Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00254

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
ewis,
.ondliami
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUt VOICI" nd "FEDATION RIPOtTEI"
in conjunction with The Jtwith Federation if Pah* fetch Comity
.7 Number 17
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, August 21,1981
CfndSKocfyi
Price 35 Cent*
Ehrlich Terms Saudi Plan a Turning Point
By GIL SEDAN
^RUSALEM Uty Premier Simcha Ehrlich
described the Middle East
ce plan proposed by Saudi
bia as a turning point,"
that "this is the first time
country (Saudi Arabia)
Iks of Israel's right to exist."
, he added, despite this "we
jld not be too excited. It is
new plan and its aim is to
! about the end of Israel" by
I stages.
fchrlich offered this view at the
meeting of the new Cabinet
ch he chaired in the absence of
nier Menachem Begin who is
Ktioning in Nahariya. He was
ing to one of the eight
i in the plan which called for
nteeing the rights of all
in the area to "live in
'." The plan, which was pro-
by Saudi Crown Prince
in an interview with the
il Saudi News Agency last
It, did not specifically refer to
Israel by name. The plan also did
not mention the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization.
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Sha-
mir, who briefed the Cabinet on
the plan, was highly critical of it.
In an interview in Yediot Ach-
ronot he said there was nothing
new in the plan. "Even the
implied Saudi willingness to
recognize Israel is not new," Sha-
mir said. "The plan and all its
details are dangerous to Israel.
We rejected it in the past and we
reject it now."
Leaders of the Labor Party re-
jected most of the points in
Fahd's plan but welcomed the
part which spoke of the right of
people in the region to live in
peace. Party chairman Shimon
Peres also told Yediot that the
plan "includes one new element-
willingness to reach peace with
Israel. The other points, such as
Israel returning to its 1967
borders, establishment of a Pal-
estinian state and dividing Jeru-
salem (with East Jerusalem as
the capitol of a Palestinian state)
are old proposals and it is incon-
ceivable that Israel will accept
them." He added that "dictating
preconditions will only block
peace. The Saudis should know
what Israel can and cannot
accept. Their conditions are un-
acceptable."
Former Premier Yitzhak Rabin
also told Yediot that the Saudi
plan must be rejected. "But
Saudi Arabia's readiness to be
involved in efforts to resolve the
Arab-Israeli dispute is very posi-
tive," he said. We should there-
fore reject the plan but call on
Saudi Arabia to negotiate with
Israel"
Most of Monday's Cabinet ses-
sions were devoted to adminis-
trative matters. Ten Deputy
Ministers the highest number
ever to serve in a Cabinet in
Israel's history were ao-
Continued on Page 2
re Went to Israel Last Year on The
lewish Federation of Palm Beach
bounty's Community Mission...
io Did We..
A id
4*
ton't You
swish Federation of Palm Beach County's Annual CommunitMission
-tober 11-21
>st:$900 per person double occupancy, New York, New York
[eludes five-star hotels, three meals per day and daily touring
[Igibility requirements: Minimum commitment to the 1982 Jewish
1eratlon-ujA Campaign
>ns Gift $1,500, Spouse's Gift $500, Singles Gift $1,500
*nd Simchat Torah in Israel
further information contact The Jewish Federation office 832-2120
U.S. Studying
Fahd's Proposal
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The State Department said it was
studying an eight-point proposal
for Middle East peace proposed
by Crown Prince Fahd of Saudi
Arabia.
But the Department's deputy
spokesman, Allan Romburg, said
that the United States has seen
nothing but press reports about
Fahd's proposal which said that
the Arab states would accept
United Nations Security Council
Resolutions recognizing Israel's
rights to "live in peace' if Israel
withdrew from the administered
territories and a Palestinian state
was established there.
Romburg also said that the
United States had heard "noth-
ing from the Saudis" about
Fahd's reported threat to cancel a
visit to the United States in
October unless the United States
changed its policy on Israel. t
Both Israel and Egyptian-
President Anwar Sadat have re-
jected Fahd's Mideast peace pro-
posal. While the Israelis saw
some progress in Fahd's proposal
to recognize the Jewish State,
Sadat said on NBC-TV's "Meet
the Press" that this proposal was
nothing new. Instead, he urged
the Saudis to join in the Camp
David peace process.
Sadat indicated that Fahd
made his proposals at this time in
response to Sadat's own trip to
Washington where he urged the
Reagan Administration, as the
Inext step in the Mideast process,
to begin talks with the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
However, there is some belief
hat this is part of the effort to
give the Saudis a moderate image
n order to convince Congress not
to reject the Administration's
proposal to seU five AW ACS re-
connaissance planes to Saudi
Arabia. Administration spokes-
men have stressed in recent
weeks the help Saudi Arabia gave
the United States to achieve the
ceasefire across the Israel-
Lebanon border.
Sharon Reports
Signs Of
Shooting
On Border
i
TEL AVIV Defense Minis-
ter Ariel Sharon told the Knesset
that Jordan was a "Palestinian
State" and Israel would not allow
the estannshment of another Pal-
estine State on the Weat Bank.
. Bkaron was making his first
address*) the Knesset in his new
capacity aa Defense Minister,
'replying to Parliamentary ques-
tions.
Sharon said that there were
signs of a renewal of shooting on
Israel's northern border at the
Palestinians were fortifying their
positions there and building up
stocks of arms and ammunition.
Referring to his inspection of
the northern area Sharon said Is-
rael had no intention of "putting
towns and industries in the north
underground." He said ways
would be sought to ensure normal
.life and production under shell-
fire.
Sharon said that during his
tour he had ordered contractors
to start the immediate con-
struction of blast and safety
walls around BRU educational
institutions in the north.
Plan to Attend!
J?2%

November 4.1981
- JEWISH
~ WOMEN'S
ASSEMBLY
HYATT-PALM BEACHES
8 43 mm 2:15 pm


Pag*2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Frida
Oral History Project Receives
Matching Grant From B'nai Zion
Rep. Qay Shaw Announces
Grant to Florida
y, August 2l,i
B'nai Zion Foundation, Inc. of munity's effort aa perhaps the
New York has awarded a match- beginning of a documentation of
ing grant to the Oral History, the American Jewish experience
Project of the Jewish Federation: in South Florida, that will assist
of Palm Beach County, which is not only the local communities,
also receiving major support for but also serve to update the
this work from the Florida En-1 records of museums and inati-
dowment for the Humanities.'tutions of learning throughout
This project will chronicle the the world who are interested in
history of the Jewish Community this rapidly-growing vital center
of Palm Beach County and pre- of Jewish life."
sent this information to the The Jewish Federations proj-
public through a series of tele- ^ of compiling the hisU)rv of the
casts. The lustory will be based Jewish SSnto of Palm
on personal reminiscences which Beach ^^ b collecting oral
will be put on tape, transcribed to
manuscripts and archived in a
number of libraries throughout
the country.
B'nai Zion is an American
Zionist Fraternal Organization
which was organized in New York
State seventy two years ago. It is
one of three non-political Zionist
organizations in the world, and is
dedicated to the centrality of the
State of Israel and to the pro-
tection of Jewish rights all over
the world. B'nai Zion supports
many institutions in Israel
among them homes for retarded
children in Rosh Ha-Ayin and
Kfar Ha-Shvedi in Jerusalem. It
also supports medical centers
throughout Israel including a re-
cently dedicated Kupat Holim
Meuchedet in Jerusalem.
One of B'nai Zion's major proj-
ects involves support of the Beit
Hatfuzot, Museum of the Dia-
spora, located on the grounds
of Tel Aviv University. This mu-
seum tells the story of Jewish
communities throughout the
world over the time span which
includes all Jewish history. The
auditorium in the Beit HaTfuzot
Museum has been named for Paul
Safro, past-president of B'nai
Zion. When asked about B'nai
Zion's interest in the Palm Beach
County Jewish community, Mr.
Safro stated, "The present sup-
port by B'nai Zion of this oral
history project is not only con-
sistent with its interest in pre-
serving Jewish identity an*?, the
Jewish experience, but also rep-
resents the beginning of an or-
ganized study of the Jewish com-
munity of South Florida. I un-
derstand that Palm Beach
County is the first Jewish com-
munity in South Florida to
munity in South Florida to un-
dertake an Oral History Proj-
ect, and we are confident that it
researchers in the United States
and throughout the world."
Alan L. Shulman, past-presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, who was
instrumental in calling the B'nai
Zion Foundation's attention to
the Oral History Project, re-
marked, "I view our com-
-----~ 1-----------1
I
histories is being funded by
grants from the Florida Endow-
ment for the Humanities and the
B'nai Zion Foundation, Inc. The
work is being conducted in con-
junction with the American Jew-
ish Committee with additional
support from the National En-
dowment for the Humanities, the
Endowment of the Jewish Fed-
eration and through the co-
operation of WPTV-Channel 5.
For further information about
this project, please call the Jew-
ish Federation.
WASHINGTON The
Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Services
has been awarded a grant of
$13,300 for fiscal year 1981 from
the Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) to assist the state
in continuing and maintaining its
comprehensive pesticide cer-
tification program, U.S. Rep.
Clay Shaw (R., Fla.) has an-
nounced.
Public,
private, and com-
mercial applicators of restrirw I
use pesticides are certfodZ
regulated by the DeZL2
Federal funds havT^
supplemented financing fw lu
Department's certificatkm
gram, run by a staff of six
staff- is complemented by (
inspectors around the state. j
Certification is granted by the
Department only after a dm!
onstration of competency by th
applicator.
Turning Point
Continued from Page 1
pointed. Observers said the large I M"
number of deputies, named to
satisfy the demands of Likud's ,
coalition partners in return for j
their support, may create some I
financial difficulties for Finance
Minister Yoram Aridor who re-
cently ordered a freeze on added
expenditures and personnel in the
government.
Economists calculated that the
10 deputies will cost some seven
to 10 million Shekels a year. This
includes their annual salaries, full
staffs with aides and secretaries,
office space and equipment. Sev-
eral deputies are already balking
at Begin s announcement last
week that Deputy Ministers will
not be entitled to use government
cars for transportation but will
have to use their own cars or
travel by taxis.
The Deputy Ministers are: Dr.
Yehuda Ben Meir (National
Religious Party), Deputy Foreign
Miriam Glazer-Tassa
(Likud) Education; Pessach
Grupper (Liberal Party) and
Michael Dekel (Likud), Agricul-
ture; Moshe Katzav (Likud).
Housing; Haim Druckman
(NRP), Religious Affairs;
Aharon Uzzan (Tami), Absorp-
tion; Bens ion Rubin (Tami),
Labor and Special Welfare; Dov
Shilansky (Likud), Premier's
Office; and Da'vid Shiftman
(Likud), Transportation.
The Cabinet also approved the
establishment of the Ministry of
Tourism as a separate Ministry.
It had been previously part of the
Trade and Industry Ministry.
The Cabinet also approved that
the name of the Religious Minis-
try be changed to Ministry for
Religious Affairs. It was also de-
cided by the Cabinet to transfer
Project Renewal from the Pre-
mier's Office to the Ministry of
Construction.
TUNE IN TO
L'Chayim
"The Jewish Listener's Digest
An Exciting New Radio Maga/rnt
Sundays, 10:30 a.m
WPBR 1340 AM
Sponsored by the Jewish Federuticn
of Palm Beach County
'Secure Israel9 Program
AFFIX
LABEL
HERE
NEW YORK The Jewish
Labor Committee has reported a
new national program to organize
grassroots support for Israelis
security.
According to the report in the
current JLC News, the labor for a
secure Israel" program will seek
to develop support for Israel
"within government and the
general community by mobilizing
labor in areas of the country
where the Jewish community is
weak and where labor has
strength and influence."
According to the report, Pat
Porter, a former staff member of
the department of professional
employes, ALF-CIO has been
named director of the project,
which is headquartered in Wash-
ington.
The report said that among the
states under consideration for the
activities of the new program are
Maine, New Hampshire, Ver-
mont, Louisiana, Arkansas, Ala-
bama, Montana, Idaho, Wyo-
ming, North and South Dakota,
Iowa, New Mexico, Nevada and
Utah.
While the project is still in its
initial stages, the report said,
Mrs. Porter has already ad-
dressed state AFL-CIO conven-
tions in Idaho and Arkansas and
has met with officials of the Lou-
isiana AFL-CIO to talk about
Israels security needs. The re-
port said all three state AFL-CIO
labor bodies have expressed their
support for the project and have
agreed to participate in its activi-
ties.
Tune in to 'MOSAIC
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Sponsored by
The Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Sunday morning over WPTV Chamal S, at 8:30 am.
wHhhoatt Barbara Shutmaw and Slaw Gordon
SUNDAY AUGUST 23 Edna Hfcel
SUNDAY AUGUST 30 Dennis Prager
S* hmtur By Sat unarm daaign by Carol lavofcl
The Committee for the Jewish Home for the Aged
has speakers available to present the plans for the
Home to interested community organizations and
groups. For further information call Mr. Adler at
*32-2120.
I
I
I Torahs Recovered


i
PLEASE HELP US
TO SERVE YOU BETTER
J*ytWtFkxkJlmn
501 South Ftagif Or
TMNITLI
W Ptlm 8men, ft 33401
I
I

CENTEREACH, L.I. Two
Torahs stolen from the Temple
Beth Shalom in Smithtown, L.I.
last June have been recovered
and three Centereach teenagers
have been charged with the bur-
glary, the Suffolk County police
said.
The Torahs, valued at $16,000,
were found buried in a dump in a
heavily wooded area, the police
said. Still missing are the Torah
crowns and breast plates and of-
fice equipment that was taken in
the June 15 robbery. The total
,oes was estimated at $50,000.
A spokesman for the conserva-
tive Synagogue said that the
value of the missing items were
"overstated" and said he prefer-
red not to speak about the case.
He said however that "the entire
(Police) Department has done a
beautiful job" in helping to re-
cover the lost items.
K
-::
The Jewish Home for the Aged of Palm Beach County must be built to meet the |
urgent and growing needs of our Jewish aged.
forth^Horne8 "^ ** ^^ JeWi8h Community to support the capital fund drive
You have the unique opportunity to select a unit in the building to honor your
family name; or to pay tribute to departed loved f +*.
E!S3ES?wiU remain in **"***as *" ***n *
TYPICAL UNITS AVAILABLE FOR
MEMORIAL OR DEDICATIONS
Solariums(6) * Double Rooms (39) l wnno
Single Rooms (42) ?'
Double Room Furnishings (39) ?'boo
Single Room Furnishings (42) J^OO
Guardians
Builders
each
each
each
each
each
::
8
5,000
1.000
Also available:
i&iZSJKE?wing8> PavUioM -nd "~ ** -* "*- -
| CALL 832-2120 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.


tewish Floridian of Palm BeachCounty
Page 3
MAKE SECONDARY EDUCATION PRIMARY"
IDRASHA JUDAIC A HIGH SCHOOL
A COMMUNITY PROGRAM
FOR JEWISH STUDIES
i
TTModern Conversational Hebrew
^T Jewish Drama and Literature
w Jewish History
>C Jewish Law
w Holocaust Studies
m Understanding Judaism
ISRAEL SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
HIGH SCHOOL GRADES 9-12
MONDAY EVENINGS 7:00-9:30 PM
Dr. Haviva Langenaucr,
Director
For information contact:
Jewish Federation 832-2120
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
l:n cooperation with the Jewish Community Day School
tnd Local Synagogues


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, Augo*,,^!
Jewish Floridian
i
o Nn Baacn County
Camemnj Our vea' and -Federation
PBEO K SMOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHCT
Edrior ana Putnener Enom Ednor
Pweiiienerj B-Weatiy -Second Claw Poetaoe PaM at Boca
FradSnocftat
RONNIE TARTAMXM
NavaCoon
Fia USPSMMO30
PALM KACH^OCA RATON OFFICE
32C0 H Federal Hwy. Boca Raton. Fia. *3i Pnona 3K-20O1
Maw Orf.ee a Plant tMN E WfiSt M*m. Fi J3101 Pnona 373-aSOi
Piilmin Fene7a,.e^ie*ea+aaWMa^i.PO.e^ai.r%eead.rie-
Confcmed Jeaian metal Jaaiati Federation of PaM Bead Count., mc Otnoar* Praamant, Jaan-
na Lavy Vice PraawMntt Awe Enoatatein Arnold J iminiaii. 0> Ricnard Snugarman. Barbara
Snuiman Mortimer Weree Secretary. Barbara Tanen. Treaaurer. Ahnn WMeneky. Executive Director
Hormen J Sctwmalman Submn material lor publication to Room Tartako* OvacWr ot Pub
KaMBMt
Jeanan Ftondian doe* not guarantee Kaanrutn at Merchendtee Adyertraed
SUBSCRIPTION Rataa Local Area U Annual (2 Year Minimum 17 SO), or by memoerenip Jewien
Federation of Palm Baacn County. 901 S FMoMr Or. Meet Palm Baacn. Fia 33401 Pnona
832 2120 Out ot Tow Upon Reaueet
21 AB 5741
Number 17
Friday, August 21,1981
Volume 7
A Difference In Perspective
The signing of the accord on the Sinai does two things
in the process of the implementation of the Camp David
agreement. Most obviously, it establishes a peace-keeping
force according to the terms of the agreement, which the
Soviets have done everything in their power to frustrate.
While the force will not be a genuinely United Nations or-
ganization, with international representation to maintain
the provisions of the historic Israel-Egypt accord, this
may in itself be a positive outcome of the Soviet maneu-
vering and a more certain guarantee of its success. In
retrospect, the Soviets have merely assured their isolation
from the peace-keeping process, a result which both signa-
tories and the United States are likely to applaud.
The second thing that the signing of the accord does
is to set up the machinery that will have Israel cede the
last part of the Sinai in April, 1982. thus returning the
entire peninsula to the Egyptians, which the Israelis cap-
tured in the 1967 war and have occupied since then, piece-
meal most recently.
Now that the signing itself has occurred, the Middle
East comes into an even more dangerous period vis-a-vis
peace between Israel and Egypt than existed before. The
reason is rooted in the different perspectives held by the
signatory parties on the meaning of the ceding of the Sinai
in the first place.
Egypt makes no bones about its view of this final
step in the agreement. Ambassador Ashraf Ghorbal. for
example, sees next April, 1982 as the final step in the
return of Egypt to the Sinai in its entirety, a procedure
that began with the signing of the Camp David agreement
in March, 1979. He sees it as the culminating achievement
of Egypt's purposes with respect to Israel which it has
wrested from its aborted Yom Kippur War. In this sense.
Egypt is playing the role of belaid victor and Israel the
role of the vanquished.
On the other hand, the Israelis see the ceding of the
Sinai as a quid pro quo on the road toward normalization ;
of relations with Cairo, a process that the Egyptians have ;
been avoiding like the plague in their effort to walk the
treacherous fence of peace with Israel and all the benefits
peace has brought them at the same time that they hope
to mend their ties to the rest of the Arab world.
It is for this very difference in perspective that in-
creasing resistance is being noted in Israel against the
final step of withdrawal from the Sinai come next April. In
short, Israel does not see the normalization quid pro quo
as having come to pass, or indeed as coming at all in the
months ahead.
While the signing of the peace-keeping agreement is a
welcome move in the direction toward the final implemen- :
tation of the Camp David process, we would not be sur-
prised to see a stalling in the process itself come next
April. Israelis are not likely to want to bear the whole
blunt of the burden. They don't want to wake up and dis-
cover that they have given up the Sinai and won nothing
in return for that dear concession. Not normalization and,
therefore, not peace.
ASTHesAvymq^oes
Hebrew University
Archaeologists Hope To Reach
Level of Canaanite Jerusalem
JERUSALEM The
Hebrew University arch-
aeological team digging at
the City of David, Jeru-
salem's Biblical nucleus,
aims this summer to reach
the level of the Canaanite
Jerusalem that existed
before King David's con-
quest around 1000 BCE.
The season got under way mid-
July and will last until Sept. 4.
The excavations are carried out
by the City of David Society,
founded in 1978. whose members
include the Institute of Archaeo-
logy of the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, the Israel Exploration
Society, the Jerusalem Founda-
tion, a group of sponsors from
South Africa headed by Mendel
Kaplan, and the Ambassador In-
ternational Cultural Foundation.
California. Additional assistance
has been granted by the Jeru-
salem Municipality and the
Kothschild Foundation.
THE EXCAVATIONS are
headed by Dr. Yigal Shilo of the
Hebrew University, and con-
ducted by the permanent staff
from that institution, whose
members include Donald T. Ariel.
Alon DeGroot. David Tarler.
Yair Shoham. Jane Cahill and
Yigal Val. The architect of the
expedition is Giora Solar. A con-
tingent of archaeology students
from the Hebrew University, as
well as other American and Euro-
pean universities, complement
the staff. The project has stimu-
lated much interest among arch-
aeologists and archaeology stu-
dents abroad. Some 400 volun-
teers from Israel and the world
over have applied to participate
this year.
During the course of this
summer, its fourth season, the
expedition will continue to in-
vestigate that set of problems
which it began in 1978. The ex-
cavations are being carried out on
state lands along the eastern
slope of the City of David, above
the Gihon Spring.
Segments of the Israelite city
wall from the time of the mon-
archy will be uncovered in addi-
tion to the 45 meters thus far
revealed. Residential buildings
ot the same period, built atop
Mont-, stepped terraces descend-
ing the eastern slope, will be ex-
cavated as well. In the past three
seasons such structures de-
stroyed by the Babylonians in
586 BCE have yielded a wealth
of finds.
THE LOWER portion of an
impressive construction a
stone, stepped structure ex-
posed to a height of 16 meters
thus far. will be revealed. This
monumental structure was built,
apparently, in the tenth century
BCE, during the reign of David
or Solomon, and served as a com-
ponent of the building complex in
the Upper City, site of the royal
acropolis of Jerusalem (possibly
the Opheli during its apogee in
the First Temple period.
During the last three seasons,
special emphasis has been placed
on uncovering the city's remains
from the Israelite period. This
year, the excavators are reaching
Canaanite Jerusalem the c*
of Jebus from the LateBnZ
^_Pr?y -P* Aes- wh*h Pfc
ceded David s conquest. I-JT
tant structural remains &WZ
perwd were discovered dunq
Investigation continues .
the ancient underground wIle
systems hewn out of rock aW
uhe-L"L.pe^ these iwludl
Hezekiah s Tunnel, the Suotm
tunnel-channel, excavated
1978-79. and "Warren s Shaft"
excavated and partiallv reopener!
during 1980. The expediti*
hopes this season to complete tat
hydrologicai survey of the* i
systems being undertaken byi
Dan Gil of the Geological h I
slitute.
At the southern end of the Cut
of David, the expedition hopesu
excavate an area in which terrace
wall remains have been preserved
dating to the Persian and Hell-
enistic periods (6th 2nd ct
turies BCE). Few remains fan
these periods have been found in
other excavations in Jerusalem.
and great importance has been
attached to their discovery on the
City of David Hill, which was the
main center of Jerusalem from its
inception until the Hasmonean
period.
WANfEDTOBUY ""
Signed Oil Paintings. Poiisn-
Dutch-Belgium-Norwegian-
Swedish-Danish-German-
Hungarian-Austnan
(Not by Artists Living Today)
Private Collector
656-3286
ably so StoX^f'hav? wdMonally boasted, and jusdfi-
Sm rfdS^rkk^f IP'1*5*101 achievements. But in how many
rMGHT!" hmh P"" P"1'* P*laim: "Meet my son, THE
And A^^-tec,^^
n^*^^,^^^^ ,;
ft It whispers.
wp-.NY *-


ir. August 21,
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
'y ?
II ir
Work Progresses on Hornstein
Jewish Community Day School
be new campus of the Benja-
S. Hornstein Elementary
ol of the Jewish Community
iy School is undergoing ex-
sive renovation and new con-
uction. The existing classroom
[ldings and mansion house are
refurbished. Work is pro-
ng on a new primary class-
>m building, multi-purpose
ilding and renovation of the
y-raedia center.
Dr. Howard Kay, president,
has indicated that, "The result of
all of this work will be a facility
that will make the Parker Avenue
site a model Jewish Day School
facility in which the students can
expect an environment that will
enhance education."
The development of the new
school as well as the recent ac-
creditation of the school has re-
sulted in a substantial increase in
our early registration. The enroll-
ment in the school at this point
far exceeds any previous summer
registration figures. Last year at
this time there were approxi-
mately 110 students involved.
Current enrollment is close to 140
students. All indications are that
the enrollment for the coming
year will far exceed our 1980-81
enrollment of 153 students.
A Message to Parents of
High School Students
In the past it was often diffi-
It to persuade parents to give
fcir children an elementary Jew-
| education. It was not easy to
the idea of the necessity of
ning the three R's of Jewish
k. Those hard times for Jewish
ucation are gone. Among the
e-opening revelation of a re-
nt national survey of Jewish
bcation in the United States is
following hard fact: "Well
80 percent of Jewish chil-
kn receive some Jewish school-
at some time during school
L" Therefore we may conclude
kt the great majority of parents
1 want, and do provide, some
I of Jewish schooling for their
udren. But what do we mean
"some sort"? Our problem is
[longer to get our children to
i Jewish school, but rather, to
re them stay in the schools
: enough to make that educa-
stick with them! In other
r ary education is important.
|far so good. But what about a
Ondary Jewish education?
If we neglect continuation
dies beyond Bar Mitzvah
tt is to happen to the founda- ,
i upon which we have built? It I
is clear that the time has come to
MAKE SECONDARY EDUCA-
TION PRIMARY! If you, as
parents are interested in the
future of the Jewish people; if
you are concerned about trans-
mitting the values that have
helped us survive for thousands
of years; if you pay heed to the
well-being of your child as an ad-
justed, well equipped American
Jew you will agree with this
motto. Elementary Jewish edu-
cation is at a peak, but the
training your child receives on
the primary level is not enough!
It takes the mind of an adoles-
cent, not that of an elementary
school child, to absorb Jewish
teachings, to cope with such con-
cept as God, faith, Torah, prayer
and the Bible. That means you
must MAKE SECONDARY
EDUCATION PRIMARY!
If you fail to give your boy or
girl a Jewish education beyond
the primary grades, you are fail-
ing your child and your people!
If you want to do right, act
right, by your children, if you
want to discharge your respon-
sibility as a thinking member of
our community, if you deem pre-
cious the trust that you hold as a
link in our glorious heritage you
will send your child to a High
School of Jewish Studies, the
Midrasha. Only then will you
MAKE SECONDARY
EDUCATION PRIMARY! You
will agree that as Jews one of our
most pressing problems today is
the continuity of the learning and
culture that has always marked
the Jewish people.
. Join us in the firm conviction
that we must MAKE
SECONDARY PRIMARY!
Enroll your children in the
Midrasha-Judaica High School
now!
The Midrasha Judaica High
School is a community program
of Jewish education. It is offered
through the cooperation of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, the Jewish Community
Day School, and local syna-
gogues. Combining the resources
of these congregations and agen-
cies enables us to offer an out-
standing intensive and varied
program of Jewish studies.
BENJAMIN S. HORNSTEIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL OF
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL OF
PALM BEACH COUNTY
a limited number of applications are being accepted
for the
1981/82 School Year
PRESCHOOL THROUGH GRADE 8
Accredited by the Florida Council of Independent Schools
Mordecai Levow
Director
Dr. Howard B. Kay
President
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida
Telephone 832-8423/4
NEW CAMPUS: 5801 Parker Avenue, Weet Palm Beach, Florida
A oeneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Riverside
Memorial Chapel Inc./Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol
of Jewish Tradition
4714 Okeechobee Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Florida
683-8676
Chapels throughout South Florida
and the New York Metropolitan area.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES.

TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE.
Leunrii
Securities
NASD
Bank liumi wUrMi M
18 East 48th Street
New York NY 10017
(212) 759-1310
ration Toll Free (800) 221 -4838
Announcing
PHILIP WEINSTEIN
Jewish Funeral Director
, Your Neighborhood FuMrainrtttor
Providing the.Finest in Jewish Funeral Service with
7 Conveniently Located Chapels
Mill
4S7-M44 WVTMO 7S30
IN COOPERATION WITH KRAEER FUNERAL HOMES
*M*
EXPERT SOfER in usa
A MAN YOU CAN TRUST
UxmiteM,ifiui,i
, I AM SELLING TORAHS USED AND NEW.
fUbbi Yakov 6urin
673-0951


Pag6
The Jewish Fldridian of Palm Beach County
Fridai
Dr. Alexander Scheiber, head of the Rabbinic Seminary of Budapest, Hungary, right, reads an article on
Hungarian Jewry which appeared in the fall, 1980 issue of the United Jewish Appeal Women's Division
Record .. aa rabbinic students look on. The article appeared after an agreement had been reached in
February, 1980, between the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee and the government and
Jewish community of Hungary to provide programs and services for the nation's Jewry. JDC funds come
primarily from the UJA which is supported by monies collected in federation campaigns throughout the
country.
Statement On Jerusalem Of
Grave Concern to IJCIC
TORONTO (JTA) -
The International Jewish
Committee for Inter-
religious Consultations (IJ-
CIC), representing Jewish
communities throughout
the world, has expressed
"shock and grave concern"
over a statement on Jeru-
salem adopted here by the
World Council of Churches'
Central Committee (WCC).
The WCC, at its meeting here
last month, adopted a statement
opposing "the Israeli unilateral
action of annexing East
Jerusalem and uniting the c'Xy as
its eternal capital' under its ex-
clusive sovereignty. This decision
is contrary to all pertinent UN
resolutions. It most dangerously
undermines all efforts towards
the just solution on the Middle
East problem and thus jeopar-
dizes regional and world peace."
THE WCC statement called on
member churches "to exert
through their respective govern-
ments all pressure on Israel to
withhold all actions on
Jerusalem, the future of which
should be included in the agenda
of official negotiations involving
Israel and the Palestinian people
on self-determination and on the
solution of the Middle East
conflict."
The IJCIC, in a statement,
characterized the WCC's state-
ment as wholly "political in
character and flagrantly par-
tisan" and charged that "it can
only serve to encourage ex-
tremists whose rejectionist
policies have 'most dangerously
undermined all efforts towards a
just solution of the Middle East
problem.' "
The IJIC, in its statement,
called on the WCC "to reconsider
thft one-sided and biased
declaration and to contribute to
pease through genuine recon-
ciliation in the spirit of the
Psalmist for 'a Jerusalem that is
built as a united city.'
THE STATEMENT noted
that "The holy city of Jerusalem
has evoked deep spiritual attach-
ments and emotional ties for
Jews, Christians and Moslems.
For Jews only, however, has
Jerusalem been the eternal citv,
the center of their spiritual world
and the focus of hope fol
millennia. For the past 3.000
years, there has always been a
living Jewish communitv in
->
Estate Planning, Pensions, Ufa and Group Insurant*
Howard H. Go/dste/n, CLU
Stanley Cohen
Btjre
Life
Pfleger Cohen Agency, Inc.
Suite 300
701 North Federal Highway
North Palm Beach, Florida
(305) 842-7201
A"Utt 21, n
Kiryat Shemona Receives
$250,000 Grant
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Jewish
Agency Executive chairman
Leon Dulzin told the Kiryat She-
mona town council that the
Agency would give a special
grant of $250,000 to the township
to help it recover from the shell-
ing and rocketing across the
border last month by Palestinian
terrorists.
Dulzin and the Jewish Agency
Executive held a special meeting
in Kiryat Shemona after touring
the border region and holding
special meetings with the Galilee
regional council and the Kiryat
Shemona council.
Dulzin and Agencv tr~-
Akiv.Uvmsky3yt2
grant would be in additX?
fund, already budget foTJ?
cial projects in the Galilee in 1
erd and Kiryat ShenZ 55.
gfrjApncy member, 9
problem appeared to be noti
much economic and finmciil
social. I
kSSS^1 10P*tilk,!
Kiryat Shemona population U
stayed in the township throul
out the two weeks of sheZj
Observers say the residenu hSl
not been sufficiently prepare) j,
advance for the possible effect* rf!
Israel air raids against tenons I
installations in Lebanon.
Jerusalem."
The text of the IJCIC state-
ment was presented and
discussed at a joint consultation
of the WCC and the IJCIC here.
The IJCIC statement with a
covering letter was simul-
taneously sent to Dr. Philip
Potter, WCC Secretary General
requesting that the text be sub-
mitted to the WCC's Central
Committee.
The letter was signed by Prof.
Shemaryahu Talmon of
Jerusalem, IJCIC chairman;
Rabbi Bernard Mandelbaum of
New York, co-secretary, and Dr.
Gerhard Riegner of Geneva, co-
secretary. The IJCIC is com-
prised of the World Jewish Con-
gress, Synagogue Council of
America, American Jewish Com-
mittee. Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith and the Israel
Interfaith Committee.
RESPONDING to the state
ment, Prof. Krister Stendahl.
chairman of the WCC's Commis-
sion on the Church and the
Jewish people, declared: "The
Christian participants (in this
joint WCC-IJCIC consultationl
recognizing the deep hurt caused
by the WCC statement, saw the
urgent necessity that in the
^matter of Jerusalem, a Jewish
koice from men and women of
aith be heard clearly by the
phurches as they receive the
fWCC statement.
"Toward that end. the Chris-
tian participants resolved to offer
their services to make the Jewish
statement known as widely as
possible, and to seek further
I ways by which the voices of the
: Jewish community can be freely
heard within the WCC in such
matters that are of deep concern
to them."
The Home Of
*(PEBB PEIS0IAL CHECIII9!)
12 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
MAIN OFFICE
401 Northlake Boulevard
North Palm Beach
Telephone: 848-0611
WALLET STYLE ONLY
MEMBER FDIC a.~i. m Imn oi *30O Mill
V>\vcSM
Or PALM BEACH COUNTY

Stephen S. Scher, M.
Announces The Opening Of His Office
For The Practice Ol
GYNECOLOGY
AND
INFERTILITY
DELRAY MEDICAL COMPLEX
Suite 1Q
3434 Lake Ida Road
Delray Beach
OFFICE HOURS: TELEPHONE:
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY 272-8000
By Kings Point Bus
La Cha made Restaurant Francan
3700 South Dixie Highway Cocktails
Weil Palm Batch. Florida 33405
Owner Host
JACQUES GARRIGUE
(305) 8324733
Open Monday to Saturday
5.30 to 11pm.
Also Serving
Prix Fixe (set price)
$12.50
mi ii i m i i IWIBB1 wijaaeaB**BB**B< I TEACHERS WANTED
Pre-K, Kindergarden. 1st
Sundays 9 A.M. -12 Noon
1 Call Ruth Levow
I Temple Beth El
I 8334330
I 'i i m i i mmmanmmm
National I
a* Bank'
MORE THAN A BANK
Where You're More Than A Customer
A FULL SERVICE BANK
For information
659-2265
(IT SPELLS BANK).
Main Of Hce
501 South Flagier Drive
West Palm Beach. Fla. 33401
Nortlake Blvd. Branch
2863 Northlake Boulevard
Lake Park. Fla. 33410 '
Forest Hill Branch
1850 Forest Hill Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33406
Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. Bra** .
2380 Palm Beach Lakes Boute**'
West Palm Beach. Fla. 334W
Member FDIC Member Federal Reserve System


iimty
]fath
IMI > M
fazswH
E5
asaSsa
f^0^^M^^^$^M^W^:i^^ jj$f?

fatt.tiV.tlV
^^^m^^^W^^^^^^^^^^
J^A-.CiJi,w.j, ^^^i^^Aii^rS^i^!^^ ?i^^V^ii^ j&&&li
'-;. >.v
i I tWTtfc^niiil'ft NSWW&8& ^sp*s$
#& iWv ?SSg?^. :%8N|i^af g^s^w^--
mgTW.rW'S'A&i 6feSitl4j'-iii

.*.*. :>! .Vv;. ^7^p> "'
Wfflffifc Gin* Mm
fill SPl
A ;--
f i I .
I


.';' 1
';.
f^>'-,E>

4 V *

. "
|
. -
1
'**& jr.^4

1
|
SKI


RH
wi$ ,
ttl
****
MBK
good taste
and low tar; too.
^M

HBS^I
|; :;
Urt"3
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
Thai Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
1UGHTS: 4 mg. "tar". 0.4 mg. nicotine. FILTER: 9 mg. "tar". 0.8 mg. nicotine, av. per cigarette by FTC method
-
i

******
i" *'-.> *^
VANTAGE
,lOWlQ,9
mg


^^S^toHdJanofPaim Beach County
y.A
Organizations in the News
m
PIONEER WOMEN
The Theodore Hani Club of
Pioneer Women will hold their
regular meeting September 3, 1
p.m. at the L ike Worth Shuffle-
board Courts, 1121 Lucerne Ave-
nue. A one act play wul be pre-
sented by. the Crest haven Thea-
tre Group.
Refreshments will be served.
GOLD A MEIR CLUB
Golds Meir Club Pioneer
Women meeting at First Federal
of Del Ray On Thursday, Sept. 3
first meeting of the season.
October 1 report on convention
being held at the Concord Hotel
in New York.
November 5 meeting and
membership tea box lunch S3.
Performers for our entertain-
ment.
November 25-27 3-day
Thanksgiving trip to Busch Gar-
dens, dinner and dance plus visit
to Cypress Gardens. Call Bea
Cohen for reservations.
December 12 Royal Palm Din-
ner Theatre "Gypsy". Call Bea
Cohen for reservations.
B'NAI B'RITH
WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women Menorah
Chapter, meets 12 noon Tuesday,
Sept. 8, at The First Federal
Bank of Delray, Boutique hour 12
noon-1 p.m. Victor P. Whitney,
Senior Vice President, First
American Bank, will speak on
"Living Trusts and Estate Plan-
ning." Refreshments will be
served.
Trips, Etc. Scheduled:
Oct. 15, Early Dinner and Card
Party at 4 p.m. at Bagel World.
Nov. 4 and 5, Disney World.
Complete admissions to all at-
tractions for two days, nightly
dinners and shows, complete full
breakfast and stay at Rodeway
Inn.
Nov. 26, Thanksgiving Night
Dinner and Show at the Royal
Palm Dinner Theatre, Btoca
Raton "Private Lives."
Dec. 30, 31 and Jan. 1, 3-day
New Year's Weekend at Holi-
dome Inn at Fort Myers, Break-
fasts. Dinner, Boat Trip, New
Year's Eve at Naples Dinner
Theatre.
HADASSAH
Hadaesah Lake Worth
Chapter Board will meet on
Wednesday, September 4, at the
Sunrise Savings and Loan in the
Gun Club Plaza on Military Trail
at 10 a.m.
Sylvia Mass, President will re-
Ert on the National Convention
Id in New York City in August.
Plans will be made for the en-
suing year.
The Board of Hadaaaah, Lake'
Worth-South Palm Beach Chap-1
ter has voted to change their1
name to Lake Worth Chapter.
This action was taken since Had
assah Florida Central Region has
grown and the Chapter no longer
takes in the South County.
Shalom Hadaaaah will hold an
Early Bird Supper and Card
Party at Bagel World, 4:30 p.m.,
on Sept. 8. Proceeds will benefit
Hadassah Israel Education Serv-
ices. For reservations, call Ann
Spanierman, Fritzi Glkk. Freddi
Herman.
Other events: Dinner and
Show (Frisco Follies) at Newport
Pub, Miami Beach, on Oct. 15, ,
transportation and gratuities in-
cluded. Contact Fran Nudelman,
Florence Siegel, Lillian Schack.
A mini Flea Market is sched-
uled for Sunday, Oct. 18, 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m., at Atlantic Bank,
Okeechobee Blvd. If you have
suitable merchandise, call Bertha
Rubin or Lillian Schack.
routine check to make sure you're not on the black list
Soviet Jew Sentenced To
Two Years In Exile
NEW YORK (JTA) The
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry has learned that another
Jewish emigration activist, the
second in two weeks, has been
convicted in the Soviet Union.
Evgeny Lein, a 42-year-old
doctor of engineering, was
sentenced in a Leningrad court to
two years of exile at hard labor
for allegedly "resisting a repre-
sentative of authority."
Lein was held in prison since
his arrest on May 17. On that day
he had attended a seminar on
Jewish history in a private apart-
ment, when uniformed policemen
and KGB agents burst in and ar-
rested several participants,
including Lein. He was accused
of "beating a policeman."
Lein defended himself at his
one-day trial yesterday, attended
by about 50 people. According to
Community Relations Council Speakers available
Topics. Israel, Community Concerns, Soviet
Jewry, Energy, Holocaust
For information and bookings, contact
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman's office
at the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, 832-2120
wm
Tikvah Chapter of Hadaaaah
Sept. 21 Opening meeting
at Anshei Sholem at 1:30 p.m.
Boutique at 12:30 p.m. Conven-
tion report by president, Martha
Sheffrin. Entertainment by the
Lyric Trio consisting of Max
Lubert, Mildred Birmbaum and
Beatrice Kahn.
AMERICAN MIZRACHI
WOMEN
American Mizrachi Women,
Rishona Chapter will hold its
regular meeting on Sept. 17, at
the First Federal Bank of the Del
Ray, Westgate. Estelle Leven-
stone will entertain 1 p.m.
Remember our delightful
weekend at the Tarleton Hotel,
MB. on Oct. 30, to Nov. 2. Many
goodies await you. Reserve now.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Centurv. Chapter Women's
Ajnerican ORT, will wefcq
back it s members at their I
meeting of the new season^
Thursday, Sept. 10,12:30 pjn!j
Temple Anshei Shalom. '
Ms. Sunny Elliot, Bus Dei i
Public Relations Officer of tv,
First American Bank of Pit \
Beach County, will present a very |
interesting program entity
"The History of Florida Thn'
Currency." Everyone is invite!!
to attend.
Coming Events
November 26-27-28-29 #1
Thanksgiving Weekend to G#i
Coast jam packed with hmj
things to see and do.
January Join us for a |
ant evening at Musicana.
March 7 Lake Worth Plai-
house "Funny Girl"
April 24 Lunch and Mating i
at Royal Palm Dinner Theaterhr
" Pirates of Penzance."
. 1., .7
I
I ndrr The Supervision
>( KabblnlraJ < oum-ll
Of Thr Palm Brm.hr*
The Arqus
THENEWIrviAGE'
(Zonturv
->s ">ea
4714 OIEICHOIII IlVD VIST P AIM IUCN
Optflt-7
Mon-Thun
MFn.
I 4 Sun
Closed Sit
Ib-twn-R Military Trail a MaverkaU la the Mlal Mail
THE MOST MODERN & COMPLETE KOSHER SUPERMARKET I
activists, the procurator's wit
nesses did not succeed in'
proving the charge. It was
shown that an injury to the po
(iceman's leg could not have been
inflicted inside an apartment.
Furthermore, a medical state-
ment produced by the procurator
was written 20 days after the
incident was to have occurred.
Three men who wished to testify
on Lein's behalf were not permit-
ted to do so by the judge because
of their friendship for the
defendant.
Irina Lein, at the time of her
husband's arrest, called it a "tac-
tic in the KGB tyranny now
being waged against Jewish re-
fuseniks and others involved in
the struggle for Jewish self-
awareness." The Lein family has
been denied emigration to Israel
since 1978.
OPCN ALL YEAR
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS
ASUCCOTH
SUCC A on premises
Services Will Be Conducted
by a Prominent Cantor
Pnata Saach Swimming Poor
TV In All Room Ft.. Parking
Cntartainmanl
LET THE
SHORE CUB HOTEL
BE YOUR YEAR ROUND HOME
MCLUDMG
Dtfickxs Mash and All
fabttsM of Tho Lovely Ho*
Rataa on FWqua*
GLATTKOSHER !
uTWau lAawarni ***' *?
Phone: 1-538-7811 ~*+^*
OH TMt OCEAN AT ISM M. Miami Baach
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCC0TH
Traditional Services Will Be
Conducted By
Cantor ISAAC HAMMERMAN
BEAUTIFUL 0CEANFR0NT
SUCCAH
by Canto
ISAAC HAMMERMAM
C
Tennis Facilities Sauna Handball Volleyball
Olympic Swimming Pool Full Block of Private Beach
TV In All Rooms Appropriate Entsrtainrnant
OPEN FOR THE SUMMER
Dinning Room Open to the PvbUC 1
JJ Ml| Services is Oar
SPACIOUS 0CEAHFR0HT SYNAGOGUE
TNE MUlTI-MtUION DOLLAR KOSHER
NtTEt
QIATT
eTteac. f4l,lSt Haaaxtaacft
w 1-638-9045 or 531-5771 f
fcv rour Hosts. MIcrwcH Lerkowltz A Alex Smllow
Put a new bright taste into your brisket
"*"V.!.UWk..u*Sl,1
Cook
it with
n cup green beans, I" pieces
fresh or frown
iSKSLU GULDEN'S'
lSW*ShM.kHkfrozen ^^Cdl B
JwWespoon, Gulden, Mustard
2 tablespoons Pineapple junre
tatty Mastare
Blanch *ll the Vegetable, in boiling Ww for 7
win cold or hoi meals such as brisket us
irimi. corned beef, salami and bolo'inT
Makes approximately 2 cups. '
R cup chopped apple
V, cup chopped pear
Vi cup chopped canned
cling peaches
ft cup raisins
tablespoons Gulden's Mustard
I tablespoon cling peach syrup
BUnch appk*s and pears I* boiling water lor S
minutes, drain. Add peaches, raisins, Gulden 1
Mustard and peach syrup; stir well Store in re
f rigerator. Serve with cold or hot
brisket, pastrami, corned beef,
botoHi Makes 2 cups.
such as
and
- "^^Ba^MaT otaav Mates z cups.
""hWlN-H *ew* .,


I August 21,1981
The Jewish FloHdian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
CC Happenings
Senior News
Career Singles
Jewish Community Cen-
bmprehensive Senior Serv-
nter, receives funds from a
kl Grant, Title III of the
I Americans Act, awarded
Ifstream Areawide Council
and the Florida De-
"of H.R.S., enabling us
ride transportation for the
, disadvantaged as well as
ty of recreation and educa-
vices.
a-Going Programs
ortation is available to
insit disadvantaged. Call
I for information.
Out Enjoy an after-
of expression, friendship
rning with Wynn Kenton,
i leader, on Mondays at
[ Wynn is leaving the area
ame in August. Since the
ate is not known, Wynn
ntinue Speak Out on a
i week basis. Call the Con-
formation about this
689-7700.
Bd Table Talk for Men
Topics for Thinking
During the summer
Round Table Talk for
and Timely Topics for
Dg Women will hold joint,
liscussion sessions on poli-
conomics. and current
on Tuesdays at 1 p.m.,
the second Tuesday of
nonth. Sylvia Skolnik,
ider for the women, is
several months. How-
: Greenberg, group leader
men, will conduct these
ssions.
kers Club Herbert
President, invites all
nterested in public speak-
join this group, which
) Thursdays at 10 a.m.
h Insurance,. Assistance
Reiter, health insurance
ator, will assist persons
health insurance forms,
ns, etc., every third
y of the month at 2 p.m.
I the month of August she
at the Center on August
| Dine Out Luncheons at
restaurants will be held
| month. For further infor-
call Sam Rubin at the
|at 689-7700.
Tuesday Club The
Tuesday Club will hold
lar meeting on Tuesday,
ber 8, at 1 p.m. Program
announced. There willbe a
celebration for September
H/s and refreshments will
ult the Frame Doctor
W have problems with
your pictures, needle-
photographs? Ida Blauner
the JCC on August 28.
and thereafter on
th Friday of each month,
Iw L0ur thi the problems you have.
her information, call the
t 689-7700.
Classes Adult
n Palm Beach County:
Wednesdays
nei 4:30-5:40 p.m. Dar-
?huth, Instructor. Learn
of hearing through
Skilla, Thursdays
:30 a.m. Frank Bostwick,
' (Beginners). Learn the
entals of good writing.
n8 Skilla, Fridays 9:30-
fm. Advanced and Inter-
Frank Bostwick, Ins-
Enjoy expressing
in writing and learning
11 never dreamed you
begin-
Pj> for new classes
P>lember21.
jve Driving 56 and
Paul Oblas, licensed De-
Unving Instructor, will
pwnt a class tailored to
1 and problems of the re-
tired population of the Palm
Beaches. This class is provided
by AARP. It is a seven hour
seminar divided into two day ses-
sions. Persons insured by Colon-
ial Penn or Prudential Life will be
granted a 10 percent discount on
their auto insurance premiums
upon completion of the two ses-
sions. First class to be held on
Wednesday, Sept. 2, from 9 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. Second class, Sept.
9, same time. Pre-registration is
required, plus a $5 fee for instruc-
tional material. Checks are to be
made out to the AARP. Call the
Jewish Community Center and
ask for the senior office for infor-
mation.
Art of the Month Ida Blau-
ner, Chairperson, announces that
the artist for the month of Au-
gust is Jacob Appelbaum. The
Center is open Monday through
Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Come in to view these lovely
paintings.
This newly formed group of
I employed men and women, ages
35-55, is fast becoming a very
active group of the Jewish Com-
munity Center.
An exciting schedule for the
month of September is presently
being worked out by the group.
' Interested persons should call the
Center, 689-7700, to receive all
the news.
Interested in Tennis? Need a
partner? Call Flo (after 10 p.m.)
at 689-4021 for information. Save
iMonday night for the game of
"love."
Lido Spa Get A-W.y Sun-
day, Nov. 20 Wednesday, Dec.
Bus leaves the Weetgate of
Century Village on Sunday, Nov.
29 for a fun filled 4-day, 3-night
stay at the Lido Spa in Miami.
Trip includes daily massage,
three meals a day, diet or regular,
nightly entertainment and
fabulous company. Don't be left
out!!! Make your reservations
NOW. Registration must be ac-
companied by a $25 deposit,
which includes a $5 non-
refundable registration fee.
Members, double occupancy
S125, including gratuities. Single
rooms for members is $144, in-
cluding gratuities. Non-members
fee is $10 more per person. Bus
transportation will be announced
in the Fall. For reservations and
further information, call Sam
Rubin at the Center at 689-7700.
Congregation to Welcome/Rabbi
Temple
Rabbi
Golden Lakes
welcomes the arrival of
and Mrs. Joseph Speiser. He is
the Spiritual Leader and Cantor
of the Congregation, which will
dedicate its new Temple building
over the weekend of Sept. 11,12
and 13.
A member of the Rabbinical
Council of America, as well as the
New York Board of Rabbis,
Rabbi Speiser's thirty years of
service in Portchester, N.Y., well
qualify him to fill the spiritual
needs of his new congregation in
Florida.
NbKfHAJVlERlGAN
RARE.CCHNSJNC. ;
Buying Silver, Gold and Coins
Paying Areas Highest Prices
Spencer Square
2550 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach
(305)684-1771
ET MORE IMMEDIATE
CASH FROM BALOGH
Bafogh pays its highest prices ever tor your prck>us|owel$,dkimonclaand
antiques. Sett ww* leading bar**, trust offteen, am* attorney* trove been
dealing for 70 years.
(Retired brokerage eervfce available.
ITM
Coral 9aMM! .242 Mfcoole ***. 4*5-26*1 fjBWWCffd: 920-WJOJ
Mami leaa* 447 Arthur GcOfwy W, S3t407 (Browofd 920-6500)
Ho*imfce/Woltyw<>oohW5fmktn^U<^9Mu*$**2tO
LauderMS: 4444 Inverrary Blvd., W2-2225
W^PMWVT*
New Maxwell House Master Blend.
Delicious ground coffee that can
save you money!
With new Maxwell House Master
Blend Coffee you enjoy delicious
ground coffee. And you can save
money, too.
New Maxwell House
Master Blend tastes delicious.
Master Blend is 100% pure
ground coffee that's specially roasted
and ground, not concentrated or
flaked. i
You can save
money, too.
Because we make it
a special way, 13
ounces of Master
Blend goes as far as
16 ounces of ordinary
coffee. And you make
it the same way you
usually do.
Use the same
number of scoops.
That's how Master Blend can save
you money.
New Maxwell House Master
Blend Coffee comes in three grinds:
Regular, Electra-Perk? and
Automatic Drip Blend. It's the
delicious ground coffee that's always
.. ."Good to the Last Drop?" and it
can save you money, too.
fUC'Pft "-'
wHOU

01981 Onenl Foods Corporation
Available in three grinds.
K Certified Kosher


Marian Margulies
Curing Kids by Treating Family
By MARIAN MARGULIES
A family counseling program
for Orthodox Jews, createdtwo
years ago as an outgrowth of a
Hebrew day school guidance
program, has opened a third
center in the New York metropol-
itan area, according to the coor-
dinator of the family centers,
Mose Wangrofsky. He said the
family programs are called family
enrichment centers.
Both the day guidance pro-
gram and the family counseling
program are units of Counter-
force, a mental health agency
connected with Torah Umesorah,
the Society for Hebrew Day
Schools.
The newest family enrichment
center has been opened on Man-
hattan's Lower East Side, ac-
cording to the United Jewish
Council (UJC) of the East Side.
The two older family centers are
located in the Forest Hills section
of Queens and the Flatbush
section of Brooklyn.
The 11-year-old day school
service that involves both the
child and his or her family. Ac-
cording to a UJC report, the two
programs provide counseling
services to more than 2,600 New
York City Jews each" year.
WANGROFSKY told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
typical problems in the day guid-
ance program concern child rela-
tionships with their peers,in
class, or with their teachers, as
well as learning and behavioral
difficulties. A child receives
counseling once a week in 60-
minute sessions. The duration of
the counseling varies depending
on the needs of the child, said
Yitzhak Twersky, clinical
director of Counterforce. He said
it was the child counselor's res-
ponsibility to decide whether re-
ferral of a child to the family
counseling program was neces-
sary.
Twersky reported that "some-
times the problem does noU re-
volve solely around the child but
may include a family dynamic."
When a counselor sees a child's
problem as probably being
gram's 20 therapists either in
their private offices or in one of
the three family counseling cen-
ters. Families receive an hour of
therapy once a week which may
last four to five months, Twersky
said.
The Counterforce budget of
$515,000 for its fiscal year of July
1, 1980 to June 30. 1981 is in part
allocated to the three family cen-
ters, though the JTA was told
precise figures on how the funds
are allocated were not available.,
The funds are provided by the
New York State Department of
Substance Abuse.
FOR THE prior fiscal year,
only $350,000 was provided but
for the 1981-82 fiscal year, the
state is expected to match the
$515,000 for the fiscal year end-
ing June 30, Twersky said.
He reported that some 70 fami-
lies are seen each week, among
them 175 children. Some of the
families meet in groups, others on
an individual family basis. He
said children are not always
present at family treatment ses-
sions. He said that if marital
guidance program provides free cmaed by the chMs family or b,ems surfa'e during a the-
counseling to children in 60 creating a problem within the --=- yeshivas throughout the Greater fem^y the counselor is likely to,
New York Metropolitan area, suggest the services of the family'
according to Wangrofsky. He program,
said the family programs, held in
the evening, is a more specialized Ffmi!'f neet? /Um help
meet with one of the familv pro-
West Germany
Cracking Down on
Neo-Nazi Groups
man, led a group of 16 persons
BONN (WNS) Two recent
moves here represent efforts by
West German authorities to take
sterner measure against neo-Nazi
groups and activists, some of
whom have been linked to the
Palestine Liberation
Organization, it was reported
here July 30. The two moves in-
cluded the announcement by the
ruling Social Democratic Party
(SPD) which sought to tighten
legislation barring neo-Nazi
propaganda and the announce-
ment July 29 that four neo-Nazis
have been accused by the federal
prosecutor in Stuttgart of organ-
izing a terrorist group active
against Jews and foreigners.
Meanwhile, further details of
the long-known link between the
outlawed Wehrsportsgruppe
Hoffman and the PLO were pub-
lished this week in the Bonner
Rundschau. The neo-Nazi organi- ,
/atkm. headed by Karl Heinz
Hoffmann, was banned last year
after its masquerade as a sports I
club was exposed. According to
the newspaper, Hoffmann and his
female friend, Franziska Brink-
21 Killed in
Accident
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Twenty one people were killed
when a truck collided with an
army tank transporter near Gaza.
It was the worst traffic accident
in Israel's history. Some 40 of
those injured remained in the
hospital for treatment. All the
dead and all but one of the in-
jured were Arabs, on their way
from their village of Deir el-
Ballah in the Gaza Strip to work
in Tel Aviv.
The Arab workers were travel
ling in a truck, equipped with
benches to carry passengers,
which entered a crossroad near
Gaza on a green light. An empty
army tank transporter entered
the junction on a red light,
travelling at high speed. It
knocked the passenger vehicle
into a field where it overturned.
The tank transporter plunged
into a field and came to a stop
when it hit a railway em-
it.
rapeutic session, a decision is
often made to see the child
separately.
Family therapy is conducted
by professionals psychologists
and social workers who are
screened not only for experience
and competence but also to
determine whether they are Or-
thodox. Twersky added that "we
are able to reach more people be-
cause many feel less threatened
by our therapists than by those'
at mental health centers." who
need not be Orthodox.
FEES FOR family service are
strictly a matter between the
who spent time at a PLO instal- therapist and the family, Twer-
lation south of Beirut last year to1 s^y said- He also said there is a
receive training in terrorist
tactics and the use of firearms.
/ The paper reported that three
members of the group, including
21-year-old Kai Uwe Bergmann,
found conditions at the camp in-
tolerable and tried to escape.
They were captured and tortued
by Hoffmann and his cohorts.
They managed to escape again in
September, 1980, the Bonner
Rundschau said, and were given
flight tickets back to Germany
by the German Embassy in
Beirut. But as the boarded the
plane, they were seized by PLO
guards and taken back to the
training camp.
minimum of bureacracy because
paperwork is limited to the
maximum extent possible. He re-
ported that while the family pro-
gram was created to help families
of yeshiva children, on occasion
Jews will be accepted who do not
have a child in a yeshiva or even
may not have any children. He
said "we are reluctant to turn
away those who seek our help."
Rabbi Murray Friedman, The
Counterforce director, said the
rate of referrals "has been in-
creasing steadily" but be ex-
pressed concern about the pinch
expected to follow federal budget
cuts which indirectly will affect
Counterforce.
2352 PGA Boulevard
Palm Beach Gardens, Fl 33410
Investment Equity
Real Kstate
Don Vogel
REALTOR
Res.dential-ConrJominiurn-lnvestment
Business 626 5100
Residence 622-.


atul
ctvuna
fJuutty SAetl becenf 4ote
tjfocwnd
Blanche and Bud Lang juat returned from Gain**!,
having attended a double graduation at the UniverSrT
Florida. Son Michael received a Bachelors Degree in Account*!!
with honors and son Edward received a Masters Degree in Ba
ness Administration. In addition to graduations it
Edward s birthday. Sisters and other relatives joined the |2
family in celebration. Blanche and Bud you have beiutS
children. --------
The Brookman Family has its share of good news. GW
Joel, son of Dr. Robert Brookman. celebrated his Bo
Mitzvah in Israel this past June. Grandma Brookman was i*
cently elected president of AMC Cancer Research & HosniUL!
Syd Karten Chapter, of Cresthaven. May Brookman is a fonw i
president of the President's Council of the Asthmatic ChilaW
Research Hospital, Denver, and Grandpa George is presentti
Palm Beach County Coordinator for the Committee on NatkS I
Health Insurance, Washington, D.C. He is also a member of d*
American School Oriental Research, doing research on The fliil, I
vis-a-vis The Dead Sea Scrolls. Grampa George was a forms
member of the Massachusetts Commission on Elder Affairs TV
Brookmans are forever involved.
son
Rose and Morris Brownsteina 60th Wedding anniversary
atj'aE !8J 'j2i.Wa* ce.rtain,v a very good year! Sixty v
later Rose and Morris Brownstein celebrated their
anniversary. The reception was held on June 21 at ban
Sheraton Newark Airport. The brunch was attended by approi
mately 100 friends and relatives.
The Brownsteina resided in Irvington until they retiiaM
trom Inland hreightways. Inc.. Kearny, N.J.. a company Mora
founded in the 1930s. The company is currently being operate! j
D> his son. The Brownsteina now reside in Covered Bridge, Latej
Worth.
The celebration was attended by their children. Al aa
Betty Brownstein of Short.Hills and Bernire and JoeGanaMJfl
i nun Rose (the former Rose Rothenberg) and Morris hrvf
grandchildren and IT. great-grandchildren. A heartv Mtuoir
toyouandyoursl
Around The Town received an exciting and educational!
tetter from Esther and Richard Zaretsky concerning theirvisti
to Israel. We hope to reprint their reactions and feelings in taB]
near future,
TEMPLE BETH
215 North FloflkwDrivji
W#tr.ln,l*o REGISTER YOUR CHILDREN NOW
FOR RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
AroaS ONI Y Conservative School Mooting Stand** ^
Unitod Synagogue Hours and Curriculum
* All toachers fully certified
Youth Group*: Kadima and U.S. Y.
- Instruction in Musk and luaoli Dancing
Bar-Bat Mitzvah Instruction
Call Now 833-0339
IAlii HOWAID J. HltSCH
Bain* Sha*. Canter Burf, tv*. Diractof o I


The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
PigeU
merican and British Stole
MIAMI BEACH'S ONLY BOARDWALK KOSHER HOTEL
SUMMER SUPER SAVING VACATIONS
, ROBERT E.SEGAL
\~A Seven Arts Feature
eD Ronald Keagan met with
Prime Minister Margaret
her not long after Inaugu-
Bjr, our President spoke of
klood relationship binding
to Great Powers,
thropologists would wonder
(the accuracy of such assur-
hf consanguinity; but it was
ntentioned. Despite 1776,
i of Americans have
imagined themselves
is of the British. This de-
George Bernard Shaw's
comment that America
England are two countries
| by the same language.
history is beginning to
a more realistic com-
lity: the British are under-
la wave of rioting, looting,
ossing, and petrol-bomb-
at threatens to surpass in
i the upheavals that shook
rn country in the 1960s.
Lt causes of the British tur-
fee will be researched and
over for years. At this
Margaret Thatcher, a
kd-order matron, sticks to
inclusion that the riots are
ke consequence of naked
the underclass is clawing
a share of the upperclass
feverely bugged by the sear-
sh troubles and giving
of her time to her anti-
on crusade, she pays little
on to the Loyal Oppo-


i
j>&
S)
sition's contention that unem-
ployment is to blame in part for
the explosions in Toxteth,
Londin, Liverpool, Manchester,
and other areas.
Surely, the fact that Britain's
jobless rate has passed the 11
percent mark and is twice that in
some of the battle areas must im-
press some of her associates.
Nor can the heavy inflow of
thousands of non-white immi-
grants possibly be minimized as a
strong factor in the rioting. For
within a generation, Great
Britain has changed from a near-
ly all-white nation to a multi-
racial one. As the sun's rays so
long ominipresent on the British
Empire dwindled, the British
colonials came in ever greater
numbers. From Pakistan, Cey-
lon, Hong Kong, the West Indies,
the caravan moved into the mul-
tiplying ghettos of color. Added
to these lists more recently have
been hosts of Arabs whose wealth
breeds envy in poverty-burdened
new arrivals.
In the course of the current
season of rioting, pressure to
pass new anti-immigration legis-
lation has mounted. A year ago, a
Gallop poll revealed that 46 per-
cent of those questioned favored
an immediate halt to immigration
and 30 percent, if they had their
way, would "send the coloreds
not Britain-born back whence
they came." The proposed new
nationality law is flirting with a
clause declaring that children of
Ui/wiTun itn>4Wtf>
*s
immigrants may not be citizens
even if born in the tight little
island averaging 963 crowded
people to the square mile.
But can't the British, now so
frightened by the riots, leam
from the American experience?
Did not such valuable studies as
the Keraer Report of 1967-68 -
the survey made by the National
Advisory Committee on Civil
Disorders and the fact-
jammed review, "The History of
Violence in America," the report
of the National Commission On
The Causes and Prevention of
Violence, tell us just about all we
needed to learn about our own
history of throbbing unrest?
Beginning with Jack Kenne-
dy's assassination in 1963,
aggravated by dissent over in-
volvement in Vietnam later, and
rubbed sore by the 1968 assassi-
nations of Martin Luther King
and Bob Kennedy in rapid suc-
cession, the degree of outbreaks
in this country stunned us. From
Watts to Detroit to Newark and
along the way, riots broke out in
77 American cities. We examined
the causes, evaluated the
suggested cures, and tried not
with complete success to
detonate the unexploded piles of
social dynamite.
Basically we absorbed what
the Kerner Commission ham-
mered into our heads: "Our na-
tion is moving toward two
societies, one black, one white
separate and unequal."
THE FAMILY JACOBS
OCEAMFHONT
BOARDWALK
2Sth 4 COLLINS
MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 33139
EPIC JACOBS. Owner M|mt
CALL 1-538-5721
50th YEAR
2 Meals Daily-Complete
Breakfast. Full Dinner
3 Meals Shabbos
Complimentary OJ Pooiskle
Rabbinical Supervision
Resident Mashgiach
Synagogue in Hotel
Sugar and Salt Free Diets
Free Chaise Lounges
Nightly Programs-Shows
All Rooms-Color TV.
Regngerator
Columbus Day Weekend
4 Days. 3 Nights
I d Per Person
Doub. Occup.
Meals Included
--------. Walcote Qht
Succoth October 12-15
Simchat Torah Oct. 19-22
4 Days. 3 Nights
SCQ Per Person
D7 Doub. Occup
Metis Included I Welcome GIH'.
________3 Single Rate
We represent various fortune 500
companies with locations throughout the
state, and welcome inquiries from
Engineering and EDP Professionals.
Presently seeking: Power Supply
Engineers (electronic); Electrical and
Electronic Engineers; Production Control
Supervisor and Production Supervisors
(electrical and electronics); Technical
Buyers; Surgical & Orthopedic Technician;
Internal Auditors (Banking Experience);
'roducf^M nuiner ; Technical Writer. For
information call (305)
833-7707 or forward resume
CORPORATE RECRUITING
\
irnal Audito
(8)
MsjfL^ fcomyltlrm fcrcjp. Ire.
MAIL TO: w. O So. 2701
Weal Pasm Reach, Florida 33402
Sankgt for summer.
ttOffUNMSDOOim
Such a mechaieh!
pour an that Scrip* Brand
.SP.3SV taospoon M* Imtonr or
1 iMia-ijrwa uscaaawnsau v.uiibm m a km
oka*. Stir In 1 cup oaMwatot Add k and serve
wHha*am and moot, if you want.
\bo1 have- a cfcflghtM summer coofer. Bch,
rdcc>rN*#Krt97%a3rNVifroe. And Kosher,
too. Sa%*TOrurnrn*rlssixharrcriaiari
mertc^vauriurnmarria^orJybiO
/ .! i .1
IWTwVMip!
K CortrfuM Kosnatr
js#>r#-#>rjMF^^cw^.
BaBBaVaaaBaaBal


Page 12
'sfiMstaattfotoCmiM
Open Again ForThe HIGH HOLIDAYS
With yoor hosts Sam and Morria WaMman, Gary Shar. OavW Diamond
^ ROSH HASH ANA-YOM KIPPUR
'SERVICE CONDUCTED BY CANTOR ADOLPH FISH MAN
IN MAIN LOBBY SYNAGOGUE
13w12
Oaya- I & Night* (Sept. 27-Oct. 9) from
$345
dbtoooup.
.
Includaa 2 Meals Dairy-3 Meals Sabbath and Holidays
I 41 Days-I I Ntghta(Sapt.2BOct.B) From $3202;
O Days 5 Nights (Split Stay) From $270 m
EARLY RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
Phone Sam Waldman: 538-5731 or 534-4751
On The Ocean at 43rd Street
m
IF YOU CARE...
about
Membership in a Conservative Congregation
Worshipping in one of America's most inspiring Sanctuaries
on Shabbat and Holy Days
A pulpit that challenges and stimulates
Music that enhances our ancient liturgy
Superlative education for your children in the only fully
accredited United Synagogue Religious School in Palm Beach
County.
An award winning U.S. Y. program for Jewish Youth
Jewish self-expression through Men's Club, Sisterhood, Young
Couples and singles.
IP YOU TRULY CARE...
about
The Suvival of the Jewish People
Personal identification as a Jew
A Jewish legacy for your children
MEET US AT
peraon
OUR RABBI
Howard J. Hirach
OUR CANTOR
Elaine Shapiro
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida
OPEN HOUSE
Every Sunday Morning beginning August 23rd
1 8334)339 OUR EDUCATION DJBg;l
Rath Lev**
WE CARE! *~ '


I August 21,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 13
tobert Segal
oing 2,000 bomb pound-
Saddam Hussein's nuclear
ok only two minutes for
skyfignters; but the
and moralistic fall-out
to stretch into time
[end.
then, should the
[focus be now?
[observer sees two prime
or great concern: I) the
pent of Humankind had
[uckle the problem of
proliferation with fjery
nation in search for a firm
tathat madneae; 2) the
Jewish community and its
, must open the eyes of
to the perfidy of those
2 Iraq and like-minded op-
s everywhere.
OR the nuclear race, it
_ clear that the Interna-
Itbmic Energy Agency, as
tly constituted, is
Jg its job. Suppliers and
Its of enriched uranium
fonological know-how for
telopment of potentially
live nuclear power may be
^ to live by their own
ntil an alarmed world
the screws of control.
-1 France may enter great
pers or responsibility now
king Iraq to construct
lenachem Begin felt sure
monstrous weapon intend-
Ehe destruction of Israel;
le in nuclear ingredients is
profitable and the thirst
(oil is insatiable.
[nited States, a front run-
ting the world's leading
has a special need to '
fast on an approach to
blem of the accelerating
on of nuclear weaoon*.
fly after inauguration,
Bt Reagan said that he
oink the manufacture of
engines of destruction by
iRlec/s
CRatT
f")e seafood m the
pttMuer tradition
L'Jfs Ocean ttvd
.?.*or,n *"nuti
p"secn
6591500
j" tKPf aw Honored
Where is World Justice Hiding?
other nations waa any of <
business. The strike by Israel
against Baghdad, however it is
judged in the market of world
opinion, will certainly serve the
good cause of arousing American
leaders from such somnolence.
AS TO OUR second concern -
who knows what about Iraq and
its treatment of Jews and other
human targets of its wrath in-
formation must be broadcast
once more that before 1948 the
2,700-year-old Jewish community
of Iraq numbered 125,000 far and
away the largest Jewish popula-
tion in any Arab state. By 1979
there remained in Iraq 300 Jews,
practically all too aged to muster
strength to attempt leaving.
Turn next to The Near East
Report of a Baghdad day etched
in the records of infamy: "Bagh-
dad Radio, Jan. 27, 1969, called
upon Iraqis to 'come and enjoy
the feast.' Some 500,000 men,
women and children paraded and
danced past the scaffolds where
the grotesque bodies of the
hanged Jews swung; the mob
rhythmically chanted 'Death to
iriser
"604
s to come earlyi
special early evening
(features values on
rn Kln9 crab tegs, Maine
W, Poached Smoked
f. Chined Raw Bar
r Broiled Bay Scallops.
F schrod Florentine.
Poin steak. Charbrolled
TSI r Salmon, and
"Olcefromourdallv
catch.
""set special dinners
'Charley* Chowder.
JJ. Coie siaw. and
"lce of Vegetable.
"17.95 to $io .95 per'
worth!
* 5-6 p.m.
p.m.
Israel' and 'death to all traitors.'
Hanged in Baghdad's public
square! An oft-repeated report.
And this waa one of the few times
that anyone in Iraq's government
circles would even think of the
Jewish state as an entity. When
Iraq's President Hussein made it
clear that any nuclear explosives
he mights come to possess would
be used not against Iran but
against the target to the south of
Iraq, he built upon his myth that
there was no State of Israel
only a gang of Zionist murderers
and expansionists.
FROM THE days of 807 of the
Common Era, when Caliph
Haroun al Rashid fastened the
yellow badge of shame upon
Baghdad's Jews, down through
the 1940s when the pro-Nazi
heads of state in Iraq inspired
rioting against the Jews of Iraq
and initiated anti-Jewish laws
modeled after the Nuremberg
code and on into our own times
under Hussein's fanatical leader-
ship, Jews have suffered humilia-
tion and persecution beyond
belief in Iraq. Destruction of
Jewish cemeteries and tomb-
stones, expropriation of property,
forcible expulsion all are woven
into Iraq's brutal record.
And now the United Nations
wants Israel to pay for damage
done to the Osirak nuclear
reactor; the Third World bloc in
the UN asked for sanctions to be
imposed on Israel; Saddam Hus-
sein represents himself as an
injured hero. Where are the twins
understanding and justice
hiding?
Seven Arts Feature
LAWRENCE I. MARCUS, M.D.
Diplomate, American Board of
Psychiatry and Neurology
ANNOUNCES THE
RELOCATION OF HIS OFFICE
TO
951 N.W. 13th STREET-SUITE 1-A
BOCA RATON, FLORIDA 33432
TELEPHONE 368-9933
HOW TO_____ _____
KIBITZ WITH A KIBBUTZ IN HAIFA
DIAL DIRECT
Does your area have Inrernarional Dialing? Then you con coll around rhe world
in almosr no rime. How? Dy dialing yourself. Wirhour Operaror assisrance. And
wirhour waiting. Here's how ro dial Haifa:
INIErtNAIKJNAl casicoo(
country coot
CITY coot
011 + 972 + 4+ LOCALNUMDER
Dialing direct saves more than rime ir saves you a lor of money $4.50, more
than 47% on a 3-minure call ro Haifa placed any day during rhe week.
ALMOST DIRECT
This is rhe nexr besr way ro save rime if your area doesn'r have Inrernarional
* Dialing yer. Dial 0, and be ready ro give rhe Operaror rhe counrry dry and local
Telephone number you wonr. Specify Srarion or Person. The fewer quesrions rhe
Operaror musr ask, rhe fasrer you'll connecr. On Srarion calls nor requiring special
operaror assisrance, you can ger rhe same low rates os Inrernarional Dialing.
PS. Everyone can dial direcr ro Canada, rhe Caribbean, Alaska, Hawaii,
and parrs of Mexico-jusr as you dial direcr ro ciries inside rhe conrinenral U.S.
Ordering oranges or finding a friend, keep a record of rhe counrry and
city codes you use and use rhem ro call rhe world-fosr!___________________
cooes for pwncipai arts w isaael (972)
AMo
Ato
Oar torn
65 Dimooo
4 Hatofo
51 HfXfa
3 Hotoo
OwrStevo 57 )uK*m
57 Noxornti 65
63 Naramo 53
4 ft*hovo> 54
3 WAvtv 3
2 Tbanat 67
Southern BeN


>*
-rage n
Browsing in Books
By ANN BLICHER
Temple Israel
Library Committee
"THE HALF JEW
By Robert BeeoveJs
Now, while the poignant mem-
ory of the Reunion of Holocaust
Survivors is so fresh, it seems
suitable to call our readers atten-
tion to two books from the
shelves of Temple Israel Com-
munity Library. They deal with a
different kind of survivor
those who remained in what they
really believed were their own
countries, whose governments
and their fellow citizens would
not betray them.
How wrong they were is under-
lined by the recent interview with
one of these survivors, Henri
Bouton, as part of the series on
the Reunion in the Past. "The
Half-Jew" by Robert Beauvais,
gives us the full picture of what
happened in Vichy, France
through the eyes of a 12-year-old
boy, Jean-Jacques Benoit, the
son of a Jewish father and a
Catholic mother. Both have dis-
carded their religious beliefs and
observances, and consider them-,
selves "free thinkers," although
Jean was baptized as an infant
"just as a formality." The rela-
tionship between Papa and Jean
is close and loving and is ex-
pressed in a secret language of
their own, baaed on the Arsene
Lupin stories, which both of them
have practically memorized. The
printing shop, inherited by Papa
from bis father, provides a good
living for this petit bourgois
family, and Maman adds to it by
her job as a kindergarten teacher.
The Armistice, which the
French greet like a stroke of good
fortune, allowing them to go back
to business as usual, finds Jean
and Maman in Paris, and Papa in
the South, seeking his demobili
zatbn center when he can turn ir.
his weapon and become a civilian
again. The family comes together
in Nice. General Petain runs this ,
part of France, by permission of
the Germans, and it is here that I
the endemic anti-Semitism of the
French blossoms in the open.
Day and night the radio and the
press hammer away at one theme
, France lost the war on account
of the Jews, or better yet, France
would never have entered the war
were it not for the perfidious
Jews.
Maman, a tower of strength
who is determined to save her
family at all costs, obtains a job
as kindergarten teacher in a small
town much farther South, and
they move there. To further hide
the fact that Papa is Jewish, she
insists that they all attend Mass
every Sunday. She succeeds so
well that Jean is able to be sent to
an upper-class Catholic boys'
school, and Papa even receives a
certificate testifying to his au-
thentic Gentileness and is able
to get a small job with the city
administration. What this does
to Papa's self-respect and per-
sonality is achingly recognized
by this very bright teen-ager
even though Jean's love for his
father is not lessened. In his
school, compelled to hide his half-
Jewishness, he is bound to con-
tinue living the same he as his
father. Otherwise he puts his
father in jeopardy, just as his
father would endanger his son if
he were to confess his true origin.
Now Jean begins to question
himself Is it true what they
say? Are Jews really tricky and
deceitful? Am I able to carry this
deception off because of my
Jewish heritage?" As surely as
the beatings by a Nazi guard in a
camp, leave scars on the body,
these verbal beatings leave scars
on the psyche; on the soul, as we
see later in the book.
The family survives the war,,
their Catholic cover never
broken, and not long before the
end they return to Paris, where
Papa dies of cancer and is buried
with full Catholic ceremony from
his parish church, and Maman
goes back to teaching kindergar-
ten in Paris. Jean is 16 when the
war ends and is now attending I
the Lycee in Paris, glad to be
finished with his false Catholic-
ism.
The Third Part, dealing with
Jean-Jacques life after the "takes
his baccalaureate" or graduates
from High School, at first seemed
to this reader to be utterly unbe-
lievable and entirely out of char-
acter. But then one thinks "What
character?" That of the child,
who learned honor and truth and
dignity from his father, or the
adolescent who had to see his I
father forego all of these noble
qualities to keep his child alive,
and he himself for going them to
keep his father from the death
camps? However, I still must
quibble with the ending. It is a
bit too pat and tailored for Jew-
ish readers.
Robert Beauvais is a well-
known French humorist and
satirist, and there is plenty of
both in this very well-written
book, and the translation into
English is superb.
RICHARD A LYNN, M.D., F ACS.
Proudly Announces
The Association Of
PAUL R. LIEBMAN, M.D.
IN THE PRACTICE OF
GENERAL AND VASCULAR SURGERY
2601 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
Phone: 655 1877
Dr. I. Goodman
Chiropractor
Boynton Plaza
1W* N. Conejreea Ava. IN w 2nd Ami
oynton Beach
Backaches Headaches
Pinched Nerves Disc Problems
Arthritis* Sciatica Neuralgia
Phone 737-5591
Offlca Hrs. Mon.. Tues.. Wad.. Fri
112.29
Thurt bSet
MEDICARE, WORKMEN'S COMP
AND MOST INSURANCES INCLUDE CHIROPRAfmr
RICHARD E. KOWALSKY, M.D., P.A.
NORMAN S. COHEN, M.D.
Announce the opening of an office in Del ray Beach I
for the practice of
OBSTETRICS-GYNECOLOGY and INFERTILITY
909 Palm Trail
Suite 202
Del ray Beach, Fla. 33444
(305) 278-4442/278-4448
By Appointment Only
... -GenzPlazal
299 W. Camino Gardens Boulevard
Boca Raton, Fla. 33432
(305)392-4477
By Appointment Only
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
Orthodox
Altz Chalm Congregation Century Village
W. Palm Beach Phone; 689-4675 Sabbath services 9Vm
p.m. Dally services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. and*l
Congregation Anshei Emuna
551 Brittany L, Kings Point. Delray Beach 33446 Phone 499.71m
499-9229 Harry Silver, President Daily services 8 am and5
Saturdays and Holidays 9 am. "'
Reform
Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach 33407 Phone 831
8421 Dr. Irving B. Cohen, Rabbi Emeritus Dr. Richard G. 6t*a_
man, President Stephen J. Goldstein, Administrator Sabbath Ser-
vices. Friday 8 p.m. ,
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton 33432 Phone 39i-
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath j
vices Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9:15 a.m. Torah Study with Ratal
Singer Sabbath morning services 10:30 a.m.
Temple Sinai
at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swlnton Ave., Delrni'
Mailing address 2005 N.W. 9 Street, Delray Beach, 33444 Rabt
Samuel Silver President Lawrence Sommers (272-2906) Friday
services at 8:15 p.m.
Temple Beth Torah of Palm Beach County
at St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd. and
Wellington Trace, West Palm Beach Mailing address: 1125 Jack
Pine St., West Palm Beach 33411 Rabbi Edward Cohn President
Ronnie Kramer (793-2700) Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Temple Judea
Rabbi Joel L Levlne Cantor Rita Shore Barbara Chant
President 1407 14th Lane, Lake Worth, PL 33463 Phone 9
7778 Services Friday evenings at 8 p.m. Meeting at St
Catherine's Greek Orthodox Church Social Hall 4000 Washington
Rd at Southern Blvd
Conservative Liberal
Tempi* Eternal Light
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West Glades Road (1 mie I
west of Boca Turnpike)The Free Synagogue, P.O. Bo 3, Boca|
Raton 33432 Phone: 388-1600,391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Conservative
Qolden Lakes Temple
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., W. Palm Beach, Fl. 33411 Rabbi Joiepk
Spelser President: William M. Mach 684-1968.
, Temple Beth El
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach 33407 Phonrtt* 1
0339 Rabbi Howard J. Hirech Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sabbatt
services, Friday, 6:30 p.m., except June 19th. Saturday at Ml |
a.m. Dairy Minyan at 8:16 a.m., Sunday at 9 am
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street. West Palm Beech 33409 Phone 684-3212 Office'
hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman Cantor Mordecai
Spektor Services daily 8:30 a.m and 7:30 p.m. Friday, 8:30 a.m.. i'
p.m. late services 8:16 p.m. followed by Oneg Shabbat Saturday. MO
a.m. 7 p.m. Mincha followed by Sholoah Seudos.
Congregation Beth Kodesh
at Congregational Church, 115, N. Federal Hwy., Boynton Beach'
Phone 737-4622 Rabbi Avrom L Drazln Sabbath services, Friday
8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.
Temple Beth Sholom
315 N. A' Street, Lake Worth 33480Phone 585-5020'RaW
Emanuel Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Services Mondays m
Thursday at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday at 9a.m.
Temple Beth David
at Westminister Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail. M"
Beach Gardena. Office at 321 Northlake Blvd. North P*
Beach Phone:846-1134 Rabbi William Mardar Sabbath eervicsv
Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday 10 am
Temple Beth Sholom
224 N.W. Avenue G', Belle Glade 33430 Cantor Jack Ststsman*
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
Temple B'nal Jacob
at Faith United Presbyterian Church. 275 AJameida Drive. W
Springs 33461 Temple B'nai Jacob. President Jacob Frant rW
964-0034 Sabbath services, Friday at 8 p.m Saturday at 9 am- ** j
days and Thursdays st 9 am
B'nal Torah Congregation M
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue. Boca Raton 33432 Phone: 932-8568
Nathan Zellzer Sabbath services. Friday 8:18 pjn. Saturday *30'm
.JSWaEm,th- *D#,f**HebrewCortgregajon j
p^LW2*! A,lan,te AvO0. "y Beach M*4* P"00* 48^5L
Rabbi Bernard Silver Cantor Ben|amln Adler Sabbath ler**
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 am. Dally Mlnyans at 845 am. "
ion > Temple Emanu-El ~m
o kk, ?h Coun^ *>* *" Beach 33480Phone: MMS* ,
Hebbl Joel Chazln Cantor David Dardaahtl Sabbath semes*,
Friday at 8:30 p.m. Saturday at 9 am. ______
"Temple Beth Zion
at Colony Building, 1030 Royal Palm Beach Blvd.. Royal ;
Beach Phone: 7938021 President Bryan Schwartz Sabba<"
vices. Friday night at 8 p.m:



L August 21,1981
7%e Jewkft Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 16
Local Synagogue News
TEMPLE JUDEA
Harvey Levine of Palm
Gardens has been named
L] of Temple Judea's
m school. He will be
ad by Carole Hujsa of
Palm Beach, chairperson
i Religious School Com-
.. Both Dr. Levine and Mrs.
fare well known to the com-
L as outstanding educa-
tor. Levine received hie
1 in education from Boston
Uty. Mrs. Hujsa received
I Judaic background from
Israel of Lawrence, Long
and Temple Shalom of
IChase, Maryland.
__will be housed at the
f Community Center, 2416
lobee Blvd., close to 196
[most convenient location
jmple families who come
ts far north as Jupiter.
(Goldberg of Palm Beach
ks, JCC Executive Direc-
ts made the beautifully
fed arts and crafts room
Boor playground for small
n available to Temple
A special feature of the
as program will be a
?-toddler class so even the
et will begin to feel com-
l in religious school. This
llong with kindergarten
i grade eight will meet on
mornings beginning
) from 10 a.m. till noon.
A unique midweek Hebrew
program of private instruction
will be included in the Tuesday
evening program beginning Sept.
15 from 7 to 9 p.m. Each student
will be tutored according to his or
her language ability. Priorities
include reading fluency, mastery
of the major Sabbath and Festi-
val prayers both in Hebrew and
English, and conversational
Hebrew.
Ninth through 12th grade
classes will also meet Tuesday
evenings. Sherry Mittoldorf o"f
Palm Beach Gardens, will direct
the youth program. Mrs. Mittol-
dorf is nationally known for her
expertise in youth group work.
She directed 150 students in
Detroit at Temple Israel and re-
ceived national acclaim for her
work in the state of Michigan.
Members of her youth program
have continued their Jewish
education leading to careers as
rabbis, cantors, and educators.
Rabbi Joel Levine will be
working closely with the entire
staff following an over-all theme
of Jewish Living from Biblical
through contemporary times.
Highlights of this program in-
clude the synagogue and its
symbols, ethics old and new, the
Jewish life cycle, a passport to
Israel, international Jewish
living, twentieth century Jewish
experience, the ten command-
ments, comparative religion,
Jewish Quiz Box
RETIREE FREE RENT
Need Drivers Licence plus
small salary
in exchange for service to
Semi-invalid gentleman
Lantana Area
Phone:585-1136
[he Jewish
Community
las A Right
lb Know:
There are several funeral chapels in South
Florida that serve those of the
Jewish faith.
SOME OF THESE CHAPELS ARE NOT
OWNED BY JEWS.
Even more disturbing, they do not make this
fact apparent to the Jewish community.
MENORAH CHAPELS ARE THE ONLY
JEWISH-OWNED CHAPELS BETWEEN
HOLLYWOOD AND WEST PALM BEACH
AND THE OLDEST IN BROWARD COUNTY.
At Menorah Chapelt, unlike the others,
serving the Jewish community is more than
a business it's a way of life.
raditions of our faith and the concerns of our
pe should be genuine. It's your right, and we are
* of our religion.
leno&hm
742-
Dade, 94^3939.
Palm Beech, 833-0887.
.Jfl chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
I'ocations in Sunrise, Deerfieid Beach and Margate.
"J2!]joNorthJMiami Beach. _________
comparative Judaism, and the
Jewish family.
Mr. and Mrs. Terry Ernst of
Indian town have offered their
large ranch for day programs and
weekend retreats. Temple youth
will be able to study with famous
scholars and creative specialists
in a sttting rich in recreational '
activities such as horseback
riding, fishing, and wildlife
appreciation.
Music will be coordinated with
synagogue services which stress
congregational singing. Fran
Golden of North Palm Beach will
be teaching the students how to
feel more comfortable musically
during services.
For information and registra-
tion, call the Temple office at 965-
7778 or Helaine Kahn, member-
ship chairperson, 626-5321.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
The Men's Club of Temple
Beth David invites you to attend
a picnic at the north pavillion,
Carlin Park in Jupiter on Sun-
day, Aug. 30 at 9 a.m. Bring your
own food, as drinks and charcoal
will be provided. No alcoholic
beverages or beer please. Send a
$5 check per family payable to
Temple Beth David Men's Club,
in care of Len Karmelin, 10123
Dahlia Avenue, Palm Beach
Gardens, Fl. 33410.
Temple Beth David is a con-
servative congregation located in '
Palm Beach Gardens.
TEMPLE BETH KODESH
Temple Beth Kodeah Sister-
hood will have their first meeting
on Sept. 1, 12:30 p.m., at the
First Congregational Church, 115
No. Federal Highway, Boynton
Beach. Dr. Harry Haselkorn, who
is on the staff of the Lake Hos-
pital, will speak on "Stress and
Modem Day Living for Senior
Citizens." There will be a ques-
tion and answer period. Friends,
neighbors and husbands are in-
vited. Refreshments will be
served.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Temple Israel, 1901 No.
Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach,
i will honor The Post at a special
Sabbath Service on Friday, Aug.
28 at 8 p.m. for its outstanding
series on the World Gathering of
Holocaust survivors.
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman will
conduct the service and Dr.
Richard G. Shugarman, presi-
dent of Temple Israel, will pre-
sent an award to Thomas Kelly,
editor of The Post for its out-
standing journalism. Linda
' Duffy, reporter for The Post, who
wrote the series will briefly ex-
press her feelings and comment
on her observations and impres-
sions while covering this event.
Her articles and pictures of the
event, taken by Max Kaufman,
photographer for The Post, will
be displayed in Temple Israel
Social Hall following the service.
Henri Bouton of West Palm
' Beach, a survivor of the Holo-
caust, will speak on his ex-
periences of the World Gather-
ing, and the significance of the
I event. The area residents who
attended the World Gathering
will also participate. The entire
community is invited to attend.
Temple Ianel, 1901 No.
Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach,
' FL 33407, is offering tickets for
their Hinh Holy Days Services
for visitors to the community.
Interested parties may contact
the Temple office.
Tempk Israel. 1901 No.
FlwrJerDrive, West Palm Beach,
is wbeduled to open iU Religious
School on Sunday, Sept. 13 at
I 9:30 a.m. Ceceil Tiahman, prmci-
Sd is now accepting registration
r families with children in kin-
dergarten to eighth grade. In-
terested persons may contact
Mrs. Tiahman in the school
office.
By RABBI
SAMUEL J. FOX
(Jewish Telegraphic Agency!
QUESTION: Why is the first
meal eaten by the mourners after
the burial traditionally prepared
by neighbors and not by the
mourners themselves?
ANSWER: This is generally
traced to the passage in the Book
of Ezekiel (24:17) where the
prophet is ordered not to follow
the usual mournning practices,
included in which the Biblical
passage states "eat not the bread
of others." A number of reasons
are offered for this practice. First
of all, the mourners who return
from the cemetery are sad and
dejected. If neighbors do not pre-
pare and serve them some food
they are likely not to eat. The
Jewish faith ordains that after
the funeral a process of coming
back to reality and readjustment
should take place. Secondly,
being obligated to bring them
food, the neighbors will be en-
couraged to join them and help
them out of their feeling of
isolation. Generally, the meal is
sort of a covenantal experience in
the sense that people who have
been shocked by the passing of a
close relative seem to get a feel-
ing of challenging the Almighty's
justice. The meal serves the
function of bringing the
Almighty and mourner back into
the covenantal relationship. The
neighbors who supply the meal
give the impression that there are
those who do care and who ex-
press the care of the Almighty by
their kindness.
QUESTION: Why are eggs
traditionally served at this first
meal for the mourners?
ANSWER: A variety of rea-
sons are offered for this custom.
First, the roundness of the egg
gives a feeling of eternity which
reflects our traditional belief in
the immortality of the soul. Sec-
ond, the egg gives way to a birth
of a new organism. This reminds
us that even though the egg no
longer retains its original form it
has led to a new life. Likewise,
even though we cannot physical-
ly experience the identity of the
deceased relative any more, the
loved one has been reborn into a
heavenly existence in the Para-
dise of the Almighty.
KRAVITZ, HERBERT
The American ORT Federation and the Florida
region of Men's ORT deeply mourn the sudden
and untimely passing of our officer and good
! friend, Herbert Kravitz. We extend heartfelt
condolences to his family.
IEVITT
rONSTHN
Serving the greater Florida area
in the finest of Jewish tradition.
WEST RMjM BEACH 68*3700
DELRAY BEACH 278-7600
5411
MGroahow
ADrtreSTHATOH
Jack Sanders F.D. Julian Almeida F.D.
Pre Arranged Funerals Available Thru
Guaranteed Security Plan
Eternal 0i
^vfe-moria! Gardens
South Palm Beach & Broward Counties'
Most Beautiful All Jewish Perpetual Care Cemetery
HAS STARTED CONSTRUCTION ON ITS
FEATURE MAUSOLEUM
SPECIAL PIICC ON ALL CRYPTS SHI IN AUGUST
Anticipated completion date October
For further information, send this coupon today:
1 ETERNAL LIGHT MEMORIAL PARK < Route #1, Box 271A Boynton Beach, Fl 33437 NAMF OR CALL 737-2210 272-0098
! STRF.F.T
1 CITY ZIP *#
1 PHONE JF


y '
rage 10
'*>' MTtWIM TMACCO CO
Ultra
Salem's
lowest low tar.
Only 5 mg tar.
5 mg. "tar". 0.4 mg. njcotina av. p cigarene by FTC method.


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EFRZ5NNUE_PRWDCU INGEST_TIME 2013-06-13T15:28:48Z PACKAGE AA00014311_00254
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES