Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00223

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
^Jewish Fllendliiai m
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
16 Number 12
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, June 13, 1980
F : S/io.:
Price 35 Cents
*&CS Elects Moss Community Mission Dates Change;
Jewish Family &
s Service, at its May 19
elected John I. Moss as
t of the board of
[has served as a board
and representative of
t>n on the JF & CS board,
board member of
|n, past chairman of the
esettlement Committee
chairman of Inter-
fid Soviet Jewry Task
IC.
ngs to JF & CS a
sund' of experience.
iving Chicago, he
rial recognition for
to the Jewish
Service of Chicago
eration. He was in-
th Russian Resset-
the workshops for
jped.
the national vice
the American ORT
and has traveled to
Europe over the past
He has observed
| in Israel and Europe
to ORT's par-
Itogether with the
ribution Committee
Bh Agency in Israel.
nber of Temple Beth
B'rith Lake Worth
:ers elected: Evelyn
president; Milton
ce president; Judith
etary and Harry
jurer.
Extension into Egypt Offered

John I. Moss, new president
of Jewish Family & Chil-
dren's Service of Palm Beac*
County, Inc.
The following are newly elected
board members: Gene De Vore
and Ann Tannen.
In addition continuing board
members are Beannie Bellack,
Ann Blither, Evelyn Blum,
Lyette Feldman, Linda
Kalnitsky, Murray Kern, Renee
Kessler, Ruth Kirshner, Nathan
Kosowski and Harry Lerner.
Also, John Moss, Mildred
Moss, Ida Rapoport, Adele
Sayles, Rose Schwartz, Burton
Sharff, Phillip Soskis, Lenora
Walkover, Milton Wilensky and
Judith Zeidel.
Barbara Tanen, co-chairman of
the Missions Committee, an-
nounced that the dates have been
changed for the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County's Community Mission to
Israel. The trip will now depart
Sunday, Oct. 26, and return
Thursday, Nov. 6.
"The reason the dates have
been changed,'' stated Tanen, "is
because we have been offered an
exciting opportunity to extend
our Mission, for those interested,
into Egypt for four days Nov. 7 -
10. The extension into Egypt will
include 2'/i days sightseeing in
Cairo in a private air-conditioned
coach with accommodations at
five-star hotels.
"Participants will have the
opportunity to visit the famous
Pyramid and great Sphinx in
Giza. In addition, we will visit
the ancient city of Memphis,
which for centuries was Egypt's
capital and was known as the
'City for the Living.' There will
also be a trip to Sakkara, the
'City of the Dead,' which con-
tains over 14 pyramids, hundreds
of mastabsas and tombs, art
objects and engravings. High-
lighting the trip will be an excur-
sion to the Egyptian Museum
and a visit to the tomb of King
Tut and the Hall of Mummies."
The cost of the Israel portion of
the trip will be $900 per person
(double occupancy) including
roundtrip air transportation,
meals and accommodations at
deluxe five-star hotels. A
minimum gift to the 1981 annual
campaign of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach/ UJA is
$1,500 for the head of household,
plus a $500 woman's gift to the
Women's Division. Individual
travelers will be expected to
make a minimum commitment of
$1,500.
For further information, con-
tact Ronni Tartakow at the office
of the Federation at 832-2120.
European Community Prepares
To Recognize Palestinians
By VICTOR M. BIENSTOCK
Yassir Arafat stands on the
verge of the greatest political and
diplomatic victory of an amazing
career in which the practice of
terrorism has become recognized
as the art of statesmanship and
blackmail and intimidation as the
exercise of diplomacy.
Within weeks, Britain, France
and West Germany, with the
other members of the European
Community, will jrive Arafat all
imily Life Task Force Formed
ember, the American
immittee, in con-
with the Jewish
of Palm Beach
Jewish Family and
Service, the Jewish
Center and the
lunity Day School,
[a Jewish Family Life
fee which brought
Wer 300 people con-
rith contemporary
>f Jewish family life as
ted the community in
i County.
lult of that conference,
[ddition
last issue of The
Floridian, we
tently left out the
t>f Arnold Hoffman,
installed as a board
ir of the Jewish
tion of Palm Beach
at the annual
; on June 8.
a mandate calling for an ongoing
task force created to further
explore and identify concerns of
Jewish family life was
established.
At a recent organizational
meeting, the Jewish Family Life
Task Force was formed. Ilene
Silber accepted the position of
acting chairperson.
The purpose of the Task Force
is to gather, coordiante and
disseminate information
throughout the community
regarding family life. The Task
Force will serve as a resource to
service agencies and Jewish
organizations for the im-
plementation and development of
new programs and services. In
addition, the Task Force will
study and evaluate existing
programs and make recom-
mendations to service providers
when needs of families are not
being met.
The Task Force on Jewish
Family Life is composed of
lampaign Surpasses
$2.8 Million
..obert S. Levy, General Campaign Chair-1
announced that the 1980 Combined Jewish
il-Israel Emergency Fund campaign has!
the $2.8 million mark. The campaign will
__iue through the summer. There remains a
pficant number of givers who have not as yet
Fe their commitment to the 1980 campaign. If
f have not yet made your pledge, contact the
ksh Federation office at 832-2120.
Ilene Silber
professional staff members of the
Jewish institution in the com-
munity, representatives from
various local Jewish
organizations, and other in-
terested individuals.
Ilene Silber stated, "Jewish
family life in our community, like
in so many other cities, has
undergone dramatic changes.
We, as individuals and as a
community, must better un-
derstand these changes and work
more effectively to enhance and
strengthen Jewish family life. I
was greatly encouraged by the
interest demonstrated at last
December's conference. Now,
through this newly formed task
force, we have the opportunity
and vehicle to put our thoughts
and words into action. As a
community effort, I hope every
local Jewish organization will
respond positively to our request
for participation."
The next meeting of the Jewish
Family Life Task Force will be
Monday, June 16, at 8 p.m. at the
Jewish Community Center.
Anyone interested in attending
should call Ilene Silber after 7
p.m at 655-4135.
but the final accolade when they
formally recognize the Palestine
Liberation Organization as the
official representative of the
Palestine Arab people and accord
it the virtual status of a
government-in-exile. They have
already recognized the right of
the Palestinian people to "self-
determination."
THE PLO had previously
achieved special status in world
politics far transcending the
recognition ever given any
national liberation movement.
The PLO has a special standing
at the United Nations, official
membership on one UN com-
mission, and there is even a UN
commission (for which the United
States pays some 25 percent of
the cost) to propagandize the
Palestine Arab cause. It has
missions in Vienna and other
capitals which enjoy all
diplomatic privileges except the
formal recognition of
representative of a sovereign
state.
PLO officials serve as
mediators in disputes between
Arab states, hold membership
and vote in the Arab League and
have a considerable say in
determining League policy.
European statesmen listen
deferentially when Arafat talks
about Middle East problems.
Good Social Democrats like Willy
Brandt of West Germany and
Bruno Kreisky of Austria vie
with a patrician like Giscard
d'Estaing of France in homage to
the PLO chieftain.
It is almost impossible to
conjure up the name of any
organization comparable to the
PLO, although a painstaking
historian like Barbara Puchman
might be able to find a parallel
with the Vehme, the medieval
precursor of the Nazis, which
sought to establish its own law in
which professes to be a national
liberation movement.
IT HAS AN international
army with some elements, like es-
Saiq, either provided by or
controlled by a non-Palestinian
power. It is based on the territory
of other nations; it is well-armed
by the Soviet Union, and its
existence and presence are the
most serious military threat to
the regimes of a half dozen shaky
Arab oil dynasties. Not to be
forgotten is the war the PLO
waged (Black September) to
depose King Hussein in Jordan.
Still unresolved is the tradegy
of Lebanon where PLO forces,
supported by the Syrian Army,
destroyed the only democratic
regime in the Arab world and
reduced the country to anarchy.
Reinforcing the supra-national
character of PLO is its role as the
center of an international
terrorist web involving the major
terrorist and nihilist groups in
the non-Communist world. PLO
has affiliations and alliances with
all of these.
THEY HAVE aided PLO in its
Continued on Page 4


'lg*14
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

i.,. ....u' .- ..". r-'..' =
Friday. May 30,1980
4f IflgJ! ^>irf
Midrasha Program
Is Evaluated
The first historic year of the
Mxirasha-Judaic* High School
was brought to a dose with an
assembly of students on May 19.
A discussion and evaluation of
tbe program took place, and the
students suggested subject areas
they wanted to study in next
year's curriculum.
The Midrasha community-wide
program of Jewish education
brought together Jewish high
school students of varied back-
grounds and interests in the
ninth through the twelfth grades
The courses were designed to
stress the underlying unity of
Jews everywhere. Temple Beth
David. Temple Beth El. Temple
Israel and the Jewish Com-
munity Day School combined
their resources, and together with
support from the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County,
offered a program of Jewish edu-
cation for high school youth in
Palm Beach County
The faculty was drawn from
the supporting institutions as
well as additional professional
teachers. The school met on
Monday nights and shared facil-
ities of Temple Beth El and
Temple Israel
One of the programs of the
Midrasha encourages students to
study in Israel. At the end of the
eleventh grade of Jewish studies,
qualified students are offered
stipends to be used toward study
programs in Israel This year
three Midrasha students were
eligible for Israel Study Merit
Scholarships. They are: Jill
Weinstein. Jocie Sterner and
Yosef Langenauer. Eligibility
was based on devotion to Jewish
learning and participation in
Jewish studies in grades nine
through eleven.
Next year the Midrasha ex-
pects to expand its programs and
offer courses during fall, winter
and spring terms. Plans are
underway to establish college
credit for Hebrew language
courses offered at the Midrasha.
The new curriculum is in the
planning stages, and will be
based, in large part, on the sug-
gestions for subject areas ex-
pressed by the present students.
The new catalog will be avail-
able in August For information
about the Midrasha program, or
to be placed on the mailing list,
call the Federation office.
Community Calendar
June 15
e Be.h Sholpm Men s Club Congregof.on Anshe,
Sholom Men's Club 9 30 o.m
June 16
Hodossah T.kvah 1 p.m Jew.sh Family & Children's Ser,Ce
boord 7 30 pm Hodossah Sholom 7 p.m
June 17
Temple Bern El S.sterhood 8 p.m. Women's Amencon C*T -
Golden lakes 1 p.m. ? Hodossah Henr,ea Szold 1 p m
Bnoi B'r.ih No 3041 8 p.m. Temple Beth Dov.d boord 8
p.m Congregation Anshe. Sholom S.sierhood 1 p m B'na.
BVith Menoroh board 10 a.m.
June It
Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood board 10 o.m Women's
American ORT Polm Beach County Region 9 30am
June 19
B*na< B rilfl Women Oha 10 30 o m Women s Amer,COn
E.emng boord 8 p.m Hodossah Golda Me.r 12:30
June 21
3*1 E.emng Soc o Even! 8 p m
June 23
1 p.m Congregate
" I p m
June 26
A"sne Sho'om Co'd F
Organizations
In the News
PIONEER WOMEN
The Golda Meir Club of
Pioneer Women held its in-
stallation luncheon for new of-
ficers at Tbe Ramada Inn on
June 4 Barbara Shulman was
honored as Woman of the
Year." and entertainment was
provided by "The Merry Min-
strels."
A luncheon and card partv will
be held at Tbe Great Wall
Restaurant on.Wednesday. July
9 at 11:30 am. Call chairperson
Ida Bordecker for reservations.
Theodore Herri Club of Pioneer
Women Plans an installation
meeting June 27. at 1 p.m. at
Lake Worth Shuf fleboard Courts.
1121 Lucerne Ave
Entertainment is planned by
Sy Kalik. violinist, accompanied
by Mrs Mildred Bimbaum.
concert pianist.
HADASSAH
On Thursday. July IT. Yovel
Hadassah is planning trip on the
Paddle Queen." Buses will leave
the Westgate at noon, a sit down
salad lunch will be served: and a
two and a half hour cruise on the
Intracoastal will be change of
pace during July
Contact Lee Goldberg, or
Dorothy Isaacs
Yovel Hadassah plans an
Evening at Musicana Wed-
nesday. Aug. 20. 6 p.m. For
information phone Sylvia Lip-
nick. Sadie Knieberg or Lee
Goldberg Transportation, in-
cluding service to your own
apartment, on return. This event
benefits Youth Aliyah program.
Z'Hava Hadassah announces
the follow ing events:
June 16. 17. 18. a bus trip to
Fort Meyers. Sanibel Island, on
to Naples, and dinner and other
points of interest. Food and
gratuities included. Contact Rose
Braun.
June 18 Jai-Alai en-
thusiasts. Bus trip to Fort Pierce.
Fronton Arena. Bring lunch
Contact Laura Herman.
July 17 Mini lunch at
Golden Lakes auditorium.
"Donor" Flea Market
August Much merchandise
needed: start collecting now.
Contact Ruth Heller.
Investment Equity
Real Estate
DON V0GEL
Licensed Real Estate Broker Salesman
Restdential-Conrjommium-in vestment
2352 PGA Boulevard
Palm Beacn Gardens. Fta U41C
826-5100
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L
The only Jewish family owned
and operated funeral home
in Palm Beach Coun
EVITT
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memorial chapels
Formerly l+ntt Hemoriml ( kmprli
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wv Paim Beacrt Fia 33409
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V.P.
At the second annual con-
ference of the Florida Central
Region of Hadassah held May 4
5-6 in Hallandale. the West Palm
Beach Chapter was named
Chapter of the Year and awarded
the large silver bowl for the
second year and received 13
awards for exceeding all quotas.
This was due to the work of all
three Groups Shalom Group was
first and awarded a silver bowl
for the second year: Yovel Group
was second, and Tikvah Group
received honorable mention
Tamar Hadassah s study
group will meet on Monday. June
16. at 10 am in the borne of
Helen Abrams in Royal Palm
Beach. All are invited
A membership drive is being
launched under the direction of
Membership Chairman Frances
Frieman. Several teas are being
planned.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE FOR
ISRAEL
Women's League for Israel will
hold a rummage sale on Sunday.
June 29. at St- Christopher
Church located at the corner of
Haverhill and Belvedere Roads.
Many items will be sold, such
as jewelry, houshoid objects and
clothes The tune is 2 until 7 p.m.
Riverside
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Friday, June 13,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Perspectives on Jewish Education
What? Another New Organization?
By MORDECAI LEVOW
On June 22, a meeting is being
convened for the formation of a
National Association of Com-
munal Jewish Day Schools.
For those of us who are in-
volved in Jewish life, hearing of
the formation of another
organization, one would have to
proclaim, "What? Another new
organization?" Yet, in fact, there
is a crying need for the formation
of such a group.
The Jewish Day School
movement has grown mightily
from its beginnings some 50
years ago. At the time a handful
of schools in the major
metropolitan areas served,
basically, the organized Jewish
community with a combination of
secular and Jewish students in all
day "Yeshivot."
Today, almost 100,000
youngsters attend a variety of
day schools: Orthodox, Con-
servative, Reformed and com-
munal. The Orthodox, Con-
servative and Reformed day
schools have in common that
they are schools that represent a
particular theological position in
Judaism. The term "communal
schools" is a relatively new
phrase in the American scene.
These are schools that are in-
dependent of an ideological id-
entity. The term "communal"
means that they are not directly
affiliated with any of the three
ideological education com-
missions.
As a communal institution, the
Judaic program must maintain a
careful equilibrium in order to
serve students of a wide gange of
Mordecai Levow
Judaic backgrounds. Further,
such schools should project a
much broader program of "Kal
Yisroel" a community of
Israel. In other words, a com-
munal day school must place a
high priority and developing a
program for students about the
Jewish community: local and
national, Israel and the world
Jewish community.
The communal day school has
the tremendous challenge of
teaching a respect for, and an
understanding of, the wide
spectrum of Jewish observance
and the evolutionary nature of
the Jewish community.
Since there is no forum or voice
on a national level for this
communal day school, it becomes
crtical that we, along with com-
munal day schools
throughout the country, torm a
national association that will deal
with the special considerations of
our schools. The Jewish com-
munal day school will, in our
view, be the dominant form of the
day school of the future.
Therefore, you can expect to hear
much more of this newly formed
National Organization of Jewish
Communal Day Schools.
'Outrage' Expressed at
Attack on Jordan
NEW YORK, N.Y. "Acts of
terrorism and violence against
individuals or groups have no
place in America or in the world,"
said Ivan J. Novick, president of
the Zionist Organization of
America (ZOA), in a reaction of
sympathy to the attack on
Vernon Jordan, president of the
National Urban League, who was
shot in the back severly wounded
Fifty young leaders from throughout the state of Florida gathered together in Vero Beach last
month for the third annual UJA Floridia Regional Young Leadership Conference
Representing the Jewish Federation of Plam Beach County were: (front left to right) Michael
Zimmerman, Paul Tochner, Linda Nadelman and Dr. Hewitt Bruce. (Back left to right)
Freida Shefter, Paula Ruth Kass, Dr. Paul Klein, Max Tochner, Phyllis Weissberger, Joan
Tochner, Jeffrey Tochner, Dr. David Weissberger, Harvey White, Detra Kay, Monica Kay,
Jared Kay, Larry Shefter, Dr. Howard Kay. Not pictured: Jay Epstein, David Stone, Ronm
Tartakow.
The conference included sessions dealing with missions and
workshops focusing on leadership development and campaign.
Dennis Prager, director of
Brandeis-Bardin Institute
in California, served as
scholar in residence for the
weekend. He discussed
topics dealing trith
Kashruth, Shabbath and
the existence of God.
JCC Receives Lowe Grant
Through the efforts of Helen
Hauben, chairperson of the Com-
prehensive Senior Service Center
advisory board, the Jewish Com-
munity Center has received a
grant of $15,000 from the Joe and
Emily Lowe Foundation to
purchase a vehicle.
As a result of this bequest, the
JCC Senior Division will be able
to provide transportation to
education and recreation pro-
grams as soon as the vehicle is
purchased.
The work of the Center, with
its programs for all ages from
preschool to older adults, has
encouraged many family foun-
dations and private philan-
thropies to consider the JCC as a
recipient of grants.
in Indiana.
Citing Jordan as "an out-
standing cititzen of our great
nation," Novick and Paul Flacks,
ZOA national executive director,
said they hope Jordan, who "has
been a voice of intelligence and
moderation in the area of human
relations," would soon be able to
resume his important efforts as
president of the National Urban
League.

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An [ jual Opportunity t mplover
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JACK D GORDON. President ARTHUR H COURShOn. Chairman o' the Board


rage 14
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
rnaay.Mayao, 1980
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 13, l98i
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We Condemn the Violence
We join the many Jewish organizations and
leaders across the nation and in Israel that condemn
the violence perpetrated against Arab residents on
the West Bank
The death of the yeshiva students in Hebron
last month was a tragedy that can not be forgotten.
But the bombing attacks on the Arab mayors do
not erase the tragedy, and they can not be forgiven.
Far from strengthening Israel's presence on the
West Bank, the violence only serves to weaken it.
Furthermore, when we condemn Palestinian
violence as bestial and unspeakable, we condemn all
violence. Condemnation of violence can not be
selective. It is a repudiation of inhuman behavior.
These assessments must hold true for the
Jewish extremists responsible for this week's at-
tacks, as well.
There will be those who are afraid to repudiate
the attacks on the basis that they were launched in
the cause of Israel's survival. We do not doubt the
extent of the danger to Israel's survival. Disaf-
fection with Israel's cause grows daily, especially in
Europe, whose revolting pragmatic politics brings
new anti-Israeli betrayals every day.
But the extremist bombings do not strengthen
Israel's cause. In our view, they weaken it. Israel's
survival must depend on other thingsparticularly
the iron determination not to submit to her am-
putation and even execution by demands from her
"friends" for never ending concessions.
At the very least. Israel must be as efficient in
ferreting out those responsible for this week's
violence as she has been in the past in her defense
against outside enemies. The enemies within,
Jewish though they may be, are no less dangerous.
Consulate for Miami
For a long time now, pressure has been
mounting for the establishment of an Israel Con-
sulate in Miami. We can understand the original
consular structure as established by the State of
Israel to represent its nationals and its interests in
the southeastern part of the United States.
But to continue not to have an Israel Consulate
in Miami seems to us to be a grievous omission. It
downgrades the efficiency and the cross-sectional
representation of Israel's consular corps.
It fails to take into account the phenomenal
growth of the Jewish community of South Florida
during the past 30 years, including its substantial
Israeli contingent, whose philanthropic and
organizational contributions to the Jewish State are
legion.
Until Miami has a full-fledged Israeli Consulate
here, both will suffer an unworthy and unexplain-
able dearth of diplomatic representational presence,
presence.
'Tin Drum9Marches to Fearful Tune
Turning on the Tears
There seems to be a flood of crocodile tears by
West Bank And Gaza Strip leaders over the
resignation of Ezer Weizman as Israel's Defense
Minister. It was a "major loss for mutual un-
derstanding between Jews and Arabs," they
moaned. Others expressed the fear that the
moderate viewpoint would no longer be heard in the
Cabinet.
A similar display took place when Moshe
Day an resigned as Foreign Minister last year. It is
probably true that Day an and Weizman, both
sabras, had more rapport with Arabs than their
Cabinet colleagues. But aside from whatever had
been said privately, what support have West Bank
and Gaza leaders given the "moderate" viewpoint in
Israel?
""Jewish Floridian
Of FAUN SCACM COUNTY
C*H*| ~OU VO*CC"aatf "FCDHATtOM SEPOSTEH
la coajuacuoa with Jewtah raearaUar. or Paint Beach Countv Inr
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SM North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. PU mil Phone Mi WJi
PrtnUae; Office UO lit eth St Miami Fla XJ1JI Phone 17^4*06
RED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET RONNI TARTAKOW
-drier aad PubUaber E*ecuUre Editor Newa Coonanatoi
Mc MORTON GILBERT AdverUauuj RepreaentaUve
Tat Jawaab PlarhN Oat MM 0raalM Ts Kasbrvbi
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ubilaned n Weekly
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eaaurar: Stacl Lea ear. Secretary Bruce J Daniels Executive Director
N Cftv>rnaan J Sebunelmaa Submit malarial tor publication to Ronnl Tartafcow
1 rertoroi Public Relation*
IBSCKIPTION RATES: (Local Area) Oaa Year liM. er by meaberh. te
ONE WEEKEND evening
almost a year ago, I stepped into
a Munich theatre to see a movie
called Tin Drum. Now, the movie
is making the rounds here in
South Florida, and I have gone to
see it again.
It is even better the second
time around. The film is baaed on
the Tin Drum by the German
novelist, Gunter Grass, whom I
consider one of the foremost
literary artists in the world
today. The book is part of s
trilogy, which includes Hun-
dejahre ("Dog Years") and KaU
und Maus ("Cat and Mouse").
The trilogy documents the af-
termath of World War I as it led
to the Hitler madness and then
the aftermath of that madness
following the destruction of
Hitler's Thousand-Year Reich.
Tin Drum is the work of the
director. Volker Schlondorff.
which won an Oscar for the best
foreign-language film of the year.
But Oscars are misleading. Too
often, they praise pap. although
not in this case. Award-winner or
not. the film's excellence speaks
for itself.
IT IS ONLY a coincidence that
the "hero" of the novel, if such he
be. is also called Oskar. a tyke of
five or six years of age when the
Nazis begin to strut their stuff.
As in his other novels in this
trilogy. Grass uses Danzig as the
setting for his work, the free
Polish city which, together with
Memel. constituted the twin
poles of the Polish corridor, and
which Hitler annexed coin-
cidentally with his attack on
Warsaw to launch World War II.
For Grass, Danzig is symbolic
a microcosm of east and west
and, in a larger sense of global
mankind, at least as global as our
sensibilities permitted us to see
things before the post-war rise of
the Third World to enlarge our
view of the realities of this planet
called Earth.
IT WAS in Danzig that
Germans and Poles lived side-by-
side in an uneasy cultural and
political relationship. It was
Danzig that, as a free city, had to
survive in its integrity if
mankind itself was to survive.
But Danzig falls to the Nazi
beast, and mankind falls with it
because mankind, since the birth
of Oskar in 1924. has refused to
take a stand against the beast.
The fall of the city is hence the
fall of man himself in punishment
for his profound moral lapse.
The date of Oskar's birth is. of
course, patently significant, for it
was on February 24. 1924 that
the trial began of the leaders of
the Hitler Putsch in Munich.
including such stellar German
hghts as Gen. Erich Ludendorrf
Ernst Roehm and Wilhelm Frick!
for their attempt to overturn*
the Weimar Republic aBn
establish the Nazi hegemony
Aa artist. Grass ia mythic.
Since he views the theological fall
m political terms, he make,
Oskar a measiah. This is a
symbol he uses in Hundejahrt
and KaU und Maus, as well
BECAUSE OSKAR 18 ,
measiah, his origins are in doubt
a prerequisite for the divinely.'
inspired. We know who hit
mother is. but we can not be sure
about the identity of her father,
for she was conceived in a Polish
' potato field courtesy of a soldier
fleeing capture in World War I
Hiding beneath a peasant
woman's skirts as she pretended
to be squatting, the unknown
soldier fathered her arrival on
this earth in danger, frank
mischievousness and indifferent
anonymity at the very moment
that the enemy was sttempting
to ferret him out.
If his grandfather's identity is
in doubt, so is his father's. He
mav be hij> mnlKiw'o Di;..u i-------
he may be her German lover.
Such duality is the nature of life
in Danzig. Such, indeed, is Grass'
view of sexuality generally,
which he regards with black
humored insouciance, a pointed
de-romanticizing of sex to an
accidental experience in a non-
predictable, absurd world
Reckoned in terms of Oskar's
Continued on Page H-
Victory for Arafat?
European Community to
Recognize Palestinians
iday. June 13. I960
29 SI VAN 6740
Number 12
Continued from Page 1
terrorist operations, and PLO has
aided them in theirs. It has given
them training, arms, explosives
and expertise such as in the
mining of the U.S. Embassy in
Teheran. PLO saboteurs trained
in the Soviet Union have passed
that training on to the fanatics of
the Japanese Red Army, the
disregard of the boundaries
dividing the principalities and
fiefdoms. The PLO is in fact a
supra-national organization
ireiana, the Italian anarchists
and others. The role of the PLO
has played has been that of a
Fifth Column for the Kremlin in
the non-Communist world.
The Arab states which used
the bumbling Palestinian Arab
politician. Ahmed Shukairy, to
establish the PLO in the early
1960s and organize terrorist
operations against Israel, created
a Frankenstein which they must
bitterly regret now as they pay it
hp service and tribute. They no
longer give subsidies to the PLO
they pay tribute in
astronomical amounts-.
A recent conservative estimate
put at $250 millions the annual
payoff of the Arab states to the
PLO. Ostensibly these payments
are to finance the PLO operations
against Israel; actually they are
payments such as shopkeepers in
American cities have had to pay
to the neighborhood gang leader
so that he and his mob won't
break the shop windows or
destroy their wares.
THE PLO has the potential in
Saudi Arabia and most of the
other oil states to create so much
internal difficulty as to threaten
the existence of the current
regimes. Few if any of the oil
states could successfully resist a
PLO military infiltration.
J' nsve'To' frVr*
with their Frankenstein, but why
must the nations of Europe aad
the Third World rush headlong to
embrace it, and why should there
by increasing sentiment in this
country, particularly in govern-
ment circles, that there must be
an accommodation with the PLO
and Arafat? It is not because
they believe so deeply in the
justice of the Palestine Arab
cause and fed so strongly that
the Palestine Arabs must be
freed of the Israeli yoke.
There are other peoples in
other lands with equal if not
greater claims to independence,
but their representatives can't
even get into the waiting rooms
of the chancellories in Bonn,
Paris and London.
The answer, of course, is "Oil,"
the most important word in the
diplomatic lexicon of the of the
1980s. The countries of Europe
have not reduced their depen-
dence on imported oil since the
1973 embargo and are ever more
at the mercy of the oil producers
today than seven years ago. In
France, which is almost entirely
Caught geographically bet-
ween the Soviet Union and the
United States and with long
borders abutting the Soviet
sphere, they are so determined to
believe in detente that they
refuse to admit the possibility
that the real threat to their oil
supplies would come from
Soviet incursion into the Persian
Gulf. They consider the PLO at
the strongest force in the Arab
world and Arafat as its most
powerful man.
Britian. France and West
Germany are due to take the lead
very soon in seeking intervention
in the Arab-Israeli dispute by
taking an active part under new
conditions they would create.
displacing the United States
from its mediation role.
LORD CARRINGTON. the
British Foreign Secretary, insists
that the Europeans don't want to
interfere in the Camp David
process, but he suggests that
there isn't much the United
States can do in an election year
-------~ -...~ov ciiuinj in the way of initiatives
dependent on imports for its oil meaning pressure on Israel. This
supply, gasoline and deiael fuel the Europeans are apparently
consumption was up 23 percent
last year over 1973
IN WEST Germany, the rate
of increase was 16 percent and in
Britain. 10 percent. Both France
and Britain are engaged in an all-
prepared to apply without
hesitation or problems of con-
science.
Carrington conveniently
ignores the evidence to say be
doesn't believe the PLO "is
out effort to re^tabualTthe ^T"!?. orKani"tio0 ^
influence in the Middle East they ^J^t *"&" ^?i 7 Z
once enjoyed and to develop 5- ?nttth aoldien m "**,
markets there. France, pa? ttTmt* TC^,by?.
tkularly. is seeking cfoae tk PL0 He m lnclul, favor '
witn the Arab sUtes\hich would S"*.* l* V.^ **3
enable her to seel them arms to f^TVL ^f^ ^
pay for oil. ^^ Resolution 242 to give equal
~. ., weight with the recognition of
The European and Third Israel's sovereignty to the
VSorld oU-importmg countries. Palestinian Arab right of self-
dependent as their economies are determinat ion
on imported oil. dread any Such a move would pu1 tJ-'
developments that might disturb United States in a difficult
the flow of oil from the Middle position since it is firmly corn-
iest. They are desperatelv mitted to defense of 242 in its
anxious to believe that the present form President Carter
possibility of a renewed Arab- risk further Arab displeasure by
laws. war. ---the vsto.


Knday, June 13. iym
Harassment of Refuseniks Increases Death Sentences Affirmed
For Two Convicted Jews
KIEV As part of an on-
going mass protest campaign in
this city against the recent
cutbacks in Jewish emigration.
five Kiev Jews gathered in the
apartment of a man named
Kanevsky to appeal the OVIR's
refusal to grant them exit visas.
Subsequently, the five were
arrested.
Reports indicate that
Kanevsky has been detained by
the police and his whereabouts
are unknown. Two others
Zubko and Knizhnik were
sentenced to 15 days in prison,
and Makhlis and Bernshtein were
released.
Another group of Jewish
refuseniks went to Moscow to
formally deliver a complaint to
the Community Party's Central
Committee. Upon returning to
Kiev, one of them, Valery
Pilnikov, was arrested while
riding on a bus, and charged with
"malicious hooliganism."
In an attempt to protest the
trumped up accusations against
her husband, Pilnikov's wife
went to Moscow with a signed
statement prepared by a person
who had accompanied her
husband on the bus, clearing him
of all charges. Returning from
Moscow she went directly to the
home of Jewish activist Vladimir
Kislik, where she was ap-
prehended and arrested by the
police. It is not known when she
will be released.
Kislik, a noted long-term
refusenik, has been repeatedly
warned by the police to end his
contacts with new refuseniks. On
March 20, he was summoned to
KGB headquarters and told to
stay away from foreigners, as
well. The officers threatened that
he would be charged with "anti-
Soviet "behavior" and sentenced
to two to three years in a labor
camp, should he continue his
"activities."
Informed sources from this
town claim that KGB
harassments against Kislik have
been escalating because Soviet
authorities want to "isolate"
him. The police are particularly
eager to discourage new
refuseniks from getting involved
in Jewish activist circles.
In a related story, several
Jewish activists, including Leb
Elbert. staged a hunger strike on
May 21 to protest the growing
critical conditions in Kiev.
Anti-Semitism
Under Tight Control of Soviet State
UKRAINE The Chairman
of the Supreme Soviet of the
USSR, Leonid Brezhnev, has
rejected an appeal for clemency
by two Jews sentenced to death
August 1978 for "economic
crimes." following a yearlong
trial in the town of Donetsk in the
Ukraine.
Raphael Adzhiashvilli, 49,
from Tbilisi, married with three
children, and a man named
Abasov from Baku, went to trial
with 52 co-defendants for
allegedly stealing factory surplus
textile for resale. All but eight of
the defendants were Jewish.
Although the prosecutor asked
for sentences of 10-15 years for all
the defendants. four Jews
received death sentences.
Alter appealing to the
Supreme Soviet of the USSR.
two of the four condemned Jews
- Gabriel Sepiashvilli and Ilya
Mikhaishvilli had their
sentences commuted to 15 years
in jail. Sepiashvili*s clemency, .
decreed by the First Deputy
chairman of the Supreme Soviet.
Vasily V. Kuznetsov, was
received a few days ago, before he *
was transferred from his death
cell to a regular prison cell.
Alerted to the fact that the
Supreme Soviet had denied
Adzhiashvili's appeal for
clemency, his family im-
medialtely left for Moscow for an
eleventh hour attempt to save the
life of the condemned prisoner.
Reacting to the rejected ap
peals, the NCSJ has called upon
members of Congress and the
U.S. Department to make
inquiries with the USSR.
By SHARYN PERLMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Modern day Soviet anti-
Semitism is characterized by two
basic factors: anti-Semitism is in
the hands of the state and can
therefore be turned on or off at
will: it is now more racially
oriented than before, and this
prevents Soviet Jewry from
assimilating into the mainstream
of society because "according to
religious and cultural views
today there is very little dif-
ference between Russian Jews
and Russian Russians."
This analysis was presented
here by Ezra Mendelssohn, senior
lecturer at the Institute of
Contemporary Jewry and
Russian Studies at the Hebrew
University and a visiting
professor of history at the
University of Michigan.
MENDELSSOHN was one of
several guest speakers at the
Conference of Problems of Soviet
Ethnic Policies examining the
status of Jews in the USSR and tam.(,
the impact of anti-Semitism. I he ^,,,
forum, held at New York's
Columbia University, was
sponosred jointly by the Jacob
Blaustein Institute for the
Advancement of Human Rights.
Columbia University Program on
(ieneral Education. Columbia
University Program on Soviet
Nationality, and the Greater New
York Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
Speaking to about 150 people,
Mendelssohn presented an
historical perspective of Czarist
and Soviet anti-Semitism. Under
the Czars, although conditions
were favorable for "collective
Jewish expression," tolerance for
individual Jews was very low as
they were perceived as an "alien
element in backward peasant
society," he said.
Jews also found themselves in
the middle of intense nationalist
competition, especially in the
Ukraine, "the hotbed of anti-
Semitism in the pre-World War I
period," which led to both social
and religious anti-Semitism.
Also. Mendelssohn observed,
during the late 19th and early
20th centuries, Russia was going
through great political and social
flux a condition never con-
sidered conducive for minority
advancement and or ac-
THE SOVIET period, Men-
delssohn continued, reflected a
reversal in Czarist patterns. The
new Soviet regime was
dominated by forces hostile to
Judaism but friendly to Jews as
individuals. A secular culture
Light tt\e candle
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based on Yiddish was allowed to
flourish, and Jews were in
positions of authority. Class
loyalty was the important factor,
and anyone, regardless of
religion, who exemplified this
loyalty was favored, he said.
According to Mendelssohn,
this favorable treatment of "loyal
Jews," which allowed them to
assume positions of influence and
stature in the community, began
to be resented and the Soviets
feared a takeover by these newly
emancipated Jews.
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rage 14
The Jewish Floridan of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 13,1980
Shamir By-Passed
Begin Cools Vigorous Political Wrangle
Egypt Welcomes UJSL Aircraft
At Air Base in Cairo
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin announced
that he will serve as De-
fense Minister until the
coalition crisis over the re-
placement of former De-
fense Minister Ezer Weiz-
man is resolved. Begin's
interim appointment of
himself was approved by
the Cabinet at its weekly
meeting. The Cabinet also
reappointed Mordechai
Zipori as Deputy Defense
Minister.
Weizman resigned officially on
May 26 with a scathing attack
on the performance of the Likud-
led government in which he
served for the last three years.
Begin promptly announced that
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, who took office in
1 March, would be shifted to the
defense slot and that Energy
t Minister Yitzhak Modai, leader
t of Likud's Liberal Party, would
f Minister.
t
jj HIS PLANS ran into stiff
9 opposition from the Democratic
k Movement which said Modai
f was unacceptable to it, from the
" National Religious Party which
complained that it was not con-
sl suited in advance and from
fr Agriculture Minister Ariel
sj Sharon who presented himself as
M the most suitable candidate for
fc Defense Minister and threatened
X to resign if the post went to
M Shamir. He accepted the interim
S appointment of Begin.
^* Sunday's Cabinet session was
a marked by sharp exchanges be-
tween Sharon and Begin.
* Sharon, a Yom Kippur War hem
it most out
n spoken hawk, claimed that if
M Shamir became Defense Minister
ID and Modai Foreign Minister.
Begin would have "abandoned
the security of Israel.'
Begin retorted lhai he did not
consider it necessary to have a
military man as Defense
Minister and noted that in many
countries, including Britain and
the U.S.. that office traditionally
is held by a civilian.
MANY observers believe that
the hard-line Sharon was, in fact,
Begin's first choice to replace
Weizman. But he was served
notice bv the DM and the
Gen. Shqmn
Liberal Party that they would
oppose Sharon. The Liberals
insist that they will accept only
Modai who emerged as the
party's strong-man in its in-
ternal elections last month. The
DM claims Modai lacks the
qualifications to serve as Foreign
Minister and has been pushing
its own No. 2 man, Justice
Minister Shmuel Tamir, for the
job.
The NRP is the only coalition
partner which has indicated that
it will hold off for the time being
and not adopt a final position.
Begin met with an NRP
delegation Friday and ap-
parently reached an under-
standing with them. Although
Begin himself threatened to
resign last week unless the
Cabinet crisis is resolved, he
changed his mind.
He reportedly told the NRP
members that if he quit now,
bringing down the Likud
government, the next govern-
ment might be headed by the
Labor Alignment which could
mean, according to Begin,
handing the West Bank over to
the Arabs to form a Palestinian
state. "My hands will not spill
this blood," he said. Meanwhile,
the Labor Party charged the
Begin government with en-
dangering national security.
"The security and the very exis-
tence of the State have become
toys in the hands of a quarrel-
some and unstable government,"
the Labor Party said over the
weekend. "It is not a matter of
conflict between the opposition
and the government but real
concern for our existence," the
party communique said.
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) American aircraft
are engaged in training
exercises with Egyptian
airmen at the West Air
Base in Cairo, the State
Department said. The De-
partment's chief spokes-
man, Hodding Carter,
refused to comment as to
whether the U.S. aircraft
were reconnaissance planes.
But he emphasized that
they were there for training
purposes with the Egyptian
Air Force.
State Department sources also
said that "possibly" addition.'
U.S. aircraft will go to Emt
The sources said they weri^n
aware" that the American planet
may have flown over Sinai or
made any use of the Israeli
facilities on the peninsula. This ig
the first time American aircraft
have been engaged in such
exercises.
ASKED IF the U.S. aircraft
might use Israeli facilities as well
as Egyptian, s source ssid. We
have under review use of such
facilities in a number of coun-
tries." He declined to comment
on "specific possibilities."
Egyptian Defense Minister
Kamal Hassan Ali ssid the U.S.
could use "Egyptian facilities."
3917648
2200 W. Glades Road, Suite 1205
Glades Plaza
Boca Raton, Florida
400 Attend Press Club
'Arab-Night' in Washington
&Ae '/'atm^e \
ll\o"um.ta,in I_,a,:t$:e
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The National Press Club's
"package" agreement with the
Arab League, which includes the
Palestine Liberation
Organization in its membership,
was completed here with an
Arab Night" extravaganza
attended by some 400 persons.
While the guest list was not
available, the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency was informed by club
staff members that about half the
attendance was made up of
members <>t the Arab embassies
in Washington and Arab
American--
THE JTA was told that Drew
von Bergen, the clubs president,
had the only list and he's gone
away for a few days The Arab
League's information officer.
Morwan Kanafani, who identified
himself as a Palestinian, told the
JTA that "all the embassies" of
the League's member states in
Washington were represented,
except Egypt. Among those from
the Carter Administration
present was Paul Costello.
assistant press secretary to Mrs.
Rosalynn Carter.
During the night, four
telephone bomb threats were
received at the Press Club but no
trace of the caller was reported.
Police dogs were used to search
the club's ballroom during the
day and during the night but
nothing was found.
In the street outside the Press
Club building, four men picketed
the event, the only tigs oi
protest One <>f them, who
identified himselt as Mike Meir
and said he represented only
himselt. charged that the Arabs
were buying'' tht press club.
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Americans Growing More Sympathetic Toward Egypt
NEW YORK The American
public has reacted to recent
events in the Middle East by
recognizing differences between
Egyptian and other Arab
nations, and by overlooking
differences between the PLO and
other Palestinians.
These were among the major
findings of a national telephone
survey conducted last December
for the American Jewish Com-
mittee by Yankelovich, Skelly
and White, the public opinion
pollsters, and released by the
Committee here.
According to the poll, voters
continued to sympathize to a
greater extent with Israel than
with any of the other Arab
countrjes. but saw Egypt in a
different and more sympathetic
light than they did the others: 16
per cent for Egypt, six per cent
for other Arab countries.
IN A SIMILAR poll con-
ducted in April. 1979, 11 per cent
supported the other Arabs, in-
dicating a five per cent drop in
support by December of the same
scar. However, almost one-third
of those queried expressed un-
certainty about support for
Israel. Egypt or other Arab
countries in the event of a
conflict.
Asked about Palestinians and
the PLO in relation to Israel. 15
per cent gave the Palestinians
their support I HI per cent to
Israeli and II percent approved
the PLO 156 per cent to Israeli.
indicating that distinctions
between the PLO and other
Palestinians still existed in the
public mind, but somewhat less
sharply.
Apparently not much change
took place in public attitudes
towards negotiations with the
PLO. Asked in January, 1975,
whether Israel was right or
wrong in refusing to negotiate
with the PLO, 29 per cent
throught Israel right, while 36
per cent disapproved. The same
question asked in the current
survey brought similar results,
30 per cent approving Israel and
41 per cent disapproving. About
one-third of the respondents both
in 1975 and 1979 had no opinion
or were not sure how to answer
the question.
DO AMERICANS favor
United States negotiating with
the PLO even if Israel objected?
Here Americans were split
almost into thirds. Forty-two
percent said no. 34 percent said
ves. and 24 percent were un-
certain.
Respondents were asked how
they lelt about power groups in
the United States. Their
responses, consistent in surveys
tor the past five years, named oil
companies, large corporations.
labor unions and Arab interests
as groups with too much power.
-Zionist groups and American
Jews appeared at the bottom of
the list. ,
Yankelovich, Skelly and White
has been surveying American
attitudes toward Jews and Israel
for the American Jewish Com-
mittee since 1974.
Feinstein
Reelected
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Rabbi Moshe Feinstein,
president of the Union of
Orthodox Rabbis of the United
States and Canada for the past 12
years, was unanimously reelected
to another term at the
organization's annual convention
which opened here.
In his address to the several
hundred delegates and visiting
rabbis from all over the world,
the renowned Torah sage
stressed the need for Jewish
education to make the Jewish
people aware of the vital role of
Torah and halacha in their daily
lives.
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Leo Mindlin
'Tin Drum' Marches to Fearful Tune
Continued from Page 4
less than stellar genealogy, this is
the Holy Trinity of his arrival
here on earth. Since mythology
demands that all messiahs suffer
as a prerequisite to their divine
status, it is Oskar's martyrdom,
a la Lautrec, to fall down a flight
of steps at age three that
ostensibly leaves him a dwarf.
IT IS THIS act that purifies
Oskar and prepares him to accept
I his role as savior. Aware of the
first frightening noises the Nazis
are making in Danzig, par-
ticularly the attack on the toy
I store of the Jewish shopkeeper,
Sigismund Markus, who suffers
unrequited love for Oskar's
mother and who even vainl)
goes through baptism and
conversion for the sake of thii
love, Oskar makes a bole
decision.
He refuses to grow up. He acts
out symbolically the negligible
and medically unexp lain able
effect of the fall on him. Now
physically imperfect like all other
messiahs (Moses' stammering.
Jesus' chauvinism, Lenin's in-
difference to cruelty, Che
Guevarra's obesity), Oska:
rejects the world which is about
to visit its Armaggedon.
He is especially confirmed in
his decision by the action of his
alleged father, the man who
publicly accepts the dubious role,
whom he sees on the morning
following the infamous
Kristallsnacht at the
Michaelisweg Synagogue now
ablaze taking, as Grass says in
the novel, "advantage of the
opportunity to warm his feelings
and his fingers..."
OSKAR'S REJECTION of a
*orld indifferent to cruelty is
riven substance by the Jewish
shopkeeper Sigismund Markus'
rift to him of a tin drum, which
Xskar now beats incessantly in
ieu of human communication
>nd as a means of gathering the
aithful to his divine cause. Of
vhat use are words in the season
if his discontent?
When Oskar does bypass the
rum on occasion to let his
selings be known, he engages in
loments of rageful shouting,
hich are so piercing that they
estroy glass and windowpanes
- a Kristallsnacht all their own,
lod's wrathful voice warning us
f humanity's impending
isaster.
The book and the film are too
Ken in image, myth and symbol
o pursue here. The film version
f Tin Drum goes partly off track
y marking Oskar's puberty at
lie moment when he divests
imself of the role of messiah.
he dwarf's sexual encounter
ith Maria, the sister of a friend,
hose name Grass chooses as no
xident (there are no accidents
any sort in his superb artistry),
ives rise to a pregnancy and
timately to a son.
WHEN FOR the first time
jskar speaks significantly in
ear and distinct language, it is
> announce that he has a son; it
at this point that we know that
| skar's end as messiah is at
tnd. He passes from the in-
, mate to the carnal. The book
akes no such special emphasis,
id the film's departure in this is
squeaky note in what is
herwise a symphony of mythic
ual and romance.
But the film, Tin Drum,
lows the book admirably in its
pology. The "Trinity" is
Explicable mystery. Grass'
thic trinitarians are each
d 'mbols of evil in their own way:
I 'kar's "father," who is a Nazi
jinpathizer; Oskar's mother,
J 10 becomes pregnant again
j 'citly, a metaphor for im-
another son or messiah by
committing suicide she eats
herself to death with a
voluminous quantity of fish, the
food of the disciples.
And then there is Oskar
himself, the son-messiah, who
rejects the evil world, finding his
solace in the inchoate warnings of
a drumbeat; in Grass' favorite
haunt, the circus, perhaps the
best home for messiahs after all,
where the only reality is illusion;
even in a mental institution.
ONLY THE Jew, Sigismund
Markus, is charitable and
humanitarian in his love and
understanding of Oskar and of
Oskar's sexually prolific mother,
who dies of the overdose of fish
(Sex and the divine, warns Grass
cynically, are incapable of union.
Is that not the lesson of the
Trinity after all?) But even
Markus, in his baptism and
conversion, has shown weakness
of faith and succumbed to the
bestial. In this sense, he is ap-
parently no better than his Nazi
tormentors, who ultimately
murder him as he sits at his desk
in his toy shop.
Still, Grass writes, "There was
once a toy merchant, his name
was Markus and he sold tin
drums There was once a
drummer, his name was Oskar,
and he needed the toy merchant
There was once a drummer,
his name was Oskar, and they
took away his toy merchant .
There was once a toy merchant,
his name was Markus, and he
took away all the toys in the
world in his act of this world."
In the end, of course Markus.
though inconsistent in his faith,
has not fallen from it. Between
his Judaism and his adopted
Christianity, suggests Grass,
may be a stupid gulf, but a gulf is
not a fall. And why did Markus
convert anyway? Was it not for
love?
BUT BETWEEN Judaism and
Christianity on the one hand, and
Nazism on the other, is more than
a gulf. Between Judaism and
Christianity on the one hand, and
Nazism on the other, is the fall-
Hence, Markus is of a certainty
better than his tormentors. And
hence Grass writes, repudiating
Christian and Nazi, whom he sees
as the root of the evil that tore
Europe (and humanity) asunder,
with the Jewish shopkeeper as a
symbol of the victim of their evil:
"... there is no Paul, the man's
name was Saul, and it was Saul
who told the people of Corinth
something about that he
called faith, hope and love, which
he advertized as easily
digestible."
Only Markus as Jew digests
well. The others merely eat well
and fornicate well, which both the
novel and the film depict almost
toe graphically.
THERE IS no Paul. He is
Christianity as an institutional
myth that fails repeatedly to
prevent evil this time,
mankind's latest fall in the
Hitlerian madness. There is only
Saul, whom Grass depicts as
Markus, the eternal Jew, the
divine impulse in man that the
Christian illusion forever betrays.
Oskar is his disciple, a new
gospel to the world which the
world refuses to heed; Danzig,
Europe, the very universe are the
victims of their own evil, their
senseless baptism of Saul as Paul
whose cunning words again
mistranslate the true testament.
Markus. crucified by
mankind's wickedness, leaves
Oskar silenced a drummer
without a drum, a disciple
without a message.
If, like all human gods,
Sigismund Markus is carnal in
the end, so is Oskar who,
silenced, succumbs to another
drumstick, his outsized penis ide
rigueur in a Grass novel), a sign
now not of his divinity but of his
absolute humanity. It has
already served him with Maria,
FOR THE
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David Bennent as the three-year-old Oskar, with pounding
drum and shattering scream, in the film version of 'Tin Drum '
a film translation of the German novel by Gunter Grass.
and now he rejects his role,
precisely as other messiahs have
attempted to do in the past.
OSKAR GROWS up. He joins
the world with the end of the war,
the end of Nazism. But he places
the drum into the hands of his
illegitimate son, conceived not by
a ghost but frank carnality,
hoping that he will become the
new messiah, the messenger of
the true testament to carry his
father's ministry forward. The
war may be over, but the danger
of another fall is always im-
minent.
The son refuses the drum.
Grass knows: mankind has not
yet risen from the last fall or,
indeed, from the first. The Bible
the Third Reich man's
wickedness is endless in its
variety.
Volker Schlondorff s
production of Tin Drum shows all
this quite admirably. To boot, the
photography is exquisite, oc-
casionally bordering in its beauty
on the still life scenes of the great
French cinematographer, Jean
Renoir. And David Bennent as
Oskar is a gothic treasure.
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Tridi
The Jewish Fioridian of Palm Beach County
Page $

Linda Budin Kalnitsky, left, former president, presents award
to Rose Schwartz, outgoing JF & CS president.
Jewish family & Children s Service board members receive special commWuSn^tSng,
left -right: Murray Kern, Evelyn Blum, Rose Schwartz, Ruth Horen, Russian case aid
coordinator, Harry Lerner. Seated, left right: Milton Wilensky, Ann Blicher. Not pictured:
Linda Kalnitsky, Renee Kessler, Ruth Kirshner, Mildred Moss, Burton Sharff, Lenora
Walkover. "
Rose Schwartz
Honored by JF&CS
The Jewish Family &
Children's Service, at its May 19
meeting, honored outgoing
president, Rose Schwartz, with a
surprise dessert and presented
her with a plaque for meritorious
service during her term as
president of the board.
Mrs. Schwartz, a native of New
York, attended and was grad-
uated from Hunter College and
Columbia University School of
Social Work. In addition to
having been director of
professional services for the
Family Service Society of
Yonkers, N.Y., she was affiliated
with the New York University
Graduate School of Social Work
as an associate professor of social
work.
Rose, and her husband, Jules,
moved to this area in 1970. She
had been acting director of the
Center for Family Services, in
addition to doing marital and
family counseling here in Palm
Beach County.
Mrs. Schwartz intends to
continue her work on the JF & CS
board, working closely with John
I. Moss, the newly elected
president of the board.
Other honored at the May 19
meeting were: Evelyn Blum, vice
president; Milton Wilensky, vice
president: Lenora Walkover,
secretary; Harry Lerner,
treasurer.
Special commendation for
faithful service rendered was
given to each of the following:
Ann Blicher, Membership
Committee; Evelyn Blum,
Service and Case Committee;
Linda Kalnitsky, Public
Relations Committee; Murray
Kern, Site Selection Committee;
Rennee Kessler, Ways and
Means Committee; Ruth Kirsh-
ner, Nominating Committee;
Mildred Moss, Personnel
Committee; Burton Sharff, Legal
Committee; Lenora Walkover,
Budget and Finance Committee.
Certificates for outstanding
work on behalf of the Russian
Resettlement activities were
awarded to: Bette Gilbert, John
Moss and Ruth Horen.
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* IJ I UV.fF! 1 '.< M llllu II t7/ 1 Ull'I UCUUI V i.../.. *
rriaay, June 13.'ioo.0
Minister Warns
Jerusalem Slated to be 'De-Judaized'
j
i
NEW YORK 'One of the
most successful public relations
campaigns of this century" has
redefined the issues in the Middle
East conflict from Israel's
security to "Palestinian self-
determination," according to a
Protestant theologian, the Rev.
Isaac C. Rottenberg.
In this "distorted" picture of
the actual situation, he said,
"Israel, the David of the Middle
East, threatened by the Goliath
of a hostile Arab world, is viewed
as the powerful oppressor of an
exiled people."
REV. ROTTENBERG made
his remarks in an address on
"Christians and Israel: New
Problems for the 80's" before
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith leaders attending the
agency's national commission
meeting in New York last
weekend.
He said the "redefinition" had
become "blinded with all sorts of
Third World concerns and
ideologies leading in some
cases to a hypercritical stance
toward Israel" and "stormy"
Jewish-Christian relations.
A Christian survivor of the
Holocaust, Rev. Rottenberg was
national communications director
of the Reformed Church of
America until 1978, when he was
summarily dismissed after
publicly charging the National
Council of Churches with waging
a "persistently anti-Israel
propaganda campaign." He is
currently consultant to the
president of Rockland Com-
munity College.
Rev. Rottenberg said today
that he believed confrontations
with the NCC have had "some
constructive effects."
"TO BE SURE," he declared,
"hard-line anti-Israel bureaucrats
have not had a change of heart,
but a number of church leaders
have gained deeper insight into
the complexities of the Middle
East situation and have become
more sensitive to Jewish con-
cerns."
He said he expected a "de-
Judaized" Jerusalem to be the
next target of Christian and
Muslim opponents of Israel."
Expect "a shift of emphasis"
during the 1980s, he told the
ADL leaders. from the
Palestinian issue to "the question
of Jerusalem."
"In essence." Rev. Rottenberg
said, "noble phrases about
universal spiritual values will be
used in an attempt to conceal the
basic demand: that Jerusalem be
de-Judaized in order to ac-
pommodate Christian and
Muslim sentiments and sen-
sibilities."
REV. ROTTENBERG
declared that he is not ad-
vocating "an uncompromising
stance" since "there are valid
Christian and Muslim concerns
and there ought to be room for
discussion." Nevertheless, he
emphasized, "Jerusalem should
become the great symbol of
shalom and creative in-
terreligious relationships (and)
there ought to be no compromise
when attempts are made to
undermine the basic historical
relationship between Jerusalem
and the Jewish people, which
predates the birth of either
Christianity or Islam."
Observing that some of the
Christian antagonism toward
Israel is resentment against the
state for having "deprived the
world of its favorite victim, the
wandering Jew' who was to live
in everlasting homelessness,"
Rev. Rottenberg said Christian
attitudes toward Jews and
Judaism have been influenced by
"bad and unbiblical teachings."
While there has been a "a
growing counteroffensive among
Christian scholars against some
of the traditional teaching about
the Jews and Israel." he went on,
"much work remains to be done
in the 1980's."
HE PRAISED the Roman
Catholic Church for doing far
more about its church school
curricula than the Protestant and
Orthodox churches but noted
that the "fortresses" of Seminary
education have barely been
penetrated.
"And if we are not getting to
the people who are being trained
as priests and pastors." Rev.
Rottenberg said, "one can
imagine the gap that remains
between the works of the scholars
and the words you hear spoken
week after week in church school
classes."
He pointed out that in the
evangelical community, strong
emphasis on the eventual
"restoration" of Israel has led to
strong support of the Jewish
state, but he said "this time
eschatological expectation also
provides the motivation for an
aggressive missionary stance."
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ihi'.ifinan Piunuiu
It If l l mm !*..<
Violence Erupts
Coordinated West Bank Bombings
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Coordinated bomb
attacks against prominent
West Bank leaders
severely wounded Mayor
Bassam Shaka of Nablus
and Mayor Karin Khallaf
of Ramallah Monday and
caused grave injuries to a
police sapper who was
attempting to dismantle a
bomb intended for Mayor
Ibraham Tawil of El Bireh.
Seven other people were
wounded when a bomb exploded
in an Arab school in the center of
llibron. The school is located in
a liuilding once owned by Jews.
The blasts in widely separated
towns occurred almost simul-
taneously.
IT IS widely acknowledged in
Israel and on the West Bank
that the outrage was the work of
Jewish extremists, who have
already taken 'credit" for the
attacks in revenge for the
ambush killings of six yeshiva
students by terrorists in Hebron
exactly one month ago.
Mayor Shaka had both of his
legs amputated at Rafadiya
Hospital in Nablus.' Mayor
Khallaf, in Ramallah Hospital,
lost part of his left leg. The
police sapper, treated at
Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem,
lost both eyes and one arm. All
three men were reported in
serious condition.
The bombings initially
stunned the West Bank
,._pulace, but anger quickly re-
placed the shock. Tension
reached a new high throughout
the territory, although Israeli
military authorities described
the situation as relatively calm.
There was a total strike in
Nablus and a partial one in
Kamallah.
SECURITY forces spent the
day attempting to disperse
student demonstrators in both
towns. Three youngsters were
bounded in the legs by Israeli
soldiers who came under a hail of
stones when they tried to
remova road block. They were
hospitalized.
The Town Councils of
Kamallah and El Bireh. ten miles
north of Jerusalem, convened in
emergency session in violation of
orders from the military govern-
ment. They were joined by sym-
pathy delegations from Hebron,
Bethlehem and Halhoul. The
Town Council of Gaza resigned
en masse to protest "the
negative developments in the
territories."
l'rime Minister Menachem
Begin, in his first act as interim
HI mister of Defense, ordered
security forces to launch a com-
prehensive investigation to find
' hose responsible for the
bombings.
HE DESCRIBED them as
"crimes of the worst kind." But
he rejected demands by the
I'eace Now Movement and the
Sheli faction to immediately
disarm the Gush Emunim and
other Jewish extremists and
-ylace their settlements and
living quarters under curfew.
"We are a state of law, and as
long* as we have no proof, we
should not cast suspicions
against anybody," Begin said. It
was recalled however that after
the Hebron kjllings on May 2,
that town was placed under a
curfew which lasted 12 days, and
scores of local Arabs were
rounded up for questioning.
Begin said that as a human
being he expressed sorrow over
. L^he acts an<* snared the grief of
"*>^*> families of the victims.
Deputy Prime Minister Yigael
Yadin, leader of the Democratic
Movement, expressed "shock"
over the assassination attempts
But said he was confident that
the security agencies would find
those responsible and put them
on trial.
SHAUL ROSOLIO, a Labor
MK and former Chief of Police,
presented an urgent motion to
the Knesset condemning the
outrage. Labor MK Yossi Sarid
said bombs "blasted to
smithereens any illusion that
Israel could maintain its control
of the administered territories
indefinitely."
MK Chaike Grossman of
Mapam sent a telegram to Begin
demanding that Israel's special
anti-terrorist squad be put on
the trail of the perpetrators
immediately. The Hadash Com-
munist Party issued a statement
blaming the Gush Emunim and
Rabbi Meir Kahane's extremist
KACH movement for the bomb-
ings.
Kahane's group has long been
agitating for vigilante action
against West Bank Arabs, and
Kahane himself was placed
under administrative arrest last
month for allegedly harassing
Arabs. KACH spokesmen denied
any connection with the bomb-
ings but implied that they ap-
proved of the acts.
YOSSI DAY AN, an aide to
Kahane, told reporters that the
bombings were "the tip of the
iceberg" compared to what
would happen if the proposed
autonomy plan was implemented
on the West Bank. He said he
had not been approached bv the
police so far and had nothing to
hide from them.
The U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv
issued a strong condemnation of
the bombings. An Embassy
spokesman said, "This is yet
another incident in the vicious
circle of hostility and counter-
hostility." Officials at the Egyp-
tian Embassy also denounced
the attacks and said Egypt
opposed any kind of violence
from whatever source.
Police reported that their
initial investigation showed that
the three bombs intended for the
Arab mayors were planted in the
same manner, attached to the
left front wheels of the mayors'
cars and wired to detonate either
when the ignition key was
turned or when the door on the
driver's side was opened.
THE FIRST blast wrecked
the car of Mayor Khallaf of
Kamallah. Brig. Gen. Binyamin
Ben-Eliezer, Commander of the
West Bank, immediately ordered
police sappers to inspect the cars
of all West Bank mayors. In
Mayor Shakas' case, the police
arrived too late. In El Bireh, the
mayor escaped injury, but the
police sapper assigned to his car
was badly injured.
Ben-Eliezer toured the West
Bank by helicopter and visited
the towns where the bombings
occurred. He was accompanied
by Lt. Gen. Moshe Levy, com-
mander of the central region.
Asked if the army was taken
by surprise by the violence, Ben-
Eliezer told reporters, "The
army has always been ready."
He refused further comment.
IN JERUSALEM meanwhile,
police checked the homes and
cars of all Arab dignitaries. They
were placed on special alert to
prevent possible demonstrations
by the Arab population in East
Jerusalem.
The question remained as to
whether the events would further
aggravate the grave situation on
the West Bank where protests
have been mounting against
what the local populace regards
as increasingly tough measures
by the Israeli authorities.
Tension has been running high
since the summary deportations
of Mayor Fahed Kawasme of
Hebron, Mayor Mohammed
Milhim of Halhoul and Kadi
(Religious Judge) Rajeb Buyud
Tamimi of Hebron in the after-
math of the May 2 killings. Last
month, the Supreme Court gave
the government 45 days to show
cause why the deportation orders
should not be rescinded.
Ironically, Mayor Shaka of
Nablus was ordered deported
last year because of allegedly
anti-Israel remarks he made in a
private conversation with an
Israeli official. The Supreme
Court was also involved in that
case, but the military govern-
ment withdrew the deportation
order before the court could act
on an appeal by Shakas family.
Many wore masks and waved
Molotov cocktails over their
heads. Soldiers and reporters
who approached them were
greeted with stones and shouted
slogans such as "Israel, no, no,
no only PLO" and "End the
occupation." The demonstrators
were dispersed by tear gas.
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^12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
i nuay. j\
-Friday, Jun? 13,1980
Jennifer Blender of the Jewish Community Center's Pre
School is shown enjoying the special attention Mildred
Goodman, a volunteer from the Center's Senior Center, is
giving her during one of the Center's many "inter-
generational" programs.
JCC Senior News
The comprehensive Senior
Service Center is funded by Title
III OAA through Gulfstream
Areawide Council on Aging,
providing transportation to
transit disadvantaged adults 60
years or older in a designated
area and a full education and rec-
reation program. Call the Center
at 689-7700 for more information.
Adult Education Classes begin
the week of June 16, for a period
of eight weeks.
Mondays, 9-11 a.m., Writers
Workshop. 1:30 3:30 p.m.
(Extension class at Tanglewood)
Writers Workshop. Wednesdays,
1 3 p.m., Psychology for Today.
Medicare Assistance: Ed
Rosen and Carl Sitzer, trained
volunteers through the Social
Security office, will provide aid
with forms and any other help
regarding Medicare, every third
Monday of the month from 1 3
p.m.
Round Table Talk for Men
meets every Monday at 1:30 p.m.
Joe Greenberg, discussion
leader.
Speakers Club: Meets on
Thursdays from 10 a.m. to noon -
Herbert Sperber, president.
Artis of the Month: Isaac
Allen, a resident of West Palm
Beach, will display his award-
winning oil paintings at the
Jewish Community Center
during- the month of June. Allen
is a retired architect and has been
painting for several years. Stop
in and view his works at the
Center Mondays through
Fridays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Speak Out! Beginning
Monday, June 30, at 1:30 p.m.,
for three consecutive Mondays,
join Wynn Kenton for "Speak
Out." Learn self-appreciation by
self-expression. Come and rap
with Wynn and help yourself and
others.
Project Good Health: Thurs-
day, June 19,1:30 p.m., Dr. John
Scruggs, optometrist, will speak
on "Eve Care." Thursday, June
26, 1:30 p.m., Dr. M. Sandala.
podiatrist, will speak on "Foot
Care." For further information,
call the Center at 689-7700.
Extension Classes: Century
Village Knitting and
crocheting classes meet the
second and fourth Mondays of
the month from 1 to 3 p.m.
Instructor, Sonna Simon.
COMING EVENTS
Senior Olympics The 1980
Palm Beach County Senior
Olympics will take place on Oct.
16 25. The Jewish Community
Center Comprehensive Senior
Service Center is working in
conjunction with the Senior
Olympics Committee and will be
a central location for persons to
register for events, as well as to
obtain necessary forms and
information. Winners of the State
Olympics will advance to the
National Olympics, which will
take place in November. Talent
groups will also be involved.
Active and sports-minded
seniors, watch for more in-
formation.
Flea Market and Garage Sale:
It's Flea Market time again. The
Second Tuesday Club runs two
flea markets a year. The summer
flea market will take place
Sunday, Aug. 24. Sam Rubin,
president, savs. "We will pick up
you used electrical appliances,
television sets, lamps, drapes,
clothing, bric-a-brac." Call 689-
7700 and ask for Sam.
TRIPS
Flagler Museum Wed-
nesday, June 25. The bus leaves
the Westgate of Century Village
at 10 a.m. Then on to the Flagler
Museum for a tour. Then to the
Breakers for a full lunch. Call
Sam Rubin at 689-7700 for
reservations.
Lido Spa Nov. 23 26.
Transportation will be available
with prices to be announced in
September. For reservations and
additional information, call the
Center at 689-7700 and ask for
Bonnie or Sam Rubin.
End of Season Sale
Up to 50% off on all merchandise
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inet Grateful
er, Muskie 242 Stand Satisfying
I
I

E
SEDAN
EM (JTA)
net expressed
ion to Presi-
and Secretary
jnund Muskie
opposition to
new Middle
re by the Wes-
in nations and
it's unequivo-
that the U.S.
any move in
ed Nations
ncil to alter or
ution 242.
sd in an interview
I new all-news
1 network, that
exercise its veto
n allies or any
attempted an
ould damage the
ce process which
Resolution 242.
dieted that the
ly talks between
nd the U.S. would
rtly.
IDENT repeated
on the CBS tele-
i. Meet the Press.
progress toward
Middle East "has
resolution and the
iccords, "which is
Bible now," he
lister Menachem
[>ected to state
i on the European
statement to the
[that the European
fing pressed by
and West Ger-
fer legitimacy on
Liberation Or
support a Pales-
grounds that the
re entitled to self-
Carter's strong
the initiative were
jme here.
flATIVE is ex-
shape when the
Be nine member
luropean Economic
|(EEC) meet in
and 12 to discuss
tin Middle East
er will meet with
ina later in the
Europeans have
jr some time that
bss for changes in
cess launched at
if the autonomy
yield noticeable
the May 26 target
rere suspended last
! President Anwar
at on grounds that
|ions on autonomy
ip progress.
expressed hope
lend that the nego-
jld be resumed
er said that he ex-
and Egypt to start
within two weeks.
Jn to you is without
>re delay we will be
negotiating table
ess again toward
eace treaty on that
1) basis and full
r the West Bank
I he told the Cable
! he did not expect a
nove for several
["We have a veto
I we can exercise if
prevent the Camp
Kess from being
subverted and I
hesitate to use it if
(le declared.
pledged the wide dif-
Itween Egypt and
the nature of auton-
ther matters and
lese kinds of things
hard to resolve but
we are down to what you might
call the nitty gritty now. The
issues are clearly defined."
Carter said the Europeans had
the "same hope that we do that
the issue of autonomy on the
West Bank, the resolution of the
Palestinian problem, the
provision of security for Israel, a
permanent peace in the Middle
East (be) comprehensively nego-
tiated with Israel's neighbors.
We have the same goals."
HE NOTED that he would be
attending a seven nation Euro-
pean economic summit meeting
in Vienna on June 22 and that
the EEC leaders will convene in
Venice ten days earlier. "There
will certainly, almost certainly
be no action by them before that
date. We are encouraging the
European allies not to intervene
in the (Israeli-Egyptian) nego-
tiations as long as we are
meeting and are making
progress toward a Mideast peace
settlement," he said.
He warned however that
"Even if they do come in, we will
not permit in the United Nations
any action that would destroy
the sanctity of and the present
form of UN (Security Council
Resolution) 242."
Carter's strong statement of
his position came after visiting
French Foreign Minister Jean
Francois-Poncet told reporters in
Washington Friday that the
European allies would take a
new initiative in the Middle East
very shortly to meet Palestinian
aspirations, despite American
objections. He said the Euro-
peans would act because they
felt that the American-mediated
autonomy talks had broken
down.
HE SAID that while the
specific language of the Euro-
pean initiative has not yet been
decided, "it will be and must be
a balanced approach" that
should provide for Israel's
security and for Palestinian self-
determination, a term generally
interpreted as the right of the
Palestinians to have their own
state on the West Bank and
Gaza Strip.
Poncet met with reporters
after he conferred with Muskie.
The Secretary of State repor-
tedly urged against a European
initiative in the Mideast and
insisted that the U.S. did not
feel the autonomy talks were
dead.
;*:-:*:-:-:*:*:*:-:-:-:-:-:-^
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The first coins made date back to the 7th Century BCE. The
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The art of coinage decayed and from 500 to 1400 CE coins were
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In the 15th century, the art of coinage was revived. Metal
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"Silver and gold investments are speculative to pressure
from outisde sources," said Andy Kossin, North American Rare
Coins office manager and expert on bullion trading. He handles
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Spencer, Kossin and Walt Hood, president of North
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throughout the United States, 48 weeks a year to purchase coins
for clients. Reid advocates investing in rare coins of proven
scarcity and superb quality.
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rage 14

iihi.uuiii mi \.*m
CRC Update
Conservation, the Best Energy Buy in Town
By HY RUCHL1S
Energy Task Force
Community Relations Council
Events of the past seven years
have made it clear to many
Americans that it is urgent to
substantially reduce and
eventually eliminate our
dependence on imported oil. This
is not only a matter of inflation
and the individual pocketbook,
but far more important,
preservation of peace in the
world.
The erroneous belief that our
monumental energy problems are
beyond any control by the man-
in-the-street has paralyzed many
of us into apathetic inertia. What
can one person do? In actual fact,
plenty.
A number of studies by energy
experts and agencies during the
past few years have amply
documented the fact that as
much as half of our energy
consumption is wasted by use of
inefficient devices and methods
of use. Such waste contributes
nothing to our well-being and
standard of living. It does no
good at all to have a refrigerator,
air conditioner, water heater or
automobile that uses much more
energy than required to ac-
complish essential tasks.
A wasteful energy-using
device, or an inefficient way of
using it, simply puts holes in our
pockets and puffs up the rate of
inflation by unnecessarily in-
creasing demand for energy and
imported oil. Yet such waste is
rampant, not only in our homes
and cars, but also in our industry,
Marchers Scuffle
NKWARK IJTA) A
scuffle between Palestinian
marchers and a group of Jewish
war veterans erupted Sunday
when the former grabbed Israeli
and American flags, over-
powering the blockade set up by
state police.
The march, held in North
Bergen because ot its con-
centration of Palestinians, was to
mark International Palestinian
Day. Judge Geoffrey Gaulkin of
New Jersey Superior Court ruled
that North Bergen officials had
unlawfully denied the
Palestinians a parade permit.
About HOO Palestinian par-
ticipated in the parade.
office buildings, factories and
transportation and com-
munication systems.
Within the next few months,
the major electrical appliances
sold in our stores will begin to
feature standardized labels that
specify the average cost per year
of energy consumption. Don't be
surprised if you find that some
devices use twice as much energy
as other appliances of comparable
capacity, service, function and
quality.
For some devices, such as
refrigerators, air conditioners and
water heaters, the operating
costs for energy in 10 or 15 years
may be several times the original
cost. In some cases, it may pay to
replace an appliance that has
some useful life left, and buy a
new one that uses energy much
more efficiently. This will require
careful comparison shopping and
paying attention to energy costs
for every major appliance you
buy.
Some ways of increasing
energy productivity cost nothing
at all and merely involve a bit of
thought and action on your part.
For example. lowering the
thermostat of the water heater to
120 degrees F, or even 110
degrees F, could save up to $5 a
month without any in-
convenience to you. If you have a
dishwasher, first try 120 degrees
F (You can shift upwards later if
you find the setting un-
satisfactory). First turn off the
current, remove the lower cover
plat on the heater with a
screwdriver, and set the ther-
mostat to the desired level.
Another simple way of con-
serving energy is to shut off the
air conditioner whenever you
leave the house for three hours or
more. Also, use hot water and
cold water, too more sparingly
when you wash hands or dishes,
or take a shower. (Incidentally,
tin need to conserve water in this
country is as great as the need to
conserve energyl.
Finally, support community,
state and federal programs which
encourage conservation. Urn
your political leaders and el
officials to do the same.
A strong conservation effort of
this kind is the best buy in town
and enables you to do your part
as a citizen, to make a significant
contribution to solving our
national and world-wide energy
problems. If every individual,
every business, every con-
dominium and every government
official did the same, we would all
be out of the woods that much
sooner.
Conservation is certainly the-
quickest, cheapest, easiest wayto
begin the long, hard road to
energy independence, and would
give us the precious time we need
to wrestle with the tougher
problems of developing new
kinds of less pollutant energy
resources that the future
requires.
^IIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIMMHIIIK:
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dinner 5- 10 p.m.
= |

I
I
Film Director Polanski on Visit to Israel
Bj YITZHAK SHARGIL
TF1. AVIV (JTA) -
Roman Polanski. the polish born
Jewish film director and
Holocaust survivor, is on his first
visit to Israel to inspect possible
locations for his next film The
Pirates. It will be produced by an
Israeli's businessman. Arnon
Milchan, who is Polanski s host
and guide for his 10-day visit,
and Sam Weinberg.
The 47-year-old movie-maker
was saved from the Holocaust
when his father had him
smuggled out of the Cracow
ghetto after the Nazi occupation
oi Poland. He achieved in-
ternatkmal fame for his film,
Knife (N the Water, made in
Poland, and for his American
films such as Rost mary't Baby
and Chinatown.
WHILE IN Israel. Polanski
will attend the screening of his
latest film. Teat, based on the
Thomas Hardv novel Teas of the
W Urbervilles The proceeds will
be donated to charity.
Meanwhile, K was learned that
the American film actress and
political activist .lane Fonda will
visii Israel next month with her
husband. Tom llayde'n. and
movie director Sidney Pollack.
She will attend screenings ,,t
excerpts from several of her
films, the proceeds of which will
go to help the financially
distressed Haifa Theater.
Banquet Facilities Available for
\ parties of 20 300 Please Contact Judy Dolan
Located at the Sheraton Inn
1901 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla.
(305)686-1770
SllllllllllllllllllllllWIII
fn
Why
The Big
Tzimmes
Over
Tetley's
Tiny
Little Tea
Leaves?
TINY IS TASTIER. THAT'S WHY!
Gourmets have always known that! That's why
they buy tiny peas. Tiny baby lamb chops. And
the same goes for tea leaves. The most flavorful
are the tiny young leaves. The kind of leaves
Tetley packs into every tea bag. That's why hot
or iced, Tetley Tea gives you rich, refreshing
flavor. Tetleythe favorite tea in Jewish homes
since 1875.
K Certified Kosher
A CENTURY OLD TRADITION
RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Who was the first American
scientist to win a Nobel Prize?
A: Albert Abraham Michelson.
Born in Prussia in 1852, Michelson
came to America as a youngster with
his parents. After graduating from
the U.S. Naval Academy in 1873.
and serving several years as an of-
ficer, he changed careers and began
teaching and experimenting. His
work in helping to measure the
speed of light won him the Nobel
Prize in 1907the first American
scientist to be so honored!
A NOT-SO-RARE FACT...
A big part of Jewish warmth and
affection is to 'open the house' when
mishpocha. guests or friends drop
in. Out comes the fine food and,
invariably, J&B Rare Scotch. And
why not?J&B is a clean, light
scotch with the superb taste that fits
right in with the tradition of serving
the best. And because of its great
taste. J&B commands a high level
of elegance... at home or at your
most important simchas.
And that's a fact!
RARE
SCOTCH
'


'---------
Takes Defense Minister's Post
ie Minister
i new tasks
and pledged
fill all the
[office in ad-
ther respon-
t conference
the General
ise Ministry
prior to that,
Ity Defense
Zipori, Chief
el Eitan, and
Director
ise Ministry.
Mir meeting
jfficers, which
"the most
id for a long
tted that the
in of cuts in
rere raised.
doubt there
iy question is
l noted that the
already met
linister Yigal
matter and
kill be held in
ticipate.
The Carter
llled on the
; to bring swift
et rat ors of the
West Bank
ed two Arab
Btic to the
[Liberation
[ seven others,
ne to exercise
at ion also in-
ked the Israeli
bind its ban on
in occupied
Bast Jerusalem
that Israeli
Icite the Arab
grist Israelis.
Fata s demand
:t any niideast
governments
to resolve the
bt. bul urging
kim' military
el and destroy
entity," the
eiterated that
agreements
ramework" for
rotiated set-
CRT
SBArMX
VM.
ITM>N
INS
IAN
ivica
IBEMIBST
EMtvni
memorandum, issued by Maj.
Gen. R. Dean Tice, Deputy
Assistant Secretary of Defense,
ackowledged that the action
came in response to an ADL
inquiry and information on the
play.
Disclosure of the ban was made
in a report on the 1980 version of
the Passion Play by Nat
Kameny. chairman of ADL's
Program Committee, at the 67th
annual meeting of the agency's
National Commission.
Prime Minister Begin
PARIS Pope John Paul met
the French Chief Rabbi who
blessed him for his actions in
favor of human rights.
The 20-minute meeting be-
tween the Pontiff and Rabbi
Jacob Kaplan took place in a
seminary here in the presence of
representatives of the French
Church and the Jewish com-
munity.
Rabbi Kaplan said he was
much pleased to see the pope and
praised the church for its new
favorable attitude towards
Judaism.
The Catholic Church
recognizes the permanent
vocation of Judaism, and there is
a new effort on its part to look at
Judaism with different eyes,"
KaWlii Kaplan said after the
meeting.
lie added that relations
between Catholics and Jews were
"excellent" and that the Pope
had assured him that the church
firmly condemned anti-Semitism
and Nazism.
CHICAGO Alexander
Slepak, a Soviet Jew whose
parents are exiled in Siberia,
urged continued pressure on the
USSR for free Jewish emigration
in order to "stop the next
Holocaust."
Speaking before a group of 600
at a Solidarity Day rally for
Soviet Jews held at the Daley
Center Plaza, Slepak said his
parents and other refusniks will
never tire of fighting for their
right to be free.
"Soviet Jews are tired only of
discrimination," Slepak said.
"We have seen enough of death
and slavery." He noted that since
his parents first applied for exit
visas in 1970, they were subject
to interrogation, imprisonment,
and harrassment.
Sister Ann Gillen, executive
director, National Religious task
force on Soviet Jewry, who met
the Slepaks in 1974, noted that
Soviet capriciousness in ad-
ministering emigration
procedures has "destroyed
families."
NEW YORK The Defense
Department has ordered the
Armed Forces to "cease im-
mediately" all promotion of the
Oberammergau Passion Play in
West Germany because of its
"sectarian nature" and "anti-
Semitic tone," the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith revealed.
The ban, specifically directed
to the Armed Forces Recreation
Center, West Germany, which
had been arranging tours to the
controversial pageant, declared
such promotion "inappropriate"
and ordered that "no efforts be
made in the future to promote
similar commercial sectarian
events."
The Defense Department
C:**t
Mm \
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
I'nder The Supervlnlon
Of Rabbinical Council
Of The Palm llearhea
"THE NEW IMAGE"
.Century
Opn -7
Mon-Thurs
-SFri.
1-4 Sun.
Closed Sat.
4774 OKEECH0IEE IIVD.. WEST AIM lEaCM
Her* pen Military Trail & Haverulll In the Mini-Mall
THE MOST MODERN & COMPLETE KOSHER SUPERMARKET
Now
you can
have
your bran
and like it,
in
That's what hundreds of people
discovered when they tried Bran
Chex* cereal for the very first time. In a
comparison taste test against other high
fiber bran cereals, Bran Chex proved to
a lot of hard-to-convince men and
women that high fiber and great flavor
can go together. They'd always assumed
you had to give up one to get the other,
till Bran Chex cereal came along. Now
they know better. And better is Bran
Chex. Use the coupon to help us prove
you can have your bran and like it, too
... the way they do... with Bran Chex.
i*ton Putina Comptny >f
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SAVE13* 13*
on your next
purchase of
Bran Chex?..the light
crisp, high fiber cereal.
>0 "*l CONSUMC* Canoe Pimm m* t wwini fW "MM* m-mj -a.
mmmtmmmmmmmm*mm mm* wOm% mmmimmcmm*
mmmk it atraa mmy mo. >i i U cmh *t mm m% m m m
CfHM JU, M* mm Ml*I MM PIMM Mat 'MM* CMMM <**
MMM
"tTAtUft "o MMM* <* <*M .** 0M b* MMMJ MM 10 R#MW Pw*a
Cium PO tm P\t liMi m Rmi W17 Cmjm M M* oa*
BMMMMM 0* MMMMM CtMBM MM MMMM M W
m *M mr <<( oi na mmm mam mm mmm m mm*
oc mtmn of mHcmm smc- mm* mmm imwm cm* e
RPCo 1979
ilMKhiih vmm 'mummm > cmmw mmmmi mammm '*
am hmumTw* m-mtmim mmmmxm ** m ** im mm
M M CMSMMf " I MWiMt ttUCMd CMMMMJII~
W
I :me IMWWCW W ,m< am conn it"" ow w> w ciwa, r.
use JSrcoWiW mnis "mm commons >auo uo
Coupon enures Oecemtw 31 1980
STORE COUPON 50 /Bx\ 50


svr*.** -m-T-
. ._ .~.Q. W tW. VI W KW*' t-1""/
r nuay, june Id, ivov
'f JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
2415 Okeechobee Blvd. West Palm Beach, Fla. 689-7700
GENERATION TO GENERATION
*
LIMITED SPACE
JULY 14 AUGUST
STILL
CALL
AVAf'.ABLE FOR SECOND
THE JCC TODAY TO RESERVE
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
is currently accepting applications for enrollment for the
1980/81 SCHOOL YEAR
PRESCHOOL THROUGH GRADE 8
We cordially invite you to call and make
an appointment to visit our school.
Bick from Washington
Mordecai Levow
Director
id above are the students of the Jewish Community
<>ol eighth grade graduating class as they returned
a recent class trip to Washington, D.C.
flights included a special tour of the White House, a
' l.-wish sights" in Washington sjtsVsaBBgram of ac-
rith the Jewish Day School of GmterJ Biington.
|>mpnying the class was QriJ RPumberg, the
i social studies teacher.
Sealed: Kim Sussman and Pamela Roberta. Second row:
Mara Goodman, Deborah Blumberg, Sharon Frankel, Lisa
Simon and Nancy KripiU.
Day
from
eighth
Dr. Howard Kay
President
c
j 1*/anuar ip
2S15 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach. Florida
Telephone S32-8423/4
A bansftdary ajsncy of lha Jswtah Federation of Palm Itaach Count,


^
^^M
11980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 17
;ach Comity
Million in Bonds Purchased
isenberg, chair-
Palm Beach
ids Committee,
than $7'/2
onds were pur-
79-80 campaign
anty.
st that people
tance of this,"
I. "We want all
>w that these
here, in this
le materials and
eds to support
[conform to the
Peace Accord.
is can be proud
^vesting in the
economy while
m economy at"
It sent to Israel,
noney raised by
[Bonds," added
sport, Florida
in. "will con-
imoth task of
pv, one of the
I of the peace
I. The total task
re military and
cture in the
9k. and Palm
lan responded
and happy to
of this year"s
surely a high
e when Prime
personally con-
Dunty on the
I we have had.
Palm Beach
utry in sales of
(can only thank
kteers and the
I who have made
i possible."
lid to mention
vhom we need
benbergsaid. "I
lit forget one in
Ire must thank
airman of the
on especially.
Fashion Show
of the season.
apiro, chairman
s, whose cam-
[exemplary and
It was people
ade it such a
Brve as chair-
st our most
hard-working
(said Rapaport,
ising, chairman
linister's Club,
for Preminger
is. And Irv and
nan of South
South County
n, a new cam-
lat was so ably
first year for a
Boca Raton
jjty had its own
fe hope to con-
next year and
i to come," Rose
in Persoff, my
a driving force
>unty campaign.
"ke on special
because of the
ptiea surrounding
and because of
ablished by the
[other chairmen
tie 1979-80 cam-
r liur Qladstone,
Berry,' George
b Bauer, David
Weill, Louis
fPenson, Isadora
Filensky, Marvin
lings and Jesse
ciate chairmen;
ntz, chairman of
less ions; Arthur
eys; and the
Steering Corn-
included Jack
Chiat, Shirley
Werahaw, Mme. Bea Alexander,
Harry Johnson, Harold Salant,
Thelma Newman, Joseph
Mandelbaum, Sam Wadler,
Judge Louis Flaum, Mel Hersh-
enson, Daniel Jatlow, Milton
Gold, Barnett Marchand, Philip
Farbman, Sidney Elin, Jerome
Feinberg, Norman Layton, Stu
Landis, Arnold Black, Richard
Blank, Michael Chertoff, Mrs.
Jerome Tishman, Norm Marcus,
George Strassler, Maurice Blau
and Mrs. Kathryn Koffs.
Also, Dr. Irwin Strosberg, Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Molat, Jeff
Kornhauser and Amy Lampert.
The Rabbinical Committee for
Israel Bonds included Rabbis
Emanuel Eisenberg, Harry Z.
Schechtman, Asher Bar-Zev,
Irving Cohen, William Shapiro,
Joel Levine, Morris Silberman,
Merle Singer, William Marder
and Nathan Zelizer.
Egypt Warns Europe
Not to Rush
Into New Initiative
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Egypt has told Britain and
Germany not to rush headlong towards a European
initiative on the Middle East following the fruitless
expiration of the May 26 target date for Palestine
autonomy.
This was made clear during the visit here by Vice
President Hosni Mubarak during which he met Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher and Foreign Secretary Lord
Carrington. He had already met President Carter in
Washington and Chancellor Helmut Schmidt in Bonn.
DR. OSAMA AL BAZ, a senior Egyptian Foreign
Ministry official involved in the autonomy negotiations,
told the press that a European initiative would only be
worthwhile if its timing, wording and content were right
and would have to be backed by the United States.
Assuming that it should take the form of a United
Nations Security Council resolution, Al Baz said that it
should not specifically endorse a negotiating role for the
Palestine Liberation Organization.
Despite the expiration of the May 26 date he also
thought that the present round of autonomy talks
remained "the most viable way of pressing the Israelis
on the Palestinian issue."
HE SAW THEM as a "peaceful confrontation"
which forced the Israelis to debate the Palestinian issue
among themselves.
At the same time, Al Baz added, Egypt would only
resume these talks on condition that Israel refrained
from establishing or expanding settlements in occupied
territories and froze the bill to make the annexation of
East Jerusalem part of its fundamental law.
For $7.50,
You

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Congratulations to the new officers oi Temple Beth El USY
Group. Recently installed were President, Ilene Lampert; first
Vice President, Nancy Rosenberg; second Vice President, Susan
Tenzer; Secretary, Beverly Rot man and Treasurer, Robin
David.
The Kadima officers for 1980-81 are President, Cindy
Steinberger; Vice President, Karen Ratner; Secretary Richard
Rosenberg and Treasurer Stuart Newmark.
USY recently received an award from Federation for par-
ticipation in the Chaplain Aid Program. They were the only
youth group in Palm Beach County to receive the award. Again,
congratulations to an involved group of young people.
Dr. Roberts, Dr. Roberts, answer your page. No, we are not
being redundant. There are now two Dr. Roberts residing on
Pamela Lane in West Palm Beach. David Roberts, M. D., son
Carol and Hy Roberts, just graduated from the University of
Miami Medical school.
An extra source of pride for Carol and Hy is son Stephen who
just graduated from the University of Florida. He received the
J. Wayne Reitz Medal of Exellence Award for the Outstanding
Senior Student at the College of Agriculture and also was
awarded the T. K. McClane. Jr. Farm Bureau Memorial
Scholarship.
In presenting the Reitz Medal, the Dean noted that this is the
first time the same student had previously received the E.T.
York Jr. Award of Merit as the Outstanding Junior Student of
the College.
Stephen will be attending Cornell Univeristy to receive dual
degrees in law and business administration.
Abe and Esther Szmukler are flying to Martinique where they
plan to sail on a 50 foot sailboat through the Grenadines along
with longtime friends. Not to worry, there will be a captain to
navigate and even perhaps teach Esther and Abe how to sail.
Lucky that Abe and Esther are flying home fromBarbados
rather than sailing home.
Jf WISH FAMILY AMD CHIIDMN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
Jewish community of Palm Beach County. Professional and con-
fidential help is ovailable for
Problems of the aging
Consultation and evaluation services
Vocational counseling
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Private Officts:
2411 Okeadiobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Telephone. 614-1991
Moderate fees are charged in family and individual counseling to
those who can pay (Fees are based on income and family size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
National I
**Bank
@
MORE THAN A BANK
Where You're More Than A Customer
A FULL SERVICE BANK
For information
659-2265
(ITSPELLS BANK)
Main Office
501 South Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33401
Nortlake Blvd. Branch
2863 Northlake Boulevard
Lake Park. Fla. 33410
Forest Hill Branch
1850 Forest Hill Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33406
Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. Branch
2380 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard
West Palm Beach. Fla. 33409
Member FDIC Member Federal Reserve System


Page 18.
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 13,1980
* Sabbatical ^amtv
Coordinated by
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev. Ph.d
devoted to discussion of themes and iisuei
relevant to Jewish life past and present
[]
The Need for a United Front
By RABBI HARRY Z.
SCHECHTMAN
Rabbi of Congregation
Anshei Sholom, President,
Rabbinical Council of Palm
Beach County
One of the portions of the
Torah recently read at Sabbath
Services concludesl with a de-
tailed description of 'the offering
brought by the heads of the 12
tribes of Israel when the Holy
Tabernacle was dedicated by
Moses in the wilderness.
The head of each tribe brought
the same offering, yet the
description thereof is repeated in
full detail 12 times. Why should
it be so monotonously repeated
12 times since each offering was
the same?
Our sages give us an in-
teresting answer. It is repeated
again and again because the
leaders of the tribes did not try to
outdo one another. They came in
a spirit of rare harmony and
unmatched unity. They did not
try to compete because they felt
as one in the presence of the
Divine sanctuary.
The Holy Land of Israel is the
sanctuary of our times. For the
sake of its safety, all the political
parties in l>rael should form a
broad coalition government. It
behooves the leaders "the
heads of the tribes" to forget
their political animosities and
join in a united front.
The forces that unite us our
common destiny, our mutual
concern for Israel's survival and
the growing overall tension
these cohesive factors outweigh
by far the differences that tend to
pull us apart.
A measure of humility on the
part of the leaders and a degree of
elasticity in the "give and take"
of party outlook, can pave the
way for this much needed
coalition government.
ONCE BEFORE in the history
of the young state, all the parties
joined together for a united
government. This happened in
May 1967. The remarkable feat of
unity in which labor, liberals,
religious party joined with Likud,
was followed by the miracle of the
Six-Day War and its phenomenal
victory.
But the dangers facing Israel
today are as real and as ominous
as they were in 1967. If anything,
the threats of Arab neighbors are
even more foreboding, because
they are united by "General Oil"
with its pervasive impact upon
the entire free world.
Even the so-called friends of
Israel are wavering between
loyalty to a little naion like Israel
and their subjection to ... the
Arab nations in their need for the
"black gold." If there was ever a
time for a strong, unified
government in Israel, it is now,
for a show of weakness, or inner
conflict, will lay bare the chest of
Israel for the daggers of an
unfriendly world.
MOREOVER, the internal
problems facing Israel are of such
great magnitude, that only a
coalition government, including
the major political parties, can
cope with the disruptive elements
within the country and the
destructive forces from the
outside.
This is an emergency situation.
It is a time when individual
differences must be relegated to
the background, so that the spirit
of unity will bring the
beleaguered state the strength
Rabbi Schectman
and the wisdom necessary for the
miracle of survival.
Even as in ancient times the
leaders of the 12 tribes united to
Editor's Note: The views
expressed by the rabbis are
strictly their own and do not
necessarily reflect the views of
the .Ictcish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
bring their offerings upon the
divine altar, so, too, the present
leaders must unite to contribute
the best they have to offer, so
that this sanctuary, which we call
the Holy Land, will survive and
thrive.
The Torah contains the three-
fold blessing which is so often
applied in benedictions and is
worded in the singular number,
as, for example. "May the Lord
bless thee and keep thee" and so
on. Yet in the concluding verse
following these benedictions, God
says, "Let them, all in unity,
place My name upon the Children
of Israel, and I will bless them."
A truly Divine blessing can only
be realized in a land where there
is unity.
Synagogue News
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El Sisterhood's
installation was held in Senter
Hall on May 27 with Sally
Chaifetz, chairperson, and
Blanch Rich, coordinator.
Cantor Elaine Shapiro in-
stalled Blanche Lang and Blanch
Rich as co-presidents and the
entire board of directors for 1980-
81.
Doris Singer, past president,
presented Gloria Werner with her
president's pin for 1979-80.
Florence Haar received the
Woman of the Year award for her
devoted effort as membership
chairperson and support to
Sisterhood.
A variety musical program was
presented by Bruce Locktan,
Jayne McCloskey, Eunice Brown
and Joe Rubin.
The Men's Club of Temple
Beth El will sponsor a Father's
Day Breakfast Sunday, June 15,
at 10 a.m. in Senter Hall. Guest
Speaker: Alice Skaggs. Wives of
members are invited.
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISHOLOM
On Father's Day, June 15, at 8
p.m., the Men's Club of Congre-
gation Anshei Sholom will hold a
Father's Day Dance in the social
hall of the synagogue.
TUNE IN TO
L'Chayim
"The Jewish Listener's Digest"
An Exciting New Radio Magazine
Sundays, 1O.30 a.m.
WPBR 1340 AM
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Tune in to 'Mosaic9
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TUNE IN TO MOSAIC
"Mosaic," Jewish Federation's sponsored program
is aired on
Sunday mornings over WPTV Channel 5, at 9 a.m. with
hosts Barbara Shulm" and Steve Gordon.
,
Set furniture by Worrells Interiors
Set interior design by Carol Lavold
Synagogues in
Palm Beach
County
ORTHODOX
AITZ CHAIM CONGREGATION CENTURY VILLAGE
W. Palm Beach Phone: 689-4675 Sabbath Services 9 a.m..
and 5 p.m. Daily Services: 8:15 a.m,' and 6:30 p!m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
551 Brittany L, Kings Point, Delray Beach 33446 Harry Silver,
President. Services daily 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdays and
Holidays 9 a.m. Phone: 499-7407. Temple No. 499-9229
REFORM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Fiagier Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida
33407 833-8421 Rabbi Irving B. Cohen Joel L. Levlne,
Associate Rabbi Sabbath Worship Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. Saturday Torah Seminars at 10:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourt Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432* Phone: 391-
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath
Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.* Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah Study
with Rabbi Merle E. Singer 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Ser-
vices
THE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION OF DELRAY
At St Paul's Episcopal Church. 188 S. Swinton Ave., Delray
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla. 33444 Fri-
day at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver President Lawrence
Sommers, 272-2908
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. At. St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill
Blvd. and Willmgton Trace Mailing address: 1125 Jack Pine
St., West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 President Ronnie
Kramer 793-2700
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
The Free Synagogue, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 368-
1600,391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 8:15 p.m.
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West Glades Rd. (1
mile west ot Boca Turnpike)
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fl. 33407* Phone:
833-0339 Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sab-
bath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9 30 a.m. Daily
Minyan at 8:15 a.m., Sunday at 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 Phone 684
3212 Office hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schect-
man Cantor Arthur B Rosenwasser Services: Daily 8:30 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m.; Friday 8:30 am. and 5 p.m.; Late Service 8:15
p.m. followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday, 8:30 a.m 7p.m.
.followed by Shalah Sudos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. Phone 732-2555 Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazin Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9
a.m. Congregational Church, 115 N. Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 N. A' Street, Lake Worth, Fla. 33460 Phone: 585-
5020 Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Ser-
vices: Mondays and Thursdays at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday at 9 a.m.
LTEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services, Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. West-
minster Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm
Beach Gardens. (Office) 321 Northlake Blvd., North Palm
Beach, Fla. Phone: 845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor
Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
r 224 N.W. Avenue G,' Belle Glade, Fla. 33430 Jack Stateman,
Cantor Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeida Drive, Palm Springs, Fla. 33461 Sabbath ser-
vices: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. President Barnett
Brlskman Phone: 967-4962 Mondays and Thursdays at 9
a.m. Services held at Faith United Presbyterian Church, Palm
Springs
| B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton. Fla. 33432* Phone: 392-
8566 Rabbi Nathan Zelizer Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15
p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446 Phone:
276-3536 Morris Sllberman, Rabbi Leonard Price, Can-
tor Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9
a.m. Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Road, Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 Phone: 832-
0804 Cantor David Dnrdashti Sabbath Services. Friday at
| 8.30pm .Saturdayat9a.m.
'-
.


uglo Hostility Toward Them
tK The gains
lispanic Arrjericans
i are endangered by
pty of the larger
)mmunity which
as a threat and a
prding to Moises
jitor of Maryknoll
ess to the 67th
kg of the National
of the Anti-
[League of B'nai
loval called for
the Jewish com-
you with us in our
[justice," he said,
i with you."
on to say that
kricans are aware of
n of Jews in their
ity and basic rights
Ke this help to be
(expanded."
however, "Don't
br us. We need
\ are inspired by the
[your support for
ravages
mtain
Camp

lidance of owners
Al and Nanette
Savages Mountain
in Hendersonville,
[a staff of teachers,
(perienced college
one counselor for
)pers.
e special camp
Friday Sabbath
arts and crafts
sating on a private
Lake and canoes,
faks and water-jet
full time to
iteration office.
id and typing
trsified duties.
snefits. Salary
rate with ex-
jne 832-2120.
Israel, but we don't want you to
do things for us. It should be a
two-way conversation. Teach us
to fish so that we can fish for
ourselves."
Expressing concern about the
prevailing stereotype about
Hispanic Americans as a
homogeneous group suffering
from "cultural poverty," San-
doval said that in actuality there
is "great diversity in language,
culture, political viewpoints and
sense of selfworth.''
HE NOTED that Mexican
Americans like himself and his
family come from a basically
rural and agricultural
background while other
Hispanics such as Puerto Ricans.
come from an urban en-
vironment.
Hispanic Americans now
number approximately 12
million, nearly four times more
than in 1960, and are 85 percent
urban, he said.
Viewed by most Americans as
"an immigrant community," the
Hispanic population, he said, also
includes descendants of some of
the earliest settlers in America.
He rioted that St. Augustine,
Fla., was founded by Spaniards
in 1545 and that Spain once
possessed all the land included in
the Louisiana Purchase, as well
as California, Arizona and New
Mexico.
ACCORDING TO Sandoval,
most Americans misperceive
Hispanic Americans as being
steeped in "cultural poverty", to
an extent that inhibits their
ability to succeed.
URES
ir. DOS
iua/fy
instruction
\0intun 'lit ft Up
151 n 1U
..............'40
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1lr"ptr tooth
IDrtots
In- On- V,,.,
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-0593
Declaring that the facts are
otherwise and that people would
be "impressively surprised" by
the group's upward mobility, he
cited himslef, his family and
many people he knew who, rising
from the most abject poverty, are
now PhDs, educators, jour-
nalists, doctors, and successful
businessmen.
However, he declared, the
American educational system has
proved to be a failure for
Hispanics because of
discrimination which diminishes
the self-esteem of Hispanic
students.
URGING THAT bilingual
education be utilized throughout
the school systems, he said, "It is
necessary to help the children to
keep up with their fellow
students."
Violence is another major
problem of anti-Hispanic
discrimination, Sandoval
stressed, pointing out that "the
chance of a black or a Hispanic
being killed is 13 times" that of
others.
He went on to say that most of
this is due to police brutality with
many individuals dying in
custody "even when jailed for
misdemeanors, void warrants
and often no crime at all."
San'loval emphasized that the
Hispanic community is not a
separate society but one that is
being gradually assimilated
through intermarriage and ac-
culturation, that it has the same
basic values as other American
groups, that it is not interested in
taking over the society but in
basic justice and that is also has
a contribution to make to the
nation's advancement.
Sandoval said he agreed with
the Jewish community that
"merit should be the basis for
employment and advancement"
but said it should not be used to
mark injustice as when it is just
based on a test grade.
American National
Insurance Co.
Life
Health
Pension
Group
s>**t,Ns\
'90S 19
General Agent
Joseph Schulman, CLU
2001 Palm Beach
Lakes Blvd.
683-6470
American National Insurance Co.
2001 Palm Beach I^kes Blvd.
683-6470
SSi'iSSS:":
*-**'**''.'.'.:


Or. 6avi6 m. Roshkinfc,
dentist
.
Announces the Relocation
of his ppivate pRActice to
910 nopth flAQleR ORive, Suite 2
West palm Beach, floRioa 33401
Children Welcome
telephone: 659-3277
8

ARTHRITIS AND RELATED DISEASES
Emanuel L. Golden, M.D., F.A.C.P.
Diplomate American Board of Internal Medicine
Diplomate American Board Rheumatology
announces the relocation of his office to
MEDICAL CENTER OF DEERFIELD
1644 West HI llsboro Blvd.
Deerfield Beach, Fla. 33441
(305)427-5260
*
Dr. I. Goodman
Chiropractor
Boynton Plaza
153 V. N. Congrats Ave. IN.W. 2nd Ave.)
Boynton Beach
Backaches Headaches
Pinched Nerves Disc Problems
Arthritis Sciatica Neuralgia
Phone 737-5591
Office Hra. Mon.. Tu.. Wd, Fri Thur*. ft Sat.
t-12.2 5 *12
MEDICARE. WORKMEN'S COMP..
AND MOST INSURANCES INCLUDE CHIROPRACTIC
Stuart A. Feldman, D.D.S.
and
Richard J. Lazzara, D.M.D.
Periodontics
are pleased to announce the relocation
of their West Palm Beach Office to
The Crossroads Building
1897 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 215
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
Telephone: (305) 686-2477
Geraldine Oiler, R. E.
announces the opening of the
ELECTROLYSIS CLINIC & HEALTH CENTRE
OF PALM BEACH
offering
Permanent Hair Removal
Scalp Care and
Nutrition and Diet Counseling
plus
KIMBERLY COSMETICS AND SKIN CAR PRODUCTS
(Complimentary Consultation)
1897 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 112, W. Palm Beach
683-6262 ____.
Howard B. Goldman, M.D.
Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology
is pleased to announce the opening of his office
FOR SURGERY OF THE EYE
EYE EXAMINATION
GLASSES AND CONTACT LENS FITTING
GLAUCOMA CONSULTATION AND SURGERY
2200 Glades Road
Suite 910
Boca Raton
By Appointment
(305)368-5606


FAataj
Canaan
Ihhaa
The Chaplaincy9
Mary Broadman Joins Chaplain's Aides Program
.
the Faon
pine pmjncwmm.
partjopacad m'Jtm
Haakh Fee- of Uw
9
Werta. Naaeae mi patient* m need project* *m
s npx-jeti xa irrmk Faaxd? 4 Jmmmd*i
t SeMM* TW program ^ atanber of
THE MEMBERS
Vim'
part af
Taaa Ate H_
Asnry. Vex
n Derm*, .
aerBS degree Sapane Dkfaot Man
at lct|m
Gandys Kau.JIj
Esther Lctt. ;c
<* Syisie Le*-y. Sals
* MauerparL Baa* Rc*aneaj
"'' Seal HUa Santa. Eant!
content Cehn sarn: Father
of the en- Rii nlil, Stoat
ami aancarr of her Labb*/ Watf. JenaL
4* Pam. Eathar
Saccof? Be*
tad Snail
panel
loot examaoatame
.->: rrvper
apt provided by
ran at the area.
are a part of the
County Podiatry
PACE and Florida
''..--'.prartr CMBWal
Beach County Chiropractic
Soenty. Pake Beach County
Medical Society. Palm Beach
County Dental Society. Pafan
Bnec* PigMaal Vnjng N arses
Association Inc and Health
Service* of Palm Beach County
persons
attended lecture* hi the Senior
The Sient KaVr
Whet n Acupunctore Pre
and Post Menopause! Con-
dition* '.etion of the
Kidney." grven by physsnane
and chiropractor* Florida Lions
Eyebank preeented a flm and
the Palm Beach County
Kkiodrnobiie was present The
Jewish Community Center ia
starting it* own Blood Bank, and
many person* donated blood
r rancine Kravitz. staff person.
-dinated the entire prograrr.
and wm aaaiated by Jean Rubin.
the, JOC waff and volunteer*
Tuesday Crab senior* told health
Summer Youth
Program at
Beth El
Hummer Temple Meth El
will offer a youth program for all
Jewish youth in grades 642
Tuesday evenings, June 24. July
8 and 22 and Aug 12. the youth
lounge will be open from 7 t/ 10
[) r.'i
There will be an organized
sports program, stereo for those
wishing t/, dance, ping pong and
much more
All Jewish youth in the West
Palm Beach area are invited to
participate. Come and bring a
friend with you. For furhter
information, contact Larry
Goldberg, youth da-actor, 020-
MM
UOfTl I a -nr\ IJ af. mam,. UQfT W I at IT. 0.1 af.
rTCfhamOKTI


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