Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00227

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
eJewLslh Floridl&f,
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR YOKE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
lumber 16
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, August 8, 1980
Snu-
Price 35 Cents
penhagen Another Mexico City
IK The
Decade for
Mice is over
but the re-
jntinue to
the Danish
[shock upon
F Presidents
Jewish Or-
B'rith in
women's
i Carter
te the lead
efforts by
[Liberation
in the
World
countries to subvert the United
Nations Decade for Women by
transforming it into a forum for
anti-Israel and anti-Zionist
propaganda.
AT THE same time, Bernice
Tannenbaum, president of
Hadassah, sent a letter to
President Carter from Copen-
hagen in which she observed,
"We have seen our hope of sister-
hood profoundly shaken by a
divisive political circus." Mrs.
Tannenbaum attended the.
Copenhagen conference as a
delegate representing the World
Jewish Congress which has non-
governmental organization
status.
Howard Squadron, chairman
of the Presidents Conference,
sent a telegram to Secretary of
State Edmund Muskie saying
that his organization's 34 con-
stituent members were "pro-
foundly concerned at efforts by
- the enemies of Israel and peace in
the Middle East to politicize" the
Decade for Women conference.
He had urged that the U.S.
delegation "take the lead in pub-
licly opposing and in actively
lobbying against" attempts by
the Soviet-Arab bloc to condemn
Israel and to channel UN funds
for Palestinian women through
the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
"THE PLO and its Soviet-
Arab supporters seek to win
United Nations' financial support
allegedly to meet the needs of
Palestinian women. They would
also have the conference condemn
Zionism, along with imperialism,
apartheid, neocolonialism and
racism."
Squadron added: "We urge
that our country's delegation to
the conference take the lead in
publicly opposing and actively
lobbying against the infls"
maioiy polemics of the PLO and
its co-conspirators in the Arab
League, the Soviet bloc and the
Continued on Page 7
Overwhelmingly Approved
United Jerusalem
Voted Israeli Capital
&Hwia& !(#?**' *'
'net*6
From Wire Services
JERUSALEM Israels
parliament overwhelmingly
approved legislation last week
declaring united Jerusalem to be
the nation's capital, defying
international protests that the
law threatens to derail the
Mideast peace process.
The bill was adopted 69-15,
with three abstentions, after
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin's coalition and the Labor
Party, the largest opposition
group, combined to defeat two
dozen amendments.
ISRAEL has considered
Jerusalem its capital since the
foundation of the Jewish state in
1948, and it annexed the Arab-
populated eastern sector to the
rest of Jerusalem after seizing it
from Jordan in the 1967 Mideast
war.
No country has recognized
Israel's claim, however, and all
but 13 nations maintain their
embassies in Tel Aviv.
Venezuela, one of those 13,
announced last week it was
moving its embassy from
Jerusalem to Tel Aviv in order to
remain neutral.
The United States says the
future of Jerusalem must be
decided in Middle East peace
negotiations, not by Israel alone,
and most nations follow that line.
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat called the vote an act
"against the spirit and workings
of Camp David," but refused to
say whether Egypt would
suspend negotiations with Israel
on Palestinian self-rule. Egypt
had said earlier it was con-
sidering such a move.
ISRAEL has rejected any
suggestion that the city not be
under its complete control, and
has gradually tightened its grip
on East Jerusalem by moving
government offices there and
building Jewish housing projects.
With the new law, Israel has
Continued on Page 8
and resources are used fully and creatively.
..A Mission to Israel is an opportunity to touch not cold stones,
but warm hearts.
..A Mission to Israel is an opportunity to encounter the reality
of life in Israel today.
^.TArT donnt TARTAKOW AT THE JEWISH FEDERATION 832~-2120
JRTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: RONNI TAKIAKUW
***0NLY A FEW SPACES AVAILABLE***
Prime Minister Begin


Mure 10
Page 2
.

The Jewish Floridan of Palm BeachCounty
Frida,
Organizations in the News
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The Palm Beach Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
sponsor a Chinese luncheon and
card / game afternoon on
Tuesday. Aug. 26. The luncheon
will be held at the Dragon Inn of
Lake Worth from noon until 4
p.m.
All members and friends are
invited to attend and should
bring their own cards or games.
For reservations, contact Mrs.
Isadora Weissman or Mrs.
Abraham Judd.
PIONEER WOMEN
Theodore Herzl Club of Pioneer
Women plan a dessert card party
? y' v
Presenting the charter of the new Lake Worth Chapter of the
Brandeis University National Women's Committee to Chapter
President Bernice Stein of Lake Worth, (center) is National
Vice President and Expansion Chairman Gloria Boris of Fort
Lauderdale fie ft) and National President Elaine Lisberg of
Glenview, III.
Brandeis Honors Women
The Brandeis University
National Women's Committee
(NWC) recently held its 32nd
Annual Conference at Waltham,
Mass., where 350 officers and
chapter delegates from across the
country met in a five-day
program. Among them were
Floridians pictured here. The
conference theme was "Keep tht
Miracle Growing."
NWC National President
Elaine Lisberg of Glenview, 111.,
presided over meetings,
seminars, elections, induction
ceremonies and receptions which
made up the 1980 programs.
Pictured with Abram Sachar, the first president and now
chancellor of Brandeis University, are from left: Myra Cohen
of Lake Worth, Bernyce Stein of Lake Worth, Lillian Levine of
Palm Beach, and Ida Gill of Palm Beach.
H
L
The only Jewish family owned
and operated funeral home
in Palm Beach County.
EVITT
EINSTEIN
memorial chapels
Complimentary Yahrzeit Candles
5411 Oneecnooee Biva. Teiepnone sq9-87oo
w. Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 phujp wbnstbn, v.p.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES.
e e e
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
Leumi
NASD
18 Easl 48th_Street
New *xk N Y 10017
(212) 759-1310
Toll Free (800) 221-4838
Aug. 21 at 1 p.m. at Lake Worth
Shuffleboard Courts.
A membership tea will be held
onMonday.Aug.il, at lpm.at
the home of Mrs Anne
Engelstein of Lakeside Village.
Palm Springs. All Pioneer
Women who are members at
large, transferees, or anyone who
would like to join 'the different
organization where women care
and women do" are welcome.
Refreshments will be served.
HADASSAH
Ruth Streiner will host a
membership tea for Tamar
Hadassah at her home in Royal
Palm Beach on Monday. Aug. 18
at 1 p.m. All prospective
members are invited.
The annual pool party,
featuring luncheon, cards and
swimming will be held at Ruth
Baraoidan s home on Thursday.
Oct. 16.
Tikvah Hadassah will hold its
first meeting on Sept. 29 at 12:30
p.m. at Anshei Sholem.
To attain Edna Hibel's
lithograph, call Min Liebman.
On Sept. 30 a card party and
luncheon are planned at Gen-
' tleman Jim's with proceeds to
Hadassah Israel Education
Services. Frances Yaeger is
chairman.
Future events include: Oct. 15,
tea for new members. Oct. 21-23,
trip to Tampa with proceeds to
youth activities. Trip includes
Circus World, Busch Gardens
and Cypress Gardens. Min
Liebman. chairman.
Nov. 5 Tikvah Hadassah, as
part of West Palm Beach Chapter
of Hadassah, will participate in a
flea market at the West Palm
Auditorium. Call Helen
Seidowitz if you have any china,
bric-a-brac, plants, handicrafts,
jewelry or new clothing to
donate.
Nov. 18 19, two-day trip to
Disney World. Proceeds to
Hadassah Medical Organization,
Emma Shipper, chairman.
Chai Hadassah will hold a
membership meeting on Monday,
Sept. 29, at 12:30 p.m. at the
Challenger Country Club.
Mildred Birenbaum and her
Musical Notes will entertain.
Members are invited to bring
friends. Refreshments will be
served.
The Lee Veseil Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its first
meeting on Sept. 8 at 12:30 p.m.
at the home of Pauline Coler,
Covered Bridge. Transfers of
regular members, life members ~
and new members are invited.
Henrietta Szold Group of
Hadassah, Lakeside Village, is
having a seven day Royal
Caribbean Cruise, on the Song of
Norway. Dec. 6. visiting Puerto
Plata. San Juan and St. Thomas
Contact Goldye Wolff for an
early reservation.
Shalom Hadassah s fifth
annual Youth Ahyah Luncheon
takes place on Wednesday. Nov
12 at the Round Table, Palm
Lakes Blvd. Proceeds are
donated to Israels disad-
vantaged youth
Cue* speaker will be Mm.
Henry Goldman, national
education chairman. A fashion
ahow will be presented by Liaa
Boutique^ Florence Shapiro and
Martha Starr are in cbaree
reservations
cards.
JJ*Sdjool Teacher
omaone with experience anc**
background. Contact Robin Eiaarv
Memorial Chapel Inc /Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol
of Jewish Tradition
^
4714 Okeechobee Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Florida
683-8676
Now two chapels to serve you
West Palm Beach-Lantana.
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President/
Arthur Grossberg.V.P.,F.D./L*o Hack.V.P..ReligK)uAdiKif!
Kenneth M Kay.V.P.F.D./Carl Grossberg
&*MMttmmiMnmmim
Information
Call 588-1652
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
PALM BEACH'
832-0211
JROWARD
APER A
ACKAGING
1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT LAUDERDALE
jt^iaw
MORE THAN A BANK
Whare You'ra More Than A Customer
A FULL SERVICE BANK
For information
(IT SPELLS BANK)
Main Office
501 South FLgier Drive
West Palm Beach. Fla. 33401
NortJakeBlvtLBraaefc
2863 Northlake Boulevard
Lake Park, Fla. 33410
HillBraaA
18W Fore* HiUBoukwJ
WeatPaLmrkach.FU.33*11
l |W
2380 Palm Beach Lakes*
West Palm Beach, Fla a^J
Member FDIC Member Federal Reserve Sy^*"


kugu3t8,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
e Halacha
hodox Worry over Draft Law
AJC Group Elects Hoffman
YOrJK (JTA)
lalition of Orthodox
groups has ex-
concern over a
court decision
|ng the draft
jtion law un-
Itional because it
limited to men.
Th a temporary stay
decision was issued
Supreme Court
te Justice William
i, the full court will
the question in its
[tg term, which
in October.
jiile, registration for
iicially ended this
According to Rabbi Herman
Neuberger, coordinator of the
Orthodox Jewish Coalitoin on
Registration of Women for the
Selective Service System, rulings
of halachic authorities state that
Jewish religious law prohibits
Jewish girls from participating in
the Selective Service System,
whether in military or alternative
service.
SHOULD THE lower court
ruling be upheld by the Supreme
Court, and if registration is then
to be reactivated, Congress will
have to pass a new registration
law providing for the registration
of women as well as men, he
noted. Since the current draft law
provides for random selection for
induction from the pool of regis-
trants not exempted or deferred,
the problems are obvious and
ominous, Neuberger said.
ANNOUNCEMENT TO THE COMMUNITY
Is of Sept. 1, 1980, the Jewish Federation'of Palm Beach
ly will turn the full administrative responsibility of Camp
over to the Jewish Community Center of the Palm
111 organizations within the Palm Beach County com-
fy interested in information regarding rental of Camp
for weekend outings should contact Prances Witt at
k-ish Community Center, 689-7700.
Lfer Smith, (left), president of Temple Beth Sholom,
forth, and Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg, (center) present a
\ Barry Krischer, president of the Jewish Community
tool. The check represents monies collected at a Yiskor
\n the last day of Passover.
The Coalition consists of
Agudath Israel of America,
Central Congress of Orthodox
Rabbis, National Council of
Young Israel, National Jewish
Commission on Law and Public
Affairs (COLPA). National
Society for Hebrew Day Schools
(Torah Umesorah), Rabbinical
Alliance of America, Rabbinical
Council of America, Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations
of America, Union of Orthodox
Rabbis of the United States and
Canada, United Lubavitch
Organization and United Satmar
Community.
Neuberger stressed that while
the position of the Coalition is
based on religion, it is in accord
with the conclusions of a report of
the Subcommittee on Manpower
and Personnel of the U.S. House
of Representatives.
THAT REPORT, prepared in
connection with the new regis-
tration law, concluded that the
judgment of military leaders and
Congress was that a men-only
system best serves national
security.
Pointing to studies that show
that women volunteer in suf-
ficient numbers to fill the
positions open to them, the
report stated it was thus not
necessary to draft women. The
report said that since a draft
would be based on a random
selection from the pool of
.registrants, in time of national
emergency when men would be
needed quickly for combat, an
equal number of men and women
would have to be called up.
Moreover, sexually integrated
units would create great dif-
ficulty for military planners with
respect to combat deployment,
according to the report.
THE REPORT also referred to
the impact registering and draft-
ing women would have on the
family unit and maintained that a
decision on this question is
properly within the purview of
Congress. *
Dennis Rapps, executive
director of COLPA, who is
serving as an attorney for the
Coalition, said that the Coalition
would continue to work
politically to avoid the regis-
tration of women. He said that
the Coalition would also file a
friend-of-the-court brief with the
Supreme Court when it considers
the issue in the fall.
nai toRah ConqReqation
1401 NW 4th Avenue
Boca Raton, Florida
A Conservative Congregation
Auxiliary High Holy Day Services
will beheld at
Boca Tnci Country Club
5800 NW 2nd Avenue
Boca Raton, Florida
Rabbi Philip Warmflash
Cantor Lao Rosenblum
741
Hashanah
teshanah
lashanah
^shanah
Bra
lippur
Wednesday Sept. 10 ai5 p.m.
Thursday Sept. 11 &00a.m.
Thursday Sept. 11 7:30 p.m.
Friday Sept. 12 ftOOam
Friday Sept. 19 7:00 p.m.
Saturday Sept. 20 930 am.
A Limited Number of
Guest Tickets available
For Information
Call: 392-8566 or
mmmam
m
392-8576

m
Arnold J- Hoffman was
elected president of the American
Jewish Committee's Palm Beach
Chapter for the 1980-81 year at
the Committee's annual meeting
held on Wednesday evening, July
23.
A summer barbecue, which
was held at the Biltmore Beach
Club in Palm Beach, was at-
tended by about 75 members and
their guests, and the new board
and officers were elected and
installed in office.
Brenda Shapiro, the Florida
area director of the AJC spoke on
"Current Immigration Issues" in
which she discussed the unique
Florida situation. A lively
question and answer period
concerning Miami problems
concluded the evening.
Arnold Hoffman
TUNE IN TO
L'Chayim
"The Jewish Listener's Digest"
An Exciting New Radio Magazine
Sundays, 10:30 a.m.
WPBR 1340 AM
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Aug. 10-A program focussing on the Fallashah
Jewish community of Ethiopia. Graenum Berger. founder of
Ithe American Association for Ethiopian Jews, discusses their
style of living, their Jewish practice, and the problems they've
ihad entering Israel.
Tune in to 'Mosaic9
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TUNE IN TO MOSAIC
"Mosaic," Jewish Federation's sponsored program
is aired on
Sunday morning over WPTV Channel 5, at 9 a.m. with
hosts Barbara Shulman and Steve Gordon.
Set furniture by Worrells Interiors
Set interior design by Carol Lavold

GRAY HAIR
GRADUALLY
VANISHES!
Silvercheck makes gray
hair young again secretly
and easily. The leading
formula for men and
women in 26 countries.
Silvercheck is as simple to
use as hair tonic. Leaves
you with natural looking
Send S3.95 for one 4-ox.
Cream or Liquid, S7J0 for
two. Add SI pottage end
handmng. Cakjorma residents
add t% salts tax.
color that you control.
Silvercheck won't wash
out, won't leave gray roots,
is not a dye. In 2-3 weeks,
Silvercheck gives you
freedom from gray hair.
Discover it now!
Silvercheck
313 Vista de Valle
Mill Valley. CA 94941
^kT^kT^oT\^orWi^oTSW\WW
Silvercheck. Dept. M, 313 Vista de Valle, Mill Valley. CA 94*41
Please send me, in a plain wrapper,___bottles of Silvercheck
Cream ?, Liquid D. / understand Silvercheck is sold with
an unconditional moneyback guarantee. Enclosed is my check
for $-------------------which includes SI postage and handling.
Charge to my D VISA D MASTER CHARGE
Card Number___________________ Exp. Date'__________
Allow lime fur delivery. Calif. Res add 6** sales lax
Nime______________________________
?
Itf
ddre.
ily------
sgimuafl^
34.
IMMMMMMoMfi'i'iTu'i iV''


r*a10
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
m
Friday, ]
The Silent Terror
It takes a heap of guts to throw a hand grenade
at a group of youngsters as they are boarding a bus
to go off to summer camp. Yet that is what a
Lebanese terrorist did in Belgium on Sunday.
This must be seen in the context of the
"debate" for a Palestinian state which the General
Assembly of the United Nations just staged, and
which resulted in a resolution calling for just about
everything except the outright extermination of
Israel.
Why not that? Because no mention of Israel
was necessary. The resolution's demands for with-
drawal, secession and concession on Israel's part are
so sweeping that they amount to the same thing.
There will, of course, be no mention in the
Communist and Third World Parliament of Puppets
of the terrorist outrage in Belgium on Sunday.
The New Expediency
But what of the Europeans, who through the
last 2,000 years of their history have been killing
Jews en masse as a matter of course, with but a
momentary pause in their pattern since the end of
World War II?
What about the Europeans, who are by now
bored with a life devoid of Jew-killing and who have
joined ranks once again in their common cause? Will
there be no word from them?
We write these words on the eve of the General
Assembly vote on the latest Palestine resolution,and
it is a safe bet that the resolution will pass by the
crude consent of crude Communist and Third World
affirmation.
It is a less safe bet, but certainly likely, that
the European Economic Community members will
say "nay" because the resolution fails to mention
Israel's right to exist. But this is mere cosmetics.
In the scheme of things today, Israel is the
heavy for a Western world that has so obviously
and pathetically failed to learn a single lesson from
the betrayal of Czechoslovakia at Munich. And so
the terrorist children who were off to Camp in
Belgium need no mention either not from the
likes of those in the ranks of the New Expediency.
A Medieval Legacy
Was it worth all the effort to try to change the
anti-Semitic character of the Oberammergau
Passion Play?
A series of recent developments both in Ger-
many and in the United States argue that the effort
to revise the 1980 production has in fact resulted in
a number of quite substantial positive develop-
ments.
First, a survey of the West Germar ress,
radio, and TV just completed by the A rican
Jewish Committee discloses that there has en "a
virtually unanimous repudiation of the a: i-Jewish
ideas and images in the Obrammergau Passion
Play by the most influential public opinion media in
Germany."
Second, as far back as January, 1980, the U.S.
Army Chaplain Corps in Europe informed the AJC
by letter that it was "now extricating chapels and
chaplains from selling tickets to. the Passion Play"
for all American military personnel in Europe.
And finally, a number of major U.S. travel
agents, university alumni groups, and churches are
distributing widely our studies detailing the anti-
Jewish themes in the Passion Play in order to
immunize tourists against its prejudicial virus.
"The gods may work slowly," but in time
through such education programs they will work
exceedingly well in uprooting this baleful medieval
legacy.
Jewish Floridian
Of PALM IE ACM COUNTY
CamUninf "00 VOICC"aa 'FEDERATION REPORTER
In conjunction with Jewlah Federation of Palm Beach Oouniv. Inc
Combined Jewish Appeal
PALI*BEACH BOCARATONOFFICE
S300 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. Pla. SMI2 Phone SJ8-30O1
Printing Office -130 N.E. 8th St.. Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone STVMM
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE 8HOCHET RONN1 TARTAKOW
Editor and PubUshar Executive Editor New* Coordinator
The Jewlih F lor Mian Dm Met Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merc hand Im Advert! e In It* CakjlMts
FORM 3579 return* to The Jewlah FJorldlao
3200 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. Fla TJSPS 864303
Published Bl Weekly Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton. Fla
Federation Officers: President. Alan L. Shulman; Vice President*: Alec Enjel-
ateln. Jeanne Levy. Myron Nlckman, Barbara Shulman: Treasurer, Alvln
Wllensky; Secretary, Barbara Tanen: Executive Director, Norman J, Schlmel-
man Submit material for publication to Ronnl Tartakow, Director of Public
Relations.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year S3.50, or by memoersnip is
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, SOI South Flagler Drive, West Palm
Beach. FL 33401. Phone 112-2120. (Ovt of Town upon Request.)
Friday, August 8. 1980 26 AB 5740
Volume 6 Numbei 16
SmaJdag in Israel
Z0A Leader Calls
In a major policy statement
Ivan J. Novick, president of tht
Zionist Organization of America,
charged that certain American
Jewish leaders and organizations
have unwittingly been victimized
by a "semantic propaganda cam-
paign" which is not only anti-
government, but is in fact anti-
Israel in its end result.
Said Novick, "It is time that
the American Jewish community
take a long, deep and penetrating
look at what has been happening
around and within us. We must
not permit false issues to deceive
us, discourage us or disunite us."
SPEAKING before a dis-
tinguished audience of Israeli and
American officials and leaders
and representatives of all maior
Israeli media, in Zoa House-Tel
Aviv, Wednesday, June 25,
Novick stated: "If public opinion
has a growing doubt about
Israel's commitment to peace, if
it has difficulty in understanding
the dangers posed by a separate
Palestinian state, and if the link
between Israel's security needs
and the issue of settlements is
not understood, we cannot blame
it only on Arab propaganda.
"I question Jewish leaders who
charge American Jews for being
'too emotional.' When Israel is
threatened, when the Jewish
position is in jeopardy, when
Jerusalem is at stake, when Eretz
Yisrael is surrounded by a sea of
hatred, I become emotional,''
said Novick.
He added, "To me this is an
emotional issue. I will not
apologize to certain sensitive
Jews who believe that it is un-
becoming if my Christian neigh-
bors see the extent of my
emotionalism because of my love
for the Jewish people and concern
for its future.
It is regrettable,',' said
Novick, "that certain Jewish
organizations, professionals and
leaders, spend so much time
debating 'false issues' instead of
working to interpret them to
others. Israel should not be
expected to change its policies,
either to make the work easier for
its friends, to. accommodate the
media or to capitulate to State
Department policy." Said
Novick, "We should respect the
independence of the Jewish State
and should not permit ourselves
to be used as tools to attack it.
"IaBELIEVE free people of the
democratcy of Israel alone have
the right to determine their vital
interests with respect to security
and peace. There is no need for
Jews to stifle their opinions, said
Novick, "but these should be
conveyed in a responsible way
that will produce positive results.
There is little difference between
the harm done Israel by
American Jews attacking Israeli
policy in the public media and
Israeli leaders and personalities
who express their views which
are misconstrued and misunder-
stood by an uninformed
American public or capitalized
upon by unfriendly elements."
Novick issued an appeal to
those who criticize Israel to be
aware of the reaction in the non-
f8 ,wor,d- Said Novick.
What glee there must be in the
Arab world! What sarcasm murt
there be in the Soviet orbit! What
sinister pleasure must be exper-
c!!M;edr^.C8rtain den">nta in the
State Department, aa Jews in the
US or in Israel seek to outahout
each other on the state of the
public platform! Is this the best
we sophisticated Jews can do?
Continued Novick, "I do not
ask for silence. I only aak for
statesmanship, self-diacipline,
more awareness of the con-
sequences of what is being said
and the consequences of what
happens when every word is
examined, taken o

BBSJJJB
Ivan Novick
blown out of proportion and
effectively utilized to inflict a
damaging impression of the
Jewish State, its government and
its people. I do not speak of
issues, nor do I speak of parties
or personalities. I speak only of
good common sense, and a sense
of responsibility."
In a sharp challenge to the
"Peace Now Movement" in the
United States and in Israel,
Novick said, "Your basic premise
is not only faulty but it is also
used to do Israel immeasurable
harm.
"YOUR very slogan 'Peace
Now' implies that there are those
Jews who seek peace and all
others are anti-peace. You
criticize the government of Israel
that its policies make the 'work of
rejectionists easier' and I ask
are your actions conducive to
influencing them to be more
accommodating? You suggest
that Israel's policy 'impedes any
eventual agreement with the
Palestinians' and I ask do you
see in the recent Al-Fatah PLO
statement a readiness to accept
Israel regardless of the party in
power? You call upon Israel 'to
conduct negotiations with any
Palestinian body that renounces
terrorism' as though you were in
a position to produce such Arab
negotiators prepared to accept
the path of peace."
Said Novick. "Those who
suggest that any Israeli govern-
ment, any Israeli leader or any
Israeli political party does not
seek true peace, not only under-
mine Israel's image, but do harm
to all the Jewish people.
"In the United States. I hear
voices that call for dissent.' We
have heard them before. It ap-
pears that to be 'sophisticated,'
Jews must be more 'objective' in
dealing with issues which even
affect their well-being. I reject
the notion that dissent teats our
ability to view problems with
intelligence and proper per-
spective. I reject the notion that
'dissent' is the 'burning issue'
before the Jewish people. Aa
Jews, we do have a self-interest
that cannot be denied, but I
suggest that this coincides with
the values that are shared with
most of our fellow citizens. All of
us believe in a strong America
that will remain a free America, a
nation and people respected by a
world that seeks peace.
"INSTEAD of dissent,' I urge
that we place our emphasis on
what unites us aa Americans, as
Jews and as Zionists. Thus, we
nave many urgent concerns:
the Jewish people in
jeopardy in other lands,
especially in the Soviet Union
and now in Iran
American Middle East policy
tending to favor Arab positions
continuing support for Israel
as the primary ally of the United
Stau-inthe Middle Fast
for Unit
Middle East
can interests
t the growing tt>
the terrorist PLO
intention to ^
Arabia and JortCll
arsenals Hl
the Jewish people,.
Jerusalem as Iarael'sT
the campaign m
the legality of Israel',,
policy, thereby d,
Israel's legitimacy un
the campaign throu
world giving the PLOi
the continuing
portray Israel at
and its policies as an',
peace' in spite of its ibbd3
peace agreement with EgyjT
the need to suppMf
Camp David accord, to
the continuation of tat
effort
resistance to efforts L
made to alter UN ResduuaJ
the United Nitkni |
ceasing efforts to condemnI
the growing anti!
anti-Zionism
the insidious campaial
divide the Jewish people ;
the Jewish education oij
young people so they m
faithful to their tradition
heritage
f the urgent need to
hostage America' from
stranglehold of OPEC by U
plementing an effective
program
"YES, our Jewish agent]
heavy; 32 years after the Su
Israel was established
question of dissent' pales i
insignificance when coma
against the challenging a
before us. Surely the Uj
concern, influence and timj
Jewish leaders can bat]
directed to addressing
urgent problems confronta*!
Jewish people."
Concluded Novick,
enemies, be they in Israel, M
United States, in Damascuir
Moscow, understand the *
nesses and the strengths ofl
Jewish people. They antiM
our reaction and they employ
highest skills of persu
covert and overt, in the I
the mind of world public i
and especially where II
most vulnerable, a we
American Jewish commuMW
"The concept is not newj
called by the most r
definition 'divide
conquer.' It did not start I
day. We have warned oil
development, we have cauB-
regarding its danger, Jl
urged Jews, in Israel and !
United States, to stand liny
the confrontation we havef"
about yesterday, '
today.
ALL THE Philosophy, aJ
political analyses, all uJ.
interpretation of events.
meaningless if the Jewish!
are defenseless. And, tnei
would be more compos
this loss of defense wosJt
own making. I would pie*
the leaders of the Jewu*^
wherever they may iV*""1
their senses. Time is not:mj
side. We have enough
around us. Let us not
each-other.
"From WMhjJ.
Jerusalem. London, rv
Moscow, let the Jewh
stand united. No longer j|
remain silent. Let owa
voices reheard from'and I
No to the PLOjJ^J
poasementl'NotothossW
divide us!
Let Washington
Jerusalem, capitals ot
continu. H



August 8,1980
The Jewish Fioridian of Palm Beach County
>gf'
ollek Rebuffs Enemies' of Jerusalem
_y YORK (JTA)
Cyor Teddy Kollek of
kalem cautioned
(can Jewry against
opts, not only by our
es, to undermine the
of our capital city
alem.
oblique criticism,
was seen as directed
ke United States for
lating and weak
position it has taken on the
issue of Jerusalem both
inside and outside the
United Nations, was con-
tained in a letter to Rabbi
Joseph Sternstein, presi-
dent of the American Zion-
ist Federation, which is
sponsoring the Jerusalem
Pilgrimage from Nov. 17 to
20.
SENDING HIS warmest
greetings" to the Pilgrimage or-
\rab League Foreign Ministers,
EEC Set to Invite PLO In
By DAVID KANTOR
JONN (JTA) Chedli Klibi, Secretary General
Arab League, said here that the foreign ministers
Arab League and the European Economic Com-
ty (EEC) member states will hold a conference some
this year which will include representatives of the
Itine Liberation Organization.
tlibi made the announcement at a press conference
: end of his three-day visit to West Germany.
.IE SAID the Arab League and the EEC have
Id to renew the Euro-Arab dialogue, but this time on
Jitical level in contrast to the past when the elis-
ions were limited to cultural and trade matters,
pt, which the Arab League boycotts because of its
e treaty with Israel, will be excluded from the
Igue, Klibi said.
[The Arab League official claimed that West Ger-
always had reservations about the Camp David
rds and that they have increased considerably of
He claimed that the Bonn government is convinced
no peace settlement can. be reached in the Middle
without the participation of the PLO.
ganizers, Kollek said: "Your
Unions! ration of solidarity and
identity with Jerusalem will help
manifest the determination of
the Jewish people to safeguard
our city." He added he was
looking forward to welcoming
the Pilgrimage in November.
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin of Israel had previously
hailed the' Pilgrimage, calling it
an "expression of our peoples'
age-old bond with the city." He
said that "Jerusalem, the united
and indivisible city, the heart of
the Jewish people, is ours
forever."
The office of the Prime
Minister^and that of Kollek are
both assisting in developing the
three-day program in Israel.
FEATURED parts of the
Srogram are a "March for the
nity of Jerusalem" in which
thousands are. expected to
parade through the streets from
the New City to the Western
Wall; special ceremonies and
prayer's at the wall; a festive
dinner with Begin; a reception
with President Yitzhak Navon; a
session addressed by Kollek and
other dignitaries; conferring of
awards upon American Jews
who have contributed sig-
nificantly to interpreting the
meaning of Jerusalem to the
Jewish people.
high holy days Service
For the UnaffMated and Area Visitors at
Temple Beth El's Senter Hall
Officiated by Rabbi Morris Silberman
And Cantor Albert Koslow
September 10,11,12,19,20
Limited Seating $40 Donation per person
MAIL RESERVATIONS TO:
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 N. FLAGLER DRIVE
WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. 33407
PHONE 8334339

-dk "y^
-Off-aktot"
The Afgus
Ellen's Paperworks
Custom Invitations
Stationery Accessories
Holiday Cards Personalized gifts
for all occasions:
Lucite items, purses, etc.
By Appointment
At a Discount 848-3452
BEFORE YOU SELL YOUR
DIAMONDS
AND
PRECIOUS JEWELS
YOU REALLY SHOULD SEE
________BALOGH.________
, _____________________IMMEDIATE CASH______________----------
BALOGHpoys its highest prices evei lot ycrui precious Jewels.
diamonds and antiques
Sell wheie leading banks, trust olltceis. and attorneys have
been dealing toi 70 years (
Maxwell House9 Coffee
Is After Shopping Relaxation.
Shopping for a "good buy" has be- a close friend. The good talk. The
come one of America's favorite pas- good feelings. The warmth are some
times Its always fun to find new of the things that go along with
things, see the new fashions and Maxwell House? Perhaps that's why
many Jewish housewives don't 'shop'
for Maxwell House* They simply
buy it. It's the "smart buy" as any
balabusta knows!
'0
Corel Gables: 242 M.racle Mile ^^*^roward ^0-0O)^
Miami Be.ch: 447 Arthur Godfrey Rd. 531-0087 (Broward 920 55UU1
Hallandale: H15 E Hallandale Beach Blvd 456-8210
Lauderhill: 4444 Inverrary Blvd.. 742-2225
perhaps pick up something new for
the house or family.
Another favorite pastime is to come
home from shopping, kick off the
shoes and relax with a good cup of So, no matter what your prerer-
coffee. Maxwell House Coffee. The ence instant or groundwhen
full-pleasant aroma and great- you pour Maxwell House* you pour
tasting, satisfying flavor is relaxation. At its best... consis-
the perfect ending ........ tently cup after cup after cup.
to a busy shop-
ping day. Espe-
cially when
relaxing with
K Certified Kosher
IFmdi
< mpm
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century.


in
fW Jewish Fht ifm efl
BemehCmaUj
Ritual Circumsicion Permitted
SEW YORK i/TA.
A
fck* had
--jioi kthm :C i =*
by *
Higtilisht Poght of
At Protest
B, ZEE^ BEN SHLOMO^
of the
fta
ac=a-:
tea
ef the New Yarfe
Caty
=js*c
mhaami at p-a* taw
of the ihra dry by a
wsh wteea the father had
--; i=.. *.
i-j
TV
rr n
CAHN ISSTED faa crder at far stay
** i K pea. the an Tat '
^ m^k a stay at Cahm :raer rs-uc
M
atu .-T7 lae z-^ae xu; -_i*_.
'.* aaaBBaa w.v-ii ut rt&~jr*c -:
-r-.i- the aaapatal heyaec tae
THE PKOBLEM
reihpeetsfy entice.
--?
e aoapatat far tat me
y aaca the aawat
*c r-,c -_ae loapatai.
COLPA
a- -D,
a COLPA
QUO VAX*S?
M
li
aCCaal DC OCBBriJBCft-
WHEN THE fai
the tw COLPA
boob Wadacaday that the
heepital officials reaaaiaed
the COLPA
of aa
fay it
Repps fli'* that
aper* had to be fled to re
-:
tefthei
THE COLPA
with Cahn that
dfaaetad that
Hal
he would hear the tataer
pcuuoo the aaxt amrwaig He
aao ordered Sdrer and Repps to
an the ckefe a office of the
on Che aaxt day
- at 9:30 ta to Be
reeeatry
trad.
Aara.
Joaa.15
of
_jl70-laTiewofthe
rhealth aad dctcriorotiaa;
aot oaty a aaatter of
aci for the prfaoaera
IOSIF MENDELEVICH, aa
Orthodox Jew e at a atate of
urvaooe. beeaaae of
Friday
Prisoners
in London
ace oa .
*** fa-ij
tfahyt
'-owrna?
retiapoe had \
' breac* ofthi
-+*** He war
aotonoaa the Si
After three ran <
fafal
Beth Afaaei M ihiafai
Yan Pyodoror -, ^
Alexei hfaaihiiiko aad
easeaced to U ran r
15 years. Pyodoc^' /r"
behewar. chopped off
faajers oat of
for a a
Jlround
cfovn
By STACI LESSER

to the fact
Around the Torn" tcouid Hhe to hear from you. Seed*
rvpe-arrtfteK aad doubte-spmced to Stmd Lesser, c o
Jewish FloridiaA." 301 South Fmgier Drive, Smite 306.
Pabn Beach. FL 33401.
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCCOTH
1-538-9045
ft
& EN JOY!


y, August fiU980
The Jewish Floridian of PalmBeachCounty
I Decade of Women
How Copenhagen Became Another Mexico City
_*ntinued from Page 1
Lied Third World. Free and
locratic nations everywhere
k to the United States to play
[key role in resisting the anti-
Lei cabal in Copenhagen .
e believe it is imperative
our country's delegation in
enhagen undertake a major
Ipaign to avert a serious blow
|the American national in-
U to the Arab-IsraqJ peace
.ess and to the security of our
nd and ally Israel."
JACK SPITZER, president of
B'rith International, also
I in contacts with the White
jjse that the U.S. instruct its
tgation to take the lead in
[sting proposals that equate
nism with racism, provide UN
Isidies to the PLO under the
of helping Palestinian
nen and other PLO attempts
politicize the Copenhagen
Iference.
'The PLO and its allies" were
|ing to subvert the meeting
turn it into a propaganda
bw "to further the PLO's anti-
ice aims." Spitzer said. "B'nai
Fith is deeply concerned about
'LO's cynical exploitation of
| conference."
lannenbaum noted, in her
ti-r to Carter, that on "issues
relating to the problems of
women refugees, Palestinian
women are singled out over
Afghan, Vietnamese, Ethiopian,
Kampuchean and countless other
women refugees, thus distorting
a tragedy of staggering
proportions."
SHE ALSO stated that once
again, at the Copenhagen con-
ference, "the slander originating
in 1975 at Mexico City is being
revived by Cuba which has intro-
duced an amendment to the Plan
of .Action calling Zionism an evil
to be eradicated along with
colonialism, racism, etc."
Tannenbaum praised "the
strong efforts of our outstanding
United States delegation led by
Sarah Weddington," but despite
this, the conference "has
degenerated into an anti-
American, anti-Jewish and anti-
Israel diatribe where any ill in
any part of the world is
blamed on the United States
and/or Israel."
^ ^
*\o
<

v;*
She called on the President "to
speak out now before the con-
ference ends to affirm that the
policy of the United States is to
reject any Plan of Action con-
taining such proposals and
slanders."
IN A RELATED develop-
ment, a group of internationally
eminent women, including
several political figures, artists,
authors and actresses, signed a
statement that appealed to the
participants at the international
women's conference in Copen-
hagen to end politicization of the
conference and to "preserve its
universal character."
Among those who signed the
statement were Simone de Beau-
voir, Louise Nevelson, Madeleine
Renaud, Beverly Sills and Bella
Abzug. Other women, from the
United States, included Colleen
Dewhurst, Betty Friedan,
Shelley Winters, Ann Jackson,
Ann Meara, Jacqueline Grennan
Wexler, Bess Meyerson, Eugenie
Anderson and Reps. Beverly
Byron (D., Md.), Marjorie Holt
(R., Md.) and Margaret Heckler
(R.Mass.)
The statement, which was
released to the media on an inter-
national basis, was initiated in
France by a group of women
aware that certain agenda items
would overshadow the original
intent of the conference and turn
the event into an explosive
political forum. Among the
countries represented in the list
of signatories were Australia,
Austria, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada,
Costa Rica, Denmark, Federal
Republic of Germany, Ecuador,
Finland, Great Britain, Italy,
Japan, Mexico, Norway,
Panama, Portugal, Uruguay,
U.S. and Venezuela.
THE APPEAL "to all par-
ticipants," stated: "This con-
ference provides us with the
opportunity to make known our
views on questions which pre-
occupy women: social life,
equality, education, health and
employment. We know that
actions are envisaged to use this
conference for partisan ends thus
diverting it from its initial aims.
Politicizations have no place in
this encounter. It is to be hoped
that this conference, which rallies
women from all countries,
preserves its universal charac-
ter."
In addition, the National
Coalition of American Nuns
(NCAN) also issued an appeal
"to women of all faiths to join
hands as sisters in an effort to
make the International Women's
Conference in Copenhagen what
it is supposed to be an op-
portunity for women to dialogue
about the women's agenda."
The appeal, signed by Sister
Margaret Traxler and Sister Ann
Gillen, members of the
Coalition's executive board and
delegates to the conference,
added, in part: "NCAN deplores
the efforts of the PLO to
politicize this women's con-
ference in Copenhagen, 1980, as
they did in the International
Women's Conference in Mexico
City in 1975.
"NCAN DENOUNCES the
PLO terrorists, who presume to
speak for the largely silent Pales-
tinian people. The PLO do not
even dialogue with all their
brothers to say nothing of
their sisters ... So far, the PLO
has not shown any signs of
joining the human family, as they
are still pledged to 'liquidate' the
State of Israel .
"Palestinian women are hos-
tages to the perverse national-
istic hatred of the PLO, who
demonstrate by their plans for
Copenhagen that they dominate
their own sisters, using them as
pawns, in the game of politics,
even as they keep them in the
bondage of Arab male
supremacy. Finally, NCAN urges
Palestinian women to share the
concerns of all women and to join
in efforts to build peace for their
people."
IStf
irfl FUNnTUK a****50*1


114
Capital J
of
Fm3

mi mm m t
[*! Hi" ^ir^-"
9> 3AVTI C~**-
TZJL.

or
^i &
-
r .
**
"^52
t
T

Wkm
^ *'
-
^v tT

ar RARE JEWISH FACTS
. \ v v
-ac i
^
^


* browsing in books

Howe and Kenneth Libo.
pu. We Lived. A
cumentary History of
nigrant Jews in America
0-1930. New York: Richard
ek Publishers and Phila-
bpbia: Jewish Publication
dety, 1979.360 pp. $22.50.
bis most attractive volume of
i than 200 photographs,
Lings, posters and other iDus-
0ns, accompanied by texts
_n from many sources, is a
-tribute to the resources of the
jsh Publication Society and
its compilers. After Irving
he's The World of Our
Fathers (also published by the
JPS and the distinguished firm of
Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich) it
was to be expected that he would
follow it with a book of pictures
and texts to illustrate many of
his fascinating chapters.
What makes this book so
attractive is not only the wide
selection of illustrative materials,
much of which apparently has
seldom if ever appeared before,
but the translations of many
articles and poems from the
Yiddish by the authors for the
first time. All of us have heard of
the famous Bintel Brief and
maybe some of us have read
portions from the book published
Home Eye Test Program Offered
|o help find the one in 20 pre-
(tolers who have eye disorders
efore it is too late the
lional Society to Prevent
kdness has just issued a Home
[Test Program Guide.
the Guide is packed with sug-
iions on how community
ups can bring the Society's
ne Eye Test for Preschoolers
tmilies in their area.
Ihe Home Eye Test is a do-it-
Irself way for parents to check
|r youngsters for possible
:>n problems. A simple, self-
tamed kit, the Test includes
tye chart and instructions for
ening vision. It has been
orsed by eye specialists and
llh professionals.
|A Home Eye Test program
can make a vital contribution to
the lives of our children," says
Edward W. McGuinness, presi-
dent of the National Society to
Prevent Blindness, Florida
Affiliate.
"For most children reached by
the Home Eye Test, it is their
first vision test. When children
fail, their parents are alerted to
the fact that a professional
checkup is called for. If treatment
is indicated, it can make the dif-
ference between good eyesight or
a lifetime problem."
The Home Eye Test Program
Guide is available at $2 a copy
from the National Society to Pre-
vent Blindness, Florida Affiliate,
3741 Neptune St., Tampa. Fla.
33609.
ive it up.
Costa's 3 & 4-day cruises
from Miami aboard the Flavia.
Enjoy the good life aboard our floating Italian Festivalfor
) days to Nassau, or 4 days to Freeport and Nassau. Wine, dine,
Bance and party all the way. And when you dock, play all the
lennis and golf, do all the-fishing, snorkeling, sightseeing and
Duty-free shopping the Bahamas are famous for. All this at rates
|rom just $190 to $505 per person, double occupancy
Tell your travel agent you're ready to live it up!
Flavia of Italian Registry
50% SAVINGS
Sept.8toNov.3,1980
Book a cabin with 2
lower beds and
second occupant
pays only 50%. 3rd
& 4th berths also
available at 50% of
minimum rate.
Ls-> .x
COSTA CRUISES
It's an Italian Festival
One Biscayne Tower, Miami. Florida 33131 (305) 358-7330
several years ago; but here we
have translations of many
selections from Yiddish news-
papers, memoirs, books and
magazine articles.
The books is arranged into 11
large sections, each of them well
illustrated and amplified in the
appropriate texts. They are:
Origins, The Scene, Bintel Brief:
Letters to the Editor, Religion,
Women, Labor and Socialism,
Education, Politics, Theater,
Culture. Beyond New York. All
of the leaders in these various
categories are represented in
photographs and / or texts.
What is very appealing is the
portion extracted from the
Commercial Advertiser (now long
defunct) for which both Abraham
Cahan and his friend Lincoln
Steffens wrote. Among the first
of the truly sympathetic studies
of Jewish immigrant life in New
York's East Side were found in
its pages.
The world described in How
We Lived has passed into
history; but there are many still
alive who remember it at first
hand or because their parents and
grandparents spoke about it.
Messrs. Howe and Libo have
done a great service to the Jewish
community in picturing and
describing at first hand a life that
may have been a struggle for
sheer existence for msny, but it
was a life that was culturally one
of the richest in the history of the
Jews. The present generation of
Jews who did not know the hard-
ships and the slings and arrows
of outrageous fortune of those
days owe it to themselves to see
and read for themselves this
fascinating story.
Joseph Mersand, Ph.D.,
Temple Israel Library
1901 North Flagler Dr.
West Palm Beach, Fla.
Wreaths were placed at Royal Palm Memorial Gardens in
memory of all veterans on Memorial Day. Participating in the
ceremony were (left to right) David Bludworth, state attorney
of Palm Beach County; Brent Bludworth; Rabbi Alan R.
Sherman, chaplain of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County and chaplain of the 3220 U.S. Army Garrison in West
Palm Beach. Wreaths were also placed from patriotic
organizations of Palm Beach County.
I nder The Supervision
Of Kabblnical Council
Of The Palm Bearhee
"THE NEW IMAGE"
dentur?
Open* 7
Mon-Thurs
-JFri.
14 Sun.
Closed Sal.
lWrTtt.&MmT
4774 OCEICHOIEf IIVD.. WIST PALM HACK
Between Military Trail 4k Haveralll la Use Mlai-Mall
THE MOST MODERN COMPLETE KOSHER SUPERMARKET
Your
lightbulbs
will last
4 times
longer
... with
Bulb-MisER
,
You save up to 300% of the cost of spotlights,
floodlights, and most other bulbs. You save on
labor costs, especially with those hard-to-reach
fixtures. And you save on electric bills, too.
The Bulb-Miser is an ama/mci little device devcl
oped during NASA's Apollo moon mission. In
stalled in a light socket, this insulated,heat resist
ant metal disc absorbs the terrific thermal shock
(up to 4.000 F I that surges through the lightbulb
filament when you turn the light on. Filaments last
3 to 4 times longer. So do your lightbulbs.
Bulb-Misers are easy to install. Simply unscrew the bulb,
slip in a Bulb-Miter, and screw the bulb back in. Bulb-Miters fit snugly, and will not
fall out of ceiling sockets. Use with all one-way incandescent bulbs up to 250 watts.
SAVE OVER $9.00 PER YEAR FOR LIFE WITH EVERY SPOTLIGHT AND
FLOODLIGHT. BulbMisers never wear out*
To order Bulb-Misers for your business or home, clip and mail the coupon below.
Bulb-Miser Dealerships are available In Florida. Contact Mr. Weisinger at
(813) 461-9511. Industrial accounts Invited. Call or write for volume discounts.
Mall to:
American Dynamic Dlst., Inc.
660 Island Way. Suits 503 vo* r name.
Clearwater, Fla. 3351S Flfm_____
Please send me
Q 10 Burb-MiMri 9 $2.99 each
(Add $1 75 lor postage & handling)
[ J 20 Bulb-Mints $2.99 each
(We pay postajel
? Enclosed is my check lor $-----------
Address.
Ctv-----
Slit*___
Phone.
2*.
(' codel
UNCONDITIONAL 3 YEAR WARRANTY
II lor any reason you are not satisfied with a Bulb-Mlier's performance during Ihe first three years of
uae. simply return 11 to American Dynamic Distributors, Inc. and we will send you a check lor Ihe
amount you paid for It______________________________________________


&*s
in
f&jiwiih'ffirffin of Palm Beach County
Friday,
Champs Ely sees Takes on the Flavor of a Middle East Bazaa
^v .+^1, m^f__________ m^^^l billion Francs in 1977; the Arab and we need tec
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
There are probably more
Arabs living in France
today than in all of Israel,
including the occupied
territories. One-and-a-half
million are registered as
permanent residents in
France, and an additional
million are believed to be
living in France either as
illegal immigrants or under
the guise of temporary
visitors.
During the last 10 years,
France's Arab community with
its 43 mosques, 22 newspapers,
dozens of schools, hospitals and
banks has become a vital
economic force and an important
political factor. French
politicians and businessmen take
into account its political
aspirations and its economic
interests.
ONE ROLLS ROYCE out of
every two registered in France
belongs to a Middle Eastern
Arab visitor, and one industrial
worker out of every 20 is a North
African immigrant. Lebanese
refugees float some of France's
major banking loans, others own
large blocs of shares in major
industrial enterprises.
Many of these relative
newcomers now represent large
French corporations in Saudi
\rabia and the Persian Gulf
states handling huge sums and
indirectly controlling a heavy
share of France's exports to the
Arab world. Since January. 1977,
in slightly over three years, 29
new Arab-owned banks have
opened in France to handle the
huge amount of cash passing
through the country.
All along the Champs Elysees.
Paris main avenue. Lebanese
restaurants have opened to cater
to this new clientele. The former
"Regine's." once the center of the
Paris jet set society, has passed
into new hands and renamed
The Beirut. Lebanese Tyre
wine is flown in by special plane
and Arab bakeries throughout
Paris now prepare fresh pita like
in the suks of Cairo or Damascus.
ONE OF Paris landmarks, tne
world famous Ritz Hotel, has
been bought by an Egyptian
resident; the Cafe de la Paix.
where generations of tourists
traditionally sat. is owned by a
Kuwaiti company. The elegant
Prince de Galles Hotel, where
many senior Israeli government
and Jewish Agency officials stay,
is now owned by an Egyptian. On
the hotel's seventh floor.
Lebanese leader Raymond Edde
has his private apartment and a
22-room office suite which many
describe as a Lebanese govern-
ment in exile.
France's naval pride, the
"France," the world's largest
liner, was originally bought by
Arab businessman Akram Ojjeh.
Another Saudi entrepreneur.
Ghaith Pharaon, is the owner of a
XV Century castle, the Chateau
de Montfort, which he uses as an
occasional weekend home.
France's Arab population is
basically divided into two
communities: the North Africans
who started off as poor, unskilled
workers; and the Middle Eastern
investors attracted not only by
the pleasant West European
living standards but also by their
desire to closely control their
busmess interests and financial
investments.
THE MASSIVE North
African immigration to France
started at the end of the Algerian
Most of the arrivals at the
ADS AN KHASHOGGI. power broker
Administration and feared
possible reprisals. France, at the
start of a large-scale economic
expansion, was keen for cheap,
undemanding and unskilled
labor.
The North African influx
continued over the years Today,
according to official statistics
there are close to one miljion
Algerians in France, half a
million Moroccans and a quarter
of a million Tunisians. They still
remain the core of" the
country's low paid labor
force the men who sweep the
streets, build the roads, and work
at menial tasks in the Renault
and Peugeot automobile plants.
By their very penetration into
French economic life, the North
Africans have become an im-
portant factor both in the con-
sumer and in the distribution
process. "Should the North
\frican merchants or consumers
decide to boycott a certain
product, its producers would be
out of business within less than a
fortnight."' a member of the Paris
Chamber of Commerce admitted
recent ly
THE NORTH African
population is politically highly
motivated and well organized
within a multitude of
associations and unions where
political indoctrination is the
rule. In most Algerian cultural
centers there are regular weekly
lectures on such delicate subjects
as Jerusalem, the Palestinians
and the "'Israeli aggression
against our Arab brothers."
For the time being, most of
this population is still too b
assimilate; it is still fighting too
hard for basic economic
being to find time for political
involvement in France [i
than a generation, hov.
many of them will have opt"
French nationality, will vote, will
bring pressure to bear and will
openly make their voices and
political views heard.
Their natural loaders
already on the spot Two
generations of Arab-born
lawyers, doctors and intellectuals
who have studied in France and
have remained are generally
opting for French citizenship.
THEIR ECONOMIC
framework is also being rapidly
established, Over 20 Arab-owned
banks have opened in the Paris
region alone since January 1977
Among them are such giant- as
the Union of Arab and French
Banks with a turnover of over 13
time, in 1961, were Algerians wno
had collaborated with the French
Temple Beth David
of Northern Palm Beach County
Open House
Sunday, August 17,1 p.m. 5 p.m.
at Westminster Presbyterian Church Annex
10410 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens
Conservative congregation
. Srn^^^^^^ ^^
Faattva! service schedule
High Hottdsy service.
AduM Education
Ratgious school, K 7,
BanBat MHzvah. Confirm*! tor,
Youth program
SocteJ program committee
Sisterhood, Man's Caufc
Newcomer's Club
Meet our members, board of directors,
Rabbi and Cantor
and join our growing congregation.
Refreshments will be served.
R^WMKemMarde, Cantor Ntehota. FW
For additional information call 622-2079 or 845-1134
Investment Bank with a turnover
of five billion Francs; the Franco-
Arab Investment Bank with a
four billion Francs turnover; and
the Arab Intercontinental Bank,
with a turnover of three-and-a-
half billion Francs in 1977.
The arrival in France in 1977 of
some 20,000 Lebanese refugees
gave a new impetus to the Arab
business community. Most of
these refugees came with money,
with considerable business ex-
perience and with a practical
know how of Western economic
practices.
They took over hundreds of
business companies and now
work as French representatives
in the Persian Gulf states and
Saudi Arabia and operate smaller
but highly active banks in Paris,
Lichtenstein and Geneva.
FRENCH REAL estate agents
say that half of the apartments
they sell in the 10,000-20,000
Francs per square meter range
are bought by Arabs and mainly
Lebanese refugees. These
refugees also reportedly now own
10 percent of the Dumez in-
dustrial empire. 44 percent of
various airline companies and 39
percent of the Dunkerque
chemical concern.
Many of them have joined
older Arab established firms or
businessmen such as the groups
led by Akram Ojjeh, a Syrian-
Ixirn multi-billionaire; Adnan
hoggi, a Saudi Arabian
business wizard: Ghaith
Pharaon, a 38-year-old Saudi
Arabian who is an electronic
engineer and a graduate of
Harvard; and the new owner of
the Intra-Investment Arab Bank
and the First Arab Corporation
i M '. which several years ago
tried to buy 25 percent of the
Lockheed Corporation (a bid
turned down by the Washington
Administration) and is now
eyeing the Dassault World
lain* \t is also openly
bidding tor half a dozen giant
refineries in Western Europe,
Canada and Puerto Rico
["his Arab Strength is so ob-
vious that Khashoggi declared
recently in Paris. Whether you
like it or not. we are henceforth
bound together.'"
The Arab economic
penetration in France is less
spectacular than in Britain,
where they concentrate on
prestige real estate, and more in
depth where Arab money flows
into industrial projects and long-
range economic enterprises.
Ojjeh recently explained to the
rrench weekly, Le Point:
r rench enterprises need money
growth companies. We2i
to link our destinies togethj
* pERMANENCY<]
Arab implantation in pL
symbolized by the ne?
press. Among the 30-dIu
publications are such L.
newspapers and r^riodioZ,
wSrs rtTiar **fij
W.OOO, Al Watan Al Am?i
Hawadess-; Al ffil
HtistadweAlmalAlAnii.
Dor Assayed, and at ko*
40 other lesser
publications.
knot,!
olnCJ"? PariS ".
Cote d-Azur. an affluent
resident leaves his elegant I
or nine-room apartment dn|
his Bentley or Lincoln Cal
tinental car to his office wha.l
does not yet have a chaufem J
bodyguard, has lunch ,'
Lebanese restaurant, goes otj
the evening to an Arab eafcl
and meets friends over dnl
later at one of the chic dubs.
On the way, he stops ,I
newspaper kiosk to pick upm|
Arab dailies or weeklisl
published in France.
AT THE same time, a pot|
Arab worker, generally faq
North Africa, sweeps thestnsl
or weighs fruits and vegeubleiij
a small dingy shop, bal
nonetheless feels partofthesaal
"Moslem and Arab communitj"!
in spite of his one-room flat mat
practically no heating and jm|
one tap of running water.
Both worlds, the mullil
billionaires and the poor.areaij
feel part of the same family nil
Arab community Many Fretm
Jews feel and fear that in leal
than a generation from ml
France's Arabs will b__
main force in French political 1
economic life.
TREE
EXPERT
jrmwMiM. siapiM
KWOt L
.LANDSC APINGj
. FREE
ESTIM41KS,
FkEASOVABLE]
CALL:
MIKE
wwmrnnM
-845-1045
14 ."*
rauntMi m.Miiu
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER
Acreage Homes Lou Apartments Income Property
Royal Palm W11 Of fk*8JM
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA RES: 60WM
ROOHNOSHBTMPAl
ucuw
ABCONOmONING
UCCAC01I*
ROOFING REROOFING
CENTRAL HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
SHEET METAL WORK
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
ffittRSar- 684*00



,, August 8,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11

-^
J
ired Goodman, left, visits with the Israeli Scouts Sigal
ier, middle, and Sharona Paz, right, during senior's
ling day at Camp Shalom.
90
w
ired Goodman and Minnie Kant are shown enjoying
\iting the children during their arts and crafts period. The
's of the Jewish Community Center visited Camp
lorn, Friday, July 18.
JEWISH HMII r AND CH/IDK M'S SttVKf
.. outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
Jewish community of Palm Beoch County. Professional and con-
fidential help is available for
Problems of the aging
'onsultation and evaluation services
Vocational counseling
Morital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Private Off icts:
2411 Okeacliobee Blvd.
West Point oeoch, Fta. 33409
Telephone: 614-1991
Moderote fees ore chorged in family and individual counseling to
those who can pay (Fees are based on income and fom. ly size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency o
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
JCC Happenings
Seniors Stage Fund-Raising Events
Sam Rubin, president of
Jewish Community Center's
Second Tuesday Club, with
his wife Marion work on JCC
fundraising.
Seniors have established an
ongoing Flea Market at the
Jewish Community Center this
summer. President Sam Rubin
and his Tuesday Council note
that they have delightful
bargains. People wander in and
out of the JCC rooms, admiring
the amount of merchandise
assembled and are delighted at
having bought a treasure at such
a low price, Rubin reports.
Every day, seniors can be seen
involved in collecting, sorting
and selling a variety of used
items. Pick-ups at home are made
once a week, and seniors separate
clothes, test used appliances and
learn how to merchandise stock
attractively.
Rubin invites you to come in
every day and browse between 9
and 1. The big day is Sunday,
Aug. 17. The Flea Market will be
held indoors from 9 to 3. Hot
dogs, soda and drinks will be
sold, along with all types of
usable items from furniture to
bathing suits to television sets.
Seniors are also selling easy to
use home and auto fire ex-
tinguishers and smoke detectors.
The Tuesday Club is promoting
fire prevention this month and
encourages all people, seniors in
particular, to be prepared in case
of an emergency. Orders are
being taken and if people cannot
come to the center, fire ex-
tinguishers or smoke detectors
can be delivered. #
Call the JCC and ask for
Bonnie or fill out an order blank
under JCC senior information
column.
Jean Rubin, director, says,
"We are proud of our seniors and
hope the community will support
their drives."
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
is currently accepting applications for enrollment for the
1980/81 SCHOOL YEAR
PRE-SCHOOL THROUGH GRADE 8
We cordially invite you to call and make
an appointment to visit our school.
Mordecai Levow
Director
Dr. Howard Kay
President
Volunteers: The Jewish
Community Center's Pre-School
is comprised of over 60 children
from 2 to 4 years of age. Pre-
school director, Judy DeVore,
will be conducting a Volunteer
Pre-School Seminar on Friday,
Aug. 22, from 1-2:30 p.m. at the
Center for all interested parties.
Join a dedicated staff in the pre-
school and reap the rewards of
working with children. Call
Bonnie Silverstein, for reser-
vations and additional in-
formation.
Round Table Talk for Men:
Mondays. Joe Greenberg, group
leader, says, "Join us in
discussion every Monday at
1:30."
Modernize Your Frames: Ida
Blauner will instruct a two
session series on Thursday, Aug.
7, and Aug. 14 at 1 p.m. on how
to modernize your "old" picture
frames.
Busette Service: The new
busette service is beginning to be
enjoyed by many of the seniors.
The Joe and Emily Lowe
Foundation have provided the
JCC with a 17-passenger busette
to enable the JCC to transport
people to recreation and
education programs. This service
is offered on Tuesdays. Spend the
day at the JCC attend a morn-
ing class, bring a bag lunch and
join in the afternoon activity.
You can be home by 3 p.m. Call if
you would like to have trans-
portation. Call and let us know
your needs so that we can begin
to plan future routes.
Senior Olympics: All senior
talent groups in the fields of
music, drama and dance, in-
dividual performers and musical
chorus (leaders in particular), are
invited to hear Ms. Manya Joyce,
director, and Ross Simmons,
assistant director of Senior
Olympics, discuss "How talent
groups can become involved" on
Aug. 8 at 1 p.m. Senior Olympics
will take place on Oct. 16 through
Oct. 25. The JCC is a center for
registration, and an Olympics
representative will be at the
Center on Wednesdays from 1 -
3:30 to provide information and
registration. Senior Olympics is a
statewide activity and all in-
terested persons are invited to
attend.
An Afternoon at Norton: The
JCC Busette will be taking
people to Norton Art Gallery on
Tuesday, Aug. 19, at 12:30,
Augusta Sandier from National
Council of Jewish Women will
conduct a special guided tour.
Mrs. Sandier is a docent of the
gallery. Participants are limited.
Call for registration.
Fire Safety The Tuesday
Club is promoting fire safety this
month. Have you thought of
what you would do in case a fire
starts in your home? JCC Seniors
are selling attractive, easy to use
home fire extinguishers with a
handy hang-up basket. The
Tuesday Club says "be prepared,
keep your extinguisher in sight in
case you need it." Buy one from
the JCC Smoke detectors are
available as well.
If you wish to reserve one or
both, fill out the form below and
mail with your check. Deliveries
will be possible if you cannot
come to the JCC.
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida
Telephone 832-8423/4
A beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
689-7700
We will notify you when they
are available.
Home Fire Prevention: Fire
inspector, Jerry Catoe, will speak
at the Jewish Community Center
on Tuesday, Aug. 12, about "You
and a Home Fire" at 11 a.m.
Speak Out Wynn Kenton
com inues to lead communication
sessions. Join the many who
come on Mondays at 1 p.m. to
enjoy an afternoon of expression,
friendship and learning. Speak
Out will continue through the
month of August. Everyone is
welcome to attend.
All the Music You've Ever
Loved: Another four-session
class with Wynn Kenton on
Wednesday at 1 p.m. Part II,
Aug. 13 Frank Sinatra; Part
III, Aug. 20 Musical Comedy;
Part IV, Aug. 27 La Boheme.
Adult Education Classes
Classes will resume the week of
Sept. 22. Seven classes will be
held at the Jewish Community
Center from Oil Painting to Yoga
with Nutrition as the newest
class. Information will be forth-
coming in the fall brochure.
Second Tuesday Club: The
regular monthly meeting will
take place on Aug. 12 at 1 p.m.
Ruth Hyde, chairperson, an-
nounces that Jackie Lorber,
violinist, will present a varied
musical program including
audience participation. Refresh-
ments will be served.
Speakers Club: Herbert
Sperber, president, Thursdays,
10 to noon.
Transportation The Com-
prehensive Senior Service Center
is funded by Title III OAA
through Guff stream Areawide
Council on Aging, providing
transportation to transit
disadvantage^ adults 60 years or
older in a designated area, and a
full education and recreation
program. Call the Center for more
information.
Two Cars Are
Donated to JCC
Dr. Robert Burger, president
of the Jewish Community Center,
acknowledges the generous gifts
to the JCC of a 1972 Cadillac
Fleet wood Brougham, given by
Mr. and Mrs. David Ginsberg,
and a 1968 Dodge nine passenger
station wagon, given by Mr. and
Mrs. Ed Margolis.
If you or someone you know
has a car in good condition, and
you feel the Center can put it to
good use, call Marty Goldberg,
executive director and discuss it
with him.
Name
Address
Phone.
Please reserve #_
. extinguishers at $10.90 each
smoke detectors at $49.75
Enclosed is my check for $_


tei4
>
\ JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
^2415 Okeechobee Blvd. West Palm Beoch, Fla. 689-77O0
GENERATION TO GENERATION
tm PGfioi DflistacSGij
SUNDAY AUG. 3 FRIDAY AUG. 8
MONDAY AUG.11 FRIDAY AUG15
9AM-1 P.M.
LAST DAY
SUNDAY AUG. 17 9A.M.- 3P.M
AJTD POT) A NTH TREASURE. BROWSE ABOUND AT ALL OUR WARES.
THE DAT ASD HAVE LC*CB. HOT DOGS. SODA. COFFEE AND HOME
BARED CARES WILL BE OS SALE ALL DA
Hunger Strike
Prisoner
Bj rrrzHAK shabgil
TEL AVIV t/TAl A
He
MM A
Al
THE THREE
7$
WyUmW
the
* to hoU
the two
to to.
Otter
w
s
JEWISH COMMUWTTY CEWTEB
"* raw 3*t-
KEREN ORR
PRESCHOOL
aaajMBj
An* i
brMffz
Mi
IU
-"r?./a

W
toc.tcrronoto. oot it ooded
faftyafur^hoon.
extra polio*
to
to
iC r.'j
u
m m
**Ur*ioB mow opc. CaB
W YOU DO NOT WANT TO
HAVE TO
VY
Your
TO
inffe
Rcogtvc g Jewisli Education
Make rr a Good one
EnroM Your CWW Today
Oancng
:roojrani
Toran Troux cnar*9
1 Jwconpjregxian
SoeaaiTuconng
-USY
Temple Beth B
2815HRagierDnve
west Palm Beacn
MJ|nit
OmV
*
For Firtner information
CaiRucftLevow


y, August 8,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Black Jewtsh Boxer
Trained in Bronx, He Won't Perform to Please Miami
By HASKELL COHEN
I am writing this interview on
eve of Tiaha B'av. My
apanion is a Black Jewish
oxer by the name of Seoul
smby who is the reigning super
htweight champion of the
arid- We have just concluded a
^ussion pertaining to the
extraction of both temples and
nby, who attended cheder, is
jjt'that familiar with the various
es which befell the Jewish
ople on Tisha B'av. He's a
fcrious young man, and asked me
t tell him what happened to the
ewish people on this particular
I explained to him that there
lere some eight or nine major
gedies which, for reasons
nknown, have occurred on this
ay of the Jewish calendar. He's
i interested listener and is very
nuch concerned over the fact
hat the Jewish people have
uffered so much throughout the
enturies.
"WHY," he asked, "have the
.called chosen people had so
nuch trouble and tragedy
hroughout history?" Of course,
answers I gave him were
nswers he received from a
Variety of rabbis he has talked
Jrith over the years. Despite the
ibvious answers which'we have
en taught by tradition, Mamby
not satisfied and just can't get
; through his head as to why the
Jewish people have been chosen
i suffer.
"I just can't believe that the
Dple whom the Almighty
Adopted as his very own should
Buffer so much at the hands of
Dur Father in heaven," Mamby
paid.
More brilliant theologians than
nyself have tussled with this
problem over the years so that
anything I may have told
Mamby isn't new. At the con-
clusion of our lengthy interview I
felt that Mamby still wasn't
reconciled to the fact that the
chosen people could endure so
much and still survive
entity.
ehaRleq's
CRdb
Fine seafood in the
Chuck Muer tradition
456 s ocean Blvd.
isoutn of wortn Avenue)
Palm Beach
659-1500
American Express Honored
as an
. Young Mamby he's 32 years
old has become the super light-
weight of the world rather late in
his boxing career. Although he is
strong and feels like a kid of 19,
for a fighter, 32 is considered
passe. Nevertheless, Mamby in
his recent defense of his title,
fighting on the under card to the
Holmes-LeDoux heavyweight
championship held in Min-
neapolis, wallopped the daylights
out of his opponent. At this
writing he has a record of 29
wins, 12 losses and five draws.
MAMBY HAS been fighting
16 years, two as an amateur and
the other 14 in the pro ranks. He
said that he'll continue to pursue
his career so long as "God
permits me." He is a firm believer
in the Almighty and feels that his
destiny is wrapped up in what the
man upstairs wants him to do.
A veteran of the Vietnam War,
where he served one year and six
days, he can give you the exact
minutes and seconds, Mamby is a
believer in fate. I pointed out to
him that a heavyweight
champion was slated to fight an
exhibition match in Israel in the
not too distant past, and he
cancelled out at the last minute
because of a- flare-up on the
Lebanese border. Mamby said:
"I can see where he would be
frightened off by that sort of
thing, but after surviving
Vietname for over a year, I'm
willing and ready to go to Israel
to defend my title. Just get me a
nice Jewish competitor over
there, or bring in a fighter who is
ranked highly in my weight, and
I'll be glad to perform my duties
in the ring before my co-
religionists."
The young fighter explained
that he is a Jew by conversion.
"First my mother converted, and
then my father converted, and
subsequently I was brought into
the faith. I attended Hebrew
school in The Bronx on Boston
Road. All my classmates were
Black, and we were taught by an
Elder who was attached to the
late Rabbi Matthew's synagogue.
I learned how to read Hebrew,
and I started the studying of the
Bible in Hebrew," the pugilist
explained.
HE ATTENDED, as a youth,
the synagogue every Sabbath
and was brought up in, what he
terms, a kosher home. To this
very day, he does not mix meat
and dairy food at any given meal.
He remembers very well that his
mother observed this tradition
very cautiously, and he still
maintains the belief, to an extent,
in kashruth. He does not eat any
pig products or shell fish.
"I don't attend services with
any regularity, mainly because
I'm not located near a synagogue
where I live uptown,' Mamby
explained. "I once walked quite a
distance to attend High Holy
Day services, but I was turn#d
off by the fact that the gentleman
at the door wanted me to pay to
enter.
"I felt and feel now that people
should be free to attend any
denomination without having to
pay to enter. If I want to make a
contribution to a synagogue
and / or a chuch, I would do it out
of faith and desire, not out of
pressure."
I TRIED to explain to Mamby
that since attendances at
synagogue are heavy only on the
High Holidays, the temples have
to adhere to the practice of
charging for tickets to the ser-
vices. Mamby just wouldn't buy
this type of thinking.
Why did Mamby's success
come along so late in his career?
He believes that had he per-
mitted himself to be exploited as
a Jewish fighter he might have
made it much sooner. He
definitely refused to be shown off
as a Jewish pugilist, particularly
in Miami where there is a
plethora of Jewish boxing fans. It
was suggested that he wear chai
necklaces and a Magen David on
his trunks, and he refused to do
so.
Consequently,' it is his belief
that he was held back by his
refusal to exploit his Judaism,
something several fighters, white
and Black, have done, albeit they
are not anywhere near the Jewish
individual that our current super
lightweight champion is. He's a
pleasure and a delight to talk to,
and it is my fervent hope that he
shall continue to reign for several
years.
sunser
SP6CL4L
it pays to come early!
Our special early evening
menu features values on
Alaskan King Crab Legs. Maine
Lobster, Poached smoked
Schrod, Chilled Raw Bar
Platter, Broiled Bay scallops,
Boston schrod Florentine.
NY. sirloin Steak, Charbrolled
Swordflsh or Salmon, and
your choice from our dally
fresh catch.
All Sunset special dinners t
include Charleys Chowder.
Hot Bread, cole Slaw, and
your choice of vegetable.
From $7.50 to $10.25 per
dinner. You really get your
net's worth)
Mon-Sat 5-6 p.m.
Sun 4-6 p.m.
s


ml'
T\* Jtmmk Fk liii ofPmkm BtmehCammty
W'v.A^SS
Synagogues in
Palm Beach
County
ORTHODOX
COHGRfGATOM CetTURY VWJJIGE
C 0 H G B E SATTOW AWSH Ei EMUMA
REFORM
EW5
iAE.

S*r-i"<:* e
|TEJe1PL BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
** -acc f* : s. -?* ^*--r Mam ftowr s*o
-- -.
- ~ --
I THE REFORM HEBREW CONGflEGATION OF OELRAY
. S SMr tea >-.
Ml -;ix^ PC =.-. -vr- :>-*, =^;- r 3 i;X^ -.
;- --- ** mmwm I M PkJMUM LaWBMH
"" < i%6
TBaVLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
5*" -;-.'; r*i-3 Ccmt "i iitian
5*nwcy-_*"> 5c- si Oemds aw taws Eo
ttmnmwmL forest ma mx andmm igiia r-ace w<
** "<- c **e S' West PatMt Bea
- -
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
7>* P*ee Srvagop^e p C Bc 3 Boca Raton Ra 33*32 366-
U00 atl-im Race Bar.,*- Rour Pr*ar at a -5*ex
* Boca Mom Comm**f UMC 3800 Boca Wast Gtades Rd (i
***9 Wfl of Boi
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
38^ Nona Ftagfter D" Meat Paaw Baacft ft* XMOf P*x*
33-033B Cantor Eia*w Snac^c Sacoacn S*. 8iSon tTalBaai at30am Da*r ajajan at 8 15 a m Sua-
CONGREGATION ANSHEl SHOLOM
M8 Groe Street, mm Paaa Baacft. Fia 33406 Phone 684-
32'2 0".ce ?<, l* to i pm_ Race. Marr, z Select-
man Cantor Arthur B P^ear>was Seres Da%y aJOam
ano/30Dn Fnctay 830 am. and 5 p m. Late Servos 8 15
P m fcMoaed by Ones Snaboat Sat^day 8 30 am 'on
fottoaed by Snatati Sudca
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH
Boynton Baacii. Fia Phone 732 2555 Rate. Avrom L
Drann Sabbath Semces Fr.aay at 8:15 p.m Saturday at 9
ajn Congreoationai Church. 115 s Federal nghey
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 N A- Street. Lake rfrortn. Fia 33480Phone 585
502C Race. Emanoet Ersencerg Cantor Jacob Eknart Ser-
-ncas Mondays and Thursdays at 8.15 am.. Fnday at 8 15 p m
Saturday a! 9am.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services. Friday at 8 p.m Saturday 10 am. West-
minster Presbyterian Church. 10410 N kMrtary Trarf. Palm
6eacn Gardens (Ofhcej 321 Northtafce Bhd. North Palm
Beach. Fia Phone 8451134 Rate. Wiikam Marder Cantor
Nicholas Fenake.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
224 N.W Avenue G. Belie Glade Fia 33430 Jack Stataman
Cantor. Sabbath Services Fnday at 830 pm =*".
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemetda Dnve. Palm Spnngs. Fia 33461 Sabbatn ser-
vices Fnday at 8 p m. Saturday at 9 am President Martin
Kroehmsky Phone 986-1084 Mondays and Thursdays at 9
am. Services held at Farth united Presbyterian Church Palm
Springs ,
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W 4th Ave., Boca Raton. Fia 33432 Phone 382-
8586 Rabbt Nathan Zetuar Sabbath Services Fnday at 6 15
p.m.. Saturday at 830 am.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
5780 Wast Atlantic Avenue. Deiray Beach. Fia 33446 Phone:
278-3636 Morris Silberman, Rabbi Leonard Price. Can-
tor Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 pm. Saturday at 9
am. Daily Minyans at 8:45 am. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Road, Palm Beach. Fia 33480 Phone: 832
0804 Rabbi Joel Chazin Cantor David Dardasnt. Saocar<
Services. Friday at 830 p.m.. Saturday at 9am
CUP AMD SA VI TMS A0
BUYING
SILVER COINS
DIMES DATED 1964 OR EARLIER
QUARTERS DATED 1964 OR EARLIER
HALVES DATED 1964 OR EARLIER
BUYING I BUYING
KENNEDY HALVES
DATED 1965 THRU 1969
SILVER DOLLARS
IATED 1935 OR EARLIERl
iDillirt Mill U hi imi CNtititu
BUYING
GOLD COINS
(Cms Mist Be Ii rue C**tH)
(20 gold piece PAY $500 & up
\ 10 gold piece PAY $225 A up
(5 gold piece PAY$125&u|
t2y gold piece PAY $125 & up j
> 1 gold piece PAY $150 & up
BUYING
SCRAP GOLD
(Suck Its WeMaf Bates. Oast
Rats. Deitil fit* Mm kstky)|
BUYING
10K-14K-18K
BUYING MARKED
STERLING
SILVER
(Such As Forks. Spoons.
Knives. Trays. Etc.)
CtapMt Stts Or Daaaft.
Also Buying
Collections &
Accumulations
of
RARE COINS
9
NORTH AMERICAN
RARE COINS ~
CROSS ROADS PROFESSIONAL PLAZA
1897 PALM BEACH LAKES BLVD.
SUITE 114
WEST PALM BEACH
ijust ofri-fs sjum
hen*
684-1771

aMa*e NNVWVCSN


< I

, August 8^1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 15
General Media Silent on GOP Pro-Israel Plank
joseph polakoff
Washington t
ITA) Although Arati-
Iraeli affairs was high-
ihted in the news and in
Jmmentaries during the
Inter and through the
Tiring, usually marked by
Enunciations of Israel, the
kneral media was silent on
\e strong pro-Israel plank
the Republican Party
Jatform that was adopted
its convention in De-
oit. Neither was attention
Iven to the pro-Israeli
atements by Presidential
^ndidate Ronald Reagan
i his first news conference
nominee and in his
tceptance speech at the
fOP convention.
At the GOP conclave, literally
hnusitnds of reporters from
ound the world hung on every
nance, but they did virtually no
_ orting that the Republicans
Earned the Arabs against re-
nposing an oil embargo and
Bserted opposition to the Arab
oycott of American companies
oing business with Israel
irong medicine for the oil-pro-
fucing Arab nations despite their
contracts with American oil
Dmpanies and construction
THE MEDIA also was
trangely quiet about the in-
fighting between the adherents of
President Carter and Sen.
dward Kennedy (D., Mass.)
vhen the Democratic Party's
platform was being written in
Washington a month earlier.
That fight was over whether the
platform should say, as it did in
1976, that the U.S. Embassy
ihould be moved from Tel Aviv
> Jerusalem.
The Carterites wanted to
qualify that plank, the Kennedy-
tes balked; and in the end the
qualification was moved to
lother place in the plank. While
Dther Carter-Kennedy squabbles
vere extensively reported at the
platform writing, the difference
support for Israel was vir-
tually ignored.
A general attitude seemed to
be that platforms are meaning-
less because Presidential can-
didates don't feel bound by them.
I Some reporters felt support for
DENTURES
ft". Mmm+r. tatt
Individual
&*tom Construction
u""Ltmi,0mtwt '111*11*
&"** *** tumim
Aahai .......... ............'40
*** .."..*...............*
*** ..........V>wl
'Un*WOIIO.. 'OHNICX
MftCH riA
6884)593
Israel in platforms was the usual
stance for electioneering pur-
poses. "No news in that," one
said. "Wait until next winter,"
another remarked. "It will be
news if the President, new or old,
backs up the platform." But the
major question remains: If the
public is told when Israel is
attacked should it not be in-
formed when Israel is defended?
THE 93 JEWISH delegates
among the 1,994 delegates at the
Republican convention were
divided like the others over Vice
Presidential candidates. For
example, in the Connecticut
delegation, Robert Katz, of
Bridgeport, favored New York
Representative Jack Kemp, while
George Lewson of Danbury,
backed George Bush. A sig-
nificant fact about the size of the
Jewish number of delegates is
that it formed about 4.5 percent
of the total, about double
America's Jewish population.
The right and liberal wings of
the Republican leadership were
both represented at the American
Israel Public Affairs Committee's
reception for Jewish delegates
and others at the Detroit Plaza
Hotel. Of the approximately 350
that attended there were at least
a dozen Senators and a score of
Representatives. The chief at-
traction included Elizabeth
Taylor, accompanied by her
husband, Virginia Senator John
Warner, and Mrs. Strom Thur-
mond, wife of the conservative
South Carolina Senator who
could not attend.
Another guest was Philadel-
phia's Arlen Spector, who may
make it this time to the U.S.
Senate. In his previous state-
wide Pennsylvania races he lost
in 1978 for Governor to incum-
bent Richard Thorburgh, and in
1976 for Senator to John Heinz.
This time, pollsters say, Spec-
tor's chances against former
Pittsburgh Mayor Peter
Flaherty, a Democrat, are ex-
cellent. They are campaigning for
the seat being vacated by Repub-
lican Richard Schweiker, a friend
of Israel. David Garth, a master
at political strategy, is helping
Specter's campaign.
Spector, a district attorney in
Philadelphia for eight years and a
counsel for the Warren Commis-
sion that probed President Ken-
nedy's assassination, will be
Pennsylvania's first Jewish
Senator if he wins. He is on the
board of Orthodox Mikvah Israel
Synagogue in Philadelphia's
Independence Square and of the
American Museum of Jewish
History. His wife, Joan, an
activist for
member of
Council.
Jewish causes,
Philadelphia's
City
FRED GOTTFURCHT, a Us
Angeles investment banker who
is a founder of the National
Coalition for Reagan and has
been backing Reagan since 1966,
is the father-in-law of Rabbi
Richard Hertz of Detroit's oldest
congregation, Temple Beth El.
Max Fisher, "Mr. Republican,"
is a member of it. Gottfurcht was
a member of the California
delegation at the GOP con-
vention.
During the GOP convention,
"Mr. Republican" was not
Governor William MUliken or
Henry Ford II or even Reagan.
Since the Republicans have never
before held their national con-
clave in Detroit, and since
Reagan was their unquestioned
leader, one suspected that the top*
honor would go to one of three
mentioned. But no, indeed.
The Monthly Detroit, a slick
200-page magazine selling for
$1.50 a copy, devoted the cover of
its July issue to "Max Fisher
Power Broker." It showed him
smiling, spectacled, thinning
gray hair and wearing a white
shirt, blue tie and white handker-
chief in the breast pocket of his
dark suit befitting the con-
servative style of the globally
known benefactor who achieved
riches in gas and oil in a typical
"made in America" story that
Detroit's Junior Leaguers, like
Bev Curtis of Detroit's plush
Grosse Point suburb, proudly
told visitors, including the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency's
reporter.
INSIDE, under a two-page
spread entitled "The Power
Broker," by Kirk Cbeyfits, the
magazine reported in big type
beneath another head photo of
Fisher backgrounded by the
American flag: "Max Fisher was
a poor kid from Ohio. Now his
wealth is in nine figures. He
advises Presidents and Prime
Ministers, directs corporations,
raises millions for charities and
politicians. He's a member of the
permanent government."
The magazine describes "the
permanent government" as "that
elite band of wealthy men and
academics whose steady in-
fluence on national affairs
continues virtually undisturbed
by the temporary changes in
leadership occasioned by elec-
tions or shifts in political power.
In Fisher's case, Detroit's
mayors, Michigan's governors
and America's Presidents come
and go but Max Fisher remains a
constant force in the affairs of the
Alan B. Cohen, M.D.
Pediatrics
announces the relocation of his practice to
1501 Forest Hill Blvd.
("Vi mile west of 195)
Wwt Palm Beach, Florida 33408
city, the state, the nation and, to
some extent, the planet."
Detroit Renaissance Inc.,
which led Detroit's big busi-
nesses to favor the vast changes
from the warehouses and slums
on Detroit'8 riverfront to the
magnificent complex known as
Renaissance Center, where the
convention took place, was
Fisher's idea in 1970. He
organized it and became its first
and thus far its only
chairman. Along with his friend
and partner, Al Taubman,
Detroit Renaissance was behind
Henry Ford's decision to build
the Center.
HOW IMPORTANT is Fisher
to the Republicans? Stephen
Bull, President Nixon's Appoint-
ments Secretary, used to watch
the power brokers come and go
through the Oval Office. "Of
course, I know Mr. Fisher," Bull
said. "And it's always Mister
Fisher. I think he is probably the
most prominent Republican in
the country."
Telephone
005)439-2555
Mel Larsen, Michigan's
Republican Party chairman,
speaking of Fisher's role in the
past 18 years, said: "We'vebeen
very fortunate to have him in-
volved in the Republican Party
because if you look at the most
prominent, influential individuals
across this country, Max Fisher
has to be right in the top."
Incidentally, and to some
incomprehensibly, titles on the
Detroit magazine's cover also
had a guideline to "Bishop Trifa:
Prelate or Persecutor?" He is
covered in eight pages in which
the "lonely, persistent effort" by
a now 83-year-old New York
Jewish dentist, Charles Kremer,
is basically credited for the
federal case to strip U.S. citizen-
ship from Trifa, who has been
accused as having been a key
leader of the viciously anti-
Semitic Rumanian Iron Guard
that massacred hundreds of Jews
in Rumania during World War
II. Ironically, the magazine
prominently noted that Richard
Nixon, when Vice President,
invited Trifa to deliver the
opening prayer to the U.S.
Senate May 11,1955.
H. J. Roberts, M.D.
Diplomate, American Board of Internal Medicine
ANNOUNCES THE ASSOCIATION OF
Sheldon Konigsberg, M.D.
Diplomate, American Board of Internal Medicine
For the Practice of Internal Medicine,
Clinical Nutrition, and Gastroenterology
832-2408
300 27th Street
West Palm Beach, Florida
Dr. I. Goodman
Chiropractor
Boynton Plaza
1Utt N. Cony Avt. IN.WV. 2nd Aw*J
Boynton Bmmch
Backaches Headaches
Pinched Nerves Disc Problems
Arthritis Sciatica Neuralgia
Phone 737-5591
Office Hr. Mon, Tu.. Wd. Fri. Thor. tt Sat
Ml 2-S S12
MEDICARE, WORKMEN'S COMP,
AND MOST INSURANCES INCLUDE CHIROPRACTIC

Richard E. Kowalsky, M.D., P.A.
Is pleased to announce the association of
Norman S. Cohen, M.D.
in the practice of
OBSTETRICS GYNECOLOGY
The Genz Plaza Building
299 West Camino Gardens Boulevard
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
By Appointment
(005)392-4477
\


mm
71*
Canary
*f*M
Explanation Demanded
Why Did U.S. Consulate in E. Jerusalem Okay Arab Demonstration
By DAVID LASDAl land wffl
AM) YITZHAK SHAJtGIL
JERUSALEM iJTA) wh7
A Foreign Ministry
the United
in Td
to goon for *tt*e
... State Dep't Says
No One Was Aware
B? HELES SIL\ EE
WASHINGTON -
JJTAJ The State
Department said here that
the decision to receive a
group of Palestinian m
protestors on the giumafa m
of the US
Jerusalem hut week T
by the Consul H
there and that the
L'-S. Ambassador in Td
Aviv. Samuel Lewis, may
not have been aware of it F<
or approved it in advance. f
the Difii,
_ JohnTraoaer
aid. Tit Cowatatc General m
i
by
solace in East Jerusalem in
of Arab security
now on a hunger
the Nafba jail in
the Negev The spokesman
called it a "strange and
unprecedented step
A cone alafe spokesman
that some 40
enc rr=pi_aer erf the
garden where they
not affinal and
The con-
said that thai
agreed to advance on
Jnfy 14
Of the 26
11
15
to
lad
S oTTwS
id*
as Afi
Ihasflml Jaapri. 30. a
,, fcm food he bad
{oreedfadgBBtohishmgn.Two
r vti poMBomi and reported .
I CUOdataPTA-
THE SEWS o< the death tad
tike came Mit not reported antu
Jury 23 by Chain Levi. head of
the prison authority- Interior
Yoaef Bora has ordered
26 of the
taH striking, froai the
liiupeh Ramon to
central
of the
the hanger straw which
BUT HE and the
surprised by the large
mraad ap. He and he couid not
say why the puwntBtion took
to to three hoars.
i group of Arab
marched through East
Jerusalem to protest the death.
Police dispersed the demon
strators sad arrested 19 of them
Famines of some of the prisoners
also staged a sst-sa at the Red
Cross laadViinrtin m Jerusalem.
Fehoa Laager and
ZemeL two left-wing lawyers who
have frequently uaeeamted
saaprrt>rl terrorists, said some of
ALT HOW..
i is do worie |
that then
room
mi seen..
a1" i' of terrorisU.'
afoo bo fahnissjc seu at
^ and the prisoners ds aoti
nthnve for good bet
dsd those charged with i
criminal offenses.
eathoritisB also charged u
****" atrike eras politic* i
directed from ontasde
Jaapri. the prisoner who i
mnstraavl Israel from Jor'
1968 and was involved
attack on a settlement
iVancr
crono of
the
aspects of con-
daioos a> Saffca praou prison
Israel for persons held on
chargm of terrorist activity.
ACCORDISG TO Trattner.
"A group of approximately a)
who came to the
v* beu the group
st the consulate
i). they were peiaiined
the grounds at Si
He said the
remained in the garden where
they talked with a
representative and after
him a pet ton they departed.
Trattner said. "We are not
aware of a protest by the Israel
government He said he didn t
know if the Ambassador in Tel
Aviv was asked about the
meeting or approved it.
He said the consulate in East
Jerusalem makes its own
decisions, inr hiding any in-
volving a group of people
presenting a petition He ob-
served that "there wasn't time to
call Td Aviv, and even if there
were. I'm sure the Consul
General would make Ins own
ON ANOTHER matter related
to the Middle East. Trattner said
"the U.S. wasn't consulted in
advance" about s fact-finding
FUND RAISERS-AN EASY SAL'
purse with add! appar
poefcet ideal tor cnsnpa,
ooarnebca, hays or men
long card! Sail up a
storm 0O.
Write on Official Sta-
tionery for complete
eetam arid how to obtain
your FREE Personatead
aampm
WHOLESALE 0B.Y
FrsoBw Gifts Inc.
lB3.Vwaart(iwwBoad
Lake Park. Fie 33403
ugninVUnnmlM


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E2E6J5Q6W_TK5H90 INGEST_TIME 2013-06-13T21:36:03Z PACKAGE AA00014311_00227
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES