The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00035

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
pJemst] Flendlicn ki
OF URFXTER FORT LAM DERDALE
inte
, 4 __ Number 14
Friday, July 11, 1975
25 cent*
Singles Club To Hold
ccial Program At Temple
rting
an early observance of the
*ish holiday of Tish* BAv,
tish Guys and Gals, the Jew-
I Federation sponsored singles
for all persons ages 18 to
| will hold a special program
. July 13, at 2 p.m. The
it will take place at Temple
2101 Johnson St., Holly -
and there is no admis-
fee
program will feature the
rd winning film "A Wall in
Isalem" narrated by Richard
ton. The documentary
page
is a
of extremely rare foot-
i historical momenta in
20th-century evolution of
from idea to reality.
He film traces the struggle
be Jewish people to build a
while faced with the
ships o f anti-Semitism.
ride. Arab hostility, and in-
tional politicking, and cul-
|H with the realization of
the long dream of a homeland
in 1948.
In the use of footage filmed
throughout the 70-year-period.
audiences can appreciate the
visual record of historical fact
and identify with the universal
human need for freedom of re-
ligious expression.
Tisha B'Av commemorates
the dates on which the Temples
were destroyed and other sad
.vents which have befallen the
Jewish people.
Other upcoming programs of
Jewish Guys and Gals include a
pool party July 19. a road rally
July 20, a picnic and open meet-
ing July 27.
Further information on this
very active group can be ob-
tained by contacting Barry Ax-
ler, assistant director of the
Jewish Federation at the Fed-
eration office.
'Mahalleh' Residents Aided
By JDC-Supported Program
One of the most dramatic
changes in the Iranian Jewish
community in recent years has
been the exodus of Jews from
the Tehran ghetto to other sec-
tions of the sprawling city.
According to a recent house-
to-house census in Tehran, the
population of the Tehran "ma-
halleh." as the ghetto is called,
dropped from about 13,000 Jews
in 1957 to 1.400 Jews today.
THIS SHARP decrease does
not take into account other
thousands of Jews coming to
Tehran from the provinces who
may have passed through the
mahalleh on their way up the
economic ladder.
When the American Joint
Distribution Committee launch-
ed its program in Iran in 1949,
its main concern was the mass
of Jews who lived in the ghet-
bin, Peres Tour Gidi and Mitla
linai Passes Israel May Give Up
TEL AVIV (JT\) Premier Yitzhak Rabin and
Defense Minister Shimon Peres inspected the Mitla and Gidi
Passes in Sinai in what was apparently a personal evalua-
tion of the situation should Israel agree to withdraw from
the western reaches of the two strategic mountain passes
in order to secure an interim agreement with Egypt.
The two ministers, who, with Foreign Minister Yigal
Allon comprise the government's negotiating team for an
interim accord, were accompanied on their day-long inspec-
tion tour by Chief of Staff Gen. Mordechai Gur and Gen.
Yekutiel Adam, commander of the southern front.
THE PREMIER spoke at
PREMIER RABIN
length with senior field officers
on the possible military conse-
quences of a partial Israeli
withdrawal from the passes. The
Premier and Defense Minister
Britain Won't Bar Arms
3N (JTA) Foreign Secretary James Calla-
laid here an effective agreement limiting arms in the
East is "possible only with the support of the parties
dispute and in the context of a general agreement.
us statement was a reply to a question from a Labor
frank Allaun. who suggested that in order te encour-
ic Mideast negotiations. Britain should prohibit tne
Ned arms sale to Egypt and future arms sales to Israel
the initiative for a joint embargo in an
did not visit the Abu Rodeis
oil fields in southwestern Si-
nai which is another key point
that Israel may be prepared to
relinquish in exchange for an
acceptable interim agreement.
It would be an expensive with-
drawal, not only in terms of
the lost oil which now covers
most of Israel's domestic needs,
but the new fortifications that
would have to be built.
It was learned here that an
Israeli withdrawal from Abu
Rodeis would require the aban-
donment of a fortified defense
line that cost Israel tens of mil-
lions of Pounds to build.
take
Be
the
A new line would have to be
constructed to defend the ap-
proaches to A-Tour and Sharm
el-Sheikh.
IT WAS also learned here
that increased naval activity
has been observed recently in
Saudi Arabian coastal waters
East supplied by Britain, the United States. France
Soviet Union.
:ai.LAGHAN STRESSED that no arms exporter could
out arms horn Britain without a license. "But the
Ition is quite simply at the moment that if Britain were
Ito meet minimum requests from these countries, not
would they feel that Britain was unwilling to assist but opposite j*-^'^h,ch
they would turn elsewhere perhaps to quarters you ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^
a not wish for them to turn. without civilian or military out-
Another Ubor MP. Robin Cor*.,. sorted** ** 2!r
an attempt could be made at limiting arms to tne m thg g^^^ may take up po-
since if the countries involved did not have the means
rage war it would make a new war unlikely.
'Yes, but that is an ideal situation and I live in a world
reality," Caltaghan replied. "There is not the faintest
ice of this being achieved."
sitions in the area.
They now have in their ar-
senal American "Hawk" anti-
aircraft missiles which can be
deployed swiftly on the Saudian
side of the straitt.
tos in conditions of extreme
poverty, disease and backward-
ness.
TODAY THESE health, edu-
cation and welfare services, fi-
nanced by funds JDC receives
mainly from fund-raising ef-
forts like the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emergen-
cy Fund, still reach about 19,-
000 of Iran's 75,000 Jews; some
10,000 of them are schoolchil-
dren.
Along with the social prog-
ress the country has made since
the launching of the Shah's
"White Revolution" in 1963, the
JDC-supported school health,
feeding, mother-child and edu-
cational programs have given
thousands of Jewish children
in Iran a better start in life over
the past 25 years.
Social Welfare Services Affected
Since it has traditionally
served the mahalleh's popula-
tion, the Tehran Jewish com-
munity's social welfare service
has felt the impact of the chang-
es in Iranian Jewry's economic
and social status even more
acutely than the Jewish schools
and health services.
Those remaining in the ma-
halleh are for the most part the
weaker members of the com-
Bridges
To Jordan
Stay Open
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM(JTA) De-
scribing the Allenby Bridge as
"our biggest entry port after
Lod" (Ben Gurion Airport), De-
fense Minister Shimon Peres
said here that the open bridges
policy which permits Arabs
from neighboring countries to
visit their relatives and friends
in the administered territories
and East Jerusalem, would re-
main in effect this summer de-
spite the mounting incidence of
terrorist acts and sabotage.
Standing in the center of the
span that links the West Bank
with Jordan. Peres said he
would not make the generaliza-
tion that all who pass over the
bridge are potential terrorists.
He even conceded that the po-
litical sympathy with the PLO
held by many visitors did not
mean they approved of terror-
ist acts.
HE INDICATED that Israel
had ample means of checking
out each visitor. Peres noted
that while security measures
have been tightened at the
Jordan River crossings, special
arrangements were being made
to ease the entry process.
He said that about 64.000
have crossed the bridges since
the beginning ot this month, 25.-
000 of them summer visitors
from Arab countries.
munitythe aged, the chron-
ically ill, and the hardcore in-
digents whose chances of re-
Continnrd an Page 6
Bonn Prexy
Visits Baeck
Institute
NEW YORK (JTA) Dr.
Waiter Scheel. President of the
Federal Republic of West Ger-
many, made a point of visiting
the Leo Baeck Institute here,
during a one-day stop-over In
New York, part of his five-day
visit to the United States.
At the Institute, which Is a
research center on the history
of German Jews from the 18th
Century to the Nazi era. Dr.
Scheel declared that some of the
great Jewish intellectuals, such
as Sigmund Freud, Albert Ein-
stein and Karl Marx, were per-
sons of great German culture,
as well as being Jews.
HE DECLARED that he was
pleased that Jews driven out oC
Germany by the Nazis had main-
tained the German heritage that
Hitler sought to erase.
Dr. Ernest Hamburger, a
member of the Institute's execu-
tive committee, presented Dr.
Scheel with specially bound
volumes of two books published
by the Institute about Jews in
German political life during the
19th and 20th Centuries.
One was written by Dr. Ham-
burger.
Dr. Scheel presented to Dr.
Max Gruenwald. president of
the Institute, the first edition
of the complete works of Hein-
rich Heine, published in 1866^
Argentina's
Education
Getting Better
JERUSALEM (JTA)After
years of steady decline, the
state of Jewish education in Ar-
gentina is beginning to show
slight improvement, according
to a report delivered by Haira
Finkelstone. head of the Jewish
Agency's Education Department
to the Agency Executive.
Six new Jewish schools had
been set up in outlying areas
this year as the first stage of
a comprehensive education plaa
devised by Jewish Agency
Chairman Pinhas Sapir during
his visit to Argentina last year.
Finkelstone said.
THE OVERALL figures show-
ed a 500 increase in the num-
ber of children enrolled at Jew-
ish schools in Argentina.
But the total figure was only
a paltry 20.000. Finkelstone con-
tinued. The basic problem was a
shortage of teachers, especially
young teachers.
Altogether in Argentina there
are some 1.100 teachers of He-
brew or Jewish studies, but the
profession stood low in the so-
cial and financial scale, and for
that reason it was attracting few
new applicants.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, July n
AJCong. Women Rap Peace
League's Stand on Israel Aid
-rv< li H
' The American Jewish Con-
gress Florida Women's Division
has called on the Women's In-
ternational League for Peace
and Freedom to "repudiate in
unambiguous and unequivocal
t League's New York Metropoli-
tan Branch opposing Israel's re-
quest for $2.5 billion in U.S.
a.d
The statement was contained
in a letter to Senator Jacob K.
Javits (R., NY.), signed for its
New York Metropolitan Branch
Legislative Committee. Copies
of the letter were sent to 76
Senators who recently wrote to
President Ford supporting eco-
nomic and military aid to Israel.
THE WILPF letter declared
that "The request of Israel for
$2.5 billion dollars in her search
for peace is an example of al-
location of American funds that
cannot possibly serve the in-
terests of Americans, and will
not conceivably serve the Is-
raeli people
"The request of 76 members
of the Senate for the granting of
MYRIAM WOLF
so huge an amount to the little
state of Israel is hard to under-
stand."
In protest. Mrs. Myriam Wolf,
president of the Florida Wom-
en's Division. American Jewish
Congress, and Mrs. Judith Ten-
Florida Student Delegation
Attends SMI Conference
A delegation of Florida stu-
dents has just returned from the
National Organizing Conference
of Student Mobilization for Is.
rael held in Indian Orchard.
Pa. They now plan on an in.
tensified program of informa-
tion and education about the
Middle East and Israel, on South
Florida campuses.
One of the South Florida
delegates. Benny Ergas of Mi-
ami Beach, has been named.
southeast coordinator for the
all-volunteer student group.
Together with two other
founders of SMI in the southern
United States. Sergio Waksman
ef Miami Beach and Leo
Schwartzberg of North Miami.
Ergas will be responsible for
coordinating SMI pro-Israel ef-
forts in 20 states.
Among the projects under-
taken by SMI are political ac-
tivity op the campuses, includ-
ing creation of leaflets, pam-
phlets, articles, and placards;
sponsorship of and recruitment
for a special volunteer program
in Israel, and efforts to inform ,
and enable Americans to ex-
plore the prospects of aliya
(immigration) to Israel.
The national SMI was found-
ed in November 1974. as a
broad-based meeting place of
American students supporting
Israel. From its initial stage,
where it included students only
in the New York area. SMI now
has representation on over one-
hundred campuses.
The Florida delegation at the
Indian Orchard conference was
one of the largest from outside
the northeastern area, to which '
delegates came from as far as (
Berkeley. Calif, and Seattle.
Wash. _____________|
Tennis Party
Tickets On Sale
Plantation Jewish Congrega-
tion is planning to hold its first
tennis party Saturday. Aug. 23,
at 7 p.m., Jacaranda Country
Club Tennis Courts
Tickets are being sold which
'j will include tennis and after-
\ tennis feast at the synagogue
i on Nob Hill Road. Novices, in-
termediate or advanced tennis
buffs an welcome to join in the
fun.
Tickets will be sold in ad-
vance only Contact Toby Brown,
for further information.
At present. SMI has active af-
filiates on the campuses of Mi-
ami-Dade Community College
North and South, the University
of Miami. Florida International
University. Florida Atlantic Uni-
versity. University of Florida at
Gainesville, University of South
Florida at Tampa, and Florida
State University at Tallahassee.
It has offices at Israel Youth
Programs, 4200 Biscayne Blvd.
per. past president and cur-
rently national vie? president.
charged that the statement was
"not checked, cleared or con-
firmed by any of the national
officers of the League or by its
national sponsors many of
whom we know to be embar-
rassed by this partisan and un-
authorized pronouncement.
"IT IS imperative that those
who participate in the peace
movement not allow themselves
to be used or their ranks to be
divided by allowing the imposi-
tion of a narrow and uninform-
ed approach to the complex
problems of the Middle East "
Copies of the American Jew
ish Congress Women's Divisior
letter are being sent to the 71
Senators who received tht
WILPF statement.
The Congress Florida Worn
en's Division said that many o'
its members have been asso-
ciated with the Women's Inter-
national League in peace-re-
lated activities "and will un-
doubtedly make their feelings
known as individuals to the
leadership of the WTLPF."
REP. BELLA S. Abzug (D..
N.Y.) has already announced
her resignation from the WILPF.
whose stationery lists her as a
national sponsor, asserting:
"As you know, I have con-
sistently supported and voted
for aid to Israel and totally dis-
agree with the position taken by
the WILPF New York branch.
"I am on record suoportrng
Israel's request for $2.5 billion
in aid. At no time was I asked.
informed or consulted by any-
one in WILPF about this let-
ter'"
Rep. Abzug asked that her
name be removed from the
WILPF stationery.
I
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HOMf OWNERS!
AUTOMOM.I
ALL
IN
ONE
PACKAGE
UP TO 2S0/f DISCOUNT
IF YOU QUALIFY
CALL LEE ROSENBAUM
S87-3267 Eve. 972-3986
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U.S. 'Olim Win Review
JERUSALEM (JTA) Attorney General Melr Sham
gar will be asked by the Housing and Absorption Aimisirie,
and the Jewish Agency to review the claim by some looo
immigrant families from the United States that their rent
ha,d, been, :rw^a^d.cuotr^ry to their original contracts
The decision to ask for a legal review was : idg at a
meeting of Jewish Agency Chairman Pinhas Sapir. Houj.
\m> Minister Avraham Orer. and Absorption Minister Shlomo
Rosen with representatives of the immigrants
THE IMMIGRANTS protested the rent increases in a
demonstration outside the convention hall during -he Je*.
ish Agency Assembly meeting June 17.
They' won the .support of Mrs. Charlotte .'acobson
chairman of the American Section of the World Zionist
Organizatien. an Assembly delegate. Moshe Rivlin. director
general of the Jewish Agency, told them a solution would
be sought.
The immigrants, who came to Israel in the past four
years, said their rents were increased despite an agreement
fixing the rentals for a 12-year period.
Adult
CONDOMINIUM
Residence
from
The Meadows
370 S. STATE R0A0 7 (441)
MARGATE, FIORIDA 3*61
(305-9744614)
Rossmoor
VJCOCOIWJT CREEK
llK' IIIIM imIiiII condominium
<-oininiinii>.
from .SIA.SOO...
no land lease
iiorvm'.iiionlcnsc.
Take Turnpike exit 24
West on Ric 614 Phone (305) 971-3510
From Miami TOLL FREE (305) 947-9906
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood ana Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In the liollyumnd and Halanddc was.
5801 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood.
920-1010
In the Fort Lauderdale area
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.(SunsetStrip),Sunrise
584-6060
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapl Inc /FunTal Directors
Other Riverside chapelj in South rkwda are located A
North Miami Bach Miami B*ach jnd Miami
s rhNw York M*opoto*n uuwiti .*ap* ^anf""**
H*~nal,
MunyN Rub


>riday. July 11, 1975
The Jewish Flondian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
Rossmoor's 2nd Phase To Be Finished In 75
Construction on Rossmoor
Coconut Creeks second phase,
Nassau Village, is continuing
despite recent heavy winds and
-ins. Foundations for the first
of the 19 two-story Caribbean-
stvled villas were poured in
mid June, and the first units in
Nassau Village will be complet-
ed in earlv December, accord-
ing to Orion Smith, construction
director for the master-planned
project.
Nassau Village will have a
Starting Place
Offers Summer
School Program
The Starting Place. Fort
Lauderdale's licensed counsel-
ing and education center, an-
nounces that the school pro-
gram will continue throughout
the summer, enabling students
in need of remedial or make-up
work to complete it. Those wish-
ing to prepare for their GED
will also be axxommodated.
School is conducted by a cer-
tified teacher provided by B.
F. James alternative school
Classes are conducted Monday
through Friday from 9:30 a.m.
to i: 30.
School attendance on the
premises is a regular part of
The Starting Places complete
program of rehabilitation, voca-
tional training and counseling.
For further information con
SheldOO Shaffer, executive
director. ^_______________
Temple Sholom
Dues Fit Needs
JU ponding to the growth and
uent need in the North-
ird Community, Tem-
pi,. Sholom has announced a
-hip structure of dues
to fit individual needs.
Young families with school
are children may register for
Sunday and Hebrew School all
through the summer; Final reg-
istration date is Aug. 10.
Sabbath services continue
throuehout the summer and
Hich Holiday tickets are now
on -ali'.
Louise 'Mrs. Jerry) Soowal.
me-nburstup coordinator, has
planned a number of welcome
meeting for new congregants.
total of 276 condominium apart-
ments when completed. Se\en
different floor plans will be of-
fered, ranging trom the studio
apartment to a three bedroom
convertible, two bath unit. Pric-
es for the units begin at $21.-
900. according to Larry Uchin.
director of marketing-sales for
the adillts-only development.
Uchin said that the sales re-
sponse to the offering of Nas-
sau Village had been "even
stronger than our initial offer-
ing of Bahama Village, our first
phase.
"With completion of Bahama
Villages 304 units, our pros-
pective buyers have a very
definite idea of the type of con-
struction we're doing and
they can see the Rossmoor con-
cept of a master-planned, total
environment community actual-
ly in operation."
There are seven plans in Nas-
sau Village, which is being con-
structed directly across the
street from Clubhouse One, the
$2-million social and recreation-
al complex, and will be near all
the community's rec facilities,
including the community's pro-
jected tennis complex, Uchin
said.
Another desirable feature of
the second phase is an increase
in the number of waterfront lo-
cations, and the Village's prox-
imity to the main entrance, a
landscaped area of broad aven-
ues, lakes and waterways.
Rossmoor Coconut Creek,
which has had a spectacular
rise in acceptance this year in
Rroward County, rising from
16th to sixth place since Janu-
ary, is the first Florida venture
for the nationally-known Ross-
moor Corp.. with headquarters
in Laguna Hills. Calif. Rossmoor
has total environment com-
munities in six states, with
more than 45.000 residents.
The for-adults-only communi-
ty, which will eventually con-
tain 24 villages, all in the theme
of the Caribbean, has an 18-hole
golf course, a social and recre-
ational complex with large
swimming pool, shuffleboard
courts, ballroom, a grand
lounge, three dining rooms and
a long list of craft studios and
shops.
There is a. complex security
system, including mobile se-
curity patrols, attended gate-
houses, health and emergency
signals in the apartments, and
a staff of registered nurses on
duty 24 hours daily.
Two swimming pools are al-
ready in use in the community.
The Bahama Village pool is in
the center of that community,
and the Olympic-sized pool at j
Clubhouse One is convenient to]
all of the villages.
ImtROOuCTIOKS for C**'>
lor Morrioj*. All WOUD
WIDE SftVKI Call (SOS) 4*1-4*20
|r write Hr iufcrwBtlwM IfW
|dKK ENTERPRISES, 2501 E. Com-
Mrtiol Blvd., Ft. ItwtltHtlt, Ha.
OUR
28th
YEAR
MURPHY
PAINTS
BROW AW) PAINT
and WALLPAPER CO.
212 North Andrew Am*
523-0577, Fort laudtrdale
*
Row Co/ten, (right) a resident of Rossmoor Coconut
Creek and a member of the stone-sculpturing class, gets
some suggestions from classmate Jane Priest.
The New
KOSHER HOTEL ot me
YEAR
The
saxony
mmiwumiiwii

Vfedo
business the
right way.
Mb--*
\
SarvlcM
Conducted by
LEI* RASKIN
Enjoy The
HIGH HOLY DAYS
and SUCCOTH
w.lh the BE^M'WIT? CAMILV
Ask About 4 Weh Special
Including
m m mvs i won
For People Who Date
Hunetrnh ol seemed rejoteert mem-
bers mitctod to your preference wtri
4 dignified inn reiitfte datntf. t"v
SIS lee tor 4 moans with fuarantead
laatenes. ___,
write or call for tree refiatr-ation torms
* SOPHISThDATE
103 N.E. 79th Street
Miami, Florida 33138
305-696 1610
m mm
AoUsfr-MSO^
>t\m4mt tun mutant cmwtt
PeW napaJV aWva^^^V r^^^^
I-53MH
ADVERTISING SALESMAN
DAW BROWARD
Telephone, Personal Contact,
and/or loth.
ST.,
Bee 01*973, Miami J310I
ALL RiniCS NBO M
STliCt COHHDtMC*
Rossmoor has no recreation
lease and no land lease, and
100 per cent of all deposits are
rlaced in escrow bearing in-
terest to the purchaser at pass-
book interest rates.
Rossmoor Coconut Creek is a
half-mile west of Florida Turn-
pike exit 24 (Pompano Beach).
Model apartments are on dis-
play daily at the model and
exhibit center at the site, which
faces Coconut Creek Parkway
(State Road 814).
Gift Shop Sale
Planned July 21
Temple Sholom will bold its
annual gift shop sale Monday,
July 21, at 10:30 a.m. to make
room for new merchandise.
Channah Tribble and Alice Ar-
rick are working to tag all
merchandise at bargain prices.
Under the leadership of
President Martin Kurtz, the
Temple Sholom board of di-
rectors will meet Tuesday, Aug.
12, at 8 p.m.
The new Mr. and Mrs. Club
at Temple Sholom will hold its
next meeting at the home of
Dr. and Mrs. David Ehrlich.
Explosive In
Paint Can
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
large explosive charge con-
cealed in a paint can was found
in downtown Jerusalem and was
defused by police. The can
aroused the suspicion of a pas-
serby during the morning rush
hour in Zahal Square near City
Hall and the Old City Walls. All
Jerusalem residents have been
warned to be on the alert fol-
lowing a wave of terrorist in-
cidents in and around the city
over the recent Shavuot week-
end.
A SUSPECTED terrorist sus-
tained self inflicted wounds
when an explosive charge de-
tonated as he was planting it in
the Ramot Eshkol district.
Earlier, a charge was found
near the Rockefeller Museum
and was defused without caus-
ing damage. The most serious
incident was the explosion of a
booby-trapped picnic hamper on
the crowded public beach St
Ein Fashcha on the Dead Sea
which sent 20 persons to the
hospital. Most of the injuries
were slight.
TRAVEL WITH COUNCIL'
ISRAEL EUROPE MEXICO. ETC.
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN
LILLIAN ZALKIN 735-5755 LILLIAN RAFFEL 564-0864
THE PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGATION
IS ACCEPTING TEACHER APPLICATIONS
FOR THE HEBREW SCHOOL PROGRAM.
Please send resumes to:
DR. HELEN ACKERMAN
5921 Almond Terrace
Plantation, Fla. 33317
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J


A Bicentennial Question
Many Americans who saw President Ford's press
conference on the lawn of the White House last week
came away with the impression that, more and more,
he looks like his "own man."
The aura of uncertainty in which he took office on
Aug. 9 of last year seems to have left him, and that is
a good thing.
But is this as a consequence of the fact that he has
grown into the office and finally feels comfortable in it?
On this July 4, the opening of the bicentennial of
American independence, it is particularly important
that we understand the answer. It has something par-
ticularly vital to do with our very freedom.
Take, for example, his reaction to the question of
one reporter who asi.ed the President what would hap-
pen in the event that OPEC raised its prices on oil
again.
Mr. Ford had just finished talking about what his
administration had achieved thus far in the fields of
unemployment, the "recession" and inflation. What, the
reporter wondered, would the prospect of a new oil
hike have on these economic programs?
We must agree that the President responded more
forcefully and forthrightly than we have ever seen him
speak before. But we are not quite sure what he said.
Regretfully, we must add, his oratory reminded us
of his predecessor's. Richard Nixon was also a forceful
and forthright speaker, but one was never quite sure of
what he had said.
The Appointment of Nessen
The parallel is at first shocking, but lurking in the
hearts of all of us is the fear that perhaps nothing has
changed very much at all since last Aug. 9.
When President Ford took office, he announced
Jerry terHorst, a highly respected newsman of many
years' standing, as his press secretary. This was perhaps
his most significant appointment. After all, the very
essence of the Nixon administration was best symbolized
by Ron Ziegler, the previous press secretary, who was
imperious, perfunctory, secretive, obfuscatory.
terHorst, within days, resigned. The open adminis-
tration to which Ford pledged himself was already not
so open at all.
Whereupon, Mr. Ford promptly turned to Ron Nes-
sen, an NBC newsman, who had for years been giving
the Nixon administration its lumps on TV and, withal,
had managed to survive.
Accepting the appointment, Nessen promptly dec-
lared that if his duties as the new press secretary ever
forced him to be guilty of conspiratorially deluding the
press, as Ziegler is alleged to have done, he would quit.
Well, now. there have been several such instances
of deluding the press only within the last few weeks
all of which Nessen has since explained as "mistakes."
Add to this Nessen's outburst of uncontrolled anger
last week in a press conference all his own in which
one reporter flatly called him a "liar," and in which
Nessen responded by setting up the same the-press-is-
the-enemy parameters, that existed during the height of
Nixon's regime.
The People's Business
A final word: President Ford's outburst of rage in
reaction to a New York Times story June 26 that pre-
sumably leaked Israel's peace offer to Egypt for a sec-
ond-stage interim agreement.
Why the rage?
The point here is that the new confidence President
Ford seems to be showing is not so new, at least for us,
at all. We have been accustomed to that kind of "con-
fidence" in the past. On Aug. 9 of last year, we hoped
things would change not toward "confidence" in the
President, but in a willingness for him to recognize that
he is no more than the nation's leader at a particular
time, and hence, merely the temporary custodian of its
best interests.
We had hoped a new President, and an appointed
one at that, did not mean another Caesar.
Meanwhile, there is Israel, worried that the good
feelings growing out of the Ford-Premier Rabin meet-
ings in Washington in mid-June are already eroded.
As for the U.S.A., well, a confident President these
days apparently means a secretive one. Once again, the
people's business seems no longer to be theirs.
About Critidsm^Partisanship
IS THE months go by, cnti-
A cism of Henry Kissinger
and, indeed. Gerald Ford, wiU
increasingly be seen as partisan
rather than political.
We are, after all. approach-
ing National Convention time,
when the nation goes berserk
in a rodeo of bronco-busting
expediency.
BUT THAT is a terrible
shame because Kissinger de-
serves criticism as he never
has before. I have in mind:
His statement on his re-
turn from his Mideast shuttle
in March, which failed;
The remark he made in an
interview on television during
the visit in mid-June of Pre-
mier Rabin;
His reorganization of the
policy making mechanism of
the State Department, which
gives him even more power
over foreign policy decisions
than before.
WITH RESPECT to the first:
On Kissinger's return from the
Mideast in March, he was forc-
ed to confront not only a fail-
ure of his personal diplomacy,
but also the triumph of the
Viet Cong, which painfully be-
trayed Kissinger's naivete in
Mindlin
his long-term negotiations in
Paris with the Cong Klatch of
Le Due Tho.
He had won a Nobel Prize
for that "achievement'' Like
Chamberlain, he had brought
"peace in our time" to South-
east Asia. In a word. Le Due
Tho had taken him.
Depressed and angry. Kis-
singer responded to these twin
failures by declaring, and urg-
ing President Ford to declare,
that henceforward the United
States would no longer act as
policeman to the world.
IT WAS too expensive, un-
rewarding, and besides we had
troubles enough at home to
deal with a noble sentiment
from a secretary of state -ha i
ed with conductmq 0Ur f *
affairs, a sentiment Z ?*
Oon. professional se^J
With respect to the sw^J
When, at the eonchj?*
Premier Rabin's visit rim,.. I
asked Kissinger if pJ!^M
Ford had applu-d pnH
Rabin to get Israel to JU
more concession-. Kissing I
plied that we an- after al< ^1
ing with Israelis, and whe- Im
anybody ever know Isr* j,
give something away f0r J!\
ing? ^*
With respect to the tha*
Kissinger's suddenlyannormj
ed reorganization of thTsZ
Department's policy naS]
mechanism will have the 7n2|
of centralizing the power A
that mechanism in his basal
against the best advice of ra>|
merous critics, including a |
cial presidential commistJ
set up to study State Depart]
ment bureaucracv
AGAIN WiTH respect to t,
first and Kissinger's depress*!
and anger in March Tab!
July. I sec no evidence of o|
giving up our role as pohccc*|
foatinurd on Pace 5
Amin: Africa's Total Despot
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Time Syndicate
What a despot with total
powers does in his developing
African country seems scarcely
a candidate for the top news.
Yet President Adi Amin of
Uganda has captured and held
the headlines with his cat-and-
mouse changes of mind about
the execution of a British lec-
turer. Denis Hills, who was un-
wary enough to call him a
"village tyrant" in some manu-
script notes.
THE OBVIOUS reason for the
wprld's concern is that a man's
life hangs in balance as a mili-
tary dictator plays with it. for
motives that only a psychiatrist
could guess at.
But there is a deeper reason
as well. It goes back to one of
the underlying themes in his-
tory and literaturethat of the
mad king
IN THE too-closely intermar-
ried dynastic families of Europe
there were inevitably monarchs
whose headstrong aberrations
spread fear in their courts and
among their people.
The stories made good copy
in those lurid histories of the
European monarchies, written
by French hacks, which you
could always pick up at the
bookstalls along the Seine.
BUT KINGSHIP in Europe is
all but over, except for a few
constituuonal monarchs with no
power.
The new kings are the dic-
tators, whether they run a na-
tion by party and ideology or
by military force, or both. Mod-
ern weapons have multiplied in
their death-dealing capacity.
The mass media have given
the new kings a hold over the
minds of their subjects that the
old ones could only strive for
by aSjMBI of divine rights and
sometimes by having them-
selves turned into gods.
EVER SINCE the nuclear
bomb we have been oppressed
by a nightmare fantasy that
somehow a man with a sick
mind would become the head of
the nation and use the bomb
for his sick purposes. It is a
nightmare that will not go away.
I don't like the game of long-
distance psychoanalysis when
applied to heads of state. It if
too easy and too dangerous.
BUT IN the case of Stalin, it
was his own close collaborators
in power who experienced hit
fits of rage, and came to see
him as unbalanced as witness
Khrushchev's famous speech
about him. There could be
other such cases someday.
Each of us has our own neu-
roses, including heads of state.
But the rest of us don't have
the absolute power to put our
neuroses into affect I can't pre-
tend to fathom those of Presi-
dent Amin.
But the press records since
he came to power speak for
themselves. Many of his closest
former aides and collaborators
have fled the country. Some
were too late. Nothing seems to
have been too trivial to escape
his all-seeing eye and his om-
nipotent arm.
OF THE foreigners, the
British have suffered the moat.
President Amin seems obsessed
with Britain and its symbols of
powerQueen Elizabeth. Prime
Minister Harold Wilson. Foreign
Secretary James Callaghan.
Clearly, he is reaching be-
yond the hapless offending
lecturer and writer, whom he
threatens to execute and whom
he has used as a plaything. His
government radio reported that
the two generals whom Queen
Elizabeth sent to him approach-
ed him "on their knees."
IT ISNT too farfetched to
see this as the grandiose fan-
tasy of the former sergeant in
Britain's Uganda army, about
having brought the proud
British monarchy to its knees
before him.
Thus far the tendency of the
British, and of other govern-
ments as well, has been to dis-
miss President Amin's deeds
and words as prankish capers,
not to be taken too seriously.
Actually, even if thev toil
Amin with a high sehounajj
there is little or nothing thy]
can do about him.
PRESUMABLY there art l
limits to what a head of i mm
ereign state can dosensible il
foolish or wicked
This only sen es to nib all
into the world's great vountJ
the fact that there is as yet gj
world law, and not even a wrsj
moral community. None t]
Amin's victims could bnaj
suit against him in the exisraj|
world court.
NO ONE m the U N General
Assembly (ton its obnau
biaswould think of sreaQH
out against him. nor would ns|
General Assembly dare pawl
of its resolutions about him.
There may be a chance tat|
some groups of intellectualsj
the West would take up
OSM of their fellow writer
raise it as a world issue in i
tellectual freedom But evtal
they did. Anim would eflY
scorn them or be delighted l
their attention.
THE LUCKY v "le are I
who live undei ->me kind
constitutional forms, wrttoil
frame of a BWil contflj
Which means thai TO wi
surrendered some of their dwi
dom of action in order P
the protection of the W
But in military dictators*!
there is onlv the lawoij
man or of an army group "I
in a world whu-!: is still a jtasj
of national *o\ .-reignM* "I
idea of the social contrtfj
not yet reached out to
the helpless against the I
tence of an absolute ruler
Jewish FlorldiAn
OF OWBATBK
mm FLINT IS* N B. MS St..
LAUDCROALS
WW
tDTsstrnvNO DasMamnaNT _. ..-,,.
MIAMI APDMSS: TO. Bw OT. atUaal. Fto^ "^.
T*a .tow** rtorttftM Dm. m*X H-rnt^Th. K^
Of Tit* aairaMaSlM ASvartJa**- In It* CatawiM
r*bitafc*d Bi-WMkar
Stcond Claaa Pottage Paid at Miami, na
All P.O. U1* rtrna r to k* ""J*rd*d.,'l' uiol.
Tha Jewlah Pk>r14lan. P.O Boa 01JS7J. Miami. 11* '
T* JtwWi piHaN has
MM Jaw** Uwrty and
Mambar of tht Mrtafc TalaaSla Aa*cy
yta. WirMwt4t Mjwi Sarvica. National tditarlal
fclatlaa af Bwllafc-Jrta*
SUBSCRIPTION BATaWi vmv ....- ^ _
. Bavan Art" "" tBtaJ
M* tfca rior. Volume 4
Friday, July 11, 1975
NuiBtrJ
3AB
vancc oniy contact lony Brown; ><
for further information. ^-
J
aaaaaaaa


DESPITE TEDDY'S DENIALS, COLUMNIST BELIEVES:
Hll be Ford vs. Kennedy in '76 Race
By MAX LERNER
| lo, Angeles Times Syndicate
If there were ever any doubts
that the two major presidential
andidates in 1976Republican
Democratic are in tact
andidates, and ready to go. the
fcnibts are ^'"S dispelled.
You can discard the "ifs" and
hniybes" and say as flatly as
ruses of history' end the
jmtv of human wishes allow.
at if nominated Gerald Ford
Edward Kennedy will run.
pd if elected they will serve.
AS LONG as President Ford's
ortunes in office were minimal.
\t"t> candidacy was little
etter than academic. But they
avc been rising fortunes.
Mr Ford is on the way to
abashing himself as a Presi-
ent If he hasn't become a
.arry Truman, he is no longer
Herbert Hoover.
The Mayaguez incident evok-
a wave of popular sentiment
rhich transient as it may
veenabled him to nose out
en. Kennedy in the Harris
oil.
HIS Kl'ROPEAN trip helped
he active, mediating American
jiplomacy in the Middle East
FORD
KENNEDY
Conference option.
President Ford's gamble on
taking a personal role in the
Middle East diplomacy, in his
talks with President Anwar Sa-
dat and Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin, involved some obvious
danger to him. but it is filling
out his presidential presence in
foreign policy.
ADD SEVERAL minor eddies
of opinion which may help him.
The new political climate is
poet-Watergate in a different
sense from the past yaw.
. Sen. Lowell Weicker's (R..
Conn.) proposal for a runoff in
the hairbreadth New Hampshire
election was rejected by the
Senate Democrats, for the ob-
vious reason that the Dem-
ocratic miracle performance in
New Hampshire in 1974 would
be unlikely in 1975.
Moreover, in his struggle with
a Democratic Congress, the Ford
\etoes have been holding.
I HAVE few doubts that
President Ford and Vice Presi-
dent Rockefeller will be the
1976 Republican nominees.
Curiously, Ronald Reagan's
chances of running in 1976 de-
pend mrire on a Democrat
George Wallace than upon
Reagan's fellow Republicans.
If the primaries give Wallace
his revenge for the humiliations
that his more liberal Demo-
cratic rivals have heaped on
him. and if he makes no con-
vention headway for the Vice
Presidency (which is what he
aims at). I don't rule out Wal-
lace joining with Reagan in an
independent splinter fusion
party in the 1976 election.
IT COULD cut into both ma-
jor parties, but if it threw the
election into the House of Rep-
resentatives, the Democrats
would win. That's mainly why
I doubt whether Reagan and
Wallace would try it.
If the Republicans looked
like a burnt-out case after
Watergate, and are starting to
breathe again, the Democrats
are the Watergate victors who
are living up to their 1968 and
1972 precedents of being sui-
cidal in victory.
The Republicans have the un-
aspiring choice between Mr.
Continued on Page 8
Boston Women *
Rap Walkout
NEW YORK(JTA) The
walkout last week by some
women delegates during Leah
Rabin's address at the Interna-
tional Women's Year Confer-
ence held in Mexico City was
strongly condemned by the Jew-
ish Community Council of Bos-
ton, an organization including
a number of Jewish women'i
associations.
In a statement issued by
Dorothy Spector, a vice presi-
dent of the Jewish Community
Council of Metropolitan Boston,
"Women everywhere, who sub-
scribe to the principles of peace
and international morality,"
were urged "to deplore the
hypocrisy of those who agitated
and organized this disgraceful
incident."
IN THE statement, the coun-
0
riticism and Partisanship Not the Same
Continued f
Fa* 4-.
the world since then.
n fact, only last week, at a
ite House press conference,
sident Ford flatly declared
t "I will not allow" a con-
uinp -talemate in the Middle
Bt That is as far from the
ostened position the admin-
ration adopted in March as
ndmp one's own business is
m assuming the burden or
Itht of telling others what to
[Again with respect to the
cond As the television cam-
ground away for national
Uumption, Kissinger's re-
adout Israel and more
nccssions was followed by a
of laughter from news-
en
R "ISRAEL" and
elis.' read "Jews," and
ve the whole story.
"Is-
you
It was a frank pandering to
anti Semitic sentiment and
stereotypes dealing with Jews
and their alleged penuriousness
"Since when did you ever
know a Jew to give anything
away free?" sort of thing.
Again with respect to the
third and last: Kissinger's cen-
tralizing of the State Depart-
ment's power mechanism in his
hands comes at a time when a
special commission only last
weekend, in a 300-page report
to President Ford, strongly
recommended a DECENTRAL-
IZATION of the secretary of
state's powers.
MAINLY, the commission
was critical of the fact that Kis-
singer occupies two offices:
secretary of state and director
of the National Security Coun-
cil, in which capacity he also
SERVING
BROWARO
COUNTY
ENORAH
Cfopets
Mark Weissmaa
Breward Ceaatys ealy
JtwisJi Federal Director
Tele.aeae 1713339
5915 FARK DRIVE MARGATE. FLORIDA
441S. FEDERAL MWY. DEERFIELD BEACH, FLA.
serves as the President's na-
tional security adviser.
The commission, whose mem-
bers included Vice President
Rockefeller, strongly urged that
these two powerful posts not be
held by one person in the fu-
ture a recommendation made
to President Ford by others
some time ago, which he
promptly rejected.
I fail re see anything parti-
san in any of the exceptions I
have taken to Kissinger and the
administration in these three
instances, although it is pre-
dictable that charges of parti-
sanship will be made against
them in any case.
I SUSPECT that the greatest
exception will be taken to the
second. Kissinger is after all
Jewish himself, and a victim of
anti-Semitism. How can any-
one accuse him of pandering to
anti-Semitic sentiment?
This may explain it:
Edward R. F. Sheehan, a
recently-appointed Fellow at
the Harvard University Center
for International Affairs, has
just been authorized by Kissin- i
ger to write a book about his i
Mideast negotiations with An-
MOT Sadat to be entitled "Deal-
ings with Moderate Arab Lead-
ers."
i
His most recent, widely
circulated, was on December!
8. 1974, entitled "Why Sadat
and Faisal Chose Arafat."
HOW IS that for (a) modera-
tion and (b) impartiality on the
part of Kissinger?
such a book but an Arab propa-
gandist.
And yet, as presidential
hopefuls announce their inten-
tions, and as preparations for
National Convention time loom,
criticism of Kissinger, who has
more power over the presiden-
tial office and foreign affairs
than any secretary of state
since John Foster Dulles, will
increasingly be chalked up as
partisan.
That is why it is so impor-
tant that criticism be voiced
to put the lie, not to politics
but to politicking, and now.
Kissinger considers Sadat a
"moderate." I suppose so was
Le Due Tho.
BUT THE main issue here is
that Sheehan is being given ac-
cess to classified State Depart- \
ment records a privilege no
pro-Zionist, for example, would
ever dream of being accorded
by Kissinger.
Furthermore. Sheehan has
far years been writing pro-Arab
articles from Beirut, Cairo and
other Arab capitals.
cil declared: "We are disheart-
ened that at a conference held
ostensibly to promote peace and
understanding among women
that some delegates sought to
promote political and ethnic dis-
cord among the other delegates
present."
The statement said that the
walkout only served to distort
the stature of the conference
from "what might have been a
useful and worthwhile convoca-
tion" to a mere "arena for the
use of time-worn and hackneyed
cliches and outdated political
rhetoric."
The written condemnation al-
so acknowledged the importance
of the standing ovation received
by Mrs. Rabin before and after
her address by the remaining
delegates.
THE STATEMENT concluded
by expressing the council's "sad-
ness" occasioned by "this most
regrettable incident" but em-
phasized the "encouragement"
felt by them because "so many
delegates concur in the belief
that only through rational dia-
logue and the free exchange of
views can major international
problems be solved."
The council stated that "their
support of this principle, in ac-
cording Mrs. Rabin, as a mem-
ber of the Israeli delegation, to
speak, is to be commended by
men and women of good will
everywhere."
JEFFER
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Frida\
'Mahalleh' Residents Aided
By JDC-Supported Programs
Continued from Page 1
habilitation are limited.
TODAY OVER "50or more
than half of those in the ma-
halleh require some kind or
care.' meals-on-wheels. house-
keeping help or scholarship aid.
combination of financial and so-
cial assistance. This consists of
cash relief, food packages, cloth-
ing, certain kinds of medical
In recognition of the need to
reorganize these services, the
JDC engaged a social work ad-
ministrator for a two-year as-
signment as head of JDC-Iran's
Social Service Department. Her
main task will be to systemize
and professionalize the existing
services and ensure that the
JDC funds are utilized with
maximum effectiveness.
OTHER PHASES of the work
will involve in-service training
NfSSIN IN ASSURING STATEMENT
^^_a>M^
President Declares He's
Not Angered by 'Leak'
i By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) White House Press Secre-
tary Ron Nessen said here that President Ford is "not per-
sonally angry" with anyone over the publication of a pur-
ported Israeli proposal for a second interim agreement
with Egypt.
Nessen offered that statement when the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency asked why the President was so angry over
the "leak" that he made his statement assailing it through
the State Department. The issuance of a Presidential state-
ment through the State Department is a rare occurrence.
OBSERVERS HERE are puzzling over why the Presi-
dent expressed himself publicly with such ire over a news
scribed as "inaccurate and highly misleading."
Some analysts suggested that the Presidential state-
ment originated with the State Department which saw it as
a means to pressure Israel and demonstrate to the Arabs
that the President has no qualms about applying such pres-
sure.
Others believe Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger
felt undercut in his role as mediator between Israel and
Egypt and urged the President to make his statement as a
warning to Jerusalem to keep silent about the negotiations
now taking place through diplomatic channels.
Morgate Sisterhood Agqin Sponsors Greetings Project
Margate Sisterhood once again
is sponsoring "Holiday Greet-
incs as fund raising project.
These greetings are inscribed
in a special issue of the bulle-
tin for a small donation. For a
larger donation, a copy of the
bulletin, with your name will be
mailed to Jiy four of your
family and frtenea.
The cut-off date will be early
this year because the High Holy-
Days come early, commencing
on Sept. 5, the Eve of Rosh
Hashanah. For further informa-
tion, call Elsie Risch, Hazel
Falk or Fay Marokus.
/Meet fsrtJtff Government Dignilaries on your
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(Return October 8, 1975)
2 Weeks Isroel Plus 4 Nights Istanbul, Turkey
3 Nifhts Athens, Greece
Miami to Miami $1549.00
ALL INC E AL ISRAEL AIRLINES
Includes DE LUXE accommodation throughout trip, full
Israeli breakfasts and dinners in Israel; Continental break-
fasts in Istanbul and Athens. Transfers, sightseeing, tips
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for the volunteers on whom the
community's welfare office re-
lies for the main part of its man-
power, and the education of the
community's lay leaders in mod-
ern concepts of social work.
"The JDC is also working to
find out what has happened to
the thousands of Jews who have
moved out of the mahalleh into
other parts of Tehran and into
the city from the provinces,"
commented Harry B. Smith,
president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
"Maybe they still need us.
Maybe they don't. We want to
Hnd out."
MR SMITH reported that
the JDC is planning a study ol
the families of some 400 chiV
dren in the Ozar Hatorah school
in the Gorgon area of Tehran.
This is a lower middle class
district which lies between tha
mahalleh and a wealthy residen-
tial area of the city.
Jewish Singles
Donee Seheduled
The Jewish Federation spon-
sored Jewish Singles Group, for
persons 30 to 50. will hold a
dance Sunday. July 20, at 8 p.m.
in the Hallandale Jewish Cen-
ter. Thre will be continuous
dancing to the music of Ralph
Fine as well as door prizes.
Other programs include a
meeting Monday evening. July
24. at the Home Federal Build-
ing on Young Circle in Holly-
wood where Dr. Ralph Birzon
will speak on "Drugs in Today's
Adult Society."
Information concerning mem-
bership and upcoming programs
in the Jewish Singles Group
may be obtained by contacting
Barry Axler at the Jewish Fed-
eration office.
Reserve Now For
nttiwYMrsiaccm
High Holy Days Rates
Including QLATT KOSHER CulMnt
rtfUWMlfSMKfKST
EUROPEAN PLAN
O.DU nouMxc loStfl 1
ftnWft?IUttKainJUS17
Visit I* BOH SUM
ummamm
Pnon. 1-53S-6631
July
Mexico's Echeverria Hails
Mrs. Rabin's Courage
for science. Eduardo V
arts, and Dr. Gonzalo
Beltran for literature.
Religion
MEXICO CITY (JTA)
President Luis Echeverria has
praised Mrs. Leah Rabin for
standing up to the Arab, com-
munists and Third World dele-
gates who staged a walkout
last week during a session of
the International Women's Year
Conference when the wife of
Israel's Premier Yitxhak Rabin
began to address the assembly.
"Please give my best retards
to Mrs. Rabin and my recog-
nition for her valiant answer to
Arab delegates who ied out
when she spoke in Israel's
name," Echeverria said to Mrs.
Zina Harman and two other
Jewish women.
THE THREE were present in
the official residence of Mexi-
co's President during a cere-
mony at which three prominent
Mexicans were given the Elias
Soursky Award tor Science. Art
and Literature.
The annual award of 75.000
pesos for each recipient is
named after a Mexican Zionist
leader.
Echeverria and Education
Minister Bravo Ahuja. who were
present during the ceremony.
praised Soursky for his efforts
to stimulate the fine arts in
Mexico.
The award winners this year
are Dr. Donato Alarcon Segivia
Servi
ices
NH IAUDBBau
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and a week of popular FAMILY CAMPING AUG. 24
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lina mountainside country and our gyr-na; jm to
New Intense Majors Programs in GYMNASTICS AND
TENNIS, ADVANCED RIDING, ARTS AND CRAr'S ADVAN
CAMPING and H.A.W.K., as woll as the trad.tional P">~
in these and other activities including water skiing, car
Swimming, nflery, archery, nature study, hiding, gV~
and land sports.
Contact Fred Lowmon, PINE CREST SCHOOL
1501 N.I. 62nd ST., FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA 33334
PHONE: 772-6550
HIGH HOLY DAYS
Temple Sholom
224 S.E. llth AVENUE
P0MPAM0 REACH, F10RIDA
Rabbi Morris Skop
Cantor Jacob J. Renscr
Limited Number Oi Tickets ewe
available at the temple Office
taint cmrr contact i ooy urown; v^
for further information. ^--
J\ L


July 11. 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7-
Open Letter To President Ford
ORS SOTE: Samuel Soref is a respected leader of
Lauderdale Jewish community. A noted philanthro-
pe is a former industrialist fwm Milwaukee. Wise,
L he was active in the Jewish and general community,
[held public office. He currently serves on the board
hoots of the Jewish Federation of Greater Ft. Laud-
May 21. 1975.
[jen: (.trald Ford.
House
ington D.C
[Mr [resident:
atulate you on your scheduled trip to assist in the
| o! peace for the Mideast.
an American interested in the success of your leadership,
the liberty of informing you of a consensus arrived at in a
meeting To begin with, we do hope you will assert America's
on the basis of her dedication to justice rather than
pency
e nMpeetMb' submit these considerations to you.
to what extent has the United States, the world at large, or
limed Nations demanded that the Soviet Union relinquish
trial domination over East Germany, Hungary. Poland,
svakia or other conquered countries? Why is Israel's case
at?
sident Eisenhower turned his hack on England, France.
pratl to appease President Nasser and Company. You know
suit The Arab leaden are just as opportunistic and irre-
jle now as they were during the regime of Eisenhower.
nenca s future in the Mediterranean, the Suez Canal and
lian Ocean and its surrounding areas depends largely on a
and independent Israel. Actually, the United States does
|ve a more reliable and stronger ally in the entire world.
at not have to be a foreign affairs expert to realize that if
| does not survive or it she losses her independence. Amer-
osition will not only be weakened but will no longer be that
frst-rate power.
our spokesman has declared that "freedom of the seas, and
Ibroadly. freedom of Americans to travel and trade in the
it one of the bedrocks of American foreign policy." Amer-
| payiiw a heavy price daiiy co make that freedom possible
eif and the Free World. I refuse to believe that you will
y to tienying that freedom to the Israelis.
)r country furnishes on-going-military support and service-
the following countries: South Korea. Taiwan, the Philip-
ISingapore, Australia. Thailand. Japan, the Marianne Islands,
[number of European countries. Not one of those areas is
prucial to U S worldwide leadership than is Israel, and yet
rakes no appeal for US manpower. So much for the prac-!
)de of the conflict in the Mideast as it affects the United '
oral aspects are even raore persuasive. There is no question
:he basis of commitments made by four previous admin-
you cannot now turn your back on all-out military' and
|iic support of Israel.
rsident Anwar Sada. asks for the return of 1967 occupied
[territory" It might have been Arab territory, but most
b must of it was not occupied by Arabs Presently, it is
vim haven for refugee Jews and is being utilized on an
Itanun basis as never before.
rTHe >ou. Mr. President, to examine Arabic insistence on
urn of desolate desert land when millions of acres of more ,
oil m the Arab countries could be made available to the ,
lian refugee?. Since the demand is, of course, strictly'
ind militarily inspired, must the United States make
itself a party to the ignominy of yielding to Arab war threats
and pressures?
In considering the inflexibilities involved, a thorough exami-
nation oi the dealings and concessions will reveal Egypt I it it has
not been clearly indicated already) as the unyielding negotiator.
President Sadat's demand !or the return of "occupied territory"1
(previously occupied in name only; is an excuse for the further
dismemberment of Israel. His request for the return of additional
territory includes the pro'iso for "justice to the Palestinians."
which, when analyzed objectively, compounds the injustice to
the Israelis.
A further condition represents surrender to the Soviet Union's
Syria of land previously utilized by Syria to murder and to harass
peace-loving Israelis. You must surely be aware that agreeing to
those terms wouid ultimately mean dismemberment of Israel as
a nation and the forfeiture of its sovereignty.
No, Mr. President. Israel does not deserve the indictment of
inflexibility. The circumstances of Egypt's intransigence, unreas-
onableness, and unreliability clearly identify her as the obstrep-
erous negotiator.
It is not Israel who objects to face-to-face negotiations. It is
not Israel who issues war threats or limits the intervention of
United Nations' forces. Sadat's clandestine dealings with the So-
viet Union, his war-planning meetings with Arab leaders and
Palestinian terrorists, and his false and acrimonious incriminations
clearly add up to lack of both good faith and conciliatory interest.
How can it be disregarded that Sadat promised an announce-
ment of non-belligerency in exchange fee the Israelis moving
their forces ouc o; Zgypt &nu partially away from the Suez, and
then withdrew that pledge after Israel fulfilled its agreement?
And how can our government justify the expenditure of tens of
millions of dollars to open the Suez without having an under-
standing that Israeli ships and cargoes be allowed unhampered
use of an international waterway?
Realistically, how can our government continue those ex-
penditures in the face of Sadat's violation of his pledge to a major
United States ally? Doesn't that invalidate our governments
claim concerning an even-handed foreign policy?
Our nation took its combined hat off to you. Mr. President.
on your actions against Cambodian treachery. I am confident the
nation would applaud and support you on a two-fisted stand
against Arab ruthlessness. And even if an oil embargo resulted,
whereby international law is violated by the withholding of a
"God-given" natural resource, threatening the Free World coun-
tries with economic stagnation, our country would certainly rally
behind whatever protective measures you initiated.
Respectfully,
SAMUEL M. SOREF
Fort Lauderdale
Temple Emanu-El
hay Members To
Conduct Service
Regular Sabbath Eve services
will he herd ar Temple Emanu-
E' of Greater Ft Lauderdale
Friday at 8:15 p.m. The service
will be c inducted by lay mem-
bers of the congregation under
the guidance of the Ritual Com-
mittee Cantor Jerome Klement
will chant 'he liturgical portions
of the service,
Caflp K-e Tov is now in ses-
sion, offering diversified activi-
ties for children ages 4-12 dur-
ing the hours of -4 p.m., in-
cluding swimming lessons. To
register for future sessions
through the week of Aug. 4. con-
tact the temple office The camp
is open to all residents of North
Brovvard
Registrations for the Fall
term of the Jane Lawson Nur-
sery' School are currently being
taken- The school will offer fall
and half day sessions. Trans-
portation is available-
Call Morris Watkms. tempi*
administrator, for farther in-
formation.
Trsho B'Av Services Set
Wednesday. July 16. at 8 p.ra..
the Tisha B'Av service will be
held at the Plantation Jewish
Congregation on 400 S. Nob Hill
Rd.. Plantation, The service will
commemorate the tragedies and
martyrs of Jewish history. Af-
ter the service, the award-win-
ning movie, "A Wall in Jerusa-
lem." will be shown.
FROSTING
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale


F"day, jU[y
11,
It Will be Ford vs. Kennedy in 76 Race
CMtlued from Face 5
Ford and Reagan; the Demo-
crats ar m tha position of hav-
ing a constituency without a
candidate.
THEY HAVE three possibili-
ties. The front-runner right now
is Kennedy, and if the conven-
tion were held now he would
be the nominee.
The second is one of the old
er moderate* Sens. Henry
Jackson. Hubert Humphrey or
Edmund Muskie. The third is
one of the younger untried gov-
ernors E d mu n d (Jerry)
Brown of California, Hugh
Carey of New York, Daniel
Walker of Illinois. W. R. An-
derson of Minnesotaespecially
Brown, who is the hottest in-
experienced dark horse around.
IN TIME, if he acts respon-
sibly in the Senate investigation
of the CIA, one would have to
add Sen. Frank Church (D.,
Ida.) to the list of young hope-
fuls.
One of the new aspects of the
Rabbi Denies Emigration Stand
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Chief Rabbi Moses Rosen of
Rumania denied here re-
ports that he was seeking to
soften Jewish pressure on
Rumania particularly in
the United States on the
question of Jewish emigra-
tion from Rumania.
Rabbi Rosen arrived here
for a brief and unexpect-
edvisit and conferred with
officials of the government
and the Jewish Agency on
the situation of the Ruma-
nian Jewish community.
PRESIDENT NICOLAI Ceau-
sescu of Rumania met with Jew-
ish leaders and with Congres-
sional leaders during his recent
visit to Washington.
He is seeking to win most
favored nation trade status for
Rumania but the obstacle has
been Rumania's alleged restric-
tions on Jewish emigration.
The Jackson-Vanik amend-
ment to the Foreign Trade Act
links the emigration practices
of Communist bloc nations to
trade benefits granted them by
the U.S.
Ceausescu reportedly told
both the Jewish leaders and the
Congressmen that Rumanian
Jews who wish to leave may do
so but that not many exercise
that option.
political climate of 1976 is that
the Democrats wont be running
on the Watergate corruption is-
sue, as they did in their land-
slide of 1974.
Only the nomination of Ken-
nedy could revive the Water-
gate question silently, not
openly, and not on the issue of
swollen presidential power but
on that of character.
THE KENNEDY supporters
have dealt shrewdly with this,
by underlining the undoubted
courage the senator has shown
in the unpopular positions he
has taken recently. The idea is
to cancel out the Chappaquid-
dick charges of his lack of
courage and candor by featur-
ing the profile in courage of
today.
It is too early to know
whether it will work.
Kennedy has always been
strongly buttressed in his po-
litical career by the carrying
power of his family name and
tradition.
BUT ALL the t
how much John and
Kennedy diu or Srfj
about assassination pS,
foreign leaders has
new and unexpected n
Kennedy. Yet it i, w,
that he is hound to
Watergate was such
en-sent issue f0r the
that it pushed evervtte,
out and kept them 3
veloping other issues.
It is the Ford Admin
that has labored to $L
major issues, which eel
the new emerging clinJ
is the welfare state and/
financing.
WHETHER OR m
pression has prettv mucW
by November. 1976, y,\
will use the anti-handaBLl
spending issue The othtr|
charge of a new liber*1.,
tionism developing amoatl
Democratic majority a|
gressa kind of "iso-p
as it is getting to be .
The Democrats still _
edge for 19~6. but tbn|
have $ shoo-in of it. cj
Kennedy or any other i
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