Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00221

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
& Jewish FieriWan
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Volume 6 Number 10
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, May 16, 1980
f red Shoche:
::
Price 35 Cents
If
I
In New Jail
Sharansky Gets Okay
To See His Family
Campaign Ahead of Last Year
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Anatoly Sharansky, who was
recently moved from Chistipol
Prison to the Perm labor camp
ome 600 miles from Moscow,
I was finally granted permission to
[be visited by his mother and
Ibrother, the first time since
August, 1979 and only the third
time since his arrest in March,
1977, it was reported by the
Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry and the Union of Councils
|or Soviet Jews.
The visit, however, was cut
Irom three days to one as punish-
oent for Sharansky's "violation
bf rules" in Chistipol Prison.
IDA MILGROM, his mother,
bid Leonid Sharansky, his
brother, reported after returning
home to Moscow that Anatoly is
Working as an apprentice lathe
Iperator, eight hours a day, six
ays a week at a camp machine
Ihop. He is living in a barracks
Vith other prisoners, some of
rhom are "politicals" as he is,
nd others who were Nazi
Dllaborators.
Mrs. Milgrom said her son told
er that the grim labor camp,
there hunger is pervasive, was
till "freedom" in comparison
ith the notorious Chistipol
Anatoly Sharansky
Prison where he could not even
see the daylight.
She said he spends his spare
time walking in the camp com-
pound. Mrs. Milgrom said
Anatoly told her, "I haven't yet
time to become a member of the
labor collective,' but for the first
time in three years I now sleep in
a bed with two bedsheets and am
in a room with natural daylight."
When he was transferred from
Chistipol he was forced to leave
behind almost all his belongings,
including his books, Mrs.
The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County's 1980 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal, Israel
Emergency Fund campaign has
reached an important and critical
phase," stated Robert S. Levy,
general campaign chairman.
"Although we are ahead of last
year's campaign, we must not
lose sight of the fact that there
are still many people within the
community who have not yet
made their pledge. The per-
centage of increased giving to
date is encouraging and makes us
confident that we can raise more
money this year than ever before
in the history of Palm Beach
County."
Dr. Richard G. Shugarman,
associate campaign chairman,
stated, "The allocations process
has begun and the Budget and
Allocations Committee is re-
viewing requests from local,
national and overseas agencies.
Due to increased needs and
spiraling inflation, these agencies
as well as Israel, require greater
financial support. The upcoming
weeks in the campaign are critical
in terms of the allocation process.
The more money we raise, the
Dr. Richard Shugarman
greater is our ability to meet
these human needs."
"I am confident," stated
Robert Levy, "that our com-
munity understands the nature
and the depth of the human prob-
lems facing the people of Israel,
as well as realizes the oppor-
tunity they have to strengthen
Robert Levy
Jewish programs in our own
community, and I know that they
will do their part to help us sur-
pass all previous records."
If you have not as yet made
your pledge to the 1980 CJA-IEF
campaign, contact the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Price Set for Community Mission
TWn 19__1____-- *** m-------- --------...... -
The Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County has begun making
plans for its 1980 Community
Mission to Israel, according to
Barbara Tanen. mission chair-
man.
The Community Mission is set
for Oct. 23 Nov. 3, and will
include a comprehensive sight-
seeing and study tour of the
Jewish State from the Golan
Heights in the north to the Negev
in the south. The Mission will be
highlighted by a visit to Yad
Vashem, the National Holocaust
Museum, meeting with Israeli
dignitaries, and five days in the
Holy City of Jerusalem. In
addition, there will be other
experiences that would not be
part of a private tour to the
Mideast.
The price of the Mission is $900
per person (double occupancy),
including roundtrip air transpor-
Milgrom said.
Weizman to Run
If Begin Tries
For Second Term
TEL AVIV (ZINS) Israel's Defense Minister,
r Weizman, is reported to have had a rather extended
:ussion with two individuals identified only as "leaders
he Jewish lobby in Washington." Highlights of that
as reported by the Hebrew afternoon daily, Yediot
not, were: Weizman thoroughly enjoys his role as
ster of Defense. Concerning his political future,
man indicated that he is prepared to serve in the wv fT" TY "M W\ *~V w Vtt
capacity even if the Labor party i, returned to j)Y% fifty HeaCiS LHUf SckOOl BOOrf
The annual meeting of the Hyman Roberts, Dean Rosen-
Jewish Community Day School
tation, meals and accom-
modations at deluxe five star
hotels. A minimum gift to the
1981 annual campaign of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County-UJA is $1,500 for the
head of household, plus $500
woman's gift to the Women's Di-
vision. Individual travelers will
be expected to make a minimum
$1,500 commitment, explained
Tanen.
"Airfares will rise after June
1," stated Tanen, and "in an
effort to keep the cost down we
urge anyone in the community
interested in participating in this
Mission to get their $200 per
person deposit in before that
date."
Barbara Tanen
For information on the Com-
munity Mission, contact Ronni
Tartakow at the Federation office
at 832-2120.
IHOWEVER, if Begin decides to run for a second
i as the head of a Likud coalition, Weizman would
iate the example once set by De Gaulle; that is, he
Id withdraw from the political scene and wait for an
tation to take over the premiership. From his words it
Iclear to his two listeners that Weizman aspires to be
Vber One in the government. He is convinced that he
kpable of demonstrating the required political and
[egic leadership for the nation.
far as the problem of autonomy on the West Bank
>ncerned, Weizman reportedly favors a greater
tive from the Israeli side to find a solution to this
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Offices will be closed on the following dates:
Bhavuoth Wednesday, May 22
Bhavuoth Thursday, May 23
Vmorial Day Monday, May 26
was held on May 5, at which time
Phillip Siskin, chairman of the
Nominating Committee for the
school year 1980/81, presented
the slate of nominees to the board
of the school.
Elected to the executive board
were: Dr. Howard Kay,
president; Phillip Siskin, vke
president; Joan Tochner, vice
president; Dr. Arthur Virshup,
vice president; Michael Puder-
Harris, vice president; Joseph
Weingard, treasurer, and Shirley
Dellerson, secretary. Barry
Krischer is the immediate past
president.
Elected to the board of
directors were: Dr. Lee Fischer,
Henry Grossman, Ann Leibovit,
Jeanne Levy, Toby Lewis,
Cynnie List, Carol Roberts, Dr.
bach, Irving Salins, Rabbi Wil-
liam H. Shapiro, Dr. Fred Simon,
Beth Siskin, Max Tochner, Dr.
David Weissberger and Dr. Peter
Wunsh. The PTA will be rep-
resented by its president,
Lorraine Virshup. The represen-
tatives from the Jewish Fed-
eration and the Rabbinical Coun-
cil have yet to be appointed by
their respective organizations.
An amendment to the by-laws
of the school, proposed and
accepted at the annual meeting,
paved the way for the establish-
ment of an honorary board of
directors. The individuals who
have accepted a position on the
honorary board are: Dr.
McKinley Cheshire, George
Golden, Howard Goodman, Ben-
jamin S. Hornstein, H. Irwin
Levy, Louis Samet, Mrs. Bette
Wolfson Schapiro, Max B.
Dr. Howard Kay
Shapiro, Alan L. Shulman,
Harold Singer and Marvin Turk.
Mordecai Levow, director of
the school, expressed his delight
with the newly elected board
members, and his anticipation of
sharing together in "a very
exciting period in the history of
the Jewish Community Day
School."
Save the date-annual meeting, Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
iai Anniversary Celebration Sunday, June 8, 7:30 p
tywMKta.
L.


P*e2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Fridy.lUyi6ilieo
With the > <
Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith North Lodge will
meet Thursday, May 22, 8 p.m.
at Woodland Lakes Clubhouse,
PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gar-
dens. Everyone interested is
invited.
B'NAI B'BJTH
WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women, MiUvah
Ceeacfl of Palm Beach County,
will bold its installation of of-
ficers at the Indian Trail Country
Club on Okeecbobee Road West
on Sunday, May 18, at noon. For
reservations, call Frances
Chodosfa or Stella Zimmerman.
The installing officer will be
Ruth Wallace, chairman of the
south coastal region.
The following officers will be
installed:
President, Shirley Bloom,
Masada; Vice Presidents,
Administration, Rose Rosen,
Naomi: Program, Marsha Wahr-
man, Masada; Membership,
Raye Feinstein. Menorah; Fund
Raising, Evelyn Fisher,
Menorah; Communication, Ruth
Lichten, Naomi; Treasurer,
Sophie Dickson, Masada; Finan-
cial Secretary, Helene Wein-
traub, Masada; Recording Sec-
retary, Helen Sickerman,
Medina; Corresponding Sec-
retary, Kay Siegal, Boynton;
Counselor, Freda Bompey,
Boynton.
"The Evening's Entertain-
ment" will perform.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
The June 17 meeting of Lake
Worth Chapter of ORT will
feature election of officers for
1980-81. The meeting will be held
at 12:30 p.m. at the Lake Worth
City Hall Annex. Anne Harris
will present a review of Chaim
Potok's My Name is Asher Lev.
Members and guests are invited.
Refreshments will be served.
Judy Axel, representative of
the Palm Beach County Center
for the Arts, will be the guest
speaker at the meeting of the
Palm Beach Chapter of Women's
American ORT.
The meeting will be held at 1
p.m.. Monday. May 19, in the
Churchill Room of the Palm
Beach Ocean Hotel. Miss Axel
will describe the plans for the
Center for the Performing and
Visual Arts.
Installed as officers of the
Palm Beach Chapter for the year
1980-1981 will be: President.
Sara Marshall; Vice Presidents
Special Projects, Sylvia Colby,
Pauline Judd; Vice President
Education, Beatrice Goldstein;
Vice President Membership,
Sylvia Haymes; Vice President
Program, Jean Siff; Treasurer,
Rhode Zerkin; Financial Sec-
retary, Anne Goldberg; Record-
ing Secretary, Renee Heiman;
Corresponding Secretary. Goldye
Coopersmith; Parliamentarian.
Sylvia Leighton.
All members and friends are
invited to attend. Refreshments
will be served.
West Palm Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
hold a special meeting on Tues-
day, May 27, at the Ramada Inn.
Installation of officers is planned.
Luncheon will be served. This
will be the last meeting of the
term until September. Special
entertainment.
DEBORAH HOSPITAL
FOUNDATION
Deborah Heart Foundation
will meet on June 9 at noon at
Congregation Anshei Sholom. A
representative of Radio Station
WPIT will furnish entertain-
ment. The topic will be "Radio
Yesterday and Today, including
Old Time Radio Personalities.'
Prizes will be given for audience
participation.
Hosh Hashanah weekend will
be at the Sheraton Bal Harbour
Wednesday to Saturday, from
Sept. 10-13. Contact Pearl
Kolbert or Katie Green for
reservations.
HADASSAH
Tikvah Group of Hadassah
officers, members and friends
offer prayers and wishes for a
speedy recovery to Frances Rose,
outgoing president and now
membership vice president.
Aliya Group of Hadassah will
hold an installation luncheon and
card party at Temple Beth
Sholom, Lake Worth, on Thurs-
day. May 29. at 11 a.m. Reser-
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The only Jewish family owned
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'aim Beach County.
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INTERIOR
DESIGN
SOCIETY
"1 Sice Store For Sice T'c
vations are necessary-
Helen Smith, president, Lake
Worth-South Palm Chapter of
Hadassah. will install the fol-
lowing slate for the ensuing year:
President, Shirley Green berg;
Fund Raising Vice President,
Claire Schatz; Education Vice
President, Sophia Jacobson;
Membership Vice President,
Dora Altman; Program Vice
President. Bee Rocklin; Record-
ing Secretary, Floria Friedman;
Corresponding Secretary,
Blanche Schulman; Financial
Secretary, Pauline Schwartz; and
Treasurer. Sylvia Weisberg.
The West Palm Beach Chapter
of Hadassah will have its second
annual installation of executive
officers on Thursday, May 29, at
a luncheon at 12:30 p.m. at the
Ramada Inn, Palm Beach Lakes
Blvd.
Dorothy Mofson Kaye, Florida
Central Region Conference chair-
man, will install the following:
President: Myra Ohrenstine;
vice presidents: Frances Rose,
fund raising; Pearl Weinstein,
membership; Dorothy Lieber-
man. education; Mary Rodd,
program Secretaries: Roz Wein-
shenker, financial; Laura
London, recording; Dorothy
Segelin, corresponding; Lulu
Kahn. treasurer.
Entertainment will be by
Mildred Birnbaum with soloist,
Max Lubert, tenor, and Beatrice
Kahn, cellist. For reservations,
call Mary Rodd, program
chairman.
The Henrietta Szold Group of
Hadassah is having a meeting on
Tuesday, May 20, at 1 p.m. in the
auditorium of Lakeside Village,
Lillian Rd west of Congress
Avenue in Palm Springs.
The program for the afternoon
is: Installation of officers by Mrs.
Helen Smith, president of the
Lake Worth-South Palm Beach
Chapter. Guest speaker will be
Mrs. Dorothy Kaye, vice presi-
dent of the Florida Central
Region. There will also be enter-
tainment, followed by refresh-
ments.
Shalom Group of West Palm
Beach Hadassah will meet on
Monday, May 19, at 7 p.m., at
Congregation Anshei Sholom.
Century Village. New officers will
be installed by Ethel Roey. edu-
cation chairman of Florida
Central Region of Hadassah.
Entertainment will be provided
by an instrumental trio: Mildred
Birnbaum. pianist: Beatrice
Kahn. cellist: Bert Weiss,
violinist. Refreshments wul be
served.
The Study Group courses have
been brought to a conclusion
under the leadership of Augusta
Steinhardt. educational vice
president. Twen,ty-two students
attended her weekly Elementary
Hebrew class. In addition, she
conducted lectures and dis-
cussions in Post-Biblical History.
The Study Group will continue
its activities in the fall and wel-
comes full participation.
PRIME TIME
JEWISH SINGLES
Prime Time Jewish Singles of
the Palm Beaches, located at
Jewish Community Center. West
Palm Beach (age group 45-65)
will meet May 18. at 7 p.m. at
Jewish Community Center.
Guest Speaker: Harriette
Rowe on "Sexual Assault
Awareness."
PIONEER WOMEN
The Ezrat Chib of Pioneer
Women in Lake Worth installed
the following women as their new
officers for 1980-81 at the home of
Mrs. Bennett Lee on May 5:
President. Jean Lee: Vice
President and Membership
Chairman. Claire Mendelson:
Vice President and Program
Chairman. Celia Lev in son: Vice
President and Fundraising
Chairman. Pat Kimball:
Treasurer Beas Kauffman: Sec-
retary. Pearl Line: and Financial
Secretary. Betty Gethma.
Riverside
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Jewish Community Center
Summer Programs
o* age
arts t
jr ade
Children under 5 years
'his prograe is enricne: ith
afts, husic. Draaa t Sports.
Children entering
thru 6. Caap Shaloa, located one
ile nest of the Turnpike on Belvedere
- J'. > a sprauling 18 acre site.
IHBB9^DH: thru
grades. Caapers .ill assemble at the
'.. and sill travel to various locations
around the county.
nW^ESat^ESI Creative. Perforaing
Arts: Childrer 7th thru 9th grade*, 'his
prograa is a aorkshop oriented prograa.
Caape's skills in Theatre, arts. Sculpture.
painti-;. :-afts. etc.. sill be developed.
|: Participants aust have
coapleted 9th grade. This is a unique
prograa for eature boys C girls.
o fee.
(all prograas eicept C.I.T.)
* ees 8 aeons
ll'O.OO $235.00
(optional)
* ee*s 8 necks
120.00 $40.00
Faaily aeabership required for all prograas.
For infaraatiM and applicatioas. please
call 689-7700


IV.JUWS.lJa.lJUU
Friday, May 16.1980
Moss to Represent Florida
At World ORT Congress
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
Letter to the Editor
John I. Moss, national vice
president of the American ORT
Federation and chairman of
Florida Men's ORT, has been
appointed to serve on the
delegation of officers designated
to represent the United States at
the World ORT Congress in
Jerusalem in June.
Lou and Esther Barriah will
also attend. Lou is president of
the Palm Beach Chapter of Men's
ORT.
This historic event will mark
the 100th anniversary of ORT.
Over 500 Americans from
throughout the country will join
participants from Jewish
communities in 34 countries.
Delegations are expected from
Fance, Italy, South American
ORT, Canadian ORT, British
ORT, South African ORT. as well
delegates from several
as
Scandinavian countries, India
and North Africa.
Moss, formerly of Chicago and
past president of Chicago Men's
ORT, has been associated with
ORT for the past 20 years. He
has initiated an electronics
laboratory at the Syngalowski
ORT Technical College in Tel
Aviv, the first of its kind in
Israel.
He serves on the board of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County and as president-elect of
the Jewish Family and Children's
Service. Moss has been chairman
John I. Moss
of the Russian Resettlement
Committee and past chairman of
the Soviet Jewry Task Force of
the Community Relations
Council of the Jewish Federation.
The Congress will be opened by
Dr. William Haber, dean at the
University of Michigan and
president of the World ORT
Union Central Board, and by
Chaim Herzog, former Israel
Ambassador to the United
Nations past president of ORT
Israel and now chairman of the
international ORT Executive
Committee.
The Congress will culminate
with an address by Menachem
Begin, Prime Minister of Israel.
Teddy Kollek, mayor of
Jerusalem, and a number of
cabinet ministers are on the
program.
How Goeth the Ecumenical Movement
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian
of Palm Beach County:
The article by Rabbi Joel
Levine in your April 18 issue,
titled "Missionary Groups,
Cults, and The Jewish People,"
struck a responsive chord
inasmuch as I have lived
amongst non-Jews for many
years.
The paragraph which states,
"Love and support; this is,
precisely how these cults and
missionary groups reach the-
retired and the young," is the
underlying factor which cap-
tivates these two groups. A year
ago I was confined in a
hospital. A priest visited me, but
no Jewish rabbi. I have been
receiving literature, for many.
years, from the Worldwide
Church of God but not once from
a Jewish religious organization.
The philosophy of love and
support so aptly described by
Rabbi Levine is the crux of the
success these cults are getting by
their willingness and patience to
listen to the problems of the
elderly and the young. It seems
odd that Judaism, a remarkable
religion with so much to offer,
and which teaches the love for
one another and compassion for
the sick and lonely, has not lived
up to its precepts. Many elderly
who have moved into this area
have never been approached by
their Jewish compatriots. We
seem to wait to be called rather
than practice outreach.
"How Goeth the Ecumenical
Movement?" is the topic of a
symposium to be heard on Radio
Station WINZ, 940 on the AM
Dial, Thursday, May 29, from 8
p.m. to midnight.
Participants in the discussion
will be Father John Mangrum,
rector of St. David's Episcopal
Church, West Palm Beach; and
Rabbi Samuel Silver of the
Reform Congregation of Delray.
Rabbi Silver is the spiritual
head of a newly formed liberal
Jewish congregation in Delray
Beach.
Moderator of the radio
discussion will be talk show host,
Alan Burke.
the president, Offices and
Boar6 of diRectORs
copoiAlly invite you to
ceteBRAte with us our "chai" annivepsapy
at the
18th Annual Meeting
of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Sunday, June 8,1980,7:30 p.m.
Breakers Hotel
Palm Beach
SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKER
Herschel W. Blumberg
National Chairman, United Jewish Appeal
Installation of Officers and Board of Directors
Presentation of Community Service Awards
Recognition of Campaign Workers and Volunteers
Dessert Reception: $5 per person
For further information contact the Jewish Federation Office
832-2120
TUNE IN TO
L'Chayim
"The Jewish Listener's Digest
An Exciting New Radio Magazine
Sundays, 10:30 a.m.
WPBR -1340 AM
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
May 18 Shavnoth Three of Americas outstanding rabbis.
Gem Borowitz. Shlomo Riskin and Seymour Siegel discuss the
problems created when a Jew marries someone who has con-
In closing, I might add that I
have been a rabbinical student in
my youth. I have a certification
as a teacher from the Union of
American Hebrew Con-
gregations, and have taught at
Temple Emanuel, Worcester,
Mass. for several years. So I am
in a position to judge and diffuse
the arguments of the cults.
Unfortunately, not many of our
compatriots are intellectually
capable of judging between the
pap given by these various cults
and true Judaism.
GEORGE S. BROOKM AN.
West Palm Beach


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230 S 'ecleraiHwy 428 6800.
dv ..^? SAVINGS INSURED TO $100,000
BY AN AGE NO Of THE fEDERAl GOVERNMENT
JACKD GORDON. KCs,rtcn, A 1N. CnlrrTlin ol ,,'
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, May 16, l
9H()
""*w^.^5?dian Trial by Jury Goes on Trial
M
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
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In conjunction ilti Jewish Frderallor of Palm Beach COupIv. Inc
Combined Jewish Appeal
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Friday. May 16.1980
Volume 6
1 SI VAN 57401
Number 10
Israel's Future Possibilities
The English calendar date for the celebration of
the 32nd anniversary of the State of Israel and the
Hebrew calendar date of Yom Ytrushalayim, the day
Jerusalem was united in the Six-Day War on June 7,
1967. this year fall contiguously on May 14 and 15.
It is a happy coincidence. It is also a solemn
occasion, for the future of Israel becomes more and
more uncertain as peace is proclaimed in the Middle
East at least between Israel and Egypt.
As we celebrate the union of Jerusalem as
Israel's indivisible capital, there remain few nations
in the world that recognize Jerusalem as Israel's
capital. What is more, there is a growing number of
them that would divide the city again in the now
frantic global effort to stuff Israel back into her 1948
borders.
Thus, on this happy occasion, we must be aware
of a world bent on diminishing Israel not only
politically, but geographically, as well. We see move-
ments intent on reversing the 1967 war. on renewing
the 1948 status of Israel, and even on questioning the
right of Israel to exist in the first place.
If UN Res. 242 can be rewritten to change the
reference to Arab refugees to read "Palestinians,"
then how far can we be from rewriting the original
Palestine partition plan that established Israel in the
first place?
We do not. on this happy occasion, mean to
sound unduly pessimistic. We mean only to shake up
the Jewish community to a more realistic awareness
of what Israel's future possibilities are.
Egypt Needs No Autonomy
The onslaught on Hebron leaves Israel with
more than the sombre need once again to bury her
dead in the latest Palestinian terrorist attack.
It sharpens even further the already dangerous
political divisions within the country itself. Prime
Minister Begin's policies with respect to settlements
on the West Hank are being consistently criticized by
Minister of Defense Ezer Weizman.
At the same time, the aftermath of the Hebron
massacre has brought demands for the resignation of
Weizman on the ground that the massacre occurred
because he was indifferent to sterner security needs
in the area.
Above and beyond this stands Opposition Labor
Leader Shimon Peres, who speaks out of both sides
of his mouth on the settlements issue.
Thus, while democratic debate runs amok in
Israel, the autonomy talks continue in Herzliya. But
to no end. Egypt needs no end to the talks that would
be satisfactory to Israel so long as Israel tears herself
apart.
1,000 Diplomats
Mark Anniversary
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) Israels 32nd
anniversary was marked here with a reception attended
by more than 1,000 diplomats, Jewish leaders, Israeli
officials and other guests.
AMONG THOSE attending were Secretary General
Kurt Waldheim. U.S. Ambassador Donald McHenry,
Egypt's Ambassador Abdel Meguid and African and
Latin American diplomats as well as representatives of
West European countries.
The reception, which was held at the delegates'
dining room, was given by Ambassador Yehuda Blum and
his wife. Moriah and Iwud'a rnnsnl r,Aiwrl in Np*v
THE CASE against Johnny L.
Jones has national implications.
His guilt or innocence seems, ir
the media, to be an irrelevance
At issue is what one com-
mentator, a former editor of
mine, pinpoints as the essential
tragedy: "the fact that a man's
lifelong reputation was being
shredded."
This is sheer bourgeois sen-
timentality. Of course, it is
painful to see a man with Jones'
achievements and reputation go
down the drain. But the issue
ought not to be tears for the
result: it ought to be dismay at
the cause.
WHO PULLED the plug?
Certainly, it was Johnny L. Jones
himself, and his glittering and
complex curriculum vitae ex-
plains it all; it is almost as if he
needed gold plumbing to assure
himself that the various elements
in the listing of his achievements
were real.
MimlHii
It is almost as if he needed the
gold plumbing to convince others
that his achievements were real.
If you want to talk about the
Jones case as a tragedy, then
think in terms of Greek tragedy:
the tragic flaw in Jones* ap-
parently inauthentic personality
requiring this kind of material
evidence for metaphysical
achievement; the reversal of
fortune in the direction of his life
because he could not accept his
achievements on their own terms
and had to recreate them into
0K*&
083**-
something regal if not divine, and
therefore into something with the
capacity, not as he hoped would
reward him, but as he now learns
has punished him.
This is the tragedy, the fatal
flaw in his own personality, not
that he was judged for acting on
the flaw in an unlawful way.
I SAID at the outset that the
case has national implications,
and it does because Jones is
Black. When my old editor
responds in anguish "that a
man's lifelong reputation was
being shredded," what is missing
here is the adjective, "Black
man's lifelong reputation."
Clearly. Dr. Jones' race makes
his own choice that he pulled the
plug all the more unbearable. To
begin with, ethnic groups always
look for models to emulate. Even
if as Jews some of us are bored by
football, a Jewish quarterback,
say. in the wings to fill Roger
Staubach's shoes would un-
deniably give us a universal sense
of pride.
Jonas Salk is not exactly a
Jewish pariah, and Yitzhak
Perlman and Daniel Barenboim
make the most reserved of us
stiffen with pride.
So it was with Dr. Jones for the
Black community, but his cur-
riculum vitae cannot therefore
guarantee his innocence, and yet
that is the conclusion to which
people are being encouraged to
jump.
INDEED, from the beginning,
too many Blacks have made it a
racial issue rather than an
inquiry into just what Dr. Jones
did or did not do as a matter of
law.
One can be agonized that he
made the decision to act in an
illegal way. One can wonder
again and again at the seemingly
limitless future before him had he
not made that decision. But it is
absurd to argue that, because of
the seemingly limitless future
before him. he should not have
been judged guilty, especially
because the Black community is
now deprived of a role model to
emulate. Or that because of this
seeminglv limitless future, he
Continued on Page 17
American Hostage in Moscow
HAIFA In a world where
dozens and scores of innocent
people are held hostage by
terrorist individuals or terrorist
governments, perhaps the story
of still another hostage may no
longer cause any great ex-
citement. Thus does the con-
science of mankind appear to be
anesthetized by sheer repetition
of brutalities and injustices
Yet we dare not be silent, and I
raise my voice to tell the story of
still another hostage, an
American citizen who has for
some years been held in Moscow
against his will. The case is
known to the U.S. State
Department, but after all. what's
another American citizen more or
less?
The White House has been
informed, but Mr. Carter seems
to find the subject of American
hostages an embarrassing one.
THIS IS the story of Abraham
Stolar. age 69. born in Chicago in
1911. His parents took him and
his sister to Russia in 1931. a
tragic and fatal move. Their
American passports were taken
away. The father was arrested
and disappeared in 1937. The
mother died in 1949. The sister
was arrested in 1951. held for five
years, and went to Israel in 1973.
Abe Stolar never gave up hope
of getting out of the Soviet
Union. For some twenty years, he
worked as a Russian-English
translator: his wife is a chemist.
Finally n 1975 ha. his wife and
son received the precious visas
Carl
AlWrt
-------14 _.
L-_
leave. They severed all their ties,
shipped their personal belongings
including furniture and clothing
ahead to Israel, and only just as
they were about to board the
plane out of Moscow, they were
turned back and their exit visas
cancelled
Since then, the Stolars have
been in limbo. None of them are
Soviet citizens. The reasons
offered for their continued
detention changed from time to
time. Once it was said that Abe's
translation work had given him
access to delicate information.
Another time, it was alleged his
wife, who retired in 1973. had
done secret work. In recent years,
the Russian authorities don't
bother to give any reasons at all.
AT FIRST, the Soviets
assured the Stolars everything
would eventually be straightened
out- They were asked to afford no
publicity to their case. They were
given opportunity to be reab
sorbed into the Soviet economy,
but Abe Stolar refused. He in-
sisted on his right to go to Israel.
But even, thing led to a dead end.
and he could keep silent no
longer.
Abe Stolar ia
Jews over whom the Soviet
officials claim legal jurisdiction.
He is an American-born citizen,
being held hostage either because
of the vagaries of Kus-ian
bureaucracy, or for some
nefarious reason that has not yet
been explained.
Somewhere in an Israel
warehouse, the family belongings
wait for them, while the Stolars
eke out a marginal existence in
Moscow, never knowing what the
morrow will bring, hoping
against hope that the same
illogical, unreasonable policy that
holds them against their will
might for similar unexplained
and inconsistent reason suddenly
decide to let them leave on short
notice. As yet, the hoped-for
permission has not been received.
ABE STOLAR has not been
forgotten by the Soviets. He is a
marked man. Registered letters
which he has sent to me have
mysteriously vanished en rout*.
His courage still holds out.
If you were being held hostage.
would you not want to f*thti
someone, somewhere, was doing
something to help get you
released? President Carter, or the
State Department, or your U*
Senator, ought to know how you
feel about this spreading habitot
holding Americans hostage Do
you have the few moments to
write letter or two? It couW
help a great deal.
Abe Stolar is wondering *
anybody out there knows about
i him rr at ''


tjtuhv, w
Friday, May 16, 1980
The Jewish Floridan of Palm Beach County
Page 5
CRC Update
Downward Trend Reported in Soviet Emigration
FROM WILLIAM DANSKER
Last year, when 51,320 Jews
left the USSR and arrived in
Vienna, emigration indisputably
played an even more important
role in the life of Soviet Jews than
ever before. It was a record
figifre, since Jews began to leave
the USSR on a large scale in
1971, with a monthly average of
over 4,200 people.
A close analysis of the figure,
however, taking into account
emigration statistics for January-
February 1980, demonstrated a
simultaneous counter trend.
Sometime in the summer of 1979
a decision to cut down the rate of
emigration had apparently been
made in the highest Soviet
circles. The number of visas
issued by the Dutch Embassy in
Moscow (representing Israel in
the USSR) decreased in
November-December from 3,600-
3,300. This sharp drop was later
felt in Vienna with 2,803 arrivals
in January and 3,023 in
February, representing a 30 35
percent drop from the 1979
average.
A month-by month analysis
suggests that new restrictions,
which were implemented months
before the Soviet invasion of
Afghanistan, were not directly
connected to changes in Soviet
international policy. While we
cannot ignore the impact on
emigration of the present in-
ternational climate, a possible
cutback should be be seen as a
Soviet reaction to the U.S.
measures undertaken after the
Afghanistan invasion. Indeed, in
the past, there were situations
Gold Medal Honor to Kissinger
NEW YORK The Anti-
Defamation League has chosen
former Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger as recipient of its
1980 America's Democratic
Legacy Award.
Presentation of the award a
gold medallion which has gone to
four U.S. Presidents was made
Wednesday at the inaugural
dinner of the Anti-Defamation
League Appeal. The dinner was
in honor of New York attorney
and philanthropist, Irving D.
Lipkowitz. Edgar M. Bronfman,
chairman and chief executive
officer of The Seagram Company
Ltd., was dinner chairman.
IN ANNOUNCING the award,
ADL national chairman. Maxwell
E. Greenberg, called Kissinger "a
tireless worker, both in and out of
public office, in the cause of
democracy, peace and freedom
for Americans and peoples
throughout the world."
The award, established by
ADL in 1948 to honor
"distinguished contributions to
the enrichment of America's
democratic legacy," has been
conferred on Presidents Truman,
Eisenhower, Kennedy and
Johnson. Other recipients include
Eleanor Roosevelt, Earl Warren,
Roy Wilkins, Arthur Goldberg,
Herbert Lehman, Jacob Javits
and Abraham Ribicoff.
when emigration was maintained
at high rates during international
crises, for example during the
Yom Kippur War, in October
1973.
INSUFFICIENT KINSHIP
The decrease in emigration
seems to reflect the introduction
of a demand for an invitation
(visov) from "close or first degree
relative." This invitation is the
necessary first step for most
people to leave the Soviet Union.
Having used "insufficient
kinship of the invitee"
sporadically, as a pretext for
refusals, Soviet authorities never
applied it on a wide scale.
The broad application began in
May 1979, in Odessa, and slowly
spread to Kharkov and Kiev,
then to Kishinev and Tashkent.
By the first quarter of 1980 it
had touched Minsk, to some
extent Moscow and was an-
nounced in Leningrad at the end
of February. Not only have exit
visas been denied, but initial
applications are increasingly
rejected by the OVIR (Office of
Visas and Registration, of the
Ministry of the Interior) clerks if
the affidavit of invitation is
signed by a relative other than
spouse, parents, children or
siblings. In Kiev, where the
restrictions are most severe, only
parents_and children qualify.
ADMINISTRATIVE
CONTROLS ON
EMIGRATION
One of the usual means of
controlling emigration is to place
various administrative obstacles
in an applicant's path. Using
devices from past years, local
authorities applied these
measures to an even greater
extent than formerly. Non-
delivery of invitation letters from
Israel, the usual method of
regulating the number of ap-
plications, continued in early
1979.
Then, in Che main cities of
Jewish exodus (viz. Kiev,
Kharkov, Odessa, Minsk,
Kishinev), OVIR offices began to
limit receipt of applications to
one or two days a week. Official
forms had to be filed in legal
advice bureaus or typing offices,
sometimes located in the
suburbs. This situation has
created lines of applicants, which
reached 1,000 in Kishinev alone,
and said to be about 800 in
Minsk.
In some isolated instances,
OVIR clerks do not accept ap-
At the cheaper price, now is the tlm to
put gold back In your teeth!" Rand Daily
Mail
Announcement to
The Community
The Nominating Committee of the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County informs and advises
that the following slate of candidates for officers was submitted
at the regular April meeting of the Women's Division Board,
and will be presented for election at the annual meeting on June
8. 1980.
OFFICERS
President Anne Faivus
Vice President. Campaign Chairman............Ruthe Eppler
Vice President, Education Beth Siskin
Vice President, Leadership Development Penny Beers
Vice President, Outreach Mary Bachrach
Secretary .........................Barbara Schwartz
In accordance with the By-Laws of the Women's Division,
additional nominations may be submitted in writing no later
than May 25 by any member of the Women's Division (a mem-
ber is any woman who contributes $10.00 or more in her own
name to the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County), and that
the written consent of the nominee be obtained. Any such
written nominations shall be endorsed by at least twenty-five
(25) members of the Women's Division.
Respectfully submitted by the Nominating Committee of
the Women's Division.
Detra Kay, Chairman
Nominating Committee
Carole Klein Marva Perrin
Cynnie List Judy Waltzer
JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
2815 North Flaqler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
tel. 832-8423/24
Mordecai Levow, Director
&
COMNNUNJTY
DRY
SCHOOL
FOB-EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION
For An Outstandinn Secular And
Judaic Studies Prooram
..Suneri_or Accredited Faculty
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..Complete Secular Studies
..Hehrair I Judaic Studies
-PANSPORTATI0N AVAILABLE

fiirtJe -7
plications if there are sons of
draft age in the family.
Applications of families in which
any member has not worked an
obligatory three-year term in a
state directed job, following
graduation from university, have
also been rejected, primarily in
Leningrad. If these are not new
devices, they were more widely
used in 1979 than in previous
year.
William Dansker, a resident of
West Palm Beach since 1961, has
been appointed chairman of the
Soviet Jewry Task Force to
succeed John I. Moss. Qansker's
first contact with the problems of
Soviet Jewry was through his
son, Benjamin. Benjamin
Dansker and a friend made a trip
to the Soviet Union in the
summer of 1978. Their purpose
was to visit the refusenika, and
especially the religious
dissidents.
In December 1979, inspired by
his son's efforts, Dansker made a
trip to the Soviet Union. His trip
was also motivated by the need
to reach as many refuseniks as
i possible. Dansker contacted
I refuseniks in Kiev, Leningrad
and Moscow.
Investment Equity
Real Estate
DON VOGEL
Licensed Real Estate Broker Salesman
Res4dential-Condominium-ln vestment
2352 PGA Boulevard
Palm Beach Gardens. Fla. 1341C
Business 626-5100
Residence 622-4000
Light tl\e candle
and remember?
1MB
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Menorah Chapels, to preserve
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wishes to offer a gift of re-
membrance. A Yahrzeit
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departed and a Yearly Re- >
minder of the Yahrzeit
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CALL OR WRITE FOR YOUR
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In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
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I nlrtme* I*...:.!. -...J >kl> in D.a,mhI f*


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I1J,1SW
Friday, May 16, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
Five Die in Arab Attack in Hebron
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Three
of the five yeshiva students
murdered by terrorists in Hebron
have been identified
as originally coming from the
United States and Canada. They
were Zvi Menachem Glatt, 21, of
New York; Eli Hazeev (Wolf), 32,
believed to be from Chicago; and
Shmuel Marmelstein, 19, of
Montreal.
The other two who were killed
were Yaacov Zimmerman, 19,
and Gershon Klein, 21, both from
Hnei Brak and both soldiers in
the armored corps serving in the
Yeshivat Hesder in Kiryat Arba,
a special yeshiva where student.,
study the Torah while serving in
the army. Both were born in Bnei
Brak and graduated from local
yeshivot before joining the
Yeahivat Hesder.
GLATT, who came to Israel
four years ago, was a student in
the Merkaz Harav Yeshiva in
Jerusalem. He was a guest at the
Kiryat Arba yeshiva and with his
friends there he was making the
weekly Friday night visit to the
Machpela Cave Synagogue and
then to the old Hadassah
building when the attack oc-
curred. Marmelstein was in Israel
for one year of study at Kerem
Yavneh Yeshiva. He had also
come to Kiryat Arba for the
weekend.
Israeli Knew
Of Action
Before U.S.
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Michael Gurdus, an Israeli free-
lance journalist who gets his
news by monitoring global radio
communications, says he was
tuned into the American hostage
rescue attempt in Iran while it
was underway and knew of its
failure probably before
Washington did. But, according
to Gurdus, 35, he did not report
his "scoop" to his newspaper
clients because he feared per-
mature disclosure
Gurdus claimed that he was
listening on the wave-length used
by the Americans and was able to
follow the aborted mission step-
by-step. He said he knew of the
mission C-130 transport, in-
volved in a fatal collision with a
helicopter, that four C-130s had
lost radio contact with their
airborne command post: that an
AWACS plane, a type equipped
with advanced radar, took off
from Turkey and that the
American transports used in the
rescue attempt took off from
Cairo West Airport and refueled
at Mesira island in the Persian
(iulf off Oman and again at
Bahrain.
' GURDUS SAID he withheld
, the information because of a
' similar experience in 1977 when
he picked up the communications
of West German commando units
on thair way to rescue a hijacked
Lufthansa airliner in Somalia.
At that time, he informed the
local media which broadcast the
news and imperiled what turned
out to be a successful mission.
The West German authorities
asked the Israelis to discontinue
that type of news gathering.
Although Gurdus remained
silent about the Ame"<*"
operation. U.S. authonttes have
expressed their displeasure to
Israel that he listened in.
Wolf was a Vietnam veteran
who was divorced and had a
daughter. He was a follower of
Rabbi Meir Kahane. At Kiryat
Arba, he was studying Torah and
working as a locksmith. He was
only recently released from a
seven-month jail sentence for
harassing Hebron Arabs by
entering their homes and
demanding they leave them and
return them to the Jews who had
fled the houses in the 1929
massacre of Jews in Hebron. He
has since been identified as being
a convert to Judaism.
One of the wounded, Hanan
Kroitheimer, is still in critical
condition. Also injured seriously
were Yehuda Travitz and Aharon
Pni'el. Six Yeshivat Hesder
soldiers Mordechai Shevat,
Aharon Tzvibel, Robert
Brosovsky, Rahamim Hadges,
Allon Zimmerman and Moshe
Bosna were all reported in
good condition. Three others,
Aharon Wertheimer, 44, a soldier
in the reserves, and two tourists
from the United States, Lisa
Sherman, 20, and Simha
Wolman, were slightly injured.
FOUR INJURED women were
released. They are Kineret
Levinger, the 17-year-old
daughter of Kiryat Arba leader
Rabbi Moshe Levinger, who is
one of the women who have been
living at the old Hadassah
building for more than a year;
Meira Yahn-Daniela, 20, of
Kiryat Arba; and Gila Mintzer,
17, and Dafna Vantura, 20, both
of Bnei Brak. Also injured was
Eytan Arbel.
Wertheimer was guarding the
Hadassah building when the
attack started. "The people were
coming back from the Machpela
Synagogue via the Hadassah
building," he said. "They were
singing Shabat songs. There were
many women and children. But
by sheer luck, they were walking
ahead of the last group which
included 24 men and six girls. As
soon as the women and children
entered the building and the last
group was approaching the
gate," the attack broke out,
Wertheimer said.
"Hell was everywhere," he
continued. "Hellish fire was
coming from opposite me. I had
no time to return the fire. I was
hit, stumbled and dragged myself
into the house where I waa given
first aid." He said the firing was
so heavy and dense that he would
not have been able to do much.
"Everyone outside was hit by'the
shower of lead and fire," he
explained. "It was hell."
Another eyewitness account
was given by Vantura. She said
as they were walking from the
Machpela Synagogue "it was
quiet in the streets. They were
deserted. Just as we reached the
gate of the Hadassah building we
heard shots from behind. We fell
face down and some even found
cover in the staircase of the
Hadassah building."
VENTURA said there was a
"second series of vollevs and
explosions. Then we started to
treat the wounded." She said
passing vehicles were stopped
and those most seriously
wounded were put into them to
be taken to the hospital. Within a
short time ambulances arrived
and helicopters transferred the
most seriously wounded to three
hospitals in Jerusalem
Hadassah at Ein Kerem,
Hadassah on Mount Scopus and
Shaarei Zedek.
LIGHTS n mg. "in". 0.8 mg nicotine, LIGHT 100's Tl mg "W, 0.9 mg.nicotine.M. pet cigarette. FTC Report DEC. 79
*'' 'ooa ,. o'M'tr-o" rf/9


Page8
TheJeu-ish Fbridian of Pabn Beach County
Friday. May 16,
1980
Browsing in Books by Elsie Leviton
Anthology Appeals to Older Citizens
By JOSEPH MERSAND.
Guest Reviewer
Roth Granatz LveU. Editor
MIDDLE AGE. OLD AGE.
Short Stories. Plays and Essays
on Aging. New York: Harcourt.
Brace. Jovanovich, 390 pp. S7.95.
By the year 2000, the average
American will be 40 years old.
Today, he is only 29. Hence the
need for an anthology of high
quality literary selections from
various periods and from many
lands that would appeal to the
middle-aged and the older
citizens. To the best of my
knowledge, this is the first an-
thology of its kind; and it well
merits our attention.
Editor Lyell has divided
selections into seven parts:
her
Generational Relationships; '
Disappointment. the Life
Review, and Unresolved Con-
flicts; Old Age as Wisdom and
Peace; Loss; Dying and Death;
Alone with Peers; and The Life
Cycle.
Here one meets some of the
classics like Cicero on "Of Death
and Old Age," Confucius: more
recent classics like Browning's
Rabbi Ben Ezra" and Walter S.
Landor," On His 75th Brithday"
and many contemporary
novelists, poets, and short story
writers.
I was particularly pleased to
see the following selections by
Jewish writers: Edna Ferber's
Old Man Minidc." Thyra
Samter Winslow's Grandma"
and The Odd Old Lady."
Aharon Megged's "The Name.'
Arthur Miller's" Search for a
Future. Babette Deutsch s Old
Women" and Isaac Disraeli's
"The Progress of Old Age in New
Studies."
It would be a superb textbook
for discussion groups, for college
classes on the problems of aging
and for one's personal pleasure 1
recommend it highly.
..EKLUvJ?00? ch| of
the Library Committee of Temple
Israel Library, a community
service library open to n
residents to Palm Beach County
The public is invited to visit and
borrow books. Call 832-8421.
U.S. Says No to
Palestinian State
By YITZHAK RABI
\ UNITED NATIONS (JTA|
The Israel Mission to the
United Nations issued a state-
ment here, following the vote in
the Security Council on a reso-
lution calling for the establish-
ment of a Palestinian state,
declaring that the only way to
advance the cause of peace in the
Mideast is "through direct and
serious negotiations on the basis
of principles set up in the Camp
' Da v id fra me work.'
' The United States vetoed the
< Tunisian-sponsored resolution,
i while the four West European
< members of the Council
t France, Britain, Norway and
Portugal abstained. The
I Soviet Union and the People's
I Republic of China, along with the
' eight other members of the
Council. supported the
, resolution.
THE RESOLUTION called for
the creation of an "independent
state in Palestine," for the Pales-
tinian people; called on Israel to
withdraw from all the territories
t took in June, 1967. "including
Jerusalem"; and affirmed the
right of the Palestinian refugees
to choose between peaceful re-
patriation and equitable compen-
J sat ion for their property.
the vote that a special session of
the General Assembly would be
sought.
Professor Lyell has provided
an introduction to each part in
which she discusses the theme as
a problem of aging and relates
the insights found in the readings
to the findings of current
gerontological research.
Where can one find a collection
that would include Leo Tolstoy.
Katherine Anne Porter, Theodore
Dresier, Edgar Lee Lasters,
Robinson Jeffers, Dylan Thomas,
W.H. Auden. William Butler
Yeats, and Pierre Ronsard. not to
mention the complete script for
Robert Anderson's "I Never
Sang for My Father."
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In its statement, Israel
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peace" in the Mideast the
Camp David agreements and
was designed to interfere with the
, autonomy negotiations for the
Palestinians and undermine
Security Council Resolution 242.
Explaining the U.S. veto,
1 Ambassador Donald McHenry
told the Council before the vote
i that the Camp David accords are
the only "politically viable
avenue available" for reaching a
Mideast settlement." No one has
been able to come up with a
working alternative," he added.
McHENRY SAID that if the
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irst time in modern history-
He said that on an issue of
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Friday, May 16,1980
The Jewish Flqridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
Ask Thorny Questions
Women Pursue Ordination
Quest with Seminary Solons
Bv BF.N fJAi I nn
EASTERN EUROPE:
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Some 100 members of a new.
organization seeking to persuade
the faculty of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America
to accept women as rabbinical
candidates for Conservative
Judaism met here in the second
public action by the group for
that goal.
Elaine Kahn of New York, one
of the six coordinators of the
Group for the Rabbinic
Ordination of Women, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
the primarily lay audience at-
tending the forum at the Con-
servative Synagogue of Riverdale
comprised roughly half of men
and half of women. She also told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that four of the GROW coor-
dinators are men.
The first GROW-sponsored
lobbying meeting, held Mar. 19 in
front of the JTS building, was
called to demonstrate to the JTS
and to the public "widespread
dissatisfaction" over the decision
last Dec. 20 by the JTS Faculty
Senate to postpone indefinitely
any Seminary faculty action on
the issue.
A RESOLUTION calling on
the JTS to admit women for
rabbinical training was approved
by delegates to the 1977 con-
vention of the Rabbinical
Assembly, the association of
Conservative rabbis. The
delegates agreed to postpone
action on that resolution after Dr.
Gerson Cohen, JTS chancellor,
promised to set up a commission
of 14 members, with himself as
chairman, committed to sub-
mitting the commission's fin-
dings to the JTS faculty for
action.
Cohen said at the time that the
commission's findings, expected
to favor admittance of women,
would be submitted with a
commission request to act on the
findings early in 1979.
In its final report, the com-
mission submitted a recom-
mendation to the 1979 RA
convention declaring it found
nothing in Jewish Law barring
women from becoming rabbis and
proposed that "qualified women
be ordained." That was the
finding and recommendation
which the JTS Faculty voted to
defer indefinitely.
THE FORUM heard Rabbi
Mayer Rabinowitz, Professor of
Talmud at the JTS; Rabbi Linda
Holtzman, a 1979 graduate of the
Recon8tructionist Rabbinical
College, who is rabbi for Beth
Israel Congregation, a Con-
servative synagogue in Coats-
ville. Pa.; and Frances Klags-
brun, one of the members of the
Cohen commission.
Holtzman told the forum that
not only had she found no
resistance or objections to her as
rabbi of the Conservative
^congregation but that, in fact.
N she was sought out for such
4 ceremonies as weddings within
the congregation. Asked whether
she was getting the same salary
as a male rabbi would in that
pulpit, she replied "definitely,
yes."
Klagsbrun, who said she has
been traveling extensively for a
book she has written, told the
forum that everywhere she went
she was asked about women
rabbis. Declaring she was
"angry" over the JTS Faculty
^.postponement decision, she said
' it was "ridiculous and unfair to
exclude women from the Con-
servative rabbinate. She also
asserted that the overwhelming
majority of members of the
movement did favor such or-
dination.
issue in the debate was not
Halachic but political. He said
the question of women rabbis
serving as witness was a legal
question but one which could be
resolved by rabbinic in-
terpretation. He said that, in
respect to other rabbinic duties,
such as preaching, teaching and
counseling, there were no
Halachic barriers.
Reporting that the issue will be
raised at the Women's League
convention in November, she told
the forum that "women all over
the country are asking" for
ordination of women. She said,
Let's not pretend that they are
not."
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. May 16,1980
URGENT. .
Reserve your space on the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County's
Community Mission to Israel TODAY.
Airfares are going up as of JUNE 1. 1980.
All reservations made prior to this date
will be booked at the current rate. For further
information, contact Ronni Tartakow at the
Jewish Federation office 832-2120.
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Community Calendar
Temple Beth Sholom Men's Club Women's American ORT-
Evemng Fundraiser
Mqr 19
ji JEWISH FEDERATION EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETING 7:30 p.m.
:j: JEWISH FEDERATION ENDOWMENT FUND BREAKFAST 8:30 a.m.
;j: Women's American ORT Palm Beach Hadassah Tikvah 1
8 p.m. Temple Israel Sisterhood noon Jewish Family &
:; Children's Service board 7:30 p.m. United Order of True
>| Sisters noon Hadassah Shalom 7 p.m. JEWISH
;:: FEDERATION LETTER OF INTENT MEETING noon.
I May 20
j:j Temple Israel Confirmation 8 p.m Temple Beth El Sisterhood
Women's American ORT Golden Lakes 1 p.m. Hadassah
: H. Szold 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3041 8 p.m. Congregation
$ Anshei Sholom Sisterhood 1 p.m. Pioneer Women Theodore
g Herzl donor luncheon B'nai B'rith Menorah board 10 a.m.
S JEWISH FEDERATION COMMUNITY RELATIONS COUNCIL
SOVIET JEWRY TASK FORCE 3 p.m.
I May 21
::
A Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood board 10 a.m. Women's
American ORT- Palm Beach County Region -9:30 a.m. 'Pioneer
Women Golda Meir board 1 p.m.
May 22
SHAVUOTH American Jewish Committee 8 p.m. Hadassah -
Chai 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Medina 8 p.m.
Hadassah Aliya 1 p.m. Hadassah Bat Gurion Installation
noon.
May 24
Temple Beth El Social Set.
May 24
MEMORIAL DAY Women's American ORT Poinciana 12:30 ::
| p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Boynton board 1 p.m.
May 27 |
Temple Israel board 8 p.m. Women's American ORT- Lake !
B Worth 1 p.m. Congregation Anshei Sholom 1 p.m.
I""2* I
| JEWISH FEDERATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING 8 p.m. '-'
;: National Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach.
| May 29
5 Congregation Anshei Sholom card party.
When you re ready
for dunkin
instead of munchin
Swiss Knight Fondue has made "dunkin'' very
glamorous because there's nothing so elegantly
informal, beautifully entertaining or as teasingly
delicious as when serving Swiss Knight Fondue
The special blend of Emmenthaler and natural
Swiss Gruyere gives this treat a special ta am that
makes it "just right'' to enjoy no matter what else
you're serving. Made bubbling hot and served with
bread cubes and fruit, Swiss Knight Fondue is as
easy to prepare as it is to eat!
IMPORTED BY THE NESTLE COMPANY
CHEESE DIVISION
100 Bloomingdale Road, White Plains, NY. 10605
his Wife. Moriah Ann* Tsrpl's Cnrmul ('innoml in M

Israel Prime Minister Menachem Begin (left) and U.S. Sen. Richard Stone (D., Fla.) shake
hands at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee coffee honoring the Prime Minister during
his April visit to Washington.
The
BJU1
KOSHER
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GALA JULY 4th
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MUml Beach
A A 1 A ,I I
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July 4 to July 6 ZE July 3 to July 6
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INCLUDING GLATT KOSHER MEALS
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Entertainment Dancing Color TV Theatre
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Make Tour Early leservatlons For The
HIGH HOLT DATS >,.. $175 p.. p~. ~u. ..
Servicei on Fremiae*. by prominent Cantor
For Reservations Phone: 1-672-0333
If all we enjoyed was a perfect Passover
DAYENU!
We express our heartfelt thanks to all of you who
made it so memorable.
5H !!^S C?mers ** earth yu cam* celebrate
?Ja 1? EurODeand Australia. Canada. Mexico
and South Amenca. the Near and Far East... indeed
from Jacksonville to Jerusalem, you made the Concord
your home for the holiday. *^oncora
Adding richness, depth and warmth to our Festival.
To all who performed in our spiritual program- our
superb entertainers and speakers, the many stars of
me theater and cultural worlds, to all of you our
deepest gratitude. ^
Not for just making this Passover such a glowino
expenence. but for reminding us once a|ain of ti^e
arversity. strength, and unconquerable spirit of a creat
people celebrating a glorious tradition. S
CONCORD
Horn
e i
Kiamesha Lake New York 127:
nr\,
11
MM
"v*.


Friday. May 16, I960
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

Page 11
r
Measure to Assure
W. Bank Seniritv
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Ministerial Security
Committee will soon decide
on a series of measures to
restore the calm to Judea
and Samaria.
*N The Cabinet has rejected
criticism voiced against the
defense establishment
following the Hebron at-
tack.
The Cabinet expressed con-
dolences to the bereaved families
and offered greetings to the
wounded.
ALTHOUGH THE final
putcome of the cabinet meeting
was a rejection of the criticism
voiced against the defense
establishment and Defense
Minister Ezer Weizman, some of
the ministers expressed their own
criticism against the policy which
was adopted so far in the
territories.
Interior Minister Dr. Yosef
Burg demanded the establish-
ment of an investigation com-
mittee to look into the conditions
that led to the Hebron massacre.
But Prime Minister Menachem
Begin expressed reservation at
the criticism. He stated that the
cabinet should bear collective
responsibility for the state of
security in the territories.
Deputy Prune Minister Prof.
Yigael Yadin said the Cabinet
could not accept criticism such aa
that which was voiced against
Weizman. He proposed that the
Cabinet should express con-
fidence in Weizman.
REGARDING THE necessary
reaction to the Hebron attack,
Prime Minister Begin spoke
against hasty measures. One
should adopt a considerate and
'' balanced policy, he said, which
would enable co-existence with
the Arabs and the successful
conclusion of the autonomy talks.
DEFENSE MINISTER Ezer
Weizman accepted the
responsibility for the security
policy in the territories. But he
warned that Israel should not
deviate from working toward an
agreement with Egypt, which
was important for the security of
Israel and the breaking of its
isolation inthe region.
He suggested that the
autonomy talks should take place
'''in greater paces," while
ascertaining the security in-
terests of the country. He
suggested that the policy in the
territories should be one of "the
righteous thrive, the wicked
suffer." Details will be worked
out this week by the Ministerial
Defense Committee.
1
AJCong. Women
Elect Presidents
WASHINGTON Chiae
Herzig, of Baltimore, and Marion
A. Wilen, of Philadelphia have
been elected co-presidents of the
American Jewish Congress
National Women's Division.
The two leaders were installed
as the closing session of the
Division's national convention at
the Hyatt-Regency. Mrs. Herzig
and Mrs. Wilen succeed Leona F.
ttihanin of New York, who served
' as president for five years.
Both Mrs. Herzig and Mrs.
Wilen have served as presidents
of their local women's groups and
as national vice presidents of the
Division.
Weizman was expected to
deliver a statement this week in
the Knesset on the Hebron attack
on behalf of the government.
Following the statement, the
Knesset was to conduct a general
debate on the subject thus
opening its summer session.
NINE OF the Hebron
wounded were still hospitalized
Sunday at the Hebrew
University Hadassah medical
center in Jerusalem. President
Yitzhak Navon visited the
wounded holding long chats
with every one of them.
Tal ing to reporters, Navon said
that the policy in the territories
should not be influenced by such
acts of violence.
Engagement
Shartsis-Roberts
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob H.
Shartsis of Pensacola announce
the engagement of their
daughter, Sandra, to Mark
Elliott Roberts, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Hyman J. Roberts of West
Palm Beach.
The bride-elect is a graduate of
Washington High School and the
University of Florida, where she
majored in business finance.
Mr. Roberts, a graduate of
Forest Hill High School and the
University of Florida, now at-
tends Emory University Dental
School in Atlanta. Ga.
A June 22 wedding is planned.
Sandra Shartsis
Welcome to Herb Hartman:
A Palm Beach County native, Herb
attended Palm Beach Gardens High
School, Palm Beach Jr. College, FAU and
the U. of Florida. Herb's hobby is
photography. He was with Publix for 5
years before joining us at Stewart's Lake
Park Toyota. Herb loves the car business
and is really doing well.
U. S. #1 in North Palm Beach
across from Twin City Mall
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P.O. Bex 3990 Grand Central Stahen
NewYerk. NY 10017
Prize will be awarded as soon as compliance ot win-
ing entry with these rules is vended In order to be
awarded the prize winning participant must be avail-
able a the address shown on the entry blank or must
turnrsh a proper lorwardHig address lo sv._epstakes
officials prior lo the date ol drawing
Prize consists ol round trip economy airfare lor two via
Pan Am to London or Rome and connecting ejt to Tea
Aviv. Israel, plus hotel accarnmorJabons lor 14 days
and 13 nights tn Jerusalem or Tel Am
No substitution lor prize Prize is non-translerable and
not redeemable lor cash The trip must De taken in I960
on an available Pan Am scheduled departure date
The sweepstakes is open lo all U S residents, except
residents cl Utah, and employees (and the* tamkesi ol
General Foods Corporation, its advertising agencies
subsiAaries or affiliates or Joseph Jacobs Organza
lion, inc Federal, stale and local regulations, if any
apply Vox) m any kxaMy where taxed restricted or
prohibited by law
J. All taxes are the sole responsibility ol the winner
11. Each entry has an equal chance ot winning There is no
pre-detefmined winner Your chances of winning are
dependent on and vary according lo the actual number
ot entries recerved
OFFICIAL ENTRY BLANK
MAIL TO: Taste 01 Tradition Sweepstakes
General Foods Corporation
P0 Box 3660
Grand Central Station
New York. N Y 10017
I Name__
| Address
| City--------
Slate
INTER AS OFTEN AS TOO LIKE NO PURCHASE NECESSARV
Zip

1


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, May 1, 1980
What a United Jerusalem Means to the Three Major Faiths^^
By TEDDY KOLLEK
Mayor of Jerusalem
The fact that all three great
monotheistic religions find mean-
ing in Jerusalem cannot be a ran-
dom accident. I think the reason
is clear. First of all, Jerusalem is
a beautiful place set in the mys-
tical Judaean Hills, conducive to
meditation and thought and
wonder at the meaning of life.
And secondly, for all their
tensions and exclusiveness, the
three great religions are
historically deeply interrelated.
Jesus came to Jerusalem
because he was a Jew who made
the pilgrimage to the City of
David and the Temple.
Mohammed, whose roots were in
Mecca and Medina, is said to
have visited Jerusalem during his
night ride because his ideas and
his vision were interrelated with
Judaism and Christianity.
We must live with the reality
of these connections. For cen-
turies, men have fought and died
because of them. But I am not
alone in feeling intensely that
men can also live in brotherhood
because of them.
THESE .VERY connections
make any division of Jerusalem a
senseless exercise. The remaining
Western Wall of the Temple en-
closure, the Church of the Holy
Sepulchre and the Dome of the
Rock are all in the Old City
within yards of each other. The
Dome of the Rock is actually on
top of the Temple Mount, the
very site of the Temple of the
Jews. .
The religious tenets of the
Muslims exclude international-
ization because they reject the
idea that the Temple Mount
the Haram should be ruled by
infidels. From that point of view,
Dr. (Kurt) Waldheim is as much
an infidel as I am. Moreover, it
does not accord with their
political aspirations. As to the
Jews, the centrality of Jerusalem
in Jewish faith and tradition and
the intensity of Jewish feeling
about Jerusalem are reflected in
the 2,000-year-old prayer re-
peated throughout the centuries,
"Next year in Jerusalem."
This symbolizes not only a
religious hope but memories of
ancient glories under Jewish rule
and an unyielding struggle for
their revival. All this is expressed
for Jews in the word "Jeru-
salem." The Jewish people
cannot give up Jerusalem, nor
can or will they ever again
remove their capital from
Jerusalem .
The mayor of Jerusalem does
not make foreign policy; that is
the function of Israel's national
government. But when I look at
the future of Jerusalem, there are
two premises with which vir-
tually everyone in Israel agrees.
Those are the premises I have
already suggested: that
Jerusalem shall remain undivided
and that it shall remain the
capital of Israel. All
Jerusalemites of every per-
suasion demand that, under
whatever political solution, the
city will remain accessible to all
and the rights of every religion to
its holy places will be preserved.
THESE TWO conditions have
The following are excerpts
from an article in the dis-
tinguished periodical,
'Foreign Affairs,' by Jeru-
salem Mayor Teddy Kol-
lek on the occasion of Yom
Yerushalayim (Jerusalem
Day) which is being cele-
brated this year May 15.
The celebration combines
the observance of the 32nd
anniversary of the State of
Israel proclaimed May 14,
1948 (according to the
English calendar)
now existed for 13 years since
the city was so unexpectedly
unified when the Jordanians
attacked Israel in the June, 1967
War. And I think that the history
of relations in Jerusalem between
Jews, Arabs and Christians
during this decade points to the
kind of solution we should
eventually evolve for Jerusalem.
Tensions do exist, today in the
city, and nobody can deny them.
But it was a much less happy city
when walls and barbed wire
divided it; and it was certainly a
more violent city than it is today.
We have made progress towards
a city of tolerant co-existence in
which common interests are
emerging, and we have estab-
lished crucial principles that
make continuing progress
possible. Four of these principles
are:
There shall be free access to
all the Holy Places, and they
shall be administered by their
adherents;
Everything possible shall be
done to ensure unhindered
development of the Arab way of
life in the Arab sections of the
city and to ensure the Arabs a
practical religious, cultural, and
commercial governance wer their
own dairy lives. The same holds
true, of course, for the various
Christian communities;
Everything possible should
be done to ensure equal govern-
mental, municipal and social
services in all parts of the city;
9 Continuing efforts should be
made to increase cultural, social
and economic contacts among the
various elements of Jerusalem's
population .
FOR SOME time now, I have
envisioned a future structure in
Jerusalem under which the city
would be governed through a
network of boroughs. Each
borough would have a great deal
of autonomy over its own
municipal services and its life
style. It would decide its own
needs and priorities. It would be
modeled not on the boroughs of
New York but on those of
London, which have their own
budgets and a great deal of in-
dependence.
Of course, the borough idea is
not a panacea. The Arabs will
want the Temple Mount to be in
their borough, and no Jew would
agree to that. But the proposal
does suggest an approach under
which many of the aspects of
everyday life can be delegated to
local authorities, and the people
of the various neighborhoods can
feel some increasing control over
By making our efforts per-
manent, by assuring their ad-
ministration of the Temple
Mount and by increasing their
local autonomy, we hope to
diminish any feeling among Jeru-
salem's Arabs that their way of
life is threatened by Israeli
sovereignty. We want to create a
secure future for Arabs within
the capital of Israel .
JEWS CARE intensely about
Jerusalem. The Christians have
Rome and Canterbury and even
Salt Lake City; Muslims have
Mecca and Medina. Jerusalem
has great meaning for them also.
But the Jews have only
Jerusalem, and only the Jews
have made it their capital. That is
why it has so much deeper a
meaning for them than for any-
body else.
When the city was reunited 13
years ago, all Jews, not only the
religious but also the secular, felt
the ancient prophecy fulfilled.
Jerusalem was our capital even
when we were not here for
2,000 years. Nobody else ever
made it their capital: on the two
occasions the Arabs could have
made Jerusalem their capital,
they did not. In the Middle Ages,
they chose Ramie, near Tel Aviv,
on the way to Jerusalem, and in
1948 they chose Amman, which
they preferred to Jerusalem.
We do not aspire to find
solutions to all the problems of
the Middle East in Jerusalem.
This is a complicated city with
conflicting interests, and it is
impossible to satisfy all the
wishes of everybody .
Breyers yogurt is
not just all natural,
its all kosher, too.
W* j*J> *
.*T WT S 0
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Ffl,

In fact, Breyers yogurt
is so kosher the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congrega-
tions puts its seal of approval
on every cup
And just wait until you taste what's in
every cup. Because Breyers is the creamy smooth,
full of fruit yogurt There's luscious strawberry
raspberry, black cherry, peach and lots of other
favorite flavors And don't forget, it's made with
r8
;i"'j active yogurt cultures.
You can pick up all the Ereyers
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So when you're shopping for yogurt, look for
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fiw\w,\*.


. ...

ly 16, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm BeachVbunty
Page 13
ause Someone Cared
ligion Ploys Important Role
! SOMEONE CARED
TEPHEN LEVITT,
A.C.S.W.
lonal view from the
i director of the Jewish
& Children's Service
se names mentioned in
ties are fictitious; client
jn at Jewish Family Service is held in the
^confidence.)
last article, I touched
"special relationship"
a therapist and his
[who share the same or
ligious beliefs.
ihaustive study was
at the University of
y William Henry and
is, which eventually led
iblication of a technical
the subject of the public
private lives of
erapists.
rork helped to debunk a
1 myths concerning the
ty and nature of those in
^ing professions," most
f which was the oft-
fallacy that
ipists grow up in
Ivironments of severe
instability hence
life selection of a
which deals with
souls and tortured
ctually, Henry & Sims
a rather conventional
on the part of all
rapists (the studv
included: psycho-
psychiatrists,
social workers and
fchologists).
study of the charac-
of a "successful"
|ip established between
st and his client, they
It religion played an
; role. In fact, it was the
variable affecting the
that was found in
spanning nearly a
L study sample covered
sr metropolitan areas
: City, Chicago and Los
In one somewhat
fact, it was revealed
approximately 4,500
psychotherapists in
feity sample 40 percent
ih.
rne of the survey, these
ychotherapists had
ktely 75,000 patients
jatment. You may be
I note the percentage of
> CANTOR for high holi-
conservative congre
iutitul baritone lyric
silent traditional nusach.
many congregations
vt the U.S. Call mornings
|s 'or further information.
i National
Insurance Co.
ytMtyii
m
'os 1*
jral Agent
i Schulman, CLU
aim Beach
i Blvd.
170
i National Insurance Co.
[Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.
683-6470
Stephen Levitt
clients who were Jewish, exactly
40 percent (30,000).
Aside from some of the more
obvious questions as to how all
this came about (although
nationally we constitute 2'.j
percent of the population, in the
three selected cities the Jewish
population is in the 10 percent-15
percent range) the conclusion
drawn by Henry & Sims is that
the most significant factor in
determining who a
psychotherapist may ultimately
accept as a client on a continuing
basis is religion. In their view;
the commonality of belief
systems and shared experiences
is critical in the formation of a
relationship; these common
experiences may even supercede
such variables as an ability to
pay the fee or socio-economic
similarities between the therapist
and his client.
IN SHORT, it is helpful to
share a common background,
history and tradtion; it is in these
that we find the essence of what
ties us together, both the joys
and the sorrow. The cold, ascetic
view of a psychotherapist con-
ducting his "science" as though
his own personal background and
humanity did not enter into the
picture, is essentially an incorrect
one.
Through my review of this
literature it became very ap-
parent to me, how the female
client mentioned in my last
article could talk about a fairly
typical marriage problem, but
not without also touching upon
her personal ethnic and religious
background, for these charac-
teristics surely played a
significant part in the
development of her life; her
unconscious selection of a Jewish
agency for treatment clearly
revealed that she wished to deal
with her background per-
sonal history- even though she
was not quite ready to verbally
admit it.
(The Jewish Family &
Children's Service is a non-profit
agency designed to meet the
social, emotional and counseling
needs of the Jewish community
of Palm Beach County. Our office
is located at 2411 Okeechobee
Boulevard. Our telephone
number is 684-1991. The Jewish
Family & Children's Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County).
Commander Morton Gordon (left) of the Golden-Century Post
501 of the Jewish War Veterans is shown presenting a check to
Virginia S. Madden, medical administrative officer of the V.A.
Clinic in Riviera Beach, while David Kaplan, post service officer
looks on. The gift is to be used to update and improve the
clinic's public address system.
r^
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13*


Page 14
The.Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
sy. May 16, 1980
ZOA Leader:
Americans Live in Energy Fantasy Land
NEW YORK. N.Y. Upon
his return from a five-day, on-the-
spot examination of U.S. energy
facilities, Ivan J. Novick, "presi-
dent of the Zionist Organization
of America (ZOA), reported that
"the American people have been
living in an energy fantasy land
for the past 30 years.
"It is obvious that a greater
commitment to the solution of
our energy crisis by the American
populace is both necessary and
vital," according to Novick. He
believes that "a great deal of con-
flicting information regarding
U.S. energy policy has been dis-
seminated to the public at large."
Through the efforts of Dr.
Zalman Shapiro, a nationally
known scientist and chairman of
the ZOA Energy Committee, the
ZOA sponsored and coordinated
an in-depth energy study tour
from April 20-25 for 20 leaders of
major American Jewish Or-
ganizations, representing a con-
stituency of 4 million U.S.
citizens.
"The American Jewish leaders
had the opportunity to observe
and evaluate, first-hand, our
country's energy options, and to
reinforce their beliefs in the
crucial need to inform the
American people of the true
status of our country's current
methods of large scale energy
production, mainly coal and
nuclear.
IN ADDITION, valuable in-
sight was gained in the area of
research and development of
alternative sources of energy,
?>
V\"v
II
SK* :>

( FURNlTUR &**.&**>

including the actual availability
of wind,' solar-electric and syn-
thetic fuel, as well as a wide range
of potential long-term solutions.
The leaders acknowledged the
need for a balanced view
regarding immediate and
cumulative social and environ-
mental effects and also became
aware of the necessary trade-offs
that are part of the use of each
alternative energy source,"
Novick and Dr. Shapiro stated.
A consensus was reached with-
in the leadership group that "it is
imperative that our national
efforts be directed toward the
utilization of energy technology
now readily available to us, as
well as toward an ongoing
program of research and develop-
ment of new and alternate
sources for the future."
Dr. Shapiro noted, "The need
for public education concerning
our nation's energy crisis is
paramount, and the ZOA will
continue to be in the forefront of
the national educational effort in
the energy area. The American
Jewish community, as affected
citizens, has every reason to be
vocal and active on this complex
and all-important national
issue."
"This is not a time for silence.
In view of the shrinking time
frame, this is a time for citizen
action and involvement to
mobilize our country toward
freedom from dependence on
foreign energy supplies."
stressed Novick.
MAJOR organizations, in-
cluding the National Council of
Jewish Women, B'nai B'rith,
American Jewish Congress,
United Synagogue of America.
Anti-Defamation League of the
B'nai B'rith, Hadassah, Jewish
War Veterans of America,
National Federation of Jewish
Men's Clubs, American Jewish
Press Association, North
American Jewish Students Net-
work, National Jewish Com-
munity Relations Advisory
Council (NJCRAC), American
Zionist Federation, American
Technion Society and the Syna-
gogue Council of America were
represented in the leadership
group touring U.S. energy
facilities.
The itinerary for the five-day
tour included visits to a coal-fired
plant and a synfuel facility in
Pittsburgh, Pa.; the National
Aeronautic Space Agency in
Cleveland, Ohio; a nuclear power
plant and operator training
center in Zion, 111.; the Sandia
National Laboratories in
Albuquerque, N.M.; and the
National Reactor Testing Station
in Idaho Falls, Idaho.
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Because Eastern offers anyone age
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serve in the continental U.S. out
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our Super Saver tares!
At Eastern, seniority really
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In order to fly for half-rare,
simply i.ill us or your travel agent,
make reservations and ask for our
special 60 Plus Fare. Plan to stay
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(maximumstay is 60days).
Please remember to bring
along acceptable identification in
ouier to verify thai you are at least
60, because you may be requested
to show proof of age whenbuying
tickets and/or when boarding.
The 60 Plus Fare has a 7-day
ach ance reservation and ticket
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Seats are limited and may not
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For additional information
ah .ut t.ire-1 ir reservations, call the
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ot Eastern Airlines.

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16,1960
i i


The Jewish Fhridian of Palm Beach County
Pel5
Bond Organization Launches
1980 Reinvestment Campaign
ive campaign to secure
it of Israel Bonds
e matured or will come
g 1980 has been
by the Israel Bond
n.
83 million in coupon
s Bonds will mature
said Arthur H.
Israel Bond national
t chairman. "In
ere were $45 million
Bonds outstanding as
, 1979. This makes a
f over S125 million in
ds which should be
during 1980.
t a peace treaty has .
between Israel and Jf /*. SoutA Palm Beach County chairman for State of
County Women's
[Joseph said, "Israel
Bond reinvestment
>th to continue its
leconomic development
Beet the extraordinary
Henges of peace. Israel
have the full use of
>m matured Bonds, as
kt be set aside for
Ion payments. By
;, Bondholders put this
ack into the nation's
where it is so vitally
[this time."
to Sam Rothberg of
general chairman of
orga nization, a $ 1 -
Economic Development
lace Loan (Sixth
ent Issue of Israel
las launched in 1979 to
el bear its increased
[burden.
Israel Bonds, and his wife, Rose, South ,
i^Tnv mT/- "ere among Jewish leaders wh ""<
Israeli Prime Minister Menachem
recently.
Begin in Washington
"The uprecedented needs of
peace place a greater respon-
sibilty on the Israel Bond
organization than ever before,"
Rothberg said. "The peace treaty
sets a three-year deadline for
shifting large civilian and
military populations from the
Sinai to the Negev. The first of
those years is more than half over
and a vast new civilian in-
frastructure must still be built in
the Negev to accomodate the
people who must be moved there.
In addition. Israel's continuing
economic development cannot be
impeded."
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Open for breakfast 7 10:30 a.m.
lunch 11:30 a.m. -2:30 p.m.
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I
Joseph said that the Fourth
Development Issue State of
Israel Savings Bonds which
mature throughout 1980, and the
Third Development Issue
Coupon Bonds maturing in
March, were bought at an earlier
stage of Israel's economic
growth. "They were an af-
firmation of faith in a solidarity
with Israel. Now that a peace
treaty exists, it is absolutely vital
that Bondholders continue to
express that faith.
Dr. Marvin Rosenberg,
chairman of the board for Palm
Beach County Israel Bonds,
reminded holders of matured
Bonds that these Bonds stop
paying interest at maturity.
Local Bondholders are urged to
get in touch with the Israel Bond
office.
"Reinvestment of matured
Bonds is a simple process," Dr.
Rosenberg said, "but there are
certain necessary forms that
must be filled out. The sooner
this process is completed, the
sooner the Bonds begin to earn
nterest and Israel can benefit
rom additional investment
ollars for its projects for peace."
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i.;h Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, May 16,1980
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
2415 Okeechobee Blvd. West Palm Beach, Fla. 689 7700
GENERATION TO GENERATION,
Reflections on
Summer Days...
Fun & Friends,
Old & New
CALL THE CENTER FOR
CAMP REGISTRATION
TODAY!
4*"
'.
The CENTER will be CLOSED on the following days for SHAVUOT
TUESDAY, MAY 20th at 5:00 P.M. and
WEDNESDAY, MAY 22nd ALL DAY
THURSDAY, MAY 2 3rd ALL DAY MONbAY, MAY 26th, MEMORIAL DAY
JCC Events for Seniors

The Comprehensive Senior
Service Center is funded by Title
III OAA through Gulfstream
Areawide Council on Aging,
providing transportation to
transit disadvantaged adults 60
years or older in a designated
area, and a full education and
recreation program. Call the
Center for more information.
ONGOING ACTIVITIES
Adult Education Classes
The following are now in session:
Monday, Oil Painting, 9 a.m. to
noon; Tuesday, Transactional
Analysis, 10 a.m. to noon;
Wednesday, How to Survive
after Your Spouse Says Goodbye,
12:30 to 2:30 p.m.; Writers
Workshop, 3 to 5 p.m.; Friday.
Yoga Walking Tall, 1:30 to 3
p.m.
All adult education classes are
provided through the Com-
munity In Service Program of
Palm Beach County Schools -
Adult Education, Carole C. Cecil,
director.
The following is a letter
received from one of the members
of the Adult Education Classes:
Jean Kubin, Director
JCC
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.
W.P.B..F1. 33409
Dear Ms. Rubin:
Thank you for the May issue of
"JCC Update" JCC ddes have
a lot going on, and the "update"
does indicate this.
I do particularly want to
express my enthusiasm about the
course offered by Dr. Tim
fe. Moriah. nnri
after Your Spouse Says Good-
bye" most interesting and
informative and masterfully
presented by Dr. Schachner.
Keep up the good work of
bringing such programs and
features to us and by all means
continue with this and future
presentations by Dr. Schachner.
Cordially,
George Salage
Timely Topics for Thinking
Women and Round Table Talk
for Men meets Mondays at 1:30
p.m. Sylvia Skolnik and Joe
Greenberg, discussion leaders.
Know Your Car Provided by
Palm Beach Junior College.
Fridays at 11 a.m. Instructor
Paul Oblas. Everyone invited to
attend.
Medicare Assistance Ed
Rosen and Carl Sitzer. trained
volunteers through Social
Security, provide aid with forms
and any help you need regarding
Medicare. Every third Monday
from 1 to 3 p.m.
Artist of the Month Paul
Reinman.
Speakers Club Thursdays
from 10 a.m. to noon.
EXTENSION CLASSES
Poinciana Joy Through
Movement Dance therapy
classes conducted by Celia
Golden, licensed therapist, meet
every Thursday morning. Call
Celia Golden for information.
These classes have been made
possible by the courtesy of
Poinciana. i
Century Village Knitting-
faraAl'ft Cnnanl 0npr1
second and fourth Monday from
1 to 3 p.m. Instructor, Sonna
Simon. Call Bonnie at the JCC
for information.
The Jewish Community Center
Comprehensive Senior Service
Center thanks the National
Council of Jewish Women,
Martha Nadler, chairperson, for
providing an outstanding series
Art Appreciation for Adults,
this past year. Special thanks to
the following lecturers: Freida
Majzlin. Augusta Sandier.
Marien Leavitt, Florence Wachs,
Joan Lustig and Marilyn
Tschida.
COMING EVENTS
Card Party May 18, 1 to 4
p.m. Lunch. Arrange your own
tables. Bring your man jongg
sets, canasta cards, etc. Spon-
sored by the Second Tuesday
Club.
Senior Olympics The 1980
Palm Beach County Senior
Olympics will take place Oct. 16 -
25. The Jewish Community
Center Comprehensive Senior
Service Center is working in con-
junction with the Senior Olym-
pics Committee and will be a
central location for persons to
register for events, as well as
obtain necessary forms and infor-
mation. Winners of the State
Olympics will advance to
National Olympics, which will
take place in November. Talent
groups will also be involved.
Active and sports-minded seniors
watch for more information.
TRIPS
Flagler Museum and Lunch at
The Breakers Wednesday,
June 25. The bus leaves the
Westgate of Century Village at
10 a.m. promptly. On to the
Flagler Museum for a tour of one
* -'--------''-'-im ri
NpW i i in if '-------
Watch
"GENERATION TO GENERATION"
SUNDAY, MAY 2 5th. 1:00 P.M.
CHANNEL 12
with Hostess: BARBARA WEINSTEIN
area, and then on to The Breakers
for lunch. Limited seats avail-
able. Call Sam at the JCC for
reservations.
On the Lido Spa Just a note
to thank all the participants of
the get-away which took place
April 27 30. A special "hats off"
to Sam Kubin for his help. A
special program was held on
Sunday. April 27. to celebrate the
fifth annual meeting of the JCC
Awards were presented to Center
689-7700
volunteers. The JCC officers were
announced, and refreshments
were served.
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16. 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
ag3 f-m
Page 17-
Mindlin
ial by Jury Goes on Trial
led from Page 4
[possibly have been
[charge.
Dr. Jones who, by
deprived the Black
)f a role model, and it
bast doubt on his own
|t a community of his
aw are judged to be
consequence of the
that was imposed
I judge him.
kinds of phony
Dr. Jones' behalf
ktined to establish
edents not the
a verdict which
contribute to an
brburdened double
[ethical behavior and
weighted in favor
Inic minorities.
Viewpoint" features,
ind opinion columns
er that specialize in
[analyses, see Jones
those figures in a
isian novel, "who
ito the tragic down-
some and powerful
plication that, were
idsome and power-
ilall would not be
in mind the decline
lichard Nixon who,
i\ was far from
handsome, a failing frequently
debated during his long career.
Was the Nixon fate less tragic
therefore?
THESE ARE pivotal ques-
tions requiring carefully-con-
sidered answers because they are
diversionary. They are National
Enquirer pulp pap all tricked out
in the very respectable wardrobe
of the kind of infallible pon-
tification characteristic of, say,
the New York Times. They
remove us repeatedly from the
issue at hand the growing ten-
dency to see the Jones verdict not
as a conclusion derived from the
study of evidence but as a racist
action deliberately designed to
keep Blacks "in their place."
It is this kind of cynicism that
strikes at the very heart of the
jury process itself. "Guilty"
though he may have been judged.
School Board Chairman Phyllis
Miller has called the verdict "a
human tragedy." And that other
Cumaean Sybil of delphic
dolorousness, Joyce Knox, has
declared: "I'm sure that to a lot
of people, it still won't mean he's
guilty."
What do these pearly bits of
socratic wisdom taken from the
netherworld of their neander-
thalism mean that the verdict
was a tragedy, that public
opinion must be rallied to reverse
the jury because, sui generis, how
can "a handsome and powerful
figure" be guilty? Or that a
handsome, powerful. Black figure
must not be judged guilty?
HERE IS where the danger
lies, precisely here, in the public
statements of yahoos pandering
to an emotionally-stricken Black
community now indeed deprived
of a role model, but unwilling to
be critical of that model's tragic
flaw, incapable of saying, "We
put our money on the wrong
horse." Now merely neighing,
"The race was fixed."
If this is how Round Two is
shaping up, if racism is to be a
central issue in the attack now
shaping up on our judicial
process as it relates to favorite
minorities, then let those en-
couraging the attack also prepare
a defense against Dr. Jones' anti-
Semitic references to one of his
own attorneys in the tapes barred
by the court as evidence against
him in Round One.
It will be dilticult, indeed, for a
bigot to plead that he has been a
victim of bigotry. Even though
Jews these days (if ever) hardly
qualify as a favorite minority.
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life. And it's not even all bad. The real problem with stress is how to
recognize it and control it. So it doesn't control you.
Your body reacts to stressful situations with its nerves, glands and
hormones. And because these systems function throughout the body,
what affects them can affect other parts of your body that may be
vulnerable at the time.
That's why stress is a factor in many people's heart attacks,
hypertension, ulcers, asthma, possibly even cancers, and probably
many other ailments. That's also why, in these times of many stresses,
it's a major factor in increasingly costly health care.
You can recognize stress by heeding the warnings of your body
and emotions. Frustration. Anger. Hostilities that build up. Heavy
pressures of responsibility time demands and conflict. Headaches,
insomnia, muscle tension.
The key to handling stress is learning. Learning to air your
feelings in constructive ways, to train your body to relax, to repair a
lifestyle before you're faced with expensive medical repairs. You have
to leam what your stresses are and the best ways for.you to deal
with them. VL
But they must be dealt with. ]i ^^
Because the longer you remain in the I.IWKHTTl WATWIWAI,
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For 4 Ire* booklet about stress end preventive health care, write JF,
Liberty National. Communication Department. PO Box 2612, Birmingham. Alabama 35202
NAME-
I
I
I
I ADDRESS-
m


Page 18-
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, May 16,1980
* mabbtmcal ^amtt
Coordinated by
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev. Ph.d
avotea t feorssioa of tfcamai wd Usims
rtknt to Jtwi$* Bfa past and prtitnt
Shavuoth and Ethics
Bv RABBI DR. WILLIAM
H. SHAPIRO
Secretary Rabbinical
Council of PBCo
There is a tendency in our time
to make a distinction between
religion and ethics: the religious
people are those who believe in
God, in a high-.r power than
themselves, in a Creator and
Lord of history. There are others
who claim to live good lives,
ethical lives, who do not consider
it necessary to believe in a
Supreme Being.
Jewish tradition rejects this
false dichotomy. It believes that
the religious and ethical are one:
to separate the two is to destroy
the effectiveness of both.
Commenting on the Biblical
verse. "And God spoke all these
words saying," Rashi states:
"This teaches that the Holv One.
Blessed be He, spoke the Ten
Commandments in one ut-
terance."' The Ten Com-
mandments are all one and in-
divisible. When one chooses from
among them those that he feels
he wants to keep and rejects the
others, he thereby destroys the
effectiveness of all of them.
THE RABBIS observe that
the first five Commandments
written on one of the Tablets of
the Law, deal only with the laws
pertaining to the duties between
man and God; while the five last
Commandments, written on the
second Tablet of the Law, pertain
to the duties between man and
fellow man.
The two Tablets and the Ten
Commandments written on them
are one. It is not possible for man
to say that he will only concern
himself with the duties that he
owes to God and that he will
disregard altogether the duties
that he owes to his fellowman.
Nor is it possible for a person to
observe the duties between man
and fellowman which are, of
course, ethical precepts of the
Torah. and disregard altogether
the duties between man and God.
When Moses came down from
Mt. Sinai and saw the Children of
Israel dancing around the golden
calf, he broke the Tablets of the
Law. We can understand why he
broke the Tablet which contains
the five Commandments relating
to the duties of man to his God!
The golden calf was a defiance of
God's sovereignty and a rebellion
against the Almighty. But why
did Moses break the second
Tablet which contained the
duties between man and
fellowman? The Children of
Israel, after all, did not sin
against the ethical principles of
the second Tablet. The com-
mentators answer that once there
is no faith in God, the moral and
ethical principles will not, and
cannot last for long.
We have seen in our day
societies and governments which
base themselves supposedly on
high ethical and moral principles,
but deny the first Tablet con-
taining the duties towards a
Supreme Being. Experience has ,
taught us that soon the ethical
and moral principles are also
broken. More recently we have
observed a country like Iran,
which supposedly bases its
behavior on its faith in a Supreme
Being but has flaunted its ethical
duties towards its fellowmen.
AS SOON as man becomes the
measure of all things, man can
find reasons to perform the
crudest acts and yet feel he is
following ethical and moral
standards. Only those ethical
principles which are suffused and
informed by a faith in a higher
Rabbi Shapiro
changes of time and cir-
cumstance.
If there are no moral and
ethical absolutes, and they only
depend upon man's own stan-
dards, then, of course, they would
change as man changes and as
the climate of his society
changes.
The Book of Ecclesiastes
contains much worldly wisdom,
and it is replete with high ethical
and moral principles. But the
wisest of all men was wise enough '
to conclude all of his advice with
the following statement: The
end of the matter, all having been
heard: fear God and keep His
Commandments; for this is the
whole man.''
Only the fear of God. only faith
in a Supreme Being, will create
the conditions for man where he
can keep God's Commandments,
all of them, and live the ethical
and the moral life.
The Festival of Shavuoth
reminds us that the highest
principles by which man can
order his life must receive the
sanctity of Divine Revelation.
Our duties to God must precede
our duties to our fellowman in
order to achieve whole and in-
tegrated lives.
Sidney and Molly Falih
Histadrut Honors Faliks
Sidney Falik and Molly Falik
of Canterbury, Century Village,
were honored before a capacity
audience of over 400 friends,
neighbors and members of
Histadrut at ceremonies at
Conmvrinn Anshei Sholom.
Both Mr. and Mrs. Falik, in
the past two years, have raised
over S 100,000 for Histadrut and
the State of Israel. They were
presented with a plaque
describing their devotion and
untiring efforts over the many
years to the state of Israel and to
Jewish causes.
_
Tune in to 'Mosaic9
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TUNE IN TO MOSAIC
"Mosaic," Jewish Federation's sponsored program
is aired on
Sunday mornings over WPTV Channel 5, at 9 a.m. with
hosts Barbara Shulmon and Steve Gordon.
May-18 Lou Mass, Poet
May 25 Pioneer Women
Set furniture by Worrells Interiors
Set interior design by Carol Lovold
Synagogues in
Palm Beach
County
ORTHODOX
AITZ CHAIM CONGREGATION CENTURY VILLAGE
W. Palm Beach Phone: 689-4675 Sabbath Services 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Daily Services: 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
551 Brittany L, Kings Point, Delray Beach 33446 Harry Silver,
President. Services daily 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdays
Holidays 9 a.m. Phone: 499-7407. Temple No. 499-9229
and
REFORM
ITEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida
33407 833-8421 Rabbi Irving B. Cohen Joel L. Levine,
Associate Rabbi Sabbath WotshiD Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. Saturday Torah Seminars at 10:30 a.m.
Itemple beth el of boca raton
333 S.W. Fourt Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Phone: 391-
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath
Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.* Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah Study
with Rabbi Merle E. Singer 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Ser-
vices
[ THE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION OF DELRAY
At St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swinton Ave., Delray
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla. 33444 Fri-
day at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver President Lawrence
Sommers, 272-2908
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. At. St. David's In the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill
Blvd. and Willmgton Trace Mailing address: 1125 Jack Pine
St., West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 President Ronnie
Kramer 793-2700
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
The Free Synagogue, P.O. Box 3. Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 368-
1600, 391-1111 Rabbi Ben|amln Rosayn Fridays at 8:15 p.m.
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West Glades Rd. (1
mile west of Boca Turnpike) _______________
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fl. 33407 Phone:
833-0339 *Rabbl Asher Bar Zev Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sab-
bath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Dally
Minyan at 8:15 a.m., Sunday at 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 Phone 684-
3212 Office hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schect-
man Cantor Arthur B. Rosenwasaer Services: Daily 8:30 a.m.
and 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8:30 am. and 5 p.m.; Late Service 8:15
p.m. followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday, 8:30 am., 5 p.m.
.followed by Shalah Sudoa.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. Phone 732-2355 Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazin Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9
a.m. Congregational Church, 115 N. Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 N. A' Street, Lake Worth, Fla. 33460 Phone: 585-
5020 Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Ser-
vices: Mondays and Thursdays at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday at 9 a.m.
,TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services. Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. West-
minster Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Pal"1
Beach Gardens. (Office) 321 Northlake Blvd., North Palm
Beach, Fla. Phone: 845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor
Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
224 N.W. Avenue G,' Belle Glada, Fla. 33430 Jack Stateman,
Cantor Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeida Drive, Palm Springs, Fla. 33461 Sabbath ser-
vices: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. President Barnett
Briskman Phone: 967-4962 Mondays and Thursdays at 9
a.m. Services held at Faith United Presbyterian Church, Palm
Springs
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton. Fla. 33432 Phone: 392-
8566 Rabbi Nathan Zellzer Sabbath Services: Friday at 819
p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
. 5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446 Phone:
276-3536 Morris Sllberman, Rabbi Leonard Price, Can-
tor Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at
a.m. Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
9
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Road, Palm Baach, Fla. 33480 Phone: 832-
0804 Rabbi Myer S. Kripke Cantor David Dardashti Sab-
bath Services: Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m.


TTIMI. "H ** "~"
-iday, May 16, I960
Tng Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 19-
Synagogue News
AITZCHAIM
CONGREGATION
ervices for Shavuoth will be
Id in the Century Village
bbhouse as follows: Tuesday,
ky 20, 6:46 p.m.; Wednesday,
fy 21, 9 a.m. and 6:46 p.m.;
(ursday, May 22, 9 a.m. and
p.m.; Thursday, May 22,
kor Memorial Services, 11
TEMPLE EMANU EL
The election and installation of
Beers of Temple Emanu-El
tterhood were held at the April
[ meeting and buffet luncheon.
The following will serve as a
ksidium: Helen Coopman,
^gusta Sandier and Genevieve
erman.
tier officers include: Frances
Irn, program vice president;
Ith Rudoff, membership vice
lesident; Dee Cohen, recording
cretary; Miriam Pozen,
esponding secretary; and
ah Weissblatt, financial
etary.
[Sunny Elliot, past president,
remain on the board of
ustees as ex officio, serving in
i advisory capacity.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
On Tuesday evening, May 20,
jemple Beth David of Northern
[aim Beach County will conduct
special service marking the
festival of Shavuoth and the
onfirmation of the Hebrew
chool students. The members of
confirmation class will
articipate and present a special
Ire-gram with the theme of
I Jerusalem."
Rabbi Alan Sherman will be
nest speaker at Temple Beth
|>avid's Friday service, May 30,
p.m. Rabbi Sherman oc-
npies the dual position of
prector of the Community
elations Council and chaplain of
lie Jewish Federation of Palm
each County. His topic will be,
(Pastoral Needs within the
ewish Community." An op-
Srtunity for questions and
Irther discussion will be af-
ferded at the Oneg Shabbat.
| Temple Beth David's officers
Sisterhood's officers will be
stalled jointly on Sunday, June
at 10:30 a.m. at the Colon-
ies Bach Hotel, Singer Island.
ere will be a brunch for the
pcasion. For further fo-
rmation, call the temple office.
| TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
[An overflowing congregation
ptnessed a special tribute to the
sterhnod. following Friday
DENTURES
Or. Honmhf. O.O.S.
Individually
Custom Construction
Uppiror Low,, Dtnlun '111 ft Up
Cmi VrtMvm Parti* 159 to 199
"*" ........................'40
* ...................19**
I'trtetmm ..........1B"ift
By RonkUcmmd Dentals
S*m* Location fo Gv.-< 4 Vt**i
'00 U-LAND no W AiMrACN fL*
6890593
evening services, May 2. The
occasion was the dedication of
the Meeting Room in its honor.
Outgoing Sisterhood President
Sydeile Goldenberg, who set in
motion the idea of dedicating the
Meeting Room to Sisterhood in
recognition of its efforts and
accompishments relating to the
good and welfare of the temple,
saw her wishes fulfilled as one of
her last acts in office.
Dr. Sander V. Smith, temple
president, addressed himself tc
the occasion, emphasizing the
importance of Sisterhood as a
major influence serving the well-
being of the temple and the
Jewish community. He thanked
all past presidents for their
dedicated services.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
The Sisterhood of Temple
Israel will hold its monthly
meeting on Monday, May 19, at
noon in Schwartzberg Hall with
installation of officers by Rabbi
Joel L. Levine, as follows:
President, Barbara Chane;
First Vice President, Ann Small;
Membership Vice President, Ann
Faivus; Education Vice
President, Edith Metzger;
Human Relations Vice President,
Harriet Horowitz; Treasurer,
Rose Kohn; Financial Secretary,
Evelyn Guttag; Recording
Secretary, Jewel Duberstein;
Corresponding Secretary, Faye
Kapetansky.
A catered luncheon will be
served for which paid reser-
vations are required. For further
information, contact Temple
Israel office.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Mrs. Nettie Hanser, chair-
person, announced at the Temple
Beth El Sisterhood's annual
Torah Fund / Residence Halls
($118) for the 1980 Jewish
Theological Seminary of America
Torah Fun / Residence Halls
Campaign were:
Mrs. Mary Bachrach, Mrs.
Ann Gitlin, Mrs. Mildred
Goldstein, Mrs. Lillian Glad-
stone, Mrs. Nettie Hanser, Mrs.
Florence Haar, Mrs. Florence
Katz, Dr. Haviva Langenauer,
Mrs. Blanche Lang, Mrs. Jean
Levy, Mrs. Dorothy Lieberman,
Miss Esther Levy, Mrs. Frieda
Melnick and Mrs. Ilsa Mollen.
Also, Mrs. Gail Pariser. Mrs.
Cobey Rapaport, Mrs. Nancy
Katner, Mrs. Blanch Rich, Cantor
Elaine Shapiro, Mrs. Doris
Singer, Mrs. Beth Siskin, Mrs.
Ceil Schechter, Mrs. Gloria
Werner, Mrs. Barbara Shulman,
Robert Fine, in memory of his
wife, Ceil and Mrs. Gail Pariser in
honor of mother-in-law Dora
Pariser.
On Tuesday, April 15, election
of officers was held in Hernstein
Lounge. Mrs. Sally Chaifetz, a
member of the nominating
committee, presented the slate in
the absence of Mrs. Gail Pariser,
chairperson.
Elected were: Co-Presidents,
Blanch Lang and Blanch Rich;
Membership Vice President,
Selina Jocobson; Ways and
Means Vice President, Gail
Pariser; Youth Vice President,
Gail Weinstein; Cultural and
Program Vice President, Ilsa
Mollen; Corresponding
Secretary, Fannie Kotick;
Recording Secretary, Ann
Kachel; Financial Secretary,
Shelly Robinson; and Treasurer,
Thelma Heller.
Installation of officers will take
place on Tuesday, May 27, in
Senter Hall at 8 p.m.
Temple Beth El will honor 1980
high school graduates of temple
on Friday, May 23, at 8 p.m.
Rabbi Bar Zev will pay special
tribute to them.
Bonne Engelstein, Warren
Brams, David Goldberg, David
Shulman, Mark Berger and
Renee Lamport will participate in
the high school sabbath. Each
will receive a gift from the temple
in remembrance of this occasion.
Hosts for the Friday evening
sabbath will be the parents of the
graduates.
Geraldine Oiler, R. E.
announces the opening of the
ELECTROLYSIS CLINIC & HEALTH CENTRE
OF PALM BEACH
offering
Permanent Hair Removal
Scalp Care and
Nutrition and Diet Counseling
plus
K1MBERLY COSMETICS AND SKIN CAR PRODUCTS
(Complimentary Consultation)
1897 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 112, W. Palm Beach
683-6262
Stuart A. Feldman, D.D.S.
and
Richard J. Lazzara, D.M.D.
Periodontics
are pleased to announce the relocation
of their West Palm Beach Office to
The Crossroads Building
1897 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 215
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
Telephone: (305) 686-2477
Immediate Infusion of
Bond Loans Needed
Israeli Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin told Jewish leaders
of 34 U.S. and Canadian cities
recently that an "immediate
infusion" of large Israel Bond
loans would help bolster his
country'8 economic and peace
drives.
Speaking on a phone hookup
from Washington, D.C., after
concluding two days of talks with
' President Carter, Begin pointed
to the "very serious beginning"
that had been made in regional
peace negotiations.
"Under these circumstances,"
he said, ". we need an im-
mediate infusion of large Bond
loans to reinforce our economic
front."
An indirect reference to
Israel's position at the nego-
tiating table came when he
added: "The larger your Bond
loan, the less will be the economic
pressure on us."
A larger number of com-
munities unlinked to the phone
hookup received Begins message
on tape for broadcast to local
audiences. At Begin s side was
the President of State of Israel
Bonds, Sam Rothberg, whose
emphasis was on Israel Bonds as
Israel's sole source of low-cost
money.
In his statement, the Israel
Prime Minister said that
recently-introduced austerity
measures had already begun to
bear fruiE in the form of an im-
provement in Israel's balance of
trade and of a brake on the con-
sumer price index.
Economic problems remained
formidable, however, in view of
the allocation of nearly one-third
of Israel's Gross National
Product for defense. Moreover,
the yielding of the Sinai oil fields
under the peace accord with
Egypt meant soaring energy
costs. Next year Israel would
probably have to spend more
than $2.2 billion for oil, he said.
In citing the issues of
Jerusalem, autonomy arrange-
ments and Israel's security,
Begin defined the responsibility
of this generation as ensuring
"that our children will live in a
free Jewish country."
Key communities on the phone
hookup included Atlanta,
Indianapolis, Philadelphia,
Toronto, Birmingham, Miami,
Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood,
Fla., Teaneck, Nassau County,
> New York City, Columbus,
Paterson, Bridgeport, Jersey
City, Missouri, New Haven, Los
Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago,
Scranton, Worcester, Spring
Valley, Westchester, Boston and
Winnipeg.
Rothberg, in his message,
pointed to a new top-level
solicitation program which would
be conducted person-to-person in
each community. The goal was
not just another increase but a
"very substantial loan" through
Bonds.
"In this period of high interest
.rates, we must emphasize in the
strongest possible terms that
Israel Bonds represent the only
source of low-cost money for
Israel."
Since the launching of the
Israel Bond drive 30 years ago,
sales approaching $5 billion in
Bonds and other financial instru-
ments have been provided to help
advance every facet of Israel's
economy. Bond funds are utilized
in the development of agriculture
and industry, the building of
roads, the improvement of com-
munications and transport and
the search for energy.
Robert D. Rapaport, Florida
regional chairman of State of
Israel Bonds, was among the
Jewish leaders who met with
Prime Minister Begin in
Washington recently.
Dr. I. Goodman
Chiropractor
Boynton Plaza
3% N. CongrMS Ave. IN.W. 2nd Awe.)
Boynton Beach
Backaches Headaches
Pinched Nerves Disc Problems
Arthritis Sciatica Neuralgia
Phone 737-5591
Office Hra.Mon.TuM., Wed., Fri. Thura ft Sat
1-12.2 5 H2
MEDICARE, WORKMEN'S COMP..
AND MOST INSURANCES INCLUDE CHIROPRACTIC
Howard B. Goldman, M.D.
Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology
is pleased to announce the opening of his office
FOR SURGERY OF THE EYE
EYE EXAMINATION
GLASSES AND CONTACT LENS FITTING
GLAUCOMA CONSULTATION AND SURGERY
2200 Glades Road
Suite 910
Boca Raton
By Appointment
(305) 368-5606


I'M. HO-1
ThrJtwish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, May 16, l80
News in Brief
Sixth Victim of Hebron Attack Succumbs in Hospital
TK.I, AVIV llanan Krott
helniei. n oldlm and a vwWvi
indent (rom Ktrvat Arha. "tic
. nnibed l hla wound* tnnii'lMi in
iltech in Hiwm I
Mi< in the aUth latalltv of Ihr
iiinxhK' The pondJIhwi "i i'""'
AhMIM tll serious There i*
light UnpiovtaMi i the on
.inion oi oiiipin. hospital nuroM
re|HMted
UlU.Jl l'\ llWel ,>!!>' Ol 111.'
Hunted l llndaaaah I1.v.|\i(I in
JuVaeJasa. haWming (.> chapter*
ol the lalnim! read to them l
vlloague* I'hey oniiniw to
iiiU the Ai\ Talmud
P\R1S IhMM Veil Ihr
Jewiah Ptwetdent ol the I'tmnnniii
t'ai Itamotll and Fiwnoe formal
Hltn MMMW. hei* an Nm^mi<\ dovtoiate b\
the itat m IntwvUj Vhe
rni>Mt> also HMWM that it
i wMling ii|> special depaH
went nanwd aftet he to study
Ihe Oim v the hokvauat e\
p* i\\\r* and to
nndeitaVe reaaarvh into
hokvauat ht>r> iVominant
FWvh 0*mM>ltMN> attended the
oaeaenony Xtra \ Ml due to
> ait Wiwel next month het
toun a t ni|v in a pm ate capev*^
>* \sm\iiio\
la
OMltlOK* OWo.>t0 H* the
ttvtish and Yveevh Fnih***a
hew the \MKW* .Vwwh t\MI
ye* **. oaiWv o* the a"v'\arw
wnt ot \m# Mwwtw Mar
mm Phaavfce* awd l\sdew
v>voe*vi d Kafaiwg v ref<<*\het*
lh WiR tV>*rd ft.VO0ftMVt.Ntol*>*
ej .a* no **d tw H0>
ptwtv** ot ,*e*4tv>iiw WmmI alt
Ma <\g*** iwi>nm Mateeneeit*
**d av*w VW pe*ww war* a%ya** >
all W jaasagata* tv> *?
MfWMMMVWli OWUfXll *MHMlk:
,V)xMMWl ** VW H>* ft*<>!>
>?.->? TV> '*'* ywftwwfcti
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,>fttft/ VKvuAaN ^MVV W
-w r> v*-\ saw*
s ..(< ft Am ""?k^
*V NMMM |m^^wftf
>V*l*'' fWiMKO' <0W'W>
4Mt p w*r .* > AMwdMr ,vo-
ilrtfc. mlktm tmrnt^t k> .vmv
l*lH 4**.^ Nnkft "K
vte*^c4Mvw Wifi
*v or *
*v *w4f Wi lmf ^m
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MMTv v.
Var> AWN -Wft. kr
HAW ^m
r 'iMtrMtB* L
(ho (1m DlmiHl ('owutilitMM
mil the inlloumiruN ihnru'lMUf
I'll* i.'ii.u ninr* iU inc*plk)n.
mul thin criminal incident
IIUmtraUMi oik* wain tha trvn-
lllWOf of tha IMA) and iU
\ lolonl atma
lX)RONTX) lUwn Alain d*
llothmhtld. praaidant of Uw-
Kapraaantattvr I'ouiuil ol Jawiah
OrirantMtiona in KranH> (CR1K).
IoUi< out vimmmaly aitainat tha
MMMMMy im> ^^*,, **** *
tha Hovarmnant of l*raadant
VaWr> ;!.! an! d'Fstain* but
fctdkattd. n an ajnlwrat intar-
\ taw th tha Jawiah TaJauraphk-
\jran y hara. that M far thara has
laa htiJa tha oryanuad Kranch
.Miiiimimi) ha baan ahW to do to
rhaivira tha drattan of Kranch
pottT) in tha Mnidla Kaat
With all our ntar\-ant*>n
within tha i^vamroant a|>hara
and within iWitKal parties, tha
KMwutn |x>Ik-> i>f f>anoa has not
ohanyad," ha aaid Ha alao oh-
sai>w\l that there are Sw thar
pa it tea of pJaWHMM in Kraiw*
whoa* poho diftara >-ar> much
from t hat of t he PYeaadent
PARIS I'he home of a
\ai r>nrh leader Mark
Kradrikaen. was seriously
damaged by a bomb explosion.
Several adjacent apartments
wart also touched by flying
debris, but no casualties were
reported by the police.
Fredriksen was known as the
organiser of a neo-Nazi organiza-
tion. Federation of European
Action, which hero-worships
former Na*i leaders and ad-
vocates neo-Nazi ideology.
Several days ago, a Jewish
commando belonging to the
secret Jewish Action Organiza-
tion destroyed the Soviet stand
at a public fair held to mark the
May 1 celebrations. Police are not
prepared to say whether the same
movement is suspected in this
most recent blast
WASHINGTON A member
of the Saudi Arabian Cabinet has
ridiculed the autonomy nego-
tiations between Israel. Egypt
and the I" S and declared that
even if Washington succeeds in
bringing about an agreement be-
tween Israel and Egypt by the
May 26 target date, it arould not
be enough to satisfy the .Arab
inhabitants of the West Bank
and 0 aia Strip.
Thai vww was contacted in the
prepared address which Dr.
Uhazi Algosaibi. the Saudi
Minister of Industry and Elec-
tricity, delivered at a meeting ol
the National Association of Arab
Americans here Saturday night.
"Autonomy," he said, "means
that while the colonial power
exercises sovereignty,the natives
are allowed to tend their own
parks, build their own sewers and
collect their own traffic tickets."
He said that "no 'ism' justifies
the enslavement of a people, be it
nationalism, communism or
Camp David-ism. Occupation is
occupation, even when it is called
autonomy."
Maximum Cash for your Gold & Silver
We are paying highest prices for
GOLD SILVER DIAMONDS JEWELRY
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330 S. County Rd. Suite 16
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BROKERAGE SERVICES
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PoknBeodi
Sot.-"Appointment Onfy


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