The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00005

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewish Flcridiari
i
OF GREATER FORT EA1 OEROAEE
le 3 Number 10
Friday, May 17. 1974
l
wo Views of the Kissinger Whirlwind
i
irael Being Advised
o Other Alternative
By Tl VIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) S. i | State Henry A K.-
?4an discussions with Israeli leadei mmediately or. his arrival here
May 2.
He and his aides went directly to Premier Goida Meir's residence
[lunch and the first round of talks on a disengagement agreement
Syria.
-
DR. KISSINGtK
SINGER reportedly met
lately with Mrs Meir before
luncheon session which last-
about three hours. A further
ree-hour working session was
Md late in the day at the Prime
Inister's office. Mrs. Meir and
ministers, including Abba
n, Mo&he Dayan. Yitzhak Ra-
Yigal Allon. Shimon Peres.
Chief of Staff Mordechai Gur
id the Prime Minister's Office
(Director General Mordechai Ga-
|zi". participated on the Israeli
Kde. along with Simcha Dinitz.
the Israeli Ambassador to the
U.S.
American officials who partici-
pated included Undersecretary of
State Joseph J. Sisco. Ambassador
Ellsworth Bunker, and U.S. Am-
bassador to Israel, Kenneth Keat-
ing.
THERE WAS no immediate in-
formation as to the nature of
the talks at this meeting, merely
speculations based mainly on
leaks from the American delega-
Continued on Page 7
ANDffEf GffOMTXO
Sudden Meeting With Gromyko
Shows Soviet 'Return' in Force
By Special Report
JERUSALEM Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger's sudden
flight to Cyprus on Tuesday for
a meeting with Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko imme-
Local Bank
Purchases
Israel Bonds
The American National Bank
and Trust Company oi Fort Laud-
erdale has purchased a quarter
of a million dollar* in State of
Israel Bonds, according to Robert
If. Hermann, chairman of the
North Browari Lrael Bonds
i) >a: d of govern
The purchase was negotiated
through American National Bai I
official! J 11 Collins. Jr., presi-
dent; William L Heely. Jr., exec-
utive vice president, and James
C. Cox. senior viee president. It
represents the largest amount of
Israel Bonds ever bought by I
Fort Uuderdala area financial
institution.
Ambassador Aryeh Manor, vice
president of the Bank Leumi Le
Israel and ipi to Is-
rael's Finan M iter, visit* d
the bank few weeks ago during
a tour of the United States and
met with bank officials to discuss
the possibility of a major pur-
chase.
Subsequent meetings between
Hermann. Morton Pine, chairman
of Synagogues, and Milton M
Parson, executive director of the
South Florida Israel Bond Or-
ganization, led directors of Amer-
ican National Bank to approve
the transaction.
diately following his trip to Am-
man. Jordan, for talks with King
Hussein, has drawn the lines in
the Middle East far more clear-
ly tr.an ever before.
Detente, as envisioned by the
U.S. State Department, has meant
bringing the Soviet Union into
the negotiating phase with the
Arabs as they had not been be-
f jre
11MERE IS no secret in the
fact "hat Moscow has been anger-
ed by Dr. Kissinger's whirlwind
diplomacy in the Middle E East
the October war the kind
of diplomacy that brought a
ceasetire and troop disengament
between Israel and Egypt along
the Suez Canal.
The Russians have been fu-
rious that all this was accom-
plished without them, and that
peace might be brought to the
area at the same time that Soviet
stock would decline.
All that is changed now. The
Kissinger-Gromyko meeting on
Cyprus has signaled the fact that
the Soviets are back in business
in the Middle East
IX FACT, the furious fighting
between Israel and Syria on the
Continued on Page 3
Accepting the check from American National Bank president
J H Collins. Jr. (right) for the purchase of S250.000 in State of
Israel Bonds are Morton Pine (left). Israel Bonds chairman
of synagogues, and Robert M. Hermann, chairman of the
North Broward Israel Bonds board of governors.
L.S. Seen Pressuring
For Big Concessions
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA; L"i i v; is grow
Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger is trying to achieve dia i
ment of Syrian and Isiaeli forces mainly at Israel's expense and
without her willing agreement..
He apparently has discarded the long held U.S. policy of non-
imposition" of an agreement in the Middle East and that the partiei
themselves must negotiate it to
be effective.
A CONTRARY approach has
been projected by the Soviet
Union which has argued that the
superpowers must impose a set-
tlement.
Some analysts here feel that
Kissinger may have accepted the
Soviet view on this during his
talks with Soviet Foreign Minis-
ter Andrei Gromvko in Geneva on
April 29.
According to reports from the
specially-selected American cor-
respondents aboard Kissinger's
plane shuttling in the Middle
East. Kissinger himself used h:;
Continued on Page 10


ALSO BLEW UP PLANES
'We Raided Shemona',
Arab Terrorists Claim
NEW YORK (JTA) The terrorist group which mas-
sacred 18 persons in Kiryat Shemona April 11 is now also claim-
ing responsibility for killing an Israeli military attache in Wash-
ington last year and for sabotaging two commercial airliners in
1970.
Abous el-Abbas, spokesman for the Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine-General Command, said in an interview
in the Beirut newspaper, "As-Safa," that his group killed Israeli
Continued on Page II


Argentines Hold Holy Mass
For Former Nazi Criminal
A mass has been held at the
ary here for the hange I Nazi war
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
Church of Our Lady of the Ro-
criminal Joseph Tiso.
It was organized by the World Congress of S >vaks and the
Slovak Association of Argentina.
Msgr. Luis J. Tome officiated,
and speeches were made by R. -
Gen. Horacio Queirol and Prof.
Jordan Genta who spoke of Tiso
as a martvr.
29th annive:
of Hitler's
JOSEPH TISO went to the sal-
lows in Bratislava. Slovakia, in
1947 after his conviction for war
crimes that included the ma--..
cres and deportation of tens of
thousands of Slovakian Jews.
Ti>o had been the leader of
the Slovakian Fascist Popular
Party and became the first Prime
Minister and later President of
the Independent Slovak Republic
created by Hitler in occupied
viechoslovakia.
He was an active collaborator
witn Adolf Eichmann.
The Rev. Father Julian Agero,
parish priest of San Ignacio. cat-
egorically denied reports that a
mass would be celebrated for
Hitler at his church Tuesday, the
Father Agero s;ii he felt com-
pelled to refute malicious iun;
that a Hitler mass would be cel-
ebrated by a group ca li Ig itself
the "Nationalist Fatherland
Movement."
BUT POSTERS painted on
walls in the cenl the city
here have announced the mass.
The posters also Gelbard,
Bronner, Timerman Re.-t in
Peace," "Bolsheviks be hanged,"
Zionists to the crematorium,"
and "Catholic anti-Zionist com-
mand."
Gelbard is the Argentine Fi-
nance Minister; Bronner is presi-
dent of the General Economic
Confederation, a Peronist group;
and Timerman is editor of the
daily "La Opinion."


Page 2
-JenistntrMtor of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, May 1"
Klvma Mark* lafl Aunivt nvavy Ami
Installs Now Slate Of Officers
Blyma Group. North BtOWS I
( bapter of H
1974,7.3 Qfjfjj
25. -t the Margate Jewisl Cei
The me. hid) Barked the
ip'j | rat aim > mu j. u
under the cha;nnnn- Mrs
Bt-it K< nikaff.
In-ta'.lation officer was Mrs.
Sara Brook-, a forme: member of
the Hadassah National Boa d who
has been active in the Organiza-
tion tor mere than .to yean Mrs.
Brooks, a life member oi flat
>ih. Is currentlj a national board
abac of the Women's League
c United Synagogue. A religious
ol teacher in Buffalo. NY..
- presently vacationing in
Margate
a- .-he installed each ol Blj
. Mr>. B*'cki. pmi .->
the posl Kh a
IK" I Is
U.'. then with
aample.
Taking the oath of office wan
Mu. leddy Krimsky, presidant;
Mrs Ruth T xecutivt v<
presidant; Mrs. Be-s Schrager.
nuinbership vice president; Mis
Lil am vice presi-
dent Mrs M !l Gioioaa, record-
ing secretary: Mrs. G etches
\\ inn. corresponding retary;
Mrs. Julia Auerbach. financial
secretary, and Mrs Miriam Stl-
garman. treasurer.
Entertainment included -
by Mrs. Minnie Teicher, accom-
panied by Mrs Liiliai \
and Israeli dances led by Mrs.
Resnikoff.
Blyma Group of Hadds-sch officers for the
coming year include 'from left to right) Mrs.
Teddy Krimsky, president; Mrs. Moliie
Gioiosa recording secretary; Mrs. Miriam
Sugarman, treasurer; Mrs. Getchen W
corresponding secretary; Mrs. Ruth I:
executive vice president: Mrs. Be
membership vice president
Guv. program vice president, and
Auerbach. financial secretary.
BroMard Countv Seniors To

Hold Oiie-Dav Fair May 29
Beat Tin- Clock' Fund-Raiser For Klvma Hadaseah
The Broward Count}
Citizens Pair the !ir.-t e-.ent of
it, kind will be held tiom 9:30
am. to 4 p.m.. Wedi May
29. at the Armory. 400 SW M St.,
Fort Lauderdale.
The fair is sponsored by the
Service Aflaac) for Senior Citi-
aena, a United Way Agency.
The 40 aaaior citizens clubs in
Broward County, other agencies
for senior citizens, and local busi-
ness will display crafts, art work
and projects, Services that are
available to the elderly will be
exhibited. Agencies or businesses
interested in display- ray call
RSVP Retired Senior Volunteer
ami at 522 3761.
Howard Klein i* serving as
tha'rman of this first Broward
County Senior Citizens Fair.
K.ein. president of the Coral Ma-
nors Nursing Home in Pompano.
Lixlge And BBW
Chapter Install
New Officers
The joint installation of B'nai
B'rith Women Tamarac Chapter
1749 and Blue Star- Lodge No.
2912. was held at the Margate
Jewish Center April 28.
Past president Morris Glicks-
man (Councilman of Tamaraci
past piesident Estelle FreeJ. and
officers were discharged by Col.
Phil Cohen and Adele Beckerman
from District Five Council of
B nai B'rith The installation of
the new presidents Norman Karr
and Judith Korn and their re-
spective officers followed.
Honored guests included Ta-
marar Mayor Dwit,ht E John
and Mrs. Jehn-on and Council-
woman Helen Msasaro.
Enteitainment was furnished
by the B'nai Shalom S Re-
freshment srere served to a
b< I and gui-
A genera! mealing of the B'r.a:
B'rith Worn, srac Chu:
1479. was to be held na
rac Jewish Cente Plaza 'el Sol.
8753 NW 57th St. Tamar.
Tiursday. at 1 p.m.
JEFFER
^^HMRM HOMES IV
DIRECTORS
Irwan J'<*-
Md.n Mtf, A'v.r J"f
188-11 HilSKX Art HCU :
1283 CONEY ISIANO Wt 9WVH
212'776-1W
'3386WUXIf HWY MWM
305 947-1185
hfmaMky Sonr/lma F0
625 S OLIVf VE .W PAIV BEACH
305 8334413
SapttMnMky >!> F0
Chapels avai.ar
communities m Ne* >
throughout th* M 3-~
W Paim Bvki a'eas
Uyrt
says he ex;'
irts
to
'
e
-'

an Jul u
Braniuuo, Laudera-ile bakes
Agues Bush UFUten
The a Brown. Fort Lauderdale:
Ray Borlie. exacutivc director of
Help on W heels a I n;"ed Way
ncy; and Fred Haier, pn
dent of the Senior Citizens Clubs
of Broward County. Haller will
receive ar. I : continuing
services to senior citizens.
Chicken Unlimited Family Res-
tauraaii, Whi< I gives a ten per-
cent discount U) senior citizens,
is donating 1.000 free cbtckca
dinners to be served at the fall
Entertainment will be furnish-
ed by the Mandolin Orehe>tra
from Hollywood, the Tamarac
Karoodle Band, the Hawaiian
Gardens Choral Group and the
Senior Citizens Larks from the
Foit Laudexdale Recreation De-
partment.
APT. IN TEL-AVIV
For rtnt 2 bedroom in
center ol Tel-Aviv for
May June
in front of M J
erS| SI J Broward
I
and
was

Mar) I '
\
Kosher Meals At 200 Holiday Inn*
Summe* travelers will '
over 200 Holiday Inns throu.
the western hemisphere row fea-
ture Schreiber "UO" K
gourmet dinners.
According to an es
Gold 4 Seiger Enterpriser es
elusive mppliera of these I
to the Holiday Inn chain, this
represents an increase of over 75
Inns since tke inceptioa of th
program some five months
v complete listing of th< I
with the city locations or
addresses and telephone num-
i- now available at r.e
Charge Additionally, the H
Inn reservations system has now
recorded the inns featuring
meal;. and this information can
be obtained at the time of the
reservation
The Holid"- !rn-Kofhei MtaU
elop-
1049 J : era >n Av .
:<8104
i ird's si
l
hou' and set

and the pe so

n on the
a / idiac watch
S400 In .
made b) tl
licity chairman


I
I
Furnished 3 bedroom opt.
in Ronrat-Aviv from
August for 1 year or
less Call 538-6539
until 5 P.M.
Fashion Show Highlight Of
B'nai B'rith Women Meeting
A fashion show will highlight
the next meeting of the B'nai
B'r.th Women of Ft. Lau.!
being he'.d on Tuesday at 12 30
p.m. at the Rou kj R
Center. 1720 NW 60th St. Sun-
rise
Members will model the out
fits, which may be purchased 31
reduced prices. Fiiends and
neifbhon will be welcome. Re-
freshments will be served.
e
NOW
SERVING
NORTH
BROWARD
COUNTY
V
ENORAH
CHAPELS FUNERAL DIRECTORS
59/5 PARK DR/VE
MARGATE FLORIDA
Te ec*om 971-3330
Mark Weissman, L.E.
J. Thomas, F.D.
J
Thefirst
# J^iverside Chapel
in Broward County
is now open
in Hollywood.
5801 Hollvwood Boulevard
Telephone 920-1010
RIVERSIDE
MCM :- s- .i.vi't
. | v
,- ., t
>>>jrBo*aks :-$'> v- aim"
. ...
*wr N RuMa. '&


Friday, May 17. 1974
*'Jenisii Fhricfiau? of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
'i 0
s
v>
Browarcl Region Of ORT To Install
New Officers. Chapter Presidents
The Broward Region of Wom-
en's Ameriran ORT (Organiza-
tion for Rehabilitation through
Training) will hold its third an-
nual installation of officers at a
gala dinner dance Sunday at
Schrafft's Inn, Ft. Lauderdale.
Mrs. Leonard Pechenik, mem-
ber of the National Executive
Committee will install the new
officers, including Mrs. Russell
Paul, president; Mrs. Bernie Cha-
zin, chairman of the executive
committee: Mrs Louis Bers. Mrs.
Robert Golden. Mrs. Bernard
Goldman. Mrs. Edward Goldstein,
Mrs. Bernard Plotkin and Mrs.
Herbert Wormser, vice presi-
dents; Mrs. Sheldon Klaff, treas-
urer; Mrs. Selwyn Kent, financial
and recording secretary; Mrs. Jay
Rosen, corresponding secretary
and Mrs. Edward Light, parlia-
mentarian.
The following chapter presi-
dents will also be installed: Mrs.
R Jack Lewis. Coral Ridge: Mrs.
Max Apfel, Hallandale. Mrs. John
Kaminsky, Hallandale Beach;
Mrs. Eve Kerner. Hillcrest Hills:
Mrs. Arnold Breslow, Hollywood,
and Mrs Robert Zarcsky, Holly-
wood Beach.
Also Mrs. Ralph Rose and Mrs.
Julian Jacobson, Hollywood Hills;
Mrs. Rita Leyman, Lauderdale;
Mrs. William Reyn, Meadow-
brook Towers; Mrs. Julius Serot,
Palm-Aire 21: Mrs. Frank Michel-
son. Pine Hill; Mrs. Barrie Stern,
Plantation: Mrs. Bernardo Kriger.
Sh?ridan Heights; Mrs. Lawrence
Chait, South Ocean; Mrs. Flor-
ence Cohen, Sunverrary; Mrs.
Ruby Farber, The Estates, and
Mrs. Albeit Osborne, Woodlands
North.
Reservations can be made by
calling Mrs. Herbeit Wormser.
chairman, or the ORT office.
The Broward Region of Wom-
en's American ORT has more
than 2,100 members in its 21
chapters, serving the community
as individuals in a wide variety
of concerns and interests. To
achieve its goals, Women's Amer-
ican ORT has gone into all parts
of the world setting up its op-
erations wherever vocational
training can rehabilitate the un-
derprivileged and raise the eco-
nomic level of families.
ORT is the largest non-govern-
mental vocational training agency
in the world. {
Cyprus Meeting
Shows Soviets'
Mideast Force
Continued from Page 1
Golan Heights, if not the recent
terrorist attack on Kiryat She-
nuna, can be directly attributed
to Soviet intervention.
What the Cyprus meeting
mean; is that Dr. Kissinger -poke
up for a weakened U.S. an,I there-
fore Israeli position, while Giom-
yko presented i hard Syrian line.
About the only mitigating cir-
cumstance in the Cyp us meel
rtt that Gromyko had initially
demanded that Kissinger meet
him in Damascus, where he as
busy consulting with his Arab
CliC!:'-
GBOMTKO FINALLY ace.
to tiie "neutral" Cj pros rnei
place to which he flew at the
same Ume that Kissingei flew
there from Jerusalem, thus giving
the world the impression thai
there would be no "superpower"
deal on the Middle East, which,
of course, there was.
NEW 1, 2 & 3
BEDROOM APTS.
STARTING AT $135
Now accepting applications for
new rental opts. Occupancy ap-
proximately July 1, 1974. location
3841 NW 21 St. (off State Rd. 7)
Ft. lauderdale. (1 bedroom from
$135, 2 bedroom from SI 59, 3
bedroom from SI80 Includes all
utilities. Weekdays 10-6 phone
731-0790 $25 deposit at time of
application required. (FHA 236
qualifications)
Ambassador Robert J. McClos-
key, acting as spokesman for Dr.
ger attempted to decmphas-
Ize the meaning of the Cyprus
ing, which he said would also
on the agenda further dis-
cussion of the SALT talks pnr-
sude between the two men the
h e r. bel ii e i n Switzerland.
Initial reports of the meeting
in the wake ol an Israi l
I decision that Israel is
to make ce tain terri-
i --:ons.
THESE INCLUDE Israel's giv-
ip cl Kuneitra, the provi-
sional capital of the Golan
Heights, which she captured
th a 300-mile salient in
Yum Kippur War. but that
such a withdrawal would be bas-
ed on Syrian clarifications, par-
ticular!} on the Prisoners of War.
The Cabinet decision on Ku-
neitra came after Dr. Kissinger
flatly told the Israelis that with
out its relinquishment there was
no point in hoping for troop dis-
engagement with the Syrians.
I .: also >aid it would permit
United Nations control of the
peak of Mount Hermon, but that
Israel would have to control the
eastern slopes of the region.
SOME OF the Soviet pressure
it is felt, exercised by Gromyko
at Cyprus included a Syrian
warning from President Assad
that his country is in a much bet
ter position now than Egypt was
at the end of the October war
when its Third Army was encir
n Israeli forces.
s --,. i has observed that Syria
has 500 | ins stretching back t<
ICUS that can hit exposed
Israeli troops.
Teenage Hotline
Is Supported By
Contributions
"Teenage Hotline," a crisis in-
tervention telephone service that
has been operating in this com-
munity for almost five years, was
designed to offer a friendly ear
to adolescents and others in
stress. Since its inception ap-
proximately 20.000 calls have
been answered.
Venereal disease and pregnan-
cy are the most common prob-
lems. Narcotics, boy-girl relation-
ships, runaways, parent-child re-
lationships and teenage alcohol-
ism are among the situations
faced by troubled callers from
North Miami Beach to the Palm
Beach County line. Help is onlv
a nhono call away 966-1050 or
522-3141.
It is a completely volunteer
program. Prospective telephone
operators are interviewed and
trained by professionals in the
community who have agreed to
give their time and special skills.
There is never any personal
communication or face to face
confrontation between caller and
operator.
Teenage Hotline was founded
by Chai Lodge B'nai B'rith and
is now supported by contribu-
tions from individuals and groups
and by fund-raising activities.
The cost of essentials such as
telephone, stationery, postage and
advertising runs approximately
$10 per day. Teenage Hotline
needs volunteer operators, 16
years of age and over plus fi-
nancial support for the program.
To he an -Angel" for Teenage
Hotline for one or two days or
more send checks made pay-
able to Teenage Hotline to P.O.
Box 6430. Hollywood. Fla. 33021.
One 'Angel" who declined to
be identified, said "I'm happy to
contribute because you help teen-
agers help themselves." "Angels"
for the months of January and
February' included Stanley Green
spun. Mr. and Mrs James Franz,
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Snnnen-
klar, Ben Jon Gerber, Dr. George
in, Lewis Cohn, Italian.
Ami rican Civic League. San
Jules Cordon Mr. and Mrs
Jordan Snyder, Arnold F, rber. |
Adams, Rosi nthal an.1 Cohen
C.P.A/S, Albert and Birdie Ein-
Foundation. Dr. Y M Glai
er. Jud je Angeline B. Weir and
Abe Manges.
CHAZAN-
CANTOR
Wanted for over flow service
at Conservative Congregation
in Hallandale for the Yamim
Noraim. Telephone 920-9100
or 927-8040.
i 27th Year
WALLPAPER
BROWARD
PAINT
AND WALLPAPER CO
71? N Andrews Aye
Phone S23-0S77
We do
business the
right way.

1700 We*t Oafc *"d i'fc B .d .
f< ude"M> *.a 1U11
Pfton* 7J* '330
OAKLAND TOYOTA
Intensive 'Shomrei YisraeP
Enrollment Campaign Begins
A special Israel Bonds cam-
paign designed to expand the role
of every Jewish family in support
of Israel's economy has begun in
the Fort Lauderdale Pompano
Beach area, according to Robert
M. Hermann, chairman of the
North Broward Israel Bonds
Board of Governors.
The campaign will concentrate
on the enrollment of "Shomrei
Yisrael" (Guardians of Israel),
purchasers of $1,000 or more in
State of Israel Bonds.
More than 500 synagogues
across the United States have
scheduled events for May and
June specifically to enroll mem-
bers of their congregations as
Shomrei Yisrael.
The Shomrei Yisrael campaign
will attempt to reach 10,000 fam-
ilies in South Florida, and ar-
range their purchases of a min-
imum of $1,000. to achieve $18
million in Israel Bond sales to-
wards South Florida's $35 million
quota in 1974.
The 1974 Israel Bonds cam-
paign has undertaken the respon-
sibility of providing the necessary
dollars for Israel's $1.07 billion
development budget, compared to
$642 million for the fiscal year
which ended Mar. 31.
The development budget pro-
vides the funds for basic econom-
ic enterprises during the pres-
ent crisis.
Give it All Back-Leftist
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Meir Payil, a new far-left mem-
ber of the Knesset on a tour of
the United States, told a small
non-Jewish audience here at the
Friends Meeting House that Is-
rael will not perish even without
U.S. military aid.
Payil was reported to have told
his audience of 35 that it is neces-
sary to influence American Jews
to pressure Israel to surrender all
the territory it acquired in the
Six-Day War.
In earlier remarks to about 75
persons at Temple Sinai. Payil
said that Israel should return, in
stages, most of the lands obtain-
ed in 1967, including East Jeru-
salem, but dii not mention influ-
encing An\ ..can Jews.
Payil has spoken in New York,
Philadelphia and Boston, and will
visit Los Angeles, Chicago and
probably San Francisco.
GROUP TRAVEL The Wav To Go
JOIN NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN GROUP TOURS
Don't Miss The Opportunity To Travel With Conqenial
Companions and A Courier To Handle All Detoils.
Europe, Israel, Greek Islands. Africa,
Mexico, Orient, South Pacific etc.
CARIBBEAN CRUISES ON NEW ROYAL VIKING SEA
RHEA D. NATHAN, TOUR CHAIRMAN 942-1449
BROCHURE ON REQUEST RESERVE NOW
Everybody Welcome
Please clip and save for future reference
DOES YOUR CHILD WANT
TO BE A MEMBER OF
THE MARCHING BAND?
We have the largest staff of
degreed and professional
music instructors in South
Florida.
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riuno uud Qrgaa Leaaossi
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Page 4
*fenisttkrrt*ir of Greater Fort Lauderd.le
Friday, May 17, I974
fjfwist Florid tin Nixon's Plan for Funds to Egypt
OF GREATER FORT LAUDEROALB
ptmne s:s-4$o"
OFFICE and PUWT U'O^I.E. 6th St.. Miami. Fla. 33132
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1-373-4*05
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The Jewish Floridian Ooes Not Guarantee The Kithrwth
I Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published BI-Weekly
Second C .;o Paid at Miami. Fla.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and ths Jewish Weekly.
Member of the iwish Telegraphic Aoency. Seven Arts Feature Svnai.
cate. Worldwide N'.-wt Service. National Editorial Association. American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspspers. and the Florii'a Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATfcS: tLocil Area) One Year $4.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
Number 10
10 SIVAN 5734
Volume 3
Friday, May 17, 1974
Nixon Must Explain
II columnist Robert Novak's report is correct that some
of those deleted expletives in President Nixon's transcrip-
tion of his Watergate-related conversations stand for "little
Jew boy," then it seems to us that once and ior all the Pres-
ident's feet must be put to the fire.
Once and far all, he must be forced to say that Novak
is either right or wrong more specifically, that he uses
these expressions, or he does not.
We can not go along with Sen. Jacob Javits (R., N.Y.),
for example, that "little Jew boy" is one of those "obsceni-
ties" men use in the privacy of their conversation and that
they ought to be "understood" as really being inoffensive.
The truth is that not even Javits believes this. If he did,
he wouldn't agree with us and he does that a presi-
dential explanation is in order.
The expression, "little Jew boy," is vile, crude, ignorant.
It is not a locker room four-letter word. It is a sociological
attitude that is bigoted and corrupt.
The horror of it in a President's thinking processes is
beyond the imagination of all decently-motivated men. The
President can not be permitted to appear before audiences
around the country spouting about "the good things in
America" while leaving this unresolved.
If Novak is right, then the President diminishes "the
good things in America" he loves to talk about so long as
he refuses to explain or apologize.
Greater Involvement
During a recent debate in New York, Shulamit Aloni,
the outspoken Knesset member and leader of Israel's Civil
Rights Party, and Rabbi Joachim Prnz. the equally out-
spoken chairman of the governing council of the World
Jewish Congress, stated that the dialogue between Amer-
ican Jews and Israelis should not be limited to fund-raising
alone.
They both said the relationship should encompass all
aspects of Israel's domestic and international problems.
We agree.
If. as everyone believes, the survival and well-being
of Israel is vital to all Jews, then Jews abroad have the
obligation to speak out on these issues. Certainly the "Who
is a Jew" question, the type of territorial settlement Israel
makes in the Middle East, and the Palestinian issue can
affect the American Jewish community as much as it does
Israel.
But the central problem, as we see it, is that Mrs.
Aloni's remarks were made before an American audience.
Will Israelis see it the same way? What is needed is that
she should make these same remarks before Israeli
audiences.
American Jews would be delighted to be more than
mere money-gatherers for Israel. Would Israelis be de-
lighted to let them be more than that?
Standing Pat With JIVF
More than IL 2 million will be invested by the Jewish
National Fund in order to enlarge the reservoirs near
Kuneitra and Heital and to dig a new reservoir near Bu-
temia in the Golan.
This is an interesting report on the JNF's activities and
brings to mind that the JNf is also buying up large amounts
of land around Jerusalem these days from Arabs willing to
sell the land.
Obviously, what the Arabs are hoping for is the kind
of Middle Eastern peace settlement that will force Israel out
of Jerusalem (Jordan) and out of Kuneitra and Heital (Syria).
Then, they can return to "their" lands and keep the money,
too.
They can have their cake and eat it too.
Once before, the Arabs "willingly" sold lands to the
JNF and exited or exited without selling at all. That
was in 1948, when the British advised them to leave in an-
ticipation of returning to an extinct Israel after an Israeli
defeat in the War of Liberation.
Israel did not oblige in 1948. Whether or not she must
oblige in Jerusalem and Kuneitra remains to be seen. We'll
stand pat with the JNF's cards.
By JOSEPH AI.SOP
Ixw tngeles Ttmes Syndicate
WASHINGTON The NiXOU
Administration has already un-
veiled its decision to ask Con-
gress for $250 million of eco-
nomic aid for Egypt. Even with
that development on the record,
however, few people understand
the really enormous dimensions
of what may be coming in the
Middle East.
In brief, if President Anwar Er
Sadat completes the radical
change of course that he has been
quite publicly talking about, it
should be blatantly obvious that
the Egyptian army will then have
to be provided with large quan-
tities of American arms.
IF Yin raise this subject now,
of course, it causes a fine display
of "faintin.: in coils" by Adminis-
tration policymakers.
But practical common sense
should be enough to tell you that
President Sadat would never
have gone so far as he has al-
ready without private assurances
that American arms would surely
be available to him in case of
Deed.
The assurances must have been
a lot more easy to give because,
if the time comes for an arms
request. President Sadat will also
be paying cash on the barrel
head.
IT LS KNOWN, in fact, that
King Faisal of Saudi Arabia and
the sheik of Kuwait have already
promised to finance the needed
Egyptian arms purchases if the
Egyptian armed forces are cut
off from their present Soviet
sources of supply.
It will be ironical if this turns
out to be the way of it. to be
sure, for the money will be earn-
ed by the vastly higher crude oil
prices we are now paying.
Common sense indicates that
the United States will have to be
the main Egyptian aims supplier
for two excellent reasons. On the
one hand. President Sadat has a
big army and a large air force.
now entirely Soviet-equippe.i and
with most advanced equipment at
that.
YET EOYPT cannot po-
make the complete reversal of
alliances that President Sadat has
been publicly talking about and
still continue to receive Soviet
arms.
The Soviets have already made
that much quite dear, using the
Cairo diplomatic grapevine as is
thou habit in delicate situations
Furthermore, as President Sadat
has made quite clear himself, the
Kremlin has also taken the meat-
ax step of cutting off all deliv-
eries of spare parts to Egypt.
On the other hand, it will be
an -normous task to re-equip the
entire Egyptian armed forces
from the underclothes outward.
THE FRENCH, the British, the
Japanese and the West Germans
will all be eager for their share
in the resulting armaments or-
ders. Probably they will get a
share.
In reality, however, only Amer-
ican industiy can possibly meel
Pit-: lent BUge potential
requirements within a reason-
able period of time.
The lion's share of the orders
for armament.- will not only have
to be placed in the United States
Idition, one can foresee that
the l nited States will also have
to assist Egypt ad interim by
helping to secure needed Soviet
parts from third countries
like China, for instance.
In sum, the whole development
to be miite remarkablj
if it occurs at all.
ONE II \s to say if it occurs
at all" because there is stiii an
open quest! m about President
Sadat carrying out his announced
intentions to the full if the Syr-
ians flatly reject disengagement
with the Israelis.
But aitbo'gh the outcome is
still unceitain. it i- already time
to stop treating the new Middle
Eastern developments with the
befuddled surprise that is so
common here.
JOStm 41S0F
It is time, in fact, to say that
we may well be witn
very instant the n:
feat of diplomacy in the .
century.
THREE YEARS ago at San
Clemente. Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger rigbtl) bat
almost too forthrightly said that
"expelling" the Soviets. (:
Egypt was a aim of
America's Mideastern polk) M
the time, this seemed so lm|
sible that there was loud, patron-
izing laughter.
But if President Sadat ci
through his reversal of allian
the Soviets will indeed be ex-
pelled.
B) the same token.
Badtt will be show .
manship and a remarkabli isp
of Eg) pt's pra< tics! Inten -
Israelis, meanwhile, maj have to
pay a heavy price in the Sin I
but anything they pay will be
worth the beginning of some kind
BStOOishiafl but also because ev-
eryone the United States cares
about will be a net gainer
must sty "good luck" to Presi-
dent Sadat and his friend. Dr K.
of real peace in the Middle East
THE SAUDIS and Kui
will gat their money's worth. I i >,
in the form of badly needed po-
litical stability in their area
The diplomatic feat we nay
now be witnessing Is M dazzling/
in fact, not only because it is so
President Hum Mates America
MY
against Rich-
ard Nixon began with the
beginning of his vice presidency
Before that, during his days as
a congressman. I simply felt to-
ward him the way I feel toward
any other politician whom I le-
gard either as a bigot or else as
a greedy opportunist intent on
demeaning the public trust.
BIT WHiC.V he got that one
heartbeat away from the White
House that's when I really be-
came sufficiently galvanized in
my conviction to consider him my
personal enemy.
Over the years, the battle has
been costly.
When Nixon announced for the
presidency in the 1968 campaign,
along with many others of hi.- op-
ponents. I meticulously outlined
his record. It was not a pretty
picture.
The results were predictable.
The nation he had divided even
before the McCarthy era into the
naive halves of Nixon-Americans
and Eastern seaboard pinkniks ig-
nored the many warnings and
came to his immediate defense.
SO DISTINGUISHED a pub-
lisher as John S. Knight, intox-
icated by the early anticipation of
a GOP victory, accused me in a
column befitting a sophomore
in journalism of taking out after
Nixon because a man of my "per-
suasion" had obviously not for-
given Nixon for the Alger Hiss
conviction.
The truth is that I did not even
have Alger Hiss in mind. After
all these years, I am still not sure
about Hiss, whether he was guil-
ty, or whether he was innocent.
I was even less sure then.
BECAUSE of my uncertainty,
I 1^
Mindlin
I would never include him in an
attack on Nixon'i credibility a-
hunter of Communists. Besides.
by 1968. Nixon's well-documented
excesses were far more extraor-
dinary than his one single con-
viction on grounds the court
found reasonable however ar-
guable some thought the grounds
to be
But the Knight response was
forged in the smithy of the Nixon
mentality already paralyzing us
as a people.
It was, itself, the supreme sym-
bol of that consciousness ac
cusatory. judgmental, by inuendo
bigoted and just sufficiently
veiled as to be short of the kind
of character assassination that
not even the careless reader
could miss
"PERSUASION" MEANS many
things, but by common accept-
ance it is an overly-polite eu-
phemism for religion. If you re-
fer to a persons persuasion,"
you are talking about his religion
while pretending that you are
talking about something else.
This kind of prearranged pol-
itesse is of course necessary only
when the religion to which you
are referring is not Mcia
ceptable." either as a prop<
or a- a state of being.
"Persuasion" is. fo: I
perfect ambiguity for
which in some circle- is at I
description of damnat.
It a malediction
IN TRANSLATION, wl the
Knight observation meant <*u
that only a Jew would be
Nixon.
Other kinds of trans r |
would elicit even mor
log meanings, particular.)
equate Jew with n
Eastern .seaboard, pink:..*., or
outright Communist.
You have only to recall HI *-
ay General Baxbe'i
last month about Jews and "
niuni-ts to get a feel for this k Bd
of language. As a Nixm
pointee. he is of course I
spokesman for the Nixon v
view.
HOWEVER UNHAPPY
the 1968 Nixon campa.
been, it was at least predictable^
The 1972 campaign WSI ma>
thing else. In the 1972 campaign;
the very Jews who tndei |
the Nixon divisiwn.'-- the N I
appeal to patriotism as a d.
for personal greed, the Nixon
capacity for prejudice these
very Jews joined his campaign
witii an euthusiasm that I ionni
bitter.
AND THEY were professional
Jews, too. professional ii
sense that they had long yean o
mi vice with organizations in tl
cause against intolerance, against
prejudgment. against political
cynicism, shysterism and hoou-
gaui&nv
Continue* en Page 8


Friday, May 17. 1974
^Jc^istifhridHair, of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
| Jewish Family Service
Holds 12lh Annual Meeting
1
9
%
Jewish Famliy Service of !
ard I held 121
nua] mcWnr-BTfr pim-T. i
14, in the Town H
of the Home Federal Building,
1720 Harrison St., Hollywood.
constantly expanding .1 w-
inity in Broward
ha- brought with it an ever-
iafipetainl demani for the p.o-

by this agency. Requests
onununitiei in the i
of the county have been
"hat the agency has
I COUBMllor to that area
located in the Jewish Fed-
n of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale offices. 707 N Federal Hwy ,
Tort Lauderdale.
in 750 individuals and
families torn by marital conflict.
bewildered by the behavior of
children, concerned about grow-
jnp old. or faced with pressures
and anxieties in a world of chang-
ing values and standards, have
sought help for their problem*.
An additional 300 families were
given Information and referral
sen ices. Additionally, Jewish
Family Service provides an adop-
tion program.
Mrs. Richard Leben. nominat-
ing committee chairman, will
te for the board ot
dire hiding Robert Baer,
Ifn Bai Charles
Dubin. Rabbi Robert Frazin. Fred
Stanley G
mour in E Iws d I
'. ;i rberl Heidi n Doug-
n. Colonel R. J.
Joel Killer, Dr Ed-
\ thur Plum,
sffer, I1 ''
Tobiu, Dr.
Joel V '..... | Sheldon Wil
lens, Df Paul v\ inieh, Mrs. Sam-
uel Winn and David Yorra.
Office- to be presented an
Jame Foa Hi ;. ; -dent
Mark Fried, vice president;
Fmanuel Borenstein, treasurer,
and Mrs. Richard Temlak, secre-
tary.
The nominating committee in-
clude- Mrt Richard Leben. chair
man: Fred Greene, Douglas C.
Kaplan. Mr- Aaron Scheeter.
Henry Serfer. Mrs, Richard Tem-
lak and Dr. Paul Winick.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County jg a family and
child agency suppoited by the
United Way of Broward County,
and is also a major local reci-
pient of the Greater Hollywood
and Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Federations' funds.
The annual meeting is open to
the total community Since seat-
ing capacity is limited, reserva-
tions should be made by phoning
the agency office. Refreshments
will be served
Rabbi Skop Will Review
Ernest Gutman's Book
"The Heb.ew Christian.*' by
Ernest C.utman. will be reviewed
by Rahbi Morris A. Skop. Tues-
day May 28. at 8 p.m. in Temple
Sholom, 132 si: Uth Ave., Pom-
pano Beach.
Mr Gutman, an author and lec-
turer presently residing in Ft.
Lauderdale, will be present The
i .. will lude refresh-
ment; Mi nd friends are
invil
Swiss says cheese.
Swiss says fondua
L
/Sfss Knight says delicious Wings imported from
sorted Gruyere Cheese, perfect for snacks, parties,
lunch boxes. And for en-
tertaining. Swiss Knight
Fondue in a classic recipe
of Gruyere and Emmental
cheeses, white wine and
Kirsch. Swiss Knight
Cheese-Swiss Knight
Cheese Fondue. More than
that you cannot say.
Mir Cheese Co., Inc., Stamford, Connecticut 06905
JAMCS FOX MILLiR
Cong. Fascell
To dominate
Students
All young persons desiring to
entering the Military. Naval. Air
Force, and Merchant Marine
Academies in mid-1975, who are
residents of the 15th Congression-
al District of Florida should file
their applications no later than
Tuesday, Oct. 1. Congressman
D.mte B. Fascell (D-Fla.) has ad-
vised.
The 15th Congressional District
includes South Dade and Monroe
Counties.
Fascell will nominate a prin
cipal and nine alternates to each
of the classes entering the Mil
itary, Naval, and Air Force
Academics in June and July. 1975.
Anyone In South Dade and
>e Counties who is inter-
ested in attending a service acid
emy should write immediately t
Congressman Dante B. Fascell,
i S House of Representatives.
V'.i!:i?.-r.D. DC" 2ill!-
CONSERVATIVE CONGREGA-
TION In Hallandale is interest-
ed in a Young Man to conduct
at an over flow service the
Schachreisim during Yarnin
Noraim; capable also, if pos-
sible, to read the Tor.'h. blow
the Shofar and lead in the
English readings. Telephone
920-9100 or 927-8040.
RELIEVE
GAS PAINS
AT
GERALD VOLKSWAGEN
600 W. SUNRISE
(I lAllflFROAil 7*1 8WW
Percy Greenblatt (right) presents the State of Israel Bonds
Scroll of Honor to Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Rothman at a re-
cent Hawaiian Gardens VI "Niqht in Israel The Rothmans
were honored tor their distinguished service in support of
Israel's economic development program through the Israel
Bonds campaign. Greenblatt served as chairman of the
Hawaiian Gardens VI Israel Bonds event; Sony Kaufman
was cochairman.
HAVE YOU CALLED US? TO SEE HOW
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CERT WARNER, MIRIAM GOODMAN, LILLIAN TUCKER
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Friday, May 17. 1974
+Jefsi>fkrXtia* Ontlw For! Lauderdale
Page 7
There's No Alternative, Israel Cautioned
\
*
Continued from Page 1
tion and transmitted through
American reporters accompany-
ing Kissinger and his entourage.
According to some sources,
however, there was little hope on
the part of Kissinger that the
present round of talks would lead
to substantive results. But hope
was expressed that enough of
^groundwork will have been laid
to set in motion a renewed round
of talks in Geneva.
Discussion with Kissinger in-
cluded the problem of the 4.000
Syrian Jews, the reported mur-
ders of Jews in Syria and the
arrests of two Jews who were ac-
B'nai BVith
Opens Hollvwood
Regional Office
\;,ol(i L Ellison, executive |
! i. ildent of District Grant
Lodge No. 5, B'nai B'rith, head-
quartered in Atlanta, Gfl. has
announced the opening of a re-
al office in Suite 950 of the
Hollywood Bread Building. 1747
Van Buren St, Hollywood.
District Grand Lodge No. 5
covers 168 lodges from Maryland
to Key Weal and consists ol
19.000 members of B'nai B'rith,
the oldest and largest Jewish
s, rvice organization in the world,
now !"- itf 131st year.
The regional office will service
70 li with over 10.000 m
ners in the v' ite of
will be under Ux
onal director Col Phi ;
Cohen.
Hollywood Mayoi Da'.; K< t-
ing and Hallandale Maj
1.. Wemkle cut the ceremonial
ribbon at the opening.
Those attending inclu
dents and officers of Ds
Broward County lodges as
the South Florida and Bi
Palm Beach Councils of B'nai
B'rith Lodges, and othi
ntinjunity leaders,
cused of the murders on what Is-
rael considers trumped up
charges.
KISSINGER WAS asked to
raise these questions with Presi-
dent Hafez Assad in Damascus
and to ask Assad to allow Syrian
Jews to emigrate.
Meanwhile, according to re-
ports coming here from Damas-
cus, thousands of persons march-
ed through the streets, chanting
slogans urging Assad to remain
firm by rejecting all peace pro-
posals that do not meet Syria's
terms.
The terms Syria wants in-
cluded in the peac plan are an
Israeli commitment to withdraw
completely from all occupied Syr-
ian territory and a guarantee to
all Palestinians of national rights.
PRIME MINISTER Mahmoud
Ayoubi said in an Interview May
1 in Beirut that Syria would not
sisjn any disengagement agree-
ment with Israel unless it in-
cluded pledges on these two vital
issues.
Kissinger's visit, his fifth since
the end of the Yom Kippur War,
was clouded by unconfirmed re-
ports and speculations both as to
U.S. proposals and the Israel gov-
ernment's policy.
Some sources denied Egyptian
reports that Israel had agreed to
withdraw from the Golan Heights
town ol Kuneitra to demonstrate
its flexibility to the Syrians. Oth-
er sources claimed, however, that
the reports are substantially cor-
rect
These sources cited recent
statements from official quarters
playing down Kuneitra's military
importance. Reliable sources said
that the Cabinet is divided on the
matter.
PREMIER MEIR and Labor
Party Knesseter Aharon Yariv
were said to oppose any such
withdrawal particularly in the
early phases of the talks. Dayan
and. significantly, the Labor Par-
ty's new leader, Rabin, reported-
ly favor it.
One unconfirmed report said
Israel was ready to yield Kunei-
tra if Syria accepts its demand on
buffer zones and thinning out
of forces. Israel is giving first
priority, however, to an immedi-
ate exchange of POW's without
which disengagement talks can-
not move forward.
Mrs. Meir told Kissinger per-
sonally of Israel's dismay at the
U.S. vote in the Security Council
for a resolution condemning Is-
rael's April 12 commando raid
into Lebanon without mentioning
its motivation the massacre of
18 Israelis in Kiryat Shemona by
terrorists from Lebanese terri-
tory.
OBSERVERS SAID that Mrs.
Meir pointed out to Kissinger
that Israel takes a very serious
view of the fact that the U.S. did
not simplj abstain but voted in
favor of a totally unjust resolu-
tion.

Temple Sholom
(ioiffViiis !>
Young Students
The annual confirmation
ice of Temple Sholom wai
Sunday, at 3 p.m.
Rabbi Morris A. Stop confirm-
ed the class of 13 rtud< nts and
Cantor Jacob J. Rcr
the Cantata, -What is 1
blighting historic events
Jewish Biblical and Modern His
toi-y.
Sam Ma.ks. chairman ol i
Education Ctmmitt*
phen Tolces, temple president,
rded the diplomas and tempi.
glfU
The class of 1974 ind
r th -on ol Mrs. Audrej 1'"
Frederic, son of Dr. A Mi
Farber; Ronald, ton ol D 8
li.,. i Saff; Elaine, dau
Mr. and Mrs. Martin R
Sherry, daughter of Mr. and
Murray Lane; Pamela, dau
i Mr. and Mr* Jerome W
e .....f Di and Mrs Sam
bleiaidT*.^ K"n:,1,L >,,n "f *
er in Na#i>a\id Morel; David an l
. >ns of Mr. and Mrs. Stan
ley Goldstein; Richard, son ol
Mrs. Stephen Park, r: Jay,
Mr. and Mrs Martin BerUnan.
and Marc, son of Judge and Mrs
Gerald Mager.
The students directed the son
ice ritual and received the rabbi's
daf at the Open Ark during
the ceremonies which preceded
the Festival of Pentecost mark-
ing the -Birthday" of the Ten
-nandments.
aO0<** rtf*vX
i** 0*o*G,k
ij***

***

X
ISRAEL
MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
I SHOULD LIKE TO BE ENROLLED AS A MEMBER OF
SHOMREI ISRAEL PLEASE SEND ME A CURRENT PROSPECTUS
OF THE ISRAEL RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT BONDS.
NAME .
ADDRESS
CITV.
STATE--.
ZIP
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 2A, Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Miami Tel. 5316731 Broward Tel. 922-9457

Lr- A
MlMi


Pag 8
>knUtfkrklinr of Grt.t.r Fort l.oderdale
Soviet Jewish Problem in Russian Hands
CLEVELAND (JTA) A
prominent American Jewish lead-
er UWd that the response
to the problem of Soviet Jewry
Beatl with the Russian
government.
Rabbi Israel Miller, chairman
ef the Conference of Presidents
ef Major American Jewish Or-
ganizations, told delegates attend-
ee biennial convention of the
National Jewish Welfare Board
that the solution to the problem
of Soviet Jewry "cannot be found
in the United States, in Israel, in
the concern of humanitarians the
world over, in the protests of the
Jewish community and even in
the courageous voice of Soviet
Jews demanding their rights.
"The response to the problem
still must come from the Krem-
lin."
AMERICAN JEWRY'S efforts.
Rabbi Miller said, must be toward
exercising "whatever pressures
can be brought to bear upon the
Russian decision-makers to ease
their policy of restricting emigra-
tion.
This is the reason for our un-
swerving support of the Jackson-
Vanik Bill in the Congress and of
the initiatives of President Nixon
and Secretary of State Kissinger
in their conversations with the
Russian leaders.
"We await a response from the
Kremlin in acts, not in words.
Were the emigration figures to
rise and the distribution of the
emigrants to include proportion-
ately the Jews of Moscow. Lenin-
grad. Kiev and Odessa, we would
know the answer.
Were Sylva Zalmanson and
the other prisoners of conscience
i itences commuted
or lightened, we would take note
of the change.
"We favor I
ships with the Soviet I nion, but
detente is a tW0waj and
the I afffc must b discernible in
1 | ci.rect.ons. No act of the

CONVENTION

Russians will go unnoticed ei-
ther positively or negatively. We
are still awaiting a positive re-
sponse."
RABBI MILLER, president of
the American Zionist Federation.
is a national vice president of
JWB.
In a resolution on Soviet Jew-
ry. JWB reiterated it? own "un-
wavering support of enactment
of the Jackson Mills Vanik
Amendment by the United States
Congress."
JWB resolved to continue to
intensify its "eforts on behalf of
Soviet Jewry in communities
throughout the country."
JWB is a member of the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
H -Cr ir
Permissible to Jews
KIAMESHA LAKE. N. Y.
(JTA) A personal view of
what is permissible to Jews and
what is not in such sensitive areas
of personal and family life as
abortion, birth control, artificial
insemination and the treatment
of defective children were out-
lined by Rabbi Ben-Zion Bokser,
of the Forest Hills Jewish Cen-
ter, in a paper prepared for de-
livery at the 74th annual con-
vention of the Rabbinical As-
sembly, the rabbinical branch of
rvative Judaism.
ft ft
Working Women's Council
TEL AVIV (JTA) Pre-
mie Go! l Meii declared here
that Israel ..<.>:. would determine
it- own fate and warned against
the expression of doubts and "un-
justified guilt feelings'' that she
said would only encourage Is-
rael's enemies bent on its destruc-
tion.
Mrs. Meir addressed 3.00 wom-
en attending the 11th national
convention of the Moetzet Ha-
poalot (Working Women's Coun-
cil i which represents nearly
600.000 women members of His-
tadrut.
Referring to the latest political
developments, she said that the
current diplomacy of U.S. Secre-
tary of State Henry A. issinger
should be neither underestimated
nor overrate
* t *
Workn-en's Circle
KIAMESHA LAKE. N. Y.
(JTA) Sanford Solender, ex-
ecutive vice president of the New-
York Federation of Jewish Phil-
anthropies, charged here that
anti-poverty agencies ignored the
Jewish poor in New York City
and said his and other organiza-
tions were taking legal action to
make welfare centers more ac-
cesible and more hospitable for
poverty-stricken Jews seeking as-
sistance.
Solender addressed 1.200 dele-
gates attending the biennial con-
vention of tne Workmen's Circle,
the national Jewish labor frater-
nanal order, at the Concern Ho-
tel.
ft ft
Jewish Organization Conference
LONDON (JTA) World
Jewish leaders meeting here over
the weekend have expressed se-
rious concern over the sharp drop
in the number of Russian Jews
permitted to leave for Israel dur-
ing the first four monihs of this
year and the continuing harass-
ment of Jews who apply for exit
visas.
The matter of Soviet Jews
topped the agenda at the meet-
ing of the Presidium of the Con-
ference of Jewish Organizations
(COJOi attended by Isrieh lead-
ers and icpresentatives of Jewish
communities all over the world.
Israel Wrestles With Disengagement 'Give'
By TUVIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
care-taker Cabinet convened to
Wrestle with the major issues of
an Israeli-Syrian disengagement
accord on which firm policies
must be established before U. S.
Secretary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer arrived last Thursday.
Officials here do not seem to
share Kissinger's optimism that
an agreement will be attained.
The tenlency of the government,
hterefore. is to stick to its pre-
vious policy which allows no with-
drawal > from any territory cap-
tured from Syria In the 1967 Six-
Day War.
ACCORDING to reliable sourc-
es. Kissinger asked Israel to re-
verse that policy in the interests
of a disengagement agreement
this despite his statement on his
arrival at Ben-Gurion Airport
about seeking peace, not conces-
sions.
No final decisions were taken
at the meeting, and the Cabinet
reconvened Friday after the ini-
tial round of talks with Dr. Kis-
singer-
The meeting just prior to his
arrival was attended by Israels
envov to Washington. Ambassa-
dor Simcha Dinitz. who briefed
the ministers on the latest devel-
opments in U.S.-Israeli relations,
and Chief of Staff Gen. Morde-
chai Cur who reported on the
military situation on the Syrian
front.
THE CABINET'S main task is
to make policy decisions on five
outstanding matters connected
with an Israeli-Syrian separation
f forces.

FILLING IN
BACKGROUND
i
The first of these is withdrawal
from the Golan Heights town of
Kuncitra which Israeli forces cap-
tured in June. 1967, and which
Kissinger asked Israel to surren-
der to meet one of the conditions
of Syrian President Hafez Assad
for disengagement.
The second question concerns
hraeli military positions on lit
Hermon whose strategic 9.200-
foot peak has been the objective
of bitter fighting between Israeli
and Syrian forces for the past
three weeas.
The feeling here is that the
government will not agree to
withdraw its forces from M*. Her-
mon as long as Syria continues to
wage its war of attrition.
THE THIRD major problem is
the nature of a buffer zone that
would be established between Is-
raeli and Syrian forces in the
framework of disengagement.
Israel wants the zone to be
policed by units of the United Na-
tions Emergency Force (UNEF)
which has worked very well so
far in the Sinai buffer zone sep-
arating Israeli and Egyptian
forces.
Syria objects to the presence of
UN military units and insists that
any buffer zone established on its
front be confined to members of
the UN Truce Observers Organi-
zation (UNTSO) which includes
Soviet military personnel.
The fourth issue confronting
the government is how negotia-
tions with the Syrians are con-
tinued after Kissinger has left.
On the Egyptian front last Jan-
uary, these tatts were held at a
UN checkpoint midway between
the military lines of both sides.
HERE AGAIN, Damascus re-
fuses to follow the Egyptian pat-
tern and demands that the fur-
ther talks be moved to Geneva
where the two superpowersU S.
and USSRpresumably would be
looking over the shoulders of the
negotiators.
The Israeli position, according
to reliable reports, is that mo concrete points of a disengage-
ment accord should have been
concluded while Dr. Kissinger
Ml in the region serving as an
intermediary and the techn>al
details worked out later in Ge-
neva.
The fifth major point to be
taken up by the Cabinet concerns
Israel's approach to the Syrian
demand that any separation of
forces agreement must include a
prior Israeli commitment to with-
draw completely from the Golan
Heights and all territories oc-
cupied in 1967.
THERE ARE, in addition, other
issues such as an end to terrorist
activities on the northern front
and Israel's absolute prerequisite
that any agreement with Syria
must include a speedy exchange
of all POW-.
singer expects Israel to make the
"first move" toward an agree-
ment with Syria and in that re-
spect tried to persuade Israel to
give up Kuneitra.
According to reliable sources,
the government is aware that Kis-
Th" soda all
the plicht of Jews in Syria and
other An
of fi .
of .! wish
education in I ra.
A/A Maiks Anniversary
CHH AGO -- JTA) "The
Unite -. which gave birth
to the State of Israel in 1948. to-
some 25 years later, find- a
voice only to condemn Israel."
asserted Rabbi Stanley Rabino-
witz. spiritual leader of Ada- Is-
rael Congregation, Washington,
DC.
Rabbi Rabinowttz. also a vice
chairman of the B'nai B'rith
Youth Commission and a former
international president of Alpeh
Zadik Aleph. the boy's component
of the B'nai B'rith Youth Organi-
zation, made his remarks Satur-
day in a symposium during the
observance of hte int-rnational
AZA's golden anniversary re-
union.
Friday, May 17. 1974
Pine Crest Marks
40th Anniversary
Port Lauderdale'a Fine Crestj
school -narked I Wl iimiverj
,;,rv last week with two days of,
festivil adth an ':
fashioned barbecue and squara,
dance Wednes
Psychologist Dl Joyce Brothei
the piest speaker
Thursday's special Founder's Pi
on marking the birth
of Pine Crest's founder. Dr. Hu
McMUlen
Dr. Brothers, a syndicated col-
umnist and V levisiofl personality,
and the Hon. Virginia S. Young
of Fort Lauderdale were the
featured speakers at a Thurs-i
day evening riinnerdancc celebraj
tion in th" Yenetia Ballroom oi
Pier 66 with co'umnist Mike Mcr-j
gan as master of ceremonies.
Mrs Theodore K. Friedt an<
Mrs. William Masher cochair*
the barbecue and square danci
the Founder's Hay program was
under the cha rmanship of Mrs.
William Grhtditeh. Jr., and Mrs.
Ral'h T. Friedmann. Jr. was
chairman of the dinner dance.
IIP MINDLIN
America Humiliated
in Oval Office
Continued from Page 4
In 1972. for some res*
spiritual bellies were : .. Like
the Jew I oi l.-racl on tl
Yom Kippu:. thej foresi
tional challen '
gate was alrea Ij a cat
sue.
They, many of whom
example I I ight u> w h
was to sea en out and I
compromised and the
were now themselves consi
with compromise and corruption.
THi:\ TURNED a b!
the meaning of Water) i
it. | ear to the minions of
Iy pleading for justice in its
wake
And SO, where are th( >.
' f ours, now thai
of the mo.-t odmus mat.
Water., ti ihowi
Nixon who in his prival
sation- to people u little
Jew bov""
t> j -.' ho iced onto ti
to hoist the Nixon bam
can they raci
day to help brin
THEY CAN nOl Mil N II
fliction pai alyze: then, >spe< ia Iy
because thej who i re his
! In .pal advei
i ictims. But it leaves u>
all infirm.
Whei th< President
publisher friends) i-
uou- allest ffc-
of the i rust, in I a
end, he is contemptuous "' the
Wh om American
.I, w boj h( insull
jean^ of evi i rtiat la the
oi \ ii ica of it* In-
laws, its pnnc.p.es
ing.
at la not true of the Pre'i-
dent, v ho musl be the beet of us,
then tli one to guard
the nation against those Amer-
icans for whom it is not true and
who are the worst o! us.
TUB w ITESGATE "Jew boy,"
I nothing elsl
in hi- past, ihowj us Nixon in
the gutters of the na'. I
ii- metaphysical ""',._
ward whi< h we tooflAJ D.
Ing 1 :p.
We find him in ne gutters, an
enl i wind up gram-
maphone, Incessantly repeating
politii... i liches la natal low fi-
delity unreal and unbelievable.
For me, at least, Nixon's 'Jew
boy" i- the Mimmation of his ca-
reer For those Americans, net
Jusl Jews, who feel the assault in
it on themselves as free men, it
says i\ there la to >ay
about Nixon iron, his very be-
lt i- continue
the .-'. nst aim.
Film Library In Miami Is
ADL
Being Established B
The Fl rida Regional office of
the Ant. Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith will become the lite
of a major film library on sub-
jects relating to the field of inter-
group relations.
In making the announcement
of the plan. Jack Kassewitz. chair-
man of the League's Regional
Board, said. The ADL film
catalog represents one of the na-
tion's most comprehensive infor-
mational resources for both edu-
cators and the general public."
Films in the new library' will
cover topics including Jews and
other minorities. Israel, prejudice
and discrimination, police-commu-
nity relations, and human rela-
tions training techniques in
schools and business
George Bernstein, chairman of
ADL's Executive Committee, said
the agency is preparing to house
film library in a new multi-
purpose icreenlnfl room located
in its regional office facilities in
Miami.
We have over two hundred
titles in our 1974 audio-visual
catalog which contains films
ful for a broad range of
interest groups." Berns"
"With the new filn.
housed in Miami we expet-i
crease both the scope and effi-
ciency of ADL's ertensive molti
media services in Florida. The
new facility will also provide
more opportunities for our staff
to consult with teachers, clergy,
business and civic group pro-
grammers, by previewing our
films and advising on their most
effective use."
Copies of the 1974 audio-visual
catalog may be obtained from the
ADL Regional Office. 907 Seybold
Bldg, Miami.
ut
m
if
\t
--
a-
M
X-
...
I*
n,
1


Friday, May 17. 1374
*Mnist Fforidll&n of Greater Fort Lauderdala
Page 9
Recommend Conservative Rabbinate Ordain Women
KIAMESKA LAKE, NY. A
recommendation that the Rabbin-
ical Assembly, the rabbinical or-
ganization of Conservative Ju-
daism, accept ordained women
for membership was scheduled to
be made by Dr. Judah Nadich
in his presidential report to be
delivered at the RA's 74th an-
nual convention.
The convention, to be attended
by 1,100 Conservative rabbis, was
scheduled at the Concord Hotel
here May 5 to 9.
The recommendation is conso-
nant with the convention's theme
which is Judaism's reaction to
contemporary and future ethical
issues.
In announcing this emphasis of
the convention. Rabbi Nadich
pointed out that the three initial
sessions, "Grappling with a The-
ology for our Lives," would pro-
viHc a framework far all subse-
quent discussions as well.
The idea of admitting women
[to RA membership follows a de-
[cision announced last September
'when the Assembly's Committee
[on Jewish La,w and Standards
ruled that women may be count-
ed in a minyan, the quorum for
>T.
ft
Brandt Resigns
BONN -- Wesl German Chan-
Willy Brandt is one na-
tional leader who accepted full
responsibility for a scandal in his
admini>tration and then resigned.
Brandt announced his resigns*
tion Monday following the sensa-
tional revelation that his aide,
Guenter Guiilaume. had been a
(time spy tot the East Ger-
l Communist regime.
Foreign Minister Walter Scheel
be taking over as caretaker
chancellor.
But speculation among Israeli
diplomats here concerns W est
Germany's recent switch away
Lorn open identification with Is-
rael and a more self-interested
wooing of the Arab nations and
Arab oil.
The quesrTon is whether Scheel,
a leader of the liberal Free Dem-
ocratic Party, a partner in
Biandt's Social Democratic coali-
tion, will continue this open
break or once again pursue
friendly ties to Israel.
ii -U ft
Arair.co on the Griddle
NEW YORK The State Di-
vision of Human Rights will or-
der the Arabian American Oil
Company (Aramco) to take "af-
firmative action" to employ Jews
in professional jobs in it New
York offices, following an inves-
tigation of Arambo requested by
the American Jewish Congress.
The investigation showed that
the oil company has no Jews in
such jobs, although it emp!o>- a
"minimal'1 number in non-profes-
s.onal classifications, Human
Rights Commissioner Jack M. Sa-
ble told the Congress in a letter
reporting the results of his sur-
vey.
ft ft ft
Golda Gives Nancy Mazel Tov
JERUSALEM Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger, upon
arriving in Israel, took his new
wife. Nancy, to meet Premier
Golda Meir on the eve of Mrs.
Meir's "6th birthday.
Receiving the couple in her res-
idence. Mrs. Meir congratulated
them and gave Nancy a wedding
gift of two ancient glass bottles,
one for perfume and the other
lor tears.
The Premier explained that ac-
cording to an ancient custom
every wife must have a bottle to
collect her tears of sorrow when-
ever her husband is away.
Mrs. Kissinger '.ater went sight-
seeing while her hu.-band met
with Israeli officials-
ft ft ft
'Consregation' at Atlanta
Penitentiary
ATLANTA A 43 year oH
housewife and former Hebrew
teacher has stimulated regular
worship services an! Jewish dis-
cussion meetings for some 40
Jewish inmates who comprise
Temple Yaacov, the Jewsh con-
gregation at the Atlanta federal
penitentiary.
Mrs. Connie Giniger, mother
of two grown daughters and an
activist in B'nai B'rith community
programs in Atlanta, has been
bringing candles and grape juice
wine is banned for the Sab-
bath blessings and arranging cel-
ebrations like the seder for the
past 18 months.
A lettei from one of the in-
mates to B'nai B'rith headquar-
ters in Washington, asking for
prayer books, got Mrs. Giniger
started. Her first visit to the pris-
on was an emotional experience.
She said she kept thinking of all
the prison movies she had seen.
Normally, 15 inmates occasion-
ally attended the makeshift Fri-
day services, but word had spread
of her first visit and on that day
40 came.
She recalls that, in the conver-
sation that followed, the prison-
er- asked for prayer books and
books on Jewish history and cul-
ture, as well as contact with Jews
"on the outside."
Lord Byron's Anniversary Recalls 'Hebrew Melodies,'
His Complete Freedom from Prejudice
By CAROLE ROSEN
[ London Chronicle Syndicate
[ In 1814. Lord Byron accepted a
ommission from a young Jewish
fcusician called Isaac Nathan to
write poetry for a selection of
Jvery beautiful Hebrew melodies
It undoubted antiquity, some of
yhich are proved to have been
ing by the Hebrews before the
struction of the Temple of
erusalem."
Nathan later commented that
"Lord Byron, who exhibited a
\*r ijar feeling of commiseration
' Jews and who was en-
I'lVllinf from the prevalent
against the race of
lien, has J'l-quently remarked to
that he deemed the existence
Jews, as a dUtinct race of men.
ie most wonderful instance of
le ill effects of persecution."
PERHAPS IT was his lameness
id the hardship of his early up-
bringing which first developed
lyron's sympathy with the op-
pressed and downtrodden. His
jetic imagination was soon fired
ith enthusiasm for writing on
iblical subjects, and he hoped
tiat this pious project would con-
vince the aloof Annabella Mil-
bar.ke tnat she had become his
^reforminu angel."
On a more mundane level, both
Nathan and Byron hoped to cash
on the contemporary popular-
of collections of national poe-
and songs.
To the disgust of his more
liobbish and anti Semitic
fiends. Byron grew to enjoy the
)mpanionship of his handsome
wish composer more and more,
lesides asking him to dinner,
lyron developed the habit of get-
|ng Nathan to come and sing to
im to ease his moods of depres-
lon.
\T**E PATRONAGE of the no-
*d was a considerable feath-
.i Nathan's cap He also man-
6ed to have himself appointed
singing teacher to Princess Char-
lotte, only child of the Prince
tegent and Heiress to the Eng-
ish Crown.
Nathan claimed that he too was
f royal descent and that his
.randfather was Stanislaus Poni-
Itowski, the last King of Poland.
The story was not an impos-
sibility given the taste for Jewish
fcnistresses among a number of
Polish nobles in the 18th century.
ALL THAT is known about
Jathan's father is that he was
in. cantor of the Jewish com-
' rniarhnrv and sent
rein as a rabbi at
the first Anglo-Jewish boarding
school, established in Cambridge Ti ,i i C/s,l ii_ _i xi_ r
at the beginning of the 19th cen- This is the 150th anniversary of the death of
tury by the Reverend Solomon I Lord Byron. His fame as a poet, and hero of
Greek nationalism against the Turks overshad-
ows his championship of another opprressed
minority the Jews.
Lyon from Prague.
But young Isaac decided he
preferred to be a musician and
went to London to train with an
Italian singing teacher, Domenico
Corri.
Instead of the "one or two
songs'" for which Nathan origin-
ally asked. Byron provided him
with 30 poems which were pub-
lished with music in two volumes.
Although these "Hebrew Mel-
odies" were advertised as being
"upwards of 1.000 years old."
Nathan's settings turned out to
be conventional Regency ballads
with no trace of traditional litur-
gical melodies.
BYRON'S POEMS are a curi-
ous mixture of biblical subjects
such as "Jeptha's Daughter."
"Saul." "From Job," and the
much parodied "Destruction of
Semnachenld." and the very non-
biblical love poems, the most fa-
mous of which is "She walks in
beauty like the night."
The "Hebrew Melodies" made
Nathan famous, particularly as he
... it ....... ....... :ji:, i .,.
had persuaded the most popular
singer of the time, the Jewish
tenor John Braham (whose
daughter became Lady Walde-
grave' to include them in all his
concerts.
Byron's espousal of the Jewish
cause was not so well received by
the critic-, driving him to com-
plain "Curse the Melodies and the
Tribes to Boot."
to his friend's hand.
As It was Passover, Nathan had
th n-ppy though: of sending him
a parcel of matzot with the
hope that they would ensure his
y on his travels.
They were not fated to meet
again. Byron died an exiie in
i\ and Nathan eventually
ended his long and chequered
career in Australia in 1864 where
he was run over by Sydney's first
horse-drawn tram.
"Rivington's Reviewing Par-
sons" acidly commented: "Lord
Byron has accepted the proffered
chaplet of his Jewish brethren,
and may now be considered as
poet laureate to the synagogue."
BIT BYRON had more serious
trouble to concern him. Shunned
by society and with his marriage
in ruins, only Nathan's singing
could console him.
Before he left England in
April, 1316. he pressed EL 50 in-
HEID CONSTELLATION OF TOP ORGANIZATIONAL OFFICES
Prominent Zionist Bonchek Passes at 84
NEW YORK fJTA) Sam-
uel Bonchek, a founder and vet-
eran leader of the Labor Zionist
Movement of America, died Apr.
30 at Beth Israel Hospital after a
prolonged illness. He was 84.
II. was an assistant and inti-
mate friend of some of the found-
er^ of the State of Israel, includ-
ing Premier Golda Meir and the
late David Ben-Gurion.
AT HIS death. Bonchek was
honoraiy president of the Labor
Zionist Alliance, which he had
served as national president from
1963 through 1971.
During an active life, spanning
some 70 years. Bonchek was
among the founders and leaders
of numerous other agencies, in-
cluding the National Committee
for Labor Israel, Labor Depart-
ment of the Jewish National
Fund. Government of Israel
Bonds. National Committee for
the Jewish Folk Schools, Amer-
ican Jewish Congress, and others.
Born in 1890 in Lomze, Poland,
his father was a noted Hebrew
teacher. At 14, he was already-
active in the nascent Jewish La-
bor movement, helping in strikes
and rs a gun runner for the self-
defense of Jewish workers.
FACING ARREST and exile
alter one such exploit, he fled to
the United States, arriving in
Cleveland. 0.. in 1906 at the age
of 16.
There, he rlso went to work in
a pocketbook factory and became
active in tne Labor Zionist move-
ment.
ents were recognized, and he was
Invited by Labor Zionist leaders
to come to New York as an assist
ant to the secretary.
In the course of the next few
yean, Bonchek rose rapidly in
Labor Zionist leadership and was
assigned numerous important
tasks connected with the organi-
zation of the American Jewish
Congress, the newly-created Pal-
estine Workers Fund (forerunner
of the present Israel Histadrut)
and the Labor Zionist press.
HIS GREATEST efforts were
invested in helping to build a
fraternal branch of the move-
ment, formerly known as Far-
band-Labor Zionist Order. He de-
ated families.
Before becoming national pres-
fices and served for more than
25 years as chairman of the New
By the time he was 20, his tal-
votcd himself mainly to member-
ship enrollment and the estab-
lishment of new branches all
over the United States and Can-
ada. He was largely instrumental
in the growth of the organiza-
tion to more than 40.000 affili-
ident. he held various other of-
Yoik City Committee.
BEFORE THE end of his term
as president in 1971, he helped
brin^ about the unification with
the Farband of the members and
branches of the LZOA-Poale
Zion and the American Habonim
Association, a long cherished
dream.
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Page 10
* Jtwist ncrkf&r <**< *>rt Uudardal.
Friday, May 17, 1974
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it\i {-calendar
SUNDAY, MAY 19
** Temple Emanu-El Congregation Meeting. 8 p.m.
B'nai B'rith, 9:30 a.m., Margate Jewish Center
MONDAY, MAY 2
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood, Installation
Brandeis Women Study Group
Armon Hadassah Board Meeting
Tl ESDAY. MAY 21
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood Board 9:45 a.m.
Masada B'nai B'rith Men
Temple Sholom Sisterhood, General Meeting
Ft. Lauderdale B'nai B'rith Women. General Meeting
Golda Meir Hadassah Meeting Palmaire
Margate Jewish Center Temple Board Meeting. 7:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 22
Ahavah B'nai B'rith. General Meeting
Jewish Federation. Board Meeting
JWV &. Aux. No. 730. Board Meeting
Coral Ridge ORT. Board Meeting
American Jewish Congress Convention
Ft. Lauderdale ORT. General Meeting. Elections
THURSDAY, MAY 23
Blyma Hadassah Meeting. Margate Jewish Center, Noon
SATURDAY, MAY 25
Temple Emanu-El Men's Club Installation Dinner Dance
SUNDAY, MAY 26
Temple Emanu-El Confirmation, 7 p.m.
Margate Jewish Center Men's Club Board Meeting. 9:30 a.m.
MONDAY, MAY 27
Shavuoth
WEDNESDAY, MAY 29
Brandeis University Women, Installation
FRIDAY, MAY 31
Temple Emanu-El. Congregation-Board Installation
Margate Jewish Center Men's Club Weekend. Eden Roc Ho-
tel, Miami Beach
;
U.S. Presses Israel
For Concessions
Continued from Page 1
"moderating influence" upon Is-
rael to accept conditions that in-
clude surrender of territory in
the Golan Heights acquired in the
Six-Daj War to protect Israelis
in the croplands below.
IN ITS present politically weak
and divided position and virtual
total dependence on US. weapons
and finances to pay for them,
the Israeli government Is seen
here as probably unable to with-
stand Kissinger'! familiar ques-
tioning argument to Israel that
Bays In effect. -What Is your al-
ternative to peace except with-
drawal to where I suggest?"
While Israel is gloomy over the
costs of the Yom K'ppur War. the
steady movement of U.S. policy
towards support of the Arabs and
appeasement of Soviet diplomacy
in the detente policy. Arab lead-
ers are exulting over prospects
of achieving all their initial aims
in what is termed loosely as "dis-
engagement ."
EGYPTIAN PRESIDENT An-
war Sadat, having regained the
Suez area, is now publicly calling
for immediate implementation"
of IN Resolution 242.
He used the phrase three times
in his interview on ABC-TV's
"Issues and Answers" program
April 28. He gloated over the
"complete change in the attitude
of the United States towards us."
Hi- reference to Kissinger as
the "miracle man'' who will
achieve disengagement on the
Golan Heights is interpreted here
as meaning that the Secretary
will "suggest" Israel into capitu-
lation.
Some speculation also has been
heard here that at some point in
his Middle East talks a represen-
tative of the Palestine Liberation
Organization will be allowed to
sit in and meet the Secretary as
an opening wedge for Palestinian
NAMED CHAIRMAN Ken-
neth D. Rosen of Coral Gables,
president of Greater Miami Real-
ty. Inc. and Kenneth David Prop-
erties, Inc.. has been named
chairman of the Special Com-
mittee for Advice on Government
Housing Loans of the Florida
Association of Realtors deahru
with esual opportunity in housing
programs.
MEANWHILE, Israel's Ambas-
sador to Washington Simcha Din-
itz said that there was no danger
of a general deterioration of Is-
raeli-United States relations.
But Dinitz. who arrived at Ben-
Gurion Airport to participate in
the preparatory talks for Secre-
tary of State Henry A. Kissinger's
visit, said that there were sev-
eral "worrying appearances" in
the relations between the two
countries recently.
There was no logic in the re-
cent American vote condemning
Israel in the United Nations. Din-
itz explained, and this should be
a source of anxiety. At the same
time, he noted that the American
government continues to provide
military and financial aid to Is-
rael.
Religious
Services
FORT IAUDMDAU
BETH ISRAEL (Temple) 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip
A. Labowitx. Cantor Maurica Nao.
CMANU-EL. 5248 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Arthur J Ab-
rimi Cantor Jerome Klemeri. 48 I
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM i Tern pie). 1S2 SB 17th Ava.
Conaervativa. Rabbi Morrle A. Skop.
Cantor Jacob J. Renier.
---------
MAROATf
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. (Con.
aarvative) 8101 NW 8th St.
Friday. 8 p.m. Dr. Manilla Neumann i
will conduct; Cantor Max flallub will =
deliver the sermon Saturday. Sam.. I
regular Sabbath morning nervires.
CORAl SfRINCS
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON.
GREGATION (Reform) 3501 Unl.
verarty or., Coral Springs. Ramv
Max Weitx.
Fridjy. 8 P.m. Sabbath service*.
Terrorists Identify Selves
Continued from Page 1
military attache Yosef Allon outside his Washington home last
vciir.
HE SAID his group was also responsible for an explosion
aboard a Swissair passenger airliner over Zurich in February.
1970 in which 47 people were killed, including 20 Israeli scholars
and scientists, and an explosion on an Austrian plane in Febru-
ary, 1970. in which there were no casualties.
Abous el Abbas claimed the Austrian plane carried Israeli
pilots.
The terrorist group's spokesman said Kiryat Shemona was
carefully selected as a target for its economic, strategic and sym-
bolic significance to Israel.
"THERE WILL be more actions like Kiryat Shemona until
all Palestine is liberated." he was quoted as saying.
We want to reinforce the obstinacy of people like Gen.
Dayan in order to make impossible any peaceful settlement be-
tween the Arabs and Israelis. In fact there's an identity of views
between us and Dayan."
i
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Friday, May 17, 1974
Page 1I-A
>*ci
m j- olalioff
HER MOTHER MIFFED HIS FOLKS SNUBBED CEREMONY
pis Jake a Distant View of Kissinger's Marriage to Nancy
SENIOR rabbis of the
Islington area's largest Re-
^ Conservative congrega-
characterized Secie-
|Bf State Henry A Kissin-
marriage to non-Jewish
py Ifaginess in a civil cere-
performed by a lawyer as
p Ivata nutter and empha-
that the marriage does not
his (tabu as a Jew
\vever. a different viewpoint
expressed by an Orthodox
)i here.
consider the marriage of
rei.irs Kissinger a strictly pri-
affair of his," and "he is en-
td to be protected against vul-
intru ions," said Rabbi
|hua 0. Haberman. of the Re-
|un Washington Hebrew Con-
on.
("From the Jewish standpoint,
annarriage as li sir-
It whether the n an Is an or-
bai-y citi.:( n or a prominent
pder. However to
M-h law an I p actice, a Jew
fs not (ease t< i Jew in inj
whatevei iu be I ise
ky of his J ious priv-
the fact of intermar-
rlaj .
ere is no reason to believe
" Kissii lies to dis-
ill from the Jew-
ish faith or the Jewish people.
18 \ RABBI, i regret, of
course." he added, 'every ease
! marriage since it dilutes
and diminishes the strength of
Judaism. But at the ime I
take pride in our heritage which
accords to each Jew freedom in
so personal a matter as the
choice of a spoose "
"I'm not disturbed." said Rab-
Stanley Rabinowitz, of the
vative Adas Israel Congre-
gation.
"Secretary K has be-
a citizen of the world. He
i right to do a~ he wi
more of a Jew
I ihoul i
I affect bis
'' or in the civic com-
ind wi right to
lim."
ibinowitz, who Is a for-
mt of I v>ashi
B a: i of Ral .
secretary of the Rabbinical As-
sembly of America, said his ex-
pression was a "personal opin-
ion."
BIT RABBI H Jonah Wald-
man. of thi V^udath Aehim Con-
gregation of Washington, a tradi-
tional Orthodox synagogue, said:
Judaism does not recognise
the man lage between Avraham
nger and Miss Nancy Mag-
iness. It means, simply, according
to Jewish tradition, that they
both live together without the
sanction of Jewish law.
"J ws v. ould prohably be hap-
pier if Henry Kissinger would
take the next step, convert to
some Christian church and then
marry Miss Maginess legally with
the sanction of that church. It is
evident : hat He.no Kiss)
does net regard himself a J
all. fur he was sworn in as Sec-
State on Shabbos. and
ft hand rested on the New
Testament.
"HE FLEW to Moscow on
Shabbos and disgrat I Judaism
as a whole by ente: ing into a
Avevert S^ccia/
$'
See Ray of Hope in Desegregation
rpWBNTl VEARS ago, the Supreme Court
struck down all school state-imposed racial
discrimination, citing ihe 14th Amendments
equal protection clause
That 1954 Court determination made clear the
Iconstitutional principle but failed to prescribe
enforcement. It was a year later that America
|learned from the Court that school desegregation
lad to go forward "with all deliberate speed."
TWO DECADES have passed. In the South,
where public school segregation had been a way
of life, it was not too difficult to etfect a black-
and-white, side-by-side pattern in the classroom
But in many instances in the North, white hous-
ing enclaves and black ghettos were so separated
that the process of school integration found
rough going.
This interrelation of housing, schooling, and
integration has been dramatized lately by Fed-
eral Judge Jack B Welnstein's order, cal
upon housing authorities to pick up their share
of the burden in efforts to desegregate Mark
Twain High School in Coney Island.
THE CASE in which Judge Weinstein ruled
was the first Mew Yok City desegregation case
to reach a federal court. Every student of the
housing-public school relationship long ago con-
cluded that little if any lasting integration could
be achieved in northern cities until housing seg-
regation was tossed out alongside school segrega-
tion. These are unpopular words.
Almost anything one writes about discrimi-
n as related to the school integration issue
is unpopular these days. But popularity is one
matter, and realism quite another.
While the effect of Judge Weinstein's his-
toric order is sinking in. a number of large cities
have been making the news lately on the inte-
gration issue.
DENVER HAS been under court order to
come up with an acceptable school plan for some
months: Detroit court action has been followed
eagerly by all concerned with the problem; in
Cincinnati, the Board of Education decided not
to implement a school integration plan reported-
ly worked out by a lame duck school board:
Cleveland is torn over a proposed integration
chalk up pushed by the NAACP and opposed by
the black president of the Board of Education:
Boston has been a political double boiler for
months over court-mandated orders calling for
effective plans to desegregate.
The First Streaker Was... Jewish?
?
rpHE WORLD changes a lot .:-. i hundred yt
So it seems, but Is it i 1
The headlines of today's newspap rs
to mind. She was a beautiful souther:
in Hebrew means beautiful, and her name was
Adah Isaacs Menken.
SHE WAS born in Louisiana in 1835 1: w
so 'ong after Thomas Jefferson bad bought Lou si-
ana from Napoleon. Jefferson figured I three
cents a mile you couldn't go
the price Napoleon got for It, show.-- that '
Napoleon might have been a great genera., he
a rotten businessman.
When Adah Menken was
hood. Louisiana sent to the U.S. Sen
Benjamin, a Jew with such a Jewish name, yet
Benjamin wasn't too Interested In J*w
Adah Menken's soul, on the COOtl >" tire
with the cause of iier people.
But alas, more people were interested in her
body than in her soul.
IT YOf picked up the New York Tribune one
day in the beginning jf Abraham Lincoln's adminis-
t i might have read the following b>
Horai >. the editor:
\\ i .r not believe that the actress sched-
ul .| to ,'-"-:" our citiienry in New
York would so shock and revolt decent
people as to appear with her whole body
exposed."
Greele) was the man who said, "Go West
your.4 man." but in New York everyone seemed to
\ .dh at the Broadway Theater.
-tage on a horse, her
nude bo ad to the back of a horse.
THE SHOW was s0ld out for weeks in advance
f :- this first A sign on the theater front
was no free list. It was the time of the
ing of the Civil War. and a half dozen
of the army we
ta see the performances.
\ rtually, she wasn't nude but in flesh colored
tight- I
Her maiden name was Adah Theodore and
perhaps if the times had been more propitious, she
might have been an earlier Theodur Henl.
so-called marriage ceremony with
Miss on Shabbos."
Rabbi Waldman used Kissin-
ger's first name initially as
Avraham because he said that is
his Hebi ew name.
NEWS REPORTS on the mar-
riage and family aspects of the
wedding involving so prominent
a personality as Kissini
ened genera! interest and discus-
sion about it.
The Washington Post in its re-
port said "for years there had
been rumors of an impending
marriage. Along with tho*
meis were suggestions that Miss
-' m >ther would iii: a| -
ant, marrying a Jew. and of sim-
iiar suggestions that Kissinger's
parents would not aoprove of his
marriage to a non-Jen."
While Rabbi Rabinowitz de-
scribed Kissinger as "a citizen
of the world." a West German
paper described him as "the
greatest Jew of his time."
This recalled Albeit Einstein's
view that if he were successful
in his atomic analysis the Fiench'
would hail him as a citizen of the
I, and the Germans would
say he was German, but that if
: i.ied, the French would say
he v.ai a German, and the Ger-
. was a Jew.
Kmerarl ^y^tlDCft
Iri Getter-He's Phenomenon
In Israel Even Today
VOW THAT Uri Gcller has con-
founded and confused the
scientist, of both the United
States and England, has ci
an international controversy, and
has In large measure been re-
sponsible for a great revival of
Interest in the mysteries of the
psychic, it is appiopriate to recall
that he started in Israel, and was
introduced to a wider overseas
public through this column. What
I wrote about him four years ago
is still of interest:
"It is good that Israelis can
sometimes concentrate their at-
tention on matters less disturbing
than missiles along the Suez, hos-
tile resolutions in the UN. or
1 order incursions by Arab ter-
rorists. One such opportunity for
distraction has been provided in
recent weeks by the alignment of
forces favoring or opposing the
contioversial figure of one Uri
Geiler.
T.ELLER FIRST rani" to St.
is ier at pri-
\ ite parties. He commanded wid-
er audiences through his radio
programs) and then conquered
new worlds as one of the coun-
ty's most popular stage enter-
tainers. Thousands, tens of thou-
sands, who have seen him per-
form, hail his genius.
To his fans. Uri Gel'.er is the
exponent of a new science which
embraces telepathy, parapsychol-
ogy and telekinesis. He maintains
that the human mind can trans-
mit and receive thought waves by
appropriate concentration.
"In his programs he reads
minds; he identifies hidden num-
:ie de-c: ibes the contents of
unopened purses; he drives a car
through traffic while fully blind-
folded; he makes distant objects
move. In short, he displays acts
of 'magic' and ascribes them t3
supernatural causes.
Ocwwonr ^/}. awl"1
MK7M
Study oi India Emigres
By Kushner Disappointing
YTE HAD looked forward to
reading "Immigrants from
India In Israel," by Gilbert Kush-
ner. (University of Aiizona
Press. 138 pages, index and bib-
liO., Sri Pi .
It is obviously the author's
doc'ora ba*ed on field
work of limited duration during
1961-62 The book fails to cap-
ture the e s of acculturation
and the clash jf conflicting cul-

THE I ACS of respect by Is-
raeli administrators for the
mo :ous customs of
the ints is a 1
Ism of many ka-
rats.
The I orthodox
Jew oluntarily to Is-
rae area of In-
dia r between 1948
and 19*3. The an w chair-
mar, of the Department of An-
thropolo y at the University of
Sou da. undertook his
o prove that in Is-
an admin
,.nnot evolve
nous community
des planners" concep-
tion hat is necessary to
autonomy.
THE chapters concerning
fe in India" and on life in
Israel for the immigrants are in-
teresting. Unfortunately, Prof.
KushneT did not study the Cochin
Jews while they were in India
and did not have the opportunity
of studying Schifra Strizower's
"Bene Israel of Bombay,"
The book is much more impor-
tant than her brief chapter on
Cochin in her "Exotic Jewish
Communities." Kushner does
not mention or list D. Wiliner's
"National Building and Commu-
nity in Israel" and Weintraub
V ishava, Kibbutz
and M ha'
THESE WERE all published
prior to the book under review.
''Immigrants from India" must
be i to the recent paper
by Moshe Shokeid, "Conflict and
Entertainment: An Analysis of
Social Gatherings Among Moroc-
can Immigrants in Israel."
The lack of familiarity with
the ol the people between
the time of their arrival and that
of the author mitigates against
an acceptance of Kushner's find-
ings.
THE FOREGOING books and
article and there are many
.dioate the vast interest
ot non-Israeli so< i ntists in
aspects of fe not nor-
ma n 05 brought to the cog-
nition of tourists or even many
-idents.
The author's problems with Is-
raeli bureaucracy (despite the
"protektzia" of his cousin, Moshe
Sharret) must have been frus-
trating.


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