IS after completing a five-
Bar term at the Vladimir prison
ut was unable to obtain an exit
ermit immediately, the Con-
Jrence said.
Chernoglass had been sen-
need in Kishinev in June.
"1
I Meanwhile, sources reported
lat Yakov Vinarov. 21, was
fenced Friday by the Kiev
court to three veers in jail
evading the military draft
ter he was refused permission
March to emigrate to Israel
" PALMER'S ~ .
<1 MONUMENT COMPANY\ k
PIRSON AUZED MEMORIALS
USTOM CRAFTED
W OCR WORKSHOP
*7 S.W, 8th ST.. MIAMI
roward SCS-BM1
pose is to have U.S. officials
understand Israel's needs.
This meeting, according to
the sources, was agreed upon in
Bonn in July by Israeli Premier
Yitzhak Rabin and Kissinger.
Both felt, it was said, that a
clarification of Israel's economic
needs was useful "before an in-
terim agreement was achieved"
with Egypt.
The timetable of the meet-
ings this week would imply,
however, that the political es-
sential precede the economic
clarification.
NAL Offers
Free Guide
For Tourists
London-bound passengers on
National Airlines are receiving
a new complimentary booklet
filled with helpful tips on get-
ting the most out of their Euro-
pean vacations or business trips.
Titled "Getting Around Over-
seas." the colorful, pocket-size
guide lists information in sim-
ple, tabular form.
It includes, for example, trans-
lations from English to five
languages (French. Italian
Spanish. German and Swedish)
of the 61 most-commonly used
words and phrases, plus con-
version charts for weights and
measures, temperatures and
clothing sizes.
Also covered are foreign
currency equivalents and re-
strictions; banking hours, tele-
phone rates and time differenc-
es; depictions of international
road, informational and regu-
latory signs; and touring advice,
ranging from tipping sugges-
tions to U.S. customs and im-
migration regulations.
Nursery School's
Staff To Meet
With The Parents
The Jane Lawson Nursery
School of Temple Emanu-El is
beginning the Fall term with a
meeting of the parent* of the
students with the educational
staff Thursday, Sept. 4, at 8:30
p.m. in the temple.
Discussions will involve the
children and parents' needs in
relation to the school's curricu-
lum and activities.
The next day, Friday. Sept.
5. at 9:30 a.m. the school will
conduct an Open House to
orient the children and their
parents with the school's facili-
ties. The Fall term will start
on Monday, Sept. 8.
The nursery school is located
at Temple Emanu-El at 3245 W
Oakland Park Blvd., Ft. Laud-
erdaie, and provides a half and
full day program for 3 and 4
year olds.
Staffed by certified pre-school
educators, the school provides
socialization, pre-school and
readiness skills. Creative self-
expression in music, dramatic
play, art activities and games is
emphasized.
Monthly trips and weekly
Oneg Shabbats are an integral
part of its curriculum. The
learning of Jewish customs and
holiday crafts highlight the pro-
gram.
For information on enrolling
your child, call the temple.
Transportation is available to
most areas.
Ads Available In
Sholom's Journal
The Temple Sholom Dedica-
tion Journal is being promoted
by everyone connected with
the temple. The Journal will be
distributed throughout the area
and will be mailed to family
and friends throughout the
country.
Family, commercial or mere-
ly "Jewel" ads (your name)
will effectively say. "May the
Heavens Smile upon You, Tem-
ple Sholom, and all your con-
gregants and friends."
For further information, call
the temple office.
Notice To
Organizations and Temples
DEADLINE FOR GREETINGS TO APPEAR
IN THE ROSH HASHONA EDITION
IS AUGUST 22nd. PLEASE MAIL TO
JEWISH FLORIDIAN OF GREATER FORT LAUDO0ALE,
P.O. Sox 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101 or
CALL MRS. THOMPSON of 13734605.
by editors of the bestselling The Jewish Catalog
THE JEWISH CALENDAR 5736
Jewish history, religion:
holidays and festivals, fasts and feasts:
birthdays and death dates of religious
leaders, athletes, entertainers, artists:
candle lighting times:
Torah portions and prophetic readings.
The perfect gift-128 pages,
47 illustrations, spiral bound.
Runs from September 1975 to December 1976.
. ORi>ERFORM
os Of THE JEWISH CALENDAR 5736
Please sen i me
at $3 95 : nanuling..
My chec money *------------------is enclosed.
Name
'
Dty.
State
_ZiP.
Add sales ia< ,>hcabie.
UNIVERSE BOOKS
381 Park Avenue South, New York City 10016
Dr. Stanley P. Kessel, a member of the Florida Regional
Board of the Anti-Defamation League and the ADL's
Broward-Palm Beach Council fund-raising steering com-
mittee, presents Birdie (Mrs. Albert) Einstein, long-time
Broward County resident, with the Regent's plaque. Mrs.
Einstein is carrying on the philanthropic work of her
late husband.
Margate Men's Club Plans
4-Day Thanksgiving Weekend
Plans for a four-day Thanks-
giving Weekend. Nov. 27-30.
have been finalized by the
Men's Club of Margate Jewish
Center.
Included is a stay at the
Americana Hotel in Miami
Beach featuring American Plan
deluxe meals, cocktail hour
drinks, hot and cold, all tips,
round trip transportation, and
entertainment. For further in-
formation and reservation, call
Sam Glickman or Meyer Weiss.
r
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
OMtCTOM
INIKWrOM
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SERVING
BROWARD
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ENORAH
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Mark Weissman
Broward County's only
Jewish Funeral Director
Telephone 9713330
5915 PARK DRIVE MARGATE. FLORIDA
441 S. FEDERAL HWY. DEEREIELD BEACH, FLA
Jf


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 22,
community
calendar
MONDAY, AUGUST 25th
Temple Beth Israel Men's Club General Meeting 8 p.m.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 26th
Ft. Lauderdale Hadassah Shoshana Group General
Meeting 12:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Senior U.S.Y. 8:00 p.m.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 28th
Ft. Lauderdale Hadassah Chapter Board Meeting
12:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Junior U.S.Y. 8:00 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El Hoard of Directors Meeting 8:00 p.m.
Ft. Lauderdale Hadassah Haverim Group General
Meeting 8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 30th
Temple Sholom Coiples Social 8:00 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel Young Couples Club Board Meeting
8:00 p.m.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1st
It. Lauderdale Hadassah Annon Group General Meeting
12:30 p.m.
Woodlands ORT Board Meeting 10:00 a.m.
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood Board Meeting 8:00 p.m.
Temple Sholom Couples Club Meeting 8:00 p.m.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2nd
Jewish Federation Teacher Enrichment Program
10:00 a.m.
Temple Sholom Sisterhood Board Meeting 10:00 am
Temple Beth Israel Senior U.S.Y. 10:00 a.m.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3rd
National Council cf Jewish Women Board Meeting
10:00 a.m.
Brandeis National Women's Board Meeting 10:00 a.m.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4th
North Broward Hadassah Board Meeting 10:00 a.m.
.emple Beth Israel Junior U.S Y. 8:00 p.m.
Parker Playhouse
The Parker Playhouse will be
the setting for the observance
of the High Holy Days for the
congregants of Temple Emanu-
El (Reform), established in
1937 as the first Jewish con-
gregation m Ft. Lauderdale.
Rabbi Sanford M. Shapero.
director of the Union of Amer-
ican Hebrew Congregations.
South Eastern District, who was
ordained as rabbi in 1955. and
earned his Doctor of Hebrew
Letters degree in 1959. will of-
Religious
Services
FOftT lAUDEHDAll
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTKR. ">>
N.W. 57th St. iConaarvativa).
ETH ISRAEL (Temple) 7100 VV.
Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi Pnilia
A. LabowiU. Cantor Maurice Nw.
EMANU-EL S245 W Oak-
land Park Blvd. Reform. Cantor
Jerome Klement.
VOUNO ISRALL of HOLlVWOOO.
lOrthotom M91 Stirling Rd.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 South Nob Hill Road.
Plantation. Rabbi Arthur J Abramo.
r'nil.iy < n.m
POMf-ANO BtACM
IHOLOM (Templrt. 1J2 BK 1 X* Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morria A. *
Canter Jacob J. Renter
MARQATf
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. (Can
Mrvll v., 0101 hW ttn St
COtAl SFRIN6S
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON
GREOATION. Liberal. SaOl Umver
itv Or Rabbi Ma* Weiti.
viit .r n m Sahhath aantlcaa.
The New
KOSHER HOTEL ollhe
LERNER: 20 Years of Masters
Cortinued from Page 4
ural Function, like the appetite
for food.
THIS IS a healthy reaction
to the past uptight attitudes, but
it continues to trouble many,
especially those who feel it dis-
poses too easily of the complex-
ities surrounding homosexuali-
ty, and those who feel that it
strips away the affectional and
ends by a surrender to the "pol-
ymorphous perverse." To which
Masters and Johnson replied
that it doesn't keep them from
believing in "commitment."
which they define as "an ex-
chanec of vulnerabilities."
This leads into the third, or
psychosocial question. Watching
Masters and Johnson over the
years I feel that they haven't
changed positions but that they
have changed emphases.
THEIR EMPHASIS has shift-
ed from a severely physiological
one to a total take which leaves
important room for love, ten-
derness, fidelity, privacy, shar-
ed values and the whole psy-
chosocial universe. Yet they re-
main stubborn about the phys-
ological, too.
The lasting impact of the
Masters Johnson work will fall.
I suspect, on the fourth and
fifth areas in my overview
what it has done to enrich our
understanding of female sexu-
ality (thus giving great impetus
to the women's freedom move
ments) and what it has done in
sexual therapy. These areas
will continue to evoke tempests
of controversy.
IN BOTH areas Masters and
Johnson will be criticized but
never ignored.
My guess Is that on both
scores their work will still be
standing when the ruins of the
temple have been cleared away
and a new one is being built.
YEAR
The
saxony
MMBMI
itMBll
CIMfumrMICIWIWfl

Serxce*
Concluded by
Canlor
IEIB RASKIN
Enjoy
HIGH HOLY DAYS
and SUCCOTH
with lha BERKOWITZ FAMILY
Ask About 4 Wick Special
Call tor
lum day weh-m skoai
MCI N01Y MYS
Rales From 13U ~
i* IOW SUMMII tATIS
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Tcmple Brrrf Isracl
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hiqh
ra
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MYMYStSKCITJ
M25 **' 9"*" doubt* oec
Including GLATT KOSHER Cui.in*
toy seRvices
ROSHHASHANAH.SEPT.S&7
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\Mi\MR\ui TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
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Al XII I*.K>
Sr R\ If Y
jtted I, RJBB' Phiilip A. lCPl*
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Reserve tor Synagogue;
Saxvica* Holiday Meals
EUROPEAN PLAN
Irtai *D.50dMiateecc lateet 5
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1*6* O*ij"0 v B .0 Suffer
DONATION
i r lv.6 Cirf. ||
I1IN IIIM
#. *-oi peoane a #< o'
of Rabbi Phillip Labowit/
L
ficiate during the Rosh Ha-
shanah and Yom Kippur serv-
ices.
Cantor Jerome Klement of
Temple Emanu-El will conduct
Setting For Holiday Services
the liturgical portion. J
services. *l
A candlelight Seikbot w
ice will be held at w
Emanu El Saturday aJS
Aug. 30. A k:j| nour T.
pjp. will precede the seni
at 11:00 p.m. Rabbi Shapen,-
Cantor Jerome Klament win?
ficiate at this service also
For information cone*.*!
attendance at these kJS
contact Morns Watkint, kw|
istrator of Temple Emano^f
'Minnie's Boys'Set Nov. 2
The Sisterhood of Tta
Beth Israel. Fort Uuderd^J
sponsoring a profess*:
Broadway production of 'J
nie's Boys,'' a musical biok,
phy of ttn M ::\ Brothers
the temple. 7100 W. Oak
Park Blvd., Noi 2 at 8 pj
Tickets may tx "htamedint
vance by calling the lemplei
fice.
Book Collection
A Memorial To
Mrs. Rhea Nathan
A good selection of reference
books on Jewish Literature can
now be found at the public li-
brary. 1213 Atlantic Blvd.. Pom-
pano Beach, it has been an-
nounced.
This collection of books has
been donated by the North
Broward section of National
Council of Jewish Women as a
memorial to Mrs Rhea Nathan,
a life long member of Council,
an ardent and loyal worker for
the North Broward Section.
Mrs Nathan had very dili
gently publicized "Council
Tours" and involved her hus-
band with her prompt, personal
touches to each and every tour-
ist.
Council is continuing to en-
large this interesting collection,
believed to be the only such
collection of publications to be j
found at any public library in
the South Florida area. '

i u

CANDIEIIGHTING TIME
15 ELU1 13
III
T
DR. E. CHARLES PRICE, PA
PODIATRIST FOOT SPECIALIST
Announces the relocation of his o<
1o
101 NORTH STATE ROAD 7 SUITE 103
MARGATE. FLORIDA 33063
By Appf Only
TelepHcvv "4-0494
TEMPLE
EMANU-EL
OF GREATER FT. LAUDERDAlJ
(Reform)
AiWOUISClXG j
HIGH HOLY DAY
SERVICES j
AT
PARKER PLAYHOUSE j
ran ummiti _n
RABBI SANFORD M. SHAPERO
OFfKIATING
(DIRECTOR S. t, REGION UNION OF
AMERICAN HFKRFW CONGREGATIONS
CANTOR JEROME KLEMENT
?
i9::>
5736
ROSH HASHANAH EVE SWVICE
FRIDAY, SIPT. 5-8 P.M.
ROSH HASHANAH MORNING SERVICE
SATURDAY, SEPT. 6-10 A.M.
KOI NIDRE SUNDAY, SEPT. 14-8 PM.
YOM KIPPUR MONDAY, SEPT. 15-10 fc*
A LimrteJ Humbtr if Seats
Available at $50.00 fw Person
FOR All TICKET INFORMATION, CONTACT:
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
3243 W. OAKLAND FARK 3lVD-iTrtt
MR. MORRIS WATKINS ADMINNISTRATO*
TELEPHONE 731-2310


August 22, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort LauderdaJe
Pase 11
rotert
Q
Tampering
With The
WHO
,rED jo help mai-e the 30th anniversary year ot tne
, .. .4 Nations signiHcaat. a panel, of 2S recently vreporj;ed
li- for shoring up the structure of this highly-criticized
[1 >nt of nations. The recommendations centered on do-
he UN's economic machinery with the goal of mak-
u.pressed nations a little wealthier without impoverishing
rich nations.
nice trick if you can do it.
IbL I" IT would be equally, if not more helpful, were a fast-
I-2 UN panel to do something constructive about shabby
; a: the UN, the kind of politics the Communist. Arab,
fAin-an blocs have been playing with the State of Israel,
fearing thrice tried to penalize, embarrass, and undercut
by discriminatory action in sub councils of the UN,
t'i low have now undertaken an anti-Israel campaign in
World Health Organization.
lit was not enough for the Arab states and their current
Ijs :> drive Israel out of UNESCO, not enough to make
accusation regarding Israel's archeological excavations
lem, not enough to try to exclude Israel from a 1976
nmoral educational conference of European and Mediter-
n countries.
ko. THE newly-coalesced combine of nations bent upon
the Jewish stole are now determined to take from
rights to WHO services.
ironts to be elected for an attack upon Israel, that
l% of healing concentrate appears the most
II any gcoun n the world has demonstrated a talent
I 1 da the objectives of the World Health Organi-
- Isi
\ eopl-j baa contributed to the physical and psychic
men, women and children everywhere or. this
- Jewish doctors and other scientists.
objective 1- succinctly and clearly stated: "the at-
. of the highest level of health.' Why put
qualification on Jewish doctoni in that mdea
r ta .:. of WHO'a research and planning are
1.: ... disjaaea as polio, leprosy, cholera, malaria, and tu-
I
Ue rHOSE in command of WHO s administration going
> e so Stupid and stubborn as to rule out the use of the
isands of Jewish doctors who haye devoted I it c -
:: >rt to the conquest of these and other terrifying
: that a number of U.S. Senators and members of
have advised Dr. Falfdan Mahler, director general
v. 1 Id Health Organization, that the present mulish ar.d
ejiiipaigu against Israel may prove disastrous to a
>Ia o. ganization, WHO.
I nraediate coumeraction in the United States which
(. to a curtailment of financial support of WHO unless
it toes get off her back, is one more example of deserved
\ en to functionaries playing rough politics in UN
e oune.
VR1ISTS and educators who expressed their wrath
shenanigans in UNESCO, the archeologists who
their displeasure with Arabs and friends of A.abs who
.d the nature of excavations in Jerusalem, and
enlightened opinion throughout the world who coo-
play in connection with projected International
1 nferencea are all now joined by new and powerful
(test.
the luminaries in many fields, now critical of
UcalizatUn of UN machinery by Third World. Arab,
\ and enieiging nations elsewhere have a, better op-
:> work for a return to reason in the UN than has
ynihan, new U.S. Ambassador to the UN.
11s M/HOi.AR-uiplomat has promised to talk sense in the
ll Assembly.
W pray he s not too late; let's pray his efforts will help
[- ., e.atel} needed Urn-around in forums poisoned by
Joseph
VoLLff
U.S. Agricultural Aid
To the Arab Lands
r|'HKEE AGREEMENTS between the United
' StanVs and Egypt, signed in tairo in th last
two day of June, boosted American agricul-
tural aid to the Sadat government to S120
million in agricultural support and reached the
legal limit of $230 million in other forms of
economic aid.
Slaristics obtained by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency at the State Department and
the Department of Agriculture established that
during ihe U.S. fiscal year which ended June
30. Egypt and Syria together received more
assistance under the Agency for International
Development programs than Israel, and Egypt
alone received in dollar value more than 13
times as much in agricultural commodities as
Israel.
EGYPT, SYRIA and Jordan combined
reached agreements with the United States for
more than 16 times as much as Israel in agri-
cultural products in the 12 month period. The
State Department disclosed that on June 29 an
aid agreement for S44.2~5.000 was signed to
finance the foreign exchange costs in tne con-
struction of a grain silo in Alexandria and
anothe.- in Cairo and also for building ship
unloading facilities in Alexandria.
The next aay. June 30. another rid agree
men; was signed for $70 million far American
agricultural and industrial machinery. These
two agreements bung'ald "SuRfeit' td'Egypt for
the year to $250 million.
i'HIS WAS the sum asked by the State
Department for Egypt and approved by Con-
gress.
Meanwhile, Syria has received or will soon
receive at least $83 million of the $100 mil-
lion that the State Department had requested
as a contingency fund in the year's uy! budget.
The Egyptian-Syrian total of $33i million
compares with the $324 million earmarked for
the year for Israel.
I.N THE agricultural agreement signed
with Egypt, also in a Cairo ceremony, a? the
fiscal y-ar closed, the U.S. agreed to provide
Egypt with 50,000 additional tons of wheat or
wheat Hour equivalent at a value of $3 mil-
lion.
This delivery will bring wheat supplies to
Egypt for the year to 650,000 toes at a value of
$110 million. Ln addition, the U.o. is supplying
Egypt, with 400,124 tons of tobacco worth $10
million, bringing the value of the farm prod-
ucts to S120 million. These agreements are un-
der Public Law 430 known as Food tor Peace"
programs which paovidea the American prod-
ucts at Concessionary rates or gratis to foreign
countries
A Green Eyed Beauty Spwis
Her Diploma on Sliabbai
*4U
^
Haifa
I HAVE been reading the advertiseraeuju In
the Israel press. To judge by the numerous
ads which offer the services of professorial
masseuses and massage parlors, it would ap-
pear that a considerable number of Israelis
must suffer from aching backs. Or am I very-
naive?
A more careful reading of the adverts re-
veals that the 'treatment'' offered U indeed
professional but that of the oldest profes-
sion in the world. The inducements and at-
traction.- (I almost wrote "virtues") of the
various establishments are variously described.
"Full value for your money," says one. "Mas-
seuse will really pamper and spoil you.'
another "Reduce tension what you have
been locking for beautiful girl will receive
you in her home, absolute privacy
SOME OF the announcements become dra-
matic, .'.ax almost lyrical: "The bombshell of
the yea. green-eyed beautiful caasssuae
offers private treatment ."
These BN establishments which offer a
package deal: "Refreshing shower, enjoyable
massage, aud a, cup of coffee. Come in miJ-
afternoon. or whenever you're free. A genuine
pleasure' Or "Enjoyable, private massage
plus a surprise1'
There's nothinf? like a personil touch,
Many of the announcements carry the, names
of the operator
THERE ARE Shosh and Yaffa and i
tine, Y.oiu;e, Soloag. ButfiiaV Konit, Daphne,
Rina. Suzy, Jacqueline. Shi.lie, M1.1. Ety, Gili,
Louise, erniuaai, J&ue. Lean. Zi a, Angelica,
Nunt, iheriy. Juua, Molly, Mary-Ann and
many otn.ers. Stephy has a diploma, she proud-
ly announces.
The preponderance of e.xptic and non-
Jewish -.a.n.s is obiOiS. One parlor i> quite
direct about it: "For the elite, surprise: We are
following in the tiaditiou of oqr pretty Swiss
and French girls and our lovely students. Now,
you won t believe it, a gorgeous masseuse di-
re ct ''!*' "
EVERY AD carries full address, apart-
mei........~e. _.ij i...,..or..' nanoe.. You can't
go weong.
Taw a is appear in tiie popular afternoon
Hebrew press, as well as in the English lan-
Pcst the latter no doubt
iling to tourists who seek to reduce ten-
sion. I have found only two which cite rates.
"E cell at raa&sag? IL 3fH" and anothei more
expii.it. "fida&asaae, full now. only IL. oO."
Pro.tuition is not illegai in Israel only
solicitedjn tor such purposes, o; living off the
injorad of 1 prostitute.
THE POLICE claim they can do nothing
about those blatant advertiemee:s Ea:iier at-
tempts ;' seeding out clientele used to be in
the- shadchan columns: "Lonely girl looking
for company ." New style is more direct.
-
wmMy Cage** Books on Jewish Family, Mtions, Festivals
'HE SH.ULOT ANTHOLOGY" by Philip Good-
man (Philadelphia, Jewish Publication Soci.ty.
; I W pages) is the lateat work by the Rabbi. This
i* .'.e fort uX his untiring labors and vast
ind is a worthy successor to his previau? an-
- ol the major Jewish festivals.
renal is the same as that of his tai
re are the biblical sources fOjC
fvvej bj Its treat:iirnt in the post-Uibiica! writings
awn from a cross-section oi the Di*
1 H1N have the reference* to Snavuot i
a MiJraah, medieval liteiatu e. and the
uu and naju-g) u; cbji Hsyytfrftf '>
' maiks the anniversary ol the Heaven-
rorah.
Is a i ctlon on the manner of observance
lands and the culinary arts in conneeti "ith. The Holy Day in modern prose, poetry,


wit. .lograms and projects for young and
".j ; i. a h ) r t 1 it Is a guide to ui;
for use uninitiated and a delight to read by the
taj
"THE WALLED GARDEN," by Bermant
v >;. Macmillan Publiahing Co.. tllSS, 272
ointment. Hermans pre
bo ika were a delight because he writes well and his
knowledge ranges over fields of history, sociology,
Ml .... ,.',. _... ..- j
and Jev ; in Zngland. The book Is billed as
He eaea of Jewish Family Lite end Tradition."
Th* author agOHM have decUced that he writes
prir-ia .1 ."WikeuiUJ nglanJ. His t.w
re>rencea to American Jewish *usr?saa reveal his
ot ..r.jw.-dge oi them.
lliiSli diutitratiAl by hj ncea to Bat Mitz-
\a!>. [ ii po-*i '-' ,f
e lach ot exnlanat^pn oi
1 i di'.'fer-
b.twsan "necking" and "petting" (ar-
:cuinoing to the
m t > he a coin_r of ph I
3 paa*.of eel u- -ad the 100 blacl and white
as partia I redeem Bonn ol 11
iciently to condone omissions, that is, the
Sephardi custom of naming children alter living per-
s >ns.
n 111 mi MiiiwiiiiifTT** ~~-*-" micw 'I"'


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August
If you
tires
with'"
w^*riiSr~*
Tfou are about to find out
why a tire you never heard of
is the best tire for these times,
Radically new. Radically different.
The only radial with steel side* alls.
The I R I. All-Steel Radial is the world's first
all-steel radial tire for automobiles It's the
most economical tire you can own Because of
the radial design, you get more miles per gallon
of gas than from either bias or belted bias
tires Because of the exclusive I.R.I. All-Steel
construction, you get thousands of extra miles
out of the tire itself We believe the result
is the lowest cost per mile of driving from any
kind or any brand of tire on the market today.
Our engineers believe the I R I All-Steel
Radial drives safer, rides more comfortably,
steers more precisely and responds surer
than an> other tire you can buy at any price.
We guarantee them for 50.000 miles. What's
more. Norton is so sure you'll find these
the finest tires you've ever had that if you
are not satisfied at any time within 90 days,
we will refund your purchase price in full.
No tricks. No hidden charges.
But, boil it all down and
you've got three basic
tire types to consider.
I. BIAS 2. BELTED 3. RADIAL
I. BIAS TIRES
Two. four or sometimes even more plies (or
layers) ol material cross under the tread at an
angle or bias to the center line ol the tire General*
the cheapest tire to buy.
2. BELTFD TIRES
Similar to the bus tire with the addition of two
or more belts of material that run around the tire
under the tread This combines a bias sidewall
with increased tread staNity and improved
trad life.
i. RADIAL TIRES
Offer the most desirable features Cords of
matenai run from sidewall to sidewall crossing the
tread at 90 degrees Two or more bens of matenai
also run around the tire Price per tire but cost per mile is lower.
Buying tires is tough enough.
You almost need an engineer's education to
understand tire advertising these days. There
are bias and belted and radial types. F-78's
and FR-78's and 7 75s all of which fit the
same car. And nylon and rayon and polyester
and fiberglass and steel. And plies on plies.
AVAILABLE ONLY AT
NORTON
TIRE CO
SAWY
SERVICE
The strongest radial is an all-steel radial.
The I.R.I, is the only all-steel radial
automobile tire.
Conventional, so-called steel radials, put steel
to work beneath the tread only. One or two
belts of steel run the circumference of the tire
and fabric or fiber cords are used radially
sidewall to sidewall The conventional steel
radial tire is only a steel-belted radial. This is
important in understanding the superiority of
an I.R.I. All-Steel Radial.
An exclusive design and engineering process
put more steel in the I R I radial than in any
other automobile tire Two layers or belts of
steel cables (30 per inch) make sure the I R I.
tread stays open for maximum road contact
in all kinds of weather This also reduces
friction, which is the biggest single cause of
tire wear.
A third barrier of steel cables replaces the
fabric (polyester, fiberglass, etc ) used in the
sidewalls of all other automobile tires The
result is 100 per cent steel strength and
protection.
Rated Load Range D.
I.R.I. All-Steel Radials meet government stand-
ards equivalent to an eight-ply rating and it's
stamped on the side of every I R I. tire Most
passenger tires even steel-belted radials
earn only a B or four-ply rating. Load Range D
means an extra margin of strength and safety
for all vehicles, even the heaviest of luxury
automobiles, station wagons or pick-ups.
Improved sled cable design means extra
comfort, too.
The I.R.I. All-Steel Radial uses a specially
designed steel cable engineered exclusively for
us Each cable is wound of seven strands of
BUDGET JEMS AVAILABLE
CENTRAL MIAMI5200 N W z7th Ave 4J4-11M
CORAL OABLESBird Dourlae Road44S-S1S1
NORTH MIAMI 12240 N W 7th Are.tll-SMl
N. MIAMI BEACH1700 N K 1(3 St S4S-74S4
MIAMI BEACH 1454 Alton RadS72-SSS1
SOUTH DAOE>0ni 3 I>iii Hwy 447-7S7S
HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE I :75 4Sth SI (!I-tS*S
CUTLER RIOOE101>0 8 Dill* Hwy 222-&241
WIST MIAMIBird A Galloway Rda S12-44U
HOMESTEAD10100 8. Federal Hwy 147 1422
W. HOLLYWOOD47 8. State Rd 7N7-04S0
Far tie Start Nearest You Col! 4334*3$
1. The only tire with STEEL
sidewalls tor strength and
flexibility, more protection,
more comfort
2. Two belts of special filament
steel cable for maximum tread
strength. 30 steel cables per inch
Total: Three layers o! steel
beneath the tread.
3. Double steel protection here
The only passenger tire with steel
on both sides of the bead
for surefire responsiveness
4. All-weather computer designed
tread
three-filament wire That's a total of 21 strong
steel filaments in each cable Yet with all this
strength, the cable is as flexible .is silk The
result is a soft, luxurious ride
The new year-'round tread.
A special computer-designed tread configura-
tion was developed to make maximum use
of the strength built into the I R I All Steel
Radial. Now. the combination ol steel and
tread design provides solid, road holding
performance under all kinds of driving
conditions wet or dry. snow or summer heat-
The I.R.I. Is an all-weather, all-year lire.
Why you haven't heard about I.R.L
All-Steel Radials till now.
Compared with the giants of the tire industry.
I R I is a relatively small company We
are growing steadily on a markei rn market
plan now reaching your citv hive years
ago. we set out to produce a tire that was ss
good as the finest imported tire available
Because we had no conventional tire-making
equipment, we were free "to try anvthing
We did. And came up with a totally new del
that produced a tire even better than the one
we had set out to nuke The 1 R 1 All-Steel
Radial has been tested and re-tesied Subject*
to literally millions of miles of road handling
experience Now its available here Backed by
a 50.000-mile guarantee Sold and serviced oaf
by proven leaders in the business.
MIX
wTUttunoMAi until MOusTiift*
Extra safety. Extra comfort. Extra *
The finest tire you can buy. The LaU
All-Steel Radial.
A ?
e>oa(9*a < t>
ISATtSiaCnOR BUMURTtfO ^
{TMiwrnwMi*:
[7 V ,^ Z, ;. mwjm ~ 2Tm i
?4>*>n<


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