Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00258

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
' "dTewIsHi Flo]f idliao
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE' and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Pdm Boocn Cointty
Mum*" Number21
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, October 9,1981
F r*a Shochmt
Price 35 Cent*
'.S. Ex-Envoys Say Israel Opposes
AWACS to Jar
'he Gun Control Argument rn a n i
Ties to Saudis
IBARBARA FINKELSTE1N
I pudgv young boy with a look
Icitement m his eyes balances
He in his hands Behind him
lids his coach, a young man
yet out of his twenties.
jng unusual here at a firing
near Texas Canyon, Calif
Ept that Ixith individuals are
El
ately, various organizations
j appealed to American Jews
i themselves. Why do gun
campaigns include special
ach publicity to Jews? Do
[campaigns manipulate Jew-
sensitivity valid or ex-
lerated to anti-Semitic
Jiment in this country? Or do
play on Jewish embarrass-
bi about "Jewish passivity"
|ngWorldWarII?
PITCH for Jewish gun
ership argues that "it can
en here Another urges
businessmen to defend
nselves against inner city
The first approach is
bifically Jewish: the second
pals to Jews as members of
white middle class, often
(rated by the inefficiencies of
bureaucrat ic legal process.'
sionally, an organization like
Seattle based Second
tndment Foundation will cite
i reasons as incentives to buy
posture of the major
sh defense organizations
i sharply with the gun
' position. R'nai B'rith, the
rican Jewish Congress, the
Jerican Jewish Communtiy
Itions Advisory Council all
brsed their respective gun
Irol proposals in the early and
J-tevenlies This organ i-
nnal consensus stems less
anv liberal political
agenda than trom a cultural
revulsion towards guns which
many Jews have inherited. Jews,
it was said long ago. are not
hunters.
According to a U.S. Depart-
ment of Justice poll, 11 percent of
American Jews owned a handgun
or pistol in 1980. Twenty percent
owned a long-barrelled gun. By
contrast, 29 percent of
Protestants owned handguns and
40 percent owned rifles; 18
percent of Catholics owned
nandguns and 29 percent, rifles.
With Jewish gun ownership so
far below the national average,
why has special attention been
focused on the idea of Jews and
guns?
ONE REASON may be op-
portunistic: anti-gun control
image that the JDL relies on is
the defeated European Jew who
"consented" to his own
destruction. Occasionally the
JDL draws some rather shaky
parallels. For example, JDL
national chairman Irving Rubin
cites the legitimacy of Ku Klux
Klan candidates in recent Cali-
fornia and North Carolina elec-
tions and desecration of syna-
gogues as precursors to another
round of Nuremburg Laws and
groups may view Jews as an
untapped reservoir of supporters.
Another is the increasing
seriousness with which American
Jews have been discussing anti-
Semitism. And judging by the
space devoted to it in the Jewish
press, the subject makes com-
pelling reading. Often in such
articles the .Jewish Defense
league is mentioned or quoted.
"The JDL always knew how to
use the press," says one former
member. "It was an organization
that replied on images." The
Shamir, Carrington
ade Heated Words
By YITZHAK RABI
EW YORK (JTA) -
exchanges" took
in conversations
Israeli Foreign
Shamir
here
veen
N*r Yit/.hak
British Foreign Sec-
tj I-ord Carrington,
Tees here say.
nLW!\m,'n met at a Man-
,n hotel, and while their talk
.wscribed as "polite"
*as reported to have ex-
Israel's displeasure over
!" anti-Israel state-
n talks with leaders of
ueatmian Liberation Or
E" and support, in a
n..!!"' manner, of what is
rn" the Kuropean initiative
to bring the PLO into the ne-
gotiations for a Middle East
settlement.
SHAMIR. reportedly, ex-
pressed particular dissatis-
faction with recent statements by
Carrington calling on the U.S. to
apply pressure on Israel. Shamir
asked the British diplomat how
he would feel had Israel called on
the U.S. to pressure Britain on
the Irish question. During the
conversation, Carrington re-
portedly expressed the wish to
visit Israel and while Shamir said
he would be welcome, he did not'
extend an official invitation.
Carrington has emerged as the
most outspoken supporter of the
PI O in the European Economic
i n .nity JEF.C) and has called
Continued on Page 4
mass pogroms. If you don't want
to end up like the Jews of Europe,
the JDL states, buy a gun.
"The fact is," says the former
JDL member, "the argument
that the present is an insecure
time for Jews has at least some
validity. For example, it's
become acceptable in the past
decade to think of Jews as Zionist
aggressors worthy of UN con-
demnation."
WHILE JDL influence may be
far less wide-reaching today than
it was ten years ago, JDL-
rnsored target practices still
w non-JDL members. A
recent appeal is directed at
Russian Jewish immigrants who
are warned: "There are Nazis in
America! It CAN happen here.
Prepare to defend yourself!"
Many Jewish target shooters,
however, are less concerned with
right-wing extremists than with
self-defense against crime. "This
business about a Nazi resurgence
is bull," Philadelphian Ernest
Brydon told Philadelphia's
Jewish Exponent. "If Jews have
turned to guns it's because they
feel the judicial system has failed
and the streets are full of,
recidivist criminals. The public
has lost faith in the law but
this applies to everyone, not just
Jews. '
Hrydon's opinion raises an
important question: Just who is
supposed to be the enemy? Is it
the various Klan and Nazi parties
with their poorly attended yet
much publicized anti-black and
anti-Jewish demonstrations? Or
is it the urban criminal who
assaults a Jew in his store or on
the street maybe not as a Jew,
but as a vulnerable touch?
THE ISSUE is further con-
fused by the man-siwd silhouette
targets emblazoned with
swastikas used at a JDL firing
range. If Jews learn to shoot in
ranges like this one in order to
defend themselves against street
crime, are they also absorbing the
implied political message that
anyone who harms a Jew is a
Nazi?
' dun Control Works: Holo-
caust." expounds a bumper
sticker, leapfrogging over cause
and effect. The message is clear,
albeit glib: Buy a gun or be a
victim. A Jewish victim.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Four former Unit-
ed States Ambassadors to
Saudi Arabia have charged
that Israel does not oppose
the sale of five AWACS
surveillance planes to Saudi
Arabia because it threatens
the Jewish State, but be-
cause Israel wants "to dis-
rupt relations between the
United States and this
most important Arab coun-
try."
The four Robert Neumann,
John West, James Akins and
Parker Hart in a statement at
a press conference at the Hyatt
Regency Hotel, also declared that
"the sale must proceed" because
"the promises and credibilitv" or
President Reagan and former
President Carter "and the coun-
try are at stake."
THE FORMER four Am-
bassadors maintained they had
called the press conference at
their "own initiative." They
denied they were acting at the
request of the White House or the
State Department.
But their move came as the
Reagan Administration appeared
to be growing more concerned
that the. AWACS sale will be
vetoed by the Republican-con-
trolled Senate. Senate Majority
leader Howard Baker (R.. Tenn.)
concedes that there are enough
votes in the Senate to reject the
sale, although he believes that
some minds can be changed. Re-
ports are that the vote now is 63-
12 against the sale, well over the
51 -vote majority needed.
In their prepared statement in
Continued on Page 5-
1981-82
Jewish Federation/UJA
Campaign
Calendar of Events
JEWISH
FEDERATION
OFrVOMOEACH
COUNTY
November 20- December 2
November 29-December 4
December 9
December 16
January 10-16
January 16
International Mission
Cameo Mission
Women's Division $1,000 Luncheon
Big Gifts Meeting
Palm Beach Hi-Rise Super Week
Federation Shabbat
January 17 Super Sunday
January 26 Annual Palm Beach Community Dinner
The Breakers. Guest Speaker Congressman
Tom Lantos
February 18 United Jewish Appeal National Dinner at
The Breakers
March 21 Women's Division Victory Gala
AP118 Women's Division Phone-A-Thon
m
J,Jewisn federation of Palm Beach County will be closed for
KUuesday and Wednesday. October 13 and 14.
SUPPORT FOR HOME FOR AGED IS COMMUNITY-WIDE
See Story and pictures on page 3.
*:::::Wx*:*:$v*:'


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Frid*y.octobi
Jewish Women's Assembly to Update The American and Israel Scene
The Jewish Women's Ai
bly, to be held on Wednesday,
November 4 at the Hyatt Palm
Beaches, has taken as its theme:
"Challenges to Jewish Survival."
In planning the program for
the day the Co-Chairmen; Marjo-
rie Schimelman and Adele Simon,
felt that a necessary aspect of'
community education is discus-
sion of current issues which ad-
dress the Jewish people. With
this in mind, the Jewish
Women's Assembly will provide
each participant with a choice of
two sessions following the
Plenary address.
WQliam A. Gralnick, S.E. Re-
gional Director of the American
Jewish Committee, will speak on
the American Scene. Adele
Simon. Co-Chairman, stated:
"We had the privilege of hearing
Mr. Gralnick speak previously at

William A. Gralnick
Professor Ailon Shiloh
our committee meeting last Klux Klan, and in their implies-
month. He was so provocative tions for Jews and Anti-Semitism
and interesting in his analysis of in America. Mr. Gralnick will
the Moral Majority and the Klu discuss these topics in frreater
depth on November 4." His topic
will be the New Right: Dimen-
sions of Anti-Semitism.
Professor Ailon Shiloh, an An-
thropoligist and Archaeologist at
the University of South Florida
in Tampa, will give his Update of
the Middle-East. Marjorie
Schimelman, Co-Chairman,
stated: "We have had rave re-
views of Professor Shiloh and his
expertise in Middle-Eastern Cul-
tures. He will discuss ways of
predicting social and political
change in the Mid-East by analy-
Annual Presidents' Coffee

'^9^**. ~v.\c}f^r
ng the ethnic and w
background of the l8rtJ?
and her Arab neighbor.1
topic will be The Mwi
Socio-PoliticalDirnensio;"1"1
Both sessions on the Ari
Scene and the Middle-EaT,.
allow questions from tfe J
The sessions will be followJhJ
luncheon and keynote addnWt
be given by Sara Ehrman
Wastungton, DC.
"By offering these topic.
discussion at the Jey
Women's Assembly, it is l.
that each woman attending
be more knowledgeable and I
ter equipped to deal with
Challenges to Jewish Sur
both here and overseas,"
Marjorie Schimelman.
The Jewish Women's
bly is sponsored by the Wom^J
Division of the Jewish Federeti
of Palm Beach County. The o
for the day is $18 and registriii
will be on a first come first i
basis, as space is limited.
For more information, u
Marjorie Schimelman or
Simon, Co-Chairmen, at
2120.
:::::
Plan to Attend!
WHY:
Over 52 organizational Presidents met for the Third Annual Presi-
dents' Coffee, at the Hyatt on Monday. September 21. The Presidents'
'offep was hosted by Cynnie List, President of the Women's Division
if the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
THIRD ANNUAL JEWISH WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY
ALL MAJOR JEWISH WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS
IN THE PALM BEACHES
TO BE EDUCATED ABOUT THE 1980's: A
DECADE OF CONCERN. TO JOIN HANDS IN
A SHARED DESIRE FOR A QUALITY JEWISH
LIFE FOR ALL OUR PEOPLE.

WHERE:
WHEN:
HYATT

PALM BEACHES
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1981
8:45 A.M. 2:15 P.M.
Adele Simon, Co-Chairman, Jewish Women's Assembly, describes the
program planned for Wednesday, November 4 at the Hyatt. Also
shown are. (left to right) Mollk Fitterman. Community Liaison; Leah
SUda, VP Education; Cynnie List, President; Paula Ruth Kass
Women s Division Director. Not shown. Marjorie Schimelman. Co-
ibairman, Jewish Women s Assembly.
The Committee for the Jewish Home for the Aged has speakers available to present the
plans for the Home to interested organizations and groups. For Further information
Call Mr. Adler at 832-2120.

TUNEINTO
L'Chayim
' The Jewish Listener's Digest
An Exciting New Radio Magazine
Sundays, 10:30 am
WPBR-1340 AM
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
y.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.^^


rltfctt:
r.w2 <
" .Ac
mm
^^^mmitltlttmKHtHtU^
Tune in to'MOSAIC
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Sponsoredby
The Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Sunday morning ovsrWPTV Channel 5, at 8:30 a m.
wHh hosts Barbara Sholman and StGordon
SUNDAY October 11 World Gathering of
Holocaust Survivors
Sm furmturi by Wonwi Int.. iocs
SM Minor an^n uy Carol LaxoK)
:".:'-"
'::'
::
:
I
1
The Jewish Home for the Aged of Palm Beach County must be built to meet the
urgent and growing needs of our Jewish aged.
for\he Ho'"1* UP" thC e"tire JeW'8h Community to support the capital fund drive
:ihaVe the U"ique PPrlun'ty to' select a unit in the building to honor your
family name; or to pay tribute to departed loved .
SSSESSttTwiU remain in perpetuity as an in8piration to
TYPICAL UNITS AVAILABLE FOR
MEMORIAL OR DEDICATIONS
::
v.-
Solariums (6|
Double Rooms (391
Single Rooms (42)
Double Room Furnishings (39)
Single Room Furnishings (42)
Ciuardians
Builders
. $50,000 each
25,000 each
15.000 each
7,500 each
5,000 each
5.000
1.000
::

| WabMrom^o^* ""**' **'* "* other major units. Pledges are
| CALLM8.2120FQB FURTHER INFORMATION.


Friday. Ptote1"9- 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
Support for Home for
Aged is Community Wide
Several leaden of tbe Century ViUage CHtm which has pledged to dedicate a Residents Wing are
shown with Erwin H. Blonder, preaident ol the Jawiah Home far the Aged, (.landing aacond from left).
Seated (left to right) Nathan Weinetoch, Joseph Molat. Eatber Moiat, Shirley Fleishman. Standing (left
to right) Rev. Martin Adolf, Hyman Ben Pulda. Abe BUgaier.
Vlso pictured with Mr. Blonder are (left to right) Arnold Hoffman, Ben Roiaman, Bernard PUaskin and
ilarilyn Lam pert.
-. *
v *
-i* I

sisting in reaching women and men prospects are (seated left to right) Berenice Rogers and Sylvia
ennui. Standing (left to right) Barbara Shulman, Evelyn Blum, Detra Kay, and Jeanne Levy, preaident
l the Jewish Federation.
t 1

Community-wide interest, en-
thusiasm and support for the new
Jewish Home for the Aged was
much in evidence at a meeting
that launched the final phase of
the Building Fund campaign.
Members of the Building Fund
Committee and Board of Trus-
tees, representing every segment
of the Palm Beaches, pledged an
all-out effort during the months
of October and November to raise
nearly $2,000,000 that will assure
the success of the drive and
hasten completion of the facility
and its opening for the first resi-
dents.
Heading the drive are Erwin
H. Blonder, president of the Jew-
ish Home for the Aged; Nathan
Appleman, honorary chairman;
and Alan L. Shulman, immediate
past president of the Jewish
Federation.
Pictured here are some of the
active campaigners for the Home.
In addition, several score of vo-
lunteers have been enlisted to
reach prospective contributors in
every section of Palm Beach
County.
Alec Engelstein, chairman of the Home's construction committee, is
seen with Mr. Blonder. Standing (left to right) Rabbi William H.
Shapiro and Rabbi Irving B. Cohen.
Hornstein/Jewish Community Day
School PTA Plans Active Year
The Parent-Teacher Associa-
tion of the Hornstein-Jewish
Community Day School kicked
off the new school year with an
exceptionally well-attended
parent-faculty reception on Sun-
day Evening, September 13 in
the Schwartzberg Hall of Temple
Israel. The reception gave
parents an opportunity to meet
the faculty members and many of
the new parents whose children
are among the record number of
175 students currently attending
the school.
The PTA President, Lorraine
Virshup, outlined a schedule of
very exciting activities planned
for the children and parents.
Scheduled for the immediate
future are a series of Grade Level
Coffees at which the specific cur-
riculum and program of each
grade will be explored. The
schedule of these events, as an-
nounced by Adele Simon the
Education Vice-President, is as
follows:
Pre-Kindergarten and Kinder-
garten. Monday, October 26;
Grade One. Thursday, October
15; Grade Two, Thursday, Octo-
ber 22; Grade Three-Four, Tues-
day. October 6; Grades Five, Six,
Seven and Eighth. Thursday,
October 29.
Also on the agenda in the im-
mediate future is the Annual
Book Fair which coincides with
Jewish Book Month, November
18 to 24. The PTA school book-
store is coordinated by Sherri
Farancz. In addition to the nor-
mal school supplies, the school
bookstore arranges, weekly, for
the delivery of Challot for Shab-
bat and Holidays. More than
sixty Shabbat challot are de-
livered weekly and almost a hun-
dred were ordered for the holi-
days. "Simply Delicious," the
outstanding PTA Cookbook has
sold out more than half of its ini-
tial press run.
Thanks to an exciting and ef-
fective publicity campaign
launched by Carole Ginsburg, the
book has become a "best seller."
Fran Gordon, the Cookbook
Chairperson is making plans for
the second edition of the cook-
book. The members of the PTA
Board for the 5742 school year
are: Shirely Dellerson. Past Pre-
sident: Lorraine Virshup, Presi-
dent: Ellen Ray, Secretary; Carol
Klein. Treasurer; Frances Gor-
don, Fund Raising Vice Presi-
dent; Adele Simon, Education
Vice-President; Terri Kurit,
School Programming Vice-Presi-
dent: Peggy Smith, Chanukah
Workshop; Debra Brass, Bar-
ion's Candy Sale: Marsha
Moskowitz, Book Fair-Student
Directory; Sherri Farancz, Room
Mothers, School Store Coordina-
tor; Celeste Platt, Telephone
Committee.
Hornstein/Jewish Community Day
School Particpates in
Skills for Democracy Porject
" Jv."rtad c-wpaifn groups are (seated left to right) Saaa Mtadel
standing (Wft to right) Steve Gordon, Murray Kern aad David Taaaw
of the JWV
The Hornstein-Jewish Com-
munity Day School is one of two
private schools that was awarded
an "Adopter Grant" in conjunc-
tion with the Palm Beach County
School System for a program
that is designed to teach skills lor
democratic participation. The
project which is being coordi-
nated by the faculty of Howell
Watkins Junior High School, is
intended to teach students the
skills used for effective decision
making in a democratic society.
The program includes a series
of eight decision tnwt^sr module
topics which are incorpporated
into the regular English, Social
Studies, Math and Judaic curri-
cula content arena.
Each module provides oppor-
tunities for students to actually
participate in decision mng
using those skills that are critical
to that process. The following are
among the skills that students
will utilize in this program: ob-
serving, supporting, proposing,
mohflteing, organizing, making a
cross-benefit analysis,
negotiating, rule making and
voting. Mordecai Levow, the
Director of the Hornstein-JCDS,
in announcing the grant, indi-
cated that it was a significant
step toward accomplishing one of
the important goals of tbe Horn-
steuWCDS. "We believe," ha
said, "that a student at the
Hornstein-JCDS should be able
to participate intelligently in our
democratic society as wall as a
knowtedgable Jew."
The program is being coordi-
nated by Dr. Ilene Gerber, the
Curriculum Director of the Horn-
stein-JCDS. Mrs. Peggy Leznoff,
Mr. Skip Paille, and Mrs. Rachel
Stein are implementing the pro-
gram and incorporating it into
their Sixth and Seventh Grade
I classes.


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday
Jewish Floridiajn
ol Palm Beach County j Fred Shocriel
Combining "Our Voice" and "Federation Reporter"
FBEDK SHOCHET SUZANNE SMOCHET BONNIE TARTAKOW
Editor ana Publisher # Eiecutive Editor News Coordinator
Published Weekly October through Mid-May., Bi-Weekiy balance ol year
I Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton. Fla USPS1069030
PALM BEACH-BOCA RATON OFFICE
2200 N Federal Hwy Suite 206. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 368 2001
Main O'liceS Plant 120 N.E 6th St Miami. Fla 33101 Phone 1-373-4605
wnnatar: bend address change to Jawlati FtonrJen. p.o Bw 0i 2B73. Miami. Fto. 33101
Combined Jewish Appeal Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc OHicers President. Jean
ne levy. Vice Presidents Alec Engelstein, Arnold J Hoffman. Or Richard Stiugarman. Barbara
Shulman. Mortimer Weiss; Secretary. Barbara Tanen. Treasurer, Alvin Wilensky. Eiecutive Director.
Norman J Schimelman Submit material lor publication to Ronni Tartakow. Director of Public
Relations
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION Rates Local Area *4 Annual (2 Year Minimum $7 50). or by membership Jewish
Federation ol Palm Beach County, 501 S Ftagler Dr. West Palm Beach. Fla 33401 Phone
832-2120
Friday, October 9, 1981
Volume 7
11TISHRI5742
Number 21
'
Important Bonds Project
In many ways, it was a meeting as important as
any he had with President Reagan in Washington.'
We refer to the Israel Bonds "Canal Founders"
luncheon which Prime Minister Begin addressed in
New York during his visit to the United States.
The canal, which will provide Israel with a
waterway across the southern part of the country to
the Mediterranean Sea, is as old an idea as the Zion-
ist vision itself. It was a dream in the days of Theo-
dor Herzl well before the Jewish State became a
reality.
In an address to some 350 Israel Bond leaders
who came from throughout the United States to hear
Mr. Begin, including some from South Florida, the
Prime Minister urged the leaders to "continue in-
vesting in this great and historic project, in the
vision of Herzl and its realization." Israel Bonds has
committed itself to $100 million toward completion of
the project.
The blunt truth about the waterway is that it
would have been no less important even if Israel
never had to give back an inch of the Sinai to Egypt
in the cause of pursuing a Mideast place. It would
have provided Israel with its own private Suez
Canal, thus making her independent of the political
whims of its Arab owners.
Considering the painful geopolitical realities
today, the project is more important than ever.
Considering Israel's current financial problems
at home, the country simply doesn't have the
wherewithal to launch the building of the canl at this
time. Outside capital is the only answer. And that's
how Israel Bonds has been since its founding in the
early 1950's: the organization is taking the initiative
to show prospective investors the way.
We applaud the 450 "Canal Founders" who have
thus far purchased a minimum of $100,000 in Bonds
toward the completion of the interseas energy proj-
ect. And who have helped enroll some 1,000 other
participants in the program besides.
Yigal Barkan Joins UJA
Project Renewal in Israel
Barkan was a research fellow at
the Van Leer Jerusalem Founda-
tion in Jerusalem. He has also
been the Director of Education
for Congregation Adas Israel in
Washington D.C.; coordinator of
Student Affairs and instructor at
the Center for Jewish Education,
Hebrew University, and program
director for the Jerusalem YM
and YWHA.
Barkan is the author of Aliyah
Coining of Age in Israel, co-editor
and educational advisor for Foot-
loose in Jerusalem and curricu-
lum designer for Teaching
Mitzvot.
In his new position with the
United Jewish Appeal, he will as-
sist in coordinating efforts be-
tween the Jewish Agency Project
Renewal Department and the
UJA headquarters in New York.
He will help to develop a flow of
information and materials de-
signed to facilitate fundraising in
the United States, and also assist
in arranging community and in-
dividual visits to linked Project
Renewal neighborhoods in Israel.
He will work closely with Ameri-
can community delegations who
come to participate in the Project
Renewal budget consultation
process and UJA Missions to
Israel, as well as coordinate fund-
raising for Project Renewal in
Israel.
NEW YORK Yigal Barkan
of Jerusalem has joined the
United Jewish Appeal as UJA
Project Renewal Representative
in Israel, Robert Russell of
Miami, National Project Renewal
Committee Chairman announced.
"Mr. Barkan will add a vital
dimension in our continuing to
attempt to expand services to
communities both in the United
States and in Israel," Russell
said. "His background and ex-
perience gives us a greater oppor-
tunity to serve the needs of com-
munities in the United States
twinned with neighborhoods in
Israel."
Born in Jerusalem and edu-
cated in the United States,
Barkan is a graduate of Yeshivs
College and Hebrew Teacher's
Institute of Yeshiva University
in New York City. He received
his Master of Arts degree at
George Washington University
Graduate School of Education in
Washington D.C.
Mr. Barkan participated in ore-
doctoral studies in curriculum
development at Hebrew Univer-
sity School of Education in Jeru-
salem. He completed hie doctoral
program at George Washington
University and will soon be
awarded a PHD in curriculum
design.
Prior to joining the UJA, Mr.
S
Falling
THE OTHER day, Presidenl
Reagan was asked if the plunging
Dow figures on stocks and bonds
bothered him. The President re-
plied with a burst of laughter,
"No, I don't have any."
We are meant to believe that,
of course, the President was
making a joke. But anyone ac-
quainted with Freud's "Wit and
its Relation to the Unconscious"
would have good reason for deep ^sft:ss::::SWSSWWSWSfl
concern.
Leo
>Iin CeaV H^eac'8,.-^ ""
lably as he dipped Z"^'
mask for the trai.f 'ft.00"*
H vojc
Jokes say a lot about the peo-
ple who tell them. In fact, jokes
are only a painfully thin disguise
behind which the unconscious
drives itself itself into the relief of
public expression of what are
often cruel and socially unaccep-
table feelings.
WITH THE excuse that they
couldn't possibly mean what they
have just said, that they merely
meant to be funny, such people
believe they can get away with
saying the most outrageous
things, sometimes even for our
"own good."
David Stockman, Mr.
Reagan's crass, opportunistic
budget hatchetman, made a joke
of his own the very same day
the President played Bob Hope
to the Dow. A handful of Sena-
tors had just gone through a
school lunch authorized by the
Administration in the name of
budget cuts. One GOP legislator
called the lunch an "obscenity."
All the Senators present con-
cluded that balancing the budget
could not rightly be achieved on
the backs of poor school children.
Whereupon Stockman took to
the airwaves to assure the na-
tion's television evening news
audience that nobody was really
meant to take the reduced school
lunch program seriouslyespe-
cially to understand ex-post facto
that the ketchup-as-vegetable
scam was nothing more than a
bureaucratic boo-boo in the first
place.
THE IMPULSE is to conclude
that the ReaganiteS regard back-
bone America as something to
make jokes about. And there is
no doubt that this ia
trueespecially given Mr.
Reagan'8 predilection for an im-
perial presidency that may, in the
end, make Richard Nixon's seem
like a poor cousin by contrast.
But there is a far more bitter
lesson to be learned here. It is
not that Mr. Reagan prefers
wealth and power and that he has
a punishing attitude toward the
poor and the needy whom he re-
gards as weak and undesirable.
Few can doubt this very much
longer. After all, Teddy Roose-
velt's self-reliance principle,
taken entirely out of context by
Mr. Reagan from the larger
meaning of the Rooseveltian vi-
gorous life philosophy, is what
motivates him these day to the
point of obsession.
The bitter lesson is that humor
hides hostility given two condi-
tions: (a) the extent to which the
joke-teller is or is not sociopathic,
that is to say, the extent to which
his super-ego responds to the
greater civilizational need that he
must control his hostility as an
acceptable member of the com
munity; and (b) the extent to
which the object of the joke-
teller's hostility ia or is not nega-
tively stimulating enough tc
cause him to lose control.
THE FIR8T condition ex-
plains why inveterate joke-tellers
and, of course, professional
humorists and often keenly tortured people who
in their private lives are-not fun-
ny at alL Many of them are frank
to confess, for example, that thajr
dream is to play tragic roles, say
Hamlet or Macbeth or Lear
rather than comic roles.
The second condition explains
why there is- nothing so
dangerous as the sadistic humor-
ist, the personality that has long
since lost control over the dvili-
zational prerequisites for
membership in the community
and that finds humor and even
joy in punishing the objects of his
hostility with pain.
Joke-tellers who have em-
barked on that road have a low
anger flashpoint. They lose their
tempers easily. Paradoxically,
they are to be found more among
the seemingly mUd-niannerad,
often the successful sodahzer,
rather than among the sociopaths
who have long since given up the
pretense that they are 'nice
guys."
PRESIDENT REAGAN is the
epitome these days of the "nice
guy." When he made his joke
about the plunging Dow, he was
affable in the extreme. He
showed every aspect of his
pleasing personality that won
him the election last November.
And that, earlier in life, also won
him the Bonzo role. After all, he
did not come to play Bonzo en-
tirely by accident; anyone who
was willing to act in that context
simply had to be a "nice guy."
But then came Scene Two of
Mr. Reagan's script for the very
same day that began when he
played comedian to the Dow. In
the second scenario, the Presi-
dent was called upon to respond
to the news, the very predictable
news, which he clearly did not
anticipate or see that way, that
the Saudis were not at the mo-
ment prepared to accept the
latest GOP scheme to push the
AWACS sale through the Senate.
This was the scheme that would
have sold the AWACS but re-
quired of the Saudis that they ac-
cept American crew control over
them.
choking with rage at the sLt?
lined up against the A WAT*?
under any circumstance, u
Reagan turned Lear, hfa hottfo
bordering on threats 0fT,y
punishment for those who *
crossing him. He did not In!!!
I "what to do with them," LzS
for fading to support this dmQ
his military package for
Saudis But he would sure com^
up with something if they fou
to relent.
TOE TWO scenarios are fa*
nating because they drvidealoor.
the lmes of the Presidents &>
tional imperatives. In th
struggle for budget cuta to which
the Dow has been resrxmdhw
negatively, the Presidentcould
be his usual, affable self and
make jokes because he was after
all having his way in the war
against welfare America.
But in the arena of military en-
terprise, in the complex world of
the industrial and military fat cat
to which he has elected himself u
heir, Mr. Reagan can see no hu-
mor and will tolerate with only
great control the frustration of
his expansionist soul.
Whether or not the President
goes yet a step further remains to
be seen. He can not readily
punish the Senators of his own
party led by Robert Packwoodof
Oregon who have handed him the
AWACS defeat as it now stands.
But he can punish Israel,
whose interests he presumably
holds in such high esteem. He
can punish Israel in the same way
that, say, Lear punished bis be-
loved Cordelia. And whether or
not he attempts this depends
upon which of the two conditions
governing hostility in humor ul-
timately claims him. The time
for an end to Administration
ioke-cracking and so-called
bureaucratic boo-boos may wall
be at hand.
Shamir. Carrington
Continued from Page 1
repeatedly for negotiationa with
the PLO as part of the Mideast
peace process.
He was said to have usual nil
that call in his talk with Shamii
and to have said that although he
supports the Camp David pro-
cess, as it stands it is not enough
to reach a final settlement in the
Middle East.
/ IN HIS ADDRESS to the UN
General Assembly, Carrington
stated that in the view of his
government, "A comprehensive
settlement can only be negotiated
if all parties concerned, laWfawlfaag
the Palestinian people and the
PLO which will have to be asso-
ciated with negotiations, accept
the principles which we set out in
the Venice declaration and play
their full part." The Venice decla-
ration in June, 1980. was the
EEC's statement of pnncmles on
the Middle East.
Carrington also told the Gen-
eral Assembly that "the starting
point" toward a just peace in the
Middle East "must be the in-
dependence and security of all.
states in the area, i~-lHing i,.
reel, and the legitimate rights of
the Palestinian people, including
the right to self -determination." j
Carrington was one bf three m
European Foreign Ministers with fmsr Luftwaffe pilot, German
whom Shamir met. The others moat: decorated h
were West Germany's Foreign
Minister Hans-Dietrich Genedter
andthe "MlHappotaUd foreign
Minister of Holland M. van der
Stoel.
reel and is scheduled to & there
next spring.
The crux of the Shamir
Genscher talk was the interna-
tional situation and the role of
Saudi Arabia in the Middle East.
The Saudi image in the West is
one of moderation. But Israel's
view, as expressed by Shamir, is
that the Saudis play a negative
role, at least as far as the Arab-
Israeli conflict is concerned.
A friendly atmosphere also
prevailed at Shamir's meatmf
with Van der Stoel who Wok
office only ten days ago. The
[hitch diplomat noted with satis-
faction the improved relations
between Israel and the United
Nations Interim Force in Leba-
non (UNIFIL) which includsi
Dutch troops.
ACCORDING TO sources
aere. Shamir's talks with the
wman and Dutch Ministers
were held in a much more cordial
tooaphere than his encounter
with Britain's Foreign Secretary,
uenscher was invited to visit Is-
Medal Honors
Nazi Ace
BONN (JTAI Neo-Nati
friends of Germany's wartm*
flying ace,. Hane-Ulrich FtoedeL
aw minting a medal in gold and
sUvar to honor him on the occa-
sfaw> of his 66th birthday. The
,Geri
_ war hero, -
controversial figure. The medal
will be distributed through th
Munich-based national ttitung,1
neo-Nazi newspaper that fan &
largest circulation of any weetay
in the country.
It will be sold to neo-Naairym-
pathixers and other right-wing
extremists. The medal will earn
Roedels portrait and aNaiIn*
tary symbol, although Nam Sym-
bols are banned by law in W*
Germany.


y, October 9,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
Autonomy Talks
Resumed
Envoys Say Israel Nasty About AWACS
ena
By DAVID LANDAU
CAIRO (JTA) Af-
an 18-month sus-
jon, Israel, Egypt and
United States resumed
tiations late last week
Palestinian autonomy
the West Bank and the
Strip. The three dele-
;ions, meeting at the
House Hotel near
_ delivered brief open-
statements in which
pledged good will and
oubled efforts to move
talks towards
ment.
rhe months of spasmodic
3 tiations in the aftermath of
'Egyptian-Israel peace treaty,
in early 1979, failed to
^ieve significant progress. But
head of the Egyptian dele-
lion, Foreign Minister Kamal
issan Ali. said in his opening
narks that "a new hope" had
arisen for the success of the
s "with the new American
Iministration and the recent
tionsin Israel."
fHE KEY FIGURE on the la-
Hi team is the new Defense
nister, Ariel Sharon. His
giving new policies on the West
nk have aroused the interest of
kh the Egyptian and American
legations, which apparently
Sharon's intentions.
In recent weeks there has been
pave of reports in the Israeli
dia. inspired by Defense Min-
cirdes. to the effect that
on proposes to introduce
nor liberalizing measures on
" West Bank with the avowed
of wooing moderate local
era into the peace process.
Israel radio and television
orated on Sharon's plan to
ate between purely military
urity affairs on the West
nk, which will remain in the
ds of the army, and civilian
ktrol with as many as possible
Vstinian civilians in high ad-
histrative positions.
EGYPT'S Minister of State,
Itros Ghali, a key presence
Oughout the peace process
fh Israel, publicly welcomed
on's moves. In a statement
Ghali called on Israel to
bvide "confidence-building
sures" that would "give
to the Palestinian and
eby improve the negotiating
posphere.
ft.1! ch measures should
puae the return of the two ex-
JlTw.,?ank mav. Mo-
nmed Milhem of Halhoul and
* Kawasme of Hebron, to
\tSSi the EW*in diP-
BniVu- ** "ceruinly" the
0I 'ning we have in mind.
J^ing for the U.S. at the
m session, Alfred Atherton,
I "jt Ambassador to Egvpt.
Phasued "the commitment
^^'"Administration to
n_ a hill partner" in the
P0CM,, -We m here tQ
, '' '"' he said, "to do
nelp the process
EiSiMARKS ; &
ttt0ai,"yi-oneernb voiced ii
CK,.the ct that Sec-
ktrt ?Ute Afawder Haig
RwcI to refer to the Camp
r P">ces8 in his address to
the United Nations General
Assembly earlier this week.
Atherton also sought to allay
concerns felt both in Israel and
Egypt that the U.S. had
weakened its interest in the auto-
nomy talks by not designating a
special envoy to head its dele-
gations, as was the case under
the Carter Administration. He
said that he and the Ambassador
to Israel, Samuel Lewis, were co-
chairmen of the U.S. team and
this showed that "we are re-
doubling our efforts we're
here with two of delegation
Continued from Page 1
which the four former Am-
bassadors said they had agreed
upon, the former diplomats said
they find the AWACS system
"uniquely adapted to the defense
to the oilfields of eastern Arabia.
We see no way that the AWACS
would be a danger to Israel un-
less Israel actually were to launch
an airborne attack on the
Arabian oilfields or oil installa-
tions."
THE FOUR see three conse-
quences if the sale was rejected.
The first, they claim, would be a
Saudi interpretation of Congress
"yielding to pressure from
Israel" They say the Saudis
would also review their oil policy
which they said has "been im-
mensely beneficial to the United
States and the entire oil consum-
ing world." They also predicted
"a considerable scaling down of
American military and economic
presence in Saudi Arabia at im-
mense cost to our economy.''
When it was suggested that
they were talking about "econo-
mic blackmail," Neumann denied
this. But he said the U.S. and
West Europe need "Saudi oil and
the jobs provided by investment
in Saudi Arabia. Hart said that if
the sale is rejecteed there would
be a gradual "disintegration" of
the American presence in Saudi
Arabia, as well as U.S. invest-
ments there.
AT IHt press conference,
Akins charged that Premier
Menachem Begin of Israel was
being "cynical" in his opposition
to the AWACS sale. "If the deal
Roes through then he (Begin) can
extract much greater aid from the
United States, military aid and
economic aid," Akins claimed.
He said that if the deal is
blocked, Begin will have demon-
strated his "invulnerability." He
did not explain whether he meant
this in the area of domestic poli-
tics or foreign relations. Begin
"is in a no-lose situation,,' Akins
asserted.
Akins also charged that Israel
is "not at all serious" in arguing
that the AWACS threatened its
security because it knew that
Americans will have to fly these
planes for their full life and
American technicians will have to
be in Saudi Arabia for the full life
of the planes.
The most respected name
in Jewish funeral service.
In the world
Not surprising, it's
Riverside, and there are many
reasons.
If you've ever worked with
any of our people on community
projects ranging from fund-
raising drives for Israel to .
enhancing Jewish education
you'd understand. If you've ever
experienced the compassion
and kindness of Riverside
counselors you'd have an even
deeper appreciation of the
reasons for Riverside leader- .
ship.
At Riverside, we have the'
largest Jewish staff available
from any funeral director in
Florida. More important, they
are people who understand
Jewish tradition and honor it.
They carry on a tradition
that for over three generations
has been a priceless assurance,
to Jewish families.
Our people. They make
Riverside the most respected
name in Jewish funeral service
in the world.
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
Carl Grossberg, President
Andrew Fier, Vice President,
New York and Past President
of the Jewish Funeral
Directors of America.
Charles Solomon, Vice
President, New York.
In Florida:
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious
Advisor. .
SamRosenthal
Kenneth Kay, V.P.
Keith Kronish, F.D.
Mark Ginsberg, F.D.
Harvey Pincus, F.D.
Douglas Lazarus, F.D.
Carmen Serrano, F.D.
Robert Burstein
Arthur Zwigenthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Golland
Jules Fischbein
Elaine Gardner
LenaRothfeld
SoniaGale
Bernard Eilen
Aaron Rosenthal
Sol Silver
Charlie Blumkin.
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Sel by
Edward Dobin
Ralph Rubell
Guardian Plan Counselors:
Ira Gold berg, Manager
Steve Fischman
Alfred Stern
Syd Kronish
DickSorkin
Joseph Rubin
Henry Bofman
Joseph Bass
ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton
Road(19thSt.)/531-1151
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250
Normandy Drive/ 531-1151
MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17th St.
(Douglas Rd.)/443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480
N.E.19thAve./947-8691 -
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood
Blvd./920-1010
FT. LAUDERDALE (Tamarac):
6701 West Commercial Blvd.
(E.of University Rd.)/
587-8400
WESTPALMBEACH:4714
Okeechobee Blvd. / 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New
York Metropolitan area.
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc. / Funeral Directors
Tradition. It's what makes u -ews.
Sponsoring trie Guardian Plan PreArranee.i >
Funeral
^
.....it
I'lMI


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Fri<*y. October i
(he
By STACI LESSEF
perspectives on Jewish Education
Where Have All the Standards Gone?
. Jeffrey Rubin, son of Jean and Jerry Rubin, is enrolled in
Emory Law School in Atlanta. Sisters Donna and Lisa also live
in Atlanta. We hear that all three Rubins are doing well (perhaps
the South shall rise again!)
Around The Town received correspondence from a student at
the Southern College of Optometry. He will be in our area for the
time period of January 4 to February 5. He is requesting aid in
housing and would like to find someone who would rent him a
room at a reasonable amount for that time. He is single and
Jewish and is looking for someone in our community to be of
help to him. If you are interested please contact Around the
Town for further information about this young man. He is wait-
ing for a reply.
The time between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur seems to
be not only marked with prayer, but a time when family and
friends join together to wish the best for the New Year.
Pre-Rosh Hashanah brunches, dinners before Temple, Rosh
Hashanah lunches are each marked with apples and honey, ex-
tensive variety of food, and a general sense of a new beginning
and well being.
Along with the variety of sumptuous edibles come the full
wish that the new year will be a good one Good health, a good
year, happiness, and good friends are among the prescriptions
issued this time of year.
As Yom Kippur approaches we gather again together, both \a
prayer and fellowship, to insure that our lives are shared with
those who are the important parts of our lives.
As the Day of Atonement comes to a dose with the final blow-
ing of the Shofar we again join with our loved ones for the tradi-
tional break fast.
All over the county, East to West, North to South, we meet to
share not only our tables but our philosophy for our new year
with earnest promise. The promise that this year we will put into
practice all that we promised during this our most reflective part
of our Jewish lives.
Around the town we join together appreciating what we have.
We look at ourselves, our family, our friends, and our com-
muntiy and hope that we all will have a good year. What better
beginning could there be than to begin with those so dear, our
family and friends.
Mordecai Levow
The last week in August I, had
the priviledge and pleasure of at-
tending the annual conference of
the Coalition For Alternatives in
Jewish Education at Oberlin Col-
lege in Oberlin, Ohio. This con-
>rence, which was organized by
oung people interested and con-
med for the future of Jewish
ucation and the Jewish people,
has become the largest con-
ference on Jewish education held
annually in the United States.
This last conferrence was at-
tended by more than 800 Jewish
educators from the United States
and Canada.
The range of topics and con-
cerns was truly amazing. Here
were these young, Jewish educa-
tors, joined by many of their
older colleagues, discussing
everything from the use of com-
puters in Jewish education, to
teaching "Aleph Bet," to camp-
ing and informal education.
There was much concern about
the "single-parent family" and
many of other societal ills which
afflict all American society and
from which we as Jews are not
exempt.
One of the topics high on the
agenda of the conference was the
question of standards. There was
a serious concern for standards
on two levels: on the level of fa-
culty and on the level of students.
In an historic study of Jewish
education, Dr. Abraham Dush-
kin, the dean of Jewish educators
in the United States in the de-
cades following the Second World
War, made the soft quoted obser-
vation, "Jewish education in
America is like a river a mile wide
and an inch deep." Following
that study, efforts were intensi-
fied to shore up standards for
teacher certification by the Na-
tional Board of License of the
American Association for Jewish
Education and its affiliate licen-
sing and certification committees
on a local level. More and more
schools insisted that their teach-
ers be certified and qualified as
Judaic Studies teachers
was increasing recognition that a
person who is a certified public
school teacher was not necessari-
ly qualified to teach Judaic
Studies and an Israeli trained
teacher needed considerable re-
orientation in order to under-
stand American youngsters. Un-
fortunately, the sum total of all of
our Hebrew Teacher's Colleges
did not produce the supply of
trained qualified teachers re-
quired to staff our schools.
Therefore, in many communities
it was necessary to resort to
"homegrown" faculty not certi-
The Jewish Community Center's
Seniors are shown enjoying the
newest form of relaxation entitled
Dancersize On The Chair. This is
led by Bea Bunze, who also leads
groups at the Center in Yoga.
JCC Career Singles
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter's Career's Singles (35-55) are
continuing to enjoy many in-
teresting and exciting activities.
If you are working and want to
get actively involved call Flo at
689-4021 or Hank at 629-9999 or
Annette at 747-1590.
Sunday, October 11 at 6 p.m.
the group will meet at Sandy
Meisels for a covered dish dinner.
Participants are asked to bring
either a fish, fowl or meat dish.
Prizes for the best dishes will be
given. For reservations please
call 499-4505 (in Delray.) The fee
for the evening is S3.
JCC Young Singles
" The Young Singles (18-36) of
the Jewish Community Center of
the Palm Beaches have planned
an exciting series of events for
the month of October. Sunday,
October 11, the group will meet
at Phil Foster Park, Singer Is-
land at 3:30 p.m. to "Ride the Is-
land Quean. Boat leaves at 4
p.m. The Ire for the trip is $3 per
person. Afcer the boat ride they
will be going to Joey's for dinner.
Those who wish to join may
either meet at the park or call
Mark Mendel, at the Center, 689-
7700 for reservations. Interested
singles may also secure a calen-
dar of events if they call 689-
7700.
Flagler
t*BanR'
MORE THAN A BANK
Where You're More Than A Customer
A FULL SERVICE BANK
For information
659-2265
(IT SPELLS BANK)
Main Office
501 South Flagier Drive
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33401
Nortlake Blvd. Branch
2863 Northlake Boulevard
Lake Park, Fla. 33410 '
Forest Hill Branch
1850 Forest Hill Boulevard
West Palm Beach. Fla. 33406
Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. Branch
2380 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Member FDIC Member Federal Reserve System
not be a pious person. The nw,
fully understood that Kft
There relationship between piety Zi
giousity, and Jewish learn%
It is for this reason that ^
like the Untied BnSSi
A,Tfe three S3K3
published a standard for j^E
Congregational schools, whkh
called for a minimum of six hom,
per week in a three day schoolu
is for that same reason that Ik
Union of American Hebrew (V
gregations sets standards for,
number of years of educatkm and
hours of education in reform coj.
gregations. In fact, many of the
reform congregations adopts] I
the three day a week standard
fled and frequently not qualified. ^d a number 0f years .
before Bar Mitzvah.
In our community and in manv
communities throughout the
land, the dispersion of Jewish po-
pulation to the suburbs, the at-
tendant "car pooling" difficult
and the host of competing acti-
vities (soccer, baseball, tennii
art, music, etc.) have created u
enormous pressure on Jewiih
educators to reduce the hours and
years of instuction. The move-
ment from Jews from one com-
munity to another has created i
situation of children entering
schools at twelve in preparation
for "Bar or Bat Mitzvah."
The Jewish community, qui
community, cannot dictate stan-
dards to individual congrega-
tions. However, the leadership of
the Jewish community cannot ig-
nore the fact that a minimalist
Jewish education will set the
clock back toward that period
when Jewish education wit "i
mile wide and an inch deep." I
would anticipate that this con-
cern, too, would be a major con-
cern of our local Jewish Edtxa-i
tion Committee.
The growth of Judaic Studies
programs on the general
American college campus
provided a further reservoir of
faculty, many of whom were
enthusiastic young people who
lacked the pedagogic skills that
one gets at a Teachers' College.
The task facing us in the de-
cades of the SO's is to help this
amorphous mass of people with a
wide variety of skills and back-
grounds to become effective con-
veyors of Judaism and Jewish
tradition. This is an exciting
challenge and one which must be
met within our community
through creative and effective
professional growth opportuni-
ties. It is a priority that, we are
certain, will be high on the agen-
da of the Jewish Education Com-
mittee of Federation.
The second area of concern is
that of school standards. For
many years the national synago-
gue bodies have argued and
urged minimum standards for
graduation, confirmation, and
Bar Mitzvah. There is a rabbinic
observation that "ein am haretz
hasid." an ignorant person can-
r
Best Wishes For the New Year-
La Chamade
3700 South Dixie Highway
Wtit Palm Beach. Florida 3340S
Owner Host
JACQUES GARRIGUE
(305) 8324733
Open Monday to Saturday
5 30 to 11 p m
Rtttturtnt fttfKMH
Cocktails
Also Serving
Prix Fix* (set price)
$12.50
THANKSGIVING AT
MIAMI BEACH'S FINEST
GLATT KOSHER HOTEL
4 DAYS 3 NIGHTS
(Nov 2629) 5DAYS-4NIGHTS EVERYLUXURY
ONLY (Nov. 25-29) OCEANFRONI
PER PERSON nn FACILITY
DBL OCC y y POOL -PRIVATE
PLUS TAX BEACH
INCLUDES 2 DELICIOUS ^f'OUSSER^
KOSHER MEALS DAILY .entertainment
$84
fVALOMAN HOTEL ON THE OCEAN AT 43 ST
PHONE 538-5731 FOR RESERVATIONS
Best Wishes for a Happiness, Health and Prosperity
in the New Year
Leon A. Kleinman
Second Vice-President-lnvestments
w**oooooooooooooc _
Shearson American Express
249 Royal Palm Way
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
305-655-7850
Toll Free Out of State
Florida Only
800-327-6322
800-432-3735
Member of all principal security, option
and commodity exchanges
....................."-


[^October 9,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page!
Organizations In The News
| JEWISH CIVIL
UftCE EMPLOYEES
f i-vine, President of the
ift,ridJewhCWl Serv-
Employees, announces that
Vhapter is sponsoring a
King Holiday Weekend
, the West Coast of Flor-
ii members and frienda are
I w join the trip. For mfor-
m contact Jeanette Levine,
tfmory Drive West, Villa C,
|palm Beach, 33406.
WOMEN'S
, AMERICAN ORT
j Monday, Oct. 12, at 12:30
LeUii Worth We.tCh.p-
VWomen's American ORT
Ud a general meeting at the
RE Center 201 N.
| Highway near 2nd Avenue
\ foLake Worth. All mem-
e urged to attend.
Vil Palm Beach Chapter of
is proud to present its
-d Annual Sports Fund Day
Enday, Oct. 19 at Indian
[Country Club. There will be
| tournament which will uv
[green fees, cart and buffet
| for $18 per person. For the
i birds there wil be danish
Icoffee. Make up your own
ome or let the committee do
r you. Chairpeople are Karl
an, Danny Jatlow, Jack
n, Jay Auspitz, The Deu-
Mariam Chodosh and
i BoUtein. The round robin
i tournament includes
lunch and is $10.50 per
\n. Chairpeople are the
lers and Wises. Coordinator
yan Jacobs. Sign up now
is limited. Prizes will be
d. If you don't play, join
I swimming and lunch at $8
erson.
kick off the winter season,
the Royal Palm Beach chapter of
Women's American ORT will
hold a special evening meeting on
Wednesday, Oct. 21, 7:30 p.m. at
the Royal Palm Beach Civic Cen-
ter. The program will feature the
original cast of "Yiddish is Not
Dead." Husbands and guests are
cordially invited.
HADASSAH
Yovel HadMiah will have a
paid up luncheon Oct. 15 at Con-
gregation Anshei Sholom at 12
noon. All life members and an-
nuals are -invited. Admission is
$2.50. Annual dues must be paid
one week in advance of the lunch-
eon. For reservations contact
Dianna Klieer, Rosalie Shapiro,
Tillie Carmen or Rheba Seaver.
Yovel Had ass ah will have a
special flea market on Nov. 10 at
the Palm Beach Auditorium.
Chairperson is Reba Strauss, co-
chairman, Helen Kalick.
Celebrate Thanksgiving week-
end at the Tarleton Hotel Delux
kosher good food SI 15 per per-
son, all included (two in a room)
$160 in a single room. For reser-
vations call Bessie Hoffman and
Bertha Kaplan.
Shalom, W. Palm Beach
Hadaa.ah holds a general
meeting and Paid-up Member-
ship luncheon Monday, Oct. 26,
at Anshei Sholom. Luncheon at
12:30 p.m., admission by ticket
only, donation $2; regular meet-
ing at 1 p.m. Dorothy Lieberman
and Bertha Rubin are >n charge of
reservations. Guest speaker,
John Quigley of Channel 5.
Dates to remember: Oct. 15,
dinner and show at Newport Pub,
Miami Beach; Nov. 1-4. Lido
Spa; Nov. 5-8. Palm Beach Spa;
Dec. 3, dinner at Prince Hamlet
and Frankie Keine Show at

|Ruth Popick, of Palm Beach, (third from right), wife of the late
jropick, was honored recently for her generous gifts to the GI
Cedars of Lebanon Health Care Center in Miami. Family
* who attended the ceremony and luncheon were (from left):
no Mrs Harry, Cohen, Ricky Markman (her daughter), Mr..
IGoldberg, and David Popick (her eon).

Now ottering an extended
line of household services
in the Palm Beach area.
In addition to an extended
contract maid service to
keep your living quarters
spic and span, Jessie Hay
can provide you with
special services with no
pr>rr r r av r* additional placement fee:
l^o/i fiH^wDoyuneedaseamstress'
Household
Services, Inc.
[305) 655-3433
a waitress, a hairstylist to
come to your home?
If you want the services of
live in help but have no
living space for them, treat
yourself to the pleasure of
Jessie Hay care.
CALL 665-3433
Marco Polo; Dec 29-Jan. 1, New '
Years trio to West Coast area. ,
For above reservations, contact j
Fran Nudelman, Flo Siegel, Lil
Schack. In addition, Nov. 26-29, '
an outstanding Thanksgiving
weekend at Sea Gull (kosher)
Hotel, Miami Beach. For details,
Martha Starr, Mae Podwol. Re-
minder: Youth Aliyah luncheon,
Nov. 11. Contact Bertha Rubin,
Pearl Klein, Florence Shapiro.
The Riahona Group of the
Palm Beach Chapter of Hansah
will hold its October board meet-
ing at Temple Israel, in the Sch-
wartzberg Hall, 1901 No. Flagler
Dr., West Palm Beach, on
Thursday, Oct. 15, at 10 a.m. The
regular meeting follows:
The Rishona Group will hold a
mini-luncheon at 12 noon on
Thursday, Oct. 15, at its regular
meeting at Temple Israel, 1901
No. Flagler Drive in the Sch-
wartzberg Hall. W. Palm Beach,
FL. There will be entertainment.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Lodge 3041 of
Palm Beach, (Lt. Col. Netanyahu
Lodge), will hold their next meet-
ing on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 8 p.m.,
at the Senior Citizens Building on
Dixie Highway and North 2nd
Ave. in Lake Worth.
The distinguished guest
speaker will be Dr. Irving Rikon
on the subject, "Newest Mid-
East Policies."
Dr. Rikon is:
The author of, "Peace as it can
be."
An instructor at Palm Beach
Junior College and leader of the
policy discussion group called,
"Great Decisions."
He is the producer and host of
a talk show titled, "Open
Forum." He is a writer and edu-
cator, and as author his column
has appeared in many local news-
papers.
Community Relations Council SpeaArs available
Topics. Israel, Community Concerns, Soviet
Jewry, Energy, Holocaust
For information and bookings, contact
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman's office .
at the Jewish Federation of Pahn Beach
County. 832-2120
He has travelled throughout
the world, particularly the middle
east and has taught a course
titeld, "The middle east in histor-
ical perspective."
All B'nai B'rith members, their
wives and friends are cordially
invited to attend. Refreshments
will be served after the meeting
and a social hour will afford you
the opportunity to meet with
your friends and neighbors.
For further -information about
this program or our special mem-
bership offer, contact Morris
Kroin.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
LADIES AUXILIARY
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Jewinh War Veteran. No. 406 will
' hold its regular meeting on Tues-
day, Oct. 20, at 12:30 p.m. at the
First Federal Bank of Deb-ay on
Okeechobee Blvd., at the West
Gate of Century Village, W. Palm
Beach,
Refreshment will be served.
Also, a luncheon and card
party is planned for Monday,
Nov. 2, at 12 p.m. at Captain's
Galley, Century Corners, Okee-
chobee Blvd., and Haverhill
Road, West Palm Beach.
For reservations, contact Es-
ther Finkel, chairman of this af-
fair, Hastings G-107, CV, W.
I Palm Beach.
PIONEER WOMEN
Card Pary of the Theodore
Herxl Club of Pioneer Women
.will be held Oct. 29, at 12:30
'p.m., Lake Worth Shuffleboard
Courts, 1121 Lucerne Ave.
Dessert and Coffee Bring your
own lunch; $2 per person. For
tickets, please call: Hannah Sch-
wartz or Sydell Paris.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
National Condi of Jewish
Women Pahn Beach Section will
have a paid-up membership
luncheon at the home of Lee
Batterman (Noted Artist). 13772
Sand Crane Dr., Pahn Beach
Garden, on Wednesday. Oct. 28
at Noon.
All paid up members are in-
vited. Unpaid and new members
are welcome and may pay their
dues at the dorr. RSVP.
S NORTH AMERICAN
RARE COINS INC.
Buying Silver, Gold and Coins
Paying Areas Highest Prices
Spencer Square
2550 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach
(305)684-1771
r
k
Will
PAMPER YOU
RIGHT DOWN
TO YOUR TOES,
THE tOTN OF YOU Will LOOK MEAT, FEEl MEAT,,
ORttTRIHJffSAKTYIIaaWORSML
A luxurious massage. A set of tennis. A candlelight dinner, impeccable
in every way. This is the vacation that's more than a vacation.
This is Safety Harbor Spa.
Slide into the warm waters of a natural mineral spring. Enjoy a
steaming sauna. Or a cool swim. Safety Harbor Spa will do wonders
for the way you look and feel. Safety Harbor is your own private hide-
away on Florida's easy-going West Coast. Its a place with tennis, golf,
art classes, entertainment. A place where you can have great fun,
great food, and even lose a few pounds. Where you'll find an
atmosphere of head-to-toe conditioning supervised by skilled experts.
(You'l even get a complete physical from out medical staff)
In fact. Safety Harbor Spa is totally committed to one purpose -
making you fee! great.
And after all, isn't that what a vacation is for?
30% OFF: OCT. II MC lt
For reservations or more information in Florida or Canada call collect
(813) 726-1161. Or write Mr. Salu Devnani, Safety Harbor Spa. Safety
Harbor, Florida 33572. Just minutes from Tampa International Airport.
Resort Hotel 6l Tennis Club
ENJOY IT IN GOOD HEALTH.
A subsidiary of Hardwfie Companies Incorporate*


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, Octobttj,
MEET THE NEW STAFF AT THE JCC!! btooduong..
or RHONDA csrSARA rand MARK
Rhonda Cohen is originally from
Jericho, New York and has been in
Florida for three years. She
received her B.S. in Family and
Community Services from Syracuse
University in 1978, and is now
working part time on her Master's
Degree in Counseling at F.A.U.
Rhonda was the former Activity
Specialist at the Frail Elderly
Program of the Michael-Ann Russell
JCC in North Miami Beach. She is
presently the new Senior Staff
Coordinator for the JCC of the Palm
Beaches. Her main goal for the
Senior Adult Program is to expand
the Volunteer Program and develop
a variety of new activities and
services.
Sara Glenn joined the JCC of the1
Palm Beaches as the Arts & Crafts
Specialist this past summer and
is now working as the Media/Program
Specialist, producing the tele-
vision show called "Generation to
Generation" and developing other
cultural arts activities. Sara
is a world traveler, but is based
from Washington state where she
received a B.A. in English, and
has also completed a recent craft
studv at Penland, North Carolina.
Her experiences include teaching
dancey languages, and working in
the field of mass media all of
which she plans to utilize at the
JCC.
Mark Mendel joined bur professional
staff as Youth Services Supervisor
in June of 1981. He has been
working for the JCC during the past
three summers at Camp Shalom as
a Unit Leader and Director of the
Sports Camp. Mark comes from
Springfield, Massachusetts, where
he was working with the Office of
Residential Life at the University
of Massachusetts. Mark, who is
23, received his B.S. in Community
Services from U of Mass/Amherst.
We welcome him to Palm Beach County
and to the Jewish Community Center.
w
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER of the PALM BEACHES 2415 OKEECHOBEE BLVD. WPB tcL 689-7700
JCC Happenings Senior News
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter, Comprehensive Senior Serv-
ice Center, receives funds from a
Federal Grant, TitlTlII of the
Older Americans Act.awarded by
Gulfstream Areawide Council on
Aging, and the Florida Depart-
ment of H.R.S., enabling us to
provide transportation for the
transit disadvantaged as well as
a variety of recreation and
educational services.
ADULT EDUCATION
The Fall Session of the Adult
Community Education Classes
began September 21. Everyone is
invited to attend. Instructors are
provided by the School Board of
Palm Beach County. There is no
fee. Please call the Center for
further information.
-fOil Painting, Mondays 9
a.m.-12 noon, Debbie Simmons, 8
weeks.
Coping With Life, Mondays 1-
3 p.m., Maurice Brown, 8 weeks.
Preventive Health Care and
Nutrition, Tuesdays 9:30-11:30
a.m., Joan Fox, 8 weeks.
Know Your Car, Wednesdays
9:30a m, PaulOblas,6weeks
Dancercize in the Chain For
Men and Women, Wednesdays 1'
2:30 p.m.. Bea Bunze, 8 weeks.
Lip Reading, Wednesdays 4-
5:30 p.m.. Daflene Kohuth, 10
weeks.
+Writ*rs Workshop, Thurs-
days 930-11:30 a.m., Frank
Bosi.wick, 10 weeks.
+Advanced Writers Work-
shop Fridays 9:30-11:30 am
Fra ick, 10 weeks
+ ion for these
iao OH wish to b' |
on list, please >
Cen
On-i ioing Programs
Roi-nW Table Talk for Men
Timek .Topics for Thinking
Women Round Table Talk for
Men and Timely Topics for
Thinking Women meet on Tues-
days at 1 p.m. Timely Topics
discussion leader, Sylvia Skolnik
and Round Table Talk for Men
Joe Greenberg, discussion leader.
The Center will be closed Tues-
day, Oct. 13 and 20. Next session
Oct. 27.
Speakers Club Herbert
Sperber, President, invites all
those interested in public speak-
ing to join this group, which
meets on Thursdays at 10 a.m.
Health Insurance Assistance
Edie Reiter, Health Insurance,
Coordinator, will assist parsons
with health insurance forms,
questions, etc., the third Thurs-
day of each month at 2 p.m. For
further information, call 689-
7700.
Art of the Month Ida Blau-
ner, Chairperson, announces that
George H. Marks, well-known
photographer, will exhibit some
of his photographs at the Center
during the month of October.
Come in to the Center to view
these photographs. The Center is
open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
days through Fridays.
Dine Out Luncheons at
various restaurants will be held
once a month. For further infor-
mation, call Sam Rubin or
Rhonda Cohen at 689-7700.
What You Must Know About
Breast Cancer Mary Ann Mc-
Gowan, Administrator of the
Philip Strax Breast Cancer
Detection Institute in Fort Lau-
derdale will answer your ques-
tions and give yon new informa-
'ion about this Uvvc n I hurs-
iay, Oct. 22 at :.am
n hat every wor;
veryone invit*
COMIM
Senior Weekend : Not t. yaad
10.
Tampa Trip
Come for a fantastic three day I
weekend hosted by the Tampa
Seniors. Visit Bush Gardens, St.
Petersburg and Tampa with
seniors from 11 Florida JCCs.
This is a very special trip. Call
Sam Rubin for information 689-
7700.
Lido Spa Get-A-Way: Nov. 29
through Dec. 2. Trip includes
four day, three nights, three
meals a day, (diet or regular)
dairy massage, nightly entertain-
ment. Bus leaves the Westgate of
Century Village on Sunday, Nov.
29 at 11:30 a.m. an arrive back on
Wednesday, Dec. 2at 4:15 p.m.
Members, double occupancy-
Si 25, Non-members double
occupancy-S135, Single accom-
modations for members SI40,
Non-members single-S150. Bus
transportation S13 per person.
For further information call the
Center and ask for Sam Rubin.
Second Tuesday Club
Sam Rubin, President, an-
nounces that the Second Tuesday
Club will not meet in October due
to the Jewish Holidays.
The Senior Center of the.
constantly receives letters oil
preciation from clients who
benefiting from our trsr
tion services and who are enk
ing our interesting
stimulating classes and
grams. It is so important I
meaningful for us to know f
we are assisting and enrich
the lives of so many. Jean Rub
Director of the Senior Cen'
wishes to thank all those
have been kind enough to l
know how much the CSSC i
to them.
BENJAMIN S. HORNSTEIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL OF
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL OF
PALM BEACH COUNTY
a limited number of applications are being accepted
for the
1981/82 School Year
PRE-SCHOOL THROUGH GRADE 8
Accredited by the Florida Council of I ndependent Schools
Mordecai Levow
Director
Dr. Howard B&J
President
2815 S li er Drive, Weal Palm Beach, Florid*
I eiephone 832 >4_J/4
NEW CAMPUS: 5801 Parker Avenue, West Palm Beach, FlorWi
A beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach CouM\


5ber9. 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
Temple Beth David Welcomes
Cantor Rackoff at Succot Services
Beth David will cele-
holidays of Succot and
orah, while simultane-
:oming our new Haz-
ltor Earl J. Rackoff.
^ill be conducted by
leader Rabbi William
the liturgy chanted
Rackoff. Succot serv-
, Monday. October 12
Iy service at 7:30 p.m.,
October 13, at 10 a.m.,
lv October 14 at 10
Sh'mini Atzeret Tues-
10 at 10 a.m. Yizkor
.tTorah service will
ay October 20 with
vice at 7:30 p.nu nd
October 21 at 10
[above services will be
. Westminster Preeby-
,X Military Trail and
id, Palm Beach Gar-
I are welcome. Please do
pie is proud in having
j services of the Can-
Earl J. Rackoff ia the
Imminent Cantor corn-
started his singing
th his father. He at-
American Theatre
i he studied voice and
addition to his own
ompU-shrut'iits, he has
conducted choirs in
peal and secular works
nces at synagogue
nd concert appearances.
bent of Ownership. Man-
lot and Circulation (re-
| by 3S USC 3888): 1-Tltle
Mention The Jewish Flo-
I of Palm Beach County
Uon No. 068-OJO. 2 Date
September SO. 1M1.I-
iency of Issue: Weekly
tr thru Mid May. Bl
r balance of year. A-No.
> published annually:
l-Annual subscription
UTS. (Location of
office of publication:
Federal Highway. Suite
i Raton. Fla. 33432. 5-
bn of headquarters of
en 120 N.E 8th Street,
J.FU 31132 6 Publisher.
, rasnaglng editor: Fred
.1NK 8w all,
Fla 33132. 7 Owner.
|K. Shochet. ;a> N.E. 6
Miami, Fla. 13112. 8-
bondholdera, mor-
and other security
holding or owning 1
ftt or more of total
I of bonds, mortgages or
curUles. If any: None.
npletlon by non-profit
ations: None. 10-Extent
eof circulation, given
Icrosr: aversge no copies
Tiue during preceding 11
i followed by actual no.
Ingle Issue published
i U> filing date: a) total
Met printed (net press
IU11. 14.500 B) paid dr-
ill: 1 sales through
and carriers, street
ind counter sales. 9,0;
ubscrlpuons: 8,708.
C| total paid clroula
f.ra. 14,013, D) free dls
jwi by mall, carrier, or
Imeans, samples, corapil-
ry and other free copies,
BU^.'Sf O^Hbutlon.
|14.01S. F | copies not (as
1) office use, ton
iwsccounted tor, spoiled
Toting. 487. 487. J) r-
wmnewsagenUO, 0. at
1. 14.800 I certify
Foments made by me
" are correct and corn-
UK Shochet publisher.
Cam tor Earl J. Backoff
Cantor Rackoff has served as
Cantor at synagogues in Little
Neck, N.Y., Forest Hills, N.Y.
and Now York City for the past
27 years and has concertized ex-
tensively in the N.Y. City metro-
politan area. The Cantor and his
wife Lillian, have recently be-
come Floridians and during this
past winter and spring session, as
a~ member of the Cantors Asso-
ciation of Greater Miami, he has
participated is a number of con-
certs with the Cantors Ensemble.
During his 20 illiustrious years
as Cantor for the Marathon Jew-
ish Community Center in Little
Neck, he founded and organized a
combined choir and thereafter a
male High Holiday Choir. One of
his most memorable accomplish-
ments was the Brotherhood Con-
cert of 1966, organized by him
and utilizing several inter-faith
choir from local churches. This
concert was attended by 1,000
persons. Upon leaving the Mara-
thon Jewish Community Center,
he spent the next 5 years at the
Forest Hills Jewish Center,
where he officiated as Cantor of
the Synagogue for the High Holy
Day Services and'was the centers
Executive Director.
A profound knowledge of bis
Jewish heritage and a strong
committment to Judaism "pir*
Cantor Rackoff a very welcome
addition to our Temple family.
We look forward to a happy and
fruitful association with Cantor
Rackoff and we warmly welcome
both the Cantor and his wife to
the community.
ZOA Opens 1981-82
Membership Campaign
Southeast Regional President
Alan Taffet announced the be-
ginning of the "Zion Year" mem-
bership campaign for the Zionist
Organization of America. Mr.
Taffet, who had just returned
from a ZOA Conference in Israel,
stated that "American Zionists
are the moot important factor in
supporting the continuous
growth of a modem, strong
Israel." He urged that the
American people at large under-
stand the strategic and cultural
ties that bind the two democra-
cies together.
Mr. Taffet reported to the
Southeast Regional group on the
extensive conference attended by
several hundred American
leaders of the Zionist Organiza-
tion. They met in Jerusalem to
confer with Israeli loaders and
government officials. The Con-
ference was addressed by Israeli
President Yitzhak Navon who
stressed the importance to Israel
of the American commitment to
World Zionism.
Other speakers included ZOA
President Ivan J. Novick who
spoke of the many successes of
the Zionist Organization of
America, such as the Masada
Youth Program, ZOA House in
Tel Aviv and the educatoinal
program at Kf ar Silver.
After the formal Conference,
the ZOA leaders toured impor-
tant Israeli settlements on the
West Bank and in Egypt.
Mr. Taffet urged all concerned
Americans to join the Zionist
Organization of America. The
ZOA has been the outspoken
leader in the vital causes that af-
fect American-Israel relations
For further information con-
tact the ZOA Southeast Regional
Headquarters at 800 West Oak-
land Park Blvd., Suite 308, Fort
Lauderdale, Fla. 33311.
UJSLMuUing its Dedsmm To
Attend EguptkMbkimU Talks
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA, -
The United States has not yet
made a decision on whether it will
be represented at the resumption
of the Egyptian-Israeli autonomy
talks, but is "considering ail
options," according to State De-
partment spokesman Dean
Fischer., and "would not rule out
the possibility" that Secretary of
State Alexander Haig.will repre-
sent Che United States.
Fischer was asked at the State
pW MMfir 4ND CHftDMN'S SMVrCf
Icom-T9 pro''**onof and counseling agency ttrving fhe
lh.iri'n"y 0f m S#och Caynty *rofea iiloblm for
h* 'he 09,09
"^ondovoJuaWon
'wunteling.
service*
Morital counseling
Parent-child conflicts.
Personal problems
Plltalt OnrtCSB:
2411
Mdl.fta.Sl
1: M4.1ttl
Nil
ho,.**' 0r# cfxr9od in family ond individual counseling to
Pv (Feei ore based on income and family sue)
** ram.
V ond Children's Service hj a beneficiary agency of
-^*fQ"0n of Polm Beoch County.'
a*
Deportment briefing whether it
would not be unusual for the
United States not to be repre-
sented at the first meetings of the
Foreign Ministers scheduled to
take place in Cairo Sept. 23-24.
HAIG WILL be at United
Nations General Assembly
meetings in New York at that
time. Egyptian Foreign Minister
KamalHassan Ali is also sched-
uled to be at the General
Assembly session at the. same
time.
Fischer replied: "We don't
regard it as particularly unusual,
because of the fact that they
(Israel ana Egypt) are signator-
ies to the Camp David treaty as
we are ourselves. The two coup-
tries do have full diplomatic
relations, they meet bilaterally at
various levels on a variety of
subjects, just as we meet bilater-
ally with each of them. We regard
these meetings as being as much
a part of our full partnership as
. the trilateral negotiating sessions
themselves."
Fischer was asked whether a
replacement for former special
Mideast Ambassador Sol
Linowit* was being considered
and he replied thst decision has
not beea made" He was asked
boot report* that the autonomy
negotiations would be held in
New York and ha said, "We have
no confirmation and no comment
on them. It is very possible that
Secretary Haig will meet with
them (the participanta) if they
______._ as v__L.

Begin has asked the Bond Or-
ganization to bring to realization
Theodor Herri's vision of a canal
from the Mediterranean to the
Dead Sea to help meet Israels
needs-
Gerald Lesher Named Palm Beach
Chainnan for State of Israel Bonds
Dr. Richard Shugarman,
(right) Criainnan of the Board for
Israel Bonds has just announced
at a recent Board of Governor?)
Breakfast that Mr. Gerald
Leaner, (left) prominent Palm
Beach Attorney hats taken on tho
task of Palm Beach County
Chairman for State of Israel
Bonds for the up coming 1961-82
Campaign.
In accepting this position Mi.
Lesher stated that "in the New
Year, Israel Bonds will face the
challenge of providing the seed
money for one of the moat ambi-
tious development projects in
Israel's history. Prime. Minister
Mr. Lesher wfinstd "Our
prayers for peace in the 5742
Must be accompanied by the re-
solve to give Israel the economic
j means to achieve a better life for
! its citizens and for all those who
come to its shores hi the year
ahead." "Through your support
of Israel Bonds we can all help to
realize the Peace and financial se-
curity so desperately needed by
Israel."
Dr. I. Goodman
Chiropractor
Boyrrton Plaza
153V. N. Causa As. (N.W. 2mJ Ava.l
Phone 737-5591
OffioeHrs
..Ta,
*ri.
1>
THE OPHTHALMOLOGY
pIZ MTCD 2MB Tenth Avenue North
V/C,N,Cn !-* Worth, Florida 33481
... will continue the eye care of the
patients of William Qemon, M.D. who
has now retired. Please call tor further
information and patient records.
I 964-0707
PHILIP PASTON, M.D. PAUL M. FEUER. M.O.
TOM M. COFFMAN, M.D. LAWRENCE B. KATZEN, MO.
MICHAEL A; HECHT O.D. Optometrist
DENTURES
Our individual custom constructed dentures
are GUARANTEED
Senior CitlH ( .TJMflerafion kV.f.i 7h,s Ac
Upper or Lower Denture
Cast Vitsllium Part
Relme
.Hep
Extraction.
.onstderation W.ir. 7h,s Ac
S1 10 c. Up
S'bu toS18(
S5(
' S
510 per 1 ootr
By Plonaa Licensed bentisi:
DR. PAUL KLEIN. D.p.l
"V. TFRRY A. HORN ADA). D.D.I.
t SON. 0 C
6890593
In Same Location Over 7 Year:.
1800 Upland Rd West Palm Beach, Fla.
i to New York.'



'HJP-
M


Pa*e 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
< Sabbtmcal at0rner
Frid>y-0(toU
Coordinated by
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman
devoted to discussion of themes and issues
relevant to Jewish life post and present
The Germans Are Here
By RABBI
SAMUEL SILVER
Reform Hebrew
Congregation of Delray
Although Reform Judaism was
born in Germany during the first
part of the Nineteenth Century, it
never took strong hold in that
land, but did become a flourish-
ing denomination in the United
States.
Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise, who
died in 1900, was the chief
organizer of the Reform move-
ment. The other Jewish groups
followed his example in creating a
union of synagogues, a seminary,
and a conference of rabbis.
Currently, we have the
fascinating phenomenon that all
three of these national institu-
tions are headed by rabbis who
came to the U.S. in flight from
Nazism.
The seminary, now called the
Hebrew Union College-Institute
of Judaism (Although a better
name would be the Wise
Academy, since it is an amalgam
of two schools founded by two
Wises, Isaac M. and Stephen S.),
has as its president Rabbi Alfred
Gottschalk, who was brought to
this country by his German par-
ents.
The synagogal association,
now called the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, boasts as
its president Rabbi Alexander
Schindler, a native of Munich.
You remember Rabbi Schindler
for his splendid statesmanship
when he was the leader of the
Conference of Presidents of
leading Jewish organizations.
And recently in Jerusalem, the
rabbinic group, now called the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis, in convention assembled,
elected as its president Rabbi
Herman Schaalman, also
originally of Munich. Schaal-
man's temple is Emanuel of
Chicago, once led by Rabbi Felix
Levy, who was also a CCAR
president. That's the same tem-
ple which confirmed another
great deceased rabbi, Maurice
Eisendrath, who led the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
for many years.
And another onetime refugee
from Nazism is in the wings,
ready to take over from Rabbi
Schaalman as head of the CCAR.
He is Rabbi Gunther Plaut, of
Holy Blossom Temple, Toronto.
elected vice-president of CCAR.
Plaut was the first rabbi to head
the Canadian Jewish Congress.
A scholar of note and a con-
summate athlete, he "drops" a
scholarly book about once a year
and eloquently lectures all over
the world.
The Germans are here,
we're lucky to have them!
And
Maccabiah Victories

Music Lovers!
"Nefesh is a very pleasant and en-
itiyable recording that can be heard
again and again, nice to own and nice
to give.
The Hebrew is Ashkarauc and the spinl is
deeply Jewish, with a reapert for Orthodox
iradiuon Thoujrh modern in approach, it of-
ten haa an OnenteJ feebng and show* a pop or
>au influence Neteaheeey to oaten to.'
Ae reviewed n HADASSAH MAUAZfNE
Kerord as available by aasal frees Nefeak.
Boa eOJH6 Waal Ead Avt,
.New York. New York I0OZS.
S&JO rovers eoateeje aee) kaeaf*
ireeraeuie sf M satatneaV
Michel* Kuvin, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Sanford Kuvin of Palm
Beach, won two silver and one bronze medal at the 11th International
Maccabiah Games in Israel this summer. Michele s international
victories came in the 200. 400. and 800 meter free style swimming
events. This years events attracted over 5.000 athletes from 35
countries. The Maccabiah is held only once every four years and is
considered a major international sporting event. Michele is continuing
her studies at the University of Indiana where she swims for the Uni-
versity team and represents them at national competitions. Michele
hopes to be competing at the World Championship Competitions to be
neld in Ecquador next summer.
*-
nnsio > m a
HAVE SON? WILL TRAVEL!
SURGICAL MOHEL
Approved by all Physicians and Habbis
Painlessly Dona According to the Highest
Hygienic Medical Standards and Halacha
HOSPITAL OR HOME
(305)052-2712
tf****************************^^
Hebrew Lessons
Conversational, reading, and writing
individual and/or group
Call 627-1172

Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
Orthodox
Altz Chaim Congregation Centurv Villa*.
Palm Beach Phone: 68*4675 Sabbath service* oV
. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m osm.i
Congregation Anshei Emuna
551 Brittany L, Kings Point, Delray Beach 33446 Phon.oai.
499-9229 Harry Silver, President Dally services 8 a m ,7.. '
Saturdays and Holidays 9a.m. ".anus.
Reform
Tempi* Israel
1901 North Flagler Drive. West Palm Beach 33407 Phon. I
8421 Dr. Irving B. Cohen, Rabbi Emeritus Dr. Richard G Shu,
man, President Stephen J. Goldstein, Administrator SabbairiS
vices, Friday 8 p.m.
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton 33432 Phone *J
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen a Sabbath!
vices Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9:15 a.m. Torah Study with i
Singer Sabbath morning services 10:30 a.m.
Temple Sinai
at St. Pauls Episcopal Church. 188 S. Swinton Ave c
Mailing address 2005 N.W. 9 Street, Delray Beach. 33444. r,
Samuel Silver President. Bernard Etlsh e Friday services ai |
p.m.
Temple Beth Torah of Palm Beach County
at St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat. Forest Hill Blvd
Wellington Trace, West Palm Beach e Mailing address: 1125,
Pine St., West Palm Beach 33411 Rabbi Edward Cohn Pre^
Ronnie Kramer (793-2700) Sabbath services, Friday al 8:15p.m.
Temple Judea
Rabbi Joel L. Levine Cantor Rita Shore Barbara
President 1407 14th Lane, Lake Worth, PI. 33463'Phone
7778 Services Friday evenings at 8 p.m. e Meeting at .
Catherines Greek Orthodox Church Social Hall 4000 VVashingta
Rd at Southern Blvd.
Conservative Liberal
Temple Eternal Light
at Boca West Community UMC. 8900 Boca West Glades floadr
west of Boca Turnpike) The Free Synagogue, P 0 Box 3,
Raton 33432* Phone:368-1600.391-1111 e Rabbi Beniamm Rosayni
Sabbath services. Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Conservative
Golden Lakes Temple
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., W. Palm Beach. Fi 33411 Rabbi Josephl
Speiser President: William M. Mach 684-1968.
Temole Beth El
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach 33407 Phone:
Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch. Cantor Elaine Shapiro
Shabbath Evening Service at 8:15 p.m. in
The Sanctuary. Saturday morning at 9:30 a.m Daily Minyanat&i
a.m.. Sunday and Legal Holidays at 9:00a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5848 Grove Street. West Palm Beach 33409 Phone684-3212<
hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman Cantor Mor,
Spektor Services daily 8:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m Fndav. 3:30 Ha.-
p.m. iate services 8:15 p.m. followed by Oneg Shabbai Saturday.m
a.m.. 7 p.m. Mincha followed by Sholosh Seudos.
Congregation Beth Kodesh
at Congregational Church, 115, N. Federal Hwy.. Boynton Bex*'
r-none 737-4622 Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin Sabbath services. FrnJirj
8:15 p.m. Saturday 9a.m.
Temple Beth Sholom
315 N A' Street, Lake Worth 33460 Phone 585-5020 *!
Emanuel Eisenberg e Cantor Jacob Elmart Services Mondays Wl
Thursday at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m.
u. Temple Beth David
at Westminister Presbyterian Church. 10410 N. Military Trail I
Beach Gardens. Office at 321 Northlak* Blvd., North I-,
Beach Phone:845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Sabbath *rvK*l
Friday at 8 p.m.. Saturday 10 a.m.
v>a a.... Temple Beth Sholom
224 N.W. Avenue G\ Belle Glade 33430 Cantor Jack SUl**'
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
Temple B'nai Jacob
at Faith United Presbyterian Church. 276 Alemeida Drive.
Springs 33461 Tempi. B'aai Jacob. President Jacob Frant P
964-0034 Sabbath fMrvicM. Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday at 9 a* I
days and Thursdays at 9 a.m.
.,.,...... B'nai Torah Congregation J
HOI N.W. 4th Avenue, Boca Raton 33432?Phone: 932-8566 *
Nathan Zelizer. Sabbath services, FridayS:l5p.m. Saturday 9:30w I
ntltSSf! Em,th of *" Ww Hebrew Congregation #
o-T^T A"n"c Avenue, Delray Beach 33448 Phone: 496**
Rabbi Bernard Silver Cantor Benjamin Adler Sabbath t*"
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Dally Mlnyans at-8:45*m ""'
ion m..k o Temple Emanu-EI _.-
RaThh? Ih,^unly nMd' p"" Beeor. 33480 Phone: 832**,
F^v s^L?""1"'Cantor David Dardashti Sabbath #*
naay 8:3 P-m. Saturday at 9 a.m.
Temple Beth Zlon
8urdayU9 a7?! "T*HB D' Ry" Pa"" 8-'Ch ^^ ^


y, October 9,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
Local Synagogue News
TEMPLE JUDEA
Mple Judea will celebrate
Ch of its religious school
Sukkot Services, Monday
' o 12 at 8 p.m. in the
Zn Academy Theatre, 807
Flaeler Drive. Rabbi Joel
1 and Cantor Rita Shore
[conduct a special musical
Lny consecrating nursery
U high school students.
Harvey Levine, principal and
. Hujsa, school chairperson
jrticipate as pulpit guests.
L 12 is a very special date
the congregation. The first
was conducted four
Ihs aeo on June 12. Sine*
[Temple Judea has over 70
*n and teenagers in its
and over 175 families m
the congregation.Nursery
through eighth grades meet at
the Jewish Community Center
while grades nine through 12
meet one semester in the North
End and one semester in the
South End. A very active youth
program for both junior high and
high school age students is under
the direction of Sherry Mittel-
dorf. Barbra Kaplan will be assis-
ting Mrs. Mitteldorf in a special
Oppressed Jewry Rally led by
members of the youth group
during Simchat Torah Services.
Monday, Oct. 19 at 8 p.m. at
Rosarian.
During the Sukkot Services,
teachers will be recognized for
their service to the congregation.
The Temple Judea faculty in-
cludes Joan Levine, Miriam Ruiz.
Community Calendar
,1.9
JreeSonsof Israel 12:30 p.m.
_J.I1
.DERATION COMMUNITY MISSION TO ISRAEL THROUGH OCT.
J! Women's American ORT Evening Jewish Community
Center Sukkot Celebration 1-5 p.m. Golden Lakes Temple
Sisterhood 10 am B'na.i B'nth Women Mitzvah Council 10
i m Temple Israel Men's Club Annual Connie Ganz Memorial
bolt Tournament 10 a. m.
12
lukkot Eve free Sons of Israel Six Day trip to Smokey Mts
Vomen's American ORT Mid Palm Board B'nai B'rith
fcomen Boynton Beach 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith 2969 Board -
lp m 'Women's American ORT Lake Worth West 1 2:30 p.m.
[Hadossoh Tamor Board 9:45 a.m. United Order of True
[sters 61 Board 10 am and Meeting 12:30 p. m. B'nai B'rith
4b Board 3pm Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood Sukkot
irly
let. 13
ukkot Free Sons of Isroel Board 10 a.m. Hadassah Lee
Boord 10 am Hadassah Henrietta Szole Board 1
Bnai B'rith Women Masada Board 8 p.m. B'nai
I'mh Women Menorah
let. 14
|ukkot FEDERATION CAMPAIGN CABINET DINNER MEETING -
15 pm Temple Beth David Sisterhood Board 7:30 p.m.
fotionol Council of Jewish Women Okeechobee Unit Trip to
bhiti Village B'nai B'rith 3046 8 p.m. Temple Israel Men's
t'ub Boord -8pm.
IS
lodossoh Yovel 12 noon Labor Zionist Alliance 1 p.m.
National Council of Jewish Women Okeechobee Unit 1:30
|m B'nai B'rith Women Ohav Board 9:30 a.m. Hadassah
|Golda Meir 12 30 p.m Congregation Anshei Sholom Board
I p.m Temple Beth Sholom Board 9:30 a.m. FEDERATION
OCAl CONCERNS TASK FORCE 12 NOON.
16
emple Beth David Sisterhood Gorage Sale B'nai B'rith
jfomen 01am Board 10:30 a m. FEDERATION COMMUNITY
EIATIONSCOUNCIL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 12 NOON.
17
^DERATION LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT 8 p.m.
1.18
[noi B'rith 3113 9:30 a.m. Temple Beth Sholom Men'sClub -
n FEDERATION YOUNG ADULTS 10 a.m.-12 Noon.
1.19
*"sh Family and Children's Service Board 7:30 p.m.
|oneer Women Ezrat Board 10 a.m. Hadassah Tikvah -
|30 p m Women's American ORT Palm Beach Board 10
h1 Temple Beth David Men'sClub 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith
omen Menorah Boord 10 am Temple Beth Torah
I'terhood Simchat Torah Consecration Temple Israel
'od 11 a.m. Temple Israel Board 8 p.m.
t. 20
MINI ATZERETH Temple Beth David Boord 8 p.m.
aossah Henrietta S7old Education Day 1 p. m. B'nai B'rith
W Board 10 am Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary 408
S??;."1, TemP'e Beth El Sisterhood
l",h Women
pynton Beach
|na'B'nth 3041 -
.2l
CHAT TORAH
%,TTK"6p.m
. D'RECTORS
l"h Board
Sukkot 8 p.m. B'nai
Choi 8 p.m. Women's American ORT
12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Medino
8p.m.
FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION EXECUTIVE
FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION BOARD
8 p.m. Brandeis University Women Lake
10 a.m. B'nai B'rith 3115-8 p.m. Pioneer
Pol "n Golda Mir Board 1 p.m. Women's American ORT
m Beach County Region Boord 9:30 o m.
Ml
WjH hME FOR THE AGED BARD OF TRUSTEE 8 p.m.
b ln_ AI|yapO'd up membership Noon Hadassah Chai
Women's American ORT Century Pioneer
p.m.
|I2:30
V>ord aCyp,es* Loke* 1 p.m. Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood
[rtv. ftLP 'm- Bno' B'rim Women Motada Lunch and Card
.ITERATION COMMUNITY RELATIONS COUNCIL 1 2 Noon.
Marcy Fine, liana Gellis, Preston
Mighdoll, Susan Codkind,
Jeanne Schupper, Betty Kletter,
and Henry Desmon. The Sister-
hood will provide a special recep-
tion following services in Rosar-
ian's social hall and patio. Sheryl
Davidoff is Sisterhood President.
For more information about the
school, call Dr. Levine at 622-
0864 or the office at 965-7778.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Temple Beth David Sisterhood
Incredible Garage Sale Friday,
Oct. 16, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
new and used items, household
goods, baby items, furniture,
clothing, beer can collection and
more. 4305 Hickory Drive, Palm
Beach Gardens.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Under the leadership of Nancy
Rat nor and Ruth Levow (staff di-
rector) the adult education insti-
tute of Temple Beth El is offering
the following courses for the fall
semester, Oct. 26 through Dec. 7.
The fee is SI0 per course for tem-
ple members and non-members
the fee is $20 per course.
Life Passages (sociological,
psychological and Jewish per-
spectives. This is a new course in
seven sessions). Guest teachers-
speakers will be. Monday Oct. 26,
7:30 p.m. Keynote Address, Dr.
Alvin Rosen; Nov. 2, 7:30 p.m.,
Mid Life Assessment, Dr. Myles
Cooley; Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m..
Strengthening Family Life, Dr.
Robert Alsofrom; Nov. 16, 7:30
p.m.. What Do We expect of our
Marriage. Dr. Elizabeth S. Frei-
lich; Nov. 23, 7:30 p.m., Judaism
and Life Passages, Rabbi H.
Hirsch; Nov. 30, 7:30 p.m.. Being
Single. Divorced, Widowed in a
Couple Society, Dr. Norma
Schulman, Dec. 7, 7:30 p.m., Re-
capping and Summarizing, Dr.
Elizabeth S. Freilich and Rabbi
H. Hirsch.
Operation Aleph-Bet (Be-
ginner's Hebrew for Reading).
Mondays begins Oct. 26 at 7:30-
9:30 p.m. Tziporah Poel; Tues-
days begins Oct. 27, 10-11:30
a.m., Doris Singer; Thursdays,
begins Oct. 29, from 4 p.m. to
5:30 p.m., Sam Wadler.
Conversational Hebrew
(Habet u'Shma). Mondays be-
ginning Oct. 26, 7:30-9 p.m.,
Shoshana Wolner.
Advanced Hebrew IB'vad
Hakuhon), Mondays begins Oct.
26, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Renee
Seal.
Great Books and Ideas of the
Jewish People A bird's eye
view basic to understanding
contemporary Judaism, Rabbi H.
Hirsch. Tuesdays, begins Oct. 27,
12 noon-1 p.m. Bring a daily
lunch.
Adult Bar-Bat Mitzvah an
overview of Judaism, prayers,
laws and customs. Thursdays,
begins Oct. 29, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.,
Cantor Elaine Shapiro.
Women's Discovery One a
month on eve of the new moon
women gather to celebrate song,
prayer and bubbe meises
(stories), Tuesdays, Oct. 27, Nov.
24. Thursday, Dec. 24, 7:30 p.m.
to9 p.m., Cantor Elaine Shapiro.
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISHOLOM
Congregation Anshei Sholom
is again conducting its Adult
School of Jewish Studies under
the supervision of Rabbi Harry Z.
Schectman. Classes are open to
the public free of charge. Only
those who have never attended
classes at Anshei Sholom, and
non-members, will pay a $5 regis-
tration fee, and can register for
any or all classes. Registration
will be held the last week in Octo-
ber from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. The
first sessin will be held on
Wednesday, Nov. 4, in an indoc-
trination assembly.
Following are the courses
offered:
Elementary Sidur Reading
Intermediate Sidur Reading; Ad
vanced Sidur Reading
Elementary Hebrew Language
Intermediate Hebrew Language
Advanced Hebrew Language
Jewish Customs and Ceremonies
Prophets in Israel; Jewish Per
sonalities of the 19 and 20 Cen
turies; The Five Scriptural Books
(Megillohs); Talmud (Mishne-
Sanhedrin); and Yiddish Lan-
guage.
IEVTTT -WBNSTBN
MEMOMALOMPBA
Servtng the greater Florida area
In the finest of Jewish tmdttion.
WEST BUM BEACH 6896700
DELfW BEACH 278-7600
Mil Okeedwbc
BflGnnriow
ADMINISTRATOR
Jack Sanders F.D. Julian Almeida F
Pre Arranged Funerals Available Thru
Guaranteed Security Plan
"Wfe've discovered j
THE MENORAH I
PRE NEED PLAN.
And all the satisfaction, ^
thoughtfulness ^
and financial value m
of pit need planning!' J
"Pre-need arrangements have given us peace of mind, the right to make
our own choices and a cost set at today's prices. And at Menorah, the
traditions of our faith will be upheld. "
The Menorah Pre-Need Plan offers these guarantees:
ALL PAYMENTS are held in trust and are TOTALLY REFUNDABLE
ALL CONTRACT FORMS are APPROVED BY the office of the
FLORIDA INSURANCE COMMISSIONER
Interest free payments for up to five years
Funds may be used toward funeral expenses both locally and
out-of-state
Only the purchaser can cancel for reasons other than non-payment
To learn more about the Menorah Pre-Need Plan, just fill out and
J return this coupon to:
I Menorah Chapels, 6800 W. Oakland Park Boulevard,
| Fort Lauderdale, FL 33313. Attn: Pre-Need Director.
| I WOULD LIKE MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE MENORAH
a PRE-NEED PLAN. I UNDERSTAND IT IS AT ABSOLUTELY NO
J COST OR OBLIGATION TO ME.
NAME_________________________________________________________JZ_
| ADDRESS____________________._____;____________________
I CITY_________________
I TELEPHONE__________
STATE.
ZIP.
AGE.
The Menorah
Pre-Need Plan.
Servirxj chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
In Broward, 742-6000. In Dade, 945-3939.
In Palm Beach, 833-0887.
And coming soon to North Miami Beach.
Menorah Chapels Cemetery Counseling Service is available at no charge.


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian ofFalm Beach Comity
FritU
y.OctoUr}]
& NOMTONl
IJ3S
I CO'.. UiMTID WAJMUMTY
& SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
oaatH rm. inxinmcu.
Iinlmi Hi'U Mtum.
X
^{g!fit
YOUR
REFUNDED
Mr nut f owvMHy s^isl^ft *.th >y
,ri i. Ittr yni laiy In mi NnHui In* f.o irlmn
y(H)< OOf** WftCt
*30 0*yo<*
".I ynut tionrv wit r irfiMM ** r
?^MW
*ll*
(
A*
rW
I I 4 i
.44'
I 4 I
VERstf
1*4*
I 4 t I
I J *
i'
PFGoodrich
V**fi!
ttlW
BELTED
CLM
A STRONG, STABLE
TIRE AT A MOST
AFFORDABLE PRICE
P155/80B13
F.ET
SIZE
P.65/80B13
31.48
PT75/80B13
33.24
PT85/75B14
37.10
PT95/75B14
38.85
P205/75B14
39.90
P215/75B14
41.20
P225/76B14
4331
P205/75B15
39.67
P215/75B15
42.37
P225/75B15
44.48
P-METWC
POLVSTERCORB
RKKUSS
par
FACTORY
wnthmlls
Fiberglass cord
belts for-strength
and stability
Polyester cord body
lor a smooth quiet
ride
Belted construction
for good mileage
and traction
Wide whrtewall lor
up-to date styling
KFGoodrich
UFESAVER
XLM
P-METRIC
FACTORY wf^. n %
IVWUTEWMLS ^n 4
P235/75B15
_PWCJ_
46.58
-ELL
t 56
t 65
t 77
2 01
X' RADIAL WWTEWALLS
SIZE
P155/80R13
P195/75-14
ER78-14
FR78-14
P205/75-14
205x14
P205/75-15
GR78-15
GR70-15
2 '4
224
2 4b
2 t3
2 40
P215/75-15
215x15
2 56
2 77
SIZE
PRICE F.ET
P195/70R13 52.88
P205/70R13 54.36
24
2 n
P205/70R14I 59.21
2 35
P175/75R14! 49.41
1 88
P185/75R14I 54.36
2 04
P215/75R14
P215/75R15
P225/75R14
P205/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
P155/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
61.74
62.89
67.28
64.16
66.69
69.11
74.06
46.89
50.56
51.84
2 2b
2.1/
2 52
74
2',0
264
2 85
PRICE
49.05
69.53
71.17
71.17
62.19
74.11
78.12
FE.T.
1 46
2 22
260
254
2.51
251
2 55
2 95
81.51
291
78.12
2 75
64.03
84.41
66.00
72.81
Limited qu.inlilies
291
2 95
334
336
xvs
RMCHELIN TUBELESS
19570 t4 205/70 14
94? 101??
MICHELIK
XCA UGHT
TRUCK TIRES
Sl/I
700-15
t ply lutmloM
750 16
> lypu
800-16 5
875 16 5
H ply IhIh-I. ss
950 16 5
H.H II' ply I lnan
10-16.5
|lll ll'll-V>
_MCf_
77.66
96.30
96.85
104.81
125.58
124.64
in.
3 04
4 14
J88
4 271
4 88
506
4 88
XZX TUBELESS
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
155 12
145x13
155-13
30b
1 'II
WclWMiMASriRURO VISA
*IRICNfr|S!>
DIKIH SClUI
CORAL OABICS MIAlf AM/AU.M ..-INQ. Mill
"OBTM MIAMI MIAMI aiupoRT
NW -.,.,.. NW,.,Sl A M-....N,.., M ,,...... ,.
. N MIAMI IUC. wt.T M,AMI
"""*' ".....' '*'* ...!*<........H. ,, .
MIAMI ilACH "tNDAll OB /MIOATt BOUAIH
*'"'........"' "'>v ami. st ,-,,
IOUTM DADI MOMtBTlAD
"""'' "....."~ '*' '' HIHXIS iMtnlNn ,,.
cutiia ooi w Koumooo
/ui'K.S !.,., ..,, M-IM-.I /*.......... / M'o..,,
FT lAUDiHOAll
< I .....
TRX RADIAL
& MAG WHEEL
check our stores to see if
these will tit your model car
190 65R390BLACK
?20 55R390WHirF
SPECIAL
PRICE
l ANTAtlON
'' N Sli,| ,.H, JM<
TAMAMAC
..... .
IAMAHAC
--. :> lIMrlHi |, ,
|OM..NO II.CH
'' I.......-. Vf .1 PAIM HACK
'' '....." >44
lAKi MMK/N lM mitlCH
WN !.., |ii, 4H 4J
MIWIIIOM.CK
165x13
165.14
175-14
165 -15
175/70-13
185/70x13
185/70.14
_PRJE_
40.67
37.59
42.90
48.13
50.16
54.85
53.24
57.85
64.02
68.31
i
I 39
1 32
t 48
I 61
t 73
206
I 81
I 73
t 90
206
ri rnancf
/MM >. .|h ., s, K4 M.I. i
vinoiucH
- n/4
* OPILAMOO
MM, Ml
WNI|. >,
OATTONA II1CH
I4B/
NAn.
. 444,


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E79GI4KPF_XI84IN INGEST_TIME 2013-07-17T23:21:01Z PACKAGE AA00014311_00258
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES