Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00231

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewiSi
Wiai&n
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Roach County
i_ Number 20
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, October 3,1980
Frm Snoclft
Price 35 Cent*
s~?\
Baptists Rap Smith on Jews
Gruber to Highlight
Women's Assembly
Iruber, author and
of the National
kward for her best
will be a guest
Jewish Women's
jnsored by the
>n of the Jewish
Palm Beach
Assembly will be
Ireakers in Palm
|7, from 9 a.m. to
best known for
the Middle East,
foreign corres-
The New York
She has covered
s Israel, Alaska,
tic, Puerto Rico
)y correspondent
ron curtain that
[dropped on the
ips at Cyprus in
er prize-winning
the biography
es, a nurse and
aught lives into
the years before
fence.
the author of 14
ed college at the
1932, at the age
er doctorate from
f Cologne, Ger-
time, she was
world's youngest
[on Israel and the
11 be highlighted
session of the
Dr. Ruth Gruber
Jewish Women's Assembly. The
registration fee includes moming
coffee and lunch. Space is limited,
and registration will be closed on
Oct. 20. Invitations are now in
the mail.
The Assembly co-chairmen are
Renee Bassuk and Adele Simon.
Other members of the committee
are: Sheryl Davidoff. Sondra
Elliot, Ruthe Eppler, Carole
Hujsa, Fran Gordon, Carole
Koeppel, Paulette Koch, Staci
Lesser, Jeanne Levy, Sylvia
Lewis, Cynnie List, Shelly
Robinson, Marjorie Schimelman,
Barbara Shulman and Barbara
Wunsh. For further information,
contact the Women's Division.
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Leading Baptist ministers
and educators from several
states have strongly de-
plored Dr. Bailey Smith,
president of the 13 million-
member Southern Baptist
Convention, for his public
remark last month that
"God Almighty does not
hear the prayer of a Jew."
Scores of letters address-
ed directly to Smith, to
various Baptist church or-
gans and to American Jew-
ish leaders involved in in-
ter-faith affairs, denounced
Smith's views as contrary
to the Scriptures and unfair
and insulting to Jews.
A number of the letters were
just made public here by the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith which has long been
engaged in dialogue with
Southern Baptists on such topics
as the Jewish roots of
Christianity and the Jewishness
of Jesus and his disciples.
SMITH'S REMARKS, made
at the National Affairs Briefing,
a gathering of Fundamentalist
Christians in Dallas on Aug. 22,
were recorded by the regional
representative of the American
Jewish Committee. The
AJCommittee subsequently
disseminated the transcripts.
In a letter dated Sept. 12
addressed to Rabbi Solomon
Bernards, co-director of the
ADL's department of interfaith
affairs, J William Ange'll,
professor of religion at Wake
Forest University in Winston-
Salem, N.C., charged that Smith
"has joined himself to the
nefarious company of Haman,
Hitler, Arafat and Khomeine."
He observed that Smith's
"statements are not only untrue,
unscriptural and unkind; they
are also, as you know, far
removed from the teachings and
spirit of the Jesus whom he
pretends to serve." Angpil added,
"I do wish Dr. Smith would
pause at least long enough to
realize that Jesus was a Jew a
loyal and faithful Jew. Does that
mean that God would not hear
him?"
ANOTHER letter addressed to
Bernards on Sept. 14 from Bob
Wallace, Pastor of Grants Creek
Missionary Baptist Church in
Maysville, N.C., said Smith's
remarks were "another painful
reminder of this man's ignorance.
He may well be speaking for the
majority of Southern Baptists,
but he does not speak for me. I
repudiate his statement."
A letter to. Smith on Sept. 3
form the Rev. Glenn Inglehart,
director of the Southern Baptist
Convention's Interfaith Witness
Department, reminded him that:
"In our materials and training
conferences we teach Baptists to
share their faith without apology
and without offense. We and
those whom we train speak
directly to our Jewish friends of
our conviction in the uniqueness
of God's act in Jesus of Nazareth
for the redemption of all persons,
Jews as well as Gentiles.
"That conviction we can affirm
heartily. But to state that God
only hears the prayers of
Christians when they pray is
another matter. Of course when a
Jew prays, it is a Jewish prayer,
not a Christian prayer. But I feel
that we must be wary of placing
restrictions on whom God will
listen to."
John Laney, Minister of the
Twinbrook Baptist Church in
Rockville, Md., stated in letters
to The Maryland Baptist in
Lutherville, and The Capitol
Baptist. published in
Washington, D.C., that the God
posited by Smith "would be a
God who would have listem>d to
the silent Christians in Nazi Ger-
many while turning a deaf ear
co the millions of Jews who cried
out from the concentration camps
"1 CANNOT conceive of a God
who would eagerly listen to Jerry
Falwell and Bailey Smith but
who would not tolerate a prayer
from such great souls of the
recent past as Martin Buber and
Abraham Heschel,"
Another letter to Smith from
Jack Altman, Pastor of the
Second Baptist Church of
Cumberland, Md., stated as its
subject "Your anti-Jewish
remarks at the Religious Round-
table" in Dallas. In that con-
nection, he wrote: "Such
reckless, insensitive words by the
president of the Southern Baptist
Convention contribute nothing of
a positive nature to the work of
our Interfaith Witness dialogues
with our Jewish friends."
The Rev. Alfred Johnson, Jr.,
Pastor of the First Baptist
Church of Gary, N.C., wrote to
Smith: "We do have our dif-
ferences with Judaism con-
cerning the messiahship of Jesus.
But no true Christian doubts for
one moment that both Christians
and Jews worship and pray to the
same God and that He hears
them. Jesus himself in John 4.22
says that 'Salvation comes from
the Jews.' Please be careful what
you say in the future."
in Appointed Endowment Director
(man, president of
deration of Palm
recently an-
appointment of
to serve as
)r.
lew York, Hyman
New York City
College and the
Bridgeport. He
degree from St.
>ty.
practiced law in
N.Y., where he
il estate develop-
s, financing and
lg. He served as
tr'ct attorney in
r'ty and was at-
for the U.S.
Housing and
pment in New York
[served in the cor-
department of the
Co. Hyman is a
New York and
e and his wife,
Wellington with
iters, Tamara and
nent Fund of the
ion of Palm Beach
n in existence for
years. In that
Stanley Hyman
period, the assets of the fund
have grown to over $2.9 million.
Anticipated contributions
presently in the pipeline total
over $450,000. Though some of
these are contingent, neverthe-
less, there are many people in this
community who recognize the
need and their responsibility to
assure the future of Jewish
agencies and institutions by pro-
viding the means to meet new
needs, carry out special programs
and cope with emergency con-
ditions.
The opportunity to participate
in the program ia not limited to
the affluent. Numerous and sig-
nificant testamentry bequests are
anticipated from concerned
people, some of limited means.
Their foresight and generosity in
making provision in their wills is
one of our greatest and yet un-
tapped community resources.
The Endowment Fund of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County invites and welcomes
participation by all members of
this community. Gifts to the
Fund may be in the form of cash
or property, real estate or
securities. Such gifts may be
made during the lifetime of a
donor, or under the terms of a
will. They may be outright or in
trust. Tax savings on a bequest
or other endowment gifts, made
possible by tax laws designed to
encourage philanthropy, can
result in substantial tax savings
to the donor and his estate.
As full-time endowment direc-
tor, Hyman and members of the
legal and tax committee of the
Federation are available to meet,
at no charge or obligation, with
prospective donors and / or their
counsel, to discuss structuring an
endowment gift or bequest in a
manner most advantageous to
the donor and the Federation.
Carter 'Determined' To
Press for Mideast Talks
WASHINGTON (JTA) President Carter
declared here that he i8 "determined that progress for a
summit meeting" between himself, Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin
"will not interfere with substantive negotiations" for
West Bank-Gaza Strip autonomy.
CARTER TOLD a nationally-televised White House
press conference that he was optimistic on the Middle
East situation because "top level negotiations" were now
going on in Washington between Israeli Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir, Egyptian Foreign Minister Kamal
Hassan AH and U.S. special envoy Sol Linowitz.
Carter, in his remarks, ignored the original question,
whether there could be progress in the Mideast if there
was no discussion of the Jerusalem issue.
Count- striae
Pretoria News


tmfgBT
The Jewish Fbridian of Palm Beacn county
UJA Stages first Singles Mission
Frid*y.OetoK-
"AU my life I denied my
Jewiahnesa. I never understood
the deep ties between Judaism,
Israel and my own life. On this
mission, for the first time, I was
proud to be a Jew. I'll never make
light of my Jewishness again."
In a meeting room of a Tel aviv
hotel, a 24-year-old woman, her
voice trembling with emotion,
rose to announce her first gift to
the United Jewish Appeal. She
was followed to the microphone
by 93 other young men and
women, most visiting Israel for
the first time as members of the
first UJA Singles Mission.
Before the mission, these
declarations of commitment
would have been impossible. The
majority of the young men and
women, ranging in age from 21 to
46, were out of touch with
organized Jewish life and
Federation activities in their 20
home communities.
The concept of a Singles
Mission was initiated at the UJA
National Young Leadership
Conference in Washington, DC.
last spring. The mission's Co
Chairmen Ellen Brachman,
Chicago, National Mission's
chairman for the Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet, and Carl
Kaplan, Washington, D.C.,
Region II chairman for the
Young Leadership Cabinet
were convinced that the UJA
could "turn on" a group of en-
thusiastic but univolved young
Jewish singles by innovative
programming. The idea caught
on among other singles attending
the Conference, whose recruit-
ment efforts resulted in capacity
participation.
the group's itinerary covered :
the length and breath of Israel
from Jerusalem to Golan, from
the Galilee to Massada, and
included special briefings by high
govememtn officials as well as
informal encounters with a cross-
section of Isral's people from
children at a UJA-supported day
care center to olim (newcomers)
at an absorption center.
Three separate hospitality
programs in Jerusalem with a
singles professional group, in
Haifa with singles male and
female naval officers and a
pioneer kibbutz, gave mission
participants a chance to meet and
get to know their Israeli coun-
terparts. At the Jerusalem event,
the young Israelis were so eager
to meet the UJA group that 160
came to an event to which only 50
had been invited.
At a border settlement the
group was overwhelmed with
kindness and hospitality. "They
are struggling just to start but
they strung up brightly colored
lights and prepared a picnic
dinner for us. The whole kibbutz
came out to welcome us, all 25 of
them. We easily outnumbered
them," Kaplan said.
MISSION participants, evenly
divided between men and women,
represented a wide range of
trades and professions, including
attorneys, teachers, social
workers, bankers, doctors, slaes
people, travel agents, engineers,
secretaries, and computer
analysts.
"Our fund-raising efforts were
tremendously successful," said
Mission leader Ellen Brachman.
"There's no doubt that the
mission expereience succeeded in
changing the attitudes of most of
the participants. They started
out unaffiliated and unconcerned
Jews. They returned committed
and caring" Harvey White, a
member of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County's Young
Leadership program represented
Palm Beach County on the
mission.
Day School PTA Meeting
The Jewish Community Day
School held its first PTA meeting
of the year on Sept. 7. Mrs.
Virshup, the PTA president,
reported that "approximately
150 parents, teachers and guests
gathered to meet each other and
hear the guest speaker, Judge
Jerome Homblass."
The Jewish Community Day
School children, teachers and
families were very busy this
month of "Tishri" because they
were involved in preparing for
and celebrating the holidays of
Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kuppur.
Sukkot. and Simchat Torah
Last week they celebrated
Sukkoth. Mrs. Gabrielli, a
teacher of Judaica at the school,
explains that "at this time we
remember when the Jewish
people wandered in the desert on
their way to the land of Israel.
Led by Moses, the people built
temporary shelters along the way
a.
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"The children helped to
decorate the Sukkah and ate their
| lunch in it all week to remind
them of our peoples' wandering."
"As we usher in the New Year
of 5741, we remember our people
looking for a permanent home,"
said Dr. Gerber, the Jewish
Community Day School's
curriculum director, noting an
analogy between then and now.
She explains, "Our Jewish
Community Day School too has
had a temporary shelter for the
past seven years and will at last
have its own permanent facility
this year." Everyone is delighted
at the steady growth and
development of the Jewish
Community Day School, and the
entire Jewish community is
eagerly anticipating the for-
thcoming groundbreaking
ceremony.
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Member FDIC Member Federal Reserve System


October 3, i
980
TheJewisJ^hridiar^^aln^ea^^<
ounty
Governor Reagan
has been pro-Israel
since that nation's
creation in 1948.
Los Angeles Times, May 1980
Governor Reagan's views on
Israel, the Middle East, and
the economy are not campaign
rhetoric.
A Record of Support
for the Jewish
Community and Israel.
In 1948, long before he became
Governor of California, he re-
signed from the Lakeside Country
Club in Los Angeles because it
refused membership to a Jew. In
1967, at a pro-Israel rally at the
Hollywood Bowl, he forcefully
expressed his concern for Israel's
safety during the six-day war. In
1971, he was instrumental in en-
acting a California law, one of the
first in the United States, autho-
rizing banks and savings institu-
tions to buy and invest in State of
Israel bonds. Other states followed
California's example, dramatically
enhancing the sales of Israel
bonds in this country. That same
year, Israel's Medallion of Valor
was conferred on Governor Reagan
at an Israel Bonds Dinner.
In a speech before the B'nai
B'rith Convention on September 3,
1980, Governor Reagan reaffirmed
his strong support for Israel.
He declared:
Israel is a major strategic
asset to America and a strong,
secure Israel is clearly in Amer-
ica's self interest. To weaken
Israel is to destabilize the Middle
East and risk the peace of the
whole world. As our democratic
ally, Israel must continue to
receive economic and defense
assistance.
The PLO is a terrorist orga-
nization whose leadership is
committed to violence and ag-
P*kJ for and authorized
gression against Israel.
The United States should not
try to force a peace settlement
upon Israel and her neighbors.
Rather, the terms of a settlement
should be decided in accordance
with the United Nations Resolu-
tions 242 and 338. Resolutions in
the United States which under-
mine Israel's positions and iso-
late her people should be vetoed
because they undermine progress
toward peace.
Jerusalem is now, and should
continue to be, one city, un-
divided, with continuing free
access for all.
Governor Reagan's views on
the Middle East are based on long-
term policies, not short-term poli-
tics. He has been a friend of Israel
for more than 30 years and his
record is one of long-standing
principles and commitments.
The election of Ronald
Reagan as president will place
a strong reliable leader in the
White House instead of the man
who sits there right now.
The Hallmark of
a Reagan Administration
will be Economic
Growth.
Ronald Reagan showed his
mettle as Governor of California.
He turned a $194 million state
budget deficit into a $554 million
surplus. During his two terms as
Governor the state's inflation rate
was lower than that in the rest of
the country. He reduced taxes and
slowed down the growth of state
government.
The kind of Governor Ronald
Reagan was tells us a good deal
about the kind of President he will
bv lp> Hu.h Commit. UmUd Stale* Senator I'.ul U..U Ch.,rm.n Hay Buchanan. Tr~,urW
be. A President capable of drawing
top talent to his administration,
to help pinpoint where govern-
ment programs can be made more
efficient, and to balance the bud-
get in order to bring down the
inflation rate that's been adversely
affecting all Americans, especially
older Americans on fixed incomes.
When Ronald Reagan says he
will stimulate productivity, check
inflation, and strive to balance the
federal budget you just know he's
talking the language and artic-
ulating the philosophy that has
been consistently his.
That's why Americans trust
him. You have a clear choice in
this year's election. And that
choice should be based on trust.
It is hoped that you and other
thoughtful American's will re-
member the key word: TRUST.
Compare Ronald Reagan's long-
term policies with Jimmy Carter's
short-term politics. Evaluate the
performance of Washington's do-
mestic and foreign policies over
the last 3V-2 years. When you DO,
you'll know that the time for
Reagan is INDEED, now.
The time is now
for Reagan.
Reagan & Bush.



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J"" ^-nnKihBBO Taoa? in* US na* nacnni- mo*
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mf inem
{Speakers for Pioneer Women Conclave
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poiiuca movemer ar
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RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Who named the Tmkey"?
A: Luis de Toires ii'ho called it -TUKKI
The Hebreu- word for peacock!
V-- .v;,-: -i5
.---*- -7*sKr or *-.o^do a-^c aw (
BBBBBI *rusad fnene^ -.. ->-
-^ migra me*- -.:-. rx ;,^,
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3 ~.-r> 2.->.-ir -,,-
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naaim. and ndnaa captawtd
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-:*,-
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A SOT-SO-RARE FACT
c TJi- ; ,v->- -a-------.< .- ..- ...
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^cs: Vd twcauM o t gnrai iasw
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aaacnas.
Ws a iact
J
RARE
SCOTCH


October 3, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
Ljtain, France, U.S. Step Up Arms Sales
they underline the continued to France, which concluded no
demand of Middle East states, fewer than seven agreements
especially the oil-producing with it, for Mirage fighters,
France and the countries, for sophisticated helicopters, and anti-tank and
Western weaponry and the anti-aircraft missiles. Italy also
, MAURICE SAMUELSON
liONDON (JTA)
/fare stepping up their
, supplies to the Middle
i^X in the past 12
onths, secured at least 34
ajor
arms contracts
spared with only four by
Soviet Union. This is
aled by the Inter-
tional
Institute
Studies in
for
its
readiness of Western states to
supply them in growing quan-
tities.
THE TWO superpowers are
still supplying their principal
clients. Thus the U.S. signed
major deals with Israel, Egypt
Jordan, Morocco and Saudi
Arabia, and the Soviet Union
pledged new supplies to Algeria.
trfitlC otUUl*5 m *. f~e~ o-^^-^o ~ B.
Ifflual "Military Balance"' MS Syria and North Yemen
ublished here. But tnere were significant
I Although the number of deals variations. Iraq, which
not necessarily reflect the previously drew many of its arms
anities of weapons delivered, from the USSR, has now turned
IRedgrave in Tuesday CBS
tole Called 'Insult, Injury'
|NEW YORK Vanessa
dgrave's starring role in a CBS
Jama on Auschwitz. scheduled
broadcast next Tuesday
Ight. will distract public at-
trition from the film's com-
endahle. original goal, which
a' to illuminate one episode in
monumental tragedy of the
Uocaust." the Anti-Defamation
Ugue nt B'nai H'nth said
kday
Redgrave, an outspoken
ipporter of Palestinian
trrorists. plays the role of a
IfWi'.h survivor in the made-for-
Uevision tilm. Playing far Time.
iritten by playwright Arthur
liller, u is based on the memoirs
Kama Kinelon. a half-Jewish
rarisian women who escaped
rath by playing in the death
|amp orchestra.
ACCORDING to Justin J.
finger, director of ADL's Civil
Rights Division, "Informed and
hnughtlul viewers, particularly
hose within the Jewish com-
nunity. will find it impossible to
batch the program without being
Itruck and disturbed by the
piousness of this casting
Vcisum. '
Finger emphasized that ADL
Opposed censorship or
blacklisting as "offensive" and
ppholds i he right of performers
lake any roles regardless of
rheir political beliefs.
Hut at the same time," he
we find it necessary to
' "iir right to publicly
Express our dismay at this
Commando
Raid Reported
ILL AVIV (JTA) i9raeii'
Paval commandos carried out a
Nrpnse raid last week On
|morisi targets in the south
p>anese (M)rt of Tyre and the
party Kashidiyeh refugee camp,
"military spokesman announced.
'w units carried out their
"ussion and returned safety to
/heir bases, the announcement
paid.
-The raid was the first of its
Kind on Tyre, a stronghold of
l"y man terrorists. A similar
pw was conducted against the
Port of Sidon some time ago.
I ACCORDING TO Lebanese
I ources. the Israeli force in last
lWnts attack consisted of four
I**- c?ft and a helicopter and
achieved surprise but later en-
I ounured heavy fire from
l^ronst shore batteries and anti-
|>rcraftgun8.
Israeli sources gave no
fW?1* of th casualties in-
wwd on the terroriaU. United
^"'""fsoureea in Lebanon mid
lne child was killed and 34 people
kg* injured in the Israeli atUck.
casting decision which is both an
insult and an in)ury to the
millions of victims of the Nazi
Holocaust."
emerged as a supplier to Iraq's
navy, agreeing to sell her four
frigates, six 660-ton Corvettes
and a support vessel.
The Soviet Union agreed to
supply the Iraqis with 40 trainer
aircraft and unknown quantities
of MIG 23s, MIG 26s and MIG
27 fighers.
LIBYA, whose armory already
included 2,400 Soviet tanks, also
turned to the West in the past
year; Spain agreed to sell her
three submarines; Canada, light
aircraft. France, anti-aircraft
missiles; Italy, armored cars:
and The Netherlands, one
transport aircraft.
Kuwait, traditionally supplied
by the West, moved in the op-
posite direction and bought
ground and air missiles from the
Soviet Union. Britian is selling
287 Shir tanks to Jordan, while
Saudi Arabia has contracted to
buy AMX infantry combat
vehicles and anti-aircraft systems
from France.
Egypt's Socialist Party Calls
For Liquidation of Israel
CAIRO (ZINS) Egypt's Socialist Party, in
opposition Jo the government, has issued a call for the
liquidation of Israel and its elimination from the map. The
call was made public in the official organ of the Socialist
Party, ElShaab, and was drafted by Ahmed Hassan, the
leader of the opposition, which has 23 representatives in
the Egyptian Parliament.
The manifesto declares that once Egypt has re-
covered "most of its territories, it has to reaffirm the
conviction that the only way of solving the Palestinian
problem is through the liquidation of the Jewish State by
military force. It goes on to say that Egypt must return to
the family of Arab nations. The alienation of Egypt from
the rest of the Arab world was compared to the separation
of a head from its body.
BOTH SITUATIONS, the pronouncement says, are
fatal. The leader of the opposition also sharply attacked
Prime Minister Begin and the Jews. "Begin is no more
than the chieftain of a terrorist band, and Israel was
created to be a thorn in the side of the Arab world. The
Jews must know that on the day of our victory, when we
shall demolish their State, we do not intend to cast the
people into the sea. We will not slaughter them as they
have murdered us. We intend to enable them to live in a
Palestinian, Moslem, secular state under the leadership of
the PLO."
The call ends with a demand on President Sadat to
abandon the process of normalizing relations with Israel
and to recall the Egyptian Ambassador from Tel Aviv.
lt0J MVNOIM TOCCOCO
New SalemUltra
that stands toi
WIISiV.I1"W
U^tTwweT%m"*" *"i*"" i*' "9

Page6
-ifiwUtfhrkmri
7
Frid"y.0ctob*3,,
Community Calendar
Oct. 3 :

SIMCHAT TOR AH Bnoi B'rith Century board JO a.m. Con- *
grega lion Beth Kodeth boord lOo.m.
Oct. 4 j
FEDERATION YOUNG LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
oct.s
Women's American ORT Evening Family Picnic Jewith War I
Veieron* #501 -9:45 a.m.
Oct. 6 -:
Temple Emanu-EI Sitlerhood board 9:45 o.m Hadosiah *
Tikvah board 10 o.m. Temple Beth El Sisterhood board 8 J
p.m. Hadassah West Palm Beach board Jewish Com-
muniiy Day School board 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women '.
Masado Freeport trip Women's American ORT Palm Beach *
board 10 a.m. Congregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood
board 930 am Hadassah Golda Meir Study group 10 I
o.m. B'nai B'rith Women Boynton Beach Freeport trip
Jewish Family & Children's Service Executive Board 7:30 p.m. I
Women's American ORT Royal Palm Beach board 9:30 J
a.m. B'nai B'rith #3046 board 3 p.m Bnoi B'rith #3016
board 3 p.m. Congregation Anshe- Sholom Men's Club I
board 10 am Temple Israel Sisterhood board -10a.m. [
Oct. 7
Congregation Beth Kodesh Sisterhood 12:30 p.m. Temple I
Israel Men's Club 6:30 p.m. American Jewish Congress *
12:30 p.m. Women's American ORT Westgate Pioneer
Women Ezrat Yiddish Culture Group 10 a.m. Women's I
League of Israel 1 p.m. Temple Beth El board 8 p.m. FED-
ERATION CHAPLAIN'S AIDES 2:30 p.m FEDERATION COUNCIL I
ON AGING 7:30 p m. J
Oct. 8 :
Temple Beth David Sisterhood board 7 30 p m Jewish Com- I
mumty Center board 8 p.m Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood *
- I p m Bnoi B'rith #3046 -8pm Women's American ORT
Palm Beach County Region 9 30 a.m. JEWISH FEDERATION '.
PUBLIC RELATIONS -6 p.m.
Oct. 9
Hadassah Tikvah Evening at Musicana Hadassah Yovel
board 3 p m Hadassah Shalom board 10 am *
Hadassah Palm Beach board 10 am. Hadassah Bat
Gunon Membership Luncheon 11 a.m. Hadassah Golda I
Meir board 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Medina board *
-8pm Temple Beth Sholom board 9:30 o.m. Temple
B'noi Jacob board 10 a.m. American Israeli Lighthouse 1 J
p.m. Free Sons of Israel board 10 a.m. JEWISH FED-
ERATION LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT STEERING COMMITTEE '.
INTERVIEWS-730 p.m.
Oct. 10 ;
Hadassah Aliya board 9:45 am J
Oct. 12 :

Temple Beth El "Evening of Art" B'nai B'rith Mitzvah Council
9:30 a m. Hadassah Sholom Paid-up Membership noon
Temple Israel Men's Club Golf Tournament 8 a.m. Con J
gregation Anshei Sholom Men's Club 9:30 a.m. Temple Beth
El Men's Club 10a.m. Jewish Community Center Family Day I
Comp Shalom I to 6 p.m.
Oct. i3 :
B'nai B'rith Women Boynton Beach 12:30 p.m. Women's I
American ORT Mid Palm board I p.m.* Women's Americon
ORT North Palm Beach board 10:30 o.m. Temple Israel I
7:30p.m. J
Oct. u :
B'nai B'nth Century 7:30 p.m. Hadassah Henrietta Szold
board 1 p m B'nai B'rith Women Masado board 8 p. m. J
Women's American ORT West Palm Beach I p.m. Yiddish
Cultural Group -10am Women's American ORT Mid Palm
Vizcayo Trip Jewish Community Center Women's Association J
8pm

Oct. is :
JEWISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION BOARD OF DIRECTORS j
MEETING 7 30 p.m. B'nai B'nth North Lodge 8 p.m. Temple
Israel Men's Club board 7 30 p.m Hadassah Shalom I
National Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach 10 o.m.
Women's Americon ORT Royal Palm Beach 7:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood board 9:30 a.m. Pioneer I
Women Golda Meir board 1 p.m Women's Americon ORT
Palm Beoch County Region board 9:30 o.m. Hadassah Tik- I
vah Tea for new members
Oct. 16
Women's Americon ORT Evening board 8 p.m. Hadassah -
Yovel- 1 p.m American Jewish Congress board 12:30 pm.
Hadassah Golda Meir 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women -
Ohov board 9:30 am Jewish Family Life Task Force at the
Jewish Community Center 7:30 p.m.
tf
USer'
Ol >ttslfl Cfril
(MTht rmtmBmrkm
it-z
Mee-Thurs
-$ Pri.
I 4 Sun
Clendtet.
"THE NEW IMAGE1'
dontury
! 3
4774 HBOMM *.. KT Ml* MCN
Mime*I TiMftW". i HMIetsw Ml M
THE MOST MODERN OOfJPLETE KOSHEH SUPtZAMARKET i
Letter to the Editor
EDITOR, The Jewith Fbridian
of Palm Beach County:
On Aug. 21-24, my wife Evelyn
and I were exposed to an ex-
perience that we found o
thrilling and exciting that we
wish to share it with your
readers. Perhaps we may en-
courage others to participate in
this seminar next year.
Wildacres, a mountain top
retreat of 1.400 acres in the heart
of the Blue Ridge Mountains of
North Carolina, was the scene of
the B'nai B'rith Institute of
Judaism, sponsored by District
5, encompassing Florida.
Georgia. South Carolina. North
Carolina. Maryland. Virginia and
the District of Columbia.
The response to this seminar
was so tremendous that for the
first time since 1948, when the
retreat was opened, a B'nai B'rith
seminar was held back to back.
This dual seminar had a very
distinguished faculty, consisting
of Dr. Dov Peretz Elkins, who
combines his rabbinical training
with a strong expertise in
humanistic encounter groups. Dr.
Melvin Verbit. associate
professor of sociology at
Brooklyn College and Dr.
Jonathan Woodier, assistant
professor in the Homstein
Program in Jewish Communal
Services at Hrandeis University
The overall theme discussed
and debated was "Strengthening
Jewish Identity. Challenge lor
the hii -
To say that the seminar was
electric" is understating the
case. Each of the 90 participants
was thrilled with the spirit,
enthusiasm snd involvement
generated at the daily en-
counters.
District 5 B'nai B'rith leaders
have pledged to make the annual
summer event more accessible to
its membership.
Jack Spitxer, international
B'nai B'rith president, was the
honored guest at the seminar. He
addressed the assembly and
expressed his admiration for the
great work that was being ac-
complished. He pledged to en-
courage such gatherings and will
do his best to give such events
more exposure.
Herman Blumenthal the host,
owner and developer of the
Wildacres concept, a native of
North Carolina, also welcomed
the group to Wildacres.
The Wildacres Retreat, located
In Little Switzerland Nr
established in 1946 by tt T"
Mr. and Mrs. I.D. Blu*>
^dieted to the beXSft
fajjrn. relauon. .d **
The facilities are operated n
rKm-profitbawandaT.^'
to non-profit organuS?
regardless of race or creedL
Interested parties ji^y
direct aU inquires to DrTi
Kravtin. the Adult EdwuiL
Committee. ^"ouoo
2743 Dudley Kfc
West Palm Be.*
C006LER
FOR
CONGRESS
. .,
For advertising
information
Call
588-1652
IT'S THE COFFEE THAT'LL
MAKE EVERYONE THINK YOU DID
WHEN YOU DIDN'T!
Tne rich ground aroma and fresh perked taste
makes Maxim"'the coffee any busy baibusta
would be proud to serve. Especially wth the
strudei Or. the Honey cake. Or the lox n
bageis Or whenever friends and mishpocheh'
suddenly drop in. Maxim* the 100% freeze
dried coffee that'll make everyone think you
took the time to nake fresh perked coffee
when you didn't'
' foOOl Corptxison
CERTIFIED
KOSHER


Friday, October 3. 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
JCC Happenings
Adult Community Education
Classes School Board of
Palm Beach County
110 sessions -
Sept. 22 thru Nov. ^8>
The Jewish Community Center
is offering classes through the
pa|m Beach County Schools
Adult and Community Education
Department. Fall sessions meet
for 10 weeks. Due to the holidays,
classes will begin at different
times. All classes are open,
except oil painting. Join the
"back to school" group in a
friendly atmosphere.
Following is a schedule of
classes showing the starting
dates for each:
Oil painting, Mondays, 9 a.m.
to noon, Sept. 29; Stretching
Your Food Dollars, Mondays, 3
to 5 p.m., Sept. 22; Astrology,
Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to noon; Sept.
23; Lip reading. Wednesdays,
9:45 to 11:45 a.m., Oct. 1; Yoga,
Wednesdays, 1 to 3 p.m.. Sept.
24; Writers workshop, Wednes-
days. 3 to 5 p.m., Sept. 24; Know
Your Car. Fridays. 10:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m.. Oct. 10; Nutrition &
You. Fridays, 1 to 3 p.m., Oct. 10.
Extension Classes-Tanglewood
Transactional Analysis,
Mondays, 10 a.m. to noon,
starting Sept. 22.
Transportation
The Comprehensive Senior
Service Center is funded by Title
III OAA through Gulfstream
Areawide Council on Aging, pro-
viding transportation to transit
disadvantaged adults 60 years or
older, in designated areas and a
full education and recreation pro-
gram, (all the Center for more
information.
Busette
The Joe and Emily Lowe
Foundation Busette is available
for persons who have trans-
portation problems coming to the
JCC lor activities. Call Bonnie
Sihrerstein at the Center for
busette scheduling.
Speak Out
This program continues with
Wynn Kenton, discussion leader,
on the second and fourth Mon-
days of the month, at 1 p.m.
October sessions: Oct. 13 and 27.
Round Table Talk for Men
Meets on Tuesdays, at 1 p.m.,
except lor the second Tuesday of
each month. Joe Greenberg,
group leader, conducts a session
on politics, economics and
current events.
Speakers Club
Herbert Sperber, president,
invites all those interested in*
public speaking to become a part
of ihis j,Toup. During the month
ol October, this group will meet
on Thursdays, Oct. 9. 16.-23 and
30,al 10 a.m.
Music You Love
Join the musical series with
"ynn Kenton. which continue?
luring the month of October or
Fridays, Oct. 10 and 24. at 1(
a.m. For further information, cal
I he Center.
Medicare
I'd Rosen and Carl Sitzer.
gained volunteers through the
Social Security office, will
Provide aid with forms and other
help regarding the Medicare
program, on the third Monday of
each month from 1 to 3 p.m
October date: Oct. 20.
Second Tuesday Club
Meeting
Sam Rubin, president, an-
nounces that the regular meeting
of the Second Tuesday Club will
be held on Oct. 14 at 1 p.m. Ruth
Hyde, chairperson, announces
that Emanuel Kessler, president
of the Lawyers Group and presi-
dent of AARP, will talk on
AARP tax aid to senior citizens.
Everyone is invited to attend.
Refreshments will be served. For
further information call Sam
Rubin at the Center.
Dine Out
Luncheon at various restau-
rants will be held once a month.
For details call Bonnie or Sam.
Trips
Lido Spa trip will take place
Nov. 23 through Nov. 26, in-
WEEKLY ONLY
$11Q|' PWPERSON
1 ^TWOINROOM
FROM NOV. 2 TO MAY 3
* 5 FULL COURSE MEALS DAILY
SAFRA-SKOSMBl
An-Nell hotel
*- OPEN
gonoi 33i3> (305)531-1191
eluding three meals a day (diet or
regular) and daily massage.
Transportation is available. Call
Bonnie or Sam for information.
Joy Through Movement
A JCC Extension Course
meets Thursday mornings from
9:30 to 11 a.m. at the Poinciana
Place in Lake Worth, through the
courtesy of the Challenger
Country Club, starting Oct. 9
through Dec. 18. This class will
include exercises, basic ballet,
modern dancing and thought,
and will be conducted by Celia
Golden, an experienced, licensed
dance therapist.
Senior Keep In Touch
A program for persons bom in
1900 and before will be held on
the third Monday of each month,
at 1:30 p.m. Next meeting: Oct.
20. Mrs. Helen Marx, who is very
experienced in developing
programs for seniors, is the group
leader. Transportation will be
arranged. For further in-
formation call Bonnie at the
Center.
Learn the Art of
Teaching Needlecraft
This class will meet on Tues-
days, Oct. 14. 21 and 28 at 10
a.m. Mrs. Sonna Simon, an
experienced instructor, will
conduct the training course,
which will allow seniors an op-
portunity to learn how to teach
needlecraft to others. Call the
Center for further information.
Arthritis and Isometric
Exercises
This class, led by Jean Erde,
will meet on Fridays, Oct. 17 and
31. at 10:30 a.m. Exercises are
especially designed for those with
arthritic problems. Learn the art
of good exercise. For further
information call the Center.
Project Good Health
Chairperson Jean Gross an-
nounces that Dr. Alan Kohn,
ophthalmologist, will speak on
"Recent Advances in Eye
Surgery on Oct. 16 at 1:30 p.m.
C006LER
FOR
CONGRESS

-NOTE-
Political Heading Material and Advertising on this page is not
to be construed as an endorsement by the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County.
THANKSGIVING AT MIAMI BEACH'S FINEST Every Luxury Orpanfront
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Phone: 538-5731 for reservations
"I ask the question.Who is the architect of
the peace treaty between Egypt and
Israel? And the answer is, the President
of the United States, Mr. Jimmy Carter."
-Prime Minister Menachem Begin
Some people have forgotten.
They've forgotten about Jimmy Carter's
bold initiative-the Camp David Accords.
They've forgotten about the im-
portance of human rights. And the
300% increase in emigration by Soviet
Jews under this Administration.
They've forgotten about the
President's Holocaust Commission.
And his courageous fight against the
Arab boycott of firms that trade
with Israel.
And they've forgotten what Re-
publican Ronald Reagan and his right
wing friends have in mind. Rolling
back 40 years of Democratic progress
for social justice, civil liberties, and
racial and religious tolerance. Cutting
aid to the needy and help for the
elderly. "Unleashing" the oil com-
panies to solve our energy problems.
Jimmy Carter and Walter Mondale
stand proudly in the Democratic tradi-
tion of Roosevelt, Truman, Kennedy
and Johnson.
They are committed to Israel's
survival' To human rights around the
world and to fairness and tolerance
here at home.
That's the record and the commit-
ment the Reagan and Anderson
Republicans want us to reject
Don't let the right wingers win this
one. Let's re-elect President Carter
and Vice President Mondale.
M Re-Elect President Carter
and Vice President Mondale.
The Democrats.
("aid kit by the Carter/Mondale Ki l.k\ In mi Committee. Inc..
. Robert S. Straw* Chairman
*>


=$



-TT
Page 8
The Jewish Flondian of Palm Beach County
Friday. October 3, l^
Money And Taxes
Planning by the Closely
-Held Business
By LEONARD H.
CARTER. CPA JD
The owner of a successful,
closely-held business, by some
advance planning, has a unique
opportunity to benefit his family
and at the same time reduce
taxes.
Such planning may eliminate
or alleviate many problems, the
most important being the value
of the business for estate tax
purposes. The value of a suc-
cessful business increases an-
nually from its profitable
operations: those profitable years
further increase*the intangible or
goodwill value. Consequently, it
is difficult to predict or anticipate
death costs, thereby creating a
liquidity probem for the estate.
WHEN the owner has children
jr other family competent in the
business, the planning becomes
?asier and the tax savings more
dramatic. The objective is to
ransfer the business to the
rhildren at the least possible tax
ost. so that it can be per-
jetuated after the owner's death
>r retirement.
A well-designed plan will
iccomplish the following:
1) Satisfy the chikirens' desire
ind ambitions to have some
wnership in the business.
2) The post-transfer ap-
>reciation in value will not be
axed in the donor-owner's estate
>ut will be postponed until the
leath of the donee.
31 Current income may be
hifted to a lower bracket
ecipient.
4) Administration and probate
osts may be reduced.
5) A vehicle is created to make
ifts of income producing assets
3 grandchildren and other
lembers of the family.
6) The same vehicle may be
sed to make charitable gifts
rith little or no cost to the donor.
7) Assure the owner and/ or
is widow of an income after
retirement or death.
These objectives can be ac-
complished by recapitalizing the
closely-held corporation. There
are various ways of doing it to fit
the situation, but outlined below
is a typical plan.
ASSUME that the individual
originally went into business
many years ago investing
*100.000. The net worth of the
business has now grown to
SI.000.000 without considering
any value for goodwill. He has
vio competent sons in the
business and he would like to
given them ownership in the
business as a reward and as an
incentive to stay, enabling the
owner to retire.
The corporation is
recapitalized so that the sole
shareholders turns in his voting
common stock and receives in
exchange:
1) 900 shares of non-voting
preferred stock paying an 8
percent non-cumulative dividend
and having a par value and
liquidating value of $900,000
2) 100 shares of voting
common stock having a par value
and liquidating value of 50.000
31 100 shares of non-voting
common stock having no par
value, but entitled upon
liquidation to the entire value of
the business after deducting the
value of the preferred stock and
voting common stock.
The current value is 50.000
Total
1.000.000
The non-voting common stock
is gifted to those family members
in the business providing them
with an incentive because future
appreciation is theirs. The
original shareholder, by retaining
the voting stock, controls the
business until such time that he
feels secure in relinquishing it or
he may dispose of it by will.
Some of the preferred stock,
bearing income, may be gifted to
have regarding the above article
or any aspect of estate planning
or charitable giving, with the
Federation's Endowment
Director. Stanley Hyman. You
are also encouraged to consult
with your personal advisor or
counsel 83 to how best to im-
plement an estate plan, in a
manner most advantageous to
your circumstances.
Estate Planning is a technical
and highly personalized process.
Each plan must be tailored to an
individual's unique situation.
You are cautioned that the above
article sets forth general rules
and is only a brief examination of
the subject Recapitalizing
corporation drafting a wUllL
or estate plan is not a "?
yourself proposition rw*
mination of how the law
to your particular situation ^
the consequences of a 3
course of action Veaafi
professional advice. 8
The Federation welcomes your
inquiry about charitable giving
Please direct all inquiries to
attention of Stanley Hyman
Endowment Director, The Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, 501 South Flagler Drive
Suite 305, West Palm Beach'
Florida 33401. or call 832 2120
l^onard H. Carter
minors, parents or others in lower
tax brackets. The remaining
stock will provide the owner and
his wife with income.
PREFERRED stock may also
be given to charity When the
charity wishes to obtain cash, the
corporation may redeem the
preferred stock. This is a well
designed plan to use corporate
cash, which may otherwise be
locked in. to satisfy personal
charitable obligations and
desires.
This recapitalization ac-
complishes all the objectives. The
younger family members are part
of the organization and
responsible for its future growth
which escapes inheritance tax.
Income producing assets are
created for gifts to others and
charity and there is an overall
increase in the family wealth by
reducing estate costs.
There are various guidelines
relative to dividend rates,
redemptions and the gift and
estate taxes involved which must
be strictly adhered to. Con-
sequently, consultation with an
attorney and accountant is
essential.
NOTE: You are invited to
discuss any questions you may
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CSun-MdCmwnnr|* <>-.
OratedbyRabb.DrjHRalbag


October 3, I960
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9

nFBORAH HOSPITAL
DEFOUNCATION
The next Deborah Hospital
an meeting ifl Oct. 20 at
all -
Beach
Holiday Inn. Max
will be accom-
uth
oundatioi
on, at the
' by" MWred Birnbaum
nist. for entertainment. A
Teon and card Pty .will b
0^ 21 at Massey 8. Call
Fenster, chairperson, tor
rrther details. There are reser-
.tions available for the super
thanksgiving ce ebration at the
Vntmartre, Miami Beach -
todays and three nights, with
8UCy entertainment, and
!oarture lunch with all the
nVings. Call Pearl Kolbert to
the time of your life.
HADASSAH
The meeting is open to
Claire Friedel, chairman.
The Bat Gurion Palm
Chapter of Hadassah will hold its
opening membership luncheon on
Oct. 9 at the home of one of its
members. The luncheon will start
at 11 a.m. The program will
include various speakers, a
fashion show by Purple Turtle of
Palm Beach and a "Medley of
Original Lyrics to Familiar
Songs" by the Bat Gurion
Players. Anyone who is a paid-up
member of the Bat Gurion
Chapter may attend.
the Bat Gurion Palm Beach
Chapter of Hadassah will hold its
evening general meeting on Oct.
30, at Worrell's in Palm Beach, at
8 p.m. Jerry Langfeld, an interior
Shalom Hadassah will hold a^ designer for Worrell's, will speak
ummage Sale on Oct. 17, 9 a.m. on "interior Design for Today's
3 p.m.. at Miller's Super Value Living."
0t Volunteers needed, with cars
[ possible. Contact Bertha Rubin
(Dover) or Lillian Schack
iSouthampton).
The date of Shalom's Mystery
Trip has been changed to Nov. 2.
Buses will leave West Gate.
Century Village, at 4:30 p.m.
Fran Nudelman (Oxford 200) and
lian Schack are taking
ervations.
Inquire about "Because We
Itare" project. Earn donor credit
land more. Contact Mae Podwol
^Southampton A).
Yovel Hadassah is planning a
Itrip. leaving 8 a.m.. Oct. 29 and
Ireturning Oct. 31. Visit the Ken
Inedy Space Center, St
lAugustine and many extras
Contact Lee Goldberg, Dor
Ichester H 177; Dorothy Isaacs
Wellington K 193; or Eve
|Rogers. Greenbrier A104.
For Thanksgiving at the
I'arleton Hotel. Miami Beach.
Icontact Bessie Hoffman, Green-
Ibrier A 301 or Bertha Kaplan,
| Somerset F 110 for particulars.
Paid-Up membership luncheon
I will be held at Congregation
Anshei Sholom, Oct. 16, at noon.
Nettie Berk of Ronni Tartakow
of the Golda Meir-Boynton Beach
Chapter of Hadassah will hold
their first study group of the
season on Oct. 6 at 10 a.m. Call
Blanche Benkel if you plan to
attend.
A board meeting will be held at
the Bonanza Restaurant on Oct.
16 at 10.30 a.m.
A boat ride will be held on Nov.
9. A complete lunch will be
served at Hidden Harbor
Restaurant in Pompano, with
cruise and entertainment from
1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Call Edith
Fruchs or Frances Lempert for
information.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE FOR
ISRAEL
The Sabra Chapter of the
Women's League for Israel will
hold its next meeting on Oct. 7,
at 1 p.m. at the St. Christopher's
Church, Haverhill and Belvedere,
West Palm Beach.
Mrs. Sara Gimbel will present
a mini book review based on the
biography of a person involved in
the Holocaust.
w
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of the palm beaches, mc
KEREN ORR
PRESCHOOL
leading readiness
onR lasting friendships
lear long fun!
aring staff
PPy environment
Ha
Individual attention
Loving care
l/oing special things
appy times
One
a
oe on one learning
going activity
'edicated staff
tfograms in Judaica
Kole playing
Outstanding curriculum
- VJrowlng time
Rich in culture
Activities galore
fVlany trips
Sign up today!
and much, much, more!
Registration now open. Call
the Center 689-7700
BNAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rtih Century Lodge
No. 2939, Century Village, will
meet on Oct. 14, at 7:30 p.m. at
the Holiday Inn. Okeechobee
Blvd. West Palm Beach. The
main speaker will be Tom Kelly,
editor of the Palm Beach Post,
who will speak on "The 1980
General Elections."
B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 3041,
Lt. Col. Netanyahu of Palm
Beach, is presenting a special
program at the Palm Beach
Ocean Hotel, on Oct. 21, at 8 p.m.
The guest speaker will be Paul
L. Backman. He will talk on
"Problems for B'nai B'rith in the
State of Floirda."
For those who wish to dine
before the meeting, the Palm
Beach Ocean Hotel has arranged
a special dinner starting at 6:15
p.m. For dinner reservations,
phone Sid Stein.
PIONEER WOMEN
Ezrat Chapter of Pioneer
Women of Lake Worth will meet
Oct. 7, at 1 p.m., at the home of
Ella Nadrich. Ms. Nina Gerson,
Mid-County Medical Center
nutritionist, will be the guest
speaker.
A new chapter of Pioneer
Women has been formed in
Lakeside Village, Palm Springs.
The new chapter, Orah Israel, is
having a meeting on Oct. 13, at 1
p.m., at the clubhouse of
Lakeside Village. Anne
Engelstein, president, will lead
the meeting.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
West Palm Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
hold a general meet in on Oct. 14,
at Anshei Sholom Synagogue at
12:30 p.m. Interesting
travelogue, by Nathaniel H. Levi,
who will show slides of the
Mayan Indian civilization of
Guatemala and Yucatan. Levi
will narrate during the showing.
All ORT members are invited .
On Oct. 24, the chapter is having
a flea market at Miller's
Supermarket from 8 a.m. thru 4
p.m.
The next regular meeting of
the Royal Chapter of Women's
American ORT will be held Oct.
15, at 7:30 p.m., inmthe
auditorium of the Royal Palm
Beach Civic Center. Estelle
Baumann's Actor's Group, of
Century Village will entertain.
Estelle is the director and
coordinator of the group, which
has entertained throughout
Florida.
On Oct. 30, a "Golf for ORT
Day" open tournament (men &
women) will take place at the
Royal Palm Beach Golf and
Country Club golf course. All are
welcome to compete. If in-
terested, call Karl Kalman, Dan
Jatlow or Jack Graham.
On Nov. 16, a rummage sale
will be held on the Green by the
Big Tree. Hold all and any
rummage for this function.
The Golden Lakes Village
Chapter of Women's American
ORT is having a luncheon and
fashion show on Oct. 14 at
Sweden House, Lise Ltd.. is
sponsoring the fashion show.
AMERICAN
JEWISH CONGRESS
The American Jewish
Congress will meet Oct. 7, at 1
p.m. at Congregation Anshei
Sholom. Doris Singer, president
of the Palm Beach Chapter of the
League of Women Voters will be
guest speaker. All are welcome.
YIDDISH
CULTURE GROUP
On Oct. 7, 10 a.m.. in the
clubhouse auditorium, The
Yiddish Culture Group starts its
1980-81 season, which marks the
beginnign of it's 11th year in
Century Village.
The program will consist of
two films entitled "The Jewish
American" and "The Anne Frank
Story."
On Oct. 14, The Yiddish
Culture Group presents Rabbi
Morris Silberman who will speak
briefly about the holidays.
Cantor Albert Koslow will sing
and the Musical Friends, con-
sisting of Lillian Kessler. sinsrer
and pianist; Jackie Lorber;.Phil
Herman and Sam Finkenthal on
violins; plus John Fine on mini-
flute, will round out the program.
The Oct. 21 Yiddish Culture
prograam presents David Alt-
man playing the concertina,
accompanied by Tony Vacaro on
guitar.
RSVP Director C.J. Kennedy
will discuss the community
service program of the RSVP and
will show slides of the work that
is being done by that
organization.
Gabriel Rabinbach will sing
songs. Shirley Fleishman will be
chairman.
On Oct. 28, The Yiddish
Culture Group will feature "The
Opus HI Singers," consisting of
Mary Beth Williams, lyric
soprano; Eleanor La Forge,
mezzo soprano; Harry Switzer.
baritone and Warren Broome.
music director and pianist. This
group is sponsored by The Chase
Federal Savings and Loan Bank.
Admission is free. Sam
Finkenthal will be chairman.
C00GLER
FOR
CONGRESS
Advertising j
a
Information
Call 588-1652

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Minimum fi*i applied in nil coe% bo'nng complication*
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DR HORNADAY, D.D.S.
689-0593
Some Location for Over 5 Years
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THE JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
is currently accepting applications for enrollment for the
1980/81 SCHOOL YEAR
PRE-SCHOOL THROUGH GRADE 8
We cordially invite you to call and make
an appointment to visit our school.
Mordecai Levow
Director
Dr. Howard Kay
President
2815 North Flakier Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida
Telephone 832-8423/4
A beneficiary agency of the Jewtah Federation of Palm Beach County



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October 3,1980
The Jewish Fbridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
nfusion overCrane Amendment
RBI ALAN SHERMAN
ff Community Relation.
L^toecied amendment to
State Department
briations bill w| offered
Phil Crane (R-IU.I- ine
nent stipulated that ''no
n $i,000 may be used to
lormaintaon an embassy
1 which is not located m
Iof Jerusalem. The U.6>.
Xy in Israel is currently in
Jv.
Crane amendment caught
(Israel's supporters in the
is off guard. Rep. Stephen
iD-N.Y.). who represents a
1 which has the largest
[populaton in the country,
lio effort was made by the
of this amendment to
with those members of
Lse who have been most
[and deeply involved in
We. No effort was made to
Ibase with the various
j around the country for
[his is a matter of the most
Iportance.' Solarz said the
fcl the amendment would
Dopen a U.S. Embassy in
tan. but to close the
ky in Tel Aviv.
i, pointed out the
lent of the Embassy from
iv to Jerusalem has been a
i the last two Democratic
platforms. Many
essmen who advocate
the Kmbassy felt,
ler. that an appropriations
not the proper way to
I the change, particularly
bt hearings before the
Foreign Affairs Com-
during the authorization
The proposal was
Lehman (D-Kla.), voting against
the Ml, stated, "The amendment
would in effect close down our
Embassy in Israel. This is not a
responsible expression of concern
about the location issue and
would merely exacerbate an
already highly sensitive peace
process. American diplomatic
I'/W
to 80.
ly supporter-, of Israel did
fcl that a vote for this bill
I the best interest of U.S.-
relations. Mr. William
personnel and services are
essential to the ongoing peace
process, and this amendment
would undermine the continuity
necessary for diplomatic
discourse. Jerusalem is the
proper place for our American
Embassy, but this matter should
not be addressed in the context of
the State-Justice appropriations
bill."
Representative Dan Mica (D-
r'la), in support of Rep. Solarz'
views, and also voting against.
stated, "1 have tried my very
best to work with both sides of
this aisle and I am furious at the
way this is presented. Confusion
did reign on this floor."
-NOTE-
Political Reading Material and Advertising on this page is not
to be construed as an endorsement by the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County.
STONE vs. GUNTER TWO GOOD MEN
Both are well-qualified candidates who deserve our support.
We declare for Senator Stone. Why?
Senator Stone occupies the important post of Chairman of the
Subcommittee on the Middle East of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee. Senator Stone clearly understands the need our coun-
try has for strong, dependable, democratic Israel to remain free and
loyally supportive of our interests in the Middle East.
Gunter understands this also, but his election will mean that
this important chairmanship will pass to unsympathetic hands,
which may do great harm to Israel and to the security of the United
States in the Middle East.
SUPPORT SENATOR RICHARD STONE FOR
RE-ELECTION
PALM BEACH FRIENDS OF ISRAEL
Henry Grossman, Coordinator
West Palm Beach, Florida
Senator,
Richard (Dick)
AT WORK SECURING UJS. INTERESTS IN THE MID-
DLE EAST:
As chairman of the Middle East Subcommittee of the
Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Senator Stone is the
acknowledged leader for peace in the Middle East and for
continued strong support for the State of Israel, the
dependable ally and friend of the United States.
Senator Stone consistently and forcefully opposes the
sale of advanced weapons to the enemies of Israel. In 1976
he led the opposition to the sale of F-15 jet fighter planes to
Saudi Arabia. Recenrjy, he initiated the letter signed by
two-thirds of the members of the U.S. Senate which
warned the Administration that further F-15 offensive
capability for the Saudis would not be approved. He also
successfully amended the Senate Foreign Aid bill to
Prohibit the sale of U.S. built warship engines to Iraq.
Senator Stone has repeatedly called for the United
States to work in conjunction with Israel to secure
American interests in the Middle East. Towards this end.
and m order to project American strength in the Middle
kast, he has publicly called for the United States to lease
"e Sinai military bases at Etzion and Sharm Al Sheikh.

IF YOU CARE ABOUT
THE SURVIVAL OF
ISRAEL.
Re-elect U.S. Senator
RICHARD (DICK) STONE


Pa*Tfir
The Jewish Floridan of Palm Beach County
Frid>y.Octo^,
Pitcher Steve Stone to Visit L'Chayim Stein Play to Benefit Ji
The Oct. 12 edition of diceted radio-magazine heard
L'Chayim, the nationally syn- every Sunday, will feature an
Joy Through Movement
"Joy Through Movement," an |
extension class of the JCC, will
begin on Oct. 9 from 9:30 11
a.m. and will meet through Dec.
18 at the Challenger Club of
Poinciana Place.
Lessons are being given by
Celia Golden, a licensed dance
therapist. She taught at Lenox
Hill Hospital in New York and
has studied with some of the
outstanding authorities ;n this
field. She has been s re/oJent of
South Florida for many years and
has taught classes at the
Community Mental Health
Center and at the Jewish
Community Center in the past.
Her classes at Poinciana Place
began last year and have become
an ongoing activity for many
residents in that area. Students
have found the class most
delightful and all those who have
participate have had beneficial
results in health and well being.
Sessions in "Joy Through
Movement" have been made
possible by the courtesy of the
Challenger Country Club,
exclusive interview with major
league pitcher Steve Stone as he
discusses his Jewish background
and his feelings about being
Jewish.
Not since Sandy Koufax has
there been a Jewish baseball
player to rise to stardom in the
Msjor Leagues. A leading
candidate for this year's Cy
Young Award in the American
league (the award that goes to
the league's best pitcher), Steve
Stone had won more than 20
games beofre the month of
September, and by the time the
season ends, may well have
amassed more than 25 wins.
Stone was also the first Jewish
pitcher since Sandy Koufax to
start an All-Star Games.
During his meeting with
L'Chayim host. Rabbi Mark
Golub, Stone talks about his Bar
Mitzvah, and the importance to
Poinciana Place and by the his grandfather of living to that
expertise and graciousness important moment (his gran-
dfather died shortly thereafter).
Celia Golden
and
Celia Golden.
JCC Women's Association Meets
The Women's Association of Wednesday from 10 am to 2
the JCC held its first meeting Pm m thf Center lobby. Save
Sept. 17. Dr. Kenneth Alsofrom n6* d tune' SftjL'S
spoke on "Coping With Your JCC. Volunteers are needed to
man the store, call Bonnie
Silvers te in.
Child in the 1980s."
C006LER
FOR
CONGRESS
-
The next meeting will be held
on Oct. 14 at 8 p.m. at the Center.
The guest speaker will be Dr.
Cathy Aiello, E.D.D., topic
'Women in Transition." All
Center member women are in-
vited to attend.
The Gift Shop is open every
The Women's Association is
proud to announce their first
social of the season: "Come
Dance With Me," Nov. 15. at 8
p.m., Challenger Country Club of
Poinciana. Entertainment by disc
jockey Don Harper-Wirk. The
dress is casual. For further in-
formation contact Laura Feuer.
Zelda Pincourt, chairperson,
announced this year's major
event for the benefit of the
Jewish Community Center will be
Pat Carroll in "Gertrude Stein
Gertrude Stein Gertrude Stein."
"This prestige play is in
keeping with the quality the
Center always tries to present to
the Community," stated Mrs.
Pincourt. It will be held Oct. 25,
at the Royal Poinciana Playhouse
in Palm Beach. "We at the
Center are proud to bring this
play which comes to us directlv
"* ..I- received^L
actress Drama Desk A* J!
many notices from to?"
reviewers. ^"
Ms. Pincourt annom^
Ariette and Robert &w(
aiding the Center VS*'
this event. Rose and MoWl
will host the after J
reception honoring u. .
Carroll Call the 4te\
. chtional information.
m
\
At the Breakers, planning for the Second Annual JeJ
Women's Assembly, sponsored by the Women's Division of i
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, are tfrom left I
right) Beth Siskin, vice president education chairman; Adh
Simon and Renee Bassuk, co-chairmen of the Jewish Women
Assembly.
Dr. Alsof rom's
Therapy
you are cordially and sincerely invited to attend an all-day seminar,
desgined to introduce you to our method of
weight reduction and weight maintenance.
We particularly welcome those of you who have failed on many diets
or who feel that your weight problem is hopeless.
OUR PROGRAM
1. Is not a diet though we teach you to eat sensibly.
2. Does not allow fasting or starvation.
3. Protects your dignity. There are no humiliating
or embarrassing practices.
4. Helps you to solve personal problems.
5. Is conducted only by fully trained therapists.
6. Emphasizes permanent habit training.
7. Protects your personal confidences.
8. Uses close personal support, warmth,
friendship, understanding and patience as
our tools to help you.
WEARENOT
A. Cure-alls not everybody will succeed with us.
B. Miraculous -our method can be explained and demonstrated.
C. Easy -you have to work for your successes.
D. For everybody -we carefully select our class members.
RUT
We have changed the lives of many people from constant misery to maturity and
pride Come to our meeting and find out whether we can do this for you.
PLACE: Saarataai Hotel. Pate
WMtPateBMch.ru.
DATE: Satarday, October 11.1980
TIME: 8:30 am. to 4:30 p.m.
LakaaBNd.
SEMINAR FEE: $36.00
Per Person
Lunch will be served
Prc-regiatraUoa auggaated
For registration and/or further information
Please contact Ms. Nina Foster at 832-8446
REGISTRATION CARD
Name ___
Address _
City/State
Phone ___
I
It
i at M6.00 per pcraoa Attached i. cfceck for S___
Cbp and return to Dr Robert K. Alaofrom. 2817 N Flagkr Dr.. Suit* 502. West Palm Beach. Fk 33407
Make chacks payable to Creative Thinking. Inc.
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582-2681


r 3,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 13
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Yf35
> WILL
K-5 S>*1 Fo "'-
lff"
j presidents' Coffee, convened by the Women's
nhe Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County,
Anne S. Faivus, called to order the meeting of more
presidents of community-wide Jewish
women
ons.

M
m
**?*/

JEWISH FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION GROUPS
NAME OF GROUP COSPONSORED WITH DATES NUMBER OF SESSIONS
J
ton was drafted to be brought to the Jev ish Women's
T on Oct. 27 stating, "We as American Jewish leaders
Beach County affirm the moral imperative to build and
\a strong Jewish community, committed to promoting
{life for.Jews here and throughout the world."
Day at Camp Shalom
1. Single Parents
(Women "s Group)
2. Parenting Pre-School
Children
3. Parenting Your
Teenager
4. Learning to Appreciate
Yourself (Women's Group)
5. Marriage in Jewish Life
And Tradition
6. WhatisJ.F.C.S.?
7. Marriage & Divorce
K. Single Parents
(Men's Group)
P.B.J.C.
P.B.J.C.
8th graders at
Temple Israel
lladassah
Midrasha
J.C.C.
Oct. Nov.
Nov. Dec. (Meets
atJ.F.C.S.)
Feb.- Mar. (Meets
atJ.F.C.S.)
T.B.A.
Apr. May
Dec.
Oct. 20
Dec.
6
6
H
I
1
For further information and rates of groups, and if you are interested in forming a group other
than listed, please contact Linda Cohen, at Jewish Family & Children's Service, 684-1991.
from 1 4 p m., there
1 Family Picnic and
ly al(amp Shalom and
Ifrom 1 4 p.m., there
llntergenerational Fun
rip Shalom.
ish Community Center
lied to the concept of
] an age where families
lated not only from
but from their
ly and their religion, the
i pride in being able to
livities that engage
pgether in recreational,
I culturally stimulating
| Often times programs
to specific ages and
I thereby excluding the
|>m being a single unit
I activities where all its
nay participate.
i to offer these finds of
brograms is evident,
nit the years we will be
programs, both at the
fat Camp Shalom as a
Ifort to engage families
p unit and also to in-
lh other Jewish families
pmmunity. We further
the ever increasing
In of single parent
pi trust that activities
cifically towards them
both successful and
have any questions, call
x
"Searingly unforgettable"*
Thirteen-year-old Jack
Eisner and his gang
smuggled food and arms
over the wall of the
Warsaw Ghetto. He
fought in the ghetto
uprising. Taken to the
concentration camps, he
masterminded a series of
escapes, only to be recap
Uired. He escaped execution by seconds-time and
time again Finally, on a death march he could not
have survived. Jack Eisner was liberated by Ameri-
can troops. He was nineteen. One hundred mem-
bers of his family had perished He had survived to
tell this story.
There is something overwhelming, indeed tern
fying. in trying to respond to the experience of this
lew ish boy. Jack Eisner, characterized by an unsup
pressible will to live." Irving Howe
"An extraordinary account.. The Suwivor has a
unique place in the annals of the Nazi onslaught"
Harold M. Proshansky. President, The Graduate
School and University Center of CUNY.
"His experiences are so astonishing that often
we forget we are reading about a teenager.his final
moments with the girl he loved have a special
poignancy" "Publishers Weekly
"A powerful devastating, yet ultimately uplift-
ing memoir about the strength and courage of the
human spirit against incredible odds. The Survivor is
a brave and extraordinary book"
Susan Strasberg, creator of stage role of
Anne Frank, author of Bittersweet
ONGRESS
SKCM.
J!" wrtvi > oat your
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chasxkxjb
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M
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Illustrated with maps & photos, $1195
William Morrow mi
105 MM

TttRt 1-1
The Jewish Floridian ofFalm aeacn y,uum,
naay, (
AJC Meeting to Focus On Fundamentalist Politics
"The Impact of Fun-
damentalist Religious Activity
on Politics" will be the subject of
a talk by Milton Tobian, South-
west Regional director of the
*
damentalists to Israel.
A question and answer period
will follow Tobian's talk at the
Oct. 16 meeting.
*
J
***********
? Treasures in
Jewish
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*
*
*
*
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Cooking
t**********j
Dora Leopold
Dora Leopold was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her
parents were of European birth and ardent Zionists. As soon as
the State of Israel was established, her family immigrated there.
All of the family that survived the Holocaust came from Europe
to Israel, including Dora's grandmother. This widowed grand-
mother owned a bakery in Europe and personally did all the
baking to support her six children. From this grandmother,
Dora's mother, her aunts and finally the grandchildren obtained
recipes and instruction in baking all through their lives. Dora
has also acquired Hungarian recipes from her mother-in-law.
Dora has put these treasured recipes into practice. Her
husband held a top executive position in Washington as a con-
gressional appointee and Dora did a great deal of entertainment
for diplomatic and political leaders. ,
The Jewish Floridian and Dora Leopold share these treasures
in Jewish cooking with you.
APPLESAUCE MERINGUE TART
Sofia Rejman (Dora's mother)
Ingredients:
2 eggs, separated
'/a cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
1 package (4 oz.) butter, or
Fleischmann's margarine, softened
11 teaspoon McCormick almond extract
1 cup Pillsbury all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 Tablespoon graham cracker,
or bread, crumbs
1 medium size 16-20 oz. jar applesauce
Method:
Preheat oven to 350 deg. Grease a IO'/j" x l'/a" round glass
pie dish. In a small bowl, mix yolks, '/2 cup sugar, butter or
margarine with a wooden spoon, till well blended about 1
minute. Blend in almond extract. Mix baking powder and flour
together, and add to yolk mixture. Mix well till well blended,
and dough leaves sides of bowl. Press dough onto bottom of pie
* plate, and slightly up against sides of dish. Spread crumbs all
* over dough. Spread applesauce all over dough. Place dish in the
? preheated oven for about 20 minutes. Meanwhile, beat egg
J whites with the 2 tablespoons sugar till velvety texture. At the
if end of 20 minutes, take out pie dish from oven, and spread
* meringue all over surface. Place dish back into the oven, and
* bake till very light golden color about 10 minutes or less
* start checking after 5 minutes.
c**********#***#*******************1'
American Jewish Committee.
Tobian will speak at an open
meeting of the American Jewish
Committee on Oct. 16 at the
Sheraton Inn.
Guests are welcome. There is
no charge. Coffee and refresh-
ments will be served at 7:30 p.m.
and the program will begin at 8
p.m.
Tobian will discuss recent
religious developments which
may weaken American Jews in
effective participation in
American politics. Activities of
fundamentalist groups can shift
the political center of gravity to
the right and weaken traditional
alliances in which Jews have been
active, he says.
Such issues as anti-abortion,
anti-ERA. restoring prayer in
public schools, renouncing
Darwin's theory of evolution,
denying homosexual rights, anti-
pornography. anti-Communism
and anti-busing are included in
the merged agenda of a number
of fundamentalist groups. The
Marti andAl Coogler
want to thank all their friends
for their best wishes.
A Healthy and Happy New Year To All

implications of this agenda on
American Jews in politics and the
attitudes toward Israel, will be
discussed by Tobian.
Tobian is a native of Dallas
and was educated at Rice
Institute. He served as state
director of Texas Common Cause
from 1972-76 and was past
president of the Southwest
Region of AJC. He has been a
national board member of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations and has been a
board member of many civic,
educational and human relations
groups.
Recently, Tobian was in-
terviewed by Bill Moyers on the
attitudes of religious fun-
Milton Tobian
4!
Ned (i old berg, recently hired
by Jewish Family &
Children's Service, as
caseworker for Quick
Response Service for areas
seniors.
COOGLER
FOR
CONGRESS
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BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
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WE'RI SPECIALISTS IN
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e e
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELFX
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Securities
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Bank Ltumi kiumi B M
18 East 48th Streel
New York N Y 1001?
(212)759 1310
Toll Free (800) 221-4
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gokton
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Bran ( hex proved toa lot ol
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that high fiber and great flavor can
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you had to give up one to get the
other, till Bran thex cereal came
along. Now they know better. And
bettei is Bran Chex
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October
3.1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 15
njO Ready to Recognize Israel Hassan
^,Ei Morocco -Arab
. tose leaders met here to
'. jihad (holy war)
. lel heard Morocco a
Lan H declare Sunday
I Palestine Liberation Or-
on is ready to accept
within secure and recog-
I boundaries" as soon as
J utrees to similar recog-
lofa Palestinian state.
_ problem of the recog-
[of Israel could have been
j. lone time ago," said the
ie frifnd of PLO Chief
[Arafat. The PLO ia ready
mize Israel within secure
Jognized boundaries, but
[must accept that the PLO
, right to a country within
1 boundaries."
ins notion of a Pales-
I state is the incorporating '
j.1967 borders" as the
[point for its hegemony.
AVIV Maj. Saad
commander of the
ian militia in south
has accused United
peaceneeping forces
ol assisting a group of
linian terrorists after they
fin an attempt to infiltrate
krael
ordinj: to lladdad. a militia
(encountered the terrorists
Mr way to Israeli lines. An
hgi oi fire ensued and the
ti retreated t<> the area
lied bv .i hitch contingent
I nited Nationa Interim
in Lebanon (UNIFILI.
Bd claimed that instead ol
ihem under arrest, the
i soldiers provided the ter-
i with transportation back
b base at Tyre
pdad continues to restrict
(movement of UN1FIL
Jes in the area under his
bl. They arc allowed to
I the roads only on Mondays
Buredays to carry supplies
lteunit*
Kls Two fires set here at
pme ol a prominent human
I advocate and at a Jewish-
factory are lielieved by
[to be the work of neo-Nazi
lists Swastika armbands
?Nazi leaflets were found
bih sites There were no
ities. but damage was
In Nogueres, the 64-year-
j Rights, and his family
Dot ai home when fire broke
their apartment in a
Inable district of Paris.
as' flat was severely
Red. and that of his
Iter in the same building
virtually destroyed. The
lao sustained heavy
Re. Its walls were daubed
Inti-Semitic slogans.
prdiiu; to police sources.
onists are members of the
flv outlawed Federation for
lean and National Action
IB).
IITEI) NATIONS Sec
7 of State Kdumund Muakie
Pled on all member states of
General Assembly to lend
upport to the Camp David
and to negotiations to
ethe Middle East conflict.
P David has proved so
remains for the future.
hopeful and productive
,'to peace in the Middle
Musk,,, said in his address
?oth General Assembly.
1 u no alternative to nego-
except further conflict.
member that differences
"* t0 be croaaed. not
to turn back," he
OOGLER
NEW YORK A fire which
destroyed a synagogue in New
Jersey and several robberies
marred Yom Kippur services for
several congregations in the New
York metropolitan area.
The fire, which destroyed
Temple Ahavas Achim in New
Brunswick, occurred as 300
persons were attending services.
All were evacuated safely as were
about 35 persons from four sur-
rounding buildings.
In Brooklyn, meanwhile, the
Young Israel of Brighton Beach
was robbed of three Torahs,
valued at $1,500; four small
silver crowns, valued at 82.500;
two silver pointers, worth $200;
and three silver breastplates,
worth $1,500. In addition, the
Shomrei Torah Synagogue, also
in Brooklvn. was robbed oi a
Torah valued at $10,000 Thurs
day night.
Meanwhile, police in Suffolk
County on Long Island are
searching for vandals who caused
$100,000 in damages to the
Hebrew Academy of "Suffolk
County in Hauppauge during
Kosh Hashanah.
PARIS Hundreds of or-
ganized Jewish demonstrators
clashed here with several dozen
neo-Nazis and police on the steps
of the city criminal court where
French neo-Nazi leader Marc
Fredriksen went on trial. Over a
dozen people, including three
policemen and two Jews, were
injured in the violent streetfight
which lasted for close to two
hours.
Fredriksen. a 46-year-old bank
teller and leader of the now out-
lawed Federation for European
and National Action (FANE), is
charged with incitement to racial
hatred, justification of Nazi
crimes and spreading Nazi
theories and propaganda.
Fredriksen. who entered the
court accompanied by what
looked like half a dozen body-
guards, said. "I am here as the
representative of the National
Socialists who have been per-
secuted for the last 35 years." He
told the court. "I demand for our
organization the same freedom of
expression enjoyed bv other
movements, including the
Marxists and the Communists.
NEW YORK Rose Schrage.
founder and president of Con-
cerned Citizens, an organization
committed to defending the
rights of Jews in the Crowr
Heights section of Brooklyn, said
it was ironic that Rabbi David
Okunov, a 68-year-old Hasidic
rabbi who was killed while on his
way to synagogue services last
Oct. 25. had come to America to
escape persecution in the Soviet
Union only to be wantonly mur-
dered on the streets of New York.
DIAMONDS
AND
'RECIOUS JEWELS
REALLY SHOULD!
BALOGH.
diamond* and antiques. ^nrrsmv.^nvt
t>en dealtna lot 70 yea**
Cor.1 *: 2 ^^^^^cS^^^^OO)
Mi*,**! n*a<-iv 4A7 Arthur Godfrey Rd., sai-ow* v*"**? _^r^^^
Laudartrtth M44 inverrary vd 7*2-2225
FOR
CONGRESS
Warning The Surgeon General Has Determ.ned
Thai Cigareue Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
S a* "w". 0* % *oow* m. ait ogwrtt tof !C<
*


The Jewish ^riAan of Palm Beach County
i^/ JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
^2415 Okeechobee Blvd. West Palm Beach, Fla. 689-770C
GENERATION TO GENERATION
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
presents
PAT CARROLL
in
GERTRUDE STEIN
GERTRUDE STEIN
GERTRUDE STEIN
by Marty Martin
directed by MUtOH MOSS
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25,1980 8 RM.
ROYAL POINCIANA PLAYHOUSE
FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF THE PALM BEACHES
Theater Tickets $35 Patrons $100
SPECIAL THANKS TO THOSE WHO ARE SUPPORTING THIS BENEFIT:
HELENE AND ALAN CUMMINGS, ARLETTE AND ROBERT GORDON
PATRON TICKETS INCLUDE RECEPTION HONORING MS. PAT CARROLL HOSTED BY ROSE AND MORRIS KRAFT
ZELDA PINCOURT. CHAIRPERSON
for information cal 1 689-7700

.;,_;


ober
3,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 17
^University President
Visit South Florida
,r Gerson Avner,
ft Haifa University in
visit South Honda
10 meet with top
ders in ^ "J
counties and the
of the Florida Chapter
jerican Friends of Haifa
|(jor Avner. who has
, University for the
K years, will be the guest
land principal speaker at
L Oct. 20 at the Bankers
liami
L Oct. 19. he will be the
1 a reception at the
| home of Mr. and Mrs.
don, founders of Haifa
Iv and leaders of the
Broward Jewish
In. Both Esther and
Won are members of the
f the Florida Chapter of
Lean Friends of Haifa
ements for President
/visit are being coor-
Iby the Florida board,
I membership includes
iBraman, Stephen Muss,
llak. Dr. and Mrs.
Dauer, Morton
Gary R. Gerson,
10GLER
FOR
ONGRESS

(ierson Avner
Herbert Sadkin, Harold L.
Miller, Judge Frederick N.
Barad, William E. Schocket,
Mrs. Joan Callner Miller, Mrs.
Gila Rosenhaus and Harriet
Green, national vice president of
the American Zionist Federation.
Regional offices have been
established in Miami Beach, with
Gerald Schwartz, past president
of the South Florida Zionist
Federation, serving as director.
Founders of Haifa University
here include, in addition to the
Gordons. Dr. George S. Wise.
Muss and Sadkin.
The Learning Experience
Now Open 6 days a week
447 Spanish River Blvd.
Boca Raton
3924833
.
South Florida's finest educational development center now
accepting applications tor enrollment ol children oges 2%
to 6 (Kindergarten) Quality care from 7:30 AM to 6 PM
Monday through Friday ond 8 AM to S fM on Saturdays.
FuHy Certified Start
Varied educational play oclMly program
fascelent equipment, lib*on/, art craft supplies
Visual, heortng. speech ft dental screening
Combine the wonder of other cultures
with the elegance of ours-
Holland America's 1981 World Cruise.
Exotic new destinations. Exciting new events.
On board and on shore, the most incredible
86 days you 11 ever experience!
Circle the globe in incomparable style ^
on the magnificent s.s. Rotterdam. On
our 23rd voyage around the world, we'll
follow the sun westward to the Orient.
India, and the Mediterranean22 fas-
cinating ports in all.
. You'll enjoy exciting transits through
both the Panama and Suez Canals, as
well as unhurried 2 and 3-day stays in
Hong Kong. Bali, Bombay. Haifa, and. (
for the first time. Shanghai in the People's
Republic of China. To celebrate this inau-
gural World Cruise visit to Shanghai,
we're offering a free first-day excursion,
including entertainment and a lavish
Chinese banquet.
On board, we'll pamper you with
warm Dutch hospitality, impeccable ser-
vice, and fine cuisine. And we've planned
many new events for this remarkable
voyage: prominent international guest ^
lecturers. Broadway and international
entertainers, and film stars discussing
their own films.
And. Holland America guarantees t
1981 World Cruise rates. There'll be no
price increase, no fuel surcharge.
The s.s. Rotterdam departs Port
Everglades. January 12. 1981. and San
Francisco. January 25. For immediate
reservations, see your travel agent.
Holland America Cruises
2 Penn Plaza. New York. NY 10121

UlAWltUH 3KM*0n*>
>a


i ne J ewisfi flondian o] raim pgut.
n \svw*j
uoay,
(She
Rabbinical <0mtr
Coordinated by
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman
devoted to diicMiikm of thtmei and isitwi
relevant to Jewish Hfe pait and present
Who Speaks for the
Jewish Community?
By RABBI
ALAN R. SHER MAN
Chaplain and CRC Director
Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County
As director of the Community
Relations Council, I am often
asked how decisions are made on
behalf of the Jewish community
and who is authorized to issue
public statements. The answers
lie in an explanation of the
function of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council (NJCRAC).
NJCRAC is the instrument
through which its constituency of
national and local Jewish
organizations collectively
evaluate developments of concern
to the Jewish community, plan
how to deal effectively with those
concerns, seek consensus on joint
policies and develop guidelines
for appropriate action.
Jewish community relations
activities are directed toward
enhancement of social conditions
conducive to secure and creative
Jewish living. Such conditions
Synagogue News
TEMPLE EMANU EL
The board of the Temple
Emanu-El Sisterhood will meet in
the new social hall of the temple
on Oct. 6 at 9:45 a.m.
Plans will be finalized for the
opening membership meeting
and petite buffet scheduled for
Nov. 17, at noon. Progress
reports will be given on the
annual donor to be held at the
Breakers on Feb. 18.
CONGREGATION
BETH KODESH
The Sisterhood of
Congregation Beth Kodesh is
having a meeting on Oct. 7, at
12:30 p.m. at the Congregational
Church. Note change of meeting
dates from the last Wednesday of
the month to the first Tuesday of
the month.
Debra Caldwell, reporter on the
Channel 5 News, will be the guest
speaker. She will present a first-
hand view of the workings of a
television station and what goes
into a news program.
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISHOLOM
Sisterhood of Congregation
Anshei Sholom will hold its board
meeting on Oct. 6, at 9:45 a.m.,
and its regular meeting on Oct.
21 at 1 p.m., when George S.
Brookman will talk on Biblical
archaeology.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El Sisterhood,
West Palm Beach, will hold its
monthly meeting on Oct. 21 at 8
p.m. in Senter Hall. Guest
speaker for the evening will be
Ann Lipton, chairman of the
history department at the
Benjamin School, North Palm
Beach.
Ms. Lipton will speak about
her recent visit to Israel as part
of a group sponsored by the
department of education through
a Fulbright grant. The group
consisted of 20 educators from
throughout the United States
who spend six weeks in intensive
study of IsraeL
Ms. Lipton is also youth
director at Temple Beth David,
North Palm Beach and a teacher
in the Midrasha program.
All members and guests are
invited to attend.
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman
lean be achieved only within a
societal framework committed to
the principles of democratic
pluralism; to freedom of religion,
thought and expression; equal
rights; justice and opportunity
and within a social climate in
which differences among groups
are accepted and respected, with
each free to cultivate its own
distinctive values while par-
ticipating fully in the general life
of the society.
HISTORY has bred in Jews
''the deep conviction that such
social conditions, derived from
Judaism afford Jews, and all
others, the best opportunity to
enjoy secure and meaningful
lives.
Through a broad, coordinated
program of activity, Jewish
community relations agencies
seek to interpret Israel's position
and needs to the American public
and government; to marshall
public opinion in behalf of justice
and freedom for Soviet Jews and
other oppressed Jewish com-
munities; to promote in the
United States equality of op-
portunity, without regard to race,
religion, ancestry or sex; to
secure freedom of thought,
opinion and association; to insure
freedom of religion and
separation of church and state
and to encourage amicable
relationships between all groups.
In implementing program-
matic activities, national and
local agencies play conplimentary
roles. NJCRAC policy provides
that national agencies recognize
that Community Relations
Councils are central bodies with
primary responsibility for local
community relations policy and
programming. National agencies
accordingly are expected to
encourage their constituents to
participate in programs con-
ducted with the approval of the
local CRCs and to make their
services available to the CRCs.
The constituent organizations
of NJCRAC are: American
Jewish Committee, American
Jewish Congress, B'nai B'rith -
Anti-Defamation League,
Hadassah, Jewish Labor
Committee, Jewish War Veterans
of the USA, National Council of
Jewish Women, Union of
American Hebrew
Congregations, Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations
of America, United Synagogue of
America and Women's American
ORT.
Tune in to'MOSAIC
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Sponsored by
The Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Sunday momJngovarWPTVChano* 5, at 8:30 .m.
wtth hosts Barbara Shubnan and Stew Gordon
October 12 Professor Ann White
"Jewish Struggle Through Poetry "
S furniture by WomNit Intwnra
So MMM daMg* t>y Carol LavoM
TUNE IN TO
L'Chayim
"The Jewish Listener's Digest"
An Exciting New Radio Magazine
Sundays, 10:30 a.m.
WPBR -1340 AM
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Oct. 5: Dr. Irving Greenberg
Oct. 12: Mayor League Pitcher: Steve Stone
In a stimulating, and somewhat provocative interview one
of American Jewry's most dynamic and most creative Orthodox
rabba Irving ("Yitz") Greenberg, shares some of his views
about Jewish life in America. Rabbi Greenberg is the director of
the Nation^ Jewish Resource Center, and'is ameX/o
L Chayim s "Panel of Commentators."
Major League pitcher Steve Stone, joins LChayim to
describe his own Jewish background. The outstanding Ditcher in
ftl T7*H J^8"" thi" ynr< SUve Stone described his Bar
Mitzvah (and its importance to his grandfather, who insisted on
living just long enough to see it); his disillusionment with the
.V .....W.'.V.Y.

Synagogues in
Palm Beach
County
ORTHODOX
AITZ CHAIM CONGREGATION CENTURY VILLAGE!
W Palm Beach Phone: 889-4675 Sabbat* Services u
and 5 p.m. Daily Services: 8:15 a.m. and b .tu (> ,n
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
551 Brittany L. Kings Point, Oelray Beach 33446 Harry SiiJ
President Services daily 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdays anil
Holidays 9 a.m. Phone: 499-7407. Temple No 499 9229
REFORM
ITEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive. West Palm Beach
33407 833-8421 Rabbi Irving B. Cohen Joel L. Li
Associate Rabbi Summer Sabbath Services. Friday 8 p.m.
Plori
ITEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourt Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Phone I
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sat
Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.* Saturday. 9:15am Torah I
v vices !
| THE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION OF DELRAYl
At St. Pauls Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swmton Ave Deiray
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1901. Delray Beach. Fla 33444. fJ
day at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver President lawrenal
Sommers, 272-2908
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach. Fla. 33411 Rabbi Edward Cohn'SatibarhJ
Services. Friday at 8:15 p.m. At St David's in ihe Pines Epis-1
copal Retreat. Forest Hill Blvd. and Wellington Trace Mailing '
address 1125 Jack Pine St.. West Palm Beach Fit'
33411 President Ronnie Kramer 793 2700
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
The Free Synagogue, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton. Fla 33432*301
1600, 391 1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 8:15pm1
at Boca West Community UMC. 8900 Boca West Glades Rd |t |
mile west ol Boca Turnpike) __________^_________
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive. West Palm Beach. Fla JJ40/ I
833-0339 Cantor E.ame Shapiro Sabbath Services Friday*]
8 15pm. Saturday at 9.30 a.m. Daily Minyan dl a 15 a.m.$
day at 9 a m
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach. Fla. 33409 Phone 684-
3212 Office hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z Schect
man* Cantor Mordecai Spektor Services: Daily 8:30 ara.]
and/JO p.m.. Friday 8:30 am. and 5 p.m.. Late Service 815
p.m. followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday. 8:30 a.m. 'pm
followed by Shalah Sudos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. Phone 732-2555 Rabbi Avrom L
Dra/m Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday at 91
a.m. Congregational Church, 115 N. Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 N. A' Street. Lake Worth, Fla. 33460 Phone: 5 i
5020 Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Eiman* Ser-
vices: Mondays and Thursdays at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services. Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday 10 am West
minster Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail. P>m
Beach Gardens. (Office) 321 Northlake Blvd.. North Palm
Beach. Fla. Phone: 845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor
Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
224 N.W. Avenue ,G,' Belle Glada, Fla. 33430 Jack Stateman,
Cantor Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeida Drive. Palm Springs. Fla. 33461 Sabbath ser-
vices. Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. President Maw
Kroshinsky, Phone: 965-1084 Mondays and Thursdays an
a.m. Services held at Faith United Presbyterian Church, Plm
Springs
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave.. Boca Raton. Fla. 33432 Phone: 3
8566 Rabbi Nathan Zelizer Sabbath Services Friday am
p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue. Delray Beach, Fla. 33446 P***
276-3536 Morris Silberman, Rabbi Leonard Price. tj"9
tor Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m.. Saturday ai
a.m. Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Road, Palm Beach. Fla. 33480 *"*,
0804 Rabbi Joel Chazin Cantor David Dardashii nk*"
Services. Friday at 6:30 p.m.. Saturday at 9 a.m.


Octobe
f 3. I960
The Jewish Floridianof Palm Beach County
1HV Hi
Page 19
Construction to Begin on Marco Island Condos
k diche about "real estate
N hedge against inflation
'.than a salesman s ciy,
My here Marco Island, on
_,'s southwest coast.
[the first five months of this
[fording to the Marco
1 Board of Realtors,
r and residences showed a
j^d average increase,
.to the national average.
.-font lots averaged
* compared to $34,500 for
me period last year. Inland
to-wawrfront lots averaged
E. compared to $19,000 for
lerage price of high and mid-
fcondominiums sold during
nt five months of this year
waa $118,314, as against
$114300 last year. Also, the
average price of garden con-
dominiums reflected an even
greater increase, from $66,500 in
1979, to $73,680 for the first five
months of this year.
Building costs, pointed out
Leonard Llewellyn, president of
Marco Beach Realty Inc., are
continuing to rise at a rate of lVi
percent a month, which is un-
doubtedly prompting the con-
tinuing surge of condominium
buying from domestic as well as
foreign buyers and investors.
"Some time in November,"
said Llewellyn, "construction will
begin on what we think will be
one of the most unusual and
}eres Back on Schedule;
lad Indigestion, Fatigue
TEL AVIV (JTA) Shimon Peres, leader of the
jot Party, has been released from Tel Hashomer
spital. He was admitted to the* hospital after corn-
lining of chest and abdominal pains. Doctors at the
kpital said he was suffering from indigestion and
bue. Peres told reporters after leaving the 'hospital
[t he was already back to his normal work schedule at
Dr Party headquarters.
Morris Sternheim
It is with deep sadness and great sorrow that the officers
nd worshippers at Aitz Chaim Congregation, the Orthodox
hul at Century Village, announce the sudden and untimely
assing of our beloved President, Morris Sternheim, on Sept. 8.
Jfter chapel services at Levitt on Sept. 9, the body was accom-
ied up north for burial in the family plot.
He will be very sorely missed by all.
dramatic condominiums to be
built here on Marco Island. This
is a joint venture of several
Chicago businessmen who have
spent a considerable amount of
time on Marco Island in the past
and evidently are conviced of its
potential. And, we will serve as
exclusive sales agent for the
property."
It is called the "Sandcastle," a
V-shaped building on the Island's
crescent beach and will feature
oversized balconies. Each of the
apartments will have an unob-
structed view of the beach and
the Gulf, with the point of the
"V" about 300 feet from the
water's edge.
The 15-story building will have
two tennis courts, a large 30 by
60-foot freshwater pool, barbeque
area and health spa, surrounded
by a wood deck boardwalk to the
beach level. Residents will enjoy
the features of a private beach
near the pool area. The 13th, 14th
and 15th floors will have pen-
C00GLER
FOR
CONGRESS
.. .
. -
thouse apartments, each
featuring an outdoor roof garden
in true penthouse style.
The other apartments will
range in size from 820 square feet
to 1,350 square feet and prices are
scaled from $118,800 to $295,00
for these units. Interestingly,
pointed out Llewellyn, the
apartments went on sale on a
Tuesday and were sold out within
a week. And, he added, the
developer is also planning
"Sandcastle II." The design will
give residents an unobstructed
view of the beach and gulf.
Within a brief span of five
years, Marco Beach Realty Inc.,
specialists in the condomimium
field, has become the largest
realty firm on Marco Island, with
1979 gross sales of over $166
million.
HAROLD S. MIROPOL, M.D.
Announces The Relocation Of His Office
To
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From Kuwait to Georgetown U.
i
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Georgetown
University has accepted an
endowment of $1 million
from the government of
Kuwait for its Georgetown
Center for Contemporary
Arab Studies, which also is
being financed this year by
24 American corporations.
Wesley Christenson,
Georgetown's director ol
public relations, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that the Kuwait endow-
ment has raised the total
contributed to the center by
eight Arab governments to
$3,305,000 since its found-
ing in 1975.
"More than half the money"
for the center this year comes
from American corporations,
while the Arab governments
contribute "less than half,"
Christenson said. The center, he
said, has a faculty of 22 members
and its student body consists of
only 38 undergraduate students.
KUWAIT'S contribution is the
largest yet given to the center.
Libya and the United Arab
Emirates each have given
$750,000, the next highest gifts.
Jordan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia,
Qatar and Oman are the other
Arab states that have con-
tributed. Christenson said that
corporations that have con-
tributed include Allis Chalmers
Texaco, Bechtel, Exxon, General
Motors, Ford, Chase Manhattan
Bank and Citibank.
At a ceremony last week at the
Kuwait Embassy, Georgetown
University President Timothy
Healy said the new gift is "a
generous act of philanthropy"
and that it "will significantly
strengthen our teaching in the
field of Arab studies and con-
tribute to the expansion of inter-
cultural education at the
universitv."
A university statement said
that the Kuwait gift was to
establish an endowed professor-
ship at the Center for Con-
temporary Arab Affairs and
Public Policy. University officials
said Kuwait attached no con-
ditions to the gift and would not
participate in selections of the
professor under the endowment.
Christenson said "some Amer-
ican Jews and some Israelis" are
among the center's students.
BESIDES the Arab Center,
the university conducts a Middle
East studies program in which,
Christenson said, a visiting
Israeli professorship is a part.
Regular conferences on Israeli
economic and political affairs
have been held since 1967, and
more than 2,000 students have
taken courses there, he said. It
now has six undergraduate
courses on Judaic studies, some
of its students also go to Hebrew
University in Jerusalem, he
added.
Much of the support for the
Israeli and Jewish studies,
Christenson said, comes from the
Herman Goldman Foundation in
New York and the Hyman Gold-
man family and the Goldman's
son, Aaron Goldman, of
Washington, D.C.
While Christenson said the
Arab Center is "very objective
and as balanced as any studies
program," Ira Silverman,
director of special programs for
the American Jewish Committee.
COOGLER
FOR
CONGRESS
said the center has "a clearly
marked pro-Arab, anti-Israel bias
in its selection of curriculum
material, its faculty appoint-
ment, and speakers."
IN ACCEPTING so much
money from "political sponsors
of one point of view," Silverman
said, Georgetown "may be selling
something very precious to
Americans the integrity of its
universities." He said, "I recog-
nize efforts by by Georgetown to
enhance its Jewish studies
programs, and while I applaud
these efforts, they in no way
mitigate the political bias of the
Arab studies center."
The American Jewish Commit-
tee has previously criticized
Georgetown for accepting Arab
gifts. Eyebrows also were raised
by friends of Israel in the spring
of 1979 when the Arab Center
conducted a seminar on how to
win favor from the American
media for Arab perceptions. The
center is directed by Michael
Hudson, who frequently defends
Arab contentions regarding
Israel. He told JTA at the time of
the seminar that he obtained the
idea for it from a seminar in
Libya he had attended.
American Media represen-
tatives and others, mostly
supporters of Arab perceptions in
the Arab-Israeli situation, at-
tended the Libyan program.
Some who were in Libya par-
ticipated in the Georgetown
center's program which was
attended by an audience that
appeared predominantly sym-
pathetic to the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization and against
Israel.
GEORGETOWN is America's
oldest Jesuit institution of higher
learning. Christenson said that of
its approximately 12,000
students about 15 percent are
Jewish.
Kuwait, with a large number of
Palestinian Arabs in key
positions in its government and
oil industry, is among the most
vociferous enemies of Israel and
is fully supportive of the PLO. It
is adamantly opposed to the
Camp David accords. Libya is
officially described by the State
Department as a "terrorist''
country.
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