Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00260

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text

ne*ts of President Nation
Palm Beach County Community Leaders Visit Israel
V-

V
Orhsirin llrfll. Alan L. Shulmnn (renter) and Leroy Goldstein
guests f President Yitzhak Navon on the UJA President's Mis-
L month. I'hev are pictured above at the Western Wall in Jem-
Over 400 leaders from 62 com-
munities nationwide visited
Israel Sept. 20-25 as the guests of
President Yitzhak Navon for
meetings with top level Israeli
officials and on-site review of hu-
manitarian programs and serv-
ices funded by annual United
Jewish Appeal-community cam-
paigns. Representing the Palm
Beach County Jewish community
on the United Jewish Appeals
President's Mission were Leroy
Goldstein. Larry Ochstein and
Alan L. Shulman. UJA National
Vice Chairman and past Presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Bench County.
"The President's Mission
brought together over 400 Amer-
ican Jewish leaders." stated Alan
L. Shulman. "dedicated to the
State of Israel as the centrality of
the Jewish people. They experi-
enced together in a brief four day
mission the fabric of what consti-
tutes the accomplishments and
challenges of Israel and the
Jewish people. Prom the heights
of Masuda in the Sinai, to the
steering committee meeting of
Projttt Renewal neighborhoods,
the uniqueness of togetherness
was the theme of this Mission."
Mission participants visited 40
Project Renewal sites the
largest number ever visited by a
single UJA mission to meet
with residents and community
leaders for discussions of t he pro-
gram's progress in upgrading the
social, economic and cultural
quality of life in Israel's
distressed neighborhoods.
American Jewish leaders met
with President Navon at his
official residence and were briefed
by other key Israeli officials on
issues of continuing mutual con-
cern. The Mission also made on-
site visits to programs carried
out by the Jewish Agency and
the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee for the
young, the elderly and new immi-
grants throughout the nation.
The group was welcomed to
lerusak'm by Mayor Teddy Kol-
lok and toured the Jewish quarter
of the Old City before gathering
for individual meditation at the
Continued on Page :i
elTewislbi jFloridllao
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Number 23
Palm Beach. Florida Friday. October 23. 1981
I in1 Shoctu'l
I'rio^Centb
Reagan Confers Honorary Citizenship on Wallenberg
|\SIII\(.ION (JTAI -
km Keagan said last week
IttMKll V\ allenlierg. the
li-li diplomat who is
led wiih saving the lives of
KM) Hungarian Jews m
War II may still be held
Ruviet prison "wherever he
humtimlv hums like a
The President miide these
Jrk-- us he ronlerred honorary
|n-.hi|i mi V\ allenlierg. the
ul person ever granted this
the lirst was Sir Winston
hill.
lie Churchill, the wartime
Mi I'rime Minister. Wallcn-
I'Xemplified compassion.
Run s.inl .it a White House
mn attended liy the mis-
ipHimut s half-brother (iuy
IlKirdcl and half-sister Nina
Injrcn lie said thai the U.S.
psked Sweden in 1944 to co-
operate in protecting Hungarian
.lews who faced extermination at
the hands of the Nil/is. 'The
United States supplied the funds
and the directives, and Raoul
\\ allenlierg supplied the courage
and I lie passion. Reagan sakl.
TIIK PRESIDENT said that
Wallenberg's seizure by Soviet
inmps in I'.M.'i at the end of the
war was "in violation of diplo-
matic immunity and internation-
al law." lie was referring to the
lacl that the Swedish govern-
ment gave Wallenberg
diplomatic status in 1944 and ax-
signed him to Mudapcst where he
issued Swedish passports and
pressed Hungarian authorities to
improve the treatment of Jews
and Roman Catholics.
Tom Lantos (1).. Calif.) key
sponsor of measure to make Wal-
lenberg a citizen said it would
New Jewish Home For Aged
Offers Opportunities For
Memorials-Dedications
I is a time honored tradition
[Jewish homes for the aged
Puns institutions to honor
fwuals, the family name, or
|y tribute to departed loved
T Many Homes also serve to
pa donors of Yahrzeit dates
|at synagogue services the
"sh prayer for the departed
cited.
I*JtV^'sn Home for the
lf Palm Reach County, now
r construction, offers many
^unities for appropriate
"Ms and dedications. The
ot those honored and me-
d will be suitably in-
P'cal of the memorials and
ffons available are resident
Pavilions, lounges,
"n'ts, special depart
r solanums and other
f^weas These are available
0 000 rangin8from $7,500
1 h? "I'y e listed as Guar-
y gifts cf $5,000 and as
strengthen the US' hand in
seeking information about Wal-
lenberg's condition and demand-
ing his release if he is found UiIk'
alive. Soviet officiulx claim that
lie died in prison in 1947. hut
then1 have lieen re|M>ated ac-
counts Iroin former Soviet pris-
oners that he is still alive. If so, he
would be SWEDEN STILL lists Wal-
lenberg us missing and rejects
the Soviet account that he died of
heart failure and the Soviet con-
tention that he was detained, as a
suspected spy, as a result of the
excesses of the Stalin area.
REAGAN'S ACTION
lollowed a joint resolution passed
by both Mouses of Congress last
month which called on the Presi-
dent "to take all poanlble steps to
ascertain from the Soviet Union
the wherea!>outx of Raoul Wal-
lenberg and to secure his return
to freedom." The resolution
descrilied Wallenberg as "a pris-
oner in the Soviet Union since
1945."
At a reception sponsored by
the Anti-Defamation League to
mark Reagan's conferring
honorary citizenship on Wallen-
lerg, former Vice President
Walter Mondale said that Ameri-
cans had not acted as Americans
should have during the Holo-
caust, lie said that if they had
asawoi
Ninu Lagergrcn (left) and Guy von llnrdcl (right), half-sister and half-
brother of Raoul Wallenberg, ure pirtured with President Reagan as
he signs the bill that made Raoul Wallenberg an honorary citizen.
acted as did Wallenberg, they
could have saved hundred of
thousunds of lives and perhaps
millions.
Two days of ceremonies in
honor of Wallunlierg ended when
members of the Jewish Commu-
nity Council of (ireater Washing-
ton and the Lutheran Place Me-
morial Church will hold a candle-
light ceremony across the street
from the Soviet Kmbassy.
TOM LANTOS WILL BE
TIIK KKYNOTK
SPKAKKR AT THE
JEWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH
COUNTY'S ANNUAL
PALM BEACH COMMU-
NITY DINNER TO BE
HELD TUESDAY EVE-
NING, JANUARY 26, I9H2
AT TIIK BRKAKKRS.
PALM BEACH.
Builders for a minimum capital
fund contribution of $1,000.
Contributions are payable over a
period of three-five years.
Erwin H. Blonder, president of
the Home, has announced that a
significant number of the units
have already been reserved.
Persons interested in reserving
memorials and dedications are
requested to call 832-2120.
Moshe Dayan
1915-1981
See Story Page 9


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Fridy.octoh*a|
President Valery Giscard d'Estaing (left), architect of the
French freeze against Israel, in defeat escorts his successor,
Francois Mitterrand, to be inaugurated
In Paris
Israel, France
Freeze to Thaw?
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The strains that have
troubled relations between
France and Israel in recent
years seemed to ease per-
ceptibly with the visit here
of Jacques Attali, a special
adviser and close personal
associate of President
Francois Mitterrand.
Attali had a "very friendly"
90-minute meeting with Premier
Menachem Begin at which both
parties stressed that "a new leaf"
must be turned in Franco-Israeli
relations.
ATTALI ARRIVED in Israel
on what was officially a private
trip, but his meetings were of a
political nature, and he managed
to avoid the press for the most
part. Significantly, France and
Israel announced jointly in New
York that French Foreign Min-
ister Claude Cheysson had ac-
cepted the invitation of his Israeli
counterpart, Yitzhak Shamir, to
visit Israel in December and that
Mitterrand would visit early next
year.
Attali carried a message to
Begin from Mitterrand and
another to President Yitzhak
Navon with whom the French
diplomat also met. Their contents
were not disclosed. He met with
David Kimche, director general
of the Foreign Ministry, and was
scheduled to meet later with
Shimon Peres, chairman of the
opposition Labor Party, before
leaving for Cairo.
When he arrived in Israel,
Attali would say only that
Franco-Israeli relations were very
complex. He was invited here by
the Davis Institute of the
Hebrew University where he
delivered a lecture on "France in
the Mitterrand Era."
He said his discussion with
Begin was "deep and friendly"
and that they had covered Middle
East problems in detail and re-
lations between their countries.
He said the meeting paved the
way for the visits by the French
President and Foreign Minister.
Begin, for his part, expressed
hope that the days of "splendor"
in Franco-Israeli relations
1964-1967 would return. He
said the people of Israel regarded
France and the French people as
friends despite the "hostile' poli-
cies of former President Valery
Giscard d'Estaing.
Tune in to'MOSAIC
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Sponsoredby
The Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
nSay morning over wVTV Chama 5, 1&30.m
wHuiH saw iumsiiammmOPiltw
SUNDAY 1 OCTOBER 25
Rabbi David Saparstsia
TUNE INTO
L'Chayim
' The Jewish Listener's Digest
Aa Exciting New Radio Magazine
Sundays, 10:30 am
WPBR1340 AM
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation
I of Palm Beach County
SUNDAY OCTOBER 25 Rabbi Alex Sduadier
President of the Union of American Hebrew Congrsgatioaa',
expresses his views on the increased power of the Orthodox
religious establishment in Israel after the Begin re-election
and speculates on its impact for non-orthodox Jews hi the
United States.
Libraries to Acquire Palm Beac]
Oral History Collection
The oral history tapes of the
Jewish Community of Palm
Beach County which are current-
ly being collected, have been
requested by a number of
libraries, announced Dr. Haviva
Langenauer, project director. The
completed collection of tapes of
personal memoirs of residents of
the Jewish community of Palm
Beach County will be archived
locally at Palm Beach Junior Col-
lege, and in Gainesville at the
University of Florida. In New
York, the American Jewish Com-
mittee's Oral History Library
will serve as the repository, and
manuscripts made from the tapes
will be incorporated into the New
York Times Microfilm Collection
of regional histories. They will be
catalogued at the Library of Con-
gress in Washington.I).('. and
will provide information about
our community to scholars and
students of history throughout
the world, now and in the future.
"We are extremely pleased that
the historical significance of the
memoirs which our interviewers
are collecting is being recognized
at this time," stated Dr. Lange-
nauer.
Palm Beach County is a
repository of living history in the
lives and experiences of many of
the members of the Jewish com-
munity. The oral history project
aims to preserve and record these
experiences of today and yes-
terday, and preserve them for
future generations. In addition to
those residents of the area who
were the pioneers of the Jewish
community and who have lived
here for over 50 years, the project
plans to reach those who have
come to the Jewish community
more recently, but who reflect ex-
otic and unusual backgrounds.
The interviews for the work are
being conducted by a team of
specialists who have been trained
as oral historians under the
guidance of Dr. Samuel Proctor
of the University of Florida's
Oral History project. Among
those who are working on the
project are: Evelyn Blum, Lila
Seidler, Ann Blicher, Doris
Singer, Grace Scheinman, Sylvia
Lewis, Jean Rubin, Ann Slotkin,
Molly Fitterman, Judy Waltzer,
Debbie Brass. Martha Nadelman,
Honey and Bernie Plisskin, Bea
and Murray Kern, Alec Jacob-
son, Bobbe Taffel, Thelma New-
man, Buddie Brenner, Shirlee
Blonder, Edyth Zuckerberg,
Barbara Shulman, Dr. Elizabeth
S. Freilich and Steve Gordon.
In this age of technology, oral
history has become an imB
-ource of historical u!L
Jn the past, man "JJ
diaries or other recon! ,'
activities, while tS0'1
telephone takes the pSf-
oi these written ^
eluding iHt^whkhSf
important source of irT ^
for historians. Oral ""
collection of dataThmfe
personal conversation? P'
oecorne a most important',,
of historical information
history does not replace'
ditional historical S i
complements them by addiJ
personal insights of ?
were there when the S
The study of the Jewish (a
munity through the collection d
personal memoirs is ^
conducted by the Jewish |
eration of Palm Beach Counts
conjunction with the Anwic
Jewish Committee. Support I
the project is based on a m
from the Florida Endowmentl
the Humanities with additio
support from the Nationally
dowment for the Humaniiii
B'nai Zion Foundation, Inc.,
Endowment Fund of the Jet,
Federation, and through then
operation of WPTV-Channd5
Plan to Attend!
WHY:
THIRD ANNUAL JEWISH WOMF.N'S ASSEMBLY
ALL MAJOR JEWISH WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS
IN THE PALM BEACHES
TO BE EDUCATED ABOUT THE 1980's: A
DECADE OF CONCERN. TO JOIN HANDS IN
A SHARED DESIRE FOR A QUALITY JEWISH
LIFE FOR ALL OUR PEOPLE.
WHERE; HYATT $ PALM BEACHES
WHEN: WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1981
8:45 A.M. 2:15 P.M.


,, October 23,1981
The Jettish Fbridian of Palm Beach'County
Page 3
iiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii......iiiiiiitiiwtifittieiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiMitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiitiiiHiiiiiMiiiiiiiittifiiiifiiiiittiiiiiiwinittiiittitftitftftiiitfff
Palm Beach County Community Leaders Visit
Israel as Guests of President Navon
'" JEWISH
FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH
COUNTY
1SC0 Condemns New
lExcavation in Jerusalem
By KDWIN EYTAN
PARIS jJTA) The United Nations Ed-
Ilional. Scientific and Cultural Organization
.KSCO) has condemned Israel for its continuation of
Geological excavations in the Old City of Jerusalem.
UN KSCO executive committee voted '28-1 to con-
nn Israel or its "persistent and deliberate violations"
former UNKl'CO resolutions on this subject.
The United States was the only UN KSCO member
|ti- to vote against the Arab-sponsored resolution.
nong the countries that abstained were all those from
tern Kuropc. (iuatemala. Jamaica and Japan. Israel
not a member ol the UN KSCO executive committee.
nil. RESOLUTION, which was voted on after a
(day debate and which will now be presented to
I KSCO's general conference for ratification, said that
le excavations and transformations seriously threaten
historic and cultural sites of the city." It also claimed
^t the digs now in progress "have never reached such a
li in intensity and growth as today."
A UNKSCO-linked body, the World Heritage
nmittee. voted earlier this month to include the Old
[y "I Jerusalem in the world list of sites which enjoy
Irnational, including Jordanian, protection and finan-
cial.
Israel opposed the Jordanian-sponsored resolution
could not vote against it because it is not a committee
aber.
High Court Orders
Abu Trial Postponed
PtUSALEM The High
of Justice has ordered the
element trial of Welfare
ter Aharon Abu Hatzeira
oned. The trial had been
> begin at the Tel Aviv Dia-
Court last week with the
w entering his plea on
ps of theft and embezzle-
trom a charitable fund
" years ago.
.the High Court of Justin
r 'be proceedings sus-
wjtil the District Court
1 nd the State Prosecutor
'cause' to the High Court
Abu Hatzeira's Knesset
wy need not be lifted.
'Prosecution had argued in
nil^i?88 md th Tel
District Court Judge had
that the lifting of aShE
' munumty by the ninth
remained effective for
^nt tenth Knesset. (The
^nsthTunity waa *****
ninth Knesset towards the
"tftom. Since then, gene-
*onhave been helcfind
loth ra WM "*>ted as
oil1 uAVJV Jud8. vc-
^trovsky-Cohen, and the
Prosecutor were given
three weeks to answer the "show
cause" order. Until they do so,
and until the High Court has
considered the immunity issue in
depth, the criminal proceeding
against the Minister is
suspended.
Abu stood trial and was ac-
quitted on bribery charges earlier
this year. The new trial relates to
his period, in the mid-1970's, as
Mayor of Ramie, when ha admi-
nistered a state-supported chari-
table fund named in honor of his
late father, a leading Sephardic
rabbi The allegations are that he
stole money from this fund for his
private use.
His attorneys argue on the im-
munity issue that having been
reelected to the Knesset, his par-
liamentary immunity, though
lifted by the previous Knesset,
should be considered as automa-
tically restored. In order to try
him, therefore, the state prosecu-
sion must once again request the
(new) Knesset to lift his immuni-
ty-
Some political observers be-
lieve that in the present tight po-
litical situation, a new immunity
proceeding in the house would
not necessarily be a forgone con-
clusion.
Continued from Page 1
Western Wall. Highlights of the
Mission included a torchlight
ceremony atop the ancient for-
tress of Mnsndn with the Israel
Defense Forces Armored Corps
a first for a President's Mis-
sion and a ceremony of re-
membrance at Yad Vashem. the
memorial to victims of the Holo-
caust in Jerusalem.
A unique feature of this year's
President's Mission was visits to
IS high-technology industries in
development towns and settle-
ment* which demonstrate the
success of the Jewish Agency's
absorpt ion program.
"It was the most fantastic ex-
perience of my life." stated IjPTO.V
.(oldstcin. "Kvcryone should go.
I was most Impressed by the
spirit of the Israelis seeing
I hem face their problems and not
hiding them. I was ama/cd at the
methods hoing used to develop
the Project Renewal neighbor"
hoods,"
"What impressed me most."
statin! Larry Ochstein. "was a
speech we heard by one of the
survivors of the Holocaust when
we went U> visit Yad Ynshcm.
II is story tore at our he-arts as he
related his feelings when he
escaped from the Na/.is and found
himself with no place U>go. There
has to lie some place U> go. and
Israel is that plan*."

Larry Ochslcin (left hind U-roy Coldslcin'"enter! are greeted in Israel
on the I iiiled Jewish Appeal President's M.ssin.
i.
WD
I'm I ured nliove tit the Knesset on the rerrnl UJ A President's Mission
are (left to right) Alan I,. Shulmnn, National Viee Chairman of UJA;
Hen /.ion Lemiier. National Vire Chairman of UJA; and llersrhel
llluinlterg, UJA National Campaign Chairman for HJ82.
......ii.i..................................i................................................................
9
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I
The Jewish Home for the Aged of Palm Beach County must be. buiit to meet the
urgent and growing needs of our Jewish aged.
We are calling upon the entire Jewish Community to support the capital fund drive
for the Home.
You have the unique opportunity to select a unit in the building to honor your
family name; or to pay tribute to departed loved .' .
Suitable inscriptions will remain in perpetuity as an inspiration to
future generations.
TYPICAL UNITS AVAILABLE FOR
MEMORIAL OR DEDICATIONS
ft?
::?i

Solariums (6)
Double Rooms (39)
Single Rooms (42)
Double Room Furnishings (39)
Single Room Furnishings (42)
Guardians
Builders
I $50,000 each
25,000 each
15.000 each
7,500 each
5.000 each
5.000
1.000
Also available: Residents wings, Pavilions and other major units. Pledges are
payable from 3 to 5 years.
V.'
I
i
i
CALL 832-2120 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.
>:>


ra^t t
lewis!
lm tteach count
Jewish Florictaaa Theu Came to Praise Caesar, Not Burum
ot Palm Beach Couniy FredShocha V fj **(/]
ol Palm Beach County
Combining "Our Voice" and "Federation Reporter"
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET RONNIE TAHTAK0W
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor News Coordinate
Pubtlahed Weekly October through Mk)>May.. B<-Weekly balance ol y^ev.
Second Claaa Poalage Paid at Boca Raton. Fla. USPS fQ8S03c
PALM BEACH-BOCA RATON OFFICE
2200 N Federal Hwy Suite 206. Boca Raton, Fla 33432 Phone 36S J001
Main Otlice & Plant 120 NE 6th St. Miami. Fla 33101 Phone 137 > 4605
Combined Jewish Appeal-Jewish Federation ol Palm Beach County. Inc Ollicfl President. Jean
ne Levy; Vice Presidents Alec Engelstein. Arnold J Hollman, Or Richard Sftugarman. Barbara
Shulman, Mortimer Weiss. Secretary. Barbara Tanen, Treasurer. Alvm Wilensky, Enecutive Director
Norman J Schimelman Submit material 'or publication to Ronni Tartakow. Director ol Pubin
Relations
Jewish Flondian does not guarantee Kashruth ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION Rates. Local Area U Annual (2 Year Minimum S7 50i. or by membership Jewisr
Federation ol Palm Beach County. 501 S Fiagler Or, West Palm Beach, Fla 33401 Phone
8322120
Friday, October 23.1981
Volume 7
25 TISHRI 5742
Number 23
Tragedy of Sadat
The tragic assassination of Egypt's
President Anwar Sadat is made even more
tragic by the tacit acceptance of Mr. Sadat's
murder without a sense of genuine outrage
that international terrorism is beginning to
shape the foreign policy of the nations of the
world.
Surrogates mainly attended the funeral
for Mr. Sadat in Cairo rather than heads of
state themselves, including President Reagan
who stayed home on the advice of his security
chieftains. In this sense, the delinquents were
saying that the PLO's, the IRA's and the Red
Army Brigades of the world are telling us how
we shall comport ourselves.
We do not mean to single out President
Reagan for special criticism, but only as an
example; after all, he was the target of an as-
sassination attempt himself last March, if of
an entirely different order.
Still, he and others Britain's Prime
Minister Thatcher, France's President Mit-
terrand, West Germany's Chancellor Schmidt
were guilty of negligence of their duty as
leaders of the free world when they stayed
away from Cairo on Saturday. By their
inaction, they were saying that they no longer
make policy either for their countries or for
their international principles.
This did poor service to President Sadat,
whose-.effort to achieve peace in the Middle
East with Israel as a member of the family of
nations there is what led to his assassination.
At this moment, it would also serve Mr.
Sadat poorly if we engaged in speculation
either about Mr. Sadat's past or whether he
had any motives other than his stated ones
when he flew to Jerusalem in November,
1977. The fact is that he did fly there. The
fact is that this opened up a dialogue that
enraged his Arab bethren, who ultimately
helped kill him.
The fact is that this dialogue continues to
this very day, past the death of Mr. Sadat; it
continues in the vow by Egypt's new Presi-
dent Hosni Mubarak to pursue the peace
initiative of his predecessor. And, if there is
any credibility in the report this week by
ABC-TV's Barbara Walters, it continues in
Mubarak's promise to Prime Minister Begin
to visit Israel in the near future as a sign of
Egypt's determination not to swerve from his
country's commitment to peace with Israel.
EVEN AS the likes of newspa-
per columnist Garry Wills is ac-
cusing Prime Minister Begin of
"creating facts" through the es-
tablishment of Israeli settle-
ments on the West Bank that
make the Palestinian autonomy
talks "insoluble," Wills is himself
creating facts.
According to Wills, the object
of Begin's policy was to embar-
rass President Sadat and force
Sadat to opt out of continuing
the autonomy talks after all,
Sadat had called it quits on the
talks before. According to Wills,
this would give Begin the excuse
he has been allegedly looking for
to renege on Israel's final with-
drawal from the Sinai next April.
WILLS APES the fool from
Plains, Puddin'head Jimmy
Carter, who said the same thing
on his way over to the Sadat
Funeral in Cairo. Carter is re-
ported as having declared that if
Israel reneges, it would be a
"suicidal" decision, which was
not foolish, only meddlesome.
Also, incidentally, that Begin
should not have gone to the
funeral because his presence in
Cairo kept other Arab leaders
away who might otherwise have
come to the funeral too, which
was more than foolish it was
bigoted and reprehensible.
Which Arab leaders? Carter
didn't say. Of course not when
did he ever make sense? But what
he did say shows him to be as
predictably muddle-brained as
Wills is himself in this instance.
Talk about the pot's calling the
kettle black. In the world of
Araby, one would be hard-
pressed to decide who is the
greater pariah Jimmy Carter
or Prime Minister Begin.
That Carter did not see this is
less a mark of his incredible
egotism than it is of his absurdly
romantic nature, which Wills
clearly shares here, and the rest
of the Western claque as well, so
far as Anwar Sadat is concerned.
WILLS' OWN capacity to
create facts a priori is if anything
a more serious weakness than it
is in Carter, who is a discounted
:.>>:*:-x:*:::**^^
3
Leo
Miudlin
political entity to begin with be-
cause he is such a spongy, indeci-
sive thinker. But many people
will take Wills seriously because
he is a brilliant thinker and a pel-
lucid writer. When Wills makes a
pronouncement, many people
listen. In the end, he is not juat a
newspaper columnist; his pro-
nouncements also appear in such
distinguished and intellectual
organs as The New York Review
of Books; and the intellectuals
these days, Jews among them,
are nothing if not anti-Israel.
Still, his charge against Begin
as a manipulator of history is the
predicate upon which he
pyramids a panegyric to Presi-
dent Sadat. And the unutterable
truth in the wake of Sadat's
tragic assassination is that in the
20th Century. Anwar Sadat was
one of the most successful mani-
pulators of the facts of history of
all manipulators, past and
present; this includes the Nazis,
who thrived on the great lie, and
who failed, but not merely be-
cause they were liars; and the
Communists, who appear to be
successful, just as Sadat was, but
who are recognized for what they
are. If their lies become the offici-
al view of things in some parts of
the world, it is only that no one
has yet figured out how to stop
the Communists, short of war, as
was the case with the Nazis.
In the case of Sadat, a correc-
tion of history is not only desir-
able; it is an emergency. But with
the explosion of the hand-
grenades and gunshots that slew
him still ringing in our ears, it is
not yet fashionable, or tasteful,
to help others see Sadat as he
truly was.
'THAT NEW8pApJ
reporter, and television *P*
expected. The utkL
They are as fanciful*"?"1
reporting as any creator of .
aspires to be. Particularly J
case of the TV glamor 3*U
adore themselves without Jl
there is a need for the sulj"
to adore some external obL.
hero, as Nietzschean mj
menscA, even more. I 8yrn2|
is theu- survival. AppVJS
Anwar Sadat as an equal JwS
say. Tom Brokaw the (3
that he is as heroic as he *
have us, and himself, believe
This is a significant issue I
cause President Sadat cast |
self in the role of hero to b
with. Now that hypocrite]
politicians, of whom Carter i
Gerald Ford are mere exam]
have joined hands with 1
struck reporters who fail w &
tinguish between themselves a]
observers of events (which taw]
are) and creators of events Iwh
they are not), as a unity tj
compound the problem thatffl
describes as "creating facts."
By his own admission. Sad
was an assassin. By his o
deeds, he was a dictatorial i_
pressor of contrary opinion, S
eluding religious opinion. By bl-
own judgment as a "war hero!
this self-professed lover of GoJ
women and children launchedil
sneak attack on a neighbonnj|
country at the moment of ikl
country's most holy religwuso-|
servance. Yom Kippur. By utj
priority of his own judgments,*]
has since celebrated that nail
attack as an annual event Brij
own declaration, he wis ml
torious in that war. a war he Ira I
so overwhelmingly that only tail
threats of an American president!
and his ax-wielding secretary d]
state forced the Israeli enemy I
relent in its punishment of I
cowardly effort.
IT WAS then that Sadi
Continued on Page &
1981-82
Jewish Federation/UJA
Campaign
Calendar of Events
JEWISH
FEDERATION :
OF BUM BEACH
COUNTY
November 20
November 29-
December 9
December 16
January 10-16
January 16
January 17
January 26
February 18
March 21
April 18
December 2
December 4
wuumumitnmmm\UM\i
International Mission
Cameo Mission "
Women's Division $1,000 Luncheon
Big Gifts Meeting j
Palm Beach Hi-Rise Super Week j
Federation Shabbat |
Super Sunday'
Annual Palm Beach Community Dinner;
The Breakers, Guest Speaker Congressman j
TomLantos
United Jewish Appeal National Dinner at |
The Breakers!
Women's Division Victory GaUj
Women's Division Phone-A-Thoflj


October 23,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page5
Hornstein/Jewish Community
Day School News
ELECTS
KNESSET OFFICERS
he upper grade students at
Homstein-JCDS held their
tions, just prior to Rosh
shana, for the Day School
tor student council.
officers and representa-
elected for the 5742 school
are: Nasi (President) Peter
I Sgan Nasi iVice-President)
lTochner; Gizbar (Treasurer)
Ginsburg; Mazkir (Sec-
ty| Brian Ray; Fifth Grade
presentatives, Staphanie
and Andy Fine; Sixth
Representatives, Mark
_cher and Jeffrey Schimel-
n; Seventh Grade Representa-
Robert Frankel and Sheri
stein; Eighth Grade Rep-
kntatives, Erika Eisenberg
[Steven Klapow.
Knesset, under the
of its adult advisers,
decai Levow, Director and
bare Perlman, Teacher, will
nvolved this year as in the
in planning a host of
ohvide activities. The Knes-
i responsible for assisting in
ning holiday events, the
ribution of Tzedaka, school
i trips, special school events.
COMPUTER
| PROGRAM PLANNED
the last meeting of
the
Homstein-JCDS Board, Mor-
decai Levow, Director announced
plans for an ambitious computer
education program for the stu-
dents in the upper grades of the
school.
Through the efforts of Carole
Ginsburg, one of the parents in
the school who is professionally
skilled in the development of
community resources, the school
has developed a unique rela-
tionship with the Science
Museum of Palm Beach County.
Under an agreement with the
Science Museum, a selected
)up of students in the Sixth.
venth, and Eighth grades will
participate, starting October 27
in a weekly class at the Museum
in Computer Theory and Skills.
The thrust of the program will be
to help students, not only know
how to operate a computer but
how to develop material and to
evolve problem solutions through
the use of computers. They will
have access to the superbly
equipped computer room at the
Museum.
In return for the Museum
making these facilities available
to the school, the school will
recruit volunteers to assist in the
various activites at the Museum.
Mr. Levow in explaining the
program to the Board, indicated
iiiitiitttiiiiiitittiiiitiiiiiiitiiitiiittnttttiiiitiiiiitMfnHiiiuiittHttttMatiititHiiniiMiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiii<
Jewish Youth Council Formed
Oct. 6, nine community
entatives met to form the
?ish Community Youth
pncil. The meeting was called
; Mark Mendel, the Jewish
nmunity Center's Youth
vices Supervisor and Larry
dberg, Youth Director at
hple Beth El.
he Youth Council was formed
timulate more cooperative
amming between youth
ips, increase communication,
[to sponsor community wide
for Jewish Youth. All
ah youth groups are invited
|encouraged to become mem-
L of the council.
fe Youth Council's first
pig was well attended. The
ing people, representing
Bus groups and institutions,
present: Ilene Lamport.
El U.S.Y.; Pam Roberts,
Dg Judea; Ken ZuckerberR
IE1U.S.Y.; Larry Goldberi,
1 Director, Temple Beth El;
P'yn Lamport, Co-
P/person "Super-Sunday
Mark Mendel, Youth
Services Supervisor of the JCC;
Debra Rosenfeld, Advisor to
BBYO. Robert Schimek, Temple
Beth Torah; and Ronnie Tartak-
ow, Public Relations-Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County.
The Jewish Community Youth
Council will be involved in many
community wide programs and is
sponsoring a Volleyball League.
The league begins play on Nov.
15 at 3:15 p.m. at the JCC. To
become involved in the league
either as a group team or as an
individual call Mark Mendel 689-
7700 or Larry Goldberg at 833-
0339.
In addition to the volleyball
league, the Youth Council agreed
to recruit youth volunteers for
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County's Super Sunday
telethon to be held Jan. 17 at the
Hyatt Hotel.
The Youth Council is for all
Jewish Youth groups. If your
youth group was not represented
on Oct. 6 you are encouraged to
attend the next meeting on Oct.
27, 7 p.m. at the JCC.
XKIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHUIIIIHIHlua
>l Security Agent Was Wounded
By YITZHAK RABI
K wouSSf Ettz ^lBneh 9ecurity *** *
ii de in MWar ?dat .s Be was reviewing a military
fwV nff?!frCltY. t was disclosed here by a high
*g official m Israeli Foreign Minister Yitzhak
8 entourage.
!"HE OFFICIAL also said that Israel's Ambassador
jro Moshe Sasson, was in the reviewing stand along
paaat and other Egyptian officials and foreign dig-
"Jt but he was not hit. The official said that quiet
ned around the Israel Embassy in Cairo following
Noting of Sadat and others on the reviewing stand.
L^v^.rofaaed to comment on the tragic event
I DrrSl Ion this mBiy ***** the Egyptian-Israeli
mJ>;. e conceded, however, that it can change
many things."
his hope that not only parents
but members of the general com-
munity would support both the
Museum and the school by
volunteering their assistance in
this manner. People wishing to
volunteer and assist should call
the school at 832-8423.
SOVIET JEWRY'S
PLIGHT NOTED
On the day following Simchat
Torah, October 22, the students
at the Hornstein-Jewish Com-
munity Day School held a special
post Simchat Torah program
that highlighted the life of the
Jews in the Soviet Union.
Simchat Torah has become a
traditional time for emphasizing
the situation of Soviet Jewry.
The holiday has come to sym-
bolize the undying faith of the
Jews behind the Iron Curtain. It
is one day, when despite the best
of Soviet efforts. Jews flock to
their synagogues to show their
solidarity with Israel and World
Jewry.
The Day School program
which was planned by the Judaic
Studies staff unde.- the direction
of Mrs. Helen Schwartz, was
highlighted by the start of a
letter writing campaign to the
Soviet Jewish dissidents who
need the support and encourage-
ment of American Jewry. It is
anticipated that this will be an
ongoing project designed to raise
the consciousness of the students
about this critical issue in Jewish
life.
*H
"Y
By STACI LESSER
Mazol Tov to Peter Ray, son of Ellen and Michael Ray on
his upcoming Bar Mitzvah. Grandparents Frances and Albert
Schnitt of the Fountains. Lake Worth, and Eatelle Ray of New
York, are looking forward to grandson Peter becoming a Bar
Mitzvah at Temple Beth El. *l
Peter's aunts and uncles and cousins are frying in from all
parts of the country for this simcha. Joining the festivities will
be Aunt Elden and Unde Larry Schnitt and cousins Todd and
Drew of Virginia Beach. Unde Jack Schnitt of New York. Uncle
Eddie Schnitt of Fort LauderdaJe. and Unde Mark Ray of San
Francisco.
Peter attends the Jewish Community Day School along
with brothers Brian and Eric. He loves all sport*(the favorite
being tennis) and is an avid reader. Peter hope.' 'o become a
Cardio-Vascular Surgeon someday. Then there will be two Dr.
Rays'in the family.
Ellen Ray teaches at the Jewish Community Day School
and is very active in the community. She is secretary of the PTA
of the JCDS. Chairman of the S125 category for the Women's
Division of the Jewish Federation, and is decoration chairman
for the Women's Division Women's Assembly.
Many other relatives and friends will join Peter to celebrate
at a reception and dinner at the Breakers. Again, we wish Mazol
Tuvl
The season is rapidly approaching. The time of year when
many happy occasions occur, when relatives and friends flock
South to visit, and we in the Palm Beaches are kept forever
busy. Don't forget to share these times with us.
Send your good news to
AROUND THE TOWN. The Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, 601 South Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fl
33401.
The most respected name
in Jewish funeral service.
In the world
Not surprising,ifs River-
side, and there are many
reasons.
If you've ever worked with
any of our people on com-
munity projects ranging from
fund-raising drives for Israel
to enhancing Jewish education,
you'd understand. If you've
ever experienced the compas-
sion and kindness of Riverside
counselors.you'd have an even
deeper appreciation of the
reasons for Riverside
leadership.
At Riverside, we have
the larpest Jewish staff
available from any funerat
director in Florida. More
important, they are people who
understand Jewish tradition
and honor it.
They carry on a tradition
that for over three generations
has been a priceless assurance
to Jewish families.
Our people. They make
Riverside the most respected
name in Jewish funeral service
in the world.
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
Carl Grossberg, President
Andrew Fier, Vice President,
New York and Past
President of the Jewish
Funeral Directors of
America.
Charles Salomon, Vice
President, New York.
In Florida:
Mired Golden, Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious
Advisor.
Sam Rosenthal
Kenneth Kay, V. P.
Keith Kronish, F.D.
Mark Ginsberg, F.D.
Harvey Pincus, F.D.
Douglas Lazarus, F.D.
Carmen Serrano, F.D.
Robert Burstein
Arthur Zweigenthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Gotland
Jules Fischbein
Elaine Gardner
Lena Rothfeld
Sonia Gale
Bernard Eilen
Aaron Rosenthal
Sol Silver
Charlie Blumkin
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Selby
Edward Dobin
Ralph Rubell
Guardian Plan Counselors:
Ira Goldberg, Manager
Steve Fischman
Alfred Stern
Syd Kronish
DickSorkin
Joseph Rubin
Henry Bofman
Joseph Bass
ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton
Road (19th St.)/531-1151
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250
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MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17th St.
(Douglas Rd.)/443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480
N.E. 19th Ave./947-8691
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood
Blvd./920-1010
FT. LAUDERDALE (Tamarac):
6701 West Commercial
Blvd. (E. of University Rd.) /
587-8400
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714
Okeechobee Blvd./
683-8676
Five chapels serving the New
York Metropolitan area.
Memorial Chapal. Inc. / FunarM OMcwi
Tradition. If s what makes us Jews.
Sponsoring tha Gi.rdnn Plan
Pra-Arrancsd Funaral.
;iMrdln


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
F"dy. Octohw & |
Community Calendar
Oct. 23
Women's Americon ORT West Palm Beach 12:30 p.m.
Oct. 24
Temple Beth David Newcomers 8 p.m.
Oct. 25
R'-.-' B'rith 2969 10 a.m. Golden Lakes Ten 'e Sisterhood -
Board 10 a.m. Temple Israel Sisterhood Early Bird Dinner 5
p.m.
Oct. 26
FEDERATION COMMUNITY RELATIONS COUNCIL SOVIET JEWRY
TASK FORCE 7.30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Boynton Beach -
Board Women's American ORT Mid Palm B'nai B'rith 3016
7:45 p.m. Hadassah Shalom I p.m Hadassah Tamar -
12:30 p.m. Women's American ORT Palm Beach 12 noon
FEDERATION COMMUNITY RELATIONS COUNCIL LOCAL
CONCERNS TASK FORCE 9a.m.
Oct. 27
FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION JEWISH WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY -
HOSTESS MEETING 10 a.m. Hadassah Lee VassiI 12:30 p.m.
Congregation Beth Kodesh Sisterhood Board Congregation
Anshei Sholom Sisterhood 1 p.m. Congregation Anshei
Sholom 1 p.m. BBW-Masodo 8 p.m. Women's American
ORT Boynton Beach 1 p.m. Women's American ORT West
Palm Beach Board 12:30 p.m. FEDERATION CHAPLAIN AIDE
CORPS 2:30 p.m Temple Beth El Executive Board 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 28
FEDERATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS 8 p.m. Hadassah Choi -
Luncheon 12:30 p.m. Temple Beth David Sisterhood 7:30 p.m.
Congregation Beth Kodesh Sisterhood Luncheon and Show -
12 noon National Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach -
Paid up Membership Luncheon 12 noon FEDERATION
WOMEN'S DIVISION JEWISH WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY MEETING -
9:30a.m.
Oct. 29
National Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach Board 10
a.m. Pioneer Women Theodore Herzl Brandeis University
Women Lake Worth 10 a.m. Jewish Community Center -
Executive Committee 8 p.m. Hadassah Bat Gurion 10a.m.
Nov. 1
B'nai B'rith 3113 Board 10 a.m. Hadassah GoldaMeir Boat
Ride Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood Flea Market.
Nov. 2
Americon Jewish Committee Dinner The Breakers 6:30 p.m.
Temple Emonu-EI Sisterhood Board 9:45 a.m. B'nai B'rith
3016 Board 3 p.m. Hadassah Tikvah Board 10 a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood Board 9:30 a.m.
Women's American ORT Lake Worth West Board 9:30 a.m.
Women's American ORT Palm Beach Board 10a.m. Jewish
Community Day School Board 8 p.m. Temple Beth El
Sisterhood Board 7:30 p.m. National Council of Jewish
Women Palm Beach Board 10 a.m. Temple Beth David
Men's Club 8 p.m. Temple Israel Sisterhood Board 10a.m.
FEDERATION COMMUNITY RELATIONS COUNCIL LOCAL
CONCERNS TASK FORCE 9-11 a. m.
Nov. 3
Congregation Beth Kodesh Sisterhood B'nai B'rith 3132 7:30
p.m Americon Jewish Congress Membership Gala 12:30
p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Choi Board 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith
Women Medina Board Women's League of Israel 1 2 noon
Pioneer Women Cypress Lakes Board 10 a.m. Temple
Beth El Board 7:30 p.m. Temple Israel Men's Club -
Husband-Wife Dinner B'nai B'rith 3041 Board 3 p.m.
Nov. 4
FEDRATION JEWISH WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY HYATT-PALM
BEACH -8:45 p.m.-2:15 p.m. FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WOMEN'S DINNER MEETING 6
p.m. Jewish Community Center Board 8 p.m. Temple Beth
Sholom Men's Club- Board 7:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith 3115 -Board
- 8 p.m. Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood 1 p.m. Pioneer
Women Ezra! 12:30 p.m. Women's American ORT No. Palm
Beach County Region -9:30a.m.
Nov. 5
FEDERATION ENDOWMENT TAX SEMINAR BREAKERS 4-8 p.m.
Hadassah Choi Board 10 a.m. Women's Americon ORT -
Evening 8 p.m. Pioneer Women Theodore Herzl 1 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Ohav 1 p.m. Hadassah Palm Beach County -
Board 10 a.m. United Order of True Sisters 61 National
Convention New York Hadassah Bat Gurion Board 10 a.m.
National Council of Jewish Women Okeechobee Unit Board
- 9:30 a.m. Women's American ORT Century Board
Pioneer Women Goldo Meir 1 p.m.
For Advertising
Call Staci
at 588-1652
Because Someone Cared
By
STEPHEN LEVITT. ACSW
(A personal view from the
executive Director of the Jewish
Family and Children's Service.)
(All case names mentioned in
these articles are fictitious; client
information at Jewish Family
and Children's Servic- is held in
the strictest of confidence)
The recent news indicating
that the amount of violence de-
picted on television subsided
during the 1980-1981 season, is
welcome news in this corner,
welcome indeed.
As of this writing, I have not
had the opportunity to review the
new programs of the 1981-1982
season; I would hope the trend
toward peacable vidionics would
continue.
At a recent professional work-
shop on television violence a
number of startling facts
emerged which caused this writer
a sense of outrage with regard to
the facts of television-life. In
part, one conclusion drawn by the
experts represented was that
"tne three to four hours a day,
seven days a week, total immer-
sion in TV, typical of preschool
and elementary school children is
seen as harmful to their physical
health and literacy as well as to
their attitudes and values. One
commentator has estimated
that, upon entering kindergarten,
an American child will have spent
more hours in front of the tube
that it would take him to earn a
college degree".
In terms of the effect of tele-
vision upon literacy, Rutgers
University President, Edward
Blowstein offered the following
axiom:
"Kids + TV s Illiteracy"
We are aware. I am sure, of the
Stephen Levitt
vast financial interests involved
with the television industry; that
combined sales of the medium
grossed $23.4 billion dollars in
1975. We are equally aware of the
constitutional issues raised by
any form of censorship or
restriction or governmental regu-
lation of what we may view or not
view.
Hut at some point, our nation's
psychological health and welfare
must be considered awy ^
the arena (or as some 3
prefer circus) of the netw
program planners. In the (3
sburg vs New York case *
certamFCC rulings, ouT^j
has affirmed its constituS
nght to protect the atmospl^
in which our children will ^T
This has been accomplished.
tewaTchilC0^^^
In light of increasing scientis.1
mquiry into the effect of?2
upon children, have we Z2
the point where we can 2*1
enough? y-|
<7,hr ,Jew'sh Family oafi
Children's Service isamn-pnhl
agency designed to mm 1
social, emotional and counsWuul
needs of the Jewish comiwrtj
of Palm Beach County. Ouro/ftU
is located at 2411 Okeecholml
Boulevard. Our ttlephml
number is 684-1991. ThtJ,^\
Family and Children's SeniuA
a beneficiary agency of tJ
Jewish Federation ofPalmBn&l
County).
Attention
Israel Bond Holders
You do not help Israel by keeping your Israel
Bonds after maturity.
Israel must place the proceeds at the Chase
Manhattan Bank. Israel prefers you reinvest
your mature bonds into new bonds or file with
the Chase Manhattan Bank to collect your
principal plus interest.
For Information Call the
Israel Bonds Office
669-1445
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M


w, October 2,11
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Pn&F
ifj/Jlepresent 'Struggle9
France Wants PLO Invited
ByYIZHAKRABI
I UNITED NATIONS -
if^l French Foreign
linister Claude Chevsson
b called for the inclusion
[the Palestine Liberation
Lganization in the Middle
fast peace negotiations.
|e reiterated the French
bition at a crowded press
Inference and afterwards
, his address to the UN
eneral Assembly.
[Replying to questions at the
less conference. Cheysson said
If course" when asked if his
vemment still believes the
PLO should be associated with
the peace process.
The PLO, he said, "represents
the fight, the straggle of the
Palestinian people" and as such
should be part of the negotia-
tions. At the same time, how-
ever, Cheysson emphasized that
his government has never recog-
nized the PLO as being the sole
representative of the Palestinian
people.
THE FRENCH diplomat said
that any final Middle East peace
agreement should be left to the
Arabs and Israelis themselves.
Asked about the Saudi Arabian
peace plan proposed by Crown
Prince Fahd last month, Cheys-
son said Fahd's statements re-

mm M K
ft ?*
Israel Bond Board of Governors
Announces New Goal for
1981-82 Campaign
|t a recent Israel Bond Board
jovernors Breakfast, Chair-
of the Board Dr. Richard
garman announced, "that it
[ unanimously decided to in-
the Palm Beach County
| for Israel Bonds. This year's
would be 11 Vt Million
rs."
npaign Chairman, Mr.
lid Lesher stated, "In view of
si's need for economic secur-
e can do no less than in-,
our goal for the coming
and with the help of all of
orkers we will meet the goal
ll'/i Million." Mr. Lesher
armed "that he was looking
lard to a year of much growth
i the Israel Bond Organiza-
there are many new and ex-
challenges and ideas to
Irving Rifkin, South
ity Chairman for Israel
W was the featured speaker.
m
Mr. Rifkin described in detail the
idea of the Mediterranean Dead
Seas Canal which is being under-
taken by the State of Israel to
help make it energy self suffi-
cient. He described the excite-
ment he experienced at the
ground breaking ceremonies in
Israel, from which he has just re-
turned.
Over 50 of the top leaders for
Israel Bonds attended an early
morning Breakfast at the Hyatt,
pictured above are: seated left to
right are Rabbi Schechtman who
gave the invocation, Mrs. Evelyn
Blum, Chairman of the Women's
Division, Dr. Marvin Rosenberg,
Past Campaign Chairman, Mr.
Irving Rifkin, Boca and South
County Chairman; Standing left
to right Dr. Richard Shugarman,
Chairman of the Board, Mr.
Gerald Lesher, 1981-82 Cam-
paign Chairman, and Mr. Robert
Rapaport, Past Chairman and
Florida Regional Chairman.
National j
c Bank

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Forest Hill Branch
1860 Forest Hill Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33406
Pabn Beech Lake. Blvd. Branch
2380 Palm Beach Lake* Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Member FDIC Member Federal Reserve System
present "a remarkable progress."
He added, however, that the
statement failed to mention
self determination" which is an
important aspect of any Middle
East settlement as far as France
is concerned.
Cheysson said that after Presi-
dent Francois Mitterrand of
France visited Saudi Arabia
several weeks ago, now more
than ever he believes the Saudi
peace initiative might come to at-
tention once again.
The French Foreign Minister
was pessimistic about the situa-
tion in Lebanon which he said
was extremely grave to the point
of being "unbearable." He ob-
served that Lebanon has "almost
disappeared as a nation and as a
state." He stressed the need for a
peaceful solution to the Lebanese
crisis, which, he said, could be
found only by the parties in-
volved. He said that France
would participate in any plan to
bring peace to l^ebanon if asked
to do so by the parties or by the
UN.
IN HIS SPEECH to the
General Assembly, Cheysson
addressed the Middle Fast pro-
blem in more general terms, de-
claring that "negotiation involv-
ing all of the parties concerned is
the only acceptable means" for
reaching a settlement in the re-
gion. He also warned that "Vio-
lation of the resolutions of this
organization (UN) is not the way
to ensure the necessary security
for the countries, for all the coun-
tries in the Middle East, in-
cluding Israel. War is not the
way the peoples of this region, all
the peoples. including the
Palestinian people, will achieve
their rights recognized, including
the right to a homeland and a
state." he said.
Cheysson declared that "Jus-
tice for people, security for
states, respect for international
decisions, negotiations these
are the principles that will guide
France in the position it takes in
the Middle East and throughout
the world."
The General Assembly was
addressed by the Argentine
Foreign Minuter, Oacar ("ami-
lion, und Foreign Minister Sunao
Sonodu of Japan. Cumilion said
that one of the most serious cases
of insecurity is the persistent de-
luy in resolving the Palestinian
problem
HE ALSO noted that Israel's
occupation of territory since the
1(.K>7 war. its bombing of I rail's
nucleur installation last June and
the recent attack on a synagogue
in Viennu are all purt of the same
problems.
So nod a said mare in the Mid-
dle Beat would Ih achk'ved
through implementation of Secu-
rity Council Kesolution 2-12 and
:i:8 und the recognition of the
rights of the I'ulestinian people.
including the right to self-deter-
mination. He also said that it is
necessary for a solution that
Israel recognize the right of the
Palestinian people to self-deter-
mination and the Palestinians re-
, cognize Israel's right to exist.
The Foreign Ministers of West
Germany and Italy. Hans-Die-
trich Genscher and Emilio
Colombo, respectively, following
the West European approach to a
solution of the Middle East con-
flict, have called for mutual re-
cognition between Israel and the
Palestinians.
GENSCHER. addressing the
General Assembly, said, "We
have a vital interest of our own in
a lasting comprehensive and
equitable peace in the Middle
Kaat. Israels right to live within
si-cure and recognized boundaries
is just as indespensible for such a
peace as recognition of the right
of self-determination of the
Palestinian people," he said.
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
FridJ'.Octob28,1
Organizations In The News
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Carrying with them the state-,
ment of Jerusalem's Mayor,.
Teddy Kollek, that "the vital role
which ORT plays in vocational
education is well-known through-
out the world", the North Pafan
Beach County Region delegates
will leave on October 25, for the
26th National Biennial Conten-
tion, to be held in New York City,
October 26 through 29. Some
1,200 | delegates, representing'
145,000 members of Women's
American ORT in over 1,250
chapters from coast to coast, as
well as distinguished guests from
this country and overseas, will
attend the Convention's plenary
sessions, panels, and workshops.
Members of the North Palm
Beech Region delegation are:
Mrs. Jack Ring, President; Mrs.
Harry Bilawsky, Executive Com-
mittee Chairman; Mrs. Betty
Jackel, Past President; and Mrs.
Joseph Sugarman, Membership
Vice President.
Mrs. Ring, who heads the local
delegation, said that "Women's
American ORT's 26th National
Biennial Convention will focus on
the challenges the Jewish people
will face in the coming century."
In the decades before us, more
and more Jews all over the world
will require ORT's services and
help; and we of Women's Ameri-
can ORT will engage in the dis-
cussions that will lay the ground-
work for giving them the aid they
need. We will continue to be, as
we have been for the last 101
years, the vocational and techni-
cal education program of the
Jewish people.
ORT, Organization for Rehabi-
litation through Training, has
been in operation since 1880.
Over two million people have
been trained by ORT since its in-
ception. Today, the international
ORT network is comprised of
some 800 vocational and techni-
cal schools located in two dozen
countries on five continents, with
an annual student enrollment in
excess of 100,000, 75,000 of whom
study in Israel. The Bramson
ORT Technical Institute in New
York City and ORT's recent en-
try into the Jewish Day School
movement in Florida are bringing
ORT's experience and know-how
to the American scene. Women's
American ORT, founded in 1927,
is the largest of the groups in tht
forty nations which support the
global ORT program.
The film, "The Link and thi
Chain" will be presented at the
first meeting of the season of the
Palm Beach Chapter of Women
American ORT (The Organize
tion for Rehabilitation through
Training). The meeting will be
held at The Community l
110 Southern Boulevard, West
Palm Beach on Monday, October
26 at 1 p.m. All members and
friends are invited to attend. Re-
freshments will be served.
ORT's participation in the new
Jewish High School of South
Florida which opened in Septem-
ber marked its entry into the
United States day school system
and the extension of its opera-
tional role in America. The school
is located in North Miami Beach.
ORT's responsibilities will focus
on the Division of Science and
Technology in which computer
science and electronics will be
taught.
The North Palm Beach Chapter
of the Womens American ORT
will begin its new season with a
delightful day planned for Thurs-
day October 29 meeting at the
Flagler Museum at 10:50a.m.
There will be a guided tour ol
the museum at 11 a.m. This will
be followed by a lovely luncheon
at Chez Guido, Palm Beach. The
cost for the entire day will be 115
per person. RSVP by Friday,
October 23 to Mrs. Lawrence
Rudner 419 Marlin Road, North
Palm Beach 33408.
Your check is your reservation.
Unfortunately we must limit the
reservations to the first 30 per-
sons who send in their checks. So
do hurry and get your RSVP in
early.
The Golden Lakes Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
hold its next meeting in the
Auditorium of the Village on
Tuesday, October 27, at 12:30
p.m.
Dr. Norma Shulman, well
known psychologist and family
counselor will speak on "The
Myth of the Jewish American
Princess" and "The Yiddishe
Mama."
Refreshments will be served.
PIONEER WOMEN
Rummage sale will be held
Thursday October 29 at Millers
Super Market Military Trail.
Volunteers are needed. Call
SelmaRind.
Golda Meir Club Pioneer
Women will meet on November 5
at the First Federal of Delray
Bank at the West Gate Topic of
the Day Report on Convention."
Paid up membership meeting
will be held Thursday November
5. Box luncheon will be served.
Call Sally Plaxe or Ida Bordoker.
Make reservations for
Thanksgiving week-end. Call Bee
Cohen for further information.
Theodore Herzl Club of Pioneer
Women will have a Thanksgiving
Musical Gourmet Show Tour at
the Golden Apple Dinner
Theatre, presenting "I Do I Do."
Bush Gardens plus a Cruise and
Steak Dinner. Also at the Coun-
try Dinner Playhouse
"Naughty Marietta"; Burt Rey-
nolds Dinner Theatre "Fiddler
on the Roof."
Price per person is $220
Double, Single $40 Additional.
For tickets, please call: Hannah
Schwartz or Sydell Paris.
B'NAI B'RITH
WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women, Masada
Chapter All our members,
guests and friends are cordially
invited to attend a particularly
stimulating and exciting meeting
to be held on Tuesday, October
27, at 7:45 p.m. at the Jewish
Community Center, 2415 Okee-
chobee Blvd. West Palm Beach.
We will present a new film
m Israel entitled. "The Future
of the Wesl Bank. It portrays
two opposu-.g views on the ques-
t's Good for the
.leu
The fin < the back-
movements in-
vl ant matter
nd 'hich have
made hi-;ullines throughout the
world. A four page fact sheet will
be distributed at the meeting,
setting forth legal and political
arguments in support of Israel's
current policies.
B'nai B'rith Women, Menorah
Chapter, meets Tuesday,
November 10, at the First
Federal Bank of Delray. Bou-
tique hour 12 1 p.m. Dr.
Robert K. Alsofrom, well knowr
television and radio personality,
will speak on the "Endangered
'American Jew." Refreshments
will Deserved.
Many trips scheduled: October
29 Marco Polo Hotel, Frankie
Kein Show, "One of a Kind."
Dinner at the Prince Hamlet io
Miami, transportation. Novem
ber 4-5 Disney World, twe
days, one night, complete admis-
sions for two days, includes din-
ner and show at Once Upon a
Stage Dinner Theatre, also din
ner-show at Musicana of Orlando,
transportation. November 9-1!
Palm Beach Spa, massages, al
meals. November 26 Thanks
giving Night, dinner-show at
Royal Palm Dinner Theatre,
Boca Raton, "Private Lives."
For information and reserve
tions phone Ruth Rubin or LiUiar
Cohen.
HADASSAH
Shalom Hadaaaah West Palm
Beach holds a general meeting
i and Paid-up Membership lunch-
eon Monday, October 26, at
Anshei Sholom. Admission to
luncheon by ticket only, at 12:30
p.m., contribution $2; call
Dorothy Lieberman or Bertha
Rubin for reservations. Regular
meeting at 1 p.m. Guest speaker,
John Quigley, Channel 5.
Calendar: November 1-4, Lido
Spa; November 5-8, Palm Beach
Spa; a few choice openings still
available. Call Fran Nudelman.
Flo Siegel, Lil Schack. November
5, Fun Day at Calder Race Track;
Gene Fermaglich, Belle Kreit.
November 10, Flea Market and
Bazaar, West Palm Beach Audi-
torium, 10 to 4:30 p.m. Bargains
galore. Details, Goodie Levin,
Jean Peck man
November 11, Youth Aliyah
luncheon at Sheraton. Guest
speaker, Terry Rapaport, presi-
dent Florida Central Region.
Chairpersons Bertha Rubin,
Florence Shapiro. November 13,
Hadassah Oneg Shabbat. Guest
speaker, Edith Zamost, National
vice-president of Hadassah.
November 26-29, Thanksgiving
weekend at kosher Sea Gull
Hotel. Martha Starr, Mae Pod-
wol. December 3, Franki Keine
Show at Marco Polo, dinner at
Prince Hamlet; and December
30-January 1. New Year trip to
West Coast area. Call Fran, Flo,
or Lil. December 9, "Gypsy"
matinee at Royal Palm. Ida
Goetz, Sylvia Poznkk.
AMERICAN MIZRACHI
WOMEN
American Mizrachi Women,
Rishona Chapter will hold its
first regular meeting at Anshei
Sholom on Tuesday, November
10 at 1 p.m. and every second
Tuesday of each month at the
same place.
Community Relations Council Speakers available
Topics Israel, Community Concerns, Soviet
Jewry, Energy, Holocaust
For information and bookings, contact
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman's office
at the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County. 832-2120
illllllllrillllllHilllHIIIIIIIIIIIUHIII
Entertainment by Norma
Sirota and her performers. Re-
freshments. All welcome.
SOUTH FLORIDA JEWISH
CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES
South Florida Jewish Civil
Service Employees will hold then-
monthly meeting Sunday,
November 1, at 2 p.m. at the
Weight Watchers Auditorium in
the Gun Club Shopping Center
Military Trail and Gun Club
Road (between Summit and
Southern Blvd.) West Palm
Beach.
The First Nomination for Offi-
cers will be held at this meeting.
The Guest Speaker will be the
renowned Palm Beach County
Sheriff Richard P. Wille. Don't
miss Sheriff Wille's talk on Crime
Prevention. A question and
answer period will follow.
All members are urgedj
attend. Guests are invited Colk 1
tion served. For informationcj'
Sid Levine West Palm Bad
Theodore Frolow Lake wS
Julius Conn Delray and BoynS
Beach; and Benjamin KUnS'
b reward.
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October 23,1961
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
Moshe Day an Israeli Hero Dies Suddenly

AVIV, Israel Moshe
was buried Sunday after-
,t Nahalal, the collective
where he spent his child-
_j died last Friday at age
eI two heart attacks. Prime
Menachem Begin
_ Dayan in a statement
rfi radio Saturday night,
him "one of our greatest
I of the ages." Dayan was
d full military honors and
.funeral.
beral Moshe Dayan, Israel's
Foreign Minister, waa a
natic and outspoken man
had come to represent the
[and determination of the
people. Statesman, ar-
tist, author and military
}eneral Dyan continued to
i a member of the Knesset
ently, and remains as one
l's most controversial and
'figures.
j in Kibbutz Degania, one
first Jewish collectives in
tine, he began his long and
fished record of service to
untry at the age of 14, when
ItheHaganah.
|l939, with the issuance of
ritish White Paper favoring
| nationalism, he was ap-
ded with other Haganah
i and received a five year
sentence. Released in
served with British and
forces in liberating Syria
fcbanon. It was then that he
left eye in action and
the black patch that
omehis trademark.
Israel's War for In-
pence U948-49), he com-
I a battalion on the Syrian
and rose to the top com-
of the Jerusalem front. Af-
|tending staff college in
he returned to become
bf Israel's general staff in
I He was supreme com-
' of Israel's forces during
ki-SuezWarof 1956.
aving the army in 1958,
|lied politics at the Hebrew
sitv in Jerusalem until his
in 1959 to Israel's
t. He served as Minister of
llture from 1959 to 1964,
Ihe joined former Prime
Jer David Hen-Gurion and
[to form their own political
I
W,on thi eve of the "Siz-
ar," he lined the unity
Iment as Minister of De-
land went on to play a
crucial role in Israel's third war
with the Arab states. Following
the war, his reputation was
further enhanced by his ad-
ministration of the occupied
territories. As an architect of Is-
rael's "Open Bridges Policy," he
helped to build an effective
foundation for developing Arab-
Israeli relations.
Dayan, as foreign minister,
conducted many secret peace
missions, including one in
Morocco with Egyptian repre-
sentatives, paving the way for
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat's historic 1977 visit to
Jerusalem.
Dayan abandoned his early
Labor Party affiliations in 1977
to join Begin's Likud coalition,
which lasted but a short time.
Tributes poured in to Dayan's
family and colleagues from
around the world.
In Washington, President
Reagan called Dayan a "symbol
of Israeli resolve to be free and
independent".
"We are deeply saddened to
learn of the death of Moshe
Dayan a courageous soldier
and a great Israeli statesman,"
Reagan said in a statement re-
leased by the White House.
Egypt's new president, Ho.sni
Mubarak, cabled condolences to
Israeli President Yitzhak Navon.
Official delegations attended
the funeral on behalf of several
countries.
Attorney General William
French Smith led the American
delegation. The White House
announced. Other members of the
official U.S. delegation were
Sens. Roger Jepsen (R., Iowa)
and Edward Zorinsky (D., Neb.)
and Reps. Richard Cheney (R.,
Wyo.) and Mickey Edwards (R.,
Oklal.
Dayan had been admitted to
Tel Aviv's Tel Hashomer
hospital last Thursday night,
complaining of chest pains and
difficulty in breathing.

i
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Reagan Bemoans Loss of Sadat
Jewish Leaders Join President in Expressions of Sadness
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President
Reagan, praising the late
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat as a "humanitarian
unafraid to make peace,"
said that the American
people were "horrified" by
the "cowardly" murder of
the Egyptian President.
"America has lost a close
friend, the world has lost a great
statesman, mankind has lost a
champion of peace, "Reagan de-
clared as he appeared on the
north portico of the White House
accompanied by his wife, Nancy.
THE PRESIDENT did not
make a statement until it wa.'
offii tally announced in Cairo by
Vice President rlosni Mubarak.
'liiiL'an also praised Sadat as a
man of "courage" who sought to
hring peace to the world. He
notod that Sadiit was 'admired
and loved' by the Aim ri< an |>eo
pie.
Just a few minutes before the
President's nationally-televised
appearance, Egyptian Ambassa-
dor Ashraf Ghorbal appeared in
front of his Embassy here con-
firming Sadat's death and de-
claring that Egypt would conti-
nue to follow Sadat's path under
the "leadership" of Mubarak.
Ghorbel said Egypt would ful-
fill "its international obligations"
and will continue to involve
themselves in the Camp David
peace process working in close
partnership with the U.S.
American Jewish leaders,
meanwhile, expressed grief and
shock at the assassination of the
Egyptian leader. Maynard
Wishner, president of the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee, said that
"with the rest of the world, we
mourn the death of a man of
courage and peace. We condemn
those responsible for this
dastardly act of assassination, the
tragic consequences of which can
only be to further destabilize the
Middle East."
HENRY SIEGMAN. execu-
tive director of the American
Jewish Congress, said he hoped
the United States would "fully
absorb the implications of this
latest evidence of the tragic in-
stability endemic" to the Mideast
and that "we pray that the pro-
gress" toward peace between
Egypt and Israel "will not be un-
done" and will remain Sadat's
"great legacy" to Egypt and to
the wor'.d.
Charlotte Jacobson, chairman
of the World Zionist Organiza-
tion American section, called
the assassination a "catastrophe,"
praising "the influence and
example of this brave leader and
farsighted seeker of peace." She
said the killing was "a gun-punc-
tuated reminder" of a region
"where the fate of nations hangs
on the trigger finger of the
assassin."
Maxwell Greenberg, chairman
of the Anti- Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, said Sadat "pur-
sued" peace vigorously until he
was "cut down by terrorists
whose very act underscores the
destructivess of hate and the
fragility of peace." He urged, in
addition to suitable mourning,
dedication "to the eradication of
terrorism.
JACK SPITZER, president of
B'nai B'rith International, de-
scribed Sadat m "a singular fi-
gure" who had the courage and
vision to soak peace with Israel
"and to continue on that path de-
spite enormous opposition
throughout the Arab world."
Spitsar said "We can only hope
that President Sadat's
will honor his memory and his
dream by continuing to build the
structure of peace" that he
began.
Edgar Bronfman, president of
the World Jewish Congress, in s
telegram to the Egyptian Am-
bassador to the U.S., Ashraf
Ghorbal, said the death of Sadat
"is a loss to the world of a great
statesman and a map of incre-
dible vision and bravery."
Shirley Leviton, president of
the National Council of Jewish
Women, said Sadat's "action
brought a ray of hope into efforts
to achieve peace in the Middle
East." She added that his death
"is a matter of grave concern to
all peace loving people."'
Frieda Lewis, president of
Hadassah, described the slain
Egyptian President as "a noble
and courageous leader of his peo-
ple who chose to pursue the path
of peace regardless of the risks
and the obstacles, because he
kept before him the vision of a
better world for all people."'
MORTON MANDEL. presi-
dent of the Council of Jewish Fe-
derations, said that the Jewish
Federations of North America
"have always dreamt of a time
when Israel would truly be free of
the threat of war and instead
could cultivate the pursuits of
peace. President Sadat in his
efforts helped move that dream
closer to reality."
Joseph Tabachnik, president of
the Chicago Board of Rabbis,
called Sadat "a great world
leader. His words, 'no more war',
rang out with prophetic force as
he signed the Camp David ac-
cords. We pray that the Egyptian
people and the Israelis will conti-
nue the peace process which will
serve as'a memmorialto this great
leader."
Rabbi Joseph Sternstein, pre-
sident of the American Zionist
Federation, said the "tragic
assassination" highlighted the
"fragility" of international pacts
in the context of autocratic re-
gimes, adding that Sadat "will be
remembered as a man of peace"
Harold Jacobs, president of the
National Council of Young Israel,
said "Once again, the forces of
violence and terrorism" have cut
down "another Arab friend of the
United States. He expressed
hope the murder would not un-
dermine the Camp David ac-
cords.
RABBI SOL ROTH, president
of the Rabbinical Council of
America, called Sadat "a great
statesmen" who made "a pri-
mary contribution to the cause of
peace in the Middle East."
Calling the assassination "a ter-
rible shock," he said he hope and
prayed "this terrible act" will not
affect the peace process but
will bring the nations of the area
closer'" to the goals of peace.
Ivan Novick president of the
Zionist Organization of America,
called Sadat "an extraordinary
example of Arab moderation'" by
his acceptance of the reality of
Israel. Novick said the United
States must understand that if a
strong nation like Egypt "can be
threatened by fanatic terrorist
elements." the United States
must "exercise extreme caution
before relying on less stable and
more vulnerable nations, such as
Saudi Arabia."
Howard Squadron, chairman
of the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organi-
zations, said the murder was that
of "a man of peace, courage and
vision," embodying "the spirit of
reconciliation and rapprochement
among nations."
Rabbi William Berkowitz, pre-
sident of the Jewish National
Fund, said the "shocking death"
dramatized "how fragile" the
peace is between Egypt and
Israel. He said "now the whole
world is wondering if Egypt*' will
continue in the path of peace and
reconciliation begun "heroically"
by Sadat.
Rabbi Benjamin Kreitman,
Position Open For
Kadima Youth Advisor
Grades 6 Through 8
Send Resume To:
Larry Goldberg
%Tmple Beth El
2815 No. Flaglar Dr.
W.P.B.. Fl. 33407
Or Call Temple Office
833-0339
ion
United Synagogue of America
executive vice president, said it
was hoped that those who take on
the mantle of Sadat's leadership
"will follow in his footsteps and
seek to carry on" the peace
process he started.
A SIMILAR HOPE that
Sadat's successors would "conti-
nue in the courageous paths to
peace" initiated by Sadat was ex-
pressed by the American Profes-
sors for Peace in the Middle East.
Roselle Silberstein, president
of American Mizrachi Women,
said Sadat's assassination "is a
global tragedy" and that his
death "puts the entire Middle
East into a new perspective." She
added that "We will pray to see
Mr. Sadat's dream of peace ful-
filled. Only then can his death be
given meaning."
Nathan Peskin, executive
director of The Workmen's Cir-
cle, said Sadat's assassination "is
SOOOOOCGO
smksrsbsS
as a statesman who* d
hand will be missed"
Julius Berman, DnwM
the Union of oShffjT
Congregations of Aiw
the Orthodox JewishT'1'
"ia shocked MdSSa
the hand, of ung^l
disc.phned men of viol,?.
^'ed.one of the great Xj
and champtons of worldZl
Berman added that Sad.nS1
daring and courageous sut,
of unusual courage and sun
who stood as a wall arainTal
forces of nihilism and dwbil
Donald Slaiman, presidesj
the Jewish Labor Coma*
called the assassination of Sal
a tragic loss for the caujJ
peace and underscores than
who appease terrorism areu
mining the survival or ore
society."
TEMPLE JUDEA
Presents
Fine Arts Auction
Sunday Nov. 8,1981
Hilton Hotel 3aooN.ocin8w|
SlnotflsitN']
Praviaw 7:15 p.m.
Auction 8:00 p.m.
Conducted By: Broward Art & Frame
Original Works of Art and Prints
Amen. Calder, Chagall, Hibel, Miro Neman.
Neirman, Simbari and Many Others
JEWISH FAMttY AMD CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the i
Jewish community of Palm Beach County Professional and coo-1
fidential help is available for
Problems of ihe oging Marital counseling
Consultation and evaluation services Parent-child conflicts ]
Vocational counseling Personol problems
Private Offices:
2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beech, Flo. 3341
Telephone: 614-1991
Moderate fees are charged in -family and individual counselingJ
Those who can pay (Fees are based on income and family si)
The Jewish Family ond Children's Service is a beneficiary agency *1
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
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[October 23
twi
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
fefln/yan IllusionHaiff
Says Saudis Nix AW ACS Partnership
IdAVID FRIEDMAN
(SH1NGTON -
Secretary of State
Inder Haig warned
ers of the Senate
, Relations Com-
j that they are suffer-
[n "illusion" if they
[ethat a U.S.-Saudi
[an joint command
Igement could be
Id out in the sale of
|CS reconnaissance
t to the Saudis.
added that negotiations
|he $8.5 billion arms pack-
jve been completed with the
and that he would not go
[for further negotiations
he regarded that as
wproductive'* and "im-
|lG SAID that the type of
mmmand proposed by Sen.
i-nn iD Ohio) "is simply
ossible now. Therefore,
absolutely no point what-
| in comparing the present
I with some imaginary,
lighly desirable, joint com-
larrangement." Glenn and
lother committee members
(iot present as Haig re-
I for his second round of
I testimony before the Sen-
py today.
[choice before us is not be-
|these agreed arrangements
ome still more favorable
Haig told the committee.
I issue is whether U.S. in-
i are better served by the
bf surveillance system we
oposing or by the kind of
that would be supplied
ain or by some other third
That's the issue," Haig
ndkated that if the Senate
the arms sale, he would
opposed to the Saudis
; to buy the British Nim-
I similar reconnaissance air-
|or other equipment from
Europe. He said that
|the U.S. believes Saudi
needs the surveillance
Dent, it could not deny it
ht to try to get it elsewhere
ess refuses the >ul-
IG NOTED that if the sale
pted, it would damage U.S.
di relations. "The question
| whether Saudi Arabia will
i ranks of our enemies," he
| The Saudis have been far
I of us in recognizing and
{against the Soviet threat
[Persian Gulf. The question
her Saudi Arabia will
w from a moderate
hip role and seek instead
tion that a lower profile
[warned that "The fragile
"8 in Lebanon is a target of
1 who oppose the Middle
[ave Family,
fill Travel
ifc^ 25. from'1 to 6
I1* Jewish Community
will be conducting a
[top to the Discover/Cen-
\ t Lauderdale.
I T*l families are invited
[ ^e families already plan-
lexperience the wonders of
"^overy Center. Single
J^'uf course- encour-
EJo share the excitement
center.
at the Jewish Commu-
*. 2415 Okeechobee
l.nVf, P*r fan,fly member
rVl5 for non-members
Includes transportation
pmasion. Advance regia-
* required. Heae call
t0J additional in-
"nand-or registration.
Dr. Henry Kissinger
East peace process for they reco-
gnize that war in Lebanon could
well make peace impossible."
Therefore Haig said, "this is not
a time to impose severe strains on
relations with one of our closest
friends in the region," Saudi
Arabia.
The Secretary of State also
stressed that the Reagan
Administration is committed to
"the continued American efforts
to insure the qualitative
(military) advantage now en-
joyed by Israel" over the Arab
states. He said Israel now has the
capability to jam the radar on the
AWACS.
HAIG GAVE the committee a
chart comparing the arrange-
ments with Saudi Arabia for the
AWACS sale to the standard
arrangement for weapons sales to
other countries. He noted that
the arrangements with the
Saudis contain many more
restrictions. They include no
flights beyond Saudi Arabia's
borders: no third country per-
sonnel to perform maintenance
on the AWACS: exchange of
data between the U.S. and Saudi
Arabia at all times: and a ban on
the transfer of data to other
countries without the mutual
consent of the U.S. and Saudi
Arabia.
Meanwhile, President Reagan
lunched with a dozen former offi-
cials of past Administrations, in-
cluding defense secretaries, na-
tional security assistants and
chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, who, according to the
White House, expressed strong
support for the AWACS sale.
A statement issued on behalf
of the group warned that Con-
gressional rejection of the arms
package "would damage the
ability of the United States to
conduct a credible and effective
foreign policy, not only in the
Gulf region but across a broad
range of issues."
The White House said that
former President Jimmy Carter,
whom Reagan contacted by tele-
phone, backed the sale. Former
Presidents Ford and Nixon did so
earlier. White House press sec-
retary Larry Speakes said the
luncheon session would "de-
monstrate to doubters that there
is strong support, going back
over six administration*."
HENRY KISSINGER, who
was Secretary of State under
Nixon and Ford, attended, but
not Carter's Secretary of State,
Cyrus Vance, an outspoken op-
ponent of the AWACS deal.
Speakes said he did not know if
Vance had been invited.
The White House spokesman
said Reagan planned further
meetings with key Congressmen
this week to lobby for the sale.
Hut Senate Majority leader
Howard Baker of Tennessee con-
ceded that as of now "we do not
have the votes" to put it through.
He said "it will take a massive ef-
fort and special dedication to get
it worked out."
*a$8S%g%
w
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Yankee Beef Skillet
% pound ground beef
1 package (10 oz.) Birds Eye
New England style
vegetables
% cup water
2 teaspoons Worcestershire
sauce
BIRDS EYE
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a\ Eivglaivd
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"
Brown beef in skillet, leaving
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packet of topping. Add vegeta-
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sauce to skillet. Bring to a full
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stirring occasionally. Reduce
heat cover and simmer 5 min-
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Makes 3 servings.
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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
iKPu,-*iki^a^^
*m
m
i^^octowza,
*HWULJJi^^^P^I^


)
WATCH FOR THE TV SHOW
"GENERATION TO GENERATIONn
on CHANNEL 12, SUNDAY, OCT. 25
at 6:30 AM
TOPIC OF DISCUSSION:
The Changing role of Women in Judaism
ALSO FEATURING:
A Leck and A Schmeck
LEarn Yiddish With Beryl
Entertainment by the Performers
Community Awareness and More!
>
Show Produced by Sara Glenn, JCC
2415 Okeeckdbee Boulevard. West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
tffeas
Jewish Community Center
Senior News
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter, Comprehensive Senior Serv-
ice Center, receives funds from a
Federal Grant, Title III of the
Older Americans Act, awarded
by Gulfstream Areawide Council
on Aging, and the Florida De-
partment of H.R.S., enabling us
to provide transportation for the
transit disadvantage*! as well as
a variety of recreation and educa-
tional services.
Adult Education
The Fail Session of the Adult
Community Education Classes
began Sept. 21. Everyone is in-
vited to attend. Instructors are
provided by the School Board of
Palm Beach County. There is no
fee. Please call the Center for
further information.
+OU Painting, Mondays 9
a.m.-12 noon, Debbie Simmons, 8
weeks.
Coping With Life, Mondays 1-
3 p.m., Maurice Brown, 8 weeks.
Preventive Health Care & Nu-
trition, Tuesdays 9:30-11:30
a.m., Joan Fox, 8 weeks.
Know Your Car, Wednesdays
9:30 a.m. Paul Ob las, 6 weeks.
Dancerdze in the Chairs For
Men & Women, Wednesdays 1-
2:30 p.m., Bee Bunze, 8 weeks.
Lip Reading, Wednesdays 4-
5:30 p.m., Darlene Kohuth, 10
weeks.
?Writers Workshop, Thurs-
days 9:30-11:30 a.m., Frank
Bos t wick, 10 weeks.
?Advanced Writers Work
shop, Fridays 9:30-11:30 a.m.,
Frank Bostwick, 10 weeks.
-(-Registration for these classes
is closed. If you wish to be placed
on a waiting list, please call the
Center.
On-Going Programs
Round Table Talk For Men
Timely Topics For Thinking
Women The first session of
Round Table Talk for Men and
Timely Topics for thinking
Women will meet jointly on Oct.
6, at 1 p.m. The next session of
Timely Topics discussion
leader, Sylvia Skolnik and Round
Table Talk for Men Joe Green-
berg, discussion leader, Oct.
27 will be held separately.
Speakers Club Herbert
Sperber, President, invites all
those interested in public speak-
ing to join this group, which
meets on Thursdays at 10 a.m.
Art Of The Month Ida
Blauner, Chairperson, announces
that George H. Marks, well-
known photographer, will exhibit
some of his photographs at the
Center during the month of Octo-
ber. Come in to the Center to
view these photographs. The
Center is open from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Mondays through Fridays.
Coming Events
Senior Weekend Tampa
Trip Nov. 8,9 and 10.
Come for a fantastic three-day
weekend hosted by the Tampa
Seniors. Visit Busch Gardens, St.
Petersburg, and Tampa with
seniors from 11 Florida JCC'a.
This is a very special trip. Call
Sam Rubin or Rhonda Cohen for
information at 689-7700.
Lido Spa Get-A-Way Nov.
29 through Dec. 2.
Trip includes four day, three
nights, three meals a day, (diet or
regular) daily massage, nightly
entertainment. Bus leaves the
Westgate of Century Village on
Sunday, Nov. 29 at 11:30 a.m.
and arrive back on We
Dec. 2 at 4:15 p.m.
Members, double
SI 25, Non-members
occupancy-S135, Single
modations for members tt
Non-members single-$150.
transportation S13 per
For further information call I
Center and ask for Sam Rubin.
Hearing Tests will be ofta
the Jewish Community
the first Thursdays in Nov. I
Dec. 12:30-2.30 p.m. Nov. 51
Dec. 3.
Cardiac Pulmonary
tion (CPR) will be held it I
Jewish Community Center 1
day Nov. 16,1-4 p.m.
The Second Tuesday Ch*i
have a drawing of a 12 lb. I
turkey on Thursday, Nov.
Donation $.50. Call Sam I
purchase tickets.
Tka
Jewish Community
Youth Council
Not i.....>a VOLLEYBALL LEAGUES
Nov. If, M S wm M *. JCCJ
W VOLLEYBALL ~W BAK-B-QUE1
ftr (4) r*Mk Crwp lw alr4y
T 2**? *'P !, r
c Join mtkti !*, Mil ttorh H*n4l
M->700 m Urrj C.l*.., I))-0)J.
w
241, OkM-.SakM b.ll..rl
BENJAMIN S. HORNSTEIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL OF
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL OF
PALM BEACH COUNTY
a limited number of applications are being accepted
for the
1981/82 School Year
PRE-SCHOOL THROUGH GRADE 8
Accredited by the Florida Council of Independent Schools
Mordecai Levow
Director
Dr. Howard B.K*7
Presided
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida
Telephone 832-8423/4
NEW CAMPUS: 5801 Parker Avenua, Wtst Palm Bocti, Flortdi
A beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Couu


londian of Palm Beach
,ounty
rage iJ
Come to Praise Caesar, Not Bun Him Bein Guarantees Promises
-_J faAM PflUA 1. *^ _
Continued from Page 4-
transcendental love. Be
at the war's end, Sadat
"^ccessful in making the
em claque and its journal-
hangers-on believe in his
bus view of himself because
been pragmatic for every-
, concerned to believe in that
Translated into todays
rncy, the following is the
Jt: Even as late as Hosni
rtk's visit with President
in Washington one week
Sadat's assassination, the
J States was cool to Muba-
jpurpose a quick arms fix.
I we are prepared to invest
TMiddle Eastern stake in
bt's own future a decision
is ludicrous reckoned in
Is of the experience in Iran
four fears for the stability of
Saudi Arabian royal regime.
. wake of the Sadat assassi-
lin, can Egypt be far behind?
Western claque, led by a
[of past Presidential ghouls.
lo Cairo to praise Caesar,
[to bury him. They came to
.. tomorrow's history in the
j of today's legend according
L legacy of Anwar Sadat. By
[circuitous reasoning charac-
|tic of him, the man from
came closest to the
nate Western anguish post-
b( not that Israel was
I at the funeral in the person
denachem Begin, but that
Israel is there in the Middle East
at all. If the West' were em-
powered to redo 1948. if it were
entitled in 1981 to throw the rem-
nants of the Holocaust back into
the tender hand of the United
Nations in order to delegitimize
its existence, it would do so as
quickly and as offhandedly as
Jimmy Carter and Gerald Ford
on their way back from Cairo de-
manded U.S. talks with the ter-
rorist PLO the PLO whose
delegitimizing of Israel is its
primary intent.
The likes of Garry Wills would
never call for any of this because
he does not believe it. To him.
Israel is not anathema, but his
coy comments about Begin give
others justification to think the
thoughts of the Carters and
Fords among us. Indeed, with the
Western claque now passionately
obsessed with fixing blame for
the Sadat assassination, the
story is long since out that the
U.S. indifference to Sadat's
"patient" struggle with Israel
over autonomy is what isolated
him even further from his fellow-
Arabs and led to his death at ex-
tremist hands.
FROM THIS reasoning, it is
but a short hop to Col. Qaddafi's
funeral oration for Sadat: "He
lived like a Jew and died like a
Saudis Stay Back as Israel
Rescues Stray Ship
By HUGH ORGEL
AVIV (JTA) -
Israeli Navy missile
ran aground on the
i\ Arabian coast
feering an alert in Saudi
Israeli armed forces.
the vessel was freed
62 hours by Israeli
age crews who were not
fered with by the
lis.
J the time of the mishap, Is-
I rushed word to the Saudi
nment through the U.S.
assy that the presence of the
I in their waters was due to
pnkal breaksdown and not
; intent.
InAELI MILITARY corres-
ents were aware of the in-
pt several days ago, but it
Inot made public, reportedly
he request of the Saudis.
ah apparently wanted to
1 embarrassment in other
states for rpmaining pas-
while |> ae. performed
Rework on the Saudi coast.
?men's Support
[oup in Action
'Women's Programs Com-
f ol the Jewish Community
[T *h,ch was formed as a re-
ol the very successful
*is Day which was held in
PPnng is happy to announce
f st meeting under its new
lne Women's Support
P 21, at 7:30 p.m. at the
[*r Way, West Palm Beach.
nen will have an opportu-
^ get in touch with then-
is and themselves through
percises as valuea clarifica
I interaction with oneself,
n techniques, etc. Worn-
want to enjoy a unique
*nce are urged to come.
kr^T1^ many exciting
P"igs being planned for
r According to military sources
here, the French-built missile
boat sailed from ll.ula last month
on a routine voyage to Kilat via
the Suez Canal. While in the Gulf
of Aqaba 50 miles south of Kilat,
the electric generating system
failed knocking out the craft's
radar and gyro compass. The
vessel veered off course by 90
degrees and raced at about 27
knots toward the Saudi coast,
grounding on a coral reef within
sight of a Saudi miltiary position
Saudi troops werem m-dtothe
scene but did not open fire. Israel
Army headquarters and the De-
fense Ministry promptly ex-
plained the situation to the
Saudis through the U.S.
Embassy in Tel Aviv but at the
same time let the Saudis know
that all measures would be taken
to protect the boat and its crew.
OTHER ISRAELI naval craft
were dispatched to the scene
along with work barges and res-
cue craft. Heavy equipment in-
cluding missiles and launchers
were removed from the vessel to
lighten her. Divers blasted the
coral reef to free the keel and the
towed to Eilat.
Jew." What Qaddafi meant
doesn't matter. No anti-Semitic
statements are logical. But there
will be many to harbor Qad-
dafi's feeling as they mull over
Jimmy Carter's observation
about Prime Minister Begin,
which was of the same order as
Qaddafi's. There will be many to
say of the Jews that they have
killed Christ a second time.
And no one will bother very
much either to recall the lie of
just what Anwar Sadat was
doing at the moment he died
his ultimate triumph as a creator
of facts.
JERUSALEM (IJTA) Premier Menachem
Begin assured the Aguda Israel that his government
would honor all the promises he made to the ultra-Ortho-
dox party as a condition for its support of his coalition.
Begin met Monday with the party s four-man Knesset
faction after the Aguda s ruling Council of Sages dis-
played impatience over the government's alleged delays in
implementing their demands.
THE SAGES reportedly concentrated on the contro-
versial archaeological dig at the City of David in Jeru-
salem. They are demanding that the government invoke
Article 45 of its coalition agreement which would give the
Chief Rabbinate Council sole legal authority to determine
, whether the excavations involve the desecration of an an-
cient Jewish cemetery, as the Orthodox establishment
contends.
Syria Missiles Not 'Priority'
Habib Says He'll Go Back When Needed
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Philip Habib.
President Reagan's special
envoy for the crisis in Leb-
anon, said he would not re-
turn to the Middle East un-
til the Arab League's spe-
cial committee has a chance
to continue its efforts to
solve the problem facing
Lebanon, both internal and
external. Habib also indi-
cated that the missiles
Syria has placed in Leba-
non are not a priority issue
for the United States.
"I think it is in the United
States interest, the interest of the
|x-(>[>!( of the region, that the pro-
cess of dealing with the complex-
ities of Lebanon go on," Habib
told several hundred people at
the With annual conference of the
Middle Last Institute at the
Mayflower Hotel. He said that
the need now was to "consolidate
the gains" made in I-ebanon and
lo reduce the chances of another
crisis occurring.
HABIB, who had retired from
the Slate Department in 1978 as
Assistant Secretary of State for
Political Affairs, was sent to the
Mideast by Reagan last May
after Syria moved SAM-6 mis-
siles into Lebanon and Israel
threatened to remove them by
force.
The retired diplomat's remarks
came in response to a questioner
who asked about Premier Mena-
chem Begin's statement on a tel-
evision program while he was in
the United States recently in
which the Premier said he ex-
pected Habib to return to the
Middle East soon to get the mis-
siles removed. Habib replied that
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he will return to the Mideast
when the President decides there
is "something for me do do."
Ilubib said that while the mis-
siles arc still a major issue, at
k'list for the contending parties,
the major effort was to conso-
lidate the gains made by the
ceasefire across the Ijebanese
border to solve Lebanon's many
internal und external problems.
HABIB, who was the keynote
spouker for the conference, called
tor moving ahead swiftly on the
Mideast peace process. He said
the uohiovemonts of Camp David
wore the beginning of the peace
process, not the end of it. "The
present stiuation is about as calm
as it is ever likely to be. short of a
comprehensive settlement," he
noted. He said this is why pro-
gress must l>e made to avoid any
new crisis from developing.
He said that the reason that all
sides agreed to the ceasefire
across the Ijebanese liorder was
that they all realized that unless
they worked to "defuse the situa-
tion," they could undo all the
progress they had made.
Habib said that the United
States has a "unique" position
became it is the only major
(tower than can help bring peace
to the Middle Kast. He said the
Soviet Union could not do this
HAROLD S. STRASSER, M.D., P.A.
Announces the Association of
FRANKLIN GUTTMANN, M.D.
IN THE PRACTICE OF
ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY
1501 PRESIDENTIAL WAY, SUITE 2
WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. 33401
684-1553
Dr. I. Goodman
Chiropractor
Boynton Plaza
153* N. Congress Ave IN W 2nd Aval
Boynton Bench
Backaches Headaches
Pinched Nerves Disc Problems
Arthritis Sciatica NeuraJaia
Phone 737-5591
Office Hrs. Mon.. Turn.. Wad.. Fn Tnurs. h Sat
**21 si?
MEDICARE, WORKMEN'S COMP.,
AND MOST INSURANCES INCLUDE CHIROPRACTIC
THE OPHTHALMOLOGY
CENTER
2889 Tenth Avenue North
Lake Worth, Florida 33461
... will continue the eye care of the
patients of William Qernon, M.O. who
has now retired. Please call for further
information and patient records.
964-0707
PHILIP PASTON, M.D. PAUL M. FEUER, M.D
TOM M. COFFMAN, M.D. LAWRENCE B. KATZEN, M.D.
MICHAEL A. HECHTO.D-Optometrist
a **\mm


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Frid*y. Octob 2J
^e mabbtmcal Coordinated by
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman
dtvoted to disceuioa of tKtmti and iueei
relevant to Jewish lift past and preset*
The Joy of Introspection
By RABBI
F.MANUEL EISENBERG
Temple Beth Sholom
In our prayers we refer to Sue-
cot as "the time of our joy"
[Z'Man Simchatainu). The Torah
tells us regarding Succot: "and
thou shalt rejoice in thy feast. .
seven days shalt thou keep a
feast unto the Lord thy God .
because the Lord thy God will
bless thee in all thine increase .
and thou shalt be altogether joy-
ful."
Taking a careful look at these
versos one would be amazed at
the constant repetition and em-
phasis of the mitzvah to be
joyous. According to some com-
mentaries there are two concepts
of joy imparted in the words of
Sasson and Simcha. Simcha re-
fers to the jov of an event that
has already taken place or is in
tlie process of taking place.
Sasson refers to a future event
that we are hoping for and at
which time we will be exultant.
Succot follows the very rich
season of the high holidays, at
which time we concentrated all
our efforts on a very high spirit-
ual level in prayer and repen-
tance. We are optimistic that
God has forgiven all our trans-
gressions and will bless us with a
wonderful year to come. We
therefore come before God at this
holiday, our hearts filled with joy
and confidence that we will wit-
ness great blessing during this
ensuing year. We point our
Lulavim in all directions, once
again ascertaining the Kingdom
of God in all parts of the uni-
verse. This is Simcha.
Yet we wonder if it is possible
during the rest of the year to
perhaps somewhat continue to
maintain this pedestal of spir-
itual devotion. Regarding one of
the most beautiful ceremonies re-
corded in the history of the an-
cient Temple, the Simchat Beit
Hashoeua, the verse that we refer
to this occasion, states:
"u'sh'avtem Mayim B'Sasson
Mee'maina y Hayishua" ("and
thou shalt draw out water with
joy from well-springs of
salvation"). The word Sasson is
used here in its proper context.
If, as individuals and as a na-
tion, we wish to attain the ul-
timate salvation and to reach the
loftiest heights of personal spir-
itual satisfaction and attainment,
then we have to strive, through
our own devotion and deeds, for
the ultimate period in our per-
sonal and national life. It is then
that this concept of joy, Sasson,
will be truly implanted in our
hearts, minds and souls, and once
again become Simcha. The Suk-
kah, or fragile hut covered with
leaves, branches and fruit, is the
symbol of the early frontier days
of our people. In it, our fore-
fathers lived when they went out
into the field to gather the final
harvest of the year. The Sukkah
is the symbol of Thanksgiving,
for Succot is the most important
agricultural holiday of the an-
cient Jew.
Other symbols of the holiday
Succot are the Lulav and Esrog.
The Luslav is a palm branch
which is entwined with myrtle
and willow branches. The Lulav
is shaken after being blessed, and
waved north, south, east and
west, to indicate the presence of
God everywhere. The Esrog is a
large citrus fruit similar tc the
Kabbi Emanuel KisenherK
lemon. In blessing the Esrog, we
thank God for all things that
grown on trees and in the field,
and ask a continual blessing of
the Almighty upon us.
Some have interpreted the
meaning of the four species as a
symbolic deterrent against an in-
clination of false pride. In this
context, the palm branch sym-
bolizes a straight spine, not
bowed to temptation. The citron
represents a pure heart guarding
against false emotion. The myrtle
symbolizes good eyes, which
warn against being tempted by
anything seen superficially.
Finally the lips are symbolized by
the willow, advising the Jew to
guard his speech.
The Succot Festival is ob-
served for eight days by tra-
ditional Jews, and they observe
Simchat Torah. For the tra-
ditional Jew the first two days
and the last two days of the
holiday are equally sacred.
Liberal or Reform Jews observe
only the first and the last day of
the holidav.
Thr eighth day, according to
the traditional Judaism, is
Shemini Atztrts, when the
prayer of rain' is offered. Follow-
ing the Shemini Atzeres holiday,
Simchat Torah is observed. On
that evening the Torahs are
taken out of the Ark, and congre-
gational members parade in
procession, chanting and singing.
It is the rejoicing of the Law.
Yes, we constantly have to
look forward to every day for
being a day for accomplishment,
at which time there will be a per-
sonal Sasson and Simcha for all
of us. During this Succot festival,
the time of Simcha. let us become
joyously introspective as we
contemplate in retrospect the
message of the high holidays, and
in prospect, looking forward the
spiritual joy of our personal and
communal lives.
Synagogue News
TEMPLE BETH EL
Mr. PhU Heller. Staff Psycho-
logist at the South Center for Ex-
ceptional Children in Boca Raton,
will address a special meeting of
Temple Beth El Sisterhood on
Sunday morning, Oct. 25, at 10
a.m. at the Temple. Mr. Heller
will speak on the subject "Games
Children Play!" This subject is
about interactional games that
children will play in their rela-
tionship with siblings and their
parents.
Mr. Heller is involved at the
South Center in qualitative
evaluations of youngsters with
special learning problems and
handicaps. In addition, he
conducts counseling groups with
children and serves as a con-
sultant to teachers and ad-
ministrators.
We invite all our members and
friends to this meeting.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Tempi* Beth David Sisterhood
will hold its monthly meeting on
Wednesday, Oct. 28, at 7:30 p.m.
at Westminister Presbyterian
Church Annex, 10410 North Mil-
itary Trail, Palm Beach Gardens.
An FPL representative will speak
on "Why we pay what we pay for
electricity."
A newly formed Kadima group
for seventh and eighth graders
only, has been organized under
the leadership of Nat Kosowski,
Chairman of the Youth Com-
mittee of Temple Beth David of
Obituaries
CAS80N, LOUIS H.. S3. Oct. B. Services
were In Brookllne, Mass. Levltt-
Welnateln.
BECKER, Sarah Anita. 74, Oct 2
Chapel Service. Interment Private
Levltt-Welniteln.
BRODER. BeUe. 78. Oct. 2. Interment In
Lodl. N.J. Levitt Welnateln
Northern Palm Beach County.
The first Kadima social was held
on Sept. 20 at the home of Faye
and David Stoller and was a huge
success.
On Sunday, Oct. 25, a skate
party will be held at Trail Skate
Way on Military Trail between 1
and 4 p.m. Seventh and eighth
graders affiliated with other
Synagogues are welcome.
Admission is $2 per person. For
further information call the
Temple office.
Temple Beth David of Nor-
thern Palm Beach County will
hold a new member Sabbath eve
service Friday, Oct. 30 at 8 p.m.
All new family members will par-
ticipate in the service welcoming
them into the Temple family.
Rabbi William Marder, Spiritual
Leader, will lead the service ac-
companied by Cantor Earl
Raekoff.
The Membership Committee
will sponsor an Oneg Shabbot
after the service where all mem-
bers can meet and welcome the
newest congregants. Temple
Beth David currently meets at
Westminister Presbyterian
Church, Miltiary Trail and Bums
Road, Palm Beach Gardens. AU
are welcome.
B'NAI JACOB
The "Sisterhood of Baal
Jscob" of Palm Spring, has
arranged a "Thanksgiving
week November 24-29, aii
days-five nights, at the beautiful
Saxony Hotel in Miami Beach
All meals are strictly Kosher.
Prices are: $325 double oc-
cupancy or $245 single, transpor-
tation and gratuities are in-
cluded. Reservations are limited,
for more information contact
Khea Rosenthal or Gladys Elkin.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
Orthodox
Aitz Chaim Congregation Century Village
W. Palm Beach Phone: 689-4675 Sabbath services 9 a m
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Congregation Anshei Emuna
551 Brittany L, Kings Point, Oelray Beach 33446 Phone 499.7407,
499 9229 Harry Silver President Oail/ services 8 a.m. and 5 n I
Saturdays and Hol'da/s 9am
Reform
Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach 33407 Phone 833- I
8421 Dr Irving B. Cohen, Rabbi Emeritus Dr. Richard G. Shugar.
man. President Stephen J, Goldstein. Administrator Sabbatn Ser- <
vices, Friday 8 p.m.
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
333 S.W Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton 33432 Phone 391.
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath set j
vices Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 15 a.m. Torah Study with Rabbi
Singer Sabbath morning services 10 30 am
Temple Sinai
at St Paul's Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swinton Ave. Oelray
Mailing address 2005 N.W. 9 Street, Delray Beach 33444 Rabtn 1
Samuel Silver President, Bernard Etish Friday services al 8:151
p.m.
Temple Beth Torah of Palm Beach County
at St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat. Foresi Hill Blvd. and]
Wellington Trace, West Palm Beach Mailing address: 1125 Jack j
Pine St.. West Palm Beach 33411 Rabbi Edward Cohn President]
Ronnie Kramer (793-2700) Sabbath services. Friday at 8 15 p m
Temple Judea
Rabbi Joel L. Levine Cantor Rita Shore Barbara Chjntj
President 1407 14th Lane. Lake Worth. Fl. 33463 Phone 965-
7778 Services Friday evenings at 8 p.m. Meeting at St
Catherine's Greek Orthodox Church Social Hall 4000 Washington
Rd. at Soulhern Blvd.________________^____
Conservative Liberal
Temple Eternal Light
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West Glades RoadH
west ol Boca Turnpike) The Free Synagogue. P 0 Box 3.
Raton 33432 Phone:368-1600, 391-1111 Rabbi BeniaminRosayn*
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Conservative
Golden Lakes Temple
1470 Golden Lakes. J3lyxlM.W. Palm Beach, Fl. 33411 Rabbi Joseph |
Speiser Phone 689-9430 President, Gerson Feit.
Temole Beth El
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach 33407 Phone 8330338. j
Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch. Cantor Elaine Shapiro
Shabbath Evening Service at 8:15 p.m. In
The Sanctuary. Saturday morning at 9:30 a.m. Daily Mmyan at &15|
a.m., Sunday and Legal Holidays at 9:00a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach 33409 Phone 684-3212 Offal
hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman Cantor Monitor]
Spektor Services daily 8:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Friday. 8:30 a.m..S|
p.m. late services 8:15 p.m. followed by Oneg Shabbat Saturday,8JJJ
a.m., 7 p.m. Mincha followed by Sholosh Seudos.
Congregation Beth Kodesh
at Congregational Church, 119, N. Federal Hwy., Boynton Beach-
Phone 737-4622 Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin Sabbath services, Frier.
8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.
Temple Beth Sholom
315 N. 'A' Street, Lake Worth 33460 Phone 585-5020'Raw
Emanuel Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Services Mondays wj
Thursday at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m.
Temple Beth David
at Westminister Presbyterian Church. 10410 N. Military TnuL nai
Beach Gardens. Office at 321 Northlake Blvd.. North **]
Beach Phone:845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor Karl
Raekoff Sabbath services, Friday at 8 p.m.. Saturday 10 a.m.
Temple Beth Sholom 1,
224 N.W. Avenue G', Belle Glade 33430 Cantor Jack Stattm*1 j
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
Temple B'nai Jacob
at Faith United Presbyterian Church. 276 Alemeida *n-J"Z\
Springs 33461 Temple B'nai Jacob. President Jacob Frant r-
9644)034 Sabbath services, Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday at9a*- j
days and Thursdays at 9 a.m.
B'nai Tor ah Congregation ^
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue. Boca Raton 33432 Phone: 932-8596im|
Nathan Zellzer Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday w*"
Temple Emeth of the Delray Hebrew Congregation (I
5780 West Atlantic Avenue. Delray Beach 33446 Pnone: *~S* '
Rabbi Bernard Silver Cantor Benjamin Adler Sabbath sen-
Friday at 8 p.m.. Saturday at 9 a.m. Daily Mlnyans at 8:48 %m
p.m.
Temple Emanu-EI j^, 1
190 North County Road. Palm Beach 33480 Phone: **}TL\
Rabbi Joel Chazln Cantor David Dardashtl Sabbatn s*>
Friday at 8:30 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m.
Temple Beth Zion
Lions Club 700 Camelia Dr. Royal Palm Beach. Friday nigW81
Saturday 9 a.m.



H, October 28,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Pa815
ubarak and Begin
Will Pursue Peace
Egypt's new President Hosni Mubarak, elected in a one-candidate national referen-
non Tuesday, promised Prime Minister Menachem Begin to visit Israel in the near
lure, according to a report by ABC-TVs Barbara Walters. Both men believe that
\\i a visit would strengthen in the eyes of the world Egypt and Israel's determination
continue .forward with the peace process as set forth by Begin and the late President
flat in the treaty of peace between the two countries signed in March, 1979.
,ne Minister Begin last
kwalkedthe half-mile from his
to the funeral of President
it, who was assassinated on
6 in a reviewing stand aa
| of a national Egyptian holi-
celebrating Sadat's laun-
I of the Yom Kippur War in
..' Begin refused to ride in
t not to violate the Sabbath.
UlLIER. Begin was among
st of the foreign dignitaries
Mubarak met at his home
Jde of Cairo. They embraced
diately upon meeting, and
rak reassured Begin of
ht's intention to pursue
It's peace policy with Israel.
^e Associated Press reported
i Cairo the statement by an
ned high-ranking Israeli
who said following Begin s
nute meeting with Mubarak
I'Mubarak was very close to
dent Sadat, and shares his
| on many issues that affect
ons between Egypt and
We have full confidence
his reassurances are sin-
ubarak, who greeted Begin
I his delegation at his two-
villa in Helipolis, told
i "It was so fast. So very
" when Begin asked him,
'did it happen, how?"
THE Begin party were
Is Defense Minister Ariel
on, Foreign Minister Yitz-
ghimir and Interior Minister
[Burg.
er, Begin went with his
to visit Sadat's widow,
They kissed, and Mrs.
burst into tears. After
45-minute meeting, Begin
"At this time of sad-
Mrs. Sadat, to the chil-
the President-elect, the
nment and the people of
we mortals can not find
to console you (Mrs.
|. May God Almighty con-
1 of you."
THE funeral Saturday,
i strung across streets de-
"The march of Sadat will
^ue, the heads of the aasas-
I never stop it." Ordinary
an citizens were barred
^tending the funeral, with
|ty forces walling in the
1,000 diplomats from
countries abroad, in-
Prince Charles of En-
i Minister Begin was seen
the ceremonies standing
former French President
Giscard d'Eataing, whose
ib policies caused a rapid
between France and Israel.
Arab leaders 'stayed away.
except tor representatives from
Oman and Sudan. European
leaders were also noticeably ab-
sent
The American delegation was
headed by Secretary of State
Alexander Haig and included for-
mer Presidents Jimmy Carter,
Gerald Ford and Richard Nixon.
Also in the delegation waa former
Secretary of State Henry Kissin-
ger under Presidents Nixon and
Ford. President Reagan stayed at
home, obeying the stem advice of
American security agents.
THE ATMOSPHERE in Cairo
was tense. President Sadat's
assassination had been greeted
with dancing in the streets of Tri-
poli in Libya, and in the Palesti-
nian area of Beirut, Lebanon.
Libya's Col. Qaddafi issued a
statement that Sadat had "lived
like a Jew and died like a Jew."
An exiled Egyptian leader, for-
mer Gen. Saadeddin Shazli,
almost immediately upon Sadat's
assassination took responsibility
for the murder in the name of
Egyptian Liberation Organiza-
tion.
He warned that if President
Mubarak continued the policies
of President Sadat, he would Buf-
fer a similar fate.
But Egyptian police said that
the assassination was engineered
by Egyptian First Lt. Khaled
Ahmed Shawky el-Istambouli,
whose brother was one of more
than 1,500 anti-Sadat enemies
imprisoned by Sadat in Septem-
ber. An official report said that
Istambouli had been "blinded by
black hatred" and that he
smuggled three civilians into an
army truck in the annual parade
commemorating the Yom Kippur
War, who attacked Sadat when
the truck was made to "stall" be-
fore Sadat's reviewing stand.
FORMER PRESIDENT Ford,
on his arrival in Cairo, said that
"The American people looked
upon him (Sadat) aa a beautiful
man." Former President Carter
said of Sadat that he was "like a
hero" to the American people.
Both men returned to the
United States after the funeral.
Former President Nixon went on
to Saudi Arabia on a "private
visit," although it was under-
stood that ha had gone there to
reassure the Saudis about the da-
bate outcome over the AW ACS
in the Senate.
Secretary of Stats Haig stayed
on in Cairo and Sunday revealed
that the United States would
accelerate U.S. military supplies
B>
EVTTT-Wl
BNSTBN
the greater Florida area
of.
in the
WEST BMJ* BEACH 68M700
DEUW BEACH 278-7600
Mil
BfJOruahow
ADMraSTRATOR
lckSandr F.D. Julian Almeida F.D.
pre Arranged Funerals Available Thru
Guaranteed Security Plan
to Egypt and the Sudan. This
was precisely what President
Mubarak had hoped for when he
came to Washington for talks
with President Reagan just one
week before the assassination,
and where he was turned away
essentially empty-handed. The
assassination has apparently
worked a complete turnabout in
U.S. foreign policy in the Middle
F.ast.
HAIG S ANNOUNCEMENT
Sunday also included a statement
about large-scale joint military
exercises in Egypt in November,
and it was reported that the U.S.
has already sent teams to Egypt-
and the Sudan as a "concrete
manifestation" of American sup-
port to both. The Sudan is consi-
dered a likely objective of mili-
tary attack by Libya's Col.
Quaddafi because of the Sudan's
I support of Egypt's Middle East
peace diplomacy.
"We're going to have to show
our presence here from time to
time," Haig declared shortly
after the Sudan government
charged on Sunday that Libyan
fighter planes had attacked two
Sudanese border villages killing
several people the previous
Thursday.
One of two U.S. State Depart-
ment teams, in conjunction with
Israel's Early Withdrawal Urged
CAIRO Secretary of State Alexander Haig
apparently echoed the sentiments of former Presi-
dent Jimmy Carter here. He would like Israel to
accelerate its withdrawal date from the Sinai
Peninsula, which is due by agreement under the
Camp David accord in April. 1982.
The Haig request was made as a "gesture of
good will "that Israel could offer to prove its
commitment to the Egypt-Israel peace treaty now
that President Sadat has been killed.
"There is no room for any gestures," declared
Israel Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir, replying
to the Haig feeler. "I don't think what happened in
Egypt should bring anybody to put pressure on
Israel."
Haig hastened to assure both parties of his con-
fidence that Israel and Egypt would continue their
peace process.
teams from the Pentagon, were to
fly to the Sudan this week to
arrange for delivering somtfKK)
million in arms to that country.
On the day of Sadat's funeral,
Haig had met with Sudanese
President Jaafar Numeiri to re-
veal the Reagan Administra-
tion's decision to deliver arms to
his country.
SPEAKING OF the proposed
joint military exercises with
Egypt, Haig said it would be
code-named "Bright Star," but
he insisted it had been planned
months before. He conceded,
however that the exercises would
be "modified and expanded" as a
result of President Sadat's
assassination. To be involved are
B52 bombers in simulation of air
strikes on Egyptian bombing
ranges.
Earlier Sunday, Haig warned
that "The United States intends
to work actively with our friends
in the region, and foremost,
among these is the government of
Egypt and the people of Egypt,
for whom our friendship and re-
spect have been deepened by this
tragedy."
Ilaig's words brought immedi-
ate response from the Reagan
Administration in Washington
which was embarrassed by the
apparent slight to Israel. Asked
on CBS-TVs "Face the Nation"
about Main's statement, Richard
Allen, Reagan's National
Security Adviser, declared that
"I'm sure, though I haven't seen
that particular remark, that the
Secretary of State was un-
doubtedly referring to our friends
among the Arab nations, among
the moderate Arab nations."
AND ON ABC-TV's "Issues
and Answers," Reagan's coun-
selor, Edwin Meese, said: "Well,
Israel is one of, our foremost
friends." He explained that what
Haig meant were the Arab na-
tions. "I think there is no ques-
tion thst our special relationship
with Israel does have a particular
significance," he declared.
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Tige
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Frida
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43.31
39.67
42.37
44.48
46.58
1 65
1 77
201
2 14
2 24
2 45
2 13
2 40
2 56
2 77
%\\\s
SIZE PRICE ] FET
P195/70R13 52.88,^24
P205/70R13 54.36 U
P205/70R14 59.21 ?35
P175/75R14 49.41 86
P185/75R14 54.36 204
:P195/75R14 59.21 226
P205/75R14 61.74 2 37
P215/75R14 62.89 252
P225/75R14 67.28 2 74
P205/75R15 64.16 250
P215/75R15 66.69 264
P225/75R15 69.11 2 85
P235/75R15 74.06 306
P155/80R13 46.89 1 52
P175/80R13 50.56 1 79
P185/80R13 51.84 1 91
#
'X' RADIAL WHITEWALLS
SIZE
P155/80R13
P195/75-14
ER78-14
FR78-14
P205/75-14
205x14
P205/75-15
GR78-15
PRICE
FET
49.05
69.53
1 46
222
69.53
71.17
71.17
62.19
74.11
78.12
260
254
2 51
2 51
2 55
2 95
GR70-15
P215/75-15
'215x15
HR78-15
225x15
"230x15
81.51
78.12
64.03
84.41
66.00
72.81
2 91
2 75
2 91
2 95
3 34
336
Limited quaniilies
xvs
MICHELIN TUBELESS
195 70-14 205/70-14
94" 101"
TR
XCA LIGHT
TRUCK TIRES
SlZl
700x15
6 ply tube less
750x16
8 ply lube lype
800x16.5
8 ply tuDeless
875x16 5
8 ply tuDeless
950x16.5
8 oi 10 ply I less
10x16.5
8 ply lubetets
price
77.66
96.30
96.85
104.81
FET
3 04
4 14
388
4 271
125.58
124.64
4 88
XZX TUBELESS
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
155x12
145x13
155x13
TRX RADIAL
& MAG WHEEL
check our lores to see if
these will fit your model car
190 65R390 BLACK
?20 55R390 WHITE
SPECIAL
PRICE
165x13
165x14
175x14
165x15
175/70*13
185/70x13
185/70x14
PRICE
40.67
37.59
42.90
48.13
50.16
54.85
53.24
57.85
64.02
68.31
NORTON
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2804 South 4th SI 484 .020
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J03MS IkMlMy 233 5241 497 S SlM.Bo 7_ 9.770450
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