Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00218

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
ae6 Number 7
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, April 4,1980 i
Freoshochet Price 35 Cents
ursing Home Plans Approved ("Passover Message
::
tONNIETARTAKOW
rt <>r of Public Relations
one of us as Jews has
d the tradition of
support, protection,
and companionship for
rh In keeping with this
one of the most ex-
ps forward in this
-'s history of caring for
as recently taken at a
f the Nursing Home
Committee of the
eration of Palm Beach
nittee met last month
[approval to the plans
Jewish nursing home
l built in Palm Beach
laverhill Road (one
145th Street).
[Blonder acting
the Jewish Home
of Palm Beach
Dunced that steps
been taken to
fTporation, and that
Committee to
board of directors
committee are in
|being formed.
ich County we are
scratch as far as
home facility is
id Blonder. "We
ientify 160 Jewish
in sub-standard
in Palm Beach
know we will fill
i fast as we can get
and make them
of Obst and Obst
firm, and Alec
airman of the
imittee, gave a
itlining the details
nursing home
/ill include areas
id occupational
ledical and dental
ler dining facility,
id auditorium for
id community
v **mm. %'*&'**
The Nursing Home Planning Committee of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County recently gave final approval
to the plans for a skilled nursing home facility to be constructed
in the Palm Beach County area. Showing the artist's rendering
of the facility are (left to right) Alec Engelstein, chairman of the
Building Committee; Erwin Blonder, acting president of the
Jewish Home for the Aged of Palm Beach County; and Emily
Obst, architect.
In addition to the unanimous
approval of the plans, the
committee gave the "go ahead"
for the launching of a $5 million
capital fund campaign to take
place April 1 througri Nov. 30,
pending approval of the board of
directors of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County. These dates were chosen
so as not to conflict with the
annual Federation campaign.
"This home will serve
everybody in the county,"
Blonder continued. They will be
served on the basis of need, not
on the basis of quotas.
Representing the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County on the Nursing Home
Planning Committee are Stanley
B. Brenner, chairman; Sylvia
Berman, Mrs. Buddy Brenner,
Alec Engelstein, Heinz Eppler,
Dr. Bernard Epstein, David
Gerstein, Arthur Gladstone,
Barbara Hurst, Detra Kay,
Murray Kern, Dr. Ralph Levin-
Epstein, Stephen Levitt, H.
Irwin Levy, Jeanne Levy, Bob
List, Cynnie List, Bernard
Plisskin, Dr. Bruce Moskowitz,
Irving Roaman, Carol Roberts,
Berenice Rogers, Dr. Richard
Shugarman, Lila Seidler, Herbert
Seltzer, Barbara Shulman, Alan
L. Shulman, Doris Singer.
Michael Stein, Jerry Tishman,
Dr. Ernest Weiner and Mortimer
Weiss.
ihamir Issues Warning
, SEDAN
EM (JTA) -
Br Yitzhak Shamir
West European
|t they could not
ship for Israel and
le express support
estine Liberation
the creation of
bate.
st speech ;n the
he became r oreign
imir spoke in reply
Ida motions which
ncem over recent
Iry West European
particularly West
id France, and
extension of
a PLO official in
policies and realize that such
statements endanger peace," he
said. He urged the Europeans to
support the Camp David accords
and to assist moderate forces in
the Middle East.
According to Shamir,
European support for the
Palestinian cause was linked to
Arab oil. He said that Israel had
to improve its information
campaign abroad to convince the
world to support the
.peacemaking process and reject
such groups as the PLO which
want to destroy the Camp David
accords. He praised the efforts of
Jewish communities in West
Europe in that connection.
SAID that these
rhich considered
iendly toward Israel
to join the choir
H and aid those who
Israel's existence.,
Md reexamine its
FORMER FOREIGN,
Minister Abba Eban of the
opposition Labor Party, also
accused the West European
nations of "prejudicing the peace
process" and "preferring their
THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF
PALM BEACH COUNTY
Offices will be closed on the following
dates in observance of Passover:
Monday, April 7
Tuesday, April 8
own particular interests to the
general international welfare."
Carter
Honors
Wiesenthal
President Carter has signed
legislation which authorizes the
presentation of a gold medal to
Simon Wiesenthal, in-
ternationally known as a hunter
of war criminals.
The gold medal will recognize
Wiesenthal for his contribution
to international justice through
the documentation and location
of war criminals from World War
II.
President Carter, in a previous
telegram of praise to Wiesenthal,
hailed him as "a champion of
human rights.
"Your achievements stand as a
beacon of hope for all who have
known the horrors of persecution
by totalitarian regimes, as well as
for those of us who are deter-
mined to ensure that such horrors
will never recur," President
Carter said when he commended
Wiesenthal upon receiving the
Decalogue Society of Lawyers
Annual Merit Award.
From the President
xj As we share with our families and friends,
:: the Joy of Freedom, the true meaning of |
:: Passover, we are reminded how difficult and
:: harsh, how bitter and cruel physical and
:: mental bondage is for mankind to endure.
:: Whether it be our forefathers in Egypt after
:: generations of slavery or American hostages in
:: Iran after months of captivity, the taste of
''. freedom is indeed a great moment to capture.
:: Alan L. Shulman ::
The Hagadah directs us to eat and drink as the children of g
::; Israel to identify and to share with them the torment of slavery S
*: and the ecstacy of release.
:: Our generation has seen both the devastation of our people ::
:: and the reuniting of our people in their ancient homeland, Eretz ::
:: Yisrael. We are privileged and challenged as members of this ::
|:|: unique generation to have the opportunity to participate in the :::j
:: destiny of an eternal people.
:: Just as the Exodus of the Children of Israel from Egypt ::
:: symbolizes our yearning for freedom, let each of us rededicate ::
<' ourselves during this Passover Holiday to working together for ::
:> the fulfillment of our cherished dream of Justice and Peace for ::
3 all mankind. :?
88 ""
38 On behalf of the Board of Directors and Staff of the Jewish
:: Federation of Palm Beach County, may I extend to you and ::
:: your families "Hag Samayach." '<
ALAN. L. SHULMAN |
President,
The Jewish Federation |S
of Palm Beach County g
"he Plot nickens
Desperation in Damascus;
Moscow's Red Herrings
By SOLLY PRESS
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Due perhaps to the ascendance
of the heterodox Alawid minority
over the Syrian branch of the
Ba'ath pan-Arab movement, the
Syrian regime has come to op-
pose more stridently than its
predecessors the Christians,
Jews and Sunni Moslems in Syria
and the Fertile Crescent.
Consequently, Syria's
Christian founder of the Ba'ath,
Michel Aflaq, has fled to Bagh-
dad, again for the Iraqi Ba'ath.
Sunni Moslem fanatics have
turned to assassinating sup-
porters of the Hafez Assad
regime.
LAST MONTH, the
Damascene Lawyers' Association
publicly demanded the lifting of
the state of emergency in force
since 1963. There have been
intermittent charges from the
Palestine Liberation
Organization that the Assad
regime has turned "Black
Septembrist," and from Moscow,
that Syria has not moved
towards Marxism.
Now, a confluence of interests
has brought this disparate trinity
closer together. Assad
desperately needs a foreign
adventure to divert his coun-
trymen's attentions elsewhere.
PLO Chief Yasir Arafat is
fearful that Israel, together with
"normalized" Egypt, will achieve
a separate deal with the West
\ Bankers and Gazans. and Soviet
President Leonid Brezhnev
urgently requires an olympian
red herring to draw the world's
eyes away from the Afghan crisis
and the Islamic Conference's
condemnation.
HENCE THE renewed
propaganda line that Israel is
planning a war against Syria and
that the West supports Islam in
Kabul but opposes it in Nablus.
The truth is that the Soviet
Union backs the PLO against all
non-Marxists in the Middle East
while suppressing 20 million
Afghan Moslems and millions
more inside the USSR.
The current arming by Russia
of Assad and Arafat is, of course,
directed not only at Egypt,
Israel, Turkey and Lebanon, but
also at the oil-rich Arabian
Peninsula.
Is it too late to divert Assad
from the path of treachery?
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
in Israel, Maj. Saad Haddad in
south Lebanon, and President
Anwar Sadat in Egypt are
remaining watchful. It is to be
hoped that the rest of the Middle
Continued on Page 3
President Assad


Page 2
-w,m nfPnbn Beach County
The Jewish Floridian ofP^nBeach_
County
Frids
y. April 4,
%\ ith the
Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH
On April 15 at Congregation
Anshei Sholom at 7:30 p.m.,
Melvin H. Willes, 66 of Boca
Raton, will be honored and
rewarded with a U.S.' Bond by
Century Lodge of B'nai B'rith
2939 as the "Hero of the Year."
Attending the Ceremony and
those influential with the choice
will be Fire Chief Bennet T.
Kennedy. Police Chief William
Barnes, represented by Major
John Jamason, and Samuel
Pepper, managing editor of The
Palm Beach Post.
HADASSAH
Tamar Hadassah will install
officers for the year 1980-81 April
28 at the Village Hall in Royal
Palm Beach at noon.
Installing officer will be Terry
Rapaport, president of the
Florida Central Region.
Entertainment will be a musical
program by Don Dascher, Ethel
Phillips and George Levine. A
mini lunch will be served.
The next meeting of Tamar's
Study Group will be held at the
home of Ethel Steinglass April 21
at 10 a.m. Guests are invited to
attend.
The Florida Central Region of
Hadassah will have its annual
conference May 4, 5, and 6 at the
Holiday Inn in Plantation. Call
Frances Freiman or Martha
Pincu for further information.
Aliya Group of Hadassah will
hold its board meeting at the
home of Helen Smith, 2995A
Crosley Drive West on Thursday,
April 10, at 9:45 a.m.
The main topic of discussion
will be the slate of officers
selected by the Nominating
Committee for the ensuing year.
Lake Worth-South Palm Beach
Chapter of Hadassah board,
Helen Smith, president, will meet
at the Barnett Bank on Lake
Worth Road West on Wed-
nesday, April 9, at 10 a.m.
The main topic of discussion is
the election of officers for the
ensuing year.
Yovel Group of Hadassah will
hold its board meeting on April
10 at the home of Sybil Senecoff-
Chatham G 137.
The regular meeting to be held
on April 17 at Congregation
Anshei Sholom will highlight the
Hadassah Associates. Ben
-o Gould, lecturer and journalist,
| will speak on the "Future of
f Israel in Today's Conflict." All
"members and friends are
welcome.
The Study Group, discussin
Jews in America, will meet on
April 24, 10 a.m. at the home of
Mollie Castrok Chatham G 147.
All welcome.
Mark your calendars for the
May 4 Israel Independence Day
xl to be held at the Palm Beach
Auditorium.
Tikvah Group of Hadassah will
have its board meeting on
Thursday, April 17 at 10 a.m.
May Shieff, board secretary, will
notify board members where it
will be held.
The regular meeting will be
held at Anshei Sholom on
Monday, April 21, at 1 p.m.
Bring husbands and friends.
Keep Wednesday, April 16
open for a Paddle Wheel boat
ride. Phone Martha Fein, for
details.
The Henrietta Szold Group of
Hadassah is planning a trip to
the west coast of Florida in-
cluding the Naples Dinner
Theatre, Mavl 1.12 and 13.
For reservations call: Goldye
Wolff.
The Henrietta Szold Group of
Hadassah will meet on Tuesday,
April 15, at 1 p.m. in the
auditorium of Lakeside Village,
Lillian Road, west of Congress
Avenue in Palm Springs.
The program will be a book
review by Esther Spielvogel of
Leah's Journey. Refreshments
will be served.
Israel Independence Day
May 4 at the West Palm Beach
Auditorium. Booths will be
manned by volunteers of each
Hadassah Group. Henrietta
Szold Group members, call
Sylvia Beck.
Shalom Group of Hadassah
has elected the following officers
for 1979-80: Presidium
(President), Jeanette Greenberg,
Mae Podwol. Lillian Schack; vice
president, Mae Podwol; Mem-
bership Vice President, Bertha
Rubin; Education Vice
President, Augusta Steinhardt;
Program Vice President, Lillian
Dorf; Financial, Lillian
Abramson; Fund-Raising Vice
President, Lillian Schack;
Recording Secretary, Sydelle
Becker; Corresponding
Secretary, Flora Schwartz;
Treasurer, Bess Pearl.
Installation takes place at the
May 19 meeting, Ethel Roey,
installing officer.
A few reservations are still
open for the Tampa trip to Circus
World, Busch and Cypress
Gardens, on April 22-23-24.
Phone Lillian Schack or Mae
Podwol.
Racing Fans the shalom
monthly Day at the Races takes
place on April 28 (Monday), at
Gulf stream. Call Gene Fer-
maglich or Jean Peckman.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
West Palm Chapter of
Women's American ORT, will
hold a general meeting on
Wednesday, April 16, at Anshei
Sholom Temple in Century
Village, at 12:30. Speaker: Mrs.
Jevne Hosier, community
relations coordinator of Palm
Beach Regional Visiting Nurse
Association. All members and
friends invited.
West Palm ORT has arranged
a cruise on the St. Lucie River, on
Tuesday, April 22. Bus trip to
Gentleman Jim Restaurant in
Stuart, for a special luncheon,
then to the marina to board the
boat "East Chop" Enter
1 tainment on board all throuth the
three-hour ride. Leave West Gate
at 9:45 a.m.. by bus. return to
West Gate at 5:30 p.m.
The next regular meeting of
the Royal Chapter of Women s
American ORT will be held
Monday. April 14. 12:30 p.m., at
the Township Hall in Royal Palm
Beach. Lawyer Bruce Daniels will
talk on current events as related
to Israel.
For the past two years. Daniels
has been chairman of the
Community Relations Council of
the Jewish Federation in West
Palm Beach, and also a former
president of the B'nai B'nth
Chapter of Palm Beach. Refresh-
ments will be served. Guests are
welcome.
On April 17, the Royal Chapter
of ORT will sponsor a luncheon,
card party at the Great Wall
Chinese Restaurant in Century
Corners off Okeechobee
Boulevard in West Palm Beach
at noon. Guests are welcome. For
further details, contact Bemice
Magram who is chairing the
affair.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
Sabra Chapter of the Women's
League for Israel will hold a
general meeting on Wednesday,
April 9, at 1 p.m. at the home of
Mrs. Sidney Koenig.
Guest speaker will be Sidney
Koenig. who will review Rabbi
Herbert Tarr's book A Time {or
Loving!"
JEWISH
WAR VETERANS
AUXILIARY
Golden Century Ladies
Auxiliary Post No. 501, Jewish
War Veterans of America, will
hold a meeting on April 14 at
Carvels. Century Comers, at 1
p.m.
The Jewish War Veterans,
Ladies' Auxiliary No. 408 will
hold its regular meeting on
Wednesday. April 9, at the
Century Village Holiday Inn on
Okeechobee Road. West Palm
Beach, at 1 p.m.
MIZRACHI WOMEN
The regular meeting of the
American Mizrachi Womer
Rishona Chapter, will be held at
Congregation Anshei Sholom on
April 15 at 1 p.m. All members
are friends are invited.
PIONEER WOMEN
The Golda Meir Club of
Pioneer Women will hold its next
meeting on Wednesday. April 9,
at 1 p.m. at Congregation Anshe
Shalom. Ben Gould will be
speaker.
The Palm Beach Council of
Pioneer Women met at the home
of President Rae Hornstein to
finalize plans for the donor
Luncheon to be held at the
Challenger Club on May 7.
Phyllis Sutker, national vice
president, will be speaker. The
Palm Beach Council consists of
the following clubs in addition to
the Golda Meir Club: Bersheba.
Ezrat, Theodore Herzl and
Zipora.
YIDDISH CULTURE GROUP
On April 15, the yearly
commemoration of the Warsaw
ghetto uprising will take place in
the auditorium. Mildred Bim-
baum will open the program with
a dirge. Chana .Safron will
conduct the candlelighting
ceremonies with the participation
of concentration camp survivors
who reside in Century Village.
Louie Bialy will speak about
the Holocaust. Sol Winig, singer,
with his wife Tillie at the piano,
will sing ghetto songs.
Cantor Albert Koslow will
chant the appropriate nn
and recite the Kaddish.
The April 22 pr0Br,
Yiddish Culture wiuSkC
32nd year of {**
dependence. Morris Bwli
will speak about the birjl
l srut'l.
Irving Kupfer, violin*
play, accompanied on the t*
by Mildred Birnbaum, then]
and Mrs. Kupfer will Diav.
duets.
Clare Kay.soprano, of l~,
Beach will do a series of 21
Hebrew and Yiddish. ^'
On April 29, Yiddish Ca
presents the Yiddish
Chorus, Mildred B
director, and Dorothy UU1
at the piano. The chorus mil,-
the program and then Dari
Gotlieb. pianist and conductor!
muaic appreciation at
Village, will play.
$
Riverside
Memond Chpel Inc Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol
of Jewish tradition.
Now two Chapels to serve you .
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4714 Okeechobee Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Florida
683-8676
Joseph Rubin, F.D.
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Riverside
Memorial Chapeli
Alfred Qolden
Executive Vice President
Joseph Rubin
Vice President
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H
The only Jewish family owned
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in Palm Beach County.
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Formerly Levitt Memorial Chapeli
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r hub;, rnii u -t, ./wv

/ fie Jewish t'loridian of Palm Beach County

f&geJ
iCKens
Desperation Mounting in Damascus
Continued from Page 1
East and the West will have been
alerted by Afghanistan's fall.
THERE WAS a time when
Aflaq's influence in the Ba'ath
pan-Arab renaissance movement
was still felt, that Israeli
Socialists and Ba'athists had
come together for talks in
Britain, under the encouraging
eye of the Socialist International.
Both sides had a stake and
still have in the revival of their
region, in the improvement in the
quality of life, education, in
combatting religious fantaticism,
in development, and much else.
Unlike the earlier Hashemite-
led pan-Arabs, the Ba'athists at
first appeared capable of reaching
out beyond the aristocracy. Also,
the Ba'ath constitution of 1951
was the first Semitic document to
call for the involvement of
Ethiopia in regional affairs, and
for Middle Eastern status for
Mediterranean Europe.
There had even been a glimmer
of hope for democracy when the
Ba'athists, in common with other
Syrian parties, joined forces in
19fil tn oust Nasserist tyranny
from what was then the "Nor-
thern Province" of the United
Arab Republic.
PERHAPS THE Ba'ath was
born too soon. Perhaps the
Halkanization of the Middle
Eastern subregion in which it
found itself was too great an
obstacle for its planners. More
likely, the fact that the Ba'ath's
leadership appeared to be in too
great a hurry and devoid of
understanding the incremental
techniques of true region-
building on the pattern of the
European Economic Community,
made Ba'athism shoot its bolt.
There is no way that
Ummayad-style neo-imperialism
which is what the Ba'ath came
to represent after the Alawid
ascendance can be disguised
as regionalism.
Youth Advisors Wanted
for Sept. 1960. Cons. Cong.
Kadlma (5-7 gr.) and USY (8-12
gr.) groups. Competitive
salaries. Call B'nai Torah Cong.
392-8576, speak with Terrl
Swartz.
Teachers Wanted for
Hebrew & gen'l Judalca. 3-day
week. Competitive salaries. Call
B'nal Torah Cong. 392-8576
speak with Terri Swartz.
DENTURES
Or. Manmaar, DOS.
Individually
Custom Construction
Upptr or Low* Dintun '//# fr Up
CaatVkaKum tortrnk ISO 'o 110
Mm.......................'<>.
*** ...................iob
ttlrocliont ..........It" tar taatk
mammmmam toe* *>, m am aam ami*m$ ***'
By fhridkf Uctnsad DmiL^U
S"> loni'U" r' o- I Veen
1O0UlANDD W PALMICACH fl*
689-0593
Hence it would be surprising if
the rantings of the Syrian
Foreign Minister, Abdel Khalim
Khaddam, before the Assembly
of the Council of Europe, will be
seen as constructive by the EEC
organizations, at least.
IF THE Ba'ath has failed to
understand regionalism and
that seems to be the case also
with the Iraqi faction someone
or something else should take
place. It will be recalled that, in
the beginning, the modern pan-
Jewish (Zionist), pan-Arab, and
the Ethiopian reconstructionist
movements also began as parallel
developments. Under the impact
of contemporary events,
however, they diverged.
Today, two generations after
their rise, they still have enough
talent to face the new challenges
of regionalism, beyond the tried
and failed federation, league and
empire.
&
<4&J>
**
V
fCF
Brager & Co.
2301 Collins Avenue, Suite M-30
Miami Beach. Kin 33139
Miami Phone. 673-8393
Out of local area call collect
at
he
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ot
an
in
1
d.
he
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honored by merchants in the
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Stop by and visit us in
our Deerfield Office.
TOEEX
A $500 GROCERY
GIVEAWAY AT PUBUX
Enter as oftervas you wish
Entries available only
at our Deerfield office
Orawins to be held
April ?5,1080
Winner to be announced
April 28,1980
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ojFchm oeacfi Cutiniy
\yn
Passover and Freedom
There are few Jews, even those with little or no
religious beliefs, who do not mark Passover in some
way.
One reason is that Passover has become the one
holiday when Jews get together with their families.
It is a holiday when children play a central role, such
as asking the Four Questions at the Seder. In fact,
the purpose of the Seder is to pass on the Jewish
experience to the younger generations.
But perhaps Passover has become so important
because it marks the birth of the Jewish nation. This
has taken on added meaning with the creation of
Israel.
Passover reminds Jews of the importance of
freedom. The symbols used at the Seder and the
Haggadah itself tell Jews that once we were slaves in
Egypt, and we are enjoined to keep reminding our
children of this, because those who were once slaves
will value freedom even more.
For American Jews, it means guarding our
liberties in the United States and striving to ensure
the survival of democracy here and abroad. It means
guaranteeing that Israel will survive as a free and
prosperous and secure Jewish State that will fulfill
the Biblical commandment of being a light unto the
nations.
The Horror Spreads
With our attention riveted on the Middle East
and domestic American politics, we seem all too often
to forget what is occurring in Latin America and
what impact events there must inevitably have on
us.
One such example is the growing sickness in the
Argentine social order as exemplified by our Page
One report which tells the story of two survivors who
escaped from secret detention camps in Argentina
where they estimate that hundreds of people have
been systematically tortured and killed since 1976.
Our report reminds us that Jewish prisoners are
singled out for especially harsh treatment. Declares
the report.
The methods are chilling reminders of the
Hitlerian nightmare brought to the western hemi-
sphere. "Transfer" is, of course, a code word for
murder, which the Nazis made a favorite part of their
vocabulary.
It seems to us that we can not, just from time to
time, become exorcised by a single, glamorous case
such as was Jacobo Timerman's, the Argentinian
Jewish newspaperman ultimately permitted to leave
for Israel. We must show a continuing interest in the
new Latin horror before it takes many more lives
before it spreads to our own midst.__________
Another Score for Sadat
President Sadat's invitation to the Shah of Iran
to come and live in Egypt now places him tall in the
saddle of Middle Eastern affairs, whether for good or
bad.
One thing for sure, it strengthens his nego-
tiating position with Israel and therefore can be cal-
culated to stiffen the backs of the State Depart-
ment's already tough anti-Israel stance so far as the
Palestinians are concerned.
We should make no mistake: Sadat has no more
love for the Palestinians than do the Israelis, but he
is using them to the limit to recapture his ascendant
role over the other Arab nations, which he lost in his
peace-making process with Israel.
Nor should we make the mistake that it is a
peace-making process. What Sadat is doing is merely
recapturing the Sinai without firing a shot. After
that, the deluge.
"Viewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Csmbinine "OUR VOICE nd "FEDERATION REPORTER
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Bcadh Countv. In.
Combined Jewish Appeal
F- Al.M BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
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SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
RONNI TARTAKOW
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Of The Merchandne Advertised In Its Column*
FORM 357t returns to The Jewish F londian
3200 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. Fla TJSPS864303
Published Bl Weekly Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton. Fla
Federation officers President. Alan L. Shulman: Vice Presidents Dr Richard
Shugarman. Dr. Howard Kay. Kenneth Scherer. Jeanne Levy. Jerome Ttshman
Treasurer* Staci Lesser; Secretary: Bruce J Daniels. Executive Director.
Norman J. Schlmelman Submit material for publication to Ronnl Tartakow.
Director of Public Relations
SUBSCRIPTION RAT: (Local Area) One Yeec a.m. or fey wifiirHild t*
Jewish MwaMm of Palm Reach Cesmtv. Ml teeth Fleeter Drive. West Pasta
lit*. FL aTMTrl. PhoneU2-2IM. (Out of Teem eeen Resjeest)
Friday, April 4, 1980
Volume 6
Hill Airing Was a Disaster
18 NISAN 5740
Number 7
I WAS horrified at my first
inkling that Congress would be
pressing for an investigation into
the now infamous McHenry vote
at the United Nations on the
resolution condemning Israeli
settlements.
There was, it should have been
clear from the beginning to those
who hatched up this scenario,
absolutely nothing that could be
gained from it. On tne other
hand, there was the ever-present
danger that the administration
would use the investigation as a
platform on which to spout its
justification for the vote except,
of course, for the Jerusalem-
provisions.
AND THAT is precisely what
happened.
It is here, we are meant to
believe, that the Carter Vance -
McHenry '"sorry, wrong num-
ber" was dialed. What pure
bunk! The President says
nothing more than that he would
have instructed McHenry to
oppose the UN resolution if only
he knew of all of those Jerusalem
provisions in it.
Beyond that, what do we know
about Carter on Jerusalem
anyway? Absolutely nothing
Other than that his instructions
to McHenry, we are meant to
believe, would be predicated on
his interpretation of the
resolution as being contrary to
the Camp David accords.
This ambiguity apart, which
American Jewish voters had best
think about long and hard, the
congressional investigation did
turn out as precisely I feared. We
don't really know just what
Carter gave instructions to vote
for or against What we do know
about is administration im-
leriousness and irritation at
being questioned.
THE TAPED exchange, for
example, between Cyrus Vance
and Sen. Richard Stone was even
worse than I anticipated. The
tapes show an arrogance on
Nance's part, a determination to
do the UN vote all over again so
that McHenry can vote the same
way again, this time without
presidential apology.
No one else fared any better in
the Senate, including the ranking
Republican member of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee.
Jacob Javits of New York. And
in the Houses own "inves-
tigation. Xante was just as
hostile, just as adamant, just as
I ugly and threatening.
The point has been made
oefore: on this ,,M-. PMaJdani
i an, is a consummate politician
Which in these days. ,s sav
tun be is downright dishonest
Vance at the hearings said one
thing, which for propaganda
purposes he interpreted as pro-
tone! where, in fact, what he
was saying spells the murder of
Israel s nationhood.
MEANWHILE, back at the
peanut farm in the White House.
Carter was reconfirming the U.S.
commitment to Israel in lovely
counterpoint to Vance's death
blows. In the end. the President
believes he has had it both ways.
Gen. Sharon is, of course,
right. Speaking in New York the
other week, he attacked the
American Jewish community for
its almost indifferent reaction to
the Carter Vance McHenry
triplecro8s. American Jews are
flocking in droves to the primary
polls to vote for Carter as "the
man who can be trusted,"
although onh/ Heaven knows on
what ground.
My own view of all of this is
that a second Carter presidency,
this time unfettered by his need
to pretend to the Jewish com-
munity, would be an unmitigated
disaster. Vance would be replaced
by Ruth Stapleton once Carter's
won. Rosalynn would be surefire
Vice President, no more cos-
metics needed to hide Walter
Mondale's consignment to the
White House basement.
WHAT I fear most is the
inevitability of the Palestinian
ascendancy spurred by our U.S.
friends in Europe whose friend-
ship for us is most recently
underscored by their reaction to
the proposed Olympic boycott:
"Hell no. we're gonna go, except
that when Russian troops come
marching down the Champs
Ely sees (tra-la. tra-lal the chant
will surely change: "M'aidvz,
m'aidez."
I fear it because the rest of
America is weary of the Israel-
Arab struggle. Morals and ideals
are loo burdensome, and too
many see it as the reason for our
every crisis as if it were
destined that. Israel or no Israel,
the Arabs would not otherwise
have come to their senses about
selling a priceless commodity
such as oil so cheaply to us as
heretofore.
And so. too many are anxious
now in tell the Israelis to get lost.
so that the struggle can lie ended
and. in their way of thinking,
the energy crisis, too That's
where Europe's going. Whv not
the U.S.?
WE MUST be wary of this If
Carter and Vaniv can play
Gallagher and Sheehan on
Capitol Hill, so ought we to a
world wean ol the war of words
and fearful of yet another war of
bullets
We must continue the words.
We must not give up the debate.
On the Palestinian issue, we
might quote, say. Rafik Natasha,
the IM.o representative in Saudi
Arabia, in an interview with .1/
Riad on November 15, 1979:
The best solution (to the Israel
Arab struggle), in our opinion, is
the return o! the alien- to their
countries: The Palestinian living
as an alien far from his homeland
must return to it. and the alien
Jew who has been brought from
all over the world must return to
his country of origin."
Isn't that sweet'.' Libya's Col.
Qadaffi has the same viewpoint,
except that he proposes at what
date the cutoff point be made lor
alien and non-alien Ji
Qaddafi is prepared to declare as
null and void the UN Palestine
part it ion it -elf.
OR HOW about Sami al Atari,
secretarj of the IM.O Central
Committee, who declared on
March 7. 1978 at Al-Kabas in
Kuwait: "Self-determination for
the Palestinian people is identical
with the destruction of Israel."
And take Ibrahim Sousse,
PLO representative in Paris, in a
radio interview there on Septem-
ber 5, 1978: ". the PLO will
recognize and accept the estab-
lishment of a Palestinian state on
the West Bank and in Gaza as
one of the stages toward an inde-
pendent state in all of Palestine."
Listen to this one: Yasir
Arafat, quoted by the Associated
Press in Beirut on March 12,
1979: "Our people will continue
to fuel the torch of the revolution
with rivers of blood until the
whole of the occupied homeland
is liberated not just a part."
Or Farouk Kaddoumi, political
chief of the PLO. as reported by
West German TV: The PLO will
never recognize Israel, even if
Israel recognizes the PLO."
THESE ARE the "moderate"
PLO leaders we are meant to take
to our bosoms. When Jews con-
template voting for Ruth Staple-
ton and Rosalynn again, let them
contemplate especially these
articles from the Palestine
National Covenant (Con-
stitution):
Art. 19: The partition of
Palestine in 1947 and the estab-
lishment of the State of Israel is
fundamentally null and void."
Art 20: Judaism in its
character as a religion of
revelation is not a nationality
with an independent existence.
Likewise the Jews are not one
people with an independent
personality."
\n 21: The Palestinian
\ra!> people rejects every
solution thai is a substitute for a
complete liberation of Palestine."
\rt 22: Zionism is a racist
and fanatical movement in its
formation; aggressive, expan-
sionist and colonialist in its aims:
fascist and Nazi in its means .
and a jumping off point for
imperialism in the heart of Arab
homeland."
THE SHENNANIGANS sur
rounding the U.S. vote at the UN
and President Carters role in
them are all the more horrifying
considered in these terms. For
the PLO is where he's gonna go.
if Vance and McHenry and
Stapleton and Rosalynn have
anyt hing to sav about it.
National Security Adviser
Zhigniew Ki/c/mski has already
had secret meetings at the White
House with PLO representatives
Sources pinpoint the meetings as
recenth as i n Mar :t.
And in the IN vote, at least
Vance anil McHenry had a heap
to -ay Capitol Hill heard it all on
instant replay when Congress
held its investigation
^ M, E^pt as staves 6oui\d foNUbri
picrvdshw


Friday, April 4,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
Palm Beach Philanthropist
Given Brandeis Medal
A
Palm Beach philanthropist
David Schwartz, who began his
business career six decades ago
as a $5-a-week delivery boy and
then built one of the most suc-
cessful apparel firms in the
country, was awarded the
Brandeis University Jacob A.
Goldfarb Medal during a lucheon
at the Breakers in Falm Beach.
Schwartz, founder of Jonathan
Logan, Inc., was presented the
-.award in recognition of his
decades of communal leadership
by Irving Schneider, vice
chairman of the Brandeis board
of trustees and executive vice
chairman of Helmsley Spear,
New York.
The Goldfarb Medal was
established four years ago to
honor the longtime friend of
Brandeis who gave the university
its central library and served as
treasurer of the board of trustees
until his death in 1978.
Schwartz' Medal was in-
scribed: "Presented to David
Schwartz, who gifted humanity
with the substance and spirit of
his commitment and com-
passion."
The fifth recipient of the
Goldfarb Medal, Schwartz began
his business career more than 60
years ago and in 1978 turned over
the reins of Jonathan Logan,
Inc., one of the largest clothing
manufacturers in the United
States to his son, Richard.
Over the years, Schwartz, who
also maintains a residence in New
York City, has earned the
reputation as one of the "great
builders of institutions in this
country."
His generosity toward
Brandeis has resulted in
academic facilities that include
David and Irene Schwartz Hall;
the Richard and Sheila Schwartz
English Wing and the Bruce and
Louise Zenkel Philosophy Wing;
the David and Irene Schwartz
Fund for campus beautification;
and a variety of scholarship
., funds.
Irving Schneider,
David Schwartz
One of the university's most
generous benefactors for more
than two decades, David
Schwartz sered on the Bran-
deis board of fellows before his
election as a trustee in 1968. He
became a trustee emeritus in
1976. He also has been affiliated
over the years with many other
educational, civic and religious
causes, including the Albert
Einstein College of Medicine, Mt.
Sinai Medical Center, United
Jewish Appeal and the Jewish
Federation in New York City.
Among the participants at
Brandeis' annual Palm Beach
luncheon, which brought
together more than 200 close
friends and supporters of the
university, were new Board
Chairman Dr. Henry L. Foster;
President Marver H. Bernstein
and Chancellor Abram L. Sachar.
Chairman of the luncheon
^honoring Schwartz was Brandeis
Trustee Vice Chairman Edwin E.
Hokin. Luncheon co-chairmen
were Alva T. Bonda. trustee and
chairman of the brandeis board of
fellows, and trustees Jack K.
Lazar. Norman S. Rabb, Carl J.
Shaprio and Lawrence A. Wien.
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' i*FTe j'e'uish tJbndan of Palm' aeach
Poured above is the large turnout that attended the United Jewish Appears commemoration
of 41 years of service to Israel and world Jewry.
Nancy Beresh Joins Staff of JF&CS
Rose Schwartz, president, and
Mildred Moss, Personnel
Committee chairman, jointly
announced the hiring of Nancy F.
Beresh, MSW at the March
meeting of the board of directors
of the Jewish Family &
Children's Service.
Following the announcement,
Executive Director, Stephen
Levitt, ACSW, briefed the board
on Mrs. Beresh's past ac-
complishments.
Mrs. Beresh received her BA
degree in psychology-sociology at
the University of Miami. She was
a special honors major and a
member of Psi Chi. the
psychology honor society. She
was part of an advanced graduate
program which permitted pre-
social work school class at-
tendance and allowed for an
intersnip at Mailman Center for
Child Development, Miami.
Subsequent to her un-
dergraduate studies, Mrs. Beresh
was graduated from Barry
College Graduate School of Social
Work. While working on her
MSW degree, she had
professional clinical field
assignments with the Broward
County Youth Development
Division and the Family Service
Agency of Broward County.
While there, Mrs. Beresh
provided individual, parent-child
counseling, family and marital
counseling, as well as serving as
co-therapist wi^ "-lal ad-
justment groups
"In addition to bringing these
skills into the agency's South
County branch office. Mrs.
Beresh will be permitted to
further pursue her interest in
gerontological counseling and
direct Mrvtce pro', ision i ir our
community s elder!) Jewish
Congregation Anshei Sholom commemorated the United
Jewish Appears 41 years of extraordinary humanitarian service
to Israel and world Jewry at a congregational rally which
featured Israeli author and journalist, Zvi Kolitz as guest
speaker, and a musical tribute to Cantor Eddie Klein. The
program produced a generous response of contributions to the
United Jewish Appeal through the Jewish Federation's
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign.
Pictured above are (seated) guest speaker Zvi Kolitz and Mrs.
Betty Steinberg Tell, co-chairman for the event. Standing (left
to right) are Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman; Louts Perlman,
congregation United Jewish Appeal chairman; congregation
president Max B. Shapiro; and Abe Bisgaier, co-chairman of
the Century Village Division for the CJA-IEF drive.
Egypt Charges Israel
Blocks Free N-Zone
BvTAMARLKVY
GENEVA (JTAI The
Egyptian delegate to the United
Nations Disarmament Com-
mittee accused Israel of blocking
efforts to create a nuclear free
zone in the Middle East. The
delegate, Omar el-Shafei,
launched his bitter attack on
Israel just a day after the Israeli
Embassy was officially opened in
Cairo.
He said that Egypt is trying to
promote the Middle East as a
nuclear-free zone and its efforts
have been endorsed by the in-
ternational community in a
resolution by the General
Assembly. Israel was the only
country that abstained in the
vote last year, he said, adding
that this was further evidence
of its intransigence on the
subject.
HE WARNED that if Israel
continued to refuse to endorese
the nuclear non-proliferation
treaty, the Middle East would be
open to unlimited ventures in the
development of nuclear weapons.
El-Shafei noted that the
General Assembly was aware of
this danger and has appealed to
all countries not to cooperate
with Israel in the development of
nuclear weapons and not to
supply it with fissionalble
material. He said Egypt was
awaiting the results of the
Secretary General's study of
Israeli nuclear weapons.
Israel has denied that it'
possesses such weapons. Egypt
has proposed that the Red Sea be
designated a nuclear free zone
and is seeking an international
agreement to isolate that region
form Big Power conflicts.
MEANWHILE, Boutros'
Ghali, Egyptian Minister of
State for Foreign Affairs, told a
press conference in Bern he was
optimistic Israel and Egypt
would solve the question of
Palestinian autonomy on the
Hank and Gaza Si rip
the May deadline. "EvflO it an
agreement will not be reached on
all the problems some
agreements will be made to allow
for further negotiations.'' he said.
f
Nancy Hm -li
population," according to Levitt,
The Jewish Family 8
Child
mkj based coun
supported in pai
I he
h County
located at 3i
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Boca Raton. Members of the
community wishing to make
appointments may phone 395-
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Wesi Palm Beach office, located
at 2411 Okeechobee Boulevard.
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Friday, April 4,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
JP
Rabbi Dreyfus to Conduct
Sisterhood Sabbath Service
e9
Rabbi Elen Dreyfus of New
York City will conduct services,
deliver the sermon, and read the
Torah, in honor of Sisterhood
Sabbath, Friday. April 11, at
8:15 p.m. at Temple Israel, 1901
North Flagler Drive.
Rabbi Dreyfus was ordained in
1977 at the Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Heligion. Although she intends to
pursue a career as a pulpit rabbi.
Rabbi Dreyfus is currently a
mother of an infant baby. She is
married to Dr. James N. Dreyfus,
a New York doctor.
While she is on maternity
leave, she has the position of
chaplain of the Memorial Sloan-
KetterinK Cancer Center of New
York.
As a rabbinical student. Rabbi
Dreyfus has served as a student
coordinator in the Office of the
Dean, HUC-JIR, New York and
as a student rabbi for
congregations in Springfield,
N.J., Brooklyn. N.Y., and
Hickory, N. C. Her work at
Sloan-Kettering was initialed as
a student-rabbi.
Rabbi Dreyfus has also
distinguished herself in youth
camping, serving on the staff of
the Olin-Sang-Ruby UAHC
Camp in Oconomowoc, Wis. and
at the UAHC Camp Institute,
Zionsville, Ind.
Sisterhood Sabbath is part of
an ongoing project initiated by
Temple Israel Sisterhood in
making the Jewish community
aware of the role of female rabbis.
Now
More Than
Ever
We Are One
Number of
Refuseniks
Increases
According to the Soviet Jewry
Research Bureau, as of January,
over 3.000 Jews received new
refusals for applications to
emigrate to Israel. An increase of
500 cases in three months, this
figure represents only those
known to the NCSJ.
The number of actual refusals
is undeterminable. Many of those
whose visas were denied in the
new wave of refusals which
started in the summer of 1979.
fear publicity or don't un-
derstand how to make their
plight known to the public.
The Bureau estimates that
there are 7,500 individual cases of
Jews in the USSR whose exit
visas were denied, since a new
Soviet crackdown began.
The vast majority of those who
recently received refusals were
not involved in Jewish activities
and were merely eager to leave
the Soviet Union.
Of the 3,000 refuseniks
wanting to leave the Soviet
Union, about 200 have been
waiting to emigrate for at least
seven years. The majority,
however, have received refusals
only within the last two years. (A
list of long-term refuseniks is
available from the Soviet Jewry
Research Bureau).
Rabbi Dreyfua
Sisterhood president Barbara
Uhane and immediate past
president, Fran Zeitz, have been
informing the Jewish com-
munities about the serious
problems and challenges faced by
the 23 female rabbis and female
rabbinical students.
Bonn Financed
Facilities at
Institute
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
important new Weizmann
Institute acquisitions, financed
by grants from West Germany,
were dedicated Sunday during a
visit to the Institute by the West
German Minister for Research
and Technology, Dr. Volker
Hauff. They are an ultra-modern
electron microscope for biological
research and the Albert Einstein
Center for Theoretical Physics.
. DURING HIS visit. Hauff.
accompanied by West German
Ambassador Klaus Schuetz,
revealed that 7.5 million German
Marks are allocated each year by
his ministry through various
fellowships and grants to
promote cooperation between the
Weizmann Institute scientists
and those in West Germany. This
sum is in addition to grants by
the West German government
and private German institutions
for special facilities at the
Institute.
The Einstein Center,
established for the anniversary of
Einstein's 100th birthday, will be
headed by Prof. Yigal Talmi and
will be open to scientists from all
parts of the world, including
Israel and West Germany.
*"
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"The Jewish Listener's Digest*
An Exciting New Radio Magazine
Sundays, 10:30 a.m.
WPBR 1340 AM
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
April 6 Rabbi Isaac Trainin, chairman of the Task Force
| on Marriage and Divorce for the Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies of New York, will speak on "Divorce and the
| Jewish Community."
April 13 Program in commemoration of Yom Hashoa;
"An Interview with Elie Wiesel."
Women's American ORT
Organization for Rehabilitation through Training
Palm Beach County Region
For further information please contact:
Mrs. Betty Segal
Delray Beach
499-2761
Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous loYour Health
RSW


>------tt*
s J"
..'
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, April 4.1980
B'nai B'rith Women Elect Mrs. Ornstem
Rosalind Omstein of North
Palm Beach was elected to the
executive board of B'nai B'rith
Women at the organization's
International Biennial Con-
vention in Washington, D.C.,
March 9-12.
Mrs. Omstein serves as a
member of the National Anti-
Defamation League Advisory
Committee and as National Hillel
commissioner. She has also
served as National ADL com-
missioner and as vice chair of the
Southern Division of Operation
Stork.
Mrs. Omstein has served BBW
as secretary of the Southcoastal
Region. which encompasses
Florida and part of Georgia.
Among her leadership activities
in the Jewish women's service
organization, she served as
president of former BBW District
Five (six Southern states and the
District of Columbia) from 1974-
75.
She is a member of the South
Florida Anti-Defamation League
Speakers Bureau and a member
of the District Five B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization Steering
Committee.
In addition to her BBW ac-
tivities, Roz Omstein serves her
community in many causes. She
has served as vice president of
the Greater Palm Beach Chapter
of the Muscular Dystrophy
Association and was Palm Beach
JCC Announces Fifth
Annual Meeting
Barbara Weinstein. chair-
person for the Jewish Com-
munity Center's fifth annual
meeting, announced recently that
this event will take place on
Sunday, April 27, at 7:30 p.m. in
Schwartzberg Hall at Temple
Israel.
"Our board and our members
see this as a very important mile-
stone in our growth and develop-
ment," said Mrs. Weinstein. "In
order to encourage as much of the
community as possible to join
with us, we are planning dessert,
entertainment, and dancing at a
very reasonable cost.
"In addition, we will be
electing and installing a new slate
of officers, and presenting many
awards to various Center and
board members. We hope every-
one will mark this date on his
calendar and plan to join us."
Invitations for this event will
be mailed shortly to all Center
members. If you do not receive
one, call the JCC.
Deny Weizman in Secret Talks
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Defense Ministry
has denied reports that Defense Minister Ezer Weizman
made a three-day secret visit to South Africa last weekend
to discuss "security matters." The reports, based on one
which first appeared in Maariv, claimed that Weizman
was sent to South Africa by Prime Minister Menachem
Begin, and only a few Cabinet ministers knew about it.
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Rosalind Ornslein
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She serves on the advisory
council for the Palm Beach
County Expanded Maternal and
Infant Care Project. She is a past
chairman of the General Gifts
Division, Women's Division,
Palm Beach County Jewish
Federation, and is active in the
Federation and Israel Bond
drives.
Local Students Take Part
In Academic Olympics
Jewish Community Day School students, Jeff Tochner and Kim
Sussman, along with their instructor, Skip Paille, will be participating
in the 1980 National Academic Games Olympics.
The two will be among a group of approximately 36 students from
all of the schools in Palm Beach County who will be attending this
annual event at Eatonton, Ga.
The students participating in the National Olympics are those
who have had an outstanding record in the local academic games
tournaments which are conducted throughout the county.
The areas that are covered in the games are mathematics,
language arts and social studies.
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^

. w
*fc*
f**J
Friday, April 4, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
vgM
Sp//f Summit
Carter to Meet Begin, Sadat Separately
=*===
Page 9
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The White House
announced that President
Carter will meet separately
with President Anwar
Sadat of Egypt and Prime
Minister Menachem Begin
of Israel in Washington
next month, but the "exact
dates are undecided."
Presidential Press Secretary
Jody Powell, who made the
announcement, said, "The
purpose is to review the progress
and pace of the autonomy nego-
tiations for the West Bank and
Uaza. The negotiations are being
conducted in accordance with the
provisions of the Camp David
accords signed by all three
leaders on September 17, 1978."
A SHORT time later, at a
second briefing, Powell an-
nounced that special Ambas-
sador Sol Linowitz, President
Carter's envoy to the autonomy
talks would be on his way within
days for Egypt and Israel to meet
with the leaders of those coun-
tries and then go to Alexandria to
attend the plenary session of the
autonomy negotiations. The last
plenary session was held in The
Hague n Feb. 28 and 29.
Powell said, "The purpose of
his trip will be to pursue the
negotiations and, of course, to
i hat purpose has now been added
the preparations for the
meetings" of Carter with Sadat
and Begin in April. Asked
whether the President is averse
to a summit meeting of all three
leaders and why they will be
meeting separately, Powell
replied;
The reason for these meetings
is that all of the parties to the
Camp David.accords felt that the
time was appropriate, given the
importance of the issues under
negotiation and the May 26 goal,
and for the architects of the
Camp David accords to discuss
the progress made to date and
explore means to move forward.
It was the judgment of those
involved that this would be best
accomplished under the format I
described."
PRESSED repeatedly as to
whether progress in the
autonomy talks has come to a
halt and that the May 26 goal
may not be reached, the White
Mouse spokesman pointed out
that "These are meetings in
support of the ongoing
negotiations" and that it is "a
different situation than what we
faced in the summer of 1978"
when "there was no framework
for discussions, very little agree-
ment on any issues and no peace"
between Egypt and Israel.
Powell suggested to reporters
that they should not lean in the
direction that the upcoming
meetings are a "process" toward
a summit meeting involving the
three leaders. "These meetings
are not to replace the negotiating
process but to support the
existing process," he said.
Powell also insisted that (he
May 26 date is a "goal," not "a
deadline." But, he said, "every
effort will be made to indeed meet
that goal and that is the clear
hope of those concerned." Earlier
in the week, Begin and Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir of
Israel both made similar state-
ments. Begin said that May 26
"is not a so-called deadline or
ultimate date" Shamir also
stated that May 26 is merely a
desired date.
POWELL emphasized several
times that the talks have not
been deadlocked. Asked if they
were stalled, he said, "No, I
won't agree with that charac-
terization."
He said the talks in Washing-
ton "sre not related" to the
United Nations Security Coun-
cil's anti-Israel resolution of.Mar.
1 which the U.S. supported and
which Carter later repudiated.
Powell said the meetings have
been under discussion "at least a
couple of weeks" but the invi-
tations were "formally" extended
Mar. 19 by Carter who spoke to
Sadat and Begin.
Asked if the visits to Washing-
ton by the Israeli and Egyptian
leaders might overlap, Powell
said, "No, that is not the scenario
at all." He said he did not know
whether Begin or Sadat would
come to Washington first.
WHEN IT was pointed out
that his announcement of the
meeting referred to the West
Hank and Gaza Strip but did not
mention the issue of Jerusalem
which had figured prominently in
the Security Council's Mar. 1
resolution, Powell said,
Jerusalem is not part of the
autonomy talks except only in a
ix)tential way,"
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Page 10
The Jewish Fbridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. April 4,1980
Community Calendar
Temple Emonu-EI Sisterhood board 9:45 a.m Temple Is'ae.
Sisterhood board 10 o.m American Jewish Committee
boord 7:30 p m Women's American ORT Royal Palm BeacH
- board 9:30 am Jewish Family & Children's Service -
exec Hodassah Goldo Ve>r s'udy group 10
Congregation Anshei Sholom Men's Club executive
board -10am Congregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood -
board 9.45 a m B noi B nth Menorah 10 a.m.
April
B nai B r.th #2939 board 730 p.m. Hodassah Henrietta
SroW board 1 p.m. B'nai B'nth #3041 board 330 p.m.
Temple Be'h David eecutive 8 p.m.
Sharply Divided Vote
Move to Make Jewish Settlements in Hebron
April 9
JEWISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION EXECUTIVE MEETING -
45 o m Temple Beth Sholom Men's Club board 7 30 p.m.
Nationol Council of Jewish Women- Palm Beach board 10
am Temple Beth David Sisterhood board -8pm
Congregation Anshei Sholom boord 1 p.m. Pioneer Women
- Golda Meir -1pm
April! 0
Hodassah Tikvah boord 10 o.m Hodossoh Sholom board
1 C :Jassah Yovel boord 10 am Temple Be'*
Sholom Lake Worth board 9 30 o.m Temple Emanu-EI -
-eon noon Hodassah Aliyo board 9 30 a m.
Hodassah Bat Gur.on boord 9 45 a Hodassah Goldo
i 2:30 p m American Jewish Congress Energy -
April 12
I e =-- David Social Club Boot
-e 8 30 p
April 13
9 30 a r- "e-^ple Beth El -
Games D nnw Je* th Common r> Center Holocaust Doy
- j ; Ve- s C-jB 9 30 a
April 14
en s Am? -"oinciano boord 10.30a m B'na>
5 Women Boynton lrs'0 OtHMI and Pa WwubWlh s
->on Wome- s A e- v-on ORT Palm Beoch board 10
Order o* I an board 11 o.m and noon
ricon ORT 12 30 p.m. JEWISH FEDERATION
. 50ARD MEETING 7 30p.m.
April 15
er Women T-e.-2.--e Hnn cossc.e' Program Temple
boord -8pm B noi B rHh 2939 7 30 p m Temple
5e-- E S s't"oc3 lpm Temp e Beth El Sisterhood
-s*c affofl Ip.iw Temple Be'" El boord 8 p m Hodassah
etta S.-oU -lpm B nai B rith Menorah boord 10
o m c~ee' vYomee Er-a- 1 p B noi B'rith *3041 8
p m "ec'e Be'r- David board -8pm Congregation
jiom 1 p
April 16
- 5-: bid S s'e-c:: ooord 10 a m Wome- s
April 17
I Hodossoh Yoe 1 p.m. Women s A e- corl C9T E .eimg -
.% r e- s A e' con 05" ; .: r a Beoch -
12 30 c Nottona Z >f imoiiak Wow 0eec-obee
12.30 p.i* B na 5 A :~e- 9ten boc
:: Ve 12:30p.m
Jill
ISRAEL mV
INDEPENDEr
NOENCE DAY
S. MAY 4, 1990
WEST PALM BEACH AUDITORIUM
Bazaar 10:00 o.m.
Inside Program 1:00 p.m.
Entertainment: KUMDS
Guest Speakers Children's Choir
Food, Folafel. Bazoar. Booths
S2. 00 General Admission
$5.00 Families(2 Adults I Children)
SO. 00 Patrons
Coordinated by the
Jewish CoaMiitjr Center of the Pan 8e*c*e$, lac.
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.. H.P.I.. Me. 33409 689-7700

Bv GIL SEDAN
JKRUSALEM (JTA)
- A sharply divided
Cabinet voted 8-6 with
three abstentions to
establish religious in-
stitutions in two Jewish-
owned buildings in the
heart of the West Bank
Arab town of Hebron. The
decision, which had been
pending for more than a
month and repeatedly
postponed by the Cabinet,
was taken at the urging of
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin who argued that it
was delayed long enough.
Begin rejected appeals by some
.if his colleagues to hold off until
after his meeting with President
tarter in Washington in Mid
April Hie insistence was seen as
a deliberate rebuff t<> the U.S. for
having supported the Security
Council- Mar. 1 resolution
calling for the dismantling of
Jewish settlements in the oc-
cupied territories. Carter sub-
sequently disavowed the
American vote.
THE NARROW majority in
voting, which came after four
hours of debate, reflected the
Blowing rift over the Hebron
iasue between Begins Herut
Part) and its coalition partners
1U fore the session began. Deputy
Prime Minister Vigael Yadin of
the Democratic Movement
served notice on Begin that he
would appeal against any
on to move Jews into
Hebron to the Knesset's Foreign
Affairs and Security Committee.
Deputy Prime Minister Simcha
Ehrlich. "leader of Likud's Liberal
Party wing, opposed the decision
and said he would have to
reconsider remaining in the
Cabinet The National Religious
Party also indicated serious
reservations. Education Minister
Zevulun Hammer supported the
ion but said he did so
reluctantly.
Religious Affairs Minister
Aharon Abu-Hatzeira called it a
bad decision*' and abstained.
Interior Minister Yosef Burg,
who heads the Israeli negotiating
team in the autonomy talks, did
not attend the Cabinet meeting
because he was In greet I S
special Ambassador Sol Lin
at Ben Gunon Airport.
ALL HERUT ministers voted
for the move except Defense
Minister F./er Weizman who cast
a negative vote. The usually
outspoken Weizman had no
comment, saying he did not want
hie remarks to the Cabinet leaked
to the press Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir voted af-
firmatively but without com-
ment.
The decision was hotly
defended by Housing Minister
David Levy of Herut and sharply
denounced by Justice Minister
Shmuel Tamir of the DM. Levy
-tressed that the Cabinet had
voted unanimously last month
with one abstention, by Yadin
to declare in principle that Jews
have a right to live in Hebron.
The decision, he said, was simply
implementing the earlier one.
"Herat's representatives are in
the government in order to
implement the party's platform"
Levy said.
Tamir warned that the decision
will lead to international com-
plications. 'This will not COB
tribute anvthing to security, it
has no political value, and it does
not strengthen the State of
Israel," he said. "It could have
been the right step had it beei,
taken immediately in 1967 (when
Israel conquered the West Bank)
but now the timing is wrong,"
Tamir asserted
THE CABINET decision falls
short of meeting the demands of
nationalist and religious
militants who have demanded
that Jewish families be settled in
Hebron immediately, in buildings
that were abandoned by Jews
who fled that town during the
Arab uprising in 1929.
Only two buildings are in-
volved, the old Hadassah
building which has been occupied
for the past few months by
women from the Gush Emunim
stronghold of Kiryat Arba
Adjacent to Hebron, and the
Avraham Avinu Synagogue
Roth are close to the Patriarchs
Tomb, a shrine holy to Moslems
and -lew-
9650418
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Friday, April 4,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
ill r
Page 11
Women Continue Battle for Their Pulpit Rights
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An estimated 200 men and
women met here in front of
the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America in the
first lobbying effort of a
new organization which
seeks to induce the faculty
*-pf the Conservative school
to accept women as candi-
dates for ordination.
The sponsoring organization,
the Group for the Rabbinic Or-
dination of Women (GROW),
called the meeting to demon-
strate to the Conservative
seminary "and to the public,
widespread dissatisfaction" with
-J,he decision of the JTS faculty
senate "to table the issue of
women's rabbinic ordination,"
Simha Rosenberg, a spokes-
person for GROW, declared. She
said another objective was "to
voice strong support for the im-
mediate acceptance of women"
by the JTS as candidates for
ordination.
ROSENBERG told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, before the
meeting was held, that GROW
had been started in February,
1979 but had been revamped
recently to be more active in
advocating women's ordination
and in educating Conservative
Jews in Jewish Law and practice.
She said GROW had switched to
the more vigorous policy after the
JTS faculty postponed last Dec.
20, by a 25-19 vote, any action on
ordination of women.
Rabbi Seymour Siegel, profes-
sor of theology and ethics, and
chairman of the Committee on
Law and Standards of the Rab-
binical Assembly, the association
of Conservative rabbis, told the
gathering that "the ordination of
women is mandated and desirable
according to Jewish Law, ethics
and needs."
Dr. David Silverman, professor
of Philosophy at the JTS, read to
the assemble group the message
he said he would present to the
JTS Faculty Senate: "We
urgently request that the Senate
of the Jewish Theological
Seminary promptly reconsider
the question of ordination for
women. More importantly, we
urge them" to vote to "grant
women the right to serve as
rabbis with all deliberate speed."
A RESOLUTION to admit
women was approved by
delegates to the 1979 convention
of the RA. The delegates with-
drew the resolution on a pledge
by Dr. Gerson Cohen, JTS chan-
cellor, to name a commission of
14 members, representing the
entire range of Conservative
opinion, with himself as chair-
man, to study the issue and make
recommendations.
Francine Klagsbrun, a member
of the commission, told the
protest meeting today that the
movement to ordain women as
rabbis was not a "fad. It is a
major social revolution, we
cannot afford to sit it out."
Cohen promised the 1977 RA
delegates he would commit
himself to bringing the com-
mission findings to the J1&
Faculty Senate to act on those
findings early in 1979. But in
April, 1979, Cohen said he had
agreed to a request from the JTS
faculty to defer action on the
report which favored or-
dination of women until early
in 1980.
IN ITS final report, the com-
mission submitted a recom-
mendation to the 1979 RA con-
vention, declaring it found
nothing in Jewish Law barring
women from the rabbinate and
proposed that "qualified women
be ordained as rabbis." The 25-19
vot* tabled the proposal in-
definitely.
Asked after the meeting what
GROW planned to do next, she
said that GROW is planning a
forum in April '.
News in Brief
Dayan Opposes Hebron Decision
NEW YORK Former Israeli
Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan
said Monday he opposed the
decision by the Israeli Cabinet to
establish religious institutions in
two Jewish-owned buildings in
Hebron. He said he has been and
continues to be against moving
Jewish settlers into the West
Bank Arab town.
But he stressed to reporters
that he would also be against any
law passed by the Knesset that
would bar Jews from settling
anywhere on the West Bank. He
said that would be a policy of
advocating segregation.
JERUSALEM Prime
Minister Menachem Begin has
rejected Egyptian allegations
that Israel was responsible for
the delays in the autonomy talks.
In a letter responding to a
lengthy letter sent him by Presi-
........... dent Anwar Sadat last weekend,
F^WWWWlfliliiflft^^ Begin insisted that Israel was
observing the Camp David ac-
cords. The allegations that Israel
was creating obstacles in the
autonomy talks, Begin wrote,
were based on a misinter-
, pretation of the accords.

for the completion of the talks.
WASHINGTON The State
Department has expressed
"heightened concern" over the
Israeli Cabinet's narrow decision
to establish a "Jewish presence"
in the West Bank Arab town of
Hebron but withheld definitive
comment pending a decision on
the matter in the Knesset.
The Department's chief
spokesman, Hodding Carter, said
that "Since we understand the
issue is to be discussed by the
Knesset's Defense and Foreign
Affairs Committee, I will have no
comment beyond the statement
of the obvious," an apparent
allusion to the U.S. position that
Jewish settlements on the West
Bank are "illegal and an obstacle
to peace." <
After noting that the U.S.
government has made it "par-
ticularly clear in recent weeks"
what its position is on settle-
ments an allusion to the UN
Security Council's Mar. 1
resolution on that subject, and
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance's
statements before the Senate and
the House last week Carter
said, "We've made also our
concerns known to the Israel
government. Those concerns are
heightened by the Cabinet's
decision" on Hebron.
BONN Simone Veil,
president of the Parliament of
Europe, indicated here that the
body over which she presides
would not invite Yasir Arafat,
leader of the Palestine Liberation
Organization, which is being
courted by several European
governments, to address that
body. Replying to questions at a
press conference Saturday, she
noted that the European Parlia-
ment maintains contacts only
with other parliaments.

GOOD fifJDDY ?
\
1
*
1
s
:|:|
r>.~-
5
.V
s
He rejected the claim that if an
agreement was not reached by
May 26, Israel should be held
responsible. The date of May 26,
Begin wrote, was only mentioned
in the joint Begin-Sadat letter to
President Carter which accom-
panied the peace treaty, as the
date by which the talks should be
completed, but not as a final date
ANNOUNCING "KEHILLA: TO REACH OUT'
A PALM BEACH COUNTY MISSION
TO ISRAEL
LEAVING OCTOBER 1980
-FURTHER DETAILS TO FOLLOW
SPONSORED BY THE JEWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH COUNTS


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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, April 4, 1980
-
The Young Leadership Program and the Community Relations Council of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County recently co-sponsored a Model Seder for Freedom given
on behalf of the Jews living in the Soviet Union. The program included a creative Hagadah
entitled "Soviet Jews: The Story of a New Exodus."
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman (second from left) chaplain-CRC
director for the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, led
the Model Seder program. Pictured with him are (left to right)
Marena Busel, a member of one of the newly resettled Russian
families in Palm Beach County; Jeffrey Tochner and Max
Tocher, chairman of the Young Leadership Program.
*\
1
Morris Spector (left) reads a portion from the Freedom
Hagadah. Pictured with him are (left to right) Rabbi Alan R.
Sherman, chaplain-CRC director; Max Tochner, chairman,
Young Leadership Program and Marina Wallach, Washington
representative for the National Conference on Soviet Jewry and
keynote speaker for the evening.
Nat Kosowski, a member of
the Soviet Jewry Task Force
of the Community Relations
Council, introduces the guest
speaker.
ANNOUNCING "KEHILLA: TO REACH OUT"
A PALM BEACH COUNTY MISSION
TO ISRAEL
LEAVING OCTOBER 1980
-FURTHER DETAILS TO FOLLOW-
SPONSORED BY THE JEWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH COUNT*:'
Inna Busel, a newly resettled Soviet Jew, reads the four
questions in Russian during the Model Seder for Freedom
Pictured with her (left) Steve Spector and Rabbi Alan R.
Sherman.
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Friday, April 4,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 13

v*\
Second Tuesday Club The
Jewish Community Center will be
closed on the second Tuesday of
April for the Passover holidays.
Sam Rubin, president, announces
the Second Tuesday Club meet
on April 15. Ruth Hyde will
provide the program. Everyone is
invited.
Volunteers JCC volunteers
are an integral part of the JCC
program and agency. This past
month, volunteers worked over
525 hours with all groups and
-*_ges. Bonnie Silverstein, coor-
dinator of volunteers, invites
persons who are interested in
working with the JCC pre-school
program, and those who can
serve as receptionists, to call her.
Stop in at the CSSC, or call
Bonnie for an appointment.
Classes Timely Topics for
Thinking Women and Round
Table Talk for Men Mondays
at 1:30 p.m. Sylvia Skolnik and
.Joe Greenberg, discussion
leaders.
Speakers Club Thursdays
from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Joe
Greenberg, president. Everyone
welcome to participate.
Know Your Car offered
through Palm Beach Junior
College on Fridays at 11 a.m.
through May 2. Paul Oblas,
instructor. Get better acquainted
with your car.
Adult Education Classes will
resume on April 14. Monday, Oil
Fainting. 9 a.m. noon. Tuesday,
Transactional Analysis, 10 a.m.
noon. Wednesday, Writer's
..Workshop. 10 a.m. noon. How
to Survive After Your Spouse
Says Goodbye, 1:30-3 p.m.
Friday, Yoga Walking Tall, 1:30
p.m.-3 p.m.
Theatre Workshop will be held
on Fridays from noon to 1:30
p.m. If you ever had the urge to
perform with others, become part
of this group, led by Ken
Kolinsky, cultural arts super-
visor. Call Ken for further in-
, /ormation.
Artist of the Month Paul
Keinman will exhibit his pain-
tings at the Comprehensive
JCC Events for Seniors
Senior Service Center during the
month of April. Stop in and view
his work.
i J"? "" Join the cro*d for the
Lido Spa on April 27. Four days
and three nights. Buses will leave
from the west gate, Century
ji*ge" For nervations and
additional information call the
Center.
EIGHTIES AND PLUS
HONORED IN THE 1980a
Jean Rubin, director of CSSC,
announces that persons who were
born in 1900 and before will be
honored on Wednesday, April 23,
from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. All those
living in their own homes or
apartments or with their families,
are invited to attend. A program
is being planned, and refresh-
ments will be served. Bonnie
Silverstein wants to hear from
you if you are in this age group,
or have a parent who is eligible.
Call Bonnie for information.
Transporation Tran-
sportation is available at the
Jewish Community Center,
Monday through Friday, from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m., for senior adults,
60 years or older, who are transit
disadvantaged, within a
designated area.
Dear Editor:
I have been participating in the
JCC transportation program for
the past three years. I want you
to know how much I, and I am
sure others, appreciate this
service.
I have been able to go shop-
ping every two weeks, and when
necessary my husband and
myself have been taken to
doctors. Since I am past 70 and
my husband past 80, it is a
blessing for us. I want to thank
the JCC and its staff for their
kindness. May God bless them.
Sincerely,
Mrs. Samuel (Diane) Ury
P.S. It would be great if we could
stop every week since I have to
buy for two. At present we can
only shop every two weeks
because of the heavy demand for
this service.
689-7700
Pictured above at the recent Letter of Intent meeting are (left
to right) Henry L. Zucker, endowment fund consultant; Jeanne
Levy, chairman of the Letter of Intent Sub-committee and Alan
L. Shulman, president of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
The recently formed Letter of Intent Sub-committee of the Endowment Fund Committee met at
the Federation office March 18, with Jeanne Levy, chairperson, presiding. Seated left to right,
Barbara Shulman, Henry L. Zucker, endowment consultant; Jeanne Levy and Alan Shulman,
president of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Standing left to right are Abe Bis-
gaier, Norman Schimelman, executive director of the Federation; Robert Segal, Berenice
Rogers, Cynnie List, George Golden, John I. Moss, Bernard Plisskin, Jack Plisco, George New-
burger, Alvin Wilensky, Arnold Lampert, Jerry Tishman and Robert Fitterman. On the Letter
of Intent Sub-committee but unable to attend were Ruthe Eppler and Barbara Tanen. The
Letter of Intent is an expression of an intention to contribute to the Endowment Fund of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County but creates no legal obligation.
We'll Make The World Kosher
For You.
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For information and brochures call any travel agent.

wr
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A Comrr^iTO^tion of
Faith, Freedom, and
Human Dignity
HagSameadi
Pkssouer5740
The Republican F&rty
I,


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, April 4,1980
Is There Life After the UN?
UN Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim's prolonged wrestling
match with the Ayatollah
Khomeini and lesser Iranians
reveals that a little flame still
burns in the United Nations. The
gentle Austrian, whose life is a
series of roller coaster rides on
flimsy structures erected by
sharply competitive political,
ethnic, and cultural blocs, has
been brave and patient
throughout the long midnight of
the Iranian crisis.
Some will recall that Iran won
membership in the UN in the,
year that agency was created.
The first issue raised in the
Security Council was Iran's
grotest against the refusal of the
Dviet Union to withdraw its
wartime occupation troops from
northern Iran in 1946.
SINCE THAT time, Teheran
has certainly benefitted
economically and socially from
its UN affiliation. But once the
Ayatollah approved terrorists'
seizure of the American embassy
building and the incarceration of
American citizens there, the
Secretary General and his staff
were confronted with a challenge
dwarfing all previous crises in the
international organization's
history.
Kurt Waldheim's slow start on
the Iranian issue was in
character. But it soon became
apparent that Washington could
not win the battle without allies.
And even granting Waldheim's
commendable performance in
recent weeks, it is sad to recall
that vigorous action was long in
coming on a flagrant violation ot
rules that UN nations are sworn
to uphold.
When the dust settles, will the
UN actually be stronger? Will
there be a new display of moral
leadership? Will the Secretary-
General be looked upon as the
keeper of the UN's conscience?
Will terrorists know they can no
longer defy the justified outrage
of UN participating nations
dedicated to upholding the
canons of international decency?
NO COUNTRY has suffered
more neglect and endured more
calumny in UN forums than has
Israel. She had good reason to
criticize procedures and actions
there. The infamous UN
resolution of 1975, branding
Zionism as a form of racism, was
by itself enough to poison the
opinion of all Israelis, all Jews,
and millions of others who shared
the high hopes expressed by
Harry Truman in 1946 when he
suggested that it should be just
as easy for nations to get along in
"republic of the World" as it
had been for Americans to get
along in the republic of the
United States.
And Israel's cup of bitterness
overflows for other good reasons:
The UN Assembly's formalized
resentment against the Camp
David agreements; the constant
grumbling about hostile at-
titudes allegedly shown by Israel
against "the rights of the
Palestinian people," the recent
demand for Israel to submit all
its nuclear facilities to inspection
by the International Atomic
Energy Agency; constant
pressure on Israel to withdraw
from territories occupied by
Israel since 1967 demands
conveniently bypassing Security
Council Resolution 242.
The list is endless.
Is there no hope then for
salvaging what remains of this
noble experiment in peace-
keeping built upon a deter-
mination to scotch any post-
World War II Hitlerism that
might emerge? Must all of the
Robert
UN's good work in the fields of
health and cultural un-
derstanding and communications
be lost because leadership is
lacking and the machinations of
the Soviet-Arab-Third World
bloc are so destrictive? We all
must hope not.
YET MANY in the United
States may well wonder how long
this nation will continue to
provide 25 percent ot the UN s
budget while the bloc of 89
nations saddled with dic-
tatorships or philosophically
aligned with the USSR in other
ways pay only 1.18 percent of the
UN fare. Are these nations all so
poor? In their circle are the
OPEC countries, the total UN
income from which comes to less
than 1 percent of the cost of
maintaining the UN.
Back in 1955, only 5 percent of
all Americans polled favored our
withdrawal from the UN despite
the agency's presence on U.S.
soil. Twenty years later, 18
percent opted for withdrawal. We
shall probably hang on; but each
day's passing reinforces the long
range hunch that our role will
reflect increased opposition to the
double and triple standards
characterizing many UN actions.
The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County recently held a
cocktail reception for residents of Singer Island on behalf of the
1980 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund cam-
paign. Pictured above are (left to right) Robert and Mollie
Fitterman, hosts for the affair, and George Golden, guest
speaker. ^_^___
(Left to right), Harold Singer and Debbie and Leonard (lilman
were guests at a cocktail reception recently held on Singer
Island on behalf of the 1980 CJA-IEF campaign.
George Golden (standing}, chairman of the Energy Task Force
of the Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County, addressed a group of Singer Island
residents at a cocktail reception held on March Won behalf of
the CJA-IEF campaign.
The Tiger Bay Club
Invites You To Share A Special Open Forum With
MOSHE
DAYAN
Crisis In The
Middle East:
The World
Challenge
Sunday,
April 6, 7:30 PM
Fontainebleau Hotel Grand Ballroom
All Seats Reserved $10
Info/Charge By Phone Call 651-8750 Available
at all Bass Outlets For Group Discounts
Information call Rachell Paston: 868-1569

Attending the Singer Island cocktail reception held on behalf of
the 1980 CJA-IEF campaign are (left to right) Rita and Phillip
Sher and Lenore And George Braen.
Larry and Florence Ser,
were guests at a cocktail
reception on Singer Island,
sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County on behalf of their
annual campaign.

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jriU, 1980
The Jewish Fbridian of Palm Beach County
Page 15
Okeechobee Blvd. West Palm Beach, Fla. 689-7700
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Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, April 4, 1980
'Spotlighting the Miracle That Is You'
i
The Women s Division of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, in cooperation with Burdines, West Palm Beach held a
cekbration entitled "Spotlighting the Miracle That Is You "
I he evening celebrated the efforts of the many women who'
have given of their time and means to the Combined Jewish
Appea-Israel Emergency Fund campaign. Pictured above at I
RicharaIR^Z^rclti^"^!!^^0^! T* m,anaJer; "SJe,SSeS %r the Burdines ('^ration are (front left to right) Suellen Schiff, Martha
doctor TZeciTeVentl Z?? Si ^ S^8 ^adelman Renee Gleiber, Renee Kessler. (Rear left to right) Sheila Engelstein, Renee Bassuk,
Federation; and Richard Gundy, Burdines regional rice l^HUHHai jL
president. a
Pictured above at the Burdines Spotlight Celebration are (left
to right) Carole Klein, chairman; Judy Waitzer and Renee
Kessler, co-chairmen.
Anne Faivus, Women's
Division campaign chairman,
discussed the needs of Israel
and the local Jewish com-
munity.
THE
RAIN
DANCER
A GOURMET STEAKHOUSE
2300
PALM BEACH LAKES BLVD.
WEST PALM BEACH
684-2810
DRESS CASUAL NO RESERVATIONS
Serving as hostesses for the Burdines Celebration (left to right)
Marilyn Lampert, Women's Division associate campaign
chairman; Adele Simon and Penny Beers.
fa^V^ Buri!neS. Celebration are (left to right) Anne
Sl^WSBfcSSSchairman anS **~
As part of the Spotlight Celebration, Burdines presentee
preview of their 1980 fashion collection.
Our OfBcers, ^Hrectors & 3tafF
wish you and yours a very happy
PHSSOVeiR

-
*****oitum


^pril4. 1960
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
ipectives on Jewish Education
Reflections on the Seder
IORDECAI LEVOW
is a special "lingo" of
that I sometimes think
led to impress non-
In this new "lingo,"
Jbnger speak of libraries,
; of media centers.
nedia center contains not
uks, but a whole range of
tsual and audio-lingual
jls to enhance the
^m. Films, records, maps,
| and slides are all part of
i collection.
laginative teacher uses
laterials plus a whole
props to make learning
interesting. We conceive
as modern and innovative
>n!
is another term that is
the current popular
ry of educators
ential education." The
must not only be taught
it should also be able to
Jearn by experiencing a variety of
learning and life situations.
Then there is something that
we educators call "inquiry"
teaching. This is an approach
that maintains that the best
learning takes place when the
learner is faced with open-ended
questions. Why, how, etc. These
are questions that make a
student think!
Each year, as 1 participate in
the age-old ritual of the Seder, I
reflect on the wisdom of our sages
who developed the ritual of the
Seder as an educational model
par excellence!
The Seder is the most im-
portant part of the Passover
observance and is probably the
oldest example of an educational
"happening" or experiential
teaching.
Is there a better example of the
creative use of "visuals" and
props for teaching than the Seder
Jlround
By STACI LESSER
First Grade Students Honored
Friday evening, March
Jfirst grade students of the
|were honored at a special
Presentation" at the
Lakes Temple, under the
of their teacher, Mrs.
na Walner. v
children assisted in
ting a major portion of the
[evening service following
ksentation to the students
I own prayer books.
! marks the first year that
rst grade students were
i of conducting this type of
in an area synagogue,
lgtoMrs. Walner.
students who were
at this service include:
Jrass, Beryle Cohen, Jodi
yer, Brian Friedman, Ali
Michael Gordon, Reija
nl Dana Howard.
Tara
Nikki
Lewis,
Ravitz,
Dothan
Jillian
teceola Inn
{increases
Capacity
Ins Osceola Lake Inn, a
[hotel in the Blue Ridge
i ins on Luke Osceola in
Bonville, N.C. opens for
i season May 23 and will
jests through Nov. 1.
additions for the season
additional guest rooms, a
om, recreational facilities
lot indoor whirlpool.
Mar with outdoors en-
ts as well as with those
iply want to relax, the Inn
a host of activities in-
swimming, boating,
tennis, putting green,
jard, horseshoes, ping-
irolleyball and badminton,
idition, two 18-hole
>nship golf courses are
pally supervised programs
lilable for children as well
[planned schedule of ac-
and nightly enter-
pnt for adults.
resort, which has ac-
iations for up to 150
features the American
with Jewish-American
I. Attire is informal at all
>lor brochure and rates are
t>le by writing Rubin's
Lake Inn.
Rosenbach, Jeffrey Schwartz,
David Simon, Seth Virshup,
Shelley Wald and Joshua
Weingard.
Mordciai Levow
with its Seder plate, matzoh, four
cups of wine, Elijah's cup, etc.
Inquiry teaching? The "why"
of the Mah Nishtana is designed
to create a questioning climate
and will .insure that the par-
ticipant reviews and learns the
story of the Exodus.
We can reflect with pride on
the wisdom of our earliest Jewish
educators and we are still in
the forefront of creativity and
innovations.
"Around The Town" would like to wish everyone beet
wished for a good Passover.
There will not be a column this issue due to the fact that
this columnist is up to her neck in gefilte fish, brisket, chicken,
chicken soup, kugel, charosis, horse radish and of course,
matzah balls.
Happy Passover
Investment Equity
Real Estate
DON VOGEL
Registered Real Estate Broker salesman
Residential-Condom inium-lnvestment
2352 PGA Boulevard Business 626-5100
Palm Beach Gardens. Fla. 13410Residence 622-
UGHTS: II mg. "we". 0.8 mg nicotiM. UGHT lOOY H mg V. 0.9 mg.nicoi.. pet cigaratti. FTC (Upon DEC. 79


Page 18
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. ApriM. 1980
Most Women After Childbirth Suffer Fatigue, Anxiety
By ELISSA ALLERH AND
Fully 59.8 percent of women
during the first year after
childbirth suffer extreme fatigue,
regardless of whether they
remain at home or also work
outside the home, establishes a
research project undertaken by a
team of Tel Aviv University
researchers.
The Tel Aviv University team,
including Prof. Rebecca
Bergman, Dr. Rebecca Adams,
Dr. Nelo Shavit and coordinated
by Dalia Feinberg of the Sackler
School of Medicine's Department
of Nursing, studied the factors
which influence the return of
women to the work force after
childbirth. examining the
problems encountered by
working mothers and the extetii
in which the help and services
a\ ailable meet their needs.
Ihc research report, un-
dertaken in cooperation with'the
Ministry of Labor and Welfare
and with the National Insurance
Institute which today pays new
working mothers 75 percent of
their salary for 12 weeks,
spanned five major categories of
working women: academics.
including doctors, lawyers, husband's position was not found
scientists, and other to be a decisive factor in the
professionals; nurses; teachers; woman's returning to work,
clerical services; and blue collar
laborers.
WITHIN SIX MONTHS of
childbirth, half of the Israeli
mothers returned to their jobs,
generally to the same positions
they held before they gave birth,
some of them working less hours
than they did prior to childbirth.
By one year after childbirth, 65
percent of the mothers return to
their jobs. Only five percent of
the mothers reported that they
did not intend to return to the
work force at all.
Why do they choose to return
to work? According to the Tel
Aviv University research team,
the three main factors which
motivated women to return to
work, in the order of priorities,
were financial need, desire to get
out of the house, and interest in
lh' work they were doing.
Fifty percent of the husbands
were in favor of their wives
returning to work, while 25
percent opposed, and the rest
were non-committed. The
Of the mothers who had not
yet returned to work by eight
months after birth, the mother's
main reason for not returning
was the decision to care for the
child herself. Non-return was
most frequent in blue collar
laborers
The expense of household help
was found to take a substantial
bite out of the working woman's
salary, since approximately 78.6
percent of the mothers of small
children employed babycare
services. On the average, some 40
percent of the salary goes
towards paying the helper, and
those who hire both helpers for
baby-care and cleaning women
pay an average of 56 percent of
their salary for this help.
WHAT ARE the primary
problems of mothers of small
children? The most problematic
areas according to their severity
were extreme physical fatigue,
reported by 59.8 percent of the
women; financial difficulties, 45
percent: lack of recreation, 36.4
percent; finding suitable baby-
care arrangements, 32.3 percent;
anxiety and tension, 30 percent;
housing 23.4 percent: and
conflicts between older children
and their relationship to the
newborn, 20 percent.
Eighty-seven percent of the
women interviewed said they had
problems, and while they were
described as relatively severe,
only one third of the women
turned to anyone for help.
WANTED
Top Prices Paid
Prices based on Daily Market Condn.
BUYING ALL:
U.S. Silver Coins Pre 1964
Gold Coins
Sterling Silver
Gold Jewelry
Gold & Silver
Exchange
1528 N. Dixie, Lake Worth, Suite 4
Across from Steve Moore Chevrolet
586-8608
"LET MY
PEOPLE GO
As we
celebrate Passover
in commemoration of '%
the ancient Israelis' return to
their homeland from bondage,
let us pray for the
safe return to their homelands
^ of all people held captive
in foreign lands
anywhere in the world
> today.
WW
\
*\
AMERICAN M
SAVINGS r
AND LOAN ASSOCLATON OF FLOUtDA ^J
Shepard Broad
Chairman
Morris N. Broad
President
Serving Florida since 5711
...


The Jewish Fbridian of Palm Beach County
Hage 19
pie Israel Announces
jpendence Day Concert
ADL Director to Speak in Lake Worth
Janowski. organist and
will be featured at an
dependence Day Festive
[Saturday. April 19. at 5
Temple Israel. 1901
Igler Drive.
inowski will present an
of his own musical
>ns with the par-
of the Temple Israel
[the congregation.
Janowski is a prolific
of synagogue music.
Berlin, Germany, he
i United States in 1937
appointed director of
Chicago's K.A.M.
1938.
ly music director of
Isaiah Israel, his
music is sung in both
and Conservative
lions. He has made
jrdings, including his
Bent release, "Sh'ma
Janowski conducts
music workshops
it the United States,
recent in Los Angeles,
lalah Service and a wine
reception will follow
Bit. Jewel Duberstein
khe Metzker are co-
Max Janowski
chairpersons of Temple Israel's
Festive Musical and Cultural
Weekend in honor of Israel's
32 nd birthday. Call the temple
office for the full schedule of
activities and for ticket in-
formation.
Arthur N. Teitelbaum.
Southern area director of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, will be the guest speaker
at the second annual Palm Beach
County Appeal breakfast, to be
held Sunday, April 20, at 9 a.m.
at The Fountains of Palm Beach,
6844 Lake Worth Road, Lake
Worth.
/
Teitelbaum is responsible for
the supervision of the ADL's
multi-faceted human relations
programs in 12 southern states,
which involves the activities of
seven of the ADL's. 27 regional
offices.
In directing the League's
activities in Florida, he is
responsible for the im-
plementation of its statewide
programs in the field of inter-
religious cooperation, race
relations, education, police-
community relations and the
counteraction of extremist ac-
tivities.
Under his direction, the ADL
regional office processes
discrimination complaints in-
volving employment, housing
and public accommodations.
Teitelbaum lectures widely on
urban and inter-group relations
problems before civic,
educational and business groups.
He is a member of the Adult
Education Association of the
United States and the National
Association of Human Rights
Workers.
Isidore Greenberg. chairman,
and Irving Lyons, co-chairman of
the fund-raising breakfast, urge
the attendance and financial
support of B'nai B'rith members
and friends interested in sup-
porting the programs of the
League, established in 1913, to
fight bigotry, work for a just and
lasting peace throughout the
Middle East, improve inter-
religious understanding and help
to make democracy secure.
Arthur Teitelbaum
ANNOUNCING .. "KEHILLA: TO REACH OUT"
A PALM BEACH COUNTY MISSION
TO ISRAEL
LEAVING OCTOBER 1980
-FURTHER DETAILS TO FOLLOW-
SPONSORED BY THE JEWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY:
iV Htjfl
n* p \,
1ST 0
y .lV
W1JM Rial
aP kT
a>

^v
ci& ^
V ** p <&
$
TOJ
*^5 r
^^
J-J tt L L *
Seder plate
Paris, 20 th century Faience
ISRAEL MUSEUM. JERUSALEM
PASSOVER GREETINGS
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bank leumi vnwh pia


Page 20
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. April 4, I960
atin Terrorism Orowing
Argentina's 'Disappearances
Becoming a Hitlerian Nightmare
Party Benefits Day School
Benjamin S. Hornstein extends greetings to the guests at
the recent auction and cocktail party that benefited the Jewish
Community Day School.
Hornstein is flanked by the two honorees of the evening, the
two founders of the school, Mrs. Ann Leibovit and Mrs. Carol
Roberts. Looking on is Howard Goodman, who, together with
his wife Roni, was the host of the event.
The unique format of the event included a jewelry auction,
provided by Kimberly, Ltd.,of Worth Avenue, followed by a
cocktail party at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Goodman in Palm
Beach.
The members of the committee who planned the event were
as follows: Mrs. Irving Salins, chairman; Mrs. Paul Abrams,
Mrs. Lee A. Fischer, Mrs. Joel'Gordon, Mrs. Isadore
Moscowitz, Mrs. Michael Ray, Dr. Joan Rosov, Mrs. Fred
Simon, Mrs. Harold Singer. Mrs. Max Tochner, Mrs. Arthur
Virshup, Mrs. Barbara Weinstein and Mrs. David Weissberger.
NEW YORK Amnesty
International published an
eyewitness report by two sur-
vivors who escaped from secret
detention camps in Argentina
where they estimate that hun-
dreds of people have been
systematically tortured and
killed since 1976.
Their account and its ac-
companying lists of dead and
missing prisoners throw new
light on the possible fate of the
thousands of Argentinian
citizens who have "disappeared"
over the past three years. A
delegation of the Organization of
American States visited
Argentina in September, 1979 to
conduct on-the-spot in-
vestigations into the disap-
pearances that local human
rights groups say now total more
than 15,000. The OAS findings
have not yet been made public.
AMNESTY International
decided to publish the testimony
of the two men after months of
checking their account against its
own records of people who have
disappeared'" and the
statements of former prisoners.
The organization also consulted
well-informed sources in
Argentina and has been able to
corroborate many of the details
given by the two men.
Both came to Amnesty
International with their unique
testimony after the organization
issued a list in 1979 of 2,665
people known to have "disap-
peared" in Argentina since the
coup that brought Gen. Jorge
Videla to power in March, 1976.
They testify to a constant
pattern supervised in meticulous
detail by various branches of
Argentina's military and police
forces. Torture and interrogation
were systematic, followed by a
period of what they call "con-
centration camp" life with
regular punishments and
beatings, and finally, for most
prisoners, "transfer" the
euphemism for death. Most of the
victims had been taken from their
homes or places of work without
any semblance of legality by
armed segments of the security
forces, usually in civilian
clothing.
GONZALEZ, a 27-year-old
factory worker when he was
kidnapped, had been active
politically in a union. His wife,
who he says had not taken part in
politics, was abducted a month -
later. He has heard nothing of her
since January, 1978. De la Paz,
who was 20 when he was kid-
napped, was a student leader and
a member of the Montonero wing
of the Peronist movement.
They estimate that 800 people
passed through the camps they
were in during their 15 months in
captivity, and they provide
details on more than 300 of them.
Gonzalez and de la Paz regard
themselves as lucky to nave
stayed alive until they found a
chance to escape. "We managed
to delay our 'transfer' by
--
Continued on following page

.

0
vtmst? irana
,1? onpvi ^dVi i?
temin an TiaaD^
wishing you a joyous Passover
and health and happiness always

. \j ,

where
shopping
Publix p>~-e
t-~-


the Jewish t'lpridian of faim Heach County
' aKc '
n Terrorism on Rise
I from preceding page
[adopting an attitude
' they say. *'We did
linting, worked as
cooks, mechanics
I office work."
I. like many others,
[to Club Atletico in
bs when they were
[This building, since
served as an initial
risoners. There, they
first "operating
is the torture rooms
Club Atletico had
furnished with a
trie cattle prod) and
to which the
irere bound naked.
of burnt flesh, blood,
and excrement,
fact that there was
|lon, made the air
impossible to
By report.
IEATMENT. they
1, was essentially the
II prisoners: "For the
they would apply the
l, without asking any
[The purpose of this
put it, 'to soften you
[that we'll understand
r' They applied it
id. armpits, sexual
js. groin, mouth and
^nsitive parts of the
to the two men,
Id go on for hours, day
"Between session of
thev would use the
(holding our heads
Ir), hang us up by our
I on the sexual organs,
th chains, put salt on
Is and use any other
Ithat occurred to
]"hi'v would also apply
i' was done under the
of a doctor, who
ir blood pressure and
|st one case, however.
>ld them of a detainee
htured to death within
is abduction, before
lere received from
that he was to be
At Club Atletico, newcomers
were kept at first in a common
cell called the "lion's den,"
because that was where they
were"tamed." They v. ere later
removed to tiny cells where they
lay shackled, with tight cloth
blindfolds over their eyes. At
first, they suffered infections
from the dirty cloth, which made
their eyes swell. They were
forbidden to talk or touch the
blindfolds, and could be beaten
unconscious if a guard even saw
them move their hands.
ACCORDING to the two
men's testimony, Club Atletico
was run by the Federal Police, by
"task forces" containing men
from all the armed services used
it.
Gonzalez and de la Paz were
moved from camp to camp,
coming under the jurisdiction of
officers from the various services.
One of the camps they name is
Olimpo, next to government
offices in western Buenos Aires.
Amnesty International has
learned that in September, 1979,
the physical installations they
described were still there, though
no prisoners were seen at that
time.
Of the people desribed in the
report by Gonzalez and de la Paz
as having been kidnapped and
tortured, some had beer
politically active, others were
only related to political suspects,
and there was no apparent reason
for the abduction of some. Others
were taken for the purpose of
extortion.
THE ARMY, Navy, Air Force
and Federatl Police all had men
in the "task forces," which did
the kidnapping and operated in
the camps. Generals, colonels and
other high-ranking officers were
among those whom Gonzalez and
de la Paz say they saw at the
camps. The "task forces" had to
get authority from higher up to
carry out abductions, and they
reported methodically on their
handling of prisoners.
When a kidnapping was ap-
proved, police and other security
services would reportedly
"surrender" an area of several
city blocks to let the abduction
squad operate.
VICTIMS' property was
plundered: title deeds were
forged so that homes could be
sold, prisoners were forced to
sign bills of sale for their cars,
savings accounts were emptied.
Furniture and anything else of
value was looted, loaded onto
lorries kept for that purpose.
The authorized plunder was
apparently a major incentive for
the "task force" officers. It was
distributed according to rank,
but caused much squabbling.
Non-commissioned officers
complained bitterly about the
share taken by superior officers.
Jewish prisoners were singled
out for especially harsh treat-
ment. During torture they were
interrogated not only about their
political ideas, but also about the
Jewish community in Argentina.
Names and addresses of Jews,
diagrams of synagogues, clubs
and business premises owned by
Jews were diligently collected.
"From the moment they were
kidnapped until they were un-
cluded in a 'transfer' they (Jews)
were systematically tortured,"
the authors say. "Some of them
were made to kneel in front of
pictures of Hitler and Mussolini,
to renounce their origins ."
The report quotes a police
officer nicknamed Padre: "In
here, some people are mercenaries
and others aren't; but we're all
fascists."
Prisoners were usually
"transferred" in groups of 30 to
50. Guards tried to prevent those
left behind from hearing certain
of their final instructions to those
lined up for the "transfer," but
they were eventually overheard
telling such a group that they
would be given injections of a
"tranquilizer" because they faced
a long and difficult journey. The
groups were loaded into lorries
and never seen again. Shackled
and blindfolded, they were
generally not allowed to tak
extra clothing with thprn. "Manvi
comrades were transferred in,
just their underwear, in the
middle of winter."
IN SOME cases,
belongings which prisoners had
been seen to take with them, or
identification papers for
prisoners who had been "tran-
sferred," were found to be still at
the camp. A legless prisoner
named Eduardo was one of those
transferred, taken out in his
wheelchair. "Two days later, we
' | saw Eduardo's chair discarded in
personal a corner of the parking lot."
One prisoner told Gonzalez and
de la Paz that he had discovered
in his previous camp that
"transferred" prisoners had been
given injections of a powerful
sedative, then taken by lorry and
loaded into an aircraft, "from
which they were thrown into the
sea, alive but unconscious."
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Bernard D. Epstein M.D.
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I by appointment (305) 368-6030
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Fun 'n Games
in
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Only 35 minutes away on Grand Bahama Is-
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palace in the Western Hemisphere. Two Con-
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Crazy Gang, a colorful revue is featured twice nightly
except Monday.
Fly to Freeport/Lucaya. Tempt Lady Luck at
El Casino. Visit the fabulous Garden of the
Groves. Shop in the fascinating International
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Bahama Island.
For reservations, call your Travel Agent or
Bahamasair, Eastern Airlines, Mackey or
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Freeport/Lucaya Grand Bahama Wand
>


**" i hV.i eu-ts*h I- luFiaujfi uj'ruini oeucn county
* mabbtnical <0rntr
Coordinated by
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev, Ph.d
*votad to *cik* of tbames m
rtJavant to Jewish Hft pact and orof out
Passover Festival of Freedom
By RABBI JEROME
IKESTENBAUM
Beginning April 1, the annual
Festival of Passover will be
celebrated by members of the
Jewish faith throughout the
world, in commemoration of the
wonderous deliverance of the
Jews from Egyptian bondage.
alo:v.v.w>KWAv.v.v,v.v.v.'M
Editor's Note: The views
expressed by the rabbis are
strictly their own and do not
necessarily reflect the views of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
mmmmmtm
T.V. SPECIAL PROGRAMS
SATURDAY APRIL 5 9 p.m. on
WPBT CHANNEL2
II IK MAN IN THE CLASS HOOTH"
The program is a take-off <>n the Kichman story
and stars Maximillian Schi'll as
Arthur Goldman, a Holocaust survivor
nt the Nazi concentration camps
who is mistaken for a
Nazi warcriminal.
SATURDAY APRIL 12 6:30 p.m. on
WPTV CHANNEL 5
IWRTOFYOURL1FK
Kxcerpts from the Holocaust Survivor Film
Project interviews with survivors
living in Palm Beach County.

Tune in to 'Mosaic9
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TUNE IN TO MOSAIC
"Mosaic," Jewish Federation's sponsored program
is aired on
Sunday mornings over WPTV Channel 5, at 9 a.m. with
hosts Barbara Shulman and Steve Gordon.
April 6 Rabbi Michael Cook
April 13 Rabbi Alvin Rentes
Set furniture by Worrells Interior*
Set interior design by Carol lavold
Urgent Appeal by
Leading Rabbis of
Eretz Israel
on behalf of
The Central Aid Fund
"Notzar Chessed" o! Jerusalem
Among the activities of this organization:
(1) Free distribution of food to poor and needy families
daily and especially for Shabbos and Yom-tov.
(2) Free distribution of Passover food to over 1,000 needy
families.
(3) Free loan of tables and chairs to poor families for sim-
chas.
(4) Sale of household goods at specially reduced prices to
low income families.
We appeal urgently to our brethren to enable "NOTZAR
CHESSED" to continue and expand their vital work in
aiding poor families. We especially appeal at this time for
donations to provide Passover food for over 1,000
families.
May the Almighty bless all donors with health, long life
and success in all matters.
Rabbi Yechezkel Shraga Halberatam
Rabbi Shalom Halevy Eiscn
Rabbi Moabe HaJberstam
S50 will provide support for one family for one month.
$100 will provide Passover food for one family.
$1,000 can establish a fund in name of donor for crockery, tables and
chairs to be loaned to poor families for their simchas.
Send donations direct to:
"NOTZAR CHESSED"
P.O.B. 5619 Batei Ungarian 201
Jerusalem, Israel
"In each generation it be-
hooves everyone to regard
himself as though he were per-
sonally redeemed from the
slavery of Egypt."
This quotation i9 taken from
the Passover Prayer Book, which
narrates the story of the Exodus
of the Jewish people from Egypt,
3,200 years ago.
PASSOVER stands for
freedom for ALL PEOPLE. The
Hebrew Bible reminds us "You
shall love the stranger for you
were strangers in the land of
Egypt" In other words, the
freedom you have gained you
must share with others. Passover
is thus the great Festival of
Freedom of Brotherhood.
There is no lack of lip-service to
brotherhood. Almost everybody
will on appropriate occasions,
pay tribute to it and quote the
proper platitudes. However, in all
fairness to the situation, we must
admit that there is too little of
brotherhood as indispensable to
survival.
There were a few far-sighted
American clergymen who with
painful clarity held conversations
with Christian clergymen in
Berlin in the summer of 1933. The
German clergymen were uncom-
fortable about Hitler's anti-
Semitism but not to the extent of
recognizing its threat to the
Christian churches, nor of being
prepared to fight it openly. They
were warned that it would be
their fate, too.
Unfortunately, those who
warned were right. The attack
upon the Jews was merely the
prelude to the assault on all
Christian and democratic values.
When the concentration camp of
Oswiekem was liberated, they
found huddled together in life
and death the shriveled bodies of
Protestant ministers, Catholic
preists, and rabbis. They found
heaped and intermingled in the
rubble, crosses, crucifixes,
Torahs, prayer book and
testaments of Christians and
Jews a correct symbol of the
oneness of their fate.
THE ONENESS of man's
destiny has always been
recognized as a religious truth,
but is now a practical necessity.
In a world of radar, supersonic
planes, and hydrogen bombs,
and the delicate inter-
relationships of the world econ-
omy, our INTER-DEPEN-
DENCE is an inescapable and
desperate fact.
It has become a truism that we
will either learn to live together
or we will perish together. There
will either be the general ap-
plication of justice in human
affairs or there will be no
dependable justice for any
groups. There will either be
decent treatment of the minority
groups in America or there will be
no decent America. "Ask not for
whom the bell tolls; it tolls for
thee. "
On Passover, long years ago,
the Jewish people hearkened to
the call of freedom. Today that
call rings out agian sounding its
glorious challenge commanding
us to champion the cause of all
the oppressed and the down-
trodden, summoning all the
people throughout the world to
arise and be free.
\jel us raise our voices in
gratitude to God that this can
still be heard in the land. I-et us
give thanks that the love of
freedom still burns in the heart of
our fellow men. Let us pray that
the time be not distant when all
the world will be liberated from
cruelty, tyranny, oppret MOD and
war.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach
County
ORTHODOX
AITZ CHAIM CONGREGATION CENTURY VILLAGE
W Palm Beach Phone: 689-4675 Sabbath Services 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Dally Services: 8:15 a.m. and 5 p.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
551 Brittany L, Kings Point. Delray Beach 33446 Harry-Silver
President. Services daily 8 M. and 5 P-m. Saturdays and
Holidays 9 a.m. Phone: 499 7407. Temple No. 499j229_
REFORM
ITEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida
33407 833-8421 Rabbi Irving B. Cohen Joel L. Levlne,
Associate Rabbi Sabbath Worship Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. Saturday Torah Seminars at 10:30 a.m.
ITEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W Fourt Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Phone: 391-
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath
Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.* Saturday. 9:15 a.m. Torah Study
with Rabbi Merle E. Singer 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Ser-
vices
| THE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION OF DELRAY
At St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swinton Ave.. Delray
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1901. Delray Beach. Fla. 33444 Fri-
day at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver Preside'nt Lawrence
Sommers. 272-2908
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. At. St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill
Blvd. and Willington Trace Mailing address: 1125 Jack Pine
St., West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 President Ronnie
Kramer 793-2700 ________
CONSERVATIVE-LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
The Free Synagogue, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 368-
1600,391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 8:15 p.m.
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West Glades Rd. (1
mile west of Boca Turnpike) ________________________
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fl. 33407 Phone:
833-0339 Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sab-
bath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Daily
Mlnyan at 8:15 a.m., Sunday at 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 Phone 684-
3212 Office hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schect-
man Cantor Arthur B. Rosenwasser Services: Daily 8:30 am.
and 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8:30 am. and 5 p.m.; Late Service 8:15
p.m. followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday, 8:30 am., 5 p.m.
followed by Shalah Sudos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. Phone 732-2555 Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazin Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9
a.m. Congregational Church, 115 N. Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 N. A' Street, Lake Worth, Fla. 33460 Phone: 585-
5020 Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Ser-
vices: Mondays and Thursdays at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services, Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. West-
minster Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm
Beach Gardens. (Office) 321 Northlake Blvd., North Palm
Beach, Fla. Phone: 845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor
Nicholas Fenakel .
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
224 N.W. Avenue 'G,' Belle Glade, Fla. 33430 Jack Stateman
Cantor Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeida Drive, Palm Springs, Fla. 33461 Sabbath ser-
vices: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. President Barnett
Briskman Phone: 967-4962 Mondays and Thursdays at 9
a.m. Services held at Faith United Presbyterian Church, Palm
Springs
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Pla. 33432 Phone: 392-
8566 Rabbi Nathan Zelizer Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15
p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446 Phone:
276 3536 Morris SMberman, Rabbi Leonard Price, Can-
tor Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9
a.m. Dally Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Road. Pil"- Beach, Fla 33480 Phone 832-
0804 Rabbi Myer S Kru,*r Cantor Davio Dardashti Sab-
bath Services: Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturday at 9 a m.


14,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 23
r
Synagogue News Temple Israel to Honor David Tisnowers
fLE EMANU-EL
services at Temple
[will be conducted by
irer S. Kripke and
Dardashti. Rabbi
non topics follow:
evening 8:30 p.m.
"The Dry Bones:
World's Hope Lies";
Joming. 9 a.m. April 5
Jod of the Exodus";
a.m. April 7
and Reason Twin
! Faith"; and Tuesday,
18 "Nature and the
Jod."
> on the last morning
April 8, includes the
kor-Memorial Service
IPLE BETH EL
Beach, will have its
akfast meeting on
fril 13 at 10 a.m. in
Guest speaker will
lioner Dennis Koehler.
rives are invited.
meeting of Temple
isterhood will be held
f, April 15, at 8 p.m. in
Bin Lounge.
lancy Ratner will
Chinese Auction for
It of the Sisterhood
(embers and guests are
ing items new and old
on.
will take place at the
efreshments will be
ions can still be made
Beth El Sisterhood's
jrah-Fund / Residence
tieon in Senter hall on
r, April 23, at noon.
pttie Hanser will be
fas a Woman of
it for her devotion
toward the Jewish
Seminary campaign
ears. Entertainment
provided by the
Minstrels. Call the
lice for more in-
! BETH SHOLOM
Jeth Sholom of Lake
orated its 26th an-
[honoring the newly
^verning body, at a
id dance at the
Country Club of
| Dr. Sander V. Smith,
Edward Passman,
president; Norman
[second vice president;
iberg, third vice
George Smith,.
Abraham Halpem,
secretary; Sam
cording secretary.
|: Joseph Borkowski;
ein; David Hilton;
[Jaffa, Irving Katz,
Bit. Emanuel Scher,
Harry SelUer, David snepard,
Mollie Stuback, Israel Walder,
Irving Wolser, Milton Freedman,
outgoing president; Sydelle
Goldbenberg, president of
sisterhood; Charles Stuback,
president of Men's Club.
Judge C. Michael Shalloway
installed the new state of officers
and directors and was the
speaker for the evening.
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
delivered the invocation for the
health and success of the office-
holders, with special prayers for
the well-being of American and
world peace.
Jerry Feinberg acted as master
of ceremonies with entertainment
by Fred Zucker and his
Orchestra. Responsible for the
arrangements and success of the
affair were: Chairman, Edward
Passman and Co-Chairmen, Dr.
Sander V. Smith and Jerry
Feinberg.
The next regular meeting of
Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood
will be April 9, 12:30 p.m. at the
temple, 315 No. "A:" Street,
Lake Worth. Election of officers
will be held. The balance of the
meeting will be a musical
program with Jerry Feinberg at
the piano and Lew Young at the
violin."
The Temple Israel Division of
State of Israel Bonds will honor
David and Rose Tisnower at a
breakfast at the temple on
Sunday, April 20. The Tisnowers
will receive the Negev Award
from the State of Israel in
recognition of more than a half
century of service to Israel, the
community, and to Temple
Israel.
After moving to Palm Beach in
1924 and opening the
Southampton Market on Main
Street, now Royal Poinciana
Way, Tisnower immediately
joined the Chamber of Com-
merce, which has honored him
several times. In 1928, he turned
over the first shovel of dirt when
Temple Israel was built.
He is a Brother Elk, a member
of the Sheriff's Boys Ranch, and
a life member of Denver Hospital.
Mrs. Tisnower is a life member of
City of Hope, B'nai B'rith,
Hadassah, and ORT.
Rabbi Balfour Brickner, one of
the leading figures in Reform
Judaism, will be the guest
speaker at the testimonial to the
Tisnowers. He is director of the
National Department on
Interreligious Affairs of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations and co-director of
| its National Commission on
Social Action. ,
Members of the State of Israel Bonds Temple Israel Division
are shown here at a meeting planning the testimonial breakfast
in honor of David and Rose Tisnower at the temple. Seated, left
to right: Mrs. Ben Wacks, Betty Gilbert, Mrs. Richard Shugar-
man, Kurt Leighton. Standing, left to right: Mort Gilbert, Dr.
Sen Wacks, Mike Small, Dr. Richard Shugarman, Rabbi Joel
'^evine.
Host of an award-winning
radio program, "Adventures in
Judaism," heard over 70 radio
stations in the country, he is also
a lecturer and author. A past
chairman of the InterreliEious
Affairs Committee of the
Synagogue Council of America,
he is also a member of the
Interreligious Coalition of New
York Clergy.
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