The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00034

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
wJewisti flondli&in
OF GREATER EORT LArDERDALE
Friday. June 27, 1975
25 cents
-an (MATES TO MCBWtW "PAY SCHOOL
Board Votes To Affiliate With So. Florida JCCs
\- effort to meet the neds
of the rapidly growing Jewish
comr ity and to strengthen
v of Jewish life in the
Foil Laud-rdale area.
i of directors of the
1 .-deration voted at its
,t meeting. June 1\
to f!-. I on-going social and
cultural prognms for youth.
tP.P- and senior citizens by be-
ffilisMd with the Jew-
mnunitj Centers of South
Flori
ird also voted an allo-
to the Hebrew Day
of Fort Liud-rdale, ac-
Allan F. Ba-r. pres-
f the Jewish Federation
,\s it suit of this funding
. Jewish Communitv Cen-
South Florid*, a branch
director will be pro-
i the Greater Fort
. le area.
This director, toother with
an ad- iorv council compos '
: ration leadership and
committees consisting of in
d and concerned individ-
uals will plan, coordinate, and
supervise services and activi-
ties for the Jewish community
at different locations close to
where Jewish persona live-
It w-s the a d feeling
of the board that these varied
programs would tssitt Jews of
all au"s in developing positiv
feelings and attitudes towards
their religion, their community,
and their people.
As outlined to th" board by
the UWCUllve director and pres-
i I nt of tV .1 wsh Community
Centers of South Fl (ride, t'i I
Center program will erects an
atmosphere in which all Jews
can heJ comfortable about
the'Hnel'fta and others.
Aerordinc to Mr. Baer. the
board memb'>^ wre confid mt
this extension sen ice to the
Greater Fort Lauderdak area
would both enhance and enrich
the quality of Jewish life of this
community.
The board also voted a sub
stantiM allocation to the He-
brew Day School of Fort Laud-
erHale. The day school, whicn
will be for students in grades
ALVIN CAPP
MRS. LOIS POLISH
l(>7"> Young Leadership Awards
Go To Alvin Capp. Law Polish
Alvin Capp. a well-known Ft.
dale attorney, has won
ear's Young Leadership
Award for outstanding dedica-
tion and devotion on behalf of
Jewish communal services. Al-
lan E. Baer. president of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
fort Lauderdale. announced.
Mr. Capp, a member of the
hoard of directors of the Jew-
ish Federation, served as chair-
man of the Young Leadership
program, was chairman of the
Community Relations Commit-
tee, and chaired the successful
Plantation United Jewish Ap-
peal campaign.
Mrs Lois Polish, who was cit-
ed for outstanding service with-
in the Federation's Young
Leadership group, was respon-
sible tor the major portion of
the planning of the outstanding
programs held on a monthly
basis for the groups in the
Northeast and the Western por-
tions of the Greater Fort Laud-
erdale area.
The Young Leadership
Awards are among the highest
honors bestowed by the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
kindergarten through four, will
provide the best in secular and
Jewish education.
This type of school will
strengthen the level of Jewish
education in our community and
will offer a child the opportuni-
ty to grow and devehm as a pro-
ductive American citizen with-
in a Jewish environment. The
day school will be located at
Temple Beth Israel. 7100 W.
OaklanJ Park Blvd.
Commenting on these impor-
tant actions taken at the board
meeting. Mr. Baer stated. "It is
the responsibility of the Jew-
ish Federation to meet the
needs and improve the quality
of Jewish life in the Greater
Fort Lauderdale area.
"We also encourage partici-
pation in our community en-
deavors and our fund raising
drive which raises the monies to
support these programs as w. II
as provide for the needs of Is-
rael.
"I firmly believe that the
Jewish Community Cenier pro-
gram and the Hebrew Day
School are services that will
successfully raise the level of
Jewish consciousness and com-
mitment in Greater Fort Laud-
erdale and will make it the kind
of Jewish community of which
we can all be proud "
Shalom Directory
Now Available
For Distribution
The Shalom Directory for th*
Greater Fort Lauderdale area
is ready for distribution, ac-
cording to Mrs Howard Miller,
administrative vice president of
the Women's Division.
The Shalom Directory is de-
signed to give new residents of
the North Broward area an in-
troduction to Jewish life in their
n**w community. It contains a
history of the Greater Fort
Lauderdale Jewish community,
a description of the Federa-
tion's activities and services and
information on Synagogues and
Jewish organizations.
Mrs. Miller said that special
credit for the Shalom Directory
should go to Mrs. Henry Loew-
enstein, chairman of the Shalom
Directory Committee; Mrs. Al-
vin Gross, past president of the
Women's Division; Mrs. Albert
Garnitz: Robert M. Hermann,
first vice president of the Jew-
ish Federation; Florence Cohen;
Irving Oeisser, executive di-
rector of the Jewish Federation:
and Barry Axler. assistant di-
rector of the Jewish Federation.
Persons or groups interested
in obtaining the Shalom Di-
rectory are requested :o contact
Barry Axler at the Jewish Fed-
eration office.
KISSINGER TELLS PRESS
U.S. Has Still to Reach
Method, Role Formula
WASHINGTON iJTA) Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger said here following the third meeting between
President Ford and Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, that fur-
ther discussions are required with other Arab countries be-
fore the U.S. will determine its approach towards seeking
further progress toward a Middle East settlement.
Appearing before the press at the White House soon
after the third Ford-Rabtn meeting, Kissinger said the talks
were conducted in a "cordial and friendly atmosphere, that
the results were "very constructive" and that "the alterna-
tives"' for further negotiations were in "sharper focus.
specifically who the parties
KISSINGER POINTED out
that the Syrian Foreign Min-
ister, Abda-Hlim Khadam. will
be in Washington to meet the
President, and he mentioned
specifically that Egypt will be
consulted again and other "in-
terested parties," but he spe-
cifically ruled out meetings with
the Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation.
Kissinger said that the U.S.
would "stay in close touch" with
the government of Israel and
added that "in the next few
weeks a final clarification" will
be made by the U.S. on the
"best course" on "the basis of
consensus" of "all the parties."
He did not include the Soviet
Union, although he was asked
were
Kissinger pointed out that the
purpose of the meetings of the
President with Egyptian Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat and Rabin
were not for the purpose of
"definitive conclusions" or "de-
tailed negotiations" but to en-
able the President to contact the
principal leaders and review the
alternatives for progress.
KISSINGER SAID it was not
likely that a policy statement
would be issued by the Presi-
dent in the next week or two.
although he characterized the
meeting with Rabin as "a con-
siderable step forward." He
said that the United States is
Continued on Pate 13
COMMUNITY, CAMPAIGN AWARDS HIGHLIGHT MEETING
June 5, The Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale held its annual meeting
at Temple Beth Israel. A highlight of the
evening was the presentation of commu-
nity and campaign awards. In the picture
at left Robert M. Hermann, first vice pres-
ident of the Federation, presents outgoing
President Albert E. Garnitz (right) with
his award. Alvin Gross, a past president
of the Federation and this year's Paceset-
ter chairman, is shown presenting the
award to outgoing General Campaign
Chairman Allan E. Baer (right) in the
picture at right. See additional pictures on
Pages 8 and 9.


Page 2
The Jeuish Floridian of Greater Fort Ixiuderdale
Friday, june 27
Independence Day Observance At
Plantation Jewish Congregation
Rabbi Arthur Abrams. newly
appointed spiritual leader of the
Plantation Jewish Congregation.
hip of Helcne Silverman and
ler. and a "work of
our hands" project headed by
Shellie We
The first event, a plant party,
is scheduled WedJMdhjr, July
9. at 8 rxra. in the synagogue.
RABBI ARTHUR ABRAMS
will conduct Friday eveninc
services beginning at 8:00 p.m.
in the temple located at 400 S.
Nob Hill Rd.. Plantation
A contemporary semce given
by the Reconstructionist Move-
ment. Friday's services are ded-
icated to Independence Day and
what it means to the Jewish
people An Oneg Shabbat will
foBow
Registration for the pre
school summer progra~i is un-
derwav now. Infomation re-
farding it. and Hebrew and
Sunday Schools as well, may be
obtained by calling H Acker -
The congregation plans *
number of activities which
include the com-nunitv at lare-.
Eant Batman is chairing this
project, with the astnce of
Sue Segaul and Sue Walder
The proposed year's ca'.en
dar includes book reviews,
study clubs and musicals under
the leadership of E&rne Bau-
man: tennis parties and other
outings arranged by Deanrv1
Blafer and Toby Brown, lecture
series-adort education snonso--
ed by Marsha Gro-iet: fol*
dancing and physical fitness l?d
by Linda Schneider, art and
events under the lead-
Senior USY Group
Elects Officers
The Senior USY Group of
Temple Beth Israel recently
held elections of officers for
the coming year 19~5-19"6
Miss Debbie de Beer, outgoing
president of the group, served
as elections chairman. Officers
in-htde Holly Weinberg presi-
dent; Shari KletzeL. first vice
p.c.ijeni; oaa<.i tester, second
vice president. Sandi Tosu.
third vice president. Jill Smith.
corresponding secretary. Bar-
bara Shinn. recording secre-
tary; den Dougherty, financial
secretary, an^ -yon Serowitz.
treasurer
The new executive board has
already met several times to
plan programs and activities
for the upcoming year Miss
Weinberg has been working
hard to set up a school sched-
ule of activities. Plans are also
under way to print a detailed
schedule to be sent out in Sep-
tember to all USYers.
Anyone interested in loimng
the USY program at Beth Is-
rael should contact Eitan Grun-
wald. youth coordinator at the
temple offict.
Eitan QrumtaU
Join* Staff Of
Beth brad
:n Grunwalu ha< been hir-
ed as youth coordinator by
Temple Beth Israel. Al Lin?.
Youth < Man : m chairman
announced.
Mr. Grun.va.- will be sening
under Mile* ?. Bunder, youth
director, in supervising and co-
ordinating the erpanrixl youth
program of the svnagogue
Mr Gmnwald comes to Beth
Isra-1 i Bf years of su-
pervised group leadership ex-
perience. He has served as di-
rector of the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry, as
regional study leader at Tem-
ple Israel in Miami, as assistant
youth director at Temple Beth
Torah in North Miami Beach,
and most recently as youth di-
rector at Temple B'nai Raphael
in North Miam:.
Mr. GrunwakL who has also
taught in numerous capacities,
including ser. ce at Temple
Beth Shalom in Hollywood and
at various USY convennons.
will be working directly with
the Kadima. Junior USY and
Senior USY Groups
The youth program at Tem-
ple Beth Israel is presently ex-
panding to include specialty
groups such as basketball, arts
and crafts, dramatics. Israeli
dance, choir and newspaper, as
well as the regularly scheduled
programs.
The youth program is open
to all 5th through 12th graders.
For more information, contact
the youth office at Temple Beth
Lfttfr lo Thf Editor
EDfTOR, The Jewish FWridian:
Max Lerner's column in your
May 30 issue. VS. Must Draw
Harsh Lessons, sounds like the
first crunch to the decline and
fall of the American empire.
Nevertheless. I think he has
an excellent point to makeand
has made it excellently.
We are not the keepers of
the word". moraltry Nor are
we the keepers of the bound-
ot the nan aw of the
Chaplain's Schedule
The Jewish Federation of of South Broward. Inc. an-
nounces that Rabbi Haiold Richter. Chaplain for South Brow-
ard County', will be visiting the following
hospitals on a regular basis:
M .todays Doctors. Community and
South Forida State Hospitals
Wednesdays Hoii/wood Memorial
Hospital
Fridays Golden Isles Hospital.
The Rabbi will also visit nursing
homes and penal institutions in the South
Brovard area In additun. he will vim:
institutions in Fort Laudcrdale on Tues-
days and Thursdays.
For further information, please visit Tr*-* Jewish Federa-
tion Office at 2838 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood or phone
921-8810 or 9ee-~51.
Rabbi Richter
>
with help, gam in
World War 0. we
of oar young
men, in the mistaken notion l*n*
someone elected as the world's
pohceman.
lt s about time that we was--
up to the asshi here at ho-ne
the c re pit corrote cabal to
destroy A-nencaa dmoc.acy
the poverty and suffering of
our own people.
Lerner has don- is all a s-rv-
ice t* remind us that we might
in to look nward But I
there is somethint of a
i re to as in has notion
therefore we are a weak-
nation car shot step be-
the fallen Hnti>
MAX LEMNT
Weat
Rossmoor
V$ COCONUT CREEK
ihr niasfcr pbtiiiMil
adulf nHMkHiiiiiiiim
(MHiiinimih.
from SIHMHh
WO laiHl llVIM'
no rv(-rr;ilion Iciim*.
'
ut 2*
iz 3"5 -
j
North Broward Hadaasah (Ihapte,
Hai Race On National Honor r0
Mrs. Ralph Cannon, president
of the Nonh Broward Chap
of Hadassah has received notice
from the National Board of Ha-
dissah that the Chapter will he
placed on the Honor Roll for all
four categories of fund-raising
achievements during the fmt
year
The awards will be made at
the National Convention to be
held Aug. l~-20 in San Frar..
co Calif.
The letter from Mrs. Wil-
liam K. Dorfman. national fund-
raising coordinator, said that
North Broward will be listed on
the Honor Roll for achieving all
regular quotas, including Ha-
dassah Mvdica! Orginization.
Youth Al'vah. Hadassah Israel
Education Services. Jewish Na-
tional Fund, and Youth Activi-
The Chapter will also be list-
ed with special recognition on
the Honor Roll for completing
Building and Development auo-
ta and for significantly and sub-
stantially oversubscribing regu-
lar quotas, plus a special form
of recognition. "The Hand of
Heai ng for completing the
three vear Building and Devel-
opment quota in one rear
il
Mrs. Cann
Aronson. Chanty ,_ '
vice president, pa, SDeciJ>
ute to the outstanding t%
oflhcentnc :- -nbersMpof,
North Broward Chapter of
dassah. and to the earn,*
with which every hajj,
chairman wd
sibility
Appel Chairman
Of LJA FunctioJ
Hawaiian Garden Pha* I
residents tum-j qdJ en
Wednesday. June 11. fw
United it
Appeal
gra-n.
Hy
president
Phase VH, |
chaiun
the UJA
tlon and
rd as
master
evening
Barry .
ler. who serves as astistagi
rector of the Jewish Ft
of Greater Fort Lauderdalei
the guest speaker.
Hy Appel
Riversides
two new chapels in
Hollywood ana Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In the HoTyuood and Hofondaie onr*
5801 HoIlvAvood Boulevard. Hollywood
920-1010
In the Fort LmudeKJalr area
1171 Northwest 61st Aue.(Sunset Strip),Sunn*
5846060
RIVERSIDE
M*monC'^ bv. hunstal Dead
OtherRivervd*chapeb *ibowthFumUMC jcand*1
Norm M^mt Beach. Miami Beach *w '*' -
fc^^t.iw.V.Mais^^i'^0*-

lf, r- -s
:- Ti


riday.
June 27, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
\Jforld Health Body
Condemns Israel
GENEVA (JTA) World Health Organization assem-
bly delegates voted 63-5 with 25 abstentions, to condemn Is-
m.\ s treatment of the inhabitants of administered territories.
Only the United States, Uruguay, Bolivia and Costa Rica
wined Israel in opposing the motion. The resolution last Fri-
day put the 145-nation body on record as being "deeply
alarmed by the deterioration of health and living conditions
0f the Palestinian refugee*."
wh,ch he said were based on political and not humanitarian
ISRAEL'S REPRESENTATIVE denied the accusations,
grounds.
He said health conditions had improved in the Gaza Strip,
the West Bank and Sinai under Israeli administration.
The resolution, sponsored by Arab and non-aligned coun-
tries, voted in favor of allocating funds to improve conditions
in those area*.
Last Wednesday, six senators and 45 representatives sent
to the WHO a telegram warning that a strong move against
Israel might lead to a loss of Congressional support for the
organization.
All Day Nursery
To Be Opened
Mrs. Sheila Grenitz. director
of the Pre School Department
at Temple Beth Israel, has an-
nounced tentative plans for the
opening of an all day nursery
program at the tern]
"There are many children
who have reached the maturity
lex-el to be able to cope with an
all day program," Mrs. Grenitz
stated. "A child's ability to
learn at this age is limitless,
and we should make maximum
use of this potential."
The program will include ac-
tivities not normally done in a
half day program, i.e., special-
ized programs in dance and
movement, in-depth experience
of Jewish customs and cere-
monies, etc. Children will bring
a bag lunch. The program will
end about 2:30 or 3:00 p.m.
All interested parties should
contact the school office.
Temple Beth Israel Installs New
Officers And Board Of Directors
Season Tickets Offered For Six Shows At Temple
A "Cavalcade of Entertain- temple beginning in October, ter section, reserved especially
ent" has beea announced by and is offering season tickets at for them, and will be the guests
Men's Club of Temple Beth a very reasonable rate. at a champagne cocktail party
Israel, which has booked Season ticket holders, it was open only to them following
Bix monthly specials at the pointed out, will sit in the cen- each show.
Joey Adams will be the fea-
tured entertainer Oct. 12, Bud-
dy Greco has been booked for
Nov. 16, the Tel Aviv Revue will
appear Dec. 28, the Barry Sis-
ters will be featured Jan. 18,
Aliza Kashi will perform Feb.
8, and The Ayalons presenta-
tion will end the series March
21. All of the Sunday evening
shows begin at 9 p.m. with the
exception of the Barry Sisters,
whose performance will begin
at 8 p.m.
Tickets for individual shows
may become available, depend-
ing upon the season ticket re-
sponse. Additional information
may be secured at the temple
office.
Temple Beth Israel installed
new officers and board of
ectors for 1975-76 at a spe-
bal Friday evening service
lune 20. Chair people for the
tvent were Mrs. Harriet Mor-
and Mrs. Joan Mishkin.
Officiating at the service and
ducting the new officers was
abbi Phillip A. Labowitz. The
ate included Ron Mishkin,
president; Dr. Robert Grenitz.
Cohn, and Ron Schwartz,
ice presidents; Jules Shapiro,
surer; Mrs. Arlene Schnit-
er, financial secretary, and
Irs. Susan F. Glatt, recording
cretary.
Directors for the coming
ar are Jacob Brodzki, David
poplon, Charles Deich, Dr.
heldon Feldman. Libo Fine-
erg. Fred Greene, Jack Huber,
erome Kraus, Martin Lipnack,
tw/sfi Publicalion Society
kef $ Leo levin President
A. Leo Levin, Professor of
aw at the University of Penn-
plvania and currently director
the c ummisaion on Revision
the Federal Appellate Sys-
fm in Washington, DC, was
cted president of the Jewish
ublication Society of America
its recent 87th annual meet-
in Philadelphia.
Dr. Levin's election climaxes
"re than 20 years of distin-
ed association with the
ety, which he has served in
variety of rajartliM. Moat
ha was a viee-presi-
of JPS aad vice-chairman
its Publication Committee.
Commissioner Jack L. Moss.
Hon. Maurice Moss, Bernard
Oshinsky, Nathan Richstone,
Seymour Schnitzer, Mrs. Helen
Stoopack. Carl Whitestone and
Melvin Zipris.
Past presidents are Charles
Dickson, Dr. Jack Morris, Al-
vin Siegel, Dr. Robert Rogoff,
Dr. Sylvan Goldin, George Ber-
man and Jules Shapiro.
Men's Club president is Max
Cohn; Mrs. Max Cohn is Sister-
hood president. Young Couples'
Club president is Marc Bray;
Mrs. George Berman is School
Board chairman, Al Lang is
Youth Commission chairman,
and Holly Weinberg was elect-
ed USY president.
The newly elected president,
Ron Mishkin, said he looks for-
ward to a continued year of
growth, both physically and
spiritually. "The key to Syna-
gogue life is involvement.
That's what we're shooting for
this year," he added.
28th
YEAR
MURPHY
PAINTS
BROWARD PAINT
and WALLPAPER CO.
212 North Andrew* Ave.
523-0577, Fort Laudardele
moo
business the
right way.
ijiiii
LAUDERDALE FAMILY HEALTH & RECREATION CENTER
(FORMERLY LAUDERDALE ATHLETIC CLUB)
2625 N.E. 14th AVENUE, WILTON MANORS
Now Under New Management
SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFflR
Male Female Children AM have Exclusive Areas including
PERSONALIZED CONDITIONING PROGRAMS LIGHTED TENNI*
COURTS OUTSIOE TRACK STEAMS, SAUNA!
EXERCISE CLASSES* PRIVATE LOCKERS
PROFR88IONAI. ATHLETIC DIHWTHHS AND COUNSELLORS
ON THE KTAFK AT NO EXTRA CHARGE.
NO INITIATION FEES ___
Open Oara: Menday thraetah Friday t Saturday 10 4
For Detail, at Abaolry no Obligation Call:
ANITA SHAW 564-435* Dairy 10 5
PHYSICAL FITNESS CLASS
(MEN: 5W-:O0 p.m. and ttfeMMMR.)
I CHILDREN Daily S:SO-S:S0 o m.: Sat. 10:00.11:00)
(WOMEN OaWy Every 2 Ha^raJ
does im emi WMT
TO K A MEMKt OF
THE
w> luwe tfce largsst staff of
degree* *> fwdrfeseienal
music imtrtjctare ta **
Florida.
M Rmtau Hrpalre
I ...uo and Organ I^wona
BROWARD BAND
INSTRUMENT
nit hi. am Ave.. ft. lauoiroali
PMONB Ms-im
Two-Day Mini-Conference Planned
By North Broward Hadassah Chapter
Involved officers and chair-
men of all 10 groups of the
North Broward Chapter of Ha-
dassah will meet in a two-day
mini-conference. Monday and
Tuesday at the Pompano Beach
Community Center, according to
Mrs. Ralph Cannon, president.
The conference will include
workshops pertaining to all as-
pects of Hadassah operations,
especially procedures and plan-
ning for the new year of 1975-
76.
The program workshop will
be chaired by Mrs. Alan Marco-
vitz. chapter vice president; the
membership meeting will be
conducted by Mrs. Morton Sell-
ner, vice president, and Mrs.
Allan Porter, education vice
president, will moderate the
education session.
The conference will close
with a meeting of the Presi-
dents' Council. All group pres-
idents, including Aviva, Mrs.
Alfred Saxe; Ben Gurion, Mrs.
Sidney Gerber; Bryma. Mrs.
Harry Krimsky; Chai, Mrs. Ir-
win Stenn; Herd, Mrs. Harvey
Ehrlich; Kadimah. Mrs. Samuel
Pavony: Golda Meir, Mrs.
Charles Ruben; Orly. Mrs.
Joseph Baker; Rayus, Mrs.
Pearl Goldenberg; and Sabra.
Mrs. Richard Samuels, are ex-
pected to attend.
Visual aids, pertinent skits
and question-and-answer periods
will play important roles at
each workshop. A highlight of
the Presidents' Council meeting
will be a report by the chapter
president on world wide aid to
Hadassah disclosed by Lucien
Harris, director of Hadassah In-
formation Services, who has
just completed a brief visit to
South Florida from Israel.
The conference will be open
to those members of the North
Broward Chapter of Hadassah
who are interested in volunteer-
ing their service*.. These pros-
pects should clear with their
presidents.
New Service
For Elderly
A new and unique service fs
available to all elderly residents
of Broward County.
Broward Community College,
in cooperation with the area-
wide Project on Aging, is offer-
ing professional counseling and
job placement services to any
resident 60 years of age or
older. No fees are charged
funding is under the Older
Americans Act of 1965 with lo-
cal matching effort.
"If you happen to be on the
other side of the situation and
have any job that an elderly
person coold fill, please call us!
We have a terrific reservoir of
individuals with all kinds of
skills and experience," says
Donna K. Grady, director of
Counseling/Placement for the
Elderly.
Offices are located at Brow-
ard Community College, 3501
SW Davie Rd.. Fort Lauderdale,
in Pompano, Oakland Park, and
Hallandale.
For service at any location,
call the central number 581-
8700. Ext. 222.
TRAVEL WITH COUNCIL'
ISRAEL EUROPE MEXICO, ETC
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN
LILLIAN ZALKIN 735-5755 LILLIAN RAFFEL 564-0864
Need a Nurse who cares?
Out rv-ses beKeve a genuine concern, n understanding
mile and a compaionate attitude are important to a
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. June 2"
Rabin-Ford Results
The most positive thing that has come out of the
talks Premier Rabin had with President Ford is a
strengthening of Rabins political position at home
It was good to see that Rabin's stand in Washington
was clearly and carefully worked out in Jerusalem well
before he even took off;
This gave a ririg of authority -o hw words witfl
Ford, as well as notice to the Arabs that Rabin was not
speaking from the point of view of a Premier with a ma-
jority of one in Parliament, but from the point of view
shared by \irtually ail Israelis.
Indeed, this point of view was carefully broadcast
prior to Rabins arrival in Washington with his appoint-
ment of Likud leader Gen. Anen Sharon as his "defense
advisor."
Sharon is a hard-liner, to say the least.
We are not saying that Rabin presented a hard line
in the White House. But all of us who have Israel's best
interests at heart know that Rabin spoke for a country
that remembers what happened on Yom Kippur. 1973.
in fact will never forget it, and is determined that it
must never happen again.
A Phlegmatic CBS
The CBS television program. "60 Minutes,'" did
nothing to correct the inaccuracies and distortions in
its report on Syrian Jews last February when it repeated
the broadcast June 8. While host Mike Wallace in the
broadcast noted some of the objections in his opening
and closing remarks, his comments were inadequate and
continued to distort the true picture of the plight of
Syrian Jews.
Since last February, CBS has refused to correct the
inaccuracies in the original program despite the plea of
numerous Jewish organizations, including the Commit-
tee for the Rescue of Syrian Jews and the American
Jewish Congress.
It was only when the AJCongress announced it had
filed a complaint with the National News Council, a non-
profit organization that investigates complaints against
the media, that CBS came up with its weak response.
There were many complaints about the program,
but basically they centered on Wallace's absurd com-
ments that conditions for Syrian Jewry had improved.
No one wishes to censor any part of the media. But
the fate of Syrian Jewry hangs in the balance, and in-
accurate and distorted reports could harm Syrian Jewry.
since it casts doubu on the legitimacy of their just
grievances.
The 4Buv Israel* Program
Yehoshua Meshulach, who dreamed up the "Buy
Israel" program that has been operating in numerous
South Florida supermarkets during the past rear, has
gone back to Israel to evaluate with authorities there the
success of the program.
Meshulach's program is simple. There are some
200.000 Jews in the South Florida area. If each one
spent only SI a week, or S50 a year, on Made-in-lsrael
food products, toiletries and hardware sold in any su-
permarket, our community could generate some S10
million in foreign exports for Israel annually.
Multiply this by the number of important Jewish
communities elsewhere in the country, and the possi-
bilities become attractive indeed.
The figures ar not yet out with respect to how well
South Florida cooperated. We hope they are good, that
Meshulach will be back shortly, and that our commu-
nity can continue to offer its support in this simple
way a way bencfitting both Israeli and American
Jewry.
Jewish Floridian
Of OPtATIH FORT LAUDIROALI
Off ICE aa4 PLANT 1M N.K. tUi St.. nui rm. Ilin n AUVERTISIXG DEPARTMRNT 1 -*T.
MIAMI ADDRESS PO Box ttTS. Miami. PoH4a 111"
FRKD K 9HOGHET' 817.ANVK 8HOCHBT 8KLMA M THOMPJ^N
Editor ami PsMUfcrr Eivcvut* Edltr* Aaalatant ta Fwfcaaaar
Tm Jawiafc FlarMma Ooaa Nal Swarartaa Th Kaaarath
Of Tfca MirtHawama ASvartiaaa In Ita Caftwnna
Pabtiafcad BI-WaaklT
Sccond-OaM Pwuit Paid at Miami. Fla
All P O l$T> morns ar* to b fr.rwar*d m
The Javmk FWcmian. Pu Box l71. Mm ml. Pm mn.
-.----
TM Jawia* Flaria*a Hat tlMtH t*a Jcwtaft Unity ana t>
mo*r of tka twiah Ta4rphic Aaancy. Savaw Arta
v Wfnai ?.' m Sanrlea. National Ctfitarlat itUt'W,-
I on of Snglian- Jtwik Nawaoaaara. an* ttia *Tom a
l-
Aaaaciaticr.
Sadat Knew Just What He Said
T^HE OTHER day in London.
Anwar Sadat was being quot-
ed as saving. "There are two
governments in America one
in the White House and one on
Capitol Hill." .
The Middle East imflicatiat
of his words is that the Con-
gress is for protecting Israels
rights status quo. while Presi-
dent Ford is for protecting Is-
rael's riehts status quo ante.
At least, this is how Sadat
sympathizers interrret them
and mean to have them inter-
preted abroad
BUT IT does seem to me that
there are other meanings, as
well and that these meanings
have nothing to do with the
Middle East at all or. minimal-
ly, to the Middle East only tan-
gentially
To begin with. President Sa-
dat is not ignorant of the fact
that there is only one govern-
ment in America, and that this
government is divided not into
two opposing forces but among
three (hopefully) united forces.
Any elementary school
youngster will be able to tell
you all about the executive,
legislative and judicial branch-
es of the United States govern-
ment, as well as of the powers
delegated to each by the consti-
tution
SO CAN President Sadat.
Still, he mentioned only two of
themthe White House and Ca-
pitol Hill. He made no refer-
ence at all too the Supreme
Court, which is the ultimate ar-
biter of the work of either
branch singly and or both to-
gether.
By custom since the days of
John Marshall and Marbury vs.
leo
Mindlin
Madison, the Supreme Court is
empowered M ft ike down as
illegal or oppressive the I'gis-
latiaa conceived by either
branch singly and or both to-
gether
I CAN not imagine, as I have
already suggested, that Pr-si-
dent Sadat does not ln-w this.
Then what, in fact, was he be-
ing quoted in LonJon as having
saiJ?
The an The political soul of our nation
is no longer as it was created to
be; it has been violated too oft-
en for that By abuse and com-
pulsion, it has changed.
The gieat decisions have at
leatt for two decades now been
no rare occasion legislative.
EVEN THE civil rights issues
that have torn the nation asun-
der so manv time* during this
period art NOT judicial, as so
many people have said of them,
and continue to say of them.
The simple reality is that the
Supreme Court can not con-
ceive. It can only bless a con-
ception or abort it.
The Supreme Court docs not
act; it merely reacts.
AND SO. even the civil rights
issues have been eith, -_
live or logiaJitive, "*
though there rl no ?J;,*
the Supreme Court. 23
power to help shape < 2*
Jnf America t Jestu>T
the governing force d ^
last two decades has been a?
dominantly executive or lenT
ti.e and. in fact. incrtSf
mainly executive '
Except for Harry s .^
1 Ca i.ink of no weaker chid
executive than President Fn-d
at Me outset of his ai--;niiU"
tian.
Truman suffered. n f0rj
suffers today, a pre
hostile Congress Were wt $L
pundits, only two mom H ^
bemoaning Ford's atraagufci),
by a Democrat-cunt-..'...j rw
tol Hill determined to -j.-y him
! the Kepublicar. Pam m
1975)?
VET ford's eapacin tom*.
tain his vetoes in the txut lew
weeks demonst.ate.s baa clear-
ly even this executive h*
emerged as the bona liie rultr
of the nation.
Not even a mass : De-no-
cratt. whether for rj-eoiogical
reasons or political strategy,
Ojth, has had the will ;, check
its power.
And so. the real nr.rbatia
of Sadat's word* was thai ulti-
mately he will get -v hat he
want* because in Anieria theie
days the presidency fen rht
it wants.
From the point oi new of
history, Sadat s shreud rctv
omng is correct bee a-* oor
major impulse since World War
''cttaacd aa V*z.~ 13
Will History Vindicate British?
SCBSCRITIQN RATSS: (Lotal Araa) Ona Ytar la.00 Ovt of Town Opca.
Volume 4
Friday. June 27, 1975
Number 13
18 TA^LZ 5735
By MAX LERNER
Lot Angeles Times Syndicate
The British broke a lance for
Europe, in their recent '-ote on
the Common Market Will his-
tory at some point break a lance
for the British, and teach them
how to rescue themselves from
their current plieht?
There was a historic ironv in
the British "yes vote fa the
referendum on adhering to the
Common Market. For it was
Fence's President Charles de
Gaulle who first taid no in
1963. when the British wanted
in and it was De Gaulle who
made the referendum as a pop-
ular mandate his trademark
NOW THE British have re-
paid him on both score* with a
sarisfvinc niec of STmbolism
repaid De Gaulle's narrow,
mean, malicious no with a ve-
and used his own referendum
tool to do it.
On the no side there was an
unholy alliance of the insular
nationalism of the diehard
right, with the parochial social-
ism of the lefttwo groups who
hate each other on every other
score but share the same view-
point as "little F.nglanders '*
The left is afraid of the eco-
nomic competition of the cen-
trist nationsGermanv. France.
Holland. Belgium. Itarv
The right is afraid that these
nations may go Communist, and
that Britain will someday be tied
to a Communist Europe.
THIS THE pro-Europe vote,
mainly by the middle class and
the moderate working class, was
a vote against both these fear-
ndden extremes.
But mainly its target was the
left wing of the British Labor
Party, led by Tonv Benn and
Michael Foot, who have ob-
structed the development of the
British economy; have cowed
Prime Minister Harold Wilson
for some time, and who led a
majority of the Labor MPl
asainst him on the Common
MarmM \mm
LBUta
Harold Wilson now faces hs
moment of truth, which will
show whether he is master in
his own house: and how '-> courage he h*s in asserting him-
self, not only against the anti-
market forces in his partv anl
government but also agaui-t
those who are leading th
BriLh piunit-e into economic
suicide.
MOSTLY THESE two ek
ments firm the BSBM gro-m
Maybe Wilson is the hicky vic-
tor in the Europe struggle,
whose real champion was Ted
Heath. Or mavbe he planned it
that wav, with his masterv of
wife and guile, waiting for Tony
Benn and his laft cohort to tran
themselves and go to their self-
destruction.
B^nn has only a transient im-
portance as a svmbol Th- real
question is whether Wilson
dares tackle the trade unions
on inflation, and do something
about wag- increases, stnkes
and the eroded work ethic
The contention of the left has
been that the other Common
Market countries have "export-
ed their unemplovment" to
Britain. Certainly Britain has a
mounting trade deficit with the
other six nations
But to have left the Market,
and built a trade wall of pro-
tective tariffs around Britain's
weak industries would hit
solved nothing Rn'ain would
still have to meet id imron
costs by selling its relicts on
a larger world
nsine labor costs ind Jam-
ling plow-back of
which plagu- Bnt
dd still piagui
SOMEDAY. >"*
will kaba boa to extrioN
tV Bntish pei
phw- 'f V.Y
do n
cellar of the Fa Dai
!!,.>lev v -I*1?
leader and do it If Healej eart
or won't, then the Toe?
leader Mar*: r."J
summon the will If **
b^comex sharp en z**'
tion cabinet of all three nu*
parties mar have to be
answer.
The Italian case
no economic mtnation <
aersible if the tpi I '' ^
with it I* there Only I
nonths ago Ital
locked int i its I ^|
prime sick man of I :'1p''
but a comb.: PJ
Central Bank *
with some wise n*****^*
c.siom. and mosth the n*n
ebuUtence of the Italian ?w
themseU-es. leenaed
worked a miracle
one. _.
IS' THE British M
remedv is clean, thanjfc |
in the It-ban It ^-jfl
^aqe increases. ^^I
wage-nru* com^^ ^ t
tarv action: to en- WWJJ
half and therehv incjg^;
vestment and cut V'-^-j
and to make Bntob y
competitive again.
This cannot be done with*
the support of the p.
ielv^a. But their yes vo***.^
Common Market shows p
they may be rousmc thallj^
out of their Ion, JJ" %
.atvandisoL.t..'; \* u
ddsj is whether thw wiU twq
in time.


1 Friday. June 27,1975
The Jewish Floridum of Greater Fort Lauderdate
Hage S
Local Leaders Among Those
Honoring Prime Minister
COMANCO Management Company
Coordinates Rossmoor Activities
A dtlegation of 19 Southeast
Florida community leaders left
last wee* for New York City to
One of the least understood,
yet most important divisions in
the overall organization of ade-
MILTON PARSON
hoooi Israel's Prime Minister
Yit/hfck Rabin at a tribute din-
ner last Saturday in New York.
Milton M. Parson, executive di-
rector of the Creater Miami Is-
rael Bond Organization an-
nounced.
The Prime Minister, who was
in the United States for impor-
tant talks with President Gerald
Ford and Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger, was honored
by more than 1.500 leaden <>t
!i communities throughout
'he United States and Canada
Thf dinner was h ild on the eve
of Rabin's return to Israel.
Locally, Southeast Florida's
repres rotation waa from Dade
and Bruward counties and
Puerto RioO.
"The Prime Minister.-' Par-
son said, "agreed to be with us
on that night because he is con-
cerned that the Jewish com-
munities realize the urgent eco-
nomic needs and the role of in-
creased Bond sales in solidify-
ing Israel's economic position
during :he period of vital peace
negotiations."
The Israel Bond Organization,
the central source of funds for
I's economic development
i since is Inception channel-
billion into in
dust ial and .iGricultural de-
velopment, and every phase of
the country's economy.
This year, Israel Bonds is re-
sponsible for meeting the major
share oi Israel's new Develop-
ment Budget of more than SI
billion to help it maintain a
steady rate of progress in spite
of continuing problems and
tensions.
Terns Conducting Own Services At Aragon This Year
Tht teenager-, oi Temrle
Beth -rael will be conducting
their ( m n services for the Hijrh
Holies this year at the Ai*a-
gin country Club. Libo Fine-
h-rp chairman of the Ritual
Committee recently announced.
.vl, nnebe.g said that Tem-
ple htth Israel has seen the
B4Cesity of organizing a spe-
cial and unique Teenage Con-
'.<.',-.: on for Rosh Hashanah
and Yea Kippur
Mlverman director of
the I i>a:tment of Youth Activ-
i!i.- i the Southeast Region of
the 1 ted Synagogue of Amer-
ica il officiate at the serv-
ng with numerous tecn-
ag r from the community.
M. bilverman will soon be
assigning parts in the service,
and will be meeting with many
of the USYeis from Temple
Beth Israel to plan their parti-
cipation in tne service,
specifically for the teenagers.
The temple has also decided to!
open this service to the general
"The key to a meaningful
High Holiday Sen ice for teen-
agers is their involvement, par-
ticipation and understanding of
what is going on." Mr. Silver-
man declared.
In line with this policy. Mr.
Silverman will be compiling a
High Holiday Prayer Book
teenage community at a mini-
mal price per ticket.
For more information con-
tact the temple office.
TOM ROSSER
veloper community is the man-
agement company, the division
responsible tor the community's
day-to-day operation.
At Rossmoor Coconut Creek,
the master-pianned adult com
munity being developed near
Pompano Beach, the manage-
ment company.ACOMANCO) co-
ordinates all recreational and
social activities, maintains all
common properties, coordinates
security, transportation and
health services, supervises the
huge clubhouse, and maintains
the recreational areas, includ-
ing the 18-hole golf course.
Rossmoor's COMANCO. the
continuing liaison between the
developer and the residents, is
headed by Tom Rosser. a man-
agement executive for seven
yean with the Brookings Insti-
tution, the famed "think-tank'"
in Washington. D.C.
Rosser's staff includes an
education recreation director,
health services director and six
registered nurses; a property
management director, golf pro,
transportation director, security
chief and officers, accounting
staff, plus switchboard opera-
tors, receptionists, secretaries
and assistants in all depart-
ments.
There are 35 full-time em-
ployees on the COMANCO staff;
more will be added as the com-
munity expands.
Violence Will Get
Nowhere- Kreisky
VIENNA (JTA) Austrian Chancellor Bruno
Kreisky condemned terrorism in the Middle East June
12 and suggested efforts to end it by a peaceful settle-
meni of the conflict.
Addressing the Austrian Parliament, Kreisky said.
I told Arab representatives repeatedly that terrorism
Chancellor said he "met with understanding by some
Arab politicians."
They were aware of these dangers themselves. He
laid there is no fool-proof way to fight terrorism. How-
ever, he believed that peaceful solutions in the Middle
East would at least oartty paralyze it.
*
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6229 NORTH Ft DERM HIGHWAY, FT. UUDEftOALE
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Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
SOLOMON BUSH c.1745-c.1796
Colonel in tie Continental ArmY
Colonel Solomon Bush reached the
highest rank of all Jewish officers in
the Continental Army. His first duty
in the War of Independence was
Deputy Adjutant General of the Pennsylvania
State Militia. Fighting near Brandywine. Bush
received a near fatal wound. He survived but
was captured when Philadelphia was taken by
the British. He was later freed in a prisoner
exchange and applied for rations and pay. The
Supreme Executive Committee studied his rec-
ord and cited him for a distinguished and bril-
liant career, especially during the winter of 1776
"when the service was critical and hazardous."
After the war. unable to connect with a govern-
ment job, and probably seeking medical aid for
his wound that never quite healed. Bush jour-
neyed to England where he again was able to
serve his country'- The British were still smart-
ing under defeat, and were pursuing a policy
which led to the War of 1812. seizing and
searching American boats and conscripting
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
their sailors into the Royal Navy. At the time.
no U.S. consul or ambassador was present to
intervene. SO Col Bush took it upon himself to
act on behalf ot his fellow Americans. He
reported his efforts to President Washington
whose answer contained warm commendations
for the Colonel's successful interventions.
On his return to America. Bush applied for the
office of Postmaster General, recently vacated
by Timothy Pickering who had been promoted
to Secretary of War. He was the first Jew
known to be considered for Cabinet rank. If he
failed to reach this office, his unhealed wound
must have played a role since it did hasten his
death, probably in 1796.
4 Good to the LMitDrof (AXWEll fHOUSf
f22
"* r cotrtt
MMMtWOM L .... j
SEND FOR
EXCITINC
BOOKLET
Honoring 173b j*
and Famous
|CWSIB
American
History
You an,I your children will be thrilled to read
the fascinating stories in this booklet about
your Jexi\h heritage in Americathe profiles
of many "historic" Jews who made notable
contributions in the creation and building of
our nation Send MM mo slants > with name
ami address to
JEWISH-AMERICAN PATRIOTS
Box i uwt. Grand Central Station
New York, NY. 10017


Page ft
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 27
Loir Summer Rates Motcln Effect
Low summer rates are now been announced. Guests may
in effect at Orange Grove choose between modern mobile
Health Ranch near Arcadia in homes and single-story accom-
south central Florida, it has modations.
The resort, which occupies
194 acres, including 50 acres of
citrus grove, maintains organic
gardens supplying a variety of
vegetables in season and grows
its own out-of-season produce
in a special greenhouse. Three
vegetarian meals are offered
daily, featuring fiesh fruit and
vegetables, casserole dishes,
nuts and other health foods
"The atmosphere is infor-
mal." said the proprietor, with
buffet dining on a screened
porch overlooking the front
lawn, tropical plantings and
flowers The casual, homey at-
mosphere will delight the va-
cationer-'
A free brochure will be sent
upon request. tVnte to Organic
Groves. Inc. Route 4. Box 316.
Arcadia. Fla 33321.
Dr Meron Levitats, (left) Broward eye, ear. nose and
throat specialist, was the guest speaker at the June 8
bagel and lox breakfast sponsored by Phase III Hawaiian
Gardens in behalf of the United Jewish Appeal. With him
are Ms. Goldie Stonehill, chairperson, and her assistant.
Morris Smith. Dr. Levitats, a native of Israel, is active
in many local Jewish causes as well as the support of
Israel. Mike Wurmbrand is president of Phase III.
JDL Member in Jail
SAN FRANCISCO Roger
Pavlow. the local coordinator
of the Jewish Defense League.
was sentenced to 30 days in
jail Tuesday for violating pro-
bation by staging a sit-in at the
offices of the Jewish Welfare
Federation Apr. 3.
MILITARY FUNERAL SERVICES HUD
Terrorists Kill Village Family;
Jets Retaliate in Lebanon
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Terrorist rocket fire during
the night and early Monday
morning caused some dam-
age but no casualties in Is-
raeli villages near the Leba-
nese border. Israeli artillery
returned the fire.
A military spokeman re-
ported damage to power
lines and some buildings in
Metullah. Israel's northern-
most settlement which was
the target of Katyusha rock-
ets at about midnight.
AN ISRAELI border patrol
was attacked near Kfar Yuval
after midnight, and Yatyusha
rockets were fired at Kfar Gila-
di and Metullah just before
dawn causing slight damage
which was promptly repaired.
Monday's terrorist attack on
Kfar Yuval claimed its third Is-
Funerals For
Yom Kippur
War Heroes
TEL AVTV (JTA)Funeral
services were held here for
three Israeli soldiers killed in
the Yom Kippur War whose re-
mains were returned to Israel
a month ago under an agree-
ment with Egyptian authorities.
The men were identified as
Staff Sgts Henoch Kaufman and
Eliezer Benno and Corp. Jacob
Moscovitz.
BUT OFFICIALS of the army
Chaplaincy Corps and experts
of pathological institutes con-
ceded that they are having dif-
ficult)- identifying most of th<-
other remains returned by the
Egyptians.
Of 3*) bodies examined, only
12 have been positively iden-
tified so far.
Two were Air Force pilots,
and ten were soldiers who had
manned the Litoff stronghold on
the Bar Lev Line and were ap-
parently killed in the early
slag of the Egyptian attack 1a
October. 1973.
raeli victim Tuesday when Sim-
ha Mordechai. 22. died in Safad
Hospital of wounds inflicted by
the same hand grenade that
killed her husband, Yaacov.
Her seven-month-old son, As-
saf. was still on the serious list
after undergoing surgery to re-
move grenade splinters from
his head and legs.
HER BROTHER, Neheraia
Yossef-Chai. a newly enlisted
soldier home on his first leave,
was also killed by the four ter-
rorists who invaded the Mor-
dechai home.
All three members of the
family will be buried with full
military honors at the tiny
cemeterv in Kfar Yuval.
Mondays tragic events were
the first flare-up of violence
along the Lebanese border for
more than a month.
ISRAELI AIR Force jets reta-
liated with heavy strikes at ter-
rorist strongholds in Southern
Lebanon, concentrating on Shu-
ba Village where terrorists are
known to assemble for incur-
sions into Israel. Despite the
air attacks. Katyusha rockets
were fired into Nahanya.
wounding two civilians.
Yaacov* Mordechai. who died
in the defense of his home in
Kfar Yuval. will be decorated
posthumously for bravery. A
veteran soldier in Israel's fam-
ed Colani Brigade, he was born
in Chochin. India and was
brought to Israel as a child of
three.
ADVERTISING SALESMAN
DAM BROWARD
Telephone, Personal Contact,
and/or Both.
Send resume to S.T.,
Box 012973, Miami 33101
ALL REPLIES HELD IN
STRICT CONFIDENCE
ILOSE WEIGHT
NATURALLY!
^aeation With Us
ORANGE GROVE HEALTH RANCH
MORE THAU A DECADE OF SUCCESS
FRESH PURIFIED WATER PURE UNPOLLUTED AIR
VEGETARIAN ORGANIC
Supervised Exercise* Sun Bathing Health Lectures
. Social Activities Shopping Tours Surf Bathing
. Regular Tours of Arcadia, Sarasota, Punt* Gorda and
Port Charlotte.
LOW SUMMER KATES MOW IN EFFECT
Come for A Day A MM- A lifetime
FOB BtOCHUtE BY BfTUIN MAIL, WRITE
ORGANIC GROVES, INC
IT. 4, BOX 316, ARCADIA FLORIDA 33e21
or PHONE 813-494-4*44
Summer At Temple Beth Israel Is
Like Any Other Season Of The Year!
Regular Friday evening sen-
ices will be held this weekend
at Temple Beth Israel. "'100 W,
Oakland Park Blvd. Sunrise.
The 8:00 p.m. service will be
led by Jules Shapiro and the
Cantor will be Dr Jack Morris
Families and children are al-
ways welcome. Sabbath morn-
ing services begin at 8:45 a.m.
-The summer at Temple Beth
Israel is like any other season
of the vear." says Ron Mish-
kin. president. "Whereas in
many other Congregation*
throughout the United State*
G-d seems to take a vacation
along with the general com
munity. at Temple Beth Israel
G-d is alive and well and par-
ticipating in the normal syna-
gogue functions"
Regular Friday evening Sen-
ices are conducted throughout
the summer, as well as Shab-
bat Morning Services and Eve-
ning Minvan The Men's Club.
Sisterhood and Young Couples"
Club continue to meet on a
semi-regular basis The Youth
Program has set up a special
schedule of activities n*
Religious School has a mj,
of classes meeting on Sa
Sisterhood Orientation
The Sisterhood of Temple
Sholom is holding a series of
orientation meetings. Mary
Freeman, president, will an-
nounce a full and comprehen-
sive calendar for the Sisterhood
as soon as plans are complete.
mornings.
For information 3bout in
Temple Beth Israel anj'e,,,
Ing your children, contact
temple office.
Registration is now ooe?
the Nursery Pro
School and Confirmation
istration form- foj all prog
may be secured b] contact]
the temple office ?
is open in the rel jious sen
to temple members only.
Registration tor the Ja
and Senior U.S.Y Pn
(Youth Group oag ';,
through 12th graders Call'.
P. Bunder, youth director,
more information
The "Tenth Jounul Ann
sary Buffet Dinner and Dai
will take place Satlffdt? r L
p.m. at Temple Beth Israd
The Temp".- Judaica
Shop is open 9 30 to 4 30.:
day thru Thursday, and
ncsday nights with a wide1
riety of gifts and a good;
lection of Jewish cen
objects, greeting cards.
records.
Daily Minvan meets
morning, Monday through!
day at 8 a.m.. in the evens*]
8 p.m. and Sundays at 9 aal
I
N
S
U
R
A
N
C
E
1
HOMfOWNEBSl
AUTOMOBILE
Ml
M
ONE
PACKAGE
UP TO 251/, DISCOUNT
IF YOU QUALIFY
CALL LEE ROSENBAUM
SB7-3247 E v. 72.36
Let us be your host for a 14-day "Let's Get
Acquainted" tour to explore the possibilities of
settling and working in Israel.
The total price of the program is only $50*.
airfare not included.
Your program includes accomodations to:
entire two weeks in a fine three star hotei
breakfast daily ... a six day guided tour
including visits to absorption centers, housing
projects, etc lunch and dinner on touring
Don't miss this opportunity to dsSCOvei
the challenge of life in Israel. For further
information contact:
Israel Alivah Center
4700 Biscayne Blvd. Room 385
Miami, Florida 33137
(305) 573-2556
L* expense.
pit*


&
iepntat
101 IS HARP'S "Image of the Jews in
American Literature (Philadelphia. Jewish
(Bcation Society $10., 603 pp.) is a gargan-
compendium of digests of books that make
Lv mention of Jews from "the early Republic
\\\... immigration."
I, is an extraordinary contribution to the
Lv American image of Jews to the extent
at'books of authors of all or any quality may
I considered a reflection.
THE SPECTRUM of good, bad and indif-
ent American literature covers poetry, fic-
a and drama. The period until this century
rtrayed the Jews as invidious stereotypes
vlocks immoral, money-grubbingall with
i-Semitic overtones.
Melvin Urofsky. in a book to be reviewed
jrtly differs with Harp's analysis for the
riod until 1885. Harp take* Oscar HandHn
Leslie Fiedler to task. His disagreements
ad the works of these two men are illustrated
, his illustrations from Fiedler's "The Jews in
I American Novel" and Handlings articles and
Adventures in Freedom."
THE PLAY "Zalmen or the Madness of
by Elie Wiesel (New York. Random
use. 16.95, 172 pp.) is an account of a rabbi
ho issues a passionate cry wrung from his
urage to voice his oppression and isolation.
scene is a synagogue in a small Russian
iye which is to be visited by some Western
Itors.
^JLJiivid
t^chwartz
A STATEMENT the other day. Sade* said,
; .s Russia seven billion dollars for
led by Russia which is demanding
| payment. He wants the United
to help pay the bill.
We can visualize the scene as Mr. Sadat
:: Salzburg to present the matter.
(.LAD TO see you. Sadat, old boy.'" the
esident said. "How are the wife and chil-
en?"
"Fine," said Sadat.
And how are the pyramids?" said the
esident. "They go back quite a ways, don't
ey? We really should get some pyramids for
I think I will take up the matter
mess. 1 always say there is nothing
b having something old to look back to. You
I niary gets more valuable the older it
| like people, eh Mr. Sadat?"
"No you are right. Mr. President.' said
bdat "People don't get more valuable with
BE
"Well," said the President, "as long as
ou and the family and the pyramids are all
it. abi gesund.' as the saying goes.
I know. Mr. Sadat, that you have some-
binc on your mind. You didn't come here to
k hello.
"Now. Mr. Sadat, just tell me what's on
our mind. Don't be afraid. Remember you are
none tnends."
A Play, literature
And Philosophy
The police had warned the congregation to
avoid the foreigners. Wiesel's terse statements
are more eloquent than the' lengthy diatribes
of others. The play was shown on TV locally a
few months ago.
"STUDIES IN JEWISH THOUGHT." by
Simon Radowicz (Jewish Publication Society. '
$6.95. 448 pp.). edited by Nathan N. Glatzer.
with a foreword by Abram L Sachar. and bio-
graphical introduction by the author's son. B.
C. Ravid. is a collection of essays by the late
distinguished Brandeis professor who wrote in
Hebrew. Other than the essay on Jewish learn-
ing, which is dated 1948, the book displays the
erudition and originality of this great intellec-
tual who was born in Russia.
"IDIOTS FIRST" by Bernard Malamud
(New York. Pocket Books, $1.75. 190 pp.) will
titillate his followers with pleasure and secure
new devotees for him. The short stories are
flavored with his distinctive Jewishness and
their O'Henry finales.
A trifle late for this year but to be remem-
bered for next year is "A Passover Haggadah"
with drawings by Leonard Baskin. published
by the Central Conference of American Rabbis
(New York. $17.50 hardcover and $4 paper).
It is a beautiful Haggadah with a tradi-
tional (almost) text in Hebrew and English
translation. It is beautifully done.
Friday, June 27, 1975 > >*// ll>-ridHcir ^ge 7
Anwar Sadat Has Cheek:
He Wants Big U.S. (heck
Well. Mr. President.'- said Sadat, "You
know, we recently had a little war with Israel."
"Oi yes." said the President, "I know all
about Israel. You know our backing of Israel
back to the days of Wood row Wilson, the
Balfour Declaration and the first World War.
It was in that war that all of the Arab nations
were given their independence, and we thought
it right that the Jews should also get back
their little old homeland; the United States was
first of the great powers to recognize the inde-
pendence of Israel."
"Yes. Mr. President, as I was saying, we
had mi with Israel and Russia furnished us
with the weapons for the war. Now Russia is
demanding payment she will not even al-
low a period of grace and we are turning to
the United States to pay off the arms debt
to Russia."
I suppose that means." said the Presi-
dent, "that if you don't pay Russia for those
arms, she may not give you any more arms,
and you will not be able to start another war."
"Yes. Mr. President."
How big is the Russian debt?" asked the
President.
"Seven billion dollars." said Sadat.
"Is that all?" said the President. "For a
while I thought it would be something se-
rious."
JLdJL
Game's
The Thing
Tel Avii
\IANY MAY think that at a lime when Israel is bedevilled
by so many internal and external political and financial
difticulties that this is not the time for the operation ot an
international set of spoits games which the Hapoel Associa.
tion conducted earlier this month.
On the other hand, the government itself felt that the
Hapoel Games were very important for the local citizenry as
well as the world at large. Israel wants to show that despite
the fact that it is plagued by so many problems it still has time
to participate in sports competition.
WHAT IS more important, the government feels impelled
to show the world at large that it is safe to bring sports teams
to the State of Israel.
Some 30 countries participated in the recently completed
Hapoel Games and all of the athletes, numbering 900. left
Israel with a feeling of security and satisfaction.
The Hapoel organization had the games well organized,
abetted by all of the other sports groups in the country, and
the action in some 20 sports was continuous and flowed
smoothly.
THE UNITED States sent over a contingent of close to 70
athletes and administrators and made its presence felt by cap-
turing a large quantity of gold medals which were made avail-
able to winners.
In swimming alone, where 22 gold medals were available,
the U.S. copped 21. One gold went to a strong, superb Rumanian
girl swimmer who prevailed in her event, the 100-meter free-
style.
After a lapse of four years the United States basketball
team again asserted their superiority by winning the gold
medal. The U.S. was represented by two teams, the National
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics select All-Stars and the
Capitols of Los Angeles, who are the current AAU champions.
THE NAIA boys, by winning all three of Its games in a
round robin competition against its fellow American team, and
two Israeli national squads were awarded first place. Second
place went to the Israel "A" national team, while third place
went to the Capitols.
It is interesting to r.ote that both American teams defeated
the Israel national "A" squad which will represent the nation
in the European championships next month in Yugoslavia.
CONFINED TO four sports the U.S. contingent was only
competitive in three with gymnastics serving as an exhibition,
of the talent rather than in active competition.
Our American sprinters did very well Steve Riddick. the
ICA champion in the 100-yards and 220-yards. took a gold
medal in both the 100 and 200-meter events here. A total of six
golds were picked up by the Americans in track and field, with
five silvers and four bronzes going to the club.
THE YOUNG lady in the American Hapoel contingent who
caught the eye of spectators was Denise Walker of Lowell.
Massachusetts, a 15-year old who appears slated to be Amer-
ica's top female gymnast within the next few years. She caught
everybody's fancy and was highlighted on several local tele*
vision shows.
The administrators of the Hapoel games, in the interest ol
economy, decided somet.me ago when the Israel. Pound was
deflated, that the budget established Pound-wise at that time
would have to remain for the running of the games.
Yossi Inbar, Hapoel head here, advises us that by cut-
ting corners and zealously watching ***** gfj
organizing committee finished the games with the budget on*
inally presented to the overall group no small feat in Israel
these days.
Marshall's Impressive Credo: The Importance of Jewish Education
_r. r>vrr-T -f -- ,, Hirh the np
I'pWO SCORE and seven years ago, Louis Marshall,
the great American Jewish leader, stressed the
pmportance of Jewish education in an impressive
credo.
His words are worth reproducing now when the
Problem of Jewish education is coming more and
"lore to the forefront in Jewish communities all over
|the country. In his infinite wisdom he said:
"GREAT AS has been and is my interest in
[what has been done for the relief of our brethren
|in Eastern Europe and In Palestine, warm as is my
I sympathy and pride in the various Jewish charitable
I institutions In our great American cities, it is my
firm conviction that there is nothing that the Jews
of this country can do which equals in importance
the maintenance and development of its educational
I system.
"Unless this educational work is generously tqp-

ported, everything else for which we may strive will
have been in vain.
"WHATEVER distinction is attached to the name
of the Jew is derived almost exclusively from the
fact that he has given to the world those ethical
precepts that are exemplified in our Bible, that have
been illustrated by our great sages and teachers
and that have been incorporated into the moral
concepts of the civilized world.
THE EXTENT of attention which the organized
Jewish communities are now paying to Jewish edu-
cation is indicated in a survey by the Council of
Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds. The results
of this survey have just been made public.
They show that Federations in 93 cities have
allocated more than $16 million in 1973.
This is about 13 per cent more than in the pre-
ceding year and 127 per cent higher than seven
years ago. In some communities the increased allo_
cations for Jewish education made up more than 25
per cent of community funding for all local purposes.
THE FEDERATIONS are no newcomers in the
field of Jewish education. Some of them have sup-
ported education 40 years ago as part of their wide
range of services to the Jewish community.
However, visible acceleration of the trend of
Federation's interest in the field of Jewish education
has developed in the past several years.


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Fridav
une 2?
ij;jI
Federation's Annual Meeting Highlighted By
Presentation Of Community, Cam\mign Awards
\
Rabbi Harold Richter. Community Chaplain, and
Rabbi Phillip JttwmiU af Temple Beth Israel received
i book "Zal-nen or the Madness of God.''
Rabb: Max Weitz. (left) of the Coral Springs Hebrew
Congregation and Rabbi Morris Skop of Temple Sholom
mad O beak, Zalmen or the
Madness of God.''


'men Leo Goodman, (left/ Robert Ad-
. Sen Roisman were recognized for the outstand-
fiiml niilm on beha.' the Federation*! L'mted
Appeal Israel Emergent I campaign con-
ducted in this area.
Awards of merit were presented to Plantation Cochair-
men Harvey Kopetwxtz, (lefti Stuart Levin, Sheldon
Polish and Joel Remstein for their leadership roles.
Mrs Alvin Gross, outgoing
Womens Division presi-
dent, ls shown giving the
Women's Division report.

Ml
Top leadership iivardl vere presented to Robert y 4r.
itiu'.n [left I for his con'ibution in furtht
cooperation; Dr. Alvin Colin, chairman .\". -::: E:. ar and Temple Emanu-EI. and Israel Re ..^J
chairmen

Mr and Mrs Howard N.
Miller celebrated their 20lh
wedding anniversary with
those in attendance at the
annual meeting.
nip awards were also y : 'Veil
Sitverman, (left) Sathan Halpern, and -'"? W
their outstanding chairmanship roles in vcrrary, Gd|
Ocean llfle and Plantation respectively
,.' an
idwik
>hip.
landing cat
tsemad w Iknmrd Miller, (h ft
I
Campaign leadership
awards were presented to
Dr Stephen Levine (left/
and Ir-.-mg Eelmanson.


lnverrary cochairmen presented with at
sanding sen'ice were Casey Greet
Leibo and Al Mars.


riday. June 27, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
Lubavitcher Hea r Ford's 6Tsoris'
- |
Hawaiian Gardens Chairmen Mr. and Mrs. Joel Hoch
/left) and Temple Beth Israel chairman Alfred de Beer
received awards for their outstanding leadership.
PHILADELPHIA (JTA)
President Ford paid warm
tribute to the Lubavitch move-
ment here in his first address
to a national Jewish group
since ukiug office.
Sen. Hufih Scott (R., Pa), the
Senate Minority Leader, who al-
so addressed more than 600
guests attending the first na-
tional conference dinner of the
American Friends of Lubavitch.
declared in the President's
presence that "Each of you can
be assured the I'nited States
will never abandon Israel or her
people."
THE DINNER, organized by
Rabbi Abraham Shemtov of the
-

Una South Chairman Mil-
ton Fnmkle and Plantation
chairman Harry Lem-
ck
wnin J. Kurtz, (left)
fhairman of Temple Sho-
rn and Paul Zimmerman.
lhairman of the Federa-
tion's telethon drive, re-
ed Leadership Award
ues for their distin-
\u: hed service.
wnts of America Cochair-
icn Harry Calig (left) and
fornuel Goldfarb received
nition for their out-
tending leadership.
Israel Alivah Center Offers
'Let's Get Acquainted' Tour
A unique opportunity to ex-
plore Israel at far below the
usual cost is being offered to
individuals and families by the
Israel Alivah Center in a new
program called "Let's Get Ac-
quainted."
The "Let*! Get Acquainted"
program, which is being run
under the auspices of Tour Vt-
'Aleh. offers an inexpensive,
first-hand opportunity to see
what life and work in Israel is
really like, according to Yiz-
chak Dar, director of the pro-
gram.
" "Let's Get Acquainted' tour
participants will have ample
time." Dar pointed out. "to meet
the people of Israel and to ex-
plore the vast opportunities for
settlement, employment, and
business in Israel"
Dar said the Tour Ve'Aleh
visitors will be given an inside
look at the "real Israel" seldom
seen by the average tourist.
The program, introduced thh
week at the Israel Aliyah Cen-
ter, includes four different tour
plans, all with the same basic
ingredients: the visitor purchas-
es the regular low cost group
(G.I.T.) air tickets on El Al Is-
rael Airlines and Tour Ve'Aleh
makes the nominal cost land
arrangements.
Typical of the programs
available is a 14-day plan which
includes transfers on arrival
and departure; accommodations
for the full two weeks in three
star hotels; daily breakfast; 6
days of organized touring (with
English speaking guides) to
such interesting sites as absorp-
tion centers, housing projects,
and industrial developments as
well as the usual tourist attrac-
tions; and lunch and dinner on
touring days.
The total cost of this pro-
gram, excluding the cost of air
fare, is S50.
Further information about the
"Let's Get Acquainted" program
may be obtained at a local Is-
rael Aliyah Center office or by
contacting Yizchak Dar directly
at the Israel Aliyah Center. 515
Park Ave.. New York. NY
10022.
Lubavitch Center in Philadel-
phia, was the occasion of the
formal announcement of the
establishment of the "United
States Senator and Mrs. Hugh
Scott Library" on the campus
of Girls Town. Kfar Chabad II,
in Israel, a project sponsored
by the world-wide Lubavitch
movement to provide education-
al and vocational training for
girls on the high school and
college levels.
Ford, who was introduced by
Bernard Segal, former president
of the American Bar Associa-
tion, opened his remarks with
"Shalom."
THEN, LOOKING to Scott, he
said. "Hugh is one of the first
people I turn to when I have
"t70ris" and in the past few
weeks, have I had 'tzoris.' "
The President praised the
Lubavitch movement's commit-
ment "to preserving the deep
and abiding faith of the Jewish
tradition for the young and suc-
ceeding generations."
REFERRING TO Ford's meet-
ing with Israeli Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin in Washington last
week, Scott said, "Out of this
meeting I hope will come a
pledge of continued arms gup-
port to Israel by the Uaited
Suites; support N resist thaf ef-
forts of the PLO and its terror-
ist allies to destroy legitimate
peace efforts; a promise of con-
tinued economic assistance; an
understanding that 'reassess-
ment' of U.S. foreign policy in
no way means that our histor-
ical commitments to Israel will
be abandoned" and "recognition
that any peace settlement must
protect Israel's territorial in-
tegrity."
Scott said the American
commitment to Israel "is a bond
of friend to friend, of good
friend to good friend, of a will-
ingness to keep all pledgesto
keep them with strength when-
ever neededin order to secure
the future of Israel."
HE ALSO said that the U.S.
has done "and we will continue
to do, everything possible to
encourage the Soviet Union to
permit emigration to Israel of
the many thousands who wish
to come to the home of prom-
ise."
HERMAN M. ZEIDMAN, M. D.
ANNOt'NCIEfl TDK REMOVAL OF his OFFICE
TO
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POMPANO BEACH. FLORIDA 33060
own e hoiks
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CAN OFFER YOU
SIX IMPORTANT POINTS
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2. The point of expanding your mind through our
cultural events.
3. The point of having pride in your heritage.
4. The point of being involved in successful dances
and parties.
5. The point of having a good social life.
6. The point of being JEWISH!!!
If you are between ages 18-30 and want to make points
SOCIALLY, follow our 6 POINTS; and join in the FUN!!!
CALL Marc: 791-6169 or 791-2871
Nina: 485-0780
Sherry: 523-8618
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parents'stateroom, or 50%off the regular rate for children over 12
Program fully supervised by ships youth counselor Includes
beach party visits to leading museums handicrafts demonstration
- games In youth activities lounge photo contest p.ng-pong and
shuffleboard tournaments escorted land tours for various age
groups Rgulw laws from S36S to $750, double occupancy.
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Miami. FlarMa 33132
Tat (30SI 37 J 5502


Page 10
The Jewish Florid'an of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 27
HIM
Ceil Zucker To Head JWVA's
Department Of Florida
Solomon 243; citation^ to Ha
ry H. Cohen 7i rjgj
Paul Zimmerman had the pleasure of introducing the
Ladyijenskiy family to all those attending Federation's
recent annual meeting. The family, recently resettled in
our community from Russia, received a warm welcome.
Mr. Ladyijenskiy introduced his wife, Fania, and daugh-
ter, Ella (left). He expressed his thanks and gratitude,
addressing the audience in English. Mr. Zimmerman
pointed out that the family could not speak a word of
Bhghsh upon their arrival in the United States one month
ago-__________________________________________
El Casino In Freeport-Lucaya
Refurbished. Redecorated
FREEPORT. BahamasEl Ca-
siao. in Freeport Lucaya on
Grand Bahamas Island, the larg-
est gaming complex in the East,
has been completely refurbished
at a cost of over $500,000. Con-
struction of a new wing and re-
decoration of the casino was
completed last December. De-
sign consultant for the project
was Angela Howard Limited of
New York.
Additions to the casino in-
cluded a second gourmet dining
room. The Oasis, seating 140
persons, a spacious lounge, dis-
cotheque, and two raised bars
overlooking the casino.
El Morocco, a dining room
seating 140 persons, was re-
decorated. Cafe Aladdin, a popu-
lar-priced restaurant which
operates round the clock, was
also enlarged and refurbished
and the Kasbah Celebrity Room
was redesigned to serve as both
a showroom and convention
center, with a modular stage
and tiered seating.
The casino, covering nearly a
square city block, has been car-
peted with a reproduction of an
ancient Persian rug measuring
oner 22.000 square feet.
The rug. woven in sections in
England. Germany and Italy,
was assembled in an airplane
hangar in Manchester. England,
and packed in 15 bales, weigh-
ing over a ton each, for ship-
ping to Freeport Lucaya. It is
believed that this is the largest
angle Persian rug in the world
The walls of the casino are
decorated in burgundy and blue
panels with figurines of mount
ed Arabian knights and archers
etched in gold and silver. The
ceiling is deep blue, flecked
with gold Two thousand re-
cessed pin spotlights provide il-
lumination. Adjustable lamps
with striped sift shades hang
over the tables.
A three-ton crystal chande-
lier, made in Italy for the Sheik
of Kuwait, has been suspended
over the foyer of the casino,
which is enclosed in gleaming
spiral columns, glazed in silver
and gold.
The two dining rooms. The
Oasis and El Morocco, are sepa-
rated by a lounge. Three walls
of the lounge are inverted
El Casino is open 24 hours a
day. seven days a week,
leather pleating with gold nail
studs. The fourth is a huge
back-lit wine rack displaying
the casino's selection. The room
is furnished with overstuffed
chairs and small gilt tables,
where patrons can have cock-
tails and order from both dining
rooms.
The new Oasis Room is on
two levels; the upper for din-
ing only and the lower for din-
ing and dancing. The walls are
of sheer multicolored silk fabric,
shirred and stretched to the
ceiling to create a tent effect.
Gilded chairs and banquettes
are upholstered in blue leather.
Table linen and dinner service
is in gold.
Large silver panels, etched
with crimson and gold figurines.
decorate the walls of El Moroc-
co. The entrance arches, carry-
ing out the "Arabian Nights"
motif, are faced with golden
tiles. Table service and linens
are in matching colors.
At last week's Department of
Florida aonvention of the La-
dies Auxiliaries of the Jewish
War Veterans. Ceil Zucker was
elected to the office of presi-
dent.
Mrs Zucker has been an ac-
tive member of Abe Horrowitz
Auxiliary 682 for the past 20
years and has served in many
capacities.
On the Department level.
Mrs. Zucker has held chairman-
ships such as cultural. Amer-
icanism, hospital, child welfare,
community relations, member-
ship and senior citizens. She
has also served as Department
conductress, patriotic instruc-
tor, chaplain, treasurer, junior
vice president and senior vice
president
Other officers elected were
Belle Swartz. senior vice presi-
dent: Ann Marcus, junior vice
president; Elayne Uhr, chap-
lain: Mae Schreiber. patriotic in-
structor. Rose Lisansky. con-
ductress, and Leah Eisenman.
guard.
Trophies and citations were
awarded to the following Auxil-
iaries for their outstanding
work in the various catego-
ries:
Aid to Israel, trophy winne.s
Victor B. Freedman 613 ard
Point East 698; citations to
Murray Solomon 243. Four
Freedoms 402. and Abe Hor-
owitz 682.
Americanism trophies were
awarded to West Miami 223
and South Dade 778; citations
to Norman Bruce Brown 1~4
and Pompano Beach 196.
Child Welfare trophies to
Norman Bruce Brown 174 and
Hialeah-Miami Springs 681; ci-
tations to West Miami 223 and
Harvey Albertson 759.
Public Relations trophies to
Norman Bruce Brown 1~4 and
South Dade ~~8: citations to
Victor B. Freedman 613.
Community Relations tro-
phies to West Miami 223 and
Hialeah-Miami Springs 681; ci-
tations to Miami Beach 330 and
William Kretchman 730.
Cultural trophies to Point
East 698: citation to Harvey Al-
bertson 759.
High Holy Day
Services Hosted
Bv Inverrary C-C
Ron Mishkin. president of
Temple Beth Israel, has an-
nounced that an Auxiliary Serv-
ice of the Temple will be held
at the Country Club in Inver-
rary' for the High Hobdays as a
sen ice to the community
This service will be under
the direct supervision of Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowitz. spiritual
leader of Temple Beth Israel,
and Cantor Maurice A. Neu.
Conducting the actual serv-
ice and serving as Assistant
Rabbi will be Miles P. Bunder,
educational director of Temple
Beth Israel, and Cantor Abe
Colinkin. a new member of the
Temple Beth Israel staff.
Tickets are now on sale at
Temple Beth Israel. 7100 W. I
Oakland Park Blvd.. Sunriee.
Fla. 33319
For mare information, please
contact the temple office.
Mander
HORSE SHOE, NORTH CAROLINA
OffN ADMISSIONS FOUCY
A residential Camp for Boys ami Girls Ages 7-16
OFFERS YOU A WIDE SELECTION OF ACTIVITIES
AND TIMES TO fIT EVERY VACATION PLAN
WfTH 2-WEEK SESSIONS JUNE 28 JULY 12 rV
JULY 12 JULY 26 JULY 26 AUG. 9 AUG. 9 AUG. 23
4-WEEK SESSION JUNE 21 JULY 26
5-WEEK SESSION JULY 26 AUG. 23
and a week of popular FAMILY CAMPING AUG. 24 30
Camp Highlander makes full use of 170 acres of North Caro-
lina mountainside country and our gymnasium to present
New Intense Majors Programs in GYMNASTICS AND DANCE
TENNIS. ADVANCED RIDING. ARTS AND CRAFTS. ADVANCED
CAMPING and HAWK., as well as the traditional programs
in these and other activities including water skiing, canoeing,
swimming, riflery, archery, nature study, hiking, gymnasium
and land sports.
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CEIL ZUCKER
Historian trophies to West
Miami 223 and Robert K. Franz-
blau 177; citations to Abe Hor-
rowitz 682 and Murray Sok*
man 243.
Hospital trophies to West Mi-
ami 223 and Col David Marcus
"46; citations to Abe Horrowitz
682. North Shore 67~ and West
Palm Beach 408; honorable
mention to Point East 69o
" Legislation trophies to Harry
H. Cohen 723 Bad Haney M-
rvrt>on 739; citations to Miami
Beach 330 and Robeit K rru.r
blau 177.
Membership trophies to Vic-
tor B. Freedmar 613. and W;i-
liam Kretchman 730; atition
to West Miami 2-3 and Souih
776.
Programming trophies to
Abe Horrowitz 682 and Robert
K. Franzblau 177, citations to
Miami Peach 130 and Harry H.
Cohen ~23.
Senior Citizens trophies to
Miami :2.i and Murrav
Kretchruan 730.
Sen 'icemen's Service tronKIPt
to William Kretchman *30 2
""22 A"*rtson "y citation!
gJP-m Last 698 and Sa*
Veterans Service trophies to
West Miami 223 and Murrav
Solomon 243; citations to N0/.
man Bruce Brown 174 and Har-
vey Albertson 759.
West Palm Beach 408 receiv-
ed a three year plaque lor
Americanism.
The Woman of the Yeaj
Award was presented to Carol
Gold of West Miami Ainurur;
for her outstanding work dar-
ing the year. First runner-up
was Pearl Weinstein. second
runner-up was Bessie Gibber
The Bertha Lach award win-
ner was Eva Koch and runner-
up. Beatrice Land 15
The Edith Feibelman Award
was presented to Shirley Achf.
man. Sunshine Chairman far
the Department of Florkh,
with Florence Wroner. runner-
up.
Some 2.000 Post and Auxil-
iary members attended the con-
vention.
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Lday, June 27, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
Jt*
^sMrittical flage
co-ordinated b/ the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Upschitz Rabbi Barry Altman
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
Issues And Answers..
Our Rabbis' Views
Conflict Haunts Us
By DR. SAMUEL Z. JAFFE, Temple Beth El, Hollywood
The war in Southeast Asia has ended, at least for us Our
troops have been recalled and American personnel evacuated.
But if agony of that conflict, whose outcome we sought to in-
fluence, and its tragic results, continue to haunt us. They are
tten large on our collective conscience.
The terrible loss in life and treasure, which this nation has
suffered during the past decade and a half, is well documented.
Over 56,000 Americans were killed, 303.000 wounded, and 25.000
tota.N disabled. Our military expenditure is already over S150
billion. The Department of Commerce has estimated that the U.S.
mil he paying on the Vietnam war at least until the year 2045,
and by then the total bill will have come to S352 billion.
But the greatest casualty is the U.S. itself. Not only have we
experienced one of the worst military and diplomatic defeats in
American history', but the moral climate of our nation has been
eroded Our psychic wounds are deep and extensive, and may
show themselves in a number of ways for some time to come.
Already they are evident in the credibility gap which has
developed, in the distrust of the American people towards their
government, in the battle between Congress and the President
for the control of foreign policy, in the alienation of our young,
in the problems of inflation, recession and unemployment, and
in the trauma of demonstration and violence which have become
endemic to- this age.
Vietnam has created a general malaise afflicting our society
and has torn this nation asunder. In his book. "The Wound With-
in, Alexander Kendrick writes, "the war accentuated the negative
in the thesis and antithesis of American life. Even as Vietnam
became increasingly Americanized, so America became increas-
ingly Yietnamized."
Our President now urges upon Americans to close ranks and
forget Vietnam. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger proclaims that
the tragic ordeal is now behind us, and that recrimination of any
kind can serve no purpose. But the tragedy of Vietnam cannot be
forgotten any more than one can erase from mind the picture
of the little girl, naked and napalmed, fleeing in agony from her
tormentors.
We must not close that agonizing and disastrous chapter in
our recent history without a congressional reassessment of our
involvement, and a careful and objective evaluation of the nature
and extent of this nations commitments at present. It was George
Santayana who said that, "those who will not learn from history
are condemned to repeat it." If we are to safeguard our future,
we must reexamine our past.
The sudden collapse of South Vietnam and Cambodia has
brought about the removal of Americas presence in that part of
world, but has not ended our interest and involvement in
the plight of the thousands of refugees who have fled in fear
ol reprisals.
Many of them have worked for our government in various
capacities in a most exposed position for years, and had been
promised safety if and when Americas military and political
presence had to be withdrawn.
Many of them escaped and found a haven of refuge on these
shores In order to lighten some of our guilt and assume our moral
responsibilities, we have opened our doors to over 100.000 \iet-
namese, 60,000 of whom are children Mobilizing for mercy in
such a fashion will ease our collective conscience. There are how-
ever, many Americans, including some in high places in govern-
ment, who have raised objections against the admission of these
refugees.
These attitudes are either an outgrowth of the frustrations
engendered by the war itself, or because of the uncertain eco-
nomic conditions which prevail, or worse, as an expression of
racism. One lesson which we must learn from our recent ordeal,
is that by our involvement and our attempt to influence the out-
come of the war, we have moral responsibilities to its victims.
The ultimate teat of the strength and integrity of any nation
consists in its readiness to open its gates to the persecuted and
displaced. In the final analysis, it will make it easier for us to
live wah ourselves and with our guilt. As our tradition has de-
clared, "righteousness exalts a nation, but sin is a reproach to
ny people ... for only the work of righteousness shall be peace."
QUESTION BOX
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
What is the reason for
the Fast of the Seventeenth
Day of Tammuz?
In the course of the destruc-
tion of the first temple in Jeru-
salem, the wail was breached
on the ninth day of Tammuz.
(Jeremiah 52:6). When the
destruction of the second tem-
ple took place the wall was
then breached on the seven-
teenth day of the month Tam-
muz.
Not wanting to make two
days of mourning and fasting
in the same month, the rabbis
set aside the seventeenth day
of Tammuz as the day of mourn-
ing and fasting for the breach
of the wall in the case of the
destruction of both temples.
Even though this was the
major reason for the Fast of
Tammuz, other regrettable in-
cidents occurred on this same
day. Moses broke the first set
of tablets on this day when he
descended the mountain of Si-
nai and found the Hebrews
worshipping the Golden Calf.
Furthermore, it was on this day
when the Graeco-Syrians be-
sieged the wall of Jerusalem
that the daily sacrifices stopped
in the temple since the He-
brews could no longer procure
the lambs due to the siege
which cut off their supply.
A Roman leader burned a
Torah scroll publicly later on
in history on this same day.
The burning of a Torah was re-
garded as a great calamity for
the people of Israel.
Either in the days of the Mac-
cabean crisis or later during the
Roman period it is maintained
that an idol was placed in the
temple of Jerusalem on this
day thus bringing defilement to
this holy sanctuary.
In observing the fast day on
the seventeenth day of the He-
brew month of Tammuz all
these tragic events are brought
to mind. These events are still
remembered in current times
because the tragedies caused by
these events have nei-er been
rectified yet. There still is no
temple in Jerusalem. There
still is no daily sacrifice. The
spirit of rebellion and defile-
ment is still evident in many-
Jewish communities. Therefore,
the damage of yesterday has
nev.T been repaired.
Jews remember these facts
because they still live with hope
that there will some day be the
restitution and re-establishment
of the temple of old with its
sacrifices, its state of purity and
its spirit of dedication and com-
mitment which will be evident
in Jewish communities all over
the world.
ilization in females. Further-
Does Judaism permit
sterilization?
Judaism does not permit ster-
ilization The rabbis trace this
to a Biblical source (Leviticus
22:24) where practices like this
are forbidden in the Bible.
Some commentaries (Abra-
banel. Chinuch and Ibn Ezra)
consider such a practice as in-
terfering with matters which
are only the prerogative of the
Almighty, they claim.
Furthermore, one who has
himself castrated or sterilized
in some way indicates his dis-
satisfaction with the world be-
cause he evidently would like
to see less people enjoy it.
Judaism always had a positive
outlook on life and the world
as a whole-
Sterilization in males is a
more severe crime than ster-
more. if it is a matter of saving
an individual's live by steriliz-
ing him, this is of course per-
mitted.
There are Jewish law authori-
ties who claim that under cer-
tain conditions females may
sterilize themselves by taking
certain medication to drink, be-
cause the command to repro-
duce was generally charged to
the male.
Why does Judaism pro-
hibit certain excessive prac-
tices in mourning?
The general idea is traced
back to the Bible where it is
stated that such things as tear-
ing one's flesh or tearing out
one's hair is prohibited (Deu-
teronomy 14:1).
The Talmud states that any-
one who mourns for more than
a year for his parents is asking
for another death to occur.
Some commentaries (like Na-
hamanides ard Ibn Ezra) claim
that while mourning is allowed
in which to express one's grief,
total and extreme mourning is
disallowed because death is
actually not all bad and a bless-
ing in disguise. This goes back
to the opinion of the rabbis who
consider man to have been
better off had he not been born
to face the cruelty of living.
However, since he must live he
should enioy life and find the
glory of life wherever possible.
Thus, even though Judaism
had a positive outlook on life,
de3th was not all bad. especially
if we believe in the hereafter.
insights on questions of
Jewish interest
By
DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
Executive Editor
Encyclopaedia Judaica
Why do Jews oppose
calendar reform?
Attempts at calendar reform
have been prompted by two de-
sires: to achieve a closer syn-
chronization of the civil year of
365 days with the astronomic
fact that the earth revolves
around the sun in nearly 365'j
davs, and to make a symmetrical
division of the year. The Gre-
gorian system now in use
achieves a close synchroniza-
tion of the civil year with the
astronomic year, but the calen-
dar lacks symmetry. A date of
the month never coincides with
the same day of the week in
successive years, and the
months have a varying number
of days. Moreover, the year is
not divisible into either two
equal halves or four equal quar-
ters, the authoritative Encyclo-
paedia Judaica explains.
One of the reforms suggested
is to divide the civil year into
13 months, each of 28 days: this
total of 364 days would be sup-
plemented every six years
(sometimes five), with the ad-
dition of an extra week to the
last month.
A more popular suggested re-
form is the so-called World
Calendar, which proposes divid-
ing the year into four quarters
of 91 days (three months of 30.
30. and 31 days), giving a total
of 364 days. The extra day need-
ed to make the calendar con-
form to the astronomic cycle is
to be suspended between De-
cember 31 and January 1 of
each year. It would be called
either Blank Day or World Day.
but would be dateless. In a leap
year, there will either be two
such days in succession, or
another added at the end of
June. Such a system would be
almost entirely symmetrical,
says the Encyclopaedia Judaica.
Each date of the month would
alwavs fall on a given day of
the week, with a recurring one-
year pattern. However, whereas
the Gregorian reform affected
neither the regularity of the
days of the week, nor any pos-
sible rite occuring on them, the
main disadvantage of the pro-
posed World Calendar from the
Jewish point of view is that it
would destroy the fixity of the
Sabbath. In one year the Sab-
bath coincided with the day
known as Saturday, in the fol-
lowing year it would shift to
Friday.
Such a reform, the Judaica
states, would be unacceptable to
Judaism, whose day of rest de-
pends on an unbroken sequence
of six working days followed by
the Sabbath (Ex. 20:9-10 and
Deut. 5:13-14). Opposition has
been expressed to any world
authority rearranging the Sab-
bath, which is considered nei-
ther merely a social institution
nor simply a day of prayer, but
a fundamental of faith. In 1929,
the Synagogue Council of
America (comprising Orthodox,
Conservative .and Reform con-
gregations) declared that it
would oppose any calendar re-
form likely to interfere with the
regularity of the Sabbath. In
1931. J. H. Hertz. British chief
rabbi, vigorously opposed the
World Calendar reform before a
committee established by the
League of Nations to consider
the question for the same rea-
son
1
CANDIEL1GHTING TIME
18 TAMUZ 7:57
9
Religious
Services
FORT lAUDERDAlf
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 19
N.W. 57th St. (Conaervativa).
BETH ISRAEL (TtmpU) 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip
A. LabowiU. Cantor Maurice Nau.
EMANU-BL. K45 W. Oakland Par*
Blvd. Reforri. Rabbi Arthur J. Ab-
rama Cantor Jaroma Klamari, S
YOUNG ISRAEL Of HOLLVWOOO.
(Orthodox) 3891 Stirling Rd. U
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 South Nob Hill Road,
Plantation,
las i> m
POMPANO BEACH
HOLOM tTampl>. 1S2 SB 11t* f^*
Conaarvativa. Rabbi Morris A. Bftaa>
Cantor jarob J. Renaar.
MAROATB
MARGATE JEWISH CENTS*. arvat.va) B101 NW th SL
CMALSPRINCS
CORAL SPRINGS HrtW CC*I-
GREOATION. Libaral. S60I UniAr-
aity Or. Rabbi Max Waits. 44
rrld*y d.bv 8*bbatb aarvtoaa.


12
Jewish FlorUtian of Greater Fort bauderdale
Friday, June 27
Synagogues Begin
High Holiday Appeal
1
The High Holidays synagogue
effort for Israel has already be-
gun due to the earlier dates of
the upcoming holidays, an*
nounced Robert L. Siegel, gen-
eral campaign chairman of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization.
With Rosh Hashanah Eve be-
ginning on Sept. 5. apprux-
mately two weeks before last
year, plans to organize the tra-
ditional fall activity for con-
gregational appeals are being
formulated three months in ad-
vance.
Contact with the spiritual
leaders and leading members
of the congregations is being
made at this time on both the
local and national levels
Congregations and rabbis
have traditionally made the
High Holidays of Rosh Hasha-
nah and Yom Kippur the oc-
casion for special involvement
on behalf of the Israel Bond
campaign.
Last year's Hish Holiday ap-
peals drew a pledge of over $1
million from the Grater Miami
Jewish community for Israel's
economic reconstruction, in 26
area svnagogues alone, it was
reported.
ThL year's High Holiday ap-
peal is expected to draw even
more bond pledges from South-
east Florida temples due to the
increased concern about the ef-
fects of the Arab boycott and
Israel's extreme economic con-
dition.
Cash Mobilization Month
To Continue Throughout June
Volunteer workers forming
the telephoning committee for
Israel Bond Cash Mobilization
Month have been part of the
rising support in Greater Miami
to make the $2 million pledge a
reality, according to Arnold
Laskv, chairman of the Israel
Bond Cash Mobilization Month
drive.
Cash Mobilization Month,
which began May 21 in answer
to Israel's Prime Minister Yitz-
hak Rabin's message of econom-
ic instability in Israel, will con-
tinue through June 30.
Robert L. Siegel. general
campaign chairman of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization, pledged $2 million
as a goal to be raised in South
Florida after the Prime Minis-
ter's message.
The conununity's response
has been a good one," Siegel
said, "but we still need the ac-
tive support of as many people
as possible if we are to help
Israel through one of her most
depressed economic states. It
is not a question of generosity.
It Is a firm answer of responsi-
bibry on our part."
Recent media reports of a
coming peace in the Middle
East do net affect the critical
economic needs of Israel it was
pointed out.
M
Best Wishes from
PHILLIP 66
DEALERS
in Palm Beach
County

MR. JOHN HOUCHIN
P.O. BOX 2106
WEST PALM BEACH 33402
i
High Holy Day Ticket* Available At Temple Sho!**,
"Temple Shotom is a
of the United Synagogue of
America performing an ever ex-
panding service to the people
of the Northeast Broward com-
munity and wherever jteeded."
says Rabbi Morris Skop, spirit-
ual leader.
"The recently completed en-
larged sanctuary with the beau-
tiful stained glass windows, to-
gether with the social hall." he
added, "can accommodate mere
than 750 members.
"This year will mack. the..sec-
ond services of the High Holy
Days to be held in the new
sanctuary on SE 11th Avenue.
Pompano Beach.
"Last year the raw.*,
work Mill lq proKrvssZ*
ly visible This rear th?"
ary will be complete with
Bimah before Rosh
Sept. 5." Jacob J {
Cantor at the temple.
A limit-id number of gJ
ire available at the twnnu
fice. 224 SE 11th Ave*'
Yf TTT""Tim11A1 ill
zxx&xxmm
May Israel's Freedom Continue
in the Tradition of
America** Independence.
BURTON
SILNUTZER
INC
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& SALT WATER
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MANGONIA PARK 33407
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LAINE
FURNITURE CO.
FURNITURE RETAILERS
REFINISHERS AND
MANUFACTURERS
1845 DONNA ROAD
WEST PALM BEACH 33409


av.
June 27, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
nergy Independence Organization Forms
ASHINGTON A new or-
ation called "Americans
Energy Independence"
reed here over the week-
Mth retired Adm. Elmo R.
wait, formr Chief of U.S.
1 operations accepting its
idencv. .......
accepting the post. Zunv
warned that "the United
s has become hostage to
foreign policy of Arab na-
, and urged "immediate"
decisive" actioe toward
gy independence.
r. Hani Bethe. Nobel Lau-
fj c lull HI f tne new
Djxation'l boards and Rob-
i; Nathan, a Washington
omist is its vice chairman.
.,., (in. Endicott Peabody
Massachusetts is secretary
Harold Greenwald, a New
lawyer is treasurer.
Drastic' United Nations
PENHAGENDanish For-
Minister K. B. Andersen,
rning from Moscow, told
naii>ts Tuesday that the
usion of Israel from the
ed N.itions would be dras-
He added that the Soviets
ider the United Nations a
crs.il organization.
ked about the possible in-
tion of a Palestine Libera-
i/;itun information
an in Copenhagen. Andcr-
Mid An information of-
does not need government
isnon to open in Den-
'r yv
Two B rot hem Reunited
ERl'SALKMTwo brothers
had lost contact with each
cr for 45 years were re-
i here Tuesday with the
of the Jewish Agency's
arch for Relatives" depart-
kt Bi-nno Weiner, who im-
Irated to Irasl from the So-
Union two years ago, ap-
to the department to help
his brother. Isidore.
At the same time, Mm. Sara
Berkowitz of Kibbutz Beeri in
the Negev asked the depart-
ment to find Bcnno on behalf
of her brother-in-law, Isidore
Weiner, of'Montreal, Canada.
The department made the
-cenaecrtott, and Isadere flew in
from Montreal this week.
it -fr
October Histadrut Confab
NEW YORKThe 52nd an-
nual convention of the Nation-
al Committee for Labor Israel
Israel Histadrut Campaign-
will be held Oct. 10 to 12 at the
New York Hilton, according to
an announcement by Aaron L.
Solomon, convention chairman.
Highlighting the convention
program will be addresses by
two top Israel labor leaders, Ye-
ruham Meshel, secretary-general
of Histadrut. and Israel Kessar,
Histadrut treasurer.
ft. & ft
Bar Mitzvah In Alaska's Capital
WASHINGTON The South-
east Alaska Empire, Juneau's
daily newspaper, headlined this
week what it claimed to be the
first Bar Mitzvah ever perform-
ed in Alaska.
The paper published a front
page photograph of 13-year-old
Alan Gross and his parents with
Rabbi Morris Hershman. of San
Francisco, who officiated.
Alan*s mother, Belle Simpson
Gross, was the first Jewish
woman born in Juncau, accord-
ing to the paper.
The Jewish community in the
capital of the 50th state num-
bers less than 100. The only
synagogue in Alaska is located
in Anchorage which has a Jew-
ish population of 300.
ft ft ft
Caradon Gives Advice
JERUSALEMLord Caradon,
the former British Ambassador
to the United Nations, urged
Israel Monday to cultivate the
Palestinian leadership in the
administered territories.
"As long as Israel refrains
from doing so, she should not
be surprised that the Palestin-
ians follow other leaders who
live outside the territories," an
apparent reference to the PLO.
the newspaper Yediot Acfjronot
reported.
Lord Caradon. who is on one
of his requent visits to Israel
and the administered territories
since his retirement, also ad-
vised the Palestinians to "ac-
cept Resolution 242 and de-
mand its full implementation."
ft ftft
Brazil Tourism Up
RIO DE JANEIROTourism
from Brazil to Israel has in-
creased 63 per cent during the
first four months of 1975, com-
pared to the same period a year
earlier, according to Yeshayahu
Shay, head ot the Israel Gov-
ernment Tourist Office for
Latin America.
Shay told Brazilian travel
agents here that the number of
tourists going to Israel from
both Brazil and Argentina this
year is expected to exceed
30.000.
He said that a third of them
would be Christian pilgrims.
Hadassah Convention in
San Francisco
NEW YORK Hadassah. the
largest women's volunteer or-
ganization in the country, will
hold its annual national con-
vention in San Francisco from
Aug. 17 through 20.
About 2300 delegates, repre-
senting over 335.000 members
from 1,500 chapters and groups
throughout the United States
and Puerto Rico, will attend the
61st annual national convention
of Hadassah. the Women's Zion-
ist Organization of America, at
the San Francisco Hilton Hotel.
'I
(hit Knew Just What He Said
pontinued from Page 4-
n international.
THE name of foreign pol-
(which tne constitution eni-
irs the President to deter-
anJ earn' out. the PnsJ*
can ride today by \irtual
I ers i.lay peruse for
asure the two presi- |
dared wars the na-
ii- fought since World War
Kim. a and Vietnam, with-
ongressionaJ approval, de-,
the fad that the constitu-
specifically empowers only
Migress to declare war.
1st knows all of this. He
|s that in the end there '
ft even two governments in
rica I here is only one
not the united trinity of
which I referred here in
eginning.
'AID before that the politi-
oul of the nation has been
ed and abused that it
longer as it was created
c aad fact is that we have '
to the era of the Amer-
corporatl state, where
corporate interests are i
tsented not individual in-
s- and it is the executive,
'resident, who merely
them around to secure
interests abroad.
ben President Ford and
Nary of State Kissinger
'm-ntly that part of the
V letnam and post-Middle
I evaluation must be a pub-
Kceptance of our interna-
1 diminishment, they were
. outright.
^ HENRY Kissinger's next
io the Middle East is
tv. more nor less a ride to
maintain our international po-
tency, not t>> preside over its
liquidation
In terms of the Middle I
it is to prot-.ct American cor
porate interests there, not to
secure peace as an altruistic
measure of our national'philos-
ophy.
From the corporate point of
view, Cairo is an express stop.
Jerusalem is just a local. Kis-
singer, a trained corporate
watchdog in the best of all cor-
porate administrations thus far.
Richard Nixon's, knows pre-
cisely where to get off.
And Anwar Sadat is already
back home, waiting at the sta-
tion.
/f
SERVING
BROWARD
COUNTY
ENORAH
Mark Weissman
Broward County's only
Jewish Funeral Director
Telephone 971 3330
t
5915 PARK DRIVE
441 S. FEDERAL HWY.
MARGATE. FLORIDA
DEER FIEL D BE A CH, FLA.
Toarian Necc
NEY YORK-4JTA)Premier
Yitzhak Rabin and Israeli Tour-
ism Minister Moshe Kol urged
American Jews Jto come and
visil Israel and help to strength-
en Israel's economy and the
unity of the Jewish people.
Addressing some 200 Jewish
leaders and representatives of
the travel industry from
throughout the United States
and Canada at the North
American Conference on tour-
ism at the Waldorf Astoria Ho-
tel here, Kol expressed deep
concern over the steady de-
cline in American tourism to
the
Israel since 1973.
"Where are the Jews of
America?" Kol asked, noting
that in the last two years there
has been a decline of 29 per
cent irTThe number of American
Jewish tourists to Israel.
RABIN, in what was his lj
public, appearance before
ing back to Israel, stressed
importance of tourism to Is-
rael's economy but observed
that for the Israelis tourism
means "that we are not alone.
It gives us the feeling that we
are not isolated."
Rabin also said that tourism
is important because tourists
can come to Israel and see
everything for themselves and
then can spread the truth about
the country.
U.S. Still Studying
Peace Drive Role
Continued from Page 1-
"not pushing any one particu-
lar approach" but intends to
pursue the one most promising.
This conviction, he said, was
'emphatically" shared by Ra-
bin. He said there was "a cer-
tain parallel approach" by
Egypt and Israel for an interim
agreement which is one of the
three options the President
enumerated last week.
OTHER OPTIONS are a con-
vening of the peace conference
at Geoeva and bilateral talks
under the "umbrella" of the
Geneva conference. However,
Geneva was not mentioned by
Kissinger. Asked about aid for
Israel, Kissinger said there was
no question of U.S. economic
and military aid to Israel but
that the "question" was the re-
lation of the Israeli "large re-
quests" to "other considera-
tions."
He said that no precise date
for the presentation to the
Congress on the U.S. aid pro-
gram for Israel and its Arab
neighbors had been set.
He said neither Egypt nor
Israel had put forward a "defin-
itive proposal" for a second in
terim agreement.
REPORTERS RAISED ques-
tions about the U.S. attitude to-
ward Israel since the break-
down of the last Kissinger mis-
sion on Mar. 22. He said there
was "no purpose" to return to
rhe issues that led to the break-
down because both sides "know
what the maior concerns of each
other are."
Kissinger drew laughter when
he said, "as anyone negotiating
with Israel knows. I can assure
you that the danger of Israel
giving away something for noth-
ing is extremely remote."
He also said Israel would face
"fateful decisions" and the U.S.
"crucial decisions" and the
Ford-Rabin meetings gave the
leaders "a full opportunity to
understand the intangible as-
pects of the other side."
WHEN HE was asked whether
there would be an end to the
charges that Israel was respon-
sible for the breakdown of the
March mediation attempt and
whether the impression that Is-
rael was stubborn had been
wiped out by the Ford-Rabin
meetings Kissinger JoXed that
an Israeli friend of his defined
objectivity as "one hundred per
cent of Israel's point of view."
He said. "We are now look-
ing to the future," and "we be-
lieve that all the parties with
whom we have talked are in-
terested in progress toward
peace." He referred to Rabin's
toast June 11 that no country
in the world wants peace more
than Israel.___
fMMFRS ~
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ELKIN
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IN OUR WORKSHOP
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Page 14
The Jewish Floridian e< C-cater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June ;-
Hadassah to Beview WHO Membership
NEW YORK(JTA) The
Hadassah Medical Organiza-
tion's national board announced
its plans to review its member-
ship in the United States Asso-
ciation for World Health, the
affiliate of the World Health
Organization, a United Ni
agency which voted last
a condemnation of Israel's treat-
ment of residents of the admin-
Kterec territories.
In a tatter last week to Dr
S. A Maiafatopolous. head of
WHO. Mrs Rose E. Matzkin.
Hadassah president, said the
WHO Assembly resolution was
"an action which lowers the
moral value of the WHO and
casts doubt on the validity of its
work."
^HE SAID that after the 1967
war. hundreds of Arabs came
to Hadassah for medical treat-
ment "after years of neglect by
the Arab government*' of the
West Bank and East Jerusalem.
She said "the health stand-
ards in those areas are higher
todav than ever; the mortality
rate is lower. This attempt,
once again to politicize a UN
agency only denigrates the
value of the agency to all the
peoples of the world and ren-
ders it liable to suspicion of its
motives. As a member of the
VS. Committee tor WHO. Ha-
dassah will have to review its
position."
MRS. MATZKIN cited the
medical services provided by
the Hadassah Hebrew Univer-
sity Medical Center in Jerusa-
lem to Arab residents of Gaza,
the West Bank "and even Jor-
dan, in addition to providing
primary health care services in
hospitals and chnics.
As US. administrator for the
Food for Peace pr,*-^
added H*iassah diijjj.
supplements to Arab htfa,
!L^ lhe nutr,t'onalS
children, pregnant *
the sick and aBcd ^
this has paid off ,n ^
improvement of 'he healti
welfare of the Arab pom
in the administered terrho
She cited the fact thai
WHO assembly had confc
Israel "despite-he report,
WHO investigator app^i,
Israel s health services i
Egyptians Admit to Spying;
Hope is for Reciprocity
TEL AVIV(JTA >Three Egyptian soldiers who were
returned by Israel to Egypt admitted that they were on an
intelligence mission when they were captured by Israeli troops
in the Suez Canal area the night of June 3 and 4.
The officer and two soldiers said they were checking the
deployment of Israeli troops and weapons on the eve of the
reopening of the canal.
THE OFFICER, a Lt GamaL said in a television inter-
view that Egypt wanted peace, and with the opening of the
canal the chances for pence have doubted.
The lii nil inW said he was an agricultural engineer who
was serving three years in the reserves. All three Egyptians
said they received good treatment in Israel
It is believed here that their prompt retwrn was intended
tn set an r"*p^ for Egypt to treat captured Israelis the
same way.
On the occasion of
America's Independence Day
We Wish Israel Another Proud
Sister Democracy, Continued
Strength and Progress
Palm Electric Inc.
6900 BARBOUR ROAD
W. PALM BEACH 33407
iiiniiiimiiHiiiiiwTf
May IsraeTs Independence
Continue with Strength
as we mark this July ilh
COMMERCIAL
CONVEYOR
SERVICE INC.
4674 DYER BOULEVA93
RIVIERA BEACH 33404
miTiuniiiiiiTTm
On the Occasion of
America's Independence Day
we Wish Israel, Another Proud
Sister Democracy,
Continued Strength and Progress
Chris Erneston
and Sons Inc.
WHOLESALE PRODUCE
1220 ORTEGA ROAD
WEST PALM BEACH 33402
_____JI
gnmmmm

On the Occasion of America's
Independence Day
we Wish Israel a similar
history of Democratic Progress
FERNSraOM
MOVING
SYSTEM
1100 S.W. 12th AVENUE
POMPANO BEACH 33060


y, June 27, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 15
[eliiiious, Secular Courts Square Off for Struggle
ffv GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Ipie makings of a bitter and
v decisive confronta-
tion between the religious
and secular courts in Israel
fook 0f a Supreme Court ruling
la> week that a divorce doc-
ument, though issued by a
.abhnical court, was secu-
nature and subject to
.1 review. Israel's "da-
Kan: rr.' (religious court jus-
angrily denounced the
and proclaimed that
they would not accept di-
_-.es in halachic matters
from any but halachic au-
thorities.
Undaf the system prevailing
|n Israel the populace, though
non-Orthodox or non-
eligious, is governed by Ortho-
dox rabbinical courts with re-
|arJ to family matters such as
narriage and divorce.
THE OUTCOME of the latest
jispute may determine whether
ilachic or national law is the
arbiter.
The Supreme Court ruling, is-
ued by Justice Joel Sussman.
tad that the rabbinate could
insert into the divorce cer-
as distinct from the
"get*" which is the divorce in-
strument itself the fact that
the woman receiving the di-
vorce iris adulterous and for-
bidden, by religious law. to have
relations with either her for-
"mer husband or her lover.-
The case in question involved
a Beersheba woman whose di-
vorce document was delayed foi
three years by a local rabbin-
ical court. According to the
"dayanim" the case was pure-
ly halachic and thus exclusively
within the jurisdiction of the
rabbinical court which renders
its judgments only on the basis
of Torah law.
They accused the Suoreme
Court of violating Torah law by
intervening in matters of hala-
cha.
Meanwhile, two Knesset mem-
bers of the National Religious
Party introduced a private
calling for the establishment of
a special court to rule in juris-
dictional disputes between the
secular and rabbinical courts.
Zevulun Hammer and Yehuda
Homes Memorialized
The 'Book of Life" by Tem-
ple Sholorr.. Pompano Beach.
will memorialize the names of
loved ones no longer here. For
fuither information contact Mrs.
Dorothy Rosen.
composed of two civil court
judges and one religious court
judge, the latter to be appoint-
Ben Meir. would clearly limf Court in such cases. They sug- ed by the Minister of Religious
the authority of the Supreme gested that the special court be Affairs.
^MmLw
.

May IsraeVs Independence
Continue with Strength
as ice Mark this July 4th
JOHN REMUS
SERVICES INC.
Venetian Blinds-Window Shades
Plantation Shutters
114 S.E. 2nd STREET
DELRAY BEACH 33444
___________________J M __________________
\lIIIIITHllHTTTTftTTrtTTTHnrTTffTTI
On the Occasion of
America's Independence Day
we tcish Israel a similar history
of Democratic Progress
SffiONEY
COMPANIES
P.O. BOX 100
SOUTH BAY 33493
BBiiimmnn
May Israel's Freedom Continue
in the Tradition of
America's Independence
HAGWOODS
MARKET
GROCERIES & MEATS
945 WEST ATtANTtC AVfNUE
DELRAY BEACH 33444
"" tll 11 U'TIIIltt 11 l^TTTTTTTTITlTTarrT
AMERICA'S INDEPENDENCE DAY -
ISRAEL'S CONTINUED FREEDOM -
A PROUD PARTNERSHIP
HUDGINS FISH
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RETAIL & WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS


612 NORTH OLIVE
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Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Frida
Pi June
nearing completion
? ? ?

THE GARDEN MAUSOLEUM OF
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
5505 Northwest 3rd Street, Miami. Florida 33126
a perpetual memorial of everlasting beauty
SELECTING A FAMILY
RESTING PLACE is a sacred
family trust. Although you may
not like to think about it, the time
to arrange for it is long before
the need, when your mind is
unclouded, and you can consider
the altematives.The perfect
alternative is Mount Nebo's
Garden Mausoleum...a sanctuary
of love and peace; a comforting
place for prayer, remembrance
and meditation.
COSTS ARE COMPARABLE
TO ORDINARY GROUND
BURIAL. Entombment in this
magnificent mausoleum is com-
parable to ground burial, yet how
much more reverential. And there
is never a maintenance charge;
crypts will be maintained beauti-
fully forever, with sympathetic
concern and professional care as
part of the total purchase.
YOU MUST VISIT
MOUNT NEBO TO TRULY
APPRECIATE IT. FREE
TRANSPORTATION is offered
to this beautiful haven, from
wherever you live in Dade County.
And as a token of our apprecia-
tion for permitting our represen-
tative to show you our new
mausoleum, we have a FREE GIFT
for you YOUR CHOICE OF:
Beautiful, stainless water
pitcher... Stainless. 3-piece sugar,
creamer and tray.. .or Silver-plated
salt and pepper shakers.
We must telt you. how-
ever, that the supply of
gifts is limited.
SELECT NOW
FOR CHOICE
LOCATIONS
AND LOWER
PRICEour pre-comple
tion purchase plan offers
substantial savings, as well
as small initial deposit and
3-year terms.
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY, CALL 261-7612
MAIL THIS COUPON TOOAY
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY & GARDEN MAUSOLEUM
POST OFFICE BOX 440-367/MIAMI, FLORIDA 33144
Sw:
O Without obbgation. pleas* mail me lull information on the
Garden Mausoleum including types and availability of crypts,
and details of your payment plan.
D I prefer information about ground burial.
D Please have your sales representative call me to arrange an
appointment at Mount Nebo I understand that I will receive a
FREE GIFT, without further obligation, after I have kept my
appointment at the mausoleum site with your representative.
NAME
SX5EEL
CJTY_
BE
TELEPHONE


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