The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00028

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
'*Jemsti IFIIariidlibi in
OF i.KHATtn FORT L \l
iff:
4 Number 7
Friday, April 4, 1975
25 cents
Record Total For Women's Division Campaign
[dith Irvine
ietty Comifi
SAD DAY FOR AMERICA'
uttle Halts;
eneva Seen
Next Stop
kl'SALEM Israel is reacting sharply to the mount-
Id criticism directed against her for the failure of
ry Kissingers step-by-step diplomacy,
^casmgly, officials here are noting with anger that
bung focused on the Israel government for failing
re accommodating to Egypt's demands for an un-
ial Israeli withdrawal from the Sinai.
KISSINGER returned to Washington Sunday night
fre than two weeks of flying between Jerusalem and
id Jerusalem and Damascus in an effort to achieve
1-stage withdrawal.
la tear-choked voice, the U.S. Secretary of State
here prior to his departure that "new forums"
lave to be sought for further efforts toward peace
[Middle East.
kcre is no doubt that by "new forums," Dr. Kissinger
[a resumption of the Geneva conference, where the
(Union would now occupy a co-chairman's role along
oc United State*,
ad where other Arab demands would be raised, such
Syria's insistence that Israel vacate the Golan
ts entirely;
Recognition of the Palestine Liberation Organization
sole spokesman for a new nation to be composed of
3rd a man West Bank and Gaza;
Minimally, the internationalization of Jerusalem
pit any Israeli hegemony over any part of the city;
Total Israeli withdrawal to her pre-1948 borders.
p HIS roundrobin shuttle, Dr. Kissinger had hoped to
discussing any of these issues at this time, and merely
:us on establishing some relationship between Israel
Continued on Page 11
Deerfield Beach Residents
To Hear Emil Cohen April 8
Irving R. Friedman, chairman
of tin Deerfield Beach United
il, sai.i more than
i Women's Division Campaign has more than surpa I
y. amount raised during its successful and nationally ncog
74 Campaign, according to Evelyn Gross, president of the
. 11 .urn of Greater Fort Laudardala, and Rriha btvtae.
Campaign Chairman. The announcement was made at a
Iniil evaluation and report meeting of the Campaign Cahinet
I a'| Division.
Ihe meeting each chairman reviewed and evaluated her area's
i. and Uelene Soref led a general discussion of suggestions
\< to Itrengtben the Women's Division.
in Women's Division programs, such as a volunteer service.
p)irectory and an improved community calendar, were men
Continued on Page 8
IRVING FRIFDMAN
600 area residents are expected
to participate in the UJA Rally
a' Deerfield Beach High School,
Tuesda) at 8:00 p.m.
"Interest in the UJA campaign
il running very high and a num-
ber of organization! are cooper-
ating to make the kick off pro-
ii of April 8 a success.*' Mr.
dman reported
The chairman is being ably
assisted by his eochairman Joseph
Richmond, his cochairperson
Clan Richmond and the follow-
ing committee in formation:
Adele Barcon. Sylvia Beckman.
'Teen Cafe'
April 12 For
UJA Campaign
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale will spon-
sor a Teen Israeli Cafe" Satur
day. April 12. at 8:15 p.m. in
Deicke Auditoilum. 5701 Cypress
ML Plantation.
Jerry Baer. chairman of the
Teen Cafe, stated that it will
feature an outstanding rock band
"Dream City.** an Israeli folk
singer and Israeli and Anv rican
Pao*
Mr Baer stated that all pro-
etadrj raised from the Cafe will
be contributed to the United
Jewish Appeal Campaign. Serv-
ing OB the Committee are Mark
Gross. Debby DeBeer. Sherri
Kletzel. Linda Sloane. Nadine
Rubin and Barry Nockowitz.
Jerry urged all area Jewish
teen-agers, grades 9-12, to attend
what promises to be an out-
standing evening. Reservations
may be made by contacting Jerry
Baer. Debby DeBeer or the Jew-
ish Federation office.
Berg, Joseph Cohen, Lou
Fisher, Bob Gutchman. Fran
Gutchman. Charlotte Gordon.
Mike Gordon. Louis Halpern.
Nathan Heilvtil, Sid Ivler, Harry
Merer, Dr Marc Nusbaum, Fran
Nusbaum, Mary Pavony, Ed
Reich, Margie Reich, Theodore
Rosoff, Ada Sherman. Moe Spe
vak. Jack Solomon, Charlotte
Solomon and Harold Trotner.
Emil Cohen, an American hu-
morist with a mastery of the
Yiddish idiom, was selected by
popular demand to entertain the
Deerfield group.
Added to his talent as a ra
conteur is a melodious voice in-
herited from his father who was
a Cantor for many years. His
rendering of Chassidic melodies.
Palestinian songs, and cantonal
selections is a heartwarming ex-
perience, according to those who
have heard him.
"Am Yisroel ChaiThe Jewish
People Shall Live." is Emi'.'s
motto, and he has dedicated his
career to the preservation of
their rich culture, especially
their humor.
Mr. Friedman said the 1975
UJA Campaign is probably more
important than all previously
held campaii
"We now witness an organized
attempt by the combine I bloc of
Communist, Arab and Black
countries to destroy the State of
Israel and Jews in general." he
said. "Their action in the UN
when they overwhelmingly voted
for the recognition of the Pl.O
led by the notorious murderer
of women and children speaks
for it.self.
' The recent action of UNESCO
in barring Israel's participation
speaks for itself. The recent
mouthings of Gen. George Brown
in the language of a Hitler speaks
for itself. The only chance we
Jews have is our ability to unite
and work together for a common
cause the common cause be-
ing Jewish survival."
The committee suggests that
those requiring transportation
and those offering transportation
meet at the mail box in the Ad-
ninlstration Building parking lot
at 6:30 p.m. April 8.
Temple Emanii-EI Plans April 13
Bagel-Lox Breakfast For UJA-IEF
Temple Kmanu-EI will si>ori-
sor a laj;el an.) tan breakfast on
behalf of the United Jewish Ap
DR. ALVIX COLIN
peal-Israel Emergency Fund at
10 a.m. Sunday. April 13. at the
temple. Dr. Alvin K. Colin, chair*
man has announced.
The Committee working with
Dr. Colin includes President
Sherman Chassen. Rabbi Arthur
Abramt, Ludwik Brodzki, Dr.
Stuart Rederman. Dr. Richard
Geronemus. Alvin Capp. Robert
If, Hermann. Harvey Jeffer-
tiaum. Joseph Rogers, Dr. Ste-
phen Lev inc. I.ee Shainman. Irv-
ing Roth, Hyman Lupin and
Paul Zimmermann.
The breakfast will feature a
well known speaker. Dr. Colin
says he hopes that every mem-
ber of Temple Emanu-EI will
support this temple function,
particularly in view of Israel's
critical needs at this time.
Education Committee Offers Teens
Scholarships For Travel To Israel
Information about the scholar-
ships and other activities of the
Education Committee may be
obtained by contacting Barry
Axler. assistant director of the
Jewish Federation, at the Fed-
eration office.
Ludwik Brodzki. chairman of
the Jewish Education Commit-
tee of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale. an-
nounced that the Committee has
unanimously approved a pro-
gram whereby the Jewish Fed-
eration will offer scholarships to
deserving teens for summer trav-
el to Israel.
Mr. Brodzki said that the Com-
mittee feels it is important and
vital that the Jewish Federa-
tion encourage the travel of
teens to Israel so that these
teenagers will obtain a deeper
understanding and display a
stronger affiliation to Israel and
the Jewish people.
The scholarships will be
awarded on the basis of merit
and need and will only be grant-
ed to teen-agers going on a
sanctioned and recognized tour
to Israel. The involvement of
the particular teen-ager in a
Jewish youth group or activities
of the Jewish community will
be taken into consideration.
Mr. Brodzki emphasized that
the deliberations and judging of
the scholarships would be done
with the Strictest of confidential-
ity.
Il


r
Pape 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
F"day, April 4
19>
Lauderdale Oaks Rally In
Clubhouse Scheduled Apr. 15
I a -derda'.e Oaks United Jew-
ish Appeal Committee, in coop-
eration with the Jewish Federa-
S.IIU tlK'illiUII
l,oiiix KflH
i of Greater Fort La aierdale.
had scheduled a lu.-vi-iaLsi ij; 1.il-
ly at tle Clubhouse of Leuder-
iks Tuesrll A; i il 15, .it
7 I San Herman, chair-
"V.'e arc Stressing the ob\
fact thai Is.ael is now oottl ont*
11 with Um most critical situa-
Lta I \i-dence." Bierman
said. "Our survival can only 1 e
assured by friends, tod especial-
ly Jewish people everywhere.
i guest of honor will be
I.' is Kass, president of the
men's club of La idenlflle (aks.
He has J'een active in charitable
Im-les ami uas one of the or-
ganisers of Temple Bmaaual in
Fai krliester. HfTrhx. NY., ami
ai ken*, i'i the Van Nee) Cfe be
Association, Bronx, N.Y. He was
a general Inearenee brekae for
Leonard Sebians, re-re-enting
UJA i< giving every possible
-tamo. l.iilertainment will
be ..'Vi led I j I Iddie Schaffi i.
kku Americaa Jewish honor-
let, and (antor Jock Primer,
wh> wi'! do a rmmeef "i Mies,
.in will be served.
I t . tine.' UJA I'ampai'ins. as we.I
as an Is: a-: Lunds project In
1973 and i."i. sU of which were
.; ite s .,,
Se:\in; oil t e committee for
the \"i! p raU ere 9am Stein-
^:^i?h r>emvrot. Hilda
.'"i f, It \ i Sacks, David
Sefcol, Gie<-x Sehiff. Lou Gather,
in I eo \Vei> a Kdith ("oh. n and
A! I a' In.
David Kapler, Bernard
vtk shower, Harry Webs, Saai
nfrk. Hbrrti Geradi Arthur
Rose. Sain Bterman, Larry l'r-
vant. Hy Ient>erg. Sam Splnneaf,
her Stolov, Sidney Stolon,
Dnvid Mnsiker. Rose Musikti.
I oi Amster and Flsie Amster.
Tamar Group Sets
Education Day
Tamar Group of Hadassah will
hold its Education Day Thins
da/, April IT. Iron 12:00 to 3 >*>
p.m. at Holidav Inn. 5100 N.
State Road 7. Coffee and cake
will be ."rved.
The theme of tie seminar will
be "The ftiaeriaan Jrwish Com
munit Past. Present and Fu-
ture." The program will be a
panel discussion on the hi-tory
of Ihe American Jewish Com
munity.
H il M Arthur Ahrams of Ten
pie Emanu-El. guest speaker, will
peak en "The Present and Fu-
ture American Jewish Communi
tar.w
The panel will include Mrs
Arthur Abrsms, Hra Joseph
Born tein. Mrs Morris dreen
stein. Mrs Irvine KWn. Mr-.
Matthew Newman. Mrs Morris
Beatrices, Mrs Irvine Roth and
Un Irvine Schachnis.
Mrs William Levine. vice pres-
ident of education. w> 1 bo chair
man. Mrs. Matthew Newman is
rre id-nt
Entertainer Emil Cohen Guest At
Professional Division Bonds Event
Fmil Cohen. <>ne Of the out"
itanding performers on the
American entertainment scene.
EMU. < OMEN
will be the S|^.ial
ma^.,al dinne,
North Broward ProfawfaZ,.
n ,,f s,:i' injj
which Will be held at imern
COurrtry Out s
12. dinner ,!,,. .
Sepaul. MR. h. .,,._^
Cohen, a native of V ]
'on, Del.. | *
en inating in i,.I;
and Yiddish
labli.itaa bJmartt u *
anrlst, .,.,,,. ;
he has ap;,eareri in many hotj
theaters and tele .'j
thio ighout the eo ,-itry
Serving as dim
are AKit: Colin
Qoodmaa, mi.. ,.,,; R
Greene, ILO
be made l> Ih( :^l
Bonds office .n Port Uuot.-^l
Rabbi Kahane Begins Jail Term
NEW YORK (JTA)
Rabbi Meir Kahane. founder
of the Jewish Defense
League left a group of 20
JDL members staging a sit-
in at the office of the Israel
Consulate here to turn him-
self in in Brooklyn federal
court to start serving a one-
year prison term.
The JDL members, led by
Kahane, went to the Consul-
ate reception office and re-
mained through the night,
according to Russ Kellner,
JDL operations officer.
Kellner said Barn- Slot-
ueraid & L.olourn (Left), UJA Cosh chairman, and
Samuel H. Abramson (right), head of UJA Cash Col-
lections Department, with the Torah brought to Israel
frv members of 1975 Cash Mtssaen. The Torah was
hidden in Europe throughout the Holocaust after the
synagogue in which it had been hawed was destroyed
on Kristall Nacht. After World War II, it was brought
to the United States hy an Army chaplain who gave it
to the Scarsdale Synagogue, Scarsdale. NY. Although
"posuT (non-Kosher), it will be made whole by an Is-
raeli scribe and presented to the Diaspora Yeshiva in
Jerusalem.
Margate Men's Club Plans
Decoration Day Weekend
The Margate Jewish Center
Men's Club is planning a gala
week-end for the Decoration
Day holiday. May 30 to June
2, at the Di Lido Resort Hotel
on the Ocean in Miami Beach.
Airantrements include break-
fasts and dinners, cocktail par-
ties, bu- tiansportation. enter-
tainment, free cocktails, and all,
gratuities. Members and friends
are invited For further details
and reservations, call Sam Glick-
man. Meyer Weiss, George Gold-
stein. Kappy Kaplow or Nat
Scher.
nick, Kahane's attorney,
went to the Consulate this
morning and accompanied
Kahane to the federal court.
THE JDL leader has been
scheduled lo ~ut render to federal
authorities toil morning to start
serving the sentence imposed on
him on conviction of violating a
five ) eer probation
Kahane wai >ent to an uniden-
tified community treatment cen-
ter in Manhattan so that he can
observe Passover On Apr 4. he
will be sent to an Allenwood. Pa.,
federal pri.-on to serve out hi*
sentence.
Kahane was given a five year
probation term by federal Judge
Jack Weinstein on charges of be-
ing involved in arms smuggling
He was convicted last month of
violation of tb<- terms of his pro-
bation Judge Weinstem iap^l
a one year prison t.-rm
THE JDL dem>nstritors n|
tinued their sit In m the CoJ
sulate reception office thi af:0.|
noon Kellner said ther* et|
"a lot of policemen preset1 boll
that the Consulate officer- i^l
instructed the p t U aetl
against the JDL memben Hc|
id the police had rema:i
with the demontrators throM'
the night.
K-llner said the .-it in wwa|
continue until the JDL w
sured that its demand for a el
lionsl unity government inIeat|
and for assurances that the I
government would not yi*ld
the "demands'' of the Arabi ij
current negotiations for a |
Egyptian-Israel accord were
veyed to the Israel govrrnnmtl
Final Film In
Series April 13
Dr Steph-n Levine, c-ha^rmai;
of the Co lural Committee of th *
Jew i h Federation of Greater
F rt Luud.'rdalc. announced the
final cresentation in the Jewish
Fi'm Series Sender. Avrfl 13. a!
T m^le Beth Israel. 7100 W. Oak
!.-d Park Blvd.. will featur.- I
Wi- Born in Jerusalem'a bea.i
UM Mm rcvoaling the history.
rr^gi" mysteries and wonders of
Jiru-alem.
T^iere will be a matinee per-
formance at 2:00 p.m. where in-
dividual tickets will be sold (this
Derfbnnaace is less crowded) a-4
an evening performance at 8:00
p m. where series ticket holders
be honored fir-t
For further information on the
f. n- **ris e >ntsct the Jewish
OH office.
/
4(MMN)
happy people
111 ItOHMIlMMH*
eommunltles
earfl be wrong!
Sira'os Activities Offeed
';"'.. ,i.'\. i Single*
' "f-
fe.im men end iromeii
a ,i t tOCial ai-ti\itie-.
parties, dan
disc mkm arni brunches. For
furti.e: information call tla- Fed-
eration of.ice.
{ossiiioor
V9 P AT EXIT 24 ON THE TURNPIKE
Riverside's
two new chapels in
Hollywood and Sunrise
serve the needs of
the entire
Jewish community in
Broward County.
In the \ U >/V x *i and t laHandolc areas!
5801 Hollywood Boulevard. Hollywood.
920-1010
In the Fort l.audenUiie area'
1171 Northwest 61st Ave.( Sunset Stripl.Sunrise
5846060
RIVERSIDE
V !.,.(. .![>' Irk f ,:.via. Director*
Oiliei KiwrsKiv chapvis in South i'londa are located il
Ni >rth Miami Beach. Miami Beach and Miam.
I .-H.Vjv *idWk-hrhfi
Mun*. N H
FT. L 4/4. n
FT. L 4 4 71
4 4 71


mdav. AP" 4, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
New Booklet Honors Jewish
Patriot* In American History
Who was the flral Jewish patriot to he killed in the War
n l-'tice*
ithoift his aid they oouM not have carried on the (Rev-
I US. prat! lei I :t what
; h American?
,i Jewish commander led the legendary "Jewish Le-
g
V. horn did the British call a "very great rebel"?
eta and many other accounts are recorded in the new
el entitled: Honoring 1776 And Famous Jews In Amer-
;; rtOfy," published in commemoration of the Bicentennial
fear.
Who was the first known Jewish settler in the New World
and when did he arrive? In 1750, 1701, 1677, 1654?
Who was America's original "women's libber"?
Which Jewish officer reached the Navy's highest rank and
for what law does his name rest in U.S. history?
Whose fleet of ships were critical in the colonies' ability to
wage the War of Independence?
iy Jewish child and parent will feel pride in reading
gbou1 the heroic Jewish Americans who- helped to create the
nation and shape its growth from the earliest years. Page after
will be exciting, especially- for those who are used to
thinking >>f most Jewish contributions to America as beginning
with the great migrations at the turn of the 20th Century.
us of Honoring 1776 And Famous Jews In American
Biftory" may be obtained by mail. Send 50c for each copy
I to: Jewish Patriots.' Box 4488 Grand Central Station.
nk. N.Y. 10017.
TELETHON WORKERS E0R UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
Joe Schneider, Bill Kling. Abe Gadell. Elaine Kornfield, Irene Salett, Flora Schneider
Jewish War Veterans Post and Auxiliary No. 730
POC Release Effort a Failure
Gala Donor Luncheon Climax
Of N. Broward Hadassah Year
North Broward Chapter of
^ah's "Grand Finale" of
IU 1974-1879 year will be a Don-
report which will outline the
fantastic growth in membership,
fund-raising, community activ-
ties. political action, and educa-
tional programs.
All nine groups of the Chap-
ter share in this spectacular suc-
ONB, and credit la extended to
the excellent leadership prac-
ticed h> each group president,
including Mrs. Alfred Saxe,
A viva; lira. Sidney Gerber, Ben
Gurion; Mia. Harry Krlmaky,
nijaaa; Mra. Irwia stenn. Chai;
Mrs. Samuel Pavotty, Kadimah;
Mrs Harold Hirsch and Mrs.
Sam Schwartz, Gold* Men: Mrs.
Joaaph Baker, Orlyj Mra. Pearl
Goldanbarg, Rayus; and Mrs.
Allan Poiter. Sabra.
By YITZHAK RABl
NEW YORK(JTA)A team
of prominent American attorneys
and law professors, headed by
Telford Taylor, a law professor
at Columbia University Law
School, has been trying to obtain
the release of Jewish and other
prisoners in the Soviet Union
through the use of Russian judi-
cial procedures and laws, but the
Soviet authorities were found
' unresponsive to their own laws."
The secret efforts of the Amer-
ican team during the last year
were disclosed here at a press
conference in the New York Bar
Association building.
TAYLOR, who was chief U.S.
prosecutor at the war crimes
trials in Nuremberg, said that
after months without any re
sponse on the part of the So-
viets to charges by the American
attorneys the team is discarding
secrecy and taking the case to the
"court of world opinion."
According to Taylor, the group
aimed at proving to the Soviets
that "the validity of the legal
procedure" and Soviet criminal
laws were violated when the Jew-
ish prisoners were tried, and that
the conditions in which whose
prisoners are held are also illegal
according to Soviet law.
The team is representing the
relatives of 18 Jewish and two
non-Jewish "Prisoners of Con-
science"
THE TWO bob Jews were de-
fendants in the first Leningrad
trial in December. 1970. which
involved Soviet .lews who alleged-
ly planned to escape to Israel.
Taylor disclosed that the team ob-
tained a power of attorney to
work on behalf of the prisoners
from the relatives who immi-
grated to Israel.
After interviews with the pris-
oners' relatives and a thorough
study of each case, the team sub-
mitted a petition on behalf of
each individual prisoner to Ro-
man Rudenko. the Procurator
General of the USSR.
"While we were gratified at
the willingness of Rudenko to
receive our material, we are dis
mayed at the lack of reaction."
Taylor said, adding: "We started
legal procedures in the Soviet
Union with the firm intention to
operate privately and with no
publicity We now feel the ne-
ceasity to bring the plight of
these 20 prisoners before the
court of world opinion."
TAYLOR MET Rudenko last
July in Moscow. The two attor
neys met first at the Nuremberg
trials in 1946 and had not seen
each other since.
According to one of the docu-
ments submitted to Rudenko.
violations of the Soviet laws in
the trials of the Jewish prison-
ers included denial of free choice
of defense counsel, refusal of
permission to call witnesses in
behalf of the defense and "invo-
cation of criminal statutes clearly
inapplicable to the conduct
charged against the defendants."
Taylor said that there are some
40 "Prisoners of Conscience" in
the Soviet Union. He also charged
that the Jewish prisoners are
placed in jails with Russian war
criminals who collaborated with
the Nazis and are subject to anti-
Semitic abuse
TAYLOR SAID, We hope our
efforts will result in a measure
of relief" for the prisoners. He
pointed out that his group
represents "the relatives, not the
prisoners." because the team
members had access only to the
relatives.
Taylor said, in reply to a ques-
tion, that the State Department
was informed about the team's
efforts from the beginning.
Taylor stated that he had been
approached by the families of
other Soviet Jewish prisoners
and will represent them as part
of the continuing project
MKv ik\ i\i, HABU
aon at vYiUian son's
:.t. Thursday no-m,
A| I.
: -e ent.'i tainment will
. top itai b im i
ohi condomlni un cir-
600 women, who have
I rn : n.mimums or
ire expected t" attend this
- haired by Mrs. Harry
Chaptar vice presi-
recently elected 1975-76
' '.....Nlcen will be installed
1 event also; guest speaker
ailingwffirrr will be
living Marks, national sec-
; "-liana,
Marks' honors over the
are numerous. She has
, resident of a chapter of
' American Jewish Congress,
lent Of the Women's Oni-
! the Society for the Ad-
vanreiaat of Judaism, chair-
>t Voluntary Personnel for
the American Women's Volun-
tary Service during World War
II. and has held other positions
In various services to the Jew-
u'i community.
Mm. Ralph Cannon. Chapter
u'nt, will give the annual
Sapir Sees Large-Scale
Aliya in Years Ahead
NOW IS THE TIME TO PLAN A TRIP TO ISRAEL
Group Travel Tha only way to go
JOIN NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN GROUP TOURS
TOUR COMMITTEE
Europe, Israel, Greek Islands, Africa,
Mexico, Orient, South Pacific etc.
LILLIAN ZALKIN 735-5755
LILLIAN RAFFEL 564-0864
BROCHURE ON REQUEST EVERYBODY WELCOME
Please elm and save for future reference
JERUSALEM (JTA)Pinhas
Sapir predicted that there would
be large-scale aliya from the
West, especially the United
States, but at the same time re-
puted a decline in immigration
of Soviet Jews.
The chairman of the World
Zioni-t Organization and Jewi-h
Agency Executive, expressed
these views in response to a -e
ries of questions submitted to him
by the Seven Arts Feature Syn
dicate.
SAPIR STATED that emigra
tion from the USSR had declined
in 1974 and the figures for Janu
ary and February of this year
showed a further drop.
The reasons for the drop, he
noted, are that Soviet policy has
become harsher toward prospec-
tive emigrants and the Soviet re
jection of the trade pact with the
US.________________________
Sisterhood Mooting
Will Include Election
Margate Jewish Center Sister-
hood s monthly meeting Tuesday
at 12:10 p.m. in the Center. 6101
NW 9th St.. will include the elec-
tion of new officers.
Guest for the afternoon will be
Mrs. Sarah Brooks, who will give
a book review. "Coffee And" will
be served. Guests are invited.
AdmLsion is free.
We must now intensify the
Struggle," he Mid 'We must con
ilder nan ways of undertaking
public and political effort that
will Involve the entire Jewish
people" and every other person
or group that "believes in free-
dom and justu."
NOTING THAT <0 per cent of
Soviet emigrant! do not go to
Israel. Sapir warned that if the
figure becomes too hich the S >
viet government would no longer
\ iew it as a "homecoming migra
tion."
On aliya from the West. Sapir.
who recently returned from pro
motiny thi> in the U.S.. said it is
a "vital historic need" both for
Israel and Western Jewish com-
munities.
TO do
Nisinessthe
right way.
1TM WMt <> -' .
rMM 7IS-UM
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Port Lauderdale
Passover Hopes, 1975
Passover suggests deliverance and peace. But there
is no deliverance from today's assault upon Israel by
Egypt and her Arab confederates.
And the hope for peace in the Middle East is tenu-
ous indeed.
This year, at {he Seder table, the youngest as
throughout oUr history asks' ^e" four questions; ana
the story of the Exodus as set forth in the Haggadah
- constitutes the replies to the questions.
In this sense, Passover is an historic experience
for us in which we participate in the ongoing hope
of Jewish deliverance from the assault upon our reli-
gion, our customs, our traditions.
The Exodus from Egypt described in the Haggadah
is a surrogate for our hopes in our own time.
Exodus is Symbolic
As for peace. What can be said, other than that
nations have an inherent right to exist?
There is no nation we know of whose sovereignty
and right to security go unrecognized. That includes
South Vietnam and Cambodia, whose destinies so many
observers are attempting to link to Israel's today in the
context of U.S. foreign aid to the beleaguered.
But even in South Vietnam and Cambodia, the
question is under whose sovereignty they shall be con-
stituted as a nation, not whether they are entitled to
sovereignty.
Only Israel, a nation created by the world commu-
nity of nations, is denied that right.
And so this Passover, like so many Passovers in
the past, reaffirms the Jewish historicity but in a
world threatened with war and in which the Jewish
Exodus from travail remains more symbolic than
realized.
Friday, April 4, 1975
Now Comes the Kremlin
The Henry Kissinger shuttle has ground to a halt.
The cold and angry mutterings emanating from
Washington, the tears Dr. Kissinger is supposed to have
shed when he came to realize that the ride was over,
all seem to be directed against Israel.
If only Israel had been willing to commit suicide,
then there would be peace.
Somehow, we are reminded of Munich, 1938. If only
Czechoslovakia would commit suicide, there would be
peace.
Well, Czechoslovakia did commit suicide. (Foreign
Minister Jan Masaryk, in fact, literally did.) But there
was no peace. History reminds us that war came to the
European betrayers of Czechoslovakia exactly one year
later.
Failure in Recognition
What President Ford fails to realize, what Dr. Kis-
singer refused to anticipate, was this very impasse at
the moment in October, 1973, when the administration
forced Israel to turn its brilliant victory into a stunning
defeat.
When the administration demanded that Israel feed,
water, medicate and coddle Egypt's defeated, surround-
ed Third Army instead of demanding that a defeated
Egypt sit down at the peace table with the victors and
talk of the future, the administration assured this very
moment that brought tears to Dr. Kissinger's eyes Sun-
day night.
The administration, when it worried about another
Arab humiliation and gave the Arabs the propagandist^
capacity to trumpet their "victory," did the Kremlin's
work.
And so now, the Kremlin is needed to help complete
that work. That is what Geneva will be all about.
#Jem's#7 Floridiar
Or OREATsTft FORT LAUDIROALI
OFFICE and PLANT 1M H.B. th St.. Miami. Fla. SlltS Ffcona 171-
AUVERTISTNO DEPARTMENT l-*fl
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O Boa mi. Miami. Florida llltl
FRED K gHOCHBT 8LZA.NNE gHOCHET 8E1MA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Pahllahar Einrutiva Edltoi Assistant to Publla
Ths Jswish Floridian Doss Nat ovarsntss Ths Kaahmtft
Of Ths Marchandiaa Advsrtiaad In Its Calwmne
Published Bi-Waaklr
Second-Class Postarc Paid at Miami. Pla
All r"<> S17<> returns are to lie forwarded to
Th* Jrwiah Floridian P.O Bo 0121TJ. Miami. Fta JJ1V1
Tha Jawlah Flartd^n has ansarbad tha Jswish Unity and tnn Jswian Waaftdy.
Msmbsr of ths *wien Talaarapnic Aoan:*. *avna Arts PaaMi yndl-
eata. Woridwids K.m Sarviea. National Editorial Aaaaciatian. American As-
aociatisn of English- Jsw.an Nawapaaare. and ths Florii s Frses Asaociatian,
SUBSCRIPTION PATES: (Local Ardd) Ona Yaar fft.00. Out af Tawn Upon
Psousst ""*
A Journalist
Visits the House
Of Trotsky
i
By BORIS SMOLAR
Volume 4
Friday, April 4, 1975
Number 7
23 NISAN 5735
ALMA-ATA is the capital city
of Kaiakstan, a Soviet repub-
lic in Central Asia. Far removed
frem Moscow it lies close to the
Chinese frontier. That is where
Stalin had banished Leon Trot-
sky in 1928.
One year later, in 1929. Trot
sky was turned out of the Soviet
Union to Turkey, whence he
secretly smuggled himself out
He wandered about from country'
to country- and finally reached
Mexico in 1937 However, he was
not safe even there. The long
arm of Stalin's GPU overtook
him three years later, where a
Soviet agent murdered him bru-
tally with an axe.
TO BE in Alma-Ata three years
after Tro-tky s banishment from
there, and not to visit the house
in which he had been lodged in
exile, would have been, for .
as if someone had visited Moscow
for the Dnt time without seeing
the Kremlin.
The difference was simply
this: everyone knew that the
Kremlin was situated on Red
Square, while in Alma-Ata there
was virtually no one who knew
that Trotsky had lived in that
city for more than a year as a
political exile by order of Stalin.
Even neighbors living in the sur-
rounding houses had not been
aware of it.
I stopped one Dasser-by. then
another, and asked them to show
me the way to the house where
Trotsky had lived They looked
at me with astonishment, shrug
ging their shoulders, and answer-
ed politely that they had never
known that Trotsky had even
been in Alma-Ata.
I FELT certain that they spoke
sincerely; that their ignorance
was not an excuse to evade an
affirmative reolv; that indeed,
they had no inkling of the fact
that Trotsky had lived among
them.
I hailed a cab driver and .jit
into his droshky.
"Take me to the house where
Trotsky lived." 1 said, after I
had made mys".'f comfortable.
"What street is it on and
what number"" he asked guile-
lessly.
I surmised from his queitnns
that he too did not know where
Trotsky had lived. Still I tried
to ascertain whether his apparent
ignorance was honest.
"WHAT SORT of a cab driver
are you. that you don't know the
address where Trotsky lived?" I
asked.
He turned his liead toward
me, and scutinized me inquisitive-
ly. 1 concluded that he would
have liked to earn the few extra
rubles which I might pay. if he
would bring me to the house I
asked for. but. I now felt certain
that he had no knowledge of
such a house. He said he knew
who Trotsky was but that he had
never heard that Trotsky had
lived in Alma-Ata.
As 1 left the droshky [ noticed
a mail-carrier passing That gave
me an idea. A mail-carrier would
be apt to know Trotsky's address,
ih >-gh I was certain that Trot-
sky's mail, in Alma-Ata. had not
been delivered by ordinary post-
-
men. but by special agents of the
GPU who were keeping him
under surveillance-
"I am one of a group who ar-
rived here from Moscow today.*'
I accosted the mail-carrier. "Per-
haps you could give the address
of the louse where Trotsky
lived?"
THE MAN looked me up and
down to see whether I was actual-
ly a stranger in town, and he
replied quite cooly:
Why don't vou stop at the
GPU office? You can get that in
formation there."
His reply, since it did not in
elude a denial that Trotsky had
lived in town, made me feel that
he probably knew the address 1
was looking for; so I decid.-d
not to let him go at that.
"Why should I go to the GPL',
when I feel certain that you. be-
ing a mail carrier know that ad-
diess as well as the GPL I
wanted to open a conversation
with him
A FEW more cordial remarks
garnished by a small gift of a
few rubles produced the desired
results. In a few minutes I ob-
tained the address from the post-
al carrier He also informed me
that Trotsky had actually been
aligned two lodgings, one in the
.. and the other in the high
hills surrounding the city, where
he had been kept in complete
Isolation in the early months.
until they finally transferred him
to the city proper.
The city house was located no
more than a ten minute walk
from where I had run into the
postal-carrier Trotsky's lodging
was an apartment in a plain two
story structure, which was also
occupied by other families. None
of the latter had been aware that
a distinguished tenant had resid
ed in the building.
The weather was pleasant as
it could be in the soring s*ason
Women, their suckling infant- tfl
their arms, were lounging on th
steps of the front entrance to the
building.
I SNAPPED a nh'figraoh of
them sitting there One of th-
foreign dio'-omats who had com?
along to see the house took a
photograph at the entrance of
me and three other journalists,
onn American, one Englishman.
aid the third representing a
great Italian newsoaoer In Rome.
I still keep that snapshot in my
files
Later. I also ohtoiraphed that
buildinz in the hills where Trot
sky bad been kept in isolation
From the windows of this lodging
it was easy to see the Chines*
mountains on the other side of
the border, and their snowy
peaks.
It was not difficult to raise a
conversation with the women.
They were wives of common
laborers, and they had no inter-
est in political matters. It had
never occurred to them, at the
time, that their neighbor was
Trotiky. But they did know who
Trotsky was.
e, in our building." one of
tot- wuiT..". sa;J. "we knew him
as a most retiring person ho
seldom left his quarters and whu
kept himself aloof from all the
other occupants. His housekeep.
er also kept her distance from
us. She was not a native of these
parts."
AlrTAKBNTLT.-he must have
....been,* GpXj.. operate e who had
been assigned to keep an eye 0a
him. in the guise of a domestic,
to see who his visitors might be"'
I observed.
The women did not respond to
my remark. But they had all
formed a favorable impression
of their former neighbor They
had taken him to be a writer be-
cause he used to sit and write
into the late hours of the night.
"We never saw anyone visiting
him." one of the women stated
"But we did not consider him i
mysterious person. All we knew
was that he had come from an-
other city, but we didn't know
from which one.'
Inside Trotsky's former lodg
ings I found a familv a Kazak
stan woman and three niidrea
Her husband was at work.
THE APARTMENT *aj com-
prised of two rooms and a kitch-
en, entirely partitioned from the
other apartments on the same
story, which had a common en-
trance through a narrow hallway.
To this simple woman, it meant
nothing that she waj i upyinj
the lodginjs used by ona of the
greatest personalities of tht Rus-
sian Revolution
"It's just as well m didn't
know that Trotsky was oar neigh-
bor. one woman on the steps
later commented, as I as bid-
ding them good bye It was not
difficult to perceive what she
meant She had simply indicated
that all the neighbors on that
street would have ben living
continually in a state of agita-
tion, fearing the constant m
veillance of the area b\ GPU
agent*.
Perhaps that woman was right,
and perhaps not But GPU a.ents
must have been hovering con-
stantly about the building Sons
of them had aparentK been es-
tablished as tenant- on the same
street.
AFTER TROTSKY had been
removed to Turkey, these people
suddenlv moved out and had
never Seen seen again in t
But Trotsky's actual presence in
Alma-Ata had remained a ward-
ed MKMs from near'v the entire
ro-m'ation ot the city
During the period when Trot-
kv was livin" as an exfta in
Alma-Ata there had been no
Jew< in the Soviet republic of
Kazakstan. the area of which is
about onethir.l of that of all
America, with a population of
some six-mi:ii>n
At ore'ent. about 40'*W Jews
are livin- there All of them had
come from localities in the So-
viet Union which were in danger
of falling into the hands of th*
Naris during the war
THEY ALSO includH J>
who managed to escape from
Nazi-occupied Poland They had
been evacuated to this remoi*
territory of Asiatic Ka^kstao,
where, in the interim lar^e des-
ert areas had been transformed
into agricultral centers.
Kaxaksun now produces >
much grain as the Ukraine, and
has become a center for cattle
breeding, and cotton plantations
In the Soviet census of l9W'
28.048 people registered a- km
in that territory 1-m 3Mr*
there no*
Jewish inhabitants
than in all of Lithuania
I


M
Fridav, April 4, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Louder dale
Page S
Jewish Up's and Down's With Juan Peron
Bv ROBERT E. SEGAL
LAT E IN 1972. when Gen. Juan
pcroll "*" hysterically 'Wel-
comed back to Buenos Aires
after 17 years of exile, the Jew-
ish press throughout the world
carried the welcome news that
p,.ron had flashed a message of
friendship to the Jews of Argen-
tina.
But that was only for starters.
ju.i before he died in early
July, one and a half years and
considerable ferment later, the
Jews of Argentina were thrown
a new into a state of apprehen-
sion
PERON WAS nearing 80 now;
and despite the stirring wel-
come he received when he re-
lumed from forced residence
id, Including 12 years of
convenient hospitality from Gen-
eralissimo Franco, hjs hands on
the reins of government were
not as firm as they were when
he had Eva Maria Peron at his
fide.
Much that smouldered be-
i the deceptive calm in
Ruenos Aires was bubbling to
the surface. And Argentina's
Jews are even today in the
direct path of the heat.
Consider for a moment the
ingredients for a blow up: Pe-
ron's personal secretary'. Jose
lx>pcz Rega, holds the cabinet
; i if Soda] Welfare.
\ JEW. Jose Ber Gelbard.
wfti important also to the aging
dictator as his Minister of Fi-
nance.
Place this power struggle
linst a background of a trek
by numerous Nazis to Argen-
ifter Hitler Add the rise
iiirtanee of the South
American nation's conspicuous
A population, aware of the
heightened i*>wer of oil.
Remember always the key
iken by Argentina's fickle
clique, largely respon-
ir hoisting Peron to power
first place, central to his
in 1955. and pleased
bim again in 1974.
1 INAI.I.V, hold in mind that
it who were so vigorously
ioned by tha late Eva
ire in deeper poverty
ever BOW, and the rich
thai included the general-
tator himself) naturally rich-
i
\ nearly ocrfoct formula for
America! explosion.
I irarv. Pearan's Senor
B ,i. ihe Soda] Welfare minis-
rmirned from Libya aglo.v
* !h proatiaei of plenty of Arab
f1 I and rtaptad ud Arab trade
T i take his rival. Gelbard. the
Ish Finance Minister, down
few notches. Rega made a
toui public comment
' the unwelcome presence
of Jews in the government ol
Ai icntina.
I I cunning way of put-
' "as to, say that Argen-
nej *n^ gr 1 aid a mistaken con-
ception of Argentina's link with
Arab nations because of "reli-
gious aspects" now inherent in
the government of the powerful
American nation.
PARAPHRASED, his message
intended to reassure Arab
'"'Idies that the Jew in the
Cabinet didn't really belong
Ihore and probably would soon
be out.
The mischief wrought by,
Rcca was followed by an ugly ',
scene on a 'Journalists' Table" .
Mevtaio* panel program on,
*hich one of the participants
'd that "Zionist capital j
lsts" n be blamed for im-1
t 4 \
poverishing a country.
Adding that Judaism is "anti-
social and anti-C'hlstian-" he
helped blow the Bute of amicar 1
ories some stretching baca
Jewish-Christian relations in
Argentina.
FOB JEWS with long mem-
2.000 years this scenario is
highy disturbing. Such Jews
recall, with special apprehen-
r*rt, tna noe than 2O0 rec-
orded anti Semitic incidents in
Argentina in the 1960s when
Father Julio Mienville was rid-
ing high
He it was who told his ex-
tensive fl>ck that "Jews are the
.-hi dr^n of the devil "
This recollection makes for
gloom. And so does one's re-
call of the quasi -fascist Tacuara
in Buenos Aires, a city in which
a half-million Jews have the
best of life one day and the
worst of disquiet the next.
What now. that Peron is
gone? The future seems uncer-
tain.
Anti-Boycott Measures Scored
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) Deputy Secretary of State
Robert S. Ingersoll has scored "most"' attempts in Congress
to advance new legislation to curb Arab boycotts and black-
listing of American businesses linked to Israel or with the
American Jewish community.
In an address before the Southern Council in Atlanta
on the theme of "economic interdependence," Ingersoll,
who is in charge of the State Department while Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger is abroad, said, "We are op-
posed to legislative initiatives that would make it more
difficult for other nations to invest responsibly in the United
States."
INGERSOLL OBSERVED that
"our traditional support for
freedom of international invest-
ment flows must be responsive to
the new situation created by the
large capital accumulations in the
hands of a few oil producing
countries."
But he warned that "we must
improve our capacity to monitor
capital flows, enforce laws de-
signed to protect our vital na-
tional industries and safeguard
against abuses such as the use of
investments for political pur
poses."
The State Department official
contended, however, that "Most
of the proposed legislation deal-
ing with foreign investment goes
beyond what is necessary to safe-
guard our national interests.
Proposals such as the Williams
Bill, introduced by Sen. Harrison
Williams (D. N.J.) to grant the
President authority to screen and
block, at his discretion, any in-
vestment leadinq to foreign con-
trol of more than five per cent
of a IS company could well dtl
courage investments we would
find desirable." Ingersoll said.
HE DID not -peeify what legis-
lative proposals he favored.
In hearings in both the Senate
and House. State Department and
other government witnesses ap-
peared totally oppo-.cd to any of
the numerous proposals advanc-
ed by members of Congress
In addition to the five per
rent recommendation, the W:l-
fciami Hill would roojure dis-
closure and authorize control of
foreign investment in U.S. com-
panies.
It would also allow the Presi-
dent to prohibit foreign rnr-i
ments in an American company
where he deemed it inappropri-
ate to the national security
An amendment to the biil
would prevent foreign Investors
who participate in a boycott
against a U.S. firm from buying
a significant interest in any
American company.
IN A related development. Sen
Edward M. Kennedy again challenged the recent Sau
di Arabian-U.S. agreement by
which the American government
guarantees private investments
in Saudi Arabia.
In a letter to Controller Gen
eral Elmer Staats, Kennedy
charged that the agreement serv-
es to support the Arab blacklist
with U.S. tax funds.
The Senator asked Staats to re-
view the agreement that provides
protection against losses in cer-
tain private operations through
the Overseas Private Investment
Corporation which is a U.S. gov-
ernment agency.
"The conclusion of this agree-
ment followed disclosure by the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee of continued participation
of the government of Saudi
Arabia in the Arab blacklist pol-
icy." Kennedy wrote Staats.
"IT IS my opinion that this
agreement, therefore, plainly vi-
olates several provisions of the
Foreign Assistance Act and puts
the government of the United
States in a position of implicitly
acquiescing, approving and par-
ticipating in this policy of dis-
criminatory financial investment
and business relationships.
"It means that the United
States government and the U.S.
taxpayer will be engaged in
guaranteeing the investments of
those companies which are ac-
ceptable to Saudi Arabia."
Mizrachi* s Rambam Award Given
To Herbert Zvi Berger of CAJE
Sunday. March 9. was a very
special day for the Florida
Council of American Mizrachi
Women, when 160 guests gather-
ed at the Fontainebleau Hotel
for the A II.W s annual Scholar-
ship and Special Ciifts Luncheon.
The response to the education-
al needs of th'- thousands of
young people in Israel who come
under the aegis of American Mis-
raehi Women was unprecedented
Proceeds from tin- major fund-
raislng event totaled over $25,
000.
The gala luncheon was planned
and arranged by Pearl Schwartz,
Florida Council Schol
chairman, and Bea Young, na-
tional board member, assisted b)
Schechtor of the Shalvah
Chapter.
The honoree. recipient of
American Mizrachi Women's cov-
eted Rambam Award, was Her-
bert Zvi Berger. executive direc-
tor of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education.
American Mirachi Women's
educational goal is to make a
high school education, academic
or vocational, available for all.
in order to create productive citi-
zens. able to take their places in
an evergrowing, complex econ-
omy in Israel.
Tourism
Ministry
Eiid Seen
JERUSALEM 'JTA)Premij
er Yitzhak Rabin and his coali-.
tion partners of the Independent'
Liberal Party were locked in a
dispute here over the Premier's
intention to abolish the Ministry*
of Tourism headed by ILP leader
Moshe Kol.
Government sources confirmed
that this step was under serious
consideration, along with the ab-
olition of the Information Min-
istry whose Minister. Aharon
Yariv. resigned from the govern-
ment last month.
ACCORDING TO the sources.
Rabin intends to offer Kol the
Communications Ministry' which
has been vacant since the present
government took office. But the
ILP has objected strenuously.
Kol himself has denied reports
that his ministry was about to get
the axe.
Another ILP spokesman said-
the Ministry of Tourism must re-
main a separate Cabinet Dost and
not be combined with other min-
istries.
The situation with regard to
the Information Ministry was dif-
ferent inasmuch as Yariv recom-
mended its abolition in his let-
ter of resignation to Premier Ra-
bin.
Rabin is said to have dropped
the idea of adding another Labor
Party minister to his Cabinet af-
ter the man of his choice. Haifa*
Mayor Yosef Almogi, declined his
invitation.
THAT LEAVES the vacancy'
that Kol would fill in a Cabinet'
reshuffle, sources said.
According to ;he sources, the
dispute with the ILP is expected'
to be resolved one way or an-
other within !h, next few days.
Sisterhood Plans
Donor Luncheon
The Sisterhood of Temple Sho
lorn will hold its annual Donor
Luncheon at Bduardo'l in Ft.
1 iiuderda'.c Tue-d.iv
Invitations are in the ma I with
reservations already indicating a
i.,i turnout. The well known
and ever popular humorist, Lou
Bhor will be the featured enter
lainer.
16 GLORIOUS DAYS
LED BY RABBI MORTON MALAVSKY
FORT LAUDERDALE TO FORT LAUDERDALE
JUNE 9-JUNE 24
Arrangements by
SHALOM / PETERS TOURS INC.
PHONE 920-9202
mencan
This annual luncheon repre-
sents the culmination of fund
raising (aa woll as fun projects
in which the Sisterhood mem-
,),i. een involved.
For reservations please call
charimen Ms. Alyce Arnck, Har-
rlettt Gan or luu KarneoL
&J
international
smmr, Business is our business
bt*s
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IN THE COOL AND SCENIC BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 4. jaj
Rabbi Kronish Guest Speaker
At Woodlands Bonds Dinner
Dr. Leon Kronish. spiritual
leader of Temple Beth Sholom.
Miami Beach, will be the guest
RABBI LEON KRONISH
speaker at the Woodlands Coun-
try Club Community Israel Din-
ner of State Tuesday, dinner
chairperson Lenore Frankel and
coehairman Ben Roisman have
announced
The Israr! Bonds dinner-dance.
which will be held at Woodlands
Country Club, will Day tribute to
Mr and Mrs. Robert Adler. re-
cirient-elect of the David Ben-
Cunon Award, commemorating
the 25th anniversary of the
founding of State of Israel Bondl
by ?he late Israeli Prime M n
iter
Rabbi TCronish. one of the na-
tion's most outstanding leaders
on behalf of the Jewish com-
munity and Israel, has been in-
volved in the Israel Bonds cam-
paign since its inception in 1951.
He presently serves as Israel
Bonds national campaign cochair-
man and as chairman of the Na-
tional Rabbinic Cabinet
Past president of the Rabbini-
cal Association of Greater Miami.
Rabbi Kronish is honorary chair-
man of the Israel Histadrut
Council of South Florida and
is a member of the board of
the Southeast Council of the
American .Jewish Congress.
Rabbi Kronish"s national posi-
tions include chairman of the
board of the American-Israel
Histadrut Foundation, vice pres-
ident of the American Jewish
Congress and cochairman of the
Joint Commission on Israel.
Immediate past president of
the Alumni Association of the
Hebrew I'nion College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion. Rabbi Kro-
nish has travelled extensively
throughout North America on be-
half of the United Jewish Appeal
and Israel Bonds.
Eddie Schaffer. renowned
American Jewish folk humorist.
will he special guest entertainer
at the Israel Bonds gala honor-
ins the Adlers. Reservations for
the Woodlands dinnerIance may
be made by ral'ing the Israel
Bond* office in Ft lauderdale.
Senior Citizens Fair April 22
Sponsored By United Way Agency
The second annual Senior Citi-
zen* Fair will b? held Tuesday.
April 22. from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at the War Memorial Auditorium.
800 \'E 8th St, Fort Lauderda'e.
The fair, attended by more
than 5.000 peoole last year, is
again sponsored by the Service
Agency for Senior Citizens, a
United Way acency.
On display will be crafts, art
work and project; accomplished
by the Senior Citizens Clubs and
other county agencies for senior
citizens a. well as services pro-
vided tc tho elderly by bush
organizations.
Any ag*ncy or business in-
terested in displays should con
tact RSV'P. the Retired Senior
Volunteer Proernm. at 5223781.
Afternoon entertainment will
be by senior citizens thasnaal
including the Tamarac Kazoodle
Band, the Senior Citizens Larks
from lite Ft Lauderdale Recrea-
tion Department and the Ha
n Gardens Choral Group,
Mrv Ethel Johnson. Ft Laud
erdale. a member of the board
of directors of the Sen ice
Agency for Senior Citizens, and
Roavwri Klein, president of the
Coral Manor Nursing Home of
Poirpano Beach, are cochairper-
sons of this event honoring
Broward County's o'.der resi-
dents._______________
NCJW Plans Book Review
The North Broward &
of the National Council of Jew-
ish Women will present a book
review of Alison Lurie's 'The
War Between the Tails'' by
Mm v> tte GivnfieUl Wednes-
. it l p.m. ot the Women's
Club Of WlltDO Man.us. ti<>0 NK
21*1 Ct, Frienls and husbands
are invited.
OUR
28th
YEAR
MURPHY
PAINTS
BROWARD PAINT
and WALLPAPER CO.
212 North Andrews Ave.
523-0577. Fort Lauderdale
Katzir Stresses Importance j
Of Israel To World Jewry
NEW YORK (JTA)-----Israe-
li President Ephraim Katzir has
been stressing three basic themes
in his talks to various Jewish or-
ganizations:
The State of Israel is a "pilot
plant' where the Jewish people
can protect themselves when
necessarv: increased Jewish edu
cation in Israel, aided by Jews
in America. Israel and other
countries: Israel is a "miracle "
KATZIR. who arrived in the
United States for the first time
since he took office, told 300
leaders from the I'nited Jewish
Appeal and Jewish Federations
and Welfare Funds that "as a
chemist, I look at tiny Israel as
a kind of pilot planta labora
tory for the world around
"The world needs a place
where experiments will be done,
where morals are high, where
human life is respected. And this
little pilot plant is where we can
test the wonderful ideas for
which we have stood for so many
years '
In welcoming Katzir. L'JA gen-
eral chairman Frank R Lauten-
berg reported that $219 million
had already been pledged for the
1975 campaign and that $33 mil-
lion in cash was received by the
UJA during the past two months,
representing $8 million more
than the amount received for the
same period last vear.
THIS SESSION, at a time of
great crisis, is symbolic of our
strength, unity and determina-
tion.' Lautenberg declared.
"Our communities are stronger
than ever, with new levels of
commitment and a new vitality"
Lautenberg presented Katzir
with a special book commemorat
ing the event, including signed
messages from the leaders pres-
ent
Addressing some 200 students
and faculty members at the Jew-
ish Theological Seminary of
America. Katzir said. "There is
nothing more important" at this
time than increased Jewish edu
cation in Israel and the U.S.
This will give us enormous
strength." he said
THE PRESIDENT asserted
that the Jews of Israel want to
have closer contacts with the
Jews of America and elsewhere
Kuwaitis Voice Demand
For Holland's Punishment
WASHINGTON(JTA)According to information
received here, some Arabs are demanding punishment
of Holland for defending the right of a Dutch Jewish
journalist to enter Saudi Arabia on his professional du-
ties.
A newspaper in Kir.vait. Al Kabas, was reported as
declaring that because the Dutch Foreign Minister. Max
van der Stoel. has decided not to visit Saudi Arabia at
this time, the 20-nation Arab League should act strong-
ly against Holland "to make it realize the folly of its
course.-'
Saudi Arabia refused to grant a visa to the jour-
nalist, Jaap van Wesel, when he identified himself as
Jewish.
'Nothing Punitive' In
Israel Reassessment
WASHINGTONPresident Ford is described as being
"very disappointed" at the breakdown in the Middle East
step-by-step negotiations of Dr. Henry Kissinger.
And Dr. Kissinger is described as believing that the
Israelis were wrong in rejecting the arrangements he
worked out between Israel and Egypt, particularly because
"they couldn't have gotten a better deal."
Still, there is "nothing puni-
tive" in their sudden announce-
ment Monday night that the
United States will be entering
into a full reassessment of the
nation's policies in the Middle
MEATING PLACE
WWW nwm&j POTT fWUMflvW
I
i
VM Cordon Mm
CkickMKwr
Own Heady Escarfot
Como see us ... Of coll 527-f 141
1008 lost los Olos Bowlovord, Fort loodordolo
a LASOtM AaeAoe SToe ea.su. v Accessiatt *<*
SHAMPOO
and
SET
$3.50
Hair Cut $3 00
byMsgjarla
Monday thru Saturday
fEMMNCNT
WVt
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Manicures 12.00
Pwdkw.$5 00
CALL FOR APPT.
7721161
by Roberto
263* Commercial BW
laud by the Sea
Eat.
JUMPING THE gun. several
legislators went on record as sug-
gesting that foreign aid to Israel
be cut. But Kissinger declared
that "reassessment" means that
we are facing a new situation of
some peril."
In the Secretary's view, it is
'"inevitable in such a situation
that the President order a review
to see what is the best policy for
the United States to follow."
And as if to quash the rumors
on Capitol Hill of punitive moves
against Israel, he added, it is
not a question of cutting off any
aid Aid will be determined in
relation to the over-all policy."
KISSINGER EMPHASIZED
that "We are not engaged in any
punitive actions."
Still. State Department spokes
man Robert Anderson declared
that U.S. support of lsrel could
well lessen And. as if to echo
the disappointment and even
anger on the part of American
officials. Precedential press sec-
retary Ron Nessen said of Dr
Kissinger's shuttle diplomacy
that there certainly was a mo-
mentum 'oward a peaceful set-
tlement.
in the world in order to ha,.,
unified Jewish people.
"We have gone through a so-
difficult time since the Yom jT
pur War" KattJi ,a,d. ndajl
despite the hardship and th _
f'.culty, the Israeli people\n%\
tirmined to continue "tc k^j. I
and develop" their countn
"Noting that young Uttt
have a new intere.t in JetjS
history and tradition.. ,.-
which they had Previously^
missed as not relevant to {3
life experience Katzir detJtnJ
"These wtoes are jmporJ
because they are a sourc* o!
ner strength for our n
people, anl they gh
common language with ytju_
Jews students like you'-'jjl
wor'd over "
IN HIS address to more thai
1.500 Yesiva university stt-l
dents. Katzir said that lsrae m|
learned from disa-ter tail *f|
must educate for protectaj
worthy of survival
He stated that much of!
world refuses to accept that '
itics must be governed by _
values But there are a f-_
President of the I'mted State* a|
one who sincere.> be!;e-.t A
the supremacy of human .j:^|
"It is a character
American ideals and a>p::a'j_
for a true democratic
Referring to the m/
Soviet Jews cumins to
Katzir affirmed
convnue to I u long
there are Jews in the world
Liebntan Invited]
To Lecture At
U. of Maryland]
Prof. Seymour B Lies
Ad.ijnc* Boaearch Scholar
UtSJta of In'er-American
fair-, of the University of Ma
has been Invited ti> :! -
Department of the Dnlvantf]
Maryland, to deliver a scram
lectures at the CoOtga
Campus. April 8 10
Liebman's subject*
"The History of the Je
Latin Aaaartca 1 '
of Latin American 1"
Sephardim in Latin Amencif
Colonial Times to t!
and "Amcrici I
Croan roads." A spedal bi
in his honor v*-ejj
the faculty April 9 at the
Mama,
I lahanan'i b io 'The k
New Spain," la required rea
lor Profev.or Abl .ham D
ender's cour-c. 5otW0l
World Jewish Communities I
This book is cited and J
some SO time* S !" w.,
in Volume 19 of nil Sociin
Religious History of y
The paper read al the
tt rnattonal C<
Htspanists on ">' _
tv in the ipanisfc N^V
Colonies" which M ^"
Seymour B Liebman
Ushed later this year a
Social Studies."
^SJ>N"M>t
Man Heir Styl'nfl J**"
j43 e..i iiaaaiiMseajs-i
OH Commie* *"
ui^tiin""r ***"
CALL 776-0461
FOfl APPOINTMENT
rf- *


April 4, 1975
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Hollywood
Page 7
IL
e Mustn't Confuse Aftermath of Terror With Poverty
tv f.KKKK FAY (ASHMAN
r0T COMMUNITIES are di-
luted into wealthy, middle
ll poor INK W| th%
extremes i|^ttUV1
.,l*th.-*offpt>rtuf>rt>- t<*
,. ther half lives, with
ble exceotkm of a rar
I Glimpse fr" the ouls,dc
Ceople ho live in relative to
Consuming comfort are vague-
f poverty through the
( the mass media: but
mu-paper feature or
a television docu-
. ..,,-..-i quite the hoa to face with the
poverty.
W'HFN' A terrorist attack
! the town of Beit
he newspaper head
,i ild. mot of the
| feature writer* who
I in the de-
. and the reaction
ilati i to tei rorism.
i wi re intere-ted in
individual*.
Ri itiOBJ Hertar*-
United Jewish \p-
df the feM BNU
. rai BO stranger to
|t S V.mv of th'' com-
| m h Bfl i'1-'
and the Com-
i have boon funded
[| \ ibul on*
UJA wrlttra
h Tl ere InstfW
r of terrorism and
M>V I' the D"on!p
rw>T(HiK\PHKR DAN Ian-
ami I irrfvad from Jerusa-
in the morning.
u mi entered Beit Shean.
ii wai caught by a
y broken wall with a dirty
Id behind it
iVe stopped the car and walk
through one of the gaps in
wall Here and there were a
miserable fruit and vegetable
l!!>. with .small quantities of
iuce and very Irttle variety.
his was like a minute comer
(Jerusalem's tuned market Ma-
ne Yehuda One couldn't really
npare the two at all. In the
and alley-ways of Mahane
huda hundreds of stall keep-
compete with each other in
hlity and price of goods.
thrifty housewife can spend
day going from one stall to
?ther comparing orices until
is satisfied that she has
^ht the best bargains for the
amoii"' of money.
TAKES u-n than five rain-
I to traverse the market place
Beit Shean. Some of the
r'dors do not even bother with
luxury of a stall, but squat
pttsJvei and their wares on
vacant piece of ground.
il> dressed women, their
ds en\ eloped in colorful ker-
efs, bought a bunch of radish
here, a kilo of potatoes there
tre a- none of the stockpil-
familiar to the Jerusalem
Ipper.
Jo a tourist, the scene might
fe been quaint. To us. as Is-
h. ll was a blemish on the
pty in which we live.
andau began to get busy with
camera Some of the women
I irlj offended. One haul-
er kirts up to cover her
mother buried her head
|d th.- vegetables. Even the
i m the marketplace
nk from the eye of th*
KM Why are you taking oic-
P "f us*" demanded an angrv
nan
f IXl'l AINF.D that we were
11 V and that we didn't
V toe world to get a distorted
p* of Beit Shean. We had
to present the situation as
from day to day.
n<" woman was clearly con
Muous 0f our motivpj hut
'fraeh. a stall keeper from
"fby Moshav. immediately
need her protests with the
|mf'it "Lady, don't you know
pour survival depends on the
' America''''
1e a,mogphere relaxed some
and we learned that the
does not operate all day.
some thric o...n'hs prior to the *
terrorist attack, as part of the I
intensified security program tak
ing place in all border towns am
st'ttumciitv
. Wllf IIA# speeded tp sigd-
the attack. While she was sorry "
to lo3e the garden surrounds, she
welcomed the extra room, "be
cause with so many children. U*|
more important to have addition- I
al space inside than outside."
We drove right around Beit j
Shean. looking for some sign of I
wealth. If there is any. we didn't j
find it. The most modern an<
best kept buildings are the
Aranne High School and the
Community Center which were
est.iblhhed by the Israel Educa
tion Fund of the Jewish Agency.
IVE SAW armed guards pa-
trolling outside the si hool. where
On* of the victims of the terror-
ist attack. Jean Pierre Alum, had
a janitor By coincidence, a
memorial service was held for
him on the day that we were
there.
like markets in other parts of
I. It is open from 4 a.m. till
10 am and the women come to
buy or.lv what ihe\ need for one
day.
With large broods ,,f children
at home, they cannot afford to
buy even an extra potato. One
cannot tajr "no" to a hungry
child, when ther is food in the
house But if there is no food,
the child will not complain of
hunger.
THIS IS the ps.vchology of
poverty. From '.he market, we
went to Shikun Daleth. a dilapi
dated slum area which is becom-
ing ever more drab due to addi-
tional security precautions.
Whatever garden space existed
between the apartment blocks, is
quickly disappearing. Security
rooms are being added to each
apartment as a protective mea-
sure against further attacks.
The additional rooms are shut-
ting out most of the natural light
from the apart menta. One of the
residents of the area. Shula Ben
David, said that the building of
security rooms had commenced
ItzluiK and Hivka Peretz with two of their children. Rivka
is 33 years old and looks 50.
Children from the school con-
gregated in the large hall of the
community center to watch and
to listen to tributes to his mem
ory. Three girls clad in black
shredded garments performed a
dance of deatha dance which
spoke of .ear and challenge and
anguish and courage.
As we emerged back into the
sunlight we saw some workmen
fixing the community center's
public telephone which was out
of order
Jane Labokrti. *n American
volunteer, working and living in
Beit Shaean. told us that there
were only nine public telephones
in the whole town. Since the ter-
rorist attack, the municipal au-
thorities had decided to uwtali
another nine phones. Very few
people have private telephones.
They cannot afford them.
From Shaul I.ilach. director of
the Community Center, and >Iah-
louf Horesh. local director (il the
Ministry for Social Welfare, we
learned that 40 per cent of the
residents .f fecit Shean live on
social welfal
MIAMI TOI.n us that the
home environmint in some In-
stance* is io bad, that it is im-
perative to gel thi children out
of the house- and into the com-
munity center. Horesh. though
reluctant to expose any of the
families receiving social welfare,
cooperated to the extent of di-
recting us to the Jos"phtal sec-
tor, where a'm i*t ev< ryoni i- on
some sort of social welfare.
After that we were on our
own.
We saw a benign looking lady
standing in the doorway of a
shabby honse. W asked her
whether she would mind answer-
ing sum qm ind she geni-
ally invited us i". ide Her name
was Pircha Simi rai
the m tl .-n children
aged from t
The house was spotlessly clean,
but It looki d i like a hostel
than are i no
book ,,nal tables,
no table Ian nun of the
frippi i lich usually adorn a
home. The bedroom* were bare
e\i' nl rd and bed*.
THE DINI.NT. room had the
ehi quality I h lira;
th" kit h i roarse; there was
not i or a new*-
p;,n.r in sijjht.
The only l a tele-
vi ion set which the Simana had
purchased on time payment in
order to keen their children off
the streets and out of mischief
while inside the house. The only
abundance we detected, apart
from children, was love.
Whatever Pircha Simana and
her hushnnd could not supply to
their children by way of worldly
god. thev sunnlemented with
affection. The family motto is
"don't b unhap>v about what
you don't have. Instead, rejoice
in what vou do have."
THE*XE ABE tunes, however,
when the family can't live up to
the motto. For instance. Pircha
would like to sea her children
finish school, but there wa*
never enough money for that
Continued on Pn*e 11
AFL-CIO Fears Membership Move for PLO
HARRIMAN, NY. (JTA) An imminent confron-
tation in the International Labor Organization, a United
Nations agency composed of government, management and
labor, over the admission of the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization is causing much concern to the American labor
movement.
ation of workers in the Arab
countries, "where true trade
unionism does not exist."
Histadrut has stretched out to
them a hand of friendship and is
making genuine efforts to contact
genuine Arab labor leaders, he
declared
It has prompted the AFL-CIO
to question whether it should
continue its relationship with the
ILO. according to a report by
Michael D Boggs. of the AFL-
CIO International Affairs De-
partment, to some 100 labor
leaders and academicians attend-
ing the 10th annual Arden House
Conference of the American His-
tadrut Cultural Kxchange Insti-
tute.
The two-day conference was
devoted to the overall topic of
"The World in Crisis Labor's
Stake."
BOGGS CHARGED that the
ILO. which is supposed to uphold
the principles of progressive
labor policies jnd trade union-
ism, is being undermined by its
"new majority." a coalition of
Arab and Soviet bloc forces.
"A true Arab labor movement
does not exist," declared Boggs.
'What ILO does now is discuss
political questions, particularly
the Middle East."
The Arabs, he said, submitted
resolutions condemning Israel
for its alleged "opposition of
Arab workers in occupied terri-
tories." Histadrut fought this res-
olution day and night. So did the
AFL-CIO.
But we lost. The resolution
was passed in February." Boggs
said.
The Arab Communist forces
are now working to admit th"
PLO. and the subject will be on
the agenda in tune
APPROACHING THE problem
from another viewpoint. Uzi
Bloch. representative of Hista
drut. told the conference of the
intense efforts of Histadrut to
strengthen bonds with labor
movements in Asia. Africa. Latin
America and Europe.
He reported on "the dangers
of erosion of friendship with
Japan. Latin America and other
countries, a* a result of the in
creasing weight of Arab oil and
propaganda."
Despite the setbacks, however.
Bloch noted "our growing rela-
tions with the West German la
nor movement, which has opened
a bank in Tel Aviv and is helping
Histadrut to initiate economic
projects in Germany." and "the
headway in Scandinavian coun
tries."
BLOCH ALSO noted "a con
tinued stream of attendance at
the Histadrut Afro-Asian Insti-
tute in Tel Aviv."
He dwelt in detail on the situ-
Smart mothers give them
the natural treat-
ready to eat-f rom Sunswect!
You will too. if you know a mychel when you tasie one.
Naturally delicious Sunsweot prunes are chock full of
the vitamins, minerals and iron your family needs for
energy. And they're sweet and satisfying, too. Always
fres,h. moist and tender because more people eat
Sunswect than any other prunes. Treat your family to
something good that's good for
them. Sunswect prunes- the smart
mother's choice.
8i Abi gezunt with l\
uutiso^ef PRUNES I
Think of Ihtm as vitamins with wrinkles
K CERTIFIED KOSHER \
XunSuSel"
PITTED
PRUNES


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Uuderdale
^day, AprM lB?I
Record Total For Women's Division Campaign
CMthMwd from rage 1
Mrs. Gross announced that a special recog-
nition day to elect new officers and honor all
workers in the Women's Division will be held
Wednesday. April 23.
Education
Cheryl Ltvine, vice president of Education,
organized an education day in December to
answer questions concerning the PLO and Gen-
eral Brown. Other programs included a quiz
on Federation services and campaign worker-
training.
Future programs will feature a Shalom
Directory, sensitivity training for campaign
workers and a seminar for women with in-
dependent incomes.
Attending the Campaign Cabinet meeting-
were Cora Aboott. Terri Baer. Phyllis Chud
now. BUriede Colin. Thelzoa Feder. Evelyn
Groas. Rebecca Hodes, Dorothy Kaufman. Aaa
Levin, Esther Miller, Aime Monarch, Blandfc
Obleta, Anita PPerlman. Miriam Ring. Berenice
Palm-Aire
Under the dynamic leadership of Shirley
Levin and Anne Monarch, the Palm-Aire Wom-
en's Division had a successful 1975 Campaign
Following several planning and worker-train
ing meetings, the Campaign was highlighted
by a luncheon Jan. 29 at the Holiday Inn.
which was attended by 100 women.
Palm-Aire committee members were Mu
riel Cohen. Shirley Cohen. Lorraine Fine,
Lucille Kesner. Florence Randall. Dorothy
Resnick. Claire Wagner and Millie Slosberg.
Schankerman. Helen Shield. Fran Sindell
Helene Soref. Janice Starred. Lil Tucker and
Eva Witcoff
U
The following is a
en's Division activities
brief review of w
om-
Caervl LeviM
Community Organization
Under the chairmanship of Janice Starrels,
an All-Sisterhood Day was held Jan. 7 at Tem-
ple EmanU'El. More than 300 women attended
the Israeli brunch where Clara Stern, sister
of Golda Meir. was guest speaker.
Another extremely important project has
been the maintenance of the Community Calen-
dar with organizations clearing dates on a
central calendar.
luuict Stmrrth
Advanced Gifts
Chairman Evelyn Gross reported that 74
women in the Greater Fort Lauderdale area
contributed. $99,775. Mrs. Gross announced
that 21 new women this year joined the Ad-
vanced Gifts Division. A successful luncheon
was held Jan. 13 at the Woodlands Country
with Michael Adler as the special guest.
Initial Gifts
Terri Baer, chairman of the Initial Gifts
Division, reported that 117 women have con-
tributed $49,775. Mrs. Baer stated that success-
ful area meetings and personal solicitations
were held for the Gait Mile and North East
area residents at the home of Mrs. Jacob Lutz
with the special help of Charlotte Scheer on
Jan. 6. Woodlands at the home of Mrs. Ed-
mund Entin. Points of America with the spe-
cial help of Mrs Wallace Hodes and in Planta-
tion
Terri
iialt Ocean Mile
Helen Reiter, chairman of the Gait Ocean
Mile, announced that a successful luncheon at-
tended by 75 women was held at the Imperial
House Jan. 20. This was a result of several
planning and worker meetings held on the
Gait Mile.
Campaign workers in the Gait Mile Cam-
paign include: Connie Abraham, Bess Braff,
Rosie Frankle. May Glass. Edith Klinghoffer,
Golda Kopel, Miriam Krawitz, Anita Perhnan,
Charlotte Scheer, Belle Tilles and Eva Witcoff
. .
Inverrary
Eve Silverman. chairman of the Inverrary
Women's Division and her cochairmen, Marilyn
Berk. Thelma Feder and Florence Hazen. an-
nounced that Inverrary has formed a year-
round Women's Division. This was the result
of a successful luncheon held at the Inverrary
Country Club Jan. 30.
Workers in the Inverrary Campaign were
Betty Dorfman. Lee Feldman. Estelle Halpern.
Pearl Kay, Ruth Leavitt. Shirley Merle. Judy
Rosenberg, Julia Sherman. Ruth Steinfeld and
Marge Weinstein.
fit Sihtrmtmm
$. $t*l
Pkviris Cl*w
North East
Chairman Esther Miller and her commitee
organized a successful luncheon Jan 28 at the
home of Cora Abbott Guest speaker at the
meeting was Gerda Klein.
The luncheon meeting was preceded by a
worker training meeting conducted by Helene
Soref at the home of Esther Miller.
North East Campaign workers were Cora
Abbott, Mimi Bederman. Paula Brodzki. Ma
rianne Barnes. Marilyn Berliner. Thelma
Berns, Peggy Brodzki. Sylvia Chassen. Nonna
Cohn. Elfriede Colin. Rovi Faber. Camille Fox,
Anne Hermann. Hermine Hoffman. Gloria
Katz. Miriam Klaimitz, Bebe Kodish. Rhonnie
Leder. Sibby Mills. Terri Novick. Nancy Od
^r^^^^^^^JB
*i"
^B M ^P 3 *
Cstf CoMfera
Ntlt f .ft,.
SMrfty UvJe
AMM Mvnorck
Plantation
The Plantation Women's Division held in
major functions as well as several successful
coffees, according to Phyllis Chndnow, chair-
man. and Susan Segual. cochaim.an.
A luncheon was held at the Tower Club
Nov. 5 where the featured speaker was Ya>!
Day an A second fund-raisins affa.r was hey
at the home of Sheila Grenitz when the **
cial guest was Rev. John Grauel
In addition, educational and fiindriisiaj
coffees were held at the homos >'. Ujn Hiu.
Marsha Feldman and BaJXl>
Plantation workers included Deanna Blafer,
Toby Brown, Gail Capp. Marsh.. Feldmu.
Ruth Goldin. Sheila Grenit;. Sand) Golden-
berg, Rhea Greyson. Myra Halle Judy H>
rowiu. Sandy Jackowitz. IMl Polish and Mir-
sha Riefs.
wak. Ruth Pine. Barbara iMMberg, Beriuef
Sachs. Jackie Schwab. Roxanne Shafer, Judy
Softer. Carol Solomon. Linda Stewart and Jou
Weinstock.
Point Of Americas
Under the cochairmanship of Reberci
Hodes. Rollie Weinberg. Ceil Goldfarb and
Helen Rubin, a luncheon was held on Jan 2
at the home of Elsie Samet with over 60 worn
en attending.
The cochairmen organized a group of dedi
cated workers who contributed to the succtst
of the Point of Americas campaign Spec;*!
recognition is given to Dorothy Kaufman I*
her up-to-date records.
Point of Americas Campaign worker* were
Dorothy Babitta, Loretta Cohn. Hattk I>rucker.
fllaabeth Fisher. Maxine Hess. Helen Joseph.
Bea Kahaner. Dorothy Kaufman. BilUe KoB
man. Dora Kramer. Edie Legum Hannah
Meyer. Mollie Meyers. Irene Mishk in UjJ
Rosenstein. Elsie Samet. Sylvia Sbccaf EdjU
Scher. Edythe SeigaL Eleanor Snapirt HeW
Sirvennan. Jean Szmoa. ireoe Synd-r shirW
Stem. Jackie Tomaao aad Dons Yontie.
Woodlands
Jean Shapiro was chairman of this years
outstanding Wood'ands Campaign Her co-
chairmen were Blanche Obletz and Miriam
Goodman.
Four successful luncheons were held at the
Woodlands Country Club and at the homes of
Mrs. Edmund Entin. Mrs. Irving Zola and
Mrs. Robert Adler.
Woodlands Campaign workers included
Rosa Adler. Teddy Albrecht. Ether Brown.
Gladys Daren. Roelyn Entin. Rose Glantz. Fay
Henschel. Mary Lawson. Mitchie Libros. T 'a
Messing. Mollie Morell. Rhea Moss. Jeanette
Parker. Pauline Roi-man. Shirley Rudolph.
Hazel Sharenow Lillian Spilkin. Gertrude
Siege!. Lillian Tucker, Gertrude Wainer and
Helen Zola.


iday
, April 4, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
Bank Leumi Assets Trebled In 3 Years
Bank Leumi opened a representative office in Mi-
ami Beach in 1974; the representative is Judah H.
Kurtzbard. Mr. Kurtzbard was born in 1940 m Poland;
he and his parents later escaped from a concentration
camp and have been livins in Israel since 1950. He
completed his studies in Economics, Sociology, and Po-
litical Science at the Hebrew University and has been
working for Bank Leumi Lelsrael B.M. since 1962 in
a variety of capacities, including Business Development
and Provident Funds.
Bank Leumi Le-Israel B.M., Israel's leading commercia! bank.
. ,nrorporated in 1951 to take over and continue the business ol
the Anglo-Palestine Bank Ltd., which was established by the Zionist
IMovement in London in 1802 under the name of the Anglo-Palestine
Company as a subsidiary of the Jewish Colonial Trust Ltd., and
opened its first office in Jaffa in 1903.
The Anglo-Palestine Bank soon became the principal financial in-
stitution of the young "yishuv." In 1908 it was active in the financial
arrangements for building Tel-Aviv. In 1910 its original capital of
40.000 had increased to 100.000 and by 1914 depositi and
[reached 400.ooo.
SOON AFTER the outbreak of the war. the Turkish auth->nt'<
d the bank to be liquidated, but it managed to survive clan-
destinely and by the end of the war its deposits stood at 700.0O',
The Anglo-Palestine Bank was able to maintain its leadir.g oosi-
:nHer the British Mandate. Its board was transferred from I-on-
don to Tel-Aviv in 1981. Deposits rose from 1.550.000 in 1332 to
6 :.">0.000 in 1939.
In anticipation of independence in 1948. the bank prepared its
on currency notes. With the declaration of the State of Israel, the
Palestine Bank became government banker and bank of issue.
he establishment of the bank of Israel in December 1954.
AMONG THE specialired institutions estah l-hed by the bank.
in i .operation with the Jewish Agency, were: the General Mortgage
Bank .1924); the Otar le-Ta'asiyyah 'Industry Fund. 1944) and the
Our lellakla'ut (Agricultural Fund. 1944; merged in 1960 into
Ya .i.l Agricultural Development Bank).
In 1934 a securities clearin; house was set up. the forerunner
of the Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange. The Bank Leumi Le-Israel Invest-
ment corporation, the first in the country was formed in 1943.
Bank Leumi acquired the majority of the shares of the Union
Bank of Israel, the country's fourth largest commercial bank, a
specialist in diamond-industry financing, in 1961. and in 1966 it
bought the large cooperative bank Kupat Milveh la-Oleh "Immigrant
Loan I(ank-).
r
In 1974 the bank had 313 branches and offices in Israel and
abroad Its subsidiary in New York is Bank Leumi Trust Company
ol New York, which has six branches (Member F.D.I.C); and Leumi
Securities Corporation.
Other subsidiaries abroad are the Bank Leumi (U.K.) in Lon-
don Bank Leumi Switierland in Zurich and Geneva. Bank Leumi Le-
brael (France) S.A. and Luxinvest S.A.. opening soon in Chicago.
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
The following are a few financial highlights from the March 5
release of the Bank Leumi Group:
The total consolidated assets of the Bank Leumi Group at the
e-i.i of 1974 reached 41.1 billion (nearly 7 billion)an increase
tail rear of 15 4 billion or 60 per cent as against 7 9 billion
or 43 per cent in 1973.
The total consolidated assets, as also the balances of the various
Balance Sheet items, have more than trebled in the last three vears
'end 1971 /end-1974; see table below). The total assets of eight of
the Bank's subsidiaries pass the 1 billion mark
12
6.0
04
1971
132
60 3.4 2.0
The Group "5 77
T>ta| Consolidated Aasets ..... LI M 05
lotal Deposits ......................... M74 ,OTS 1972
I'ebcnturea Issued -............... 1 1 76.1 "*
Total Loans* .............................. Balance* In fclUWns
Capital Funds .......................... 30.0 '19.1 13 8 10 3
' including Loans to Government 'Deposit* with Treasury
CAPITAL FUNDS
The Capital Funds of the Group have passed the 1 billion mark,
ea.ching 1.115 million, a growth over the year of 354 million
or 47 per cent. This figure includes a Capital Note Issue in Israel by
Bank Leumi to a total of 130 million, the raising of capital by the
Undoa and New York subsidiaries to a total of some 40 million,
nd the accumulation of undistributed profits.
CmEDITS
Total Credits (including Deposits with the Treury) of the
Pompano Beach
Chairman Lilyan Gla-er and her cochair
men, Helen Shield and Berenice Schankennar.
brought life to the Pompano Beach Campaign
With the special help and assistance of
Fran Sindell, a luncheon meeting was held at
PaPi Captains Table in Deerfield Beach Feb
10.
The Pompano Beach Woman's Division In-
creased their number of contributors from 78
in 1974 to 98 in 1975.
Pompano workers were Ivy Barnett. Phyl-
lis Bcgelman. Sylvia Begelman. Sally Hahn.
Evelyn Lee, Gert MiUman and Fran Sindell.
Group increased to 20.6 billion, a growth of 9.0 billion or 79
per cent.
The increase in credits can be attributed mainly to an increase
in loans in foreign currency as well as in loans from earmarked
deposits.
The Bank Leumi Group in Israel accounts for some 38 per cent
of total bank loans to the public and its share in the Directed Credit
Funds reaches 40 per cent. Particularly outstanding is its share in ,
the financing of export industries, chief among them citrus fruits,
cotton and diamonds. Diamond financing in the Group is managed
as a consortium by Union Bank.
The number of Borrowers' Accounts held by the Group is in the
region of 260.000 and more than 90 per cent of them are loans for
less than 10.000, a fact which shows the weight of the small bor-
rower in the Bank.
SHARE IN THE BANKING SYSTEM
The monthly statistics of the Bank of Israel show the share of
the Bank Leumi Group (commercial banks in Israel) In the bank
ing system to have been, at the respective ends of the last three
years, as follows:
Percentage
1973
41.6
1974*
Total Assets .............................. 42.9
Deposits of the Public,
I raeli Currency ............ 36.7 35.8
Total Deposits of the Public 49.3 46.4
Credits to the Public.
Israeli Currency ......... 345 348
Total Credits to the Public 37.9 40.4
in the absence of year-end figures, end-November figures have
been taken.
1972
382
37.2
46.2
369
36.7
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
The international business of the Group, as carried out by its
Banks in Israel and affiliates abroad, continued to expand and de-
velop, despite the difficulties encountered on world marketsthe
economic recessions, the inflationary pressures, the oil crisis and
the upheavals in world finance and banking.
Four new extensions have been added to the Group's interna-
tional networktwo of them in New York, one in London and one
in Torontobringing the overall number up to 25: 4 banking sub
sidiaries operating through 12 branches, plus 13 other extensions
Representative Offices. Finance Companies and the like Four more
extensions are shortly to be opened, two of them in Europe and two
ji the United States.
The activities of the Bank extend over five continents and a
staff of some 700 (including about 30 Israelies) operates the ex-
tensions overseas.
The number of Customer Accounts of all kinds operated by the
Group (commercial banks) in Israel totals some 2.6 million, the
overwhelming majority of which are credit accounts.
Chase Bank Vows To
Continue Present Policy
NEW YORK (JTA) David
Rockefeller, board chairman and
chief executive officer of the
Chase Manhattan Bank, said here
that "in support of current ef-
forts to establish a lasting peace
in the Middle East, we intend to
continue our normal banking op-
erations under standard banking
practices with all concerned" be-
cause "we do not think that any
good purpose would be served,
public or private, by modifying
this traditional palicy."
Rockefeller issued the state-
ment in response to what he
termed "the painful irony of the
bank's situation'' with regard to
its role in the Middle East.
To "illustrate" he mentioned
a CBS broadcast editorial alleging
that Chase Manhattan "has bowed
to an Arab boycott by refusing
to o*>en an office in Israel."
AT THE same time, the news-
paper Newsday reported today
that Chase Manhattan faces boy-
cott proceedings by the Arab
League.
lit CUser
I. Scftanktrmaa
Stating that his bank serves
countries in all parts of the world
in "the cause of international
commerce.'' Rockefeller noted
that "We have for a good many-
years, served the banking require-
ments of the State of Israel, al-
ways basing our decisions on
sound economic grounds. Like-
wise, we continue to serve the
requirements of virtually every
other country in ihe Middle East.
based on these same economic
principles."
The B'nai B'rith Anti-Defama
tion League recently accused
Chase Manhattan of being one of
a number of American firms par-
ticipating in the Arab boycott of
Israel, citing the fact that the
bank has not opened a branch in
Israel although it has branches
in Lebanon and Bahrein and will
open one in Eevot.
A SPOKESMAN of the bank
said Friday that it had given con-;
sideration at one time to opening j
a branch in Israel but decided
that a branch there would not be
profitable.
The spokesman noted that
Chase Manhattan has maintained
a relationship with Israel "that
goes back 20 years." Chase Man
hattan is the chief fiscal agent
for Israel Bonds in the U.S.
Rockefeller said in his state i
ment that "The heart of the mat ,
ter is that we are earning on
normal business operations in the
Middle Eaat at a time when
fundamental and far-reaching po
litical issues are at stake. Con-
sequently, it is quite understand-
able that all concerned should be
seeking to achieve maximum ad
vantage for their side.''
Jl DAH H. KURTZBARD
Industrial j
Output j
On Rise
NEW YORK (JTAi Avra-
ham Shavit. president-elect of
the Israel Manufacturers Asso-
ciation, said here that Israel's
industrial output in 1974 was
15 percent more than in 1973
and reached a t( tal value of
$1,250 billion.
He spoke at a press confer-
ence sponsored by the American
Jewish Committee. Shavit said
it was a distortion of the condi-
tion of Israel's economy to de-
scribe it as facing an "economic
collate." This evaluation "is
not true." he added, but admit-
ted that Israel was facing eco-
nomic problems.
HOWEVER, he said, these dif-
ficulties are shared by all the
industrialized countries, citing"
the impact of inflation and
shortages of raw materials as
the major problems of Israel and
other industrialized nations.
Shavit. who arrived here for a
three-week speaking tour for the
Israel Bond Organization, said
Israel's economy was further
burdened by a costly defense
budget, which consumes 40 per-
cent of Israel's GNP, and by tho
need to absorb immigrants.
He said outlays for defense
and immigration were inflation-
ary, adding that "these expendi-
tures are like pouring fuel" on
Israels inflation.
is managing di-
Oven, the larg-
kind in Israel,
recently inten-
warfare by the
threat to the
world" and not
SHAVIT. who
rector of Shavit
est plant of its
warned that the
sified economic
Arabs was "a
whole industrial
only to Israel.
He said petro-dollars and oil
were "sophisticated weapons in
the hands of not very sophisti-
cated people," the Arabs. He
warned there was a danger that
the economies of all industrial-
affected.
HM USTIM KNOT
UNWANTED FACIAL
4 BODY HAIR
REMOVED
PERMANENTLY
Mas
Goubaud dt Paris
Natural i OrftMC
Cosmetics Parfumet
| Day A vo. Mr*. y *
Coff>plimM*j Titatffwnt I
S.n *nlfiis Wit* No
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JEANNE POftTH
ElECTRCXOGIST
M tmmmM aM
SoMM
mwt wnw


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 4,
Envoy Reviews His Duty Tour
By YITZHAK RABF
yf'TER POt R years of servin-
as Consul General of Israel
in N*w York. Ambassador David
Rivl^p will lea\e his post early
this summer to be Israel's.Am-
bassador in Norway.
In his handsomely furnished
14*Ji floor office, in a building
within walking distance of the
I'ml'd Nations. Kivlin sat be-
hind a heavy wooden desk, cov-
ered with diplomatic mail and a
daily report of the Israeli press.
THESE YEARS, he noted.
i* spent in the "city with the
largest Jewish community in the
world" as head of "the largest
Israeli representation'* anywhere
on the globe.
Rivlin is a warm, soft-spoken
jiemon whs expresses himself
1.11 rfullv. watches h:s words as a
diplomat most, and conveys the
impression of a sincere traight-
forward" man.
After coffee, relaxing wit' the
ui several cigarettes he
\ed during tne 90 minute
rview, Ri\l:n ei his
personal feelings iboul his work
a Consul General in New York.
IT HAS boon .. vi rj gratify-
ing \pn-nce and a Dnvi 1
for me to be Consul in New York
aid.
This is m si?t and volume the
largest Israeli representation
anywhere in d It is .1
the largest Israeli informs
arm W the ame time, the larg-
, lewiah comniunity in the
world is in New York and vicin-
The 52-year-old Rivlin main-
tained that during those years he
had the opportunity to know "the
soul and the guts" of the Jewish
people in America, a statement
wh:.h is not surprising coming
from a man who participated in
hundreds of mytings at Jewish
communities, synagogues and
seminars as well as meeting Jew-
ish leaders and "archa" (ordinary'
people).
As Consul General in New
York. Rivlin was responsible for
the operation oj a Consulate staff
of over 100 operating in 13 dif-
ferent departments to carry out
the daily actirities of the Con-
sulate
THESE ACTIVITIES include
speaking engagements (at least
150 a month): contacts with the,
entire media; disseminating in-
formation on Israel through
various channels: strengthening
cultural ties; dealing with the
academic world: acting on the
political and diplomatic level:
and keeping contacts with Jew-
ish and Zionist organizations
through the Jewish Liaison De-
partment of the Consulate.
Ambassador Rivlin is a former
political advisor to former Fore-
ign Minister Abba Ehan and a
former official spokesman and
director of Press Relations at the,
Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem.
His previous assignments
abroad included the post of Con-
sul Before joining Israel's diplo-
matic service. Rivlin was a jour
nalit and radio commentator in
Israel. 1
He was born in Jerusalem and
is a member of a prominent
family which settled in Jero-
salea in 1809 He is a socth gen
eratioa sabra and grew up in the
city of his birth.
RJvlJN IS a graduate of the
London University in Interns
tional Affairs. He studied philos
ophy, history and sociology at
the Hebrew University in Jeru-
salem and is a graduate of the
Israel National Defense College
He served wMh the Jewish
Brigade of the British Army dur
ing the Second World War and
later held the rank of captain in
the Israeli army.
During the interview. Rirlin
answered questions concerning
the efforts of the Consulate to
counter the growing impact of
Arab propaganda 1a the United I
States, relations with the Amer-
ican Jewish community. Jewish
youth in America, the Israeli
community here and related is-
MOI
ISRAELI HASBARA (informa-
tion) in the United States has
been a controversial issue for
ie time, anpooloiry since the
Yon Kippur War Rivlin is aware
of the criticism and admits that
Chore ls a groat deal to lie im-
proved. But he categorically
denies allegations that "nothing
is done' in the Hasbara field.
He who says that there is no
Hasbara in the U.S. either does
not know the facts or is delib-
erately distorting them." he said.
Rivlin expressed concern over
the crowing number of young
Jews who marrv out of faith, and
the indifference of a large por-
tion of Jewish students to Israel
and Judaism. "This requires in-
creaMng and deepening Jewish
education," Rivlin asserted.
WHILE HE praised the coop-
eration of Jewish and Zionist or-
ganil .ons with Israel. Rivlin
HI nonetheless unhappy with the
that the Jewi in America)
are terribly fragmented as they
are overly organized."
He r< iterated his call, first
made :it a pre s conference a few
months a'*o. to create a "Jewish
task* force" in New York, to in-
eludc all Jewish organfaotiooj, in
order to combat Arab propagan
da Pi 1! rwtnf are excerpts from
the bitei \ iew
Q. Representing Israel in the
largest Jewish community in the
world, how would you describe
the relationships and contacts be-
tween the two'.'
A. "The connection between
the Consulate and the Jewish
community in America is not
only a question of providing in-
formation and raising funds foi
Israel. These contacts are very
bnportanl and have far-reaching
aims First, there is the goal of
hVtiUlng and deepening the
awareness of Israel's civtrality
in Jewish mind and Jewish life.
Secondly, we try to bring forth
tlie nMnsagje of a Jewish. Hebrew
democratic societv in order to
strengthen historical and spirit
ual ". 's and enhance Jewish edu-
cation and nlijra to Israel. Wo
sties that a good proud Jew
comes first and is Imperative for
any link and bind with Israel
and any understanding of a free
and Lndepend
Q. How ire th< at conta. t-
made?
A. The lar: Jew ish
Minify in the world Is in New
York. There many Jew-
in N. M Y rl Mid .iv ai in
lor We ire do '
of work with J org
tsoni the u obreilo or
gan: I M of Pri
Co*terrace ami the Jewish organ-
Continued on Page 11
CONS1 I GENERAL DAVID RIVLIN
mo\e, on to i ovt in Norway
let all those who are hungry
enter and eat...
celebrate the Passover"
Enjoy flavorful fruits and juices from Mott's and Sunsweet. all
certified Kosher for Passover. Perfect for holiday breakfasts,
lunches, snacks or dinners. And all delicious, of course.
Happy fassover from our family to yours
nash -vms
Certified Kosher lor Passover by Rabbi Dr. J H Ralbag
MOTTSand SUNSWEET
TRADITIONAL FOR PASSOVER
?'


ida April 4, 197S
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laudcrdale
Page 11
,Mii Agggg BY OH t SIDED WORLD OrlNION
Dr. Kissinger's Shuttle Grinds to a Halt
Continued from Page 1
snd Egypt based on an Israeli withdrawal from Gidi and
Uitla, as well as from the Abu Rodeis oil fields.
Further. Dr. Kissinger must now reckon with an en-
hanced Soviet presence in the negotiations at Geneva.
THE SECRETARY of State this week steered clear of
signing any blame for the collapse of his shuttle, but it is
is that he has told President Ford that Israel took a
fstubborn" position in refusing to evacuate Gidi, Mitla and
hu Rodeis without some political guarantee from Egypt's
president Sadat that suggested a new and peaceful era
between the two countries.
th President Ford and Dr. Kissinger have since been
to declare that the shuttle's collapse is a setback to
eace in the Middle East only "on a temporary basis.''
STILL, rr has had not only a depressing reaction
hire 1:1 Jerusalem, but also in Washington, coming as it
does on the heels of staggering reverses for South Vietnam
IrJ Cambodia in Southeast Asia.
There, Dr. Kissinger received a Nobel Prize for his
"reace" efforts culminating in the Paris accord two years
Lo Now, together with his failure in Jerusalem, the de-
pression in both capitals is understandable.
Dr. Kissinger, while steering clear of any assignment
of blame, nevertheless noted that President Sadat had au-
thorized him to tell the Israelis that:
Egypt was willing to permit Israeli-bound cargoes
through the Suez Canal and would turn a cold shoulder
toward the worldwide Arab economic boycott;
Egypt would state openly that force was not the way
to settle outstanding problems with Israel, and that they
were negotiable;
Egypt would renounce recourse to war during the
duration of an agreement reached on the basis of an Israeli
pullback.
Egypt would reaffirm the renunciation of war as
set forth in the 1974 agreement at Km. 101, with the ex-
ception of "only symbolic" movements forward of Egyptian
forces (beyond the Km. 101 parameters).
"This is a sad day for America," Dr. Kissinger declared
on his departure from Ben Gurion Airport. "We know it is
a sad day also for Israel, which needs and wants peace
so badly."
The growing anger among Israeli officials since his de-
parture has been as a consequence of the facile growth
in world opinion that Israel is a "stubborn obstacle" to
peace, without collateral world opinion that sees anything
to criticize in the Arabs.
Diplomat Moves On
lonliiiued from PM(I 10-
|iM!ion> separately. We art in
th them through
I rsid nn Conference or the
|AZF or their main offices W>
inate materials on Israel
-. we participate in
-. meeUngs and sem-
|;r n
ntlj we held meetings
L \ ik : .i/in Jewish youth. The
: included talks and hon-
I Mil H Israel and with
I We provided informa-
. ate hits become
la total point for any Israeli activ-
[it> or activity concerned with Is-
Here, in this room, is one
Ip'.ace in which yo' can meet
I ( all segments. Zionists
and n lOrthdov Israel is the cementing
I for all of them.
Ie contacts with the Jew
kh are <>n a daily t>asis.
V ntactl with the "masses"
[ it fund-raising meet-
) agues, BUM dem-
r '.- etc. We go e\I
Q. The Jewish community in
I not one conglomerate,
different groups who
I "it different interests.
I i find yourself some-
' a dilemma? !>>
In pleasing all JtwIlB
M m America?
V "We have been meeting
h 111 Jewish denominations.
itlve tad Reform. Ortho-
1 non religious. Orthodox
I riiical of the non-reli-
of Israel. Reform
ire critical of lack of status
lof their ideology. Some complain
Israel is capitalist while
[anal as too socialist.
Jewish youth is critical.
it natural but this is a
r challenge to the Israeli
[representative. The Jews in this
[country are terribly fragmented
are overly organized.
This fragmentation does not
m..ke our job easy, physically
land ideologically, and this some-
fttaes is very hard to reconcile.
|Tne Israeli representative walks
Im this respect in a mine field."
<* What about the Jewish
|>outh in America?
*> "Ever since I assumed my
(' 'he more than half-million
|Je\,-h youngsters on America
[campuses are my greatest con-
K great many of them do
pot belong and do not show any
| A In Jewish life and Is-
UsunUatifla is rife and in
^rmarriage is rampant It is very
J-turhing to see those Jewish
Ptudents and professors who are
under the influence of the New
Left side with the foes of Israel.
Vii.s phenomenon requires in-
creasing Jnd deepening Jewish
education at home and in the
Jewish communities.
"Another fact winch is of grave
concern for me is that close to
50 per cent of A.nerican Jewry
does not "belong" at all and may-
be as a result are lost for the
Jewish people as such "
Q. The question of Israeli
Habara in the U.S. is a delicate
one. As the head of the major
information arm of Israel in the
I' S how do you see it. especially
in the face of growing Arab pro-
paganda?
A. "We are facing growing
challenges anil threats by Arab
propaganda They became more
sophisticated and have a tremen-
dous amount of money to pour
in. We were informed that the
Arabs plan to spend $200 million
in the next few vears on propa-
ganda in the US and Canada. In
1975 they have a budget of $35
million to be used directly and
through professional public rela-
tions firms Israel, of course, does
not have anything near it. but
we have the best Hasbara people
that can be found in Israel. Ef
fective Hasbara here will not
come unless Israel's friends and
Jewish leaders will be open to
new and unconventional ideas.
"These are not regular times
the public has a direct bearing
on what happens in Washington.
We have no money, but we have
friends They have to be coor-
dinated and this can be done by
a joint concerted effort on a na
tional basis. It must be establish
ed for the metropolitan area of
New York. The lack of such a
task force has been especially
felt during and after the last
war This task force can be under
the auspices of the Presidents
Conference. If established, it
would become a network of Has-
bara using media people, pro-
fessionals, artists, etc This. I be-
lieve, could be a reply to Arab
and any other anti-Israel activ-
ity ."
Q. Recent reports pointed out
a mood of grave concern and
doubt among Jews here as to the
future of Israel. What can be
the impact of such a mood?
A. "The question of the mo-
rale, the confidence and the faith
in Israel's future and Israel is in
the heart of our Jewish and non-
Jewish friends. There is no great-
er en< my. greater danger to
Israel, to the integrity of the
Jewish people and public opin-
ion. There is no justification for
it We tend to exaggerate the
negative aspects of the Yom Kip-
pur War. Soul-searching was a
good thing, we have learned a
lesson. I believe that we are go-
ing to come out of this experi-
ence a stronger and a better Is-
rael. My slogan is: "there is no
room for complacency because
we face awesome problems.' But,
yet. by no means should we U-rn
to despondency and despair. It's
strengthening our foes, eroding
American public opinion of Is-
rael, its strength and credability.
"I am still convinced that the
most Important thing in tin-
realm and world relations is a
visit to Israel. I don't call it tour-
ism, but a pilgrimage. A distress-
ing fact is that onlv ten per cent
of American /Jewry has visited
Israel in the list 27 years '
Q. There is. it s.-ms. a big
Israeli community in New York.
How many are there-'
A. "The exact number is not
clear. It is estimated that about
150.000 Israelis are living in New-
York and vicinity "
Q. Who are they, those Is-
raelis?
A. "They can be divided into
Jewish Theologu
Honor (hi Rabbis
NEW YORK, N.Y. Sixty-
three rabbis from large and
mall communities in the United
States, Mexico and Canada, both
con lal and organization-
lers, will Ik- honored by
The Jewish Theological Sem-
inal) ol America al a coaven-
Uon to i>o held on April :'0 at
Qreaatagera. New York.
l>r. Genoa D. Cohen. Sem-
inary chancel lor. will confer the
,.,. o| Doctor of Divinity,
honoris cause, <>n the rabbis, in-
cluding Rabbi Rudolph J. Adler
ol Congregation Ohav Shalom.
inland-' at the special academic
convocation which will open the
75th anniversary convention of
the Kabbinical Assembly, inter-
national association of Conserva-
tive rabbis. In addition, eight
rabbis from the West Coast Will
receive their degree at the Uni-
versity of Judaism Commence-
ment in June.
The decrees are being confer-
red in recognition of rabbis
whose careen have, in the words
of Dr. Cohen, brought honor
upon the Rabbinical Assembly,
the Seminary, and the Conserva-
tive Movement." Included in the
group are U rabbis who were
ordained at the Seminary.
01 the 98 others, a Dumber re-
ropean institutions is the Jewish
ceived ordination at such Eu-
Theologtcal Seminary of Bres-
|au and the icole Rabbinkjue de
three groups. The first group is
those Israelis who are hardly
Israelis. Israelis who came here
as babies with their parents or
Israelis who immigrated to Israel
from other countries, lived in
Israel for a brief period and then
reimmigrated to the U.S.
"The second group are the Is-
raeli nomads.'Those Israelis who
travel around not knowing how
long they will stay here. And
there are the Yordim. those Is-
raelis who cut off all relations
with Israel. But I must say that
the bulk of the Israelis here con-
sider themselves Israelis and
maintain relations with Israel."
Q. What is the main reason
for Yerida"
A. "Economic. This is the
main reason although sometimes
other factors are involved as
weil We try to persuade as many
Israelis .as possible to come back
home We are giving this prob-
lem more thought. Recently Is-
rael has offered returning Israelis
special economic privileges in
order to make their return as
easy as possible."___________
yi/ Seminary To
At Convocation
France; others received ordina-
tion from SUCh American institu-
tions as the Jewish Institute of
Religion and Hebrew Theological
College.
In conferring the degrees
upon those rabble, the Semin
is at once honoring then person-
al achievements, and paying
tribute to the Rabbinical As-
sembly, of which they are all
members.
The candidates have been
selected on the ba-sis of sen in-
to their congregations, their
communities, and the Seminary,
which is the academic and spirit-
ual center of the Conservative
Movement in American Judaism.
In addition to training rabbis,
cantors, teachers, and scholars,
the Seminary conducts several
nationwide programs for Jewish
youth, among them, the Ramah
camps. Its library has the most
extensive collection of Hebraiea
and Judaica outside of Israel,
and its Jewish Museum is a
treasure house Of Jewish cere-
monial objects from every era,
and almost every corner of the
world.
The Seminary conducts re-
ligious and educational programs
m Israel as well as in the United
States and Canada, and its In-
stitute for Religious and Social
Studies has pioneered in the
field of intergroup relations.
Fruit of Poverty
< outiiiin il from Page 7-
Perhaps the six-year-old will
make it with the help of her
brothers, most of whom will be
working by the time she reaches
final year High School.
We didn't -peak to anyone else
in Josephtal that day, but wan-
dered around imprinting the
signs of poverty in our minds.
Landau returned a few days
later to take extra photographs.
This tune, he had more in his
car than his photographic equip-
ment. The back of his car was
filled with used clothing, all of
it good quality and in good con-
dition.
He was directed to the home
of Emmy Siboni. a few >ears
back, named as Israel's "Mother
of the Year." Mrs. Siboni. though
far from wealthy herself, and
with a large family of her own,
still finds time to worry about
the needs of others. One of her
self-appointed tasks is to dis-
tribute clothing to the poor.
She was delighted to receive
a bundle of clothes which were
still completely wearable, and
commented to Landau that most
of the clothes she receives are
in such a state of disrepair, that
she virtually has to take them
apart and remake them.
LANDAU CAM*, across several
poor families throughout the
day. but his attention was cap-
tured by Itzhak and Rivka Peretz
who came to Israel from Morocco
in 1963. The Peretz family in-
cludes seven children, the eldest
of whom is a 17-year-old daugh-
ter, who is completely beyond
control.
They live in Shchunat Eliahu.
the area which was attacked by
the terrorists. Itzhak. 42. works
in an orchard and brings home
IL 800 to II. O0 per month, de-
pending on the season. Electri-
city, gas and water cost the
family IL 122 per month. They
eat meat only once a week and
buy the most inexpensive fruit
and vegetables.
The total food bill is an aVer-
age of II- 700 per month. A grow-
ing family needs clothing. There
is a limit to the wearability of
hand-me-downs. They are per-
petually in debt to the grocer
and the draper.
Rivka Peretz, 33. spends IL
200 per month on clothes for the
family. They live in a Jewish
Agency apartment for which the
rental is subsidized.
RIVKA LOOKS closer to her
husband's age than her own. This
is partly due to a serious car
accident which she had a couple
of years ago. It left her in a
state of constant fatigue and
prone to fainting fits. Welfare
authorities then supplied her
with a washing machine.
The family cannot afford to
pay for entertainment such as a
weekly movie Whatever enter-
tainment they have is derived in
the basement clubhouse of their
apartment block, a converted
bomb shelter, which now serves
a dual purpose under the super-
vision of community center
counsellors
The eldest Peretz child left
school without completing her
education, but her parents are
interested that the other children
should have a chance to finish
high school. Having been told
earlier in the piece by Lilach
that there had been almost no
immigration to Beit Shean since
1963. Landau questioned people
as to their attitudes to new im-
migrants
THE GENERAL consensus was
that new immigrants would be
welcomed, but that there was
neither enough housing nor in-
dustry to attract them.
The Jewish Agency is setting
up an absorption center in the
area and is also planning to
build an additional high school.
But it will take something
truly dramatic to give Beit Shean
a proper face lift and to trans-
form it into a thriving town.


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April
An Active Jewish Community Down Under
By CHARLOTTE JACOBSON
Chairman. YV.rld ZlonUt
Orf-antzattea
American Sect*
F HAVE recently returned from
month-long tour which took
me to the major cities of Aus-
tralia. The Jews there all 70,-
000 of them have had a shock,
and their community life will
never be the same.
Traditionally supporters of the
Labor Party, the Jews of Aus-
tralia were shaken when the
Prime Minister. Laborite Gough
Whitlam, embarked upon a
course calculated to make Aus-
tralia the leader of the Far East-
ern bloc, or of the Third World
a course which has led him to
an anti-American and anti-Israel
stance.
ONE STRAW in the wind was
his suspension of negotiations be-
tween El Al and Qantas. the
Australia airline. He was even
more direct at a meeting with
about 100 Jewish leaders, all
long-time supporters of Labor,
whom he hurt deeply by saying
you people are never satisfied."
In the recent elections, some
two-thirds of the Jewish vote
went to the Liberal Party nomi-
nee. Bill Snedden. who has not
been vocal at all on the Israel
issue. Whitlam was able to win
most of the newly-enfranchised
youth by promising increased
budgetary' allocations for educa-
tion and other youth programs.
Many Australian Jews have
close ties to Israel, with relatives
living there and about 500 mak-
ing aliyah annually. Because of
these ties, the Jews of Austra-
lia were able to raise an addi-
tional $13 million in the wake of
the Yam Kippur War. over and
at me the regular campaign in-
come of $3 million, and they are
determined to maintain this level
of giving even though their con
tnbuUons are not tax-deductible.
THERE ARE about 1.000 Is
relis living in Australia, and
about 200.000 people of Arab des-
cent, half from Lebanon, who
supported Whitlam in his cam-
paign for reelection not only
with with significant funds but
with a reelection campaign of
their own.
Unfortunately, the Jewish
community of Australia is not
geared to political activity, since
there has not been any need for
it in the past, Australia policy
having always been strongly pro-
Israel.
As a result of the new direc-
tion taken by the Whitlam gov-
ernment, however, the Jews of
Australia have had to take a new-
look at thmserves and their or-
ganizational structure and are
beginning to plan for such ac-
tivity in the future.
Dunne the Ma'alot crisis, for
example, the adult Jewish com-
munity was completely immobi-
lized except for memorial serv-
ices in the synagogues; it was
only the students who were
flexible enough to be able to go
into action and conducted me-
morial meetings on campus for
the Ma'alot victims.
THEY HAD also succeeded,
after tremendous effort, in block-
ing an earlier pito-Atab, resolu-
tion that was being lobbied for
among the university students.
Despite a certain amount of
rivalry- between the Jews of Mel-
East European background, and
EastEuropean background, and
the Jews of Sydney, most of
whom are from England. South
Africa or are native Australians,
k\-al Jewish institutions flourish,
-andIt* rwHrd-RWtl AMpttK-lfce
Jewi-h National Fund. WIZO
and B'nai B'rith are very active.
With their strong ties to Ia-
rarl. and their new awareness
arising out of the change in their
own government's attitudes, the
Australian Jewish community is
r* sinning the lonjr hard process
of transform
-more alert
atvi
't "Hoi
%*^'"*"fn ha* had
and will und,.ul-i,d|vTSi
newch.Pen,^,^,^!
a* particularly '
with the owortuiyJ
gave miio br,er Auiiri
ish leadership n *J,
Jewish organi,,,,^1.**
United States wrM
can provide gui.io|ine a
tr.lian Jews.
Controls Sought to Prevent
Arab Boycott Participation
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON(JTA) Sen.
Harrison A. Williams. Jr. N.J.) has introduced an amend-
ment to his proposed law control-
ling foreign investment in
American companies which would
prevent anyone participating in
the Arab boycott from investing
in the United States.
At the same time. Jack F
Bennett Undersecretary of
Treasury for Monetary Affairs,
opposed any new regulations and
said existine laws adequate.
WILLIAMS, chairman of the
Senate Banking. Housing and
Urban Affairs Subcommittee on
Securities, had earlier introduced
a bill to monitor any investment
of five per cent or more by a
foreign government, company or
h Aging Conference in June
NEW YORK The problems
and challenges of an aging world
population will be the subject of
discussion at an international
congress to be held in Israel this
June.
Thousands of experts in the
field of gerontology, the study
of aging, are expected to con-
verge on Jerusalem for the 10th
International Congress of Geron-
tolo:
The Congress, which was last
held in Kiev. Russia, in 1972. will
dltenai the process of aging, and
problems connected with the care
of older people in modern so-
ciety.
ir -tr Successor to Tacker
CHICAGOCantor Pavel Zim
has been appointed by th<- Park
Synagogue of Chicago to chant
its 1975 High Holy Days Set
The announcement, jointly
made by the congregations I
dent. Melvin M Carmel. and its
Rabbi. Alvin M. Kleinerman.
marked the end of the intensive
search for a successor to the late
Richard Tucker, who had been a
fixture at The Park Svnagogue
since oe first took over cantorial
duties there in 1962
Tucker, a renowned grand
opera star, died suddenly on Jan.
8 while on a concert tour.
-*- H HIT Elects Official
CINCINNATI Rabbi Alvan
Rubin, of Temple Israel. St.
Louis has been elected the new
president of the Hebrew Union
College Jewish Institute of Re-
ligion l.OOOmember Alumni As-
sociation
The HUC-JIR, Reform Juda-
ism's institution of hieher learn-
ing will observe its centennial an-
niversary this fall as the oldest
rabbinic school in North America.
The school, which maintains
campuses in Cincinnati. New
York. Los Angeles and Jerusa-
lem, trains rabbis, cantors, com-
munal service professionals and
prepares graduate and oost-grad-
uate students for academic ca-
reers.
TekMk U Speak
NEW YORKIsraeli Ambas-
sador to the United Nations, Yo-
Kf TVko.ih. will address the of-
ficial national celebration of Is-
rael's 27th anniversary sponsored
by the American Zionist Fodera
tion on April 15. in the Hunter
College Assembly Hall.
In making the announcement.
Mrs. Kaye Schenk. president of
the American Zionist Federation,
said that Mrs. Bernice Salpttar,
a vice president of the AZF. has
been named chairman of the
celebration.
Rossmoor Inviting Bids For
Construction Of Phase Two
Construction bidding is now Be-
ing accepted for the second phase
of Ros?m>or Coconut Creek, the
adults-oniy condominium com-
munity being developed near
Pompano Beach, according to
Orion Smith, construction direc-
tor for the master-planned proj
act
Nassau Village, the seconu
rv.a?c. will include 276 condomin-
ium apartments in 19 two-story,
Canbbean->led villas. Target
date for completion is Oct. L
1975
Bahama Village. Rossmoors
first construction phase, will be
finished April 15. It has 304
uniu, ranging ftom studios to
three bedroom, two baths Costs
are from $18,800 $42,400. with
no recreation lease, no ground
lease, and all deposits escrowed
Ros-moor's sales since opening in
January, 1974. are over $9 mil-
lion.
Bids for off site construction
(sewers, water mains, storm
drains, site grading and street
improvements) are being accept-
ed now. and are by appointment
paly, Smith emphasized
Working drawings of the rest-
dential villas will be ready by
April 1. Appointments will h;
made after that date for construc-
tion trades contractors.
All contractors and subcon-
tractors at Rossmoor Coconut
Creek must be licensed by the
City of Coconut Creek, Smith
said, and must have or must nb
tain a certificate of competency.
dt scribed in section one. City ol
( iconut Creek ordinance nun
ber 421.00.
Subcontractors .vi',1 be ask' |
Offer evidence of financial capa-
bility to meet bonding rcquue
ments, Smith noted.
"Special atten'ion should be
given to the competency require
ment established by the City of
Coconut Creek." the construction
executive said "Some subcon
tractors may not be familiar with
this It will be strictly complied
with at Rossmoor."
Appointments may be made by
calling Smith at Rossmoor Coco-
nut Creek, which is a half-
mile west of Turnpike exit 24
(Pompano Beach I. 31 miles north
of the Miami entrance to the
Turnpike.
Over 5.500 condominium resi-
dents for adults are projected for
Rossmoor Coconut Creek, first
Florida venture of Rossmoor
Corp (AMCC), one of the na-
tion's most successful planners
and developers of communities.
Rossmoor's $2 million club
house and recreational complex
has been completed, and the com
munitys 18 hole golf course is
now in plav. Thi community is
being developed on a 608-acre
site at State Road 814 and the
Turnpike. Construction costs art
now over $22.5 million.
individual in a U.S. company
The proposed law would also
give th President the authority
to prohibit the investment if it
was not in the national interest.
The New Jersey Democrat's
new amendment would prohibit
investment by anyone "who has
forced or attempted to force
other firms to boycott an
American business because of its
dealings with or in a fceign
country with which the U.S. has
diplomatic relations."
W1MUMS SAID the Arsb
boycott "is quite clearly snd very
o. .iissingiy. being pursued
against U S businesses merely
because they have ties to Jews or
others considered friendly to Is-
rael or Zionism "
P-nneU testifying before Wil
I arm subcommittee which began
three dajfl of hearings on the
boycott, said no new legislation
is required because existing laws
and practices "provide extensive
information with respect to for-
eign investment as well as safe-
guards to deal with particular
investments "
t| f
.-* tr
However. Bennett said tl
ministrative action is benf
en to establish an in,erl
committee reporting to taj|
ident's Economic Polk,
which would serve as the
point for ansoriag that
Investment in the L'i a,
sistent with the national]
HE ALSO luggwtHlJ
fice to serve tr. n^^A
monitoring foreign hat
analyzing trends 0f iw
and their impact and
procedures with the
foreign governmental inn
for advance > -n-uitatioas
the U.S. government on
tive major direct investax^l
the United Si itei
The Treasury official
ed that foreign inves
contributing to -he dyi_
the Amenc.i' aj or i
lating compe ---ekiagg]
Investment 0| tiet
r.ot make the lurveiuawfl
pressive as in,t|
said. "We ne< I Wffliantj
ed that Benn"- s forael
utive of Kw
C
This is the familiar clock-tower at R(M
Creek, the adult community under dteveloprnm
Pompano. Rossmoor Center is the communityrZM
and recreational complex, and the tower i- n '
meeting place for residents.


y. April 4, 1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
he Crypto-Jews of Portugal
L INACIO STE1NHARDT
,don Chronicle Syndicate
if CAME from far, from
iBclmonte. a townlet in the
mounUins, about 200
"north of Lisbon. Isabel and
|el art' peddlers and market
kers.
t when in the market place
ktomer asks if they are from
snte they vehemently deny
,b| even has documents to
that she was born at the
by town of Covilha. "Other-
[they say we are Mudeus and
don't buy from us,'' the
s.
IYPTO JEWS, New Chris
or Marranos as they are
ku>]> railed, live in many
m northern Portugal But
, cri'i v of their faith has been
hnely difficult to penetrate.
B. a Polish Jewish engineer.
[el Schwtrtl who. in 1917.
iabed the first link between
world and the 40O
of the forced con-
from Brlmonte.
mayor and the priest of
townlet will identify "their
to any interested tourist
IthfM' Jews' are still en
}hed in their tradition of
D
pn when reassured that they
taking to Vethren in faith
are only a few reliable
[of their ancient ritual that
|w.li re\eal.
IBFl. AND Daniel are our
She comes from a very
I mul.lie class family and her
rr, whom we have visited
II time* is a strongly tradi
matriarch
women know not only all
Ituals of the religion that
i taught to their great
nothtr- al the risk of their
[but also hundreds of pray
Portugueii verse, for all
>n-;, which must be learned
> heart and never written
jounfl eouple thirst for
knowledge and share a
feeling of belonging
|U probably the key to their
ess to share some of their
with me.
sever. th<"- mad me nrom
to reveal their real name*
th-v ,lo not want to be
er. trait ri" at home
\h\K they eame to L:s
or.l r ,. b* in the ivna
don-i >^e -Dia Purou"
Kiopur Day of Purity l
f lobe nside the Houie
1 'id hear almost io
the ":n.-ffable name'1 ut-
''//an. Yet they
went out to the yard at the
live prop* hours" to pra/ their
own prayers.
In return for a minor gesture
of friendshin during a period of
jdveaailK .Isabel iek that the
owed us something very dear to
her heart. She brought us the
"Lord's lamp."
It ii rare nowadays to find a
craftsman able to make these
Sabbath lamps. Even to buy the
sheaf of flax acceptable for holy
use. she had to travel from mar
ket to market and examine all
the fibres offered for sale, until
ahe found the correct lot. whie
and pure.
It had already been so'd '"> so
other and she had to Day hifh
er price to obtain it. but n- got
it and brought us enough for a
years use.
THEN ISABEL asked for a
piece of white linen and although
clearly dissatisfied with its purity
he plated it on her lap. The
flax fibres, she explained, were
spun by an old woman in Bol-
monto "who knows" and one has
to prepare and bless one's own
wicks for each occasion: Sab-
bath. Yom Kippur. departed
souls, etc.
A person can also prepare
wicks for others, but then the
name of the person and the pur
pose must be mentioned in the
blessing. This would be the case
now since she was teaching my
wife.
And so she started: "B'essed
be Thou, my Lord, my God. my
'Adoshem.' who commandest us
with Thy holy and blessed com
mands ... to be used to light and
honor the holy night of Friday
and the holy most holy Sabbath
in the names of Guitale and Ina
cio: mav the Lord of Heavens
a'so light their souls while they
dwell in this world and in the
thereafter when called to the
Royal Presence."
SHE REPEATED thi? blessing
15 times while twisting and twist
in? the lone wick which she fin-
al'v inserted in the lamp, frith
a new blessing.
Aked to teach u the blessing
f r lijhtinc the Sahbath light she
hitntH. Her husbtnd confirm
ed that it was considered a
blasohemv to oray out of the
proper time.
But her sene of "teaching
mit"va" and religious sisterhood
overcame the vacillation. "Blessed
are Thou, my Lord
the Heights bless their souls.
I .-a be I understood why I had
my taoerecorder and recited
e-enrhn oattHM onlv obvious
Israel Recruiting Additional
U.S. Educated Social Workers
i
parts of the words which should
be said only in prayer.
Isabel and her family returned
to their humble' home in Bel-
monte leaving behind the little
lamp, made of tin. -wffh' prfrnitiVe
decorations which has a place of
honor in our home. To us, at
least, it is not alien at ail.
IT WAS presented to us with
a blessing which has endured the
vicissitudes of four centuries, in
the hearts and on the murmuring
lips of the generations. Our
friends expected us to use It and,
at least for the first Sabbath, we
did.
That little name in the tin
lamp with the blessed wick was
a flickering reminder of the great
fire which fueled the faith of
those who had sanctified the
name of the Lord for 400 years
in the little townlet of Belmonte
in the heights of a mountain in
Portugal.
"Let our little !amo be lighted
and seen by holy angels and
Amen "
After the recent successful
completion of a one year orienta-
tion program for qualified Amer-
Israel. recruitment for a second
course- is under way.
i. ) ....
The program is intended for
candidates who hold a Master's
degree in social work and are
planning to settle in Israel. It
will begin in Netanya. located on
the Israeli coastline next Septem-
ber, and participants will enjoy
special benefits and partial pay
during the ten month course.
Israel has hundreds of job
openings for social workers at
present. The supply of graduates
from Israeli universities does not
meet the need. This special
orientation program is aimed at
filling the pressing shortage.
The first four months of the
study program will be devoted to
intensive study of the Hebrew
language. Concurrent with the
Hebrew studies, lectures will bo
offered on Israel's society, po-
litical make up. cultural set up,
economy, demography and social
lean educated spclal' workers in
services.
Participants will go on field
trips in order to get acquainted
with social services facilities.
Meetings will also be arranged
with potential employers and par-
ticipants will be offered a choice
of field placements. In the fifth
month, participants will be eased
into the social services in the
areas.
AH participants will enjoy the
benefits offered to new immi-
grants including the right to re-
quest a long-term, interest-free
loan for travel *o Israel. Success-
ful completion of the course will
guarantee a position.
Registration and further infor-
mation may be obtained at the
regional Israel Alivah Centers.
In Miami contact Eliezer Kroll
at the Israel Aliyah Center. 4700
Biseayne Blvd.
Mideast Peace Hangs
on U.S.-Soviet Accord
WASHINGTON (JTA) Sen. Stuart Symington (D.,
Mo.) said here that peace in the Middle East depends, in
the last resort, on an agreement between the United States
and the Soviet Union "as to what should or should not be
done" in that region.
He made his comments in reply to questions on the
ABC television program "Issues and Answers."
The "basic problems" incident
I
to the Middle East "not only
have to do with the new oil prob-
lem but also with some form of
agreement between the Soviet
Union and United States."
SYMINGTON SAID. "If we
could get some asreement be-
tween these two superpowers as
to what should or should not be
done in the Middle East, that
would be the only thing that
c.ul.l put us all more at ease
with respect to a possible future
war out there."
Symington, who has served in
the Senate for 23 years and is a
ranking member of its oowerful
Foreign Affairs and .Armed Serv-
ices Committees, drew a sharp
distinction between America
role in the Middle East and in
IndoCnica.
ASKED IF the US pull-out
from Vietnam may have under
mined its credibility in insuring
the viability of Israel. Syming-
ton replied:
"In the first place, the Israeli
situation is entirely different. I
was Secretary of the Air Force
when the State of Israel was cre-
ated. Nobody had more to do
with it than President Truman,
unless it was Mr. (Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei) Gromyko him-
self. There we did have a com-
mitment in effect to protect the
State. I know of no such commit-
ment whatever incident to Viet
najn or Cambodia. '
Asked whether, in the event
Secretary of State Henry A. Kis
singer'* current Deace efforts in
the Middle East are unsuccessful.
the U.S. should return to the
Geneva peace conference and re-
involve the Soviet Union. Sym-
ington replied that in that event,
"I don't see where else we can
go exceot Geneva."
DON'T LET iOUR MAIL END
OPlMThE DEAD LETTER
OFFICE, MAKE SORE
YOUR ADDRESSES ARE
written CLEARLY AH9
THAT TaiEY ARE CfiWlfTE
TA LATCH'S ~
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY/
HRSONALIZED MEMORI AL*
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OU* WORKSHOP
CAI 1. OH LBCT
444.0921 444.0022
S279 S W. 8th ST.. MIAMI
^
re Plagues For Egypt?
By RABBI SAMUEL SILVUt
JO Was ,t who said those who refused to
porn from history would be forced to repeat
lodern Egypt has already suffered thret
es Before she lets go of the Jews must she
So seven more?
Nsaover reminds us of the plight of the
' w oat the mataah to taste vicariously the
" food of those who are victims of hunger.
">ur nation not realize that its resources
8o less for arms and more for the relief
who are disadvanUged?
AN WE not see that those who are de-
fn become depraved? What we would
ln largesse would be less than what we
to cope with the criminal acts of the
rjto.
the hero of the Passover saga, did
could to avoid violence. He pleads with
oh to let his people go with a minimum of
In the desert, he begged other nations to
UtOi pass through without war He
was a davetee of peace.
Our nation could also reduce violence if it
Congress would pass a gun control measure. But
d-.pite the rise of bloodshed, despite the recog-
nition of the fact that lethal weapons are easy
to get, no measure to restrict the use of weapons
has passed.
How much more suffering must occur before
it does?
PASSOVER IS the home festival par excel-
lence. Seeing our loved ones around the table
should prompt us to find as many opportunities
as possible to bring our relatives together for
happy purposes. When sadness strikes, we per-
mit no alibis to interfere with our gatherings.
But for joyous occasions we procrastinate
and find many reasons why "we cant make" the
simcha. Let the gladness and heart-wi-ming up-
lift of the Seder service stir us to frd ways to
get together often with our dear ones and offer
thanks for our good fortune in having relatives
and friends who are pleasant and a delight to
be with.
SERVING
BROWARD
COUNTY
Breword CoMt/f
Only
Jewish Funeral Dirtdtr
ENORAH
CHAPELS FUNERAL DIRECTORS
5975 PARK DRIVE
MARGATE. FLORIDA
Telephone 971 3330
Mark Weissman, L.F.D.


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Fridav
April 4


he
JUbMmcai fag
t
co-ordinated b/ the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz Rabbi Barry Altman
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present

<^fn 0 idc j 11 Cm l<
By FREDERICK LACHMAN
Executive Editor
Encyclopaedia Judaica
How and when did tae
Synagogue ronr into exist-
ence?
The synagogue, together with
the Temple, is the most impor-
tant institution in Judaism. Nev-
ertheless, says the authoritative
Encyclopaedia Judaica. there are
almost no historical dates to es-
tablish its origin. Its birth was
unheralded and unrecorded and
in matured in equal obscurity.
aica
The synagogue made its first
recorded appearance as a fully
grown and firmly established in-
stitution about the first century
of the Christian era. Scholars al-
most universally 3gree that one
must look to the period of the
Babylonian Exile for the origin
of the synagogue. Jews exiled in
a strange land, deprived of their
Temple and needing consolation
in their distress, met from time
to time, probably on Sabbath and
read the scriptures. In Eiekiel.
the prophet of that Exile, one
Issues And Answers...
Our Rabbis' Views
Boredom and Violence
By RABBI NORMAN N. SHAPIRO
Temple Zion
What has happened to the great ideals of western civilization?
Why is the cult of violence so popular today and why are people
literally getting away with murder in broad daylight or in the pres-
ence of so many do-nothing bystanders?
What disturbs so many of us is the widespread conviction that
the ever-increasing incidence of burglary-, vandalism, assault, rape and
murder are not isolated phenomena in America. The eruption of viol-
ence is being accepted as an American way of life.
PERHAPS MORE exasperating to contemporary viewers of the
American scene have been the numerous instances of respectable
citizens showing an alarming indifference or disinclination to become
involved or notify the police when a crime is committed.
Children as well as adults are being conditioned to violence in all
the public mediamovies, television, radio, magazines, newspapers
and are therefore affected adversely
There are manv diagnoses for the aforementioned ills in our so-
cietyranging from environmental JBJQa, insecurity, the atomic
bomb, to the theory that the age in which we live has insured man to
bestiality as a result of mass exposure to brutality from the Nazis
through World War II. Korea. South Vietnam, the Middle East wars
and many smaller conflict* and danger soots.
Ours is a bored and violent generation The core of the crisis as
this observr sees it is one of tedium.
THE PROBI EMI today arise essentially out of boredom. Man-
kind is in a world wide a the spirit For too many people, life
is meaningless People no lonror seem to know they are a]
Vandalism and callousness, so ever present in our Mctety to-
day. evidence Ul not only in our run-down neighborhoods,
but also in our weal'hier localities
So much of our despair over the futility of life and a pessimism
for the future of mankind itemi al-o from the weakened and inef-
fectual roll' h ,,n suffers to
True, currently there i the highest tabulation of rfnretl and
synagogue affiliation in the history of the United -id a vat
or contemplated building program with its proliferation of hou-
worship all over the country Vet church and synagogue influence is
at a very low point not commensurate at all with it- id in-
calculable poterv
It was John Ru-kin. the Fnclish historian and ess3v a1 said:
"Anything that make Ml a second object, makes religion no
object. God will put up with many things in the heart, but this is
one thing He will not put up with, second place He who offers God
second place offers Him no place"
NEED I ADD anv commentary to this incisive observation*
Our main concern is that people pay too much lip service to our
religious institutions They b-long in theorybut in practice reduce
God. religion, church, synagogue and their great truths to a sub-
ordinate role
A proper understanding of our historic and traditional Jewish
ethics is the antidote to destructive tendencies To be sure, many will
agree that the urge to violence is potentially a part of every man
because it is the principal means of giving expression to his desires
and frustrations. Judaism recognizes this deep-seated urge Never-
theless it has faith that brutality can be controlled, and that man's
penchant for terrorism can be altered.
What is required is a long-range plan and campaign for the moral
education of everyone.
OUR JEWISH tradition assumes this assignment by setting pat-
terns and examples of high ethical conductby cultivating habits
which stress moral behavior and by endorsing these standards
through legal enactments and ritual practices.
Judaism enjoys a genius for translating abstract ethical princi-
ples into concrete norms of conduct. In our day and age. we must
stop offering alibis for our widespread moral laxity. No matter what
our degree of guilt by active or passive acquiescence, we are not
beyond redemption Man. like the plowshare, can take a lot of blows
but he must in turn be sharpened by them.
finds the first probable referenc-
es to it.
In the repeated mention of the
assembly of the elders before
K/ekiel (8 6. 14:1. 20:1). one may
point to the actual beginning of
the synagogue. More definite,
however, is the reference to the
"little sanctuary" (11:16) which
the Talmud applies to the syna-
gogue. Although there was an or-
ganic relation between Temple
and synagogue during the period
of the Second Temple, from the
moment the Temple was destroy-
ed and in the Diaspora before
then, the phrase "little sanctu
ary" faithfully indicates the role
of the synagogue in the thoughts
and lives of the people The En-
cyclopaedia Judaica points out.
however, that a few scholars do
not accept this explanation They
persist in dating the beginning*
of the synagogue to the First
Temple period.
It can be assumed that the
returned Exiles during the times
of Ezra and Nehemmiah brought
with them the rudiments of that
institution which thev had de-
veloped during their exile Ob-
viously, in the Diaspora the need
for local places of worship was
much more keenly felt than in
the Jewish homeland In the
homeland the Temple attracted
the main religious lovalties and
affections of the peoole: no such
rival existed in the Diaspora It
is therefore not surprising that
it is in the Diaspora, and partic-
ularly in Eevpt. that archaeolog-
ical discoveries have revealed the
remains of the earliest svna-
goeues. dating bark to a time
before the first centurv
It is in the first century C F .
however that the tynagOCue sud-
denly emer tttob-
l'-hed and ami..... institution,
the verv renter I and
reli rious life of th* people, un-
r\ tied In bnt
moniou'v nj with the
Temi le n J v.i literary
I archaeological sources the
Judaica ttatei i ionee of
the existence of the svnasogue.
with every Indication that it
not a new -. rution Philo
"- tha' the 111......ooulatl >n
of Alexandria had ..... wna-
eociies in manv ;<>c'i"is of the
city T*m' Talm'id even deecHhet
a !* there '
v i so hugi that th< vole* of -he
n^ecentor a n inaudible and
to :- n, n they
i ike th re ponxei
v. th of the
T,.... .,', ,. :
mat' reatioi I 11 -, -rtfidaJ
outside of the I ind rf r lei r-
; -. -i. n riva] as th*
fo-is n-H center of Jewish re-
ligious life.
Religious
Services
roar lAUDitOAif
TAM*Pr ,ifw N W 5-th St iConaarvat'va)
BeTW tS*AtL (Temajlt) 7100 W
Oakland Ptrfc B)>vd Raht>. RWtlUa]
A Labowiti Cantor Maurica Naw
MANU Cl "* W Oakland Par*
Ivd. trforri Rahbi Arthur J Ab-
rama Cantor Jrarxa Kiamar 41
VOUNO taAlL of HOLl VWOOO
'Orthotfovi oi BAIHIoaj Hd SI
eOMANO ilACM
HOI DM T.mnlrl 1J* ( tft* Av#.
Conaarvativa Rabbi Morrla A. tha*.
Cantor Jacob J. Htnttr
MAIOATf
MArtOATl JEWISH CINTfrt iCofi.
oarvativa) S101 NW Mb St.
CMAl sraiNcs
CORAL FRlNOa HIBKIW CON-
OrtCOATION Lib.ral SSOi Un.var.
aity Dr. Rabbi Mai Wait*. 44
Prt4ar o m Sabbath aorTlca*
Great Jewish Personalities
Baal Shem Tov (The Boht)
Baal Shem Tov: A Religion of Joy
RABBI VICTOR D. ZWELLING
Congregation B'nai Raphael
In speaking of one of my fa-
vorite personalities of Jewish his-
tory. I do so not as a Hasid and
most assuredly not as a "Mit-
nagid The one I most admire is
Israel ben Ehezer better known
as The Baal Shem Tov or the
Besht
" The life of the Besht is so
enmeshed in lore, it is near im-
possible to separat- the legend
ary from the historical.
The exact place of his birth is
unclear He was born at the be-
ginning of the 18th century and
died in 1760 During the span of
these years, the Betht fathered
the Hasidlam that we know today
The fact of his rising to promi-
nence through the working of
miracles a nd the writing of
amulets should neither surprise
nor embarrass us This wa at
common and accepted a mode of
attracting attention and adherents
in those days, as catchy sermon
titles and controversial stands are
today
Though the teachings of the
BanM were an antidote and coun
terforce to an existing imbalance
in the Judaism of his day. those
teachings are still a great value
and force in our time.
The two greatest legacies of
the Besht were his teachings with
regard to the intrinsic and poten-
tial worth of every human bing
and the appropr.ate manner in
which to ser\e the Almighty
Attaching the prevailing, tenor
of hit dav. the Besht taught that
intellectual ability is not the ulti
mate criteria of man's worth To
him the Biblical injunction to
know God In all Hu .
that God could be ^
through prayer and the
nomena of nature as aa|
throMgh Hu word, of the n
and Talmud
Not ever>one ciuld becoa.
outstanding Talmudic *J
yet each soul ha, the abl""
cling to the AlmightJ ui prj
This teaching ol the BJr
given heart and ourposeio,
who otherwise would hivt
themselves relegated to j
ondary position in Judaism
The second gr?at teachini <
the Besht came to counter
asceticism which chariotem
the Judaism of his day Tj |
Judaism wa-
to be borne H ,., > .,
gladness as a basic coraoonea^l
sen ice to God II? re-emc^]
the Psalmist miunction "w|
God with m\ and the tiaM
tion of the Torah Brcausful
did not serve the Lord :o jag_l
you shall Mrvc >ur eneajl
want of all thing]
To this dav it is I sonj and dance which ch
ues his aVMCtndanU The
involves hit em ttiooi and
ings as well as his mind andaa
reason in the w r-hip of Got
The Be>h: ih i ild not be
responsible for the \y
of Hasiditm \ Raj tbei
the disciples, bein: morr w
than the aalater v-
sage of the 1 > extj
and to a do levt'.
aaaJd indeed embarrass
master
The re\ I
day. howtver
vjlid.ty and MM oil
-age of !-' ;;
Question Box
Bv RABBI DR. SIM! Fl J. FOX
\\h were animal sA'Tifices
part of JewUh tradition*
\ variet] ol n u mi are of-
: this ph< i 3 -me
of the
mil was a lymbol of I
if the animal nature
of man '' .iy.
This nature of nd 1 i-t
1 In
alx-yance and subject to :nan's
:tual nature hr ha-
C'hinuch).
\1 kn his "Kit animal -acnfice.
under control and limited by
IB laws, w i*ed to
draw people away from paean
rituals of thoe days which went
way beyond human reason and
dignity at times.
Othntl (e.g.. Nahmanldes)
daimed that the sacrifice of the
animal showed man that he owed
the Almighty, either by gratitude
oa> guilt, his very own life The
animal was a substitute for hu-
man life which was either for-
feited through sin or owed
thankl to its Maker.
One who feels close to some-
one or who was separated and
again wishes to feel close to
someone, feels required to give
something or sacrifice something
CANDtEtlGHTING TIME
23 NISAN 7:19
as a r
Thu-
Whv d. aatM i>--plr clakal
that a iles' rmlml al 'I
priestly family ;' 'I
Knkten) li "! iB*e*dlil|
tome i:,i'>M'ai'ii'
This
that the M -
and reii
fun
The Bible
does .
the prie iarT^
totoi cated S ""l
so til..: -,' i
state of mir.
Othe he o
subject to ridicule and tnjssl
er the .1
and U
are tho- tla
fruit which \ ; J
against the f v
mighty in the Cardei "
was the fruit of the vine j
made him Intoxicated .
brought death int. 'he "J
The priest, who m*
of life. as ferbi Wee
into the sanctuan m a > J
intoxication lest -i-tiadoi
ing life to humanity, ne
cause tragedy hecMie
drunken state A itM *
cation would make it
for the priest to corn*A
in his duties an 1 certaw
could make a sacnf.ee in
Some also claim that fo>>
that service to the Aim*
a rational act and not
drunken orgy such,
worshippers perfurmed
tsaaes.


Hitler's Plot to Kidnap Pope is Traced to Source in Kurzman Book
Jerusalem
pOPE Iflll XII's failure to protest against the Nazi
deportation of Jewi from the holy city of Rom*
ltd if 's accountable to his fear of being kidnapped by
the SS and o^ the Vatican being occupied by the Ger-
mans and its treasures and holy relics carried off
TWl thesis is developed with strong documentary
Iher conoboration in a new book by ace re-
"rned historical-novelist. Dm Kurzman. "The
for Rome.'- published by Doubleday and Co.
KUltSMAN, author of the popular "6enesia 1948"
foundation of the State of Israel, was formerly
-inking roving correspondent for "The Washing-
He is currently in Israel researching for his
: v book, a detail.-d account of the Warsaw ghetto
:ng.
"The Race for Rome-' took Kurzman three years
;n re-earch and write While dialogue and description
ire vividly written, they are carefully credited in foot-
and addenda.
Kurzman explained that he was anxious to avoid
riticiaao or allegations that he had "created" dia-
as were levelled against him by some review
I Genesis 1948." quite wrongly, he says.
oUavid
^LidkA
an
THE HITLER plot to kidnap the Pope is authenti-
cated by interviews Kurzman conducted with SS Gen-
era! Karl Wolff, now living quietly in Germany after
serving a 20-year prison term.
Wolff recalled from his own contemporary notes
the day Hitler called him from Rome to the Nazi HQ
in September. 1943. and ordered him to prepare a plan
to occupy the Vatican and kidnap the Pope.
Wolff says today that though he obeyed the order
to plan the assault, he would never have actually car-
ried it out Kurzman writes, too. that other top Ger-
man generals and officials serving in Italy had their
grave doubts about the wisdom of Hitlers planamong
them Ambassador Ernst von Wiezsaccker.
This, however, did not prevent the Ambassador
from pointedly hinting at the "violent reaction-' that
could be expected from Hitler, both against the Jew,
and against the Church, if he (the Ambassador) were
to relay te Berlin the protest which the Vatican sougfet
to make in October, when the SS began rounding up
the Jews of the Roman ghetto.
KURZMAN dramatically describes how a sympa-
thetic Italian Princess. Enza Pignatclli. told the Pope
at his dawn mass of the deportation of the Jews of
Rome, how the Pope expressed his shocked Incredulity,
how he ordered his Secretary of State. Cardinal Mag-
tione. to protest to Germany, how the Cardinal 11. t
with Ambassador Von VYiezsaecker with the thou
uppermost in both their minds being Hitler's known
desire to kidnap the Pope and occupy the Vatican
when, and if. the opportunity presented itself.
The Secretary of State expressed the Pope's protest
at the deportation, and then agreed to the envoy's
unprecedented diplomatic suggestion: that he not con-
vey the Papal protest to Berlin.
Pius' relations with the occupying Germans im-
proved thereafter, with the Pope taking for. and re-
ceiving, additional units of German police to guard the
Vatican.
Rabbi and Priest
Conduct Seminar
|E>IMTE THE Vatican s persistent refusal to recognize the State
u'. Israel, at least among American Catholics and Jews the liai-
and widens In New York, in a broadly publicized
vent the rector of St Patrick's Cathedral. Msgr. James F Rieney,
i ritual leader of Temple Emanu-EI. Rabbi Ronald B.
hanged pulpHl to mark the beginning of a year of
' tween members of their faiths
|!) noticed e\ent conceived in Washington, two Cath-
I riih clergymen have gone farther and perhaps even
I tivelj
A R \BBI and a J^su't nr.est led a three-week seminar in ls-
^.e! at thi ve.n -end for IS Georgetown University students
r .lew. Catholics or of no faith at all.
seminar, sponsored by Georgetown, a Jesuit institution.
ration with the Jewish Agency's Department of Education
r ture, was conducted by Rabbi A. Nathan Abrahamowitz,
lstons Tifcreth Israel Congregation, and the Rev. Wil-
bt. C McFadden. S.J.
tench theology at Georgetown. It included visits to Jeru-
iiem Jericho, Bethl. hem and the Dead Sea.
IN A discusion at the university, aix of them spoke of their
ipenences that articulated in direct, honest terms what many
her M-itors may recognize as their own unexpressed feelings
Thus Bob Wuinn, of Manhasset. NY, a seuior in business
(minis!ration, after referring to the visit as "fne of the best
pngi I \e ever done educationally." observed: "It much of a contrat with what we're used to A real awakening
utment to somethingto live even, almost. We re just
lies We don't think of things too much and they're
reed to think of things every day "
\<' ORMMO to Mike Meotti. of Glastonbury. Conn, a senior
n Service Scho >! where he is majoring in interna-
ls, the people of Israel have "a very determined feel-
thill : the] have to do and they're going to do them,
are facing a lot of world^opposition and violent opposi
1 r cl '-et neighbor;. It's a tough task but I found among
here they seem ready to do it. and want to do it.
Bt, unlike the who give-a damn attitude in this com-
- > refreshing and dynamic feeling."
BARKY CHARLES. f Baldwin, N Y a sophomore in business
OB, put it thj way: "The main reason I wanted to go
I >- a concerned member of th American Jewish community
1 to try to guage the attitude of the people there especially
' the events of the Yom Kippur War and since then and
I hanged from the post-1967 euphoria that definitely was
eat tnroughout the country to the kind of somber impression I
I the American press exists in Israel right now.
- i found tile Israeli people seem to he totally and unquestion-
fy dedicated to preserving the State of Israel." Charles addd.
The socalled Masada complex which exists is definitely prev-
ent throughout the country
KELT they re justified in feeling that way beeause every
fmber of the country seems willing to sacrifice the greatest gift
*' which is life in the hope that the country will be prc-
rved 1 think also that the Israeli people are iust remarkable
f the fact that they live under this constant pressure and
don't show it on the outside."
in Crieb. of Alexandria. Va.. a junior majoring in |0V-
ment, remarked she was "not interested in the shrines' but in
and's archaeology and history and to see modern Israel.
' ery definiteh unique in the world.' she said "The whole
me a very good feeling the spirit that Israel and
to me. Jerusalem, have, a city that the inhabitants really
Everyone in the group really learned to love it, no mat-
J* hard the stones were to walk on."

s
wtotir
3-
oLricb
man
Christianity, Synajjogs
And the Jews Today
*ge 15
*Jeist>fkrktiaM Friday, April 4. 1975
^ ROY ECKHARDT is a Methodist clergyman
who is a friend of Jews and Israel. His book
"Your People. My People" (New York. Quadran
gle Books. $8.95. 275 pp.) is his recent attempt
to advance Jewish-Christian understanding The
Pope and the Vatican secretariat would be well
advised to read it
The author traces the history of Church anti
Semitism inspired bv New Testament sources and
times to the post Holocaust era.
HE STRESSES that the integrity of Chris
tianity is involved unless there is a sharp de
viation in Christian theology and attitudes. He
appeals for Christian penitence. His chapters
"Toward Authenticity" and "Deeds." are excel
lent springboards for true lewish-Christian dia
logue.
He affirms that Christian anti-Zionism and
evenhandedness represent anti-Semitism in a new
form. He states that. "The serious danger in
preachments stressing Arab rights is a strengthen
ing of those forces and interests that are bent
npon the destruction of the Jews af Israel" .
ORBIs ROOKS, of Maryknoll. New York.
have published several books that present in
teresting views.
Among these are "The Jewish Jesus." b>
Robert Aron. S4.95. 183 pp |; "Rich Church-Poor
Church. b\ Enzo Gatti ($4.96, 127 pp.); "African
Bedfellows Make Strange
Politics in Modern World
I OOkl.NG NOW in sorrow upon the fallout
from recent explosions in the United Nation
General Assembly and UNESCO, one is hurt most
of all to note Americans of stature upholding
those Third World politicians who defile and
putrefy the agencies of international cooperation
Dr. Benjamin Spock, who has counseled so
often against violence, now scolds our UN Am
bassador John A Scali for speaking out against
the tyranny of the new majority in the UN, a
majority extending an unprecedented welcome to
the Palestine Liberation Organization's leader
through murder, Yasir Arafat.
ROGER N. BALDWIN, who at 91 is honored
for his unending battles against totalitarian fore
i astounds his friends by deflating that the
General Assembly, having recognized the PLO,
il now closer than ever to functioning "as a uni
vertal agency for mankind."
Homer A. Jack, secretary general of the
World Conference on Religion and Peace, de
he i> ashamed of Ambassador Scali and
mutters thai the United States "hardly has clean
hands in thil c< ntrovei
By their rationalizations and sophisms, this
trio now offer proof of an old judgment: "The
default of the best is the worst of defaults."
Traditional Religion." by E. Bolaji Idowu ($5.9$
228 pp. i: "Biblical Revelation and African Be-
liefs ed. by K. Dickson and Paul Ellingworth
($5.95, 191 pp.): and 'African Culture.- by Ayl
ward Shorter ($6.50. 225 pp.) ...
"The Jewish Jesus" is a biography of JesUI
gleaned not so much from Christian source- as
from Jewish sources and prayers which the au-
thor asserts shaped the life of the man
WHILE ONE can differ from much of tha
Christian interpretation in the book, the render-
ing of the Jewish liturgy and Aron's appeal foi
the use and understanding of prayer is one that
should be heeded.
luowu's book has many scholarly pages de-
fining religion and its study as well as a surfeit
of other definitions of religious terms. "African
Traditional Religion" does not discuss the many
different religious sects or faiths in the Dark
Continent but primarily the basics of religion and
some of the commonalities among the different
beliefs .
THE ITALIAN theologian. Enzo Gatti. takes
the Catholic Church to task for not embracing tha
poor to a much greater extent He appeals for
Christianity to elevate deeds above liturgy
His theology is Christ oriented, and con so
quently his interpretations of the Bible and the
post Jesus era are clouded by this factor.
KJ
crt
C^caal
'51
ONE OE the staled purposes of the UN,
dearly spelled out in its charter, is "to be a
center for harmonizing the actions of nations in
the attainment of (certain) common ends"
those objectives including the achievement ol
international cooperation in solving problems of
an economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian
character
When a president of the General Assembly
for the first time in the body's history uses that
high post for political advantage, when represen-
tatives of the Arab-Asian-African bloc arbitrarily
try to legislate the State of Israel out of exis-
tence, how can Americans like Spock, Baldwin,
and Jack justify their contribution to the schem-
ing, offensive activities of the new majority?
LET DR. SPOCK and Messrs. Baldwin and
Jaek CO" Ider for a moment one of the Third
WOrld bloc's excuses for banning Israel from
SCO European regional membership. What
arat lara l's transgression?
Well, her renowned archeologists and engi
bad been altering the historic features of
Jerusalem. Israel's search for artifacts annoyed
Arabs. In that instance, Israel halted the digging
in deference to the Moslems.
'


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Fr'day, April 4
UT THEM KHQW WE ARE ONE

He stands hereprotecting his family miles away,
defending the future of his people.
When his thoughts turn to his own future, he
dreams of a university education... a home of his own.
But he cannot realize his dreams by himself.
He needs our help.
He does not stand alone. Let him know it
We Are One
Give to the Israel Emergency Fund
Jewish Federatio n of Greater Fort Lauderdal
707 N. FEDERAL HIGHWAY, FORT LAI DERDALE, FLORIDA 33304
Phone: 764-8899


Full Text
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FILES


riday. April 4,
1975
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
MU AMGtNO BY ON I-S/DfD WORLD OPINION
for. Kissinger's Shuttle Grinds to a Halt
Continued from Page 1
j Egypt based on an Israeli withdrawal from Gidi and
[t-la U wall ^ *rom the A^u Kodeis oil fields.
! Further. Dr. Kissinger must now reckon with an en-
Lr.ced Soviet presence in the negotiations at Geneva.
THE SECRETARY of State this week steered clear of
signing any blame for the collapse of his shuttle, but it is
is that ha has told President Ford that Israel took a
,,rn position in refusing to evacuate Gidi, Mitla and
\>deis without some political guarantee from Egypt's
resident Sadat that suggested a new and peaceful era
tween the two countries.
Both President Ford and Dr. Kissinger have since been
Lreful to declare that the shuttle's collapse is a setback to
eace in the Middle East only "on a temporary basis."
STILL, IT has had not only a depressing reaction
Lpg in Jerusalem, but also in Washington, coming as it
L n the heels of staggering reverses for South Vietnam
End Cambodia in Southeast Asia.
There, Dr. Kissinger received a Nobel Prize for his
|*neace"' efforts culminating in the Paris accord two years
[go Now. together with his failure in Jerusalem, the de-
n in both capitals is understandable.
Dr. Kissinger, while steering clear of any assignment
Piplo
mat Moves On
(.ontjinK-tl from INsge I*-
jtions -parately. We re in
tad with them through
ntfl Conference or the
AZK or their main offices We
I mate materials on Israel
I --.. u.- participate in
I n, meetings and sem-
uan
wo held meetings
I Vnu ; .can Jewish youth. The
- included talks and hon-
isuonl on Israel and with
I. We provided informa-
nnsulate has be,
Dt for any Israeli activ-
ity or activity concerned with Is-
rael Here, in this room, is one
place in which yoi? can meet
Dew* of all segments. Zionists
ir.d m n Zionists, Reform and
)rthdov Israel is the cemenUng
(actor for all of them.
ltacts with the Jew
era Of) a daiiy basis.
I with the 'masses"
t ide at fund-raising meet-
I I 'cues, mass dem-
[ m etc. Wt (0 every-
Q. The Jewish community in
not one conglomerate.
re are different groups who
ent different interests.
I find yourself somc-
I dilemma? Do
In iilnatfng all Jewish
r- itions in America?
A. We have been meeting
!'*' Jewish denominations.
] rvatlve and Reform. Ortho-
jdo\ and non religious. Orthodox
\' ntical of the non-reli-
aspect of Israel. Reform
I ntical of lack of status
kf their ideology. Some complain
I' Israel is capitalist while
i see Israel as too socialist,
plainly, Jewish youth is critical.
is natural but this is a
challenge to the Israeli
[representative The Jews in this
[country arc terribly fragmented
V they are overly organized.
|TVl fragmentation does not
pake our job easy, ohysically
land ideologically, and this some-
Rimes is very hard to reconcile.
IThe Israeli representative walks
|m this respect in a mine field."
** What about the Jewish
poutn in AmenM1
* "Ever since I assumed my
' 'he more than half-million
h^i-h youngsters on America
Kampuscs are my greatest con-
T*rn. A great many of them do
ony and do not show any
Interest in Jewish life and I-
?ai nilation is rife and in
["marriage is rampant. It is very
tMurhmg to see those Jewish
tudents and professors who are
"oder the influence of the New
* with the foes of Israel.
Vii.s phenomenon requires in-
CTtMiitf and deepening Jewish
education at home and in the
Jewish communities.
"Another fact wbich is of crave
concern for me is that close to
50 per cent of A.nerican Jewry
does not "belong" at all and may-
be as a result are lost for the
Jewish people as such "
Q. The question of Israeli
Hasbara in the I'S. is a delicate
one. As the head of the major
information arm of Israel in the
VS. how do you see it. especially
in the face of growing Arab pro-
paganda?
A. "We are facing growing
chaiienees an.i threats by Arab
propaganda They became more
sophisticated and have a tremen-
dous amount of money to pour
in We were informed that the
Arabs plan to spend $200 million
in the next few vears on propa-
ganda in the US. and Canada. In
1975 they have a budget of $35
million to be used directly and
through professional public rela-
tions fum- Israel, of course, does
not have anything near it. but
we ha\e the best Hasbara people
that can be found in Israel. Ef
fective Hasbara here will not
come unless Israel's friends and
Jewish leaders will be open to
new and unconventional ideas.
"These are not regular time-
the public has a direct bearing
on what happens in Washington.
We have no money, but we have
friends. They have to be coor-
dinated and this can be done by
a joint concerted effort on a na-
tional basis. It must be establish
ed for the metropolitan area of
New York. The lack of such a
task force has been especially
felt during and after the last
war This task force can be under
the auspices of the Presidents
Conference. If established, it
would become a network of Has-
bara using media people, pro-
fessionals, artists, etc. This. I be
lieve. could be a reply to Arab
and any other anti-Israel activ-
ity ."
Q. Recent reports pointed out
a mood of grave concern and
doubt among Jews here as to the
future of Israel. What can be
the impact of such a mood?
A. "The question of the mo-
rale, the confidence and the faith
IB Israel's future and Israel is IB
the heart of our Jewish and non-
Jewish friends. There is no great
er enemy, greater danger to
Israel, to the integrity of the
Jewish people and public opin-
ion. There is no justification for
it We tend to exaggerate the
of blame, nevertheless noted that President Sadat had au-
thorized him to tell the Israelis that:
Egypt was willing to permit Israeli-bound cargoes
through the Suez Canal and would turn a cold shoulder
toward the worldwide Arab economic boycott;
Egypt would state openly that force was not the way
to settle outstanding problems with Israel, and that they
were negotiable;
Egypt would renounce recourse to war during the
duration of an agreement reached on the basis of an Israeli
pullback.
Egypt would reaffirm the renunciation of war as
set forth in the 1974 agreement at Km. 101, with the ex-
ception of "only symbolic" movements forward of Egyptian
forces (beyond the Km. 101 parameters).
"This is a sad day for America," Dr. Kissinger declared
on his departure from Ben Gurion Airport. "We know it is
a sad day also for Israel, which needs and wants peace
so badly."
The growing anger among Israeli officials since his de-
parture has been as a consequence of the facile growth
in world opinion that Israel is a "stubborn obstacle" to
peace, without collateral world opinion that sees anything
to criticize in the Arabs.
negative aspects of the Yom Kip-
pur War. Soul-searching was a
good thing, we have learned a
lesson. I believe that we are go-
ing to come out of this experi-
ence a stronger and a better Is-
rael. My slogan is: 'there is no
room for complacency because
we face twosome probtenis.' But,
>et. by no moans should we tern
to despondency and despair. It's
strengthening our foes, eroding
American public opinion of Is-
rael, its strength and credibility.
"I am still convinced that the
most important thing in the
realm and world relations is a
visit to Israel. I don't call it tour-
ism, but a pilgrimage. A distress
ing fact is that onlv, ten per cent
of American /Jewry has visited
Israel in the lest 27 years."
Q. There is, it s.ms. a big
Israeli community in New York.
How many are there1
A. "The exact number is not
clear It is estimated that about
150.000 Israelis are living in New
York and vicinity "
Q. Who ere they, those Is-
raeli!?
A. "They can be divided into
Je irish Theologu
Honor (til Rabbis
NEW YORK, NYSixty-
three raW la from large and
small communities in the United
States, Mexico an.) Canada, both
con nai end ot Ranization-
al leader-, will be honored by
The Jewish Theological Sem-
inar) "i America at conven-
tion t" be held nn April 20 .it
Qrossiagers, New York.
Dr. Genoa i>. Cohen, Sem-
inary Chancellor, will confer the
ree ol Doctor of Divinity,
honoris causa, on the rabbis. In-
cluding Rabbi Rudolph J. Adler
of Congregation Ohev Shalom.
Orlando the Special academic
convocation which will open the
75th anniversary convention of
the Rabbinical Assembly, inter-
national association of Conserva-
tive rabbis. In addition, ei^ht
rabbis from the West Coast will
receive their degree at the Uni-
verstty of Judaism Commence-
ment in June.
The degrees are being confer-
red In recognition of rabbis
whose careen have, in the words
of Dr. Cohen, "brought honor
upon the Rabbinical Assembly,
the Seminary, and the Conserva-
tive Movement." Included in the
group are 34 rabbis who were
oidained at the Seminary.
PI the -'.* Others, a number re-
rope.in Institutions .is the Jewish
calved ordination at such Ku
Tneotogteal Seminary of Brea-
the I Beta Rabbinique de
three groups. The first group is
those Israelis who are 'hardiy
Israelis. Israelis who came here
as babies with their parents or
Israelis who immigrated to Israel
from other countries, lived in
Israel for a brief period and then
reimmigrated to the U.S.
"The second group are tii. :
raeli nomadS.'ThOSe Israelis who
travel around not knowing how
long they will stay here. And
there are the Yordim, those Is-
raelis who cut off all relations
with Israel But I must say that
the bulk, of the Israelis here con-
sider themselves Israelis and
maintain relations with Israel."
Q. What is the main reason
for Yerida"
A. "Economic. This is the
main reason although sometimes
other factors are involved as
trail. We try to persuade as many-
Israelis as possible to come back
home. We are giving this prob-
lem more thought. Recently; Is-
rael has offered returning Israelis
special economic privileges in
order to make their return as
easy as possible."
'til Seminary To
At Convocation
Prance; others received ordina-
tion from such American institu-
tions as the Jewish Institute of
Religion and Hebrew Theological
College.
In conferring the degrees
upon these rabbis, the Seminary
i- ,,t once honoring their person-
ai schievements, and paying
tribute to the Rabbinical As-
sembly, of which they are all
members.
The candidates have been
.selected on the basis of service
to their congregations, their
communities, and the Seminary,
which is the academic and spirit-
ual center Of the Conservative
Movement in American Judaism.
In addition to training rabbis,
cantors, teachers, and scholars,
the Seminary conducts several
nationwide programs for Jewish
youth, among them, the Ramah
camps. Its library has the most
tansies collection of Hebraica
and Judaica outside of Israel,
and its Jewish Museum is a
treasure bouse of Jewish cere-
monial objects from every era,
and almost every corner of the
world.
The Seminary conducts re-
ligious and educational programs
in Israel as well as in the United
Stale, and Canada, and its In-
stitute for RengtOUS and Social
Studies has pioneered in the
field of intergroup relations.
Fruit of Poverty
< miiiiiu.d from Page 7-
Perhaps the six-year-old will
make it with the help of her
brothers, most of whom will be
working by the time she reaches
final year High School.
We didn't -.peak to anyone else
in Josephtal that day. but wan-
dered around imprinting the
signs of poverty in our minds.
Landau returned a few days
later to take extra photographs.
This time, he had more in his
car than his photographic equip-
ment. The back of his car was
filled with used clothing, all of
it good quality and in good con-
dition.
He was directed to the home
of Emmy Siboni. a few years
back, named as Israel's "Mother
of the Year." Mrs. Siboni. though
far from wealthy herself, and
with a large family of her own,
still finds time to worry about
the needs of others. One of her
self appointed tasks is to dis-
tribute clothing to the poor.
She was delighted to receive
a bundle of clothes which were
still completely wearable, and
commented to Landau that most
of the clothes she receives are
In such a state of disrepair, that
she virtually has to take them
apart and remake them.
LANDAl CJJUt across several
poor families throughout the
day. but his attention was cap-
tured by IUhak and Rivka Per-tz
who came to Israel from Morocco
in 1963. The Peretz family in-
cludes seven children, the eldest
of whom is a 17-year-old daugh-
ter, who is completely beyond
control.
They live in Shchunat Eliahu,
the area which was attacked by
the terrorists. Iuhak. 42. works
in an orchard and brings home
IL 800 to IL 900 per month, de-
pending on the season. Electri-
city, gas and water cost the
family IL 122 per month. They
eat meat only once a week and
buy the most inexpensive fruit
and vegetables.
The total food bill is an aVer-
age of II- 700 per month. A grow-
ing family needs clothing. There
is a limit to the wearsbility of
hand-me-downs. They are per-
petually in debt to the grocer
and the draper.
Rivka Peretz, 33. spends IL
200 per month on clothes for the
family. They live in a Jewish
Agency apartment for which the
rental is subsidized.
RIVKA LOOKS closer to her
husband's age than her own This
is partly due to a serious car
accident which she had a couple
of years ago. It left her in a
state of constant fatigue and
prone to fainting fits. Welfare
authorities then supplied her
with a washing machine.
The family cannot afford to
pay for entertainment such as a
weekly movie. Whatever enter-
tainment they have is derived in
the basement clubhouse of their
apartment block, a converted
bomb shelter, which now serves
a dual purpose under the super-
vision of community center
counsellors.
The eldest Peretz child left
school without completing her
education, but her parents are
interested that the other children
should have a chance to finish
high school. Having been told
earlier in the piece by I.ilach
that there had been almost no
immigration to Beit Shean since
1963. Landau questioned people
as to their attitudes to new im-
migrants
THE GENERAL consensus was
that new immigrants would be
welcomed, but that there was
neither enough housing nor in-
dustry to attract them.
The Jewish Agency is setting
up an absorption center in the
area and is also planning to
build an additional high school.
But it will take something
truly dramatic to give Beit Shean
a proper face lift and to trans*
foim it into a thriving town.


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, April 4,
Envoy Reviews His Duty Tour
1973

By YITZHAK RABI
AFTER FOLK years of serving
as Consul General of Israel
in Ngej York. Ambassador David
Hivlyp will leave bis post early
this summer to be Israel's Am-
bassador in Norway.
In hi handsomely furnished
14tfc floor office, in a building
within walking distance of the
United Nations. Kivlin sat be-
hind a heavy wooden desk, cov-
ered with diplomatic mail and a
daily report ot .he Israeli press.
THESE YEARS, he noted.
v ere spent in the "city with the
largest Jewish community in the
mtff as head of "the largest
Israeli representation*' anywhere
on the globe.
Rivlin is a warm, soft-spoken
l*>i*>n who i Jewesses himself
carefully, watches his words as a
diplomat Bait, and conveys the
impression of a sincere traight-
forward" man.
After coffee, relaxing wit' the
first of several C he
smoked durum the 00 minute
interview, Rivlin expressed his
personal feelings about his work
as Consul General in New York.
-IT has been s very gratify-
ing experience and s privilege
for me to be Consul in New York
h -aid.
This is in sfc< and volume the
largest Israeli representation
anywhere in the world ll
the largest Israeli informal. >
arm At the same time, the larg-
i Jewiafl community in the
world is in New York and vicin
ity "
The 52-year-old Rivlin main-
tained that during those years he
ha.l the opportunity to know "the
soul and the guts'" of the Jewish
people in America, a statement
which is not surprising coming
from a man who participated in
hundreds of meetings at Jewish
communities, synagogues and
seminars as well as meeting Jew-,
ish leaders and "areha" (ordinary'
people).
As Consul General in New>
York. Rivlin was responsible for
the Deration c\J a Consulate staff
of over 100 operating in 13 dif-
ferent departments to carry out
the daily activities of the Con-
sulate.
THESE ACTIVITIES include
speaking engagements (at least
150 a month); contacts with the
entire media; disseminating in-
formation on Israel through
various channels; strengthening
cultural ties; dealing with the
academic world: acting on the
political and diplomatic level:
and keeping contacts with Jew-
ish and Zionist organizations
through the Jewish Liaison De-
partment of the Consulate.
Ambassador Rivlin is a former
political advisor to former Fore-
ign Minister Abba Ehan and a
former official spokesman and
director of Press Relations at the
Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem.
His previous assignments
abroad included the post of Con-
sul General to Montreal
Before joining Israel's diplo-
matic service. Rivlin was a jour
nhst and radio commentator in
Israel.
He was born in Jerusalem and
is a member of a prominent
family which settled in Jeru
sales* in 1800 He is a stfth gen
eratim sabra and grew up in the
city of his birth.
RbwUN IS a graduate of the
London University in interna-
tional Affairs. He studied philos
ophy, history and sociology at
the Bebrew University in Jeru
saleia snd is a graduate of the
Israel National Defense College
He served with the Jewish
Brigade of the British Army dur
ing She Second World War and
later held the rank of captain in
the Israeli army
During the interview. Rivlin
answered questions concerning
the efforts of the Consulate to
counter the growing impact of
Arab propaganda in the United
States, relations with the Amer-
ican Jewish community. Jewish
youth in Americi. the Israeli
community here and related is-
sues
ISRAELI HASBARA (informa-
tion) in the United States has
been a controversial issue for
time. es|iecially since the
Yom Kippur War. Rivlin is aware
of the criticism and admits that
I is a groat deal to !>e im-
proved. But he categorically
denies allegations that "nothing
is done' in the Hasbara field.
"He who says that there is no
I! i-bara in the U.S. either does
not know the facts or is delib-
erately distorting them." he said.
Rivlin expressed concern over
the growing number of young
Jews who marrv out of faith, and
the indifference of a large por-
tion of Jewish students to Israel
and Judaism. "This requires in-
.i-ing and deepening Jewish
education." Rivlin asserted.
WHILE HE praised the coop-
eration of Jewish and Zionist or-
tations with Israel. Rivlin
wa< nonetheless unhappy with the
fact that "the Jews (It America)
are terribly fragmented as they
ire overly organized.'
He ri iterated 'iis call, first
made at a press conference I few
months ago, to create a "Jewish
1.1 '..force" in New York, to in-
clude .,1! Jewish organizations, in
order to combat Arab propagan
da Pi II rwing are e\cer;>ts from
the inten lew
Q. Representing Uroel in the
largest Jewish community in the
wor.d. how WOOld you describe
the relationships and contacts be-
tween the two'.'
A. "The connection between
the Consulate and the Jewish
community in America is not
only a question of providing in-
formation and raising funds for
Israel. These contacts are very
important and have far reaching
aims. First, there is the goal of
instilling and deepening the
awareness of Israel's neutrality
in Jewish mind and Jewish life.
Secondly, we try to bring forth
the message of a Jewish. Hebrew
democratic society in order to
strengthen historical and spirit-
ual '. M and enhance Jewish edu-
cation and aliya to Israel. We
stress that a good nroud Jew
comes first and is Imperative for
any link and bind with Israel
and any understanding of a free
and independent Jewish state."
0. How -ire these contacts
le?
A. The largest Jewish com
unity in the world is in Nee
York. There are II many Jews
in New York ..nd vicinity a> in
1m k \\ i ire doing i great deal
of work with '< wish
tions ; the u nbrella or
gani_ torn- of I ie PTi
Ceaft re. s and the Jewish organ
Continued on Page 11
CONSUI GENERAL MVB RIYLIN
moves on to jost in Norway
let all those who are hungry
enter and eat...
celebrate the Passover"
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