Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00215

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
& Jewish Floridiai in

o/" Pa/m Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Llume6- Number 4
, ''Palm Beach, Florida Friday, February 22,1980 \
Fred Shochil
Price 35 Cents
-r-
Benjamin S. Hornstein Elementary School Named
Barry Krischer president of
|the Jewish Community Day
I School of Palm Beach County
line announced that the board of
Idirectors of the Day School has
lunanimously agreed to name the
I elementary school the Benjamin
Is Hornstein Elementary School
of the Jewish Community Day
School of Palm Beach County,
Inc.
"It is with great pride that we
accept the honor of joining the
name of Benjamin S. Hornstein
with the Jewish Community Day
School," said Krischer
"Knowing of Mr. Hornstein's
long and active association with
the whole spectrum of Jewish
scholarship and Jewish
education, here in Palm Beach,
throughout the country and
Dan Mica to Address Jewish Community
In an effort to keep the Jewish
Community of Palm Beach
Tounty informed of the major
isues confronting the Jewish
,ple at home and abroad, the
^;al Concerns Task Force of the
lewish Federation of Palm Beach
ounty's Community Relations
buncil is sponsoring a meeting
ith Dan Mica.
Mica, a member of the United
States House of Representatives
Eleventh Congressional District,
kill speak on Sunday, March 2,
It 7:30 p.m. at the Sheraton Inn,
1901 Palm Beach Lakes
oulevard.
As a new Congressman, Mica
berves on two House committees
and one Select Committee. He is
member of the Foreign Affairs
pommittee, and its sub-com-
nittees on Asian and Pacific
Vffairs and International
Jpcrat urns.
A member of the Veterans'
Affairs Committee, Mica also
erves on its subcommittees of
Medical Facilities & Benefits;
"ompensation, Pension,
Insurance & Memorial Affairs;
knd the Special Investigations.
\long with membership on the
elect Committee on Aging, he
herves on the Subcommittees on
puman Services, and Health and
ong Term Care.
"Congressional action and
attitudes are extremely im-
srtant to the American Jewish
fcommunity," said Bruce Daniels,
Chairman of the Jewish
federation's Community
elations Council.
"It is essential that we keep
Informed. Congressman Mica has
[ Post on the House Foreign
\ffairs Committee that touches
_nd affects the entire Middle
t-aat. In addition to learning his
latitudes, this meeting will give
Ine community an opportunity to
Worm Congressman Mica of its
fiews."
Dan Mica
"Representative government
can only be effective when people
are truly concerned about what
their lee ted representatives are
doing and communicate their
concerns to that elected official,"
said Elsie Leviton, chairperson of
the Local Concerns Task Force.
"Our meeting with Dan Mica
gives you the opportunity to
meet and exchange ideas. This is
the way to achieve A Govern-
ment By The People."
The meeting is open to the
total community. Additional
information is available from
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman at the
Jewish Federation office.
abroad, we are certain that this
link will help to insure the
strength and effectiveness of the
school.
"IT IS most appropriate that
the new school building, the first
Jewish communal structure on
the Gladstone tract, so
generously made available to the
Jewish Federation, should be
named in honor of Benjamin S.
Hornstein."
Alan L. Shulman, president of
the Jewish Federation, made the
following statement: "As
president of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, it is gratifying to see
that the Jewish Community Day
School, one of our beneficiary
Continued on Page 3
Crowd Gathers to Mark
Sharansky Birthday
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
About 300 people, many of them
youngsters, gathered outside the
Soviet Embassy shortly after
noon here to mark the 32 nd
birthday of Anatoly Sharansky
and to protest his continued
confinement in a Soviet prison.
The demonstration, sponsored
by the Soviet Jewry Committee
of the Greater Washington
Jewish Community Council, was
addressed by Rabbi Rubin
Landman of Congregation Har
Tzion-Agudath Achim and Rev.
John Steinbruch of the Luther
Place Memorial Church.
Landman, Steinbruch and
Norman Goldstein, chairman of
the Soviet Jewry Committee,
attempted to deliver birthday
cards for Sharansky to the
Embassy. An Embassy employee
came to the gate but refused to
accept the cards on grounds that
he was authorized only to
receive mail in diplomatic
pouches.
Federation Supports
Cambodian Relief
, "The Jewish people have found
Pmething hauntingly familiar in
images of the starving people
Cambodia," said Alan L.
hulman, president of the Jewish
federation of Palm Beach
"ounty, as he announced today
181 the Jewish Federation's
j>ard of directors has approved
n allocation of $2,000 to the
fambodian Relief Fund.
We are no strangers to
fraecution and isolation,"
nuiman said. "The situation in
Putheast Asia is reminiscent of
prrors of the Holocaust. In the
atastrophic moral defeat which
lade the Holocaust possible, we
pacovered the price of In-
difference and the cost of apathy.
To ignore evil is to accept its
triumph. That is why our
Federation is joining with other
Jewish communities in
Federations throughout the
country in support of this great
humanitarian effort."
The American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee is
coordinating this program for the
American Jewish community.
Over $100,000 has been received
to date. Additional individual
contributions can be made
directly to the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee, 60
East 42nd St., New York. NY
10017.
Benjamin Hornstein
Women's Division to Host
Event at Burdines
THE CARDS, addressed to
Sharansky at Chistopol Prison in
Moscow, will be mailed. A shofar
was blown to mark the occasion.
Landman said, "We blow the
shofar as a symbol of protest and
outrage at the callousness and
cruelty of a government which
directs its power to crush the
Jewish spirit. We appeal to the
soul and conscience of the Soviet
Union for compassion and
justice." Steinbruch told the
assembled group, "We must keep
the promise alive for Anatoly
Sharansky. We are his tie to the
future. We must not be
weakened."
The protestors distributed
leaflets to passersby urging that
Sharansky and other "prisoners
of conscience" be freed and
allowed to emigrate. Sharansky
was arrested in March, 1977 and
sentenced in July, 1978 to 13
years' imprisonment for alleged
treason and anti-Soviet ac-
tivities. He is reportedly in ill
health.
In New York, Burton
Levinson, president of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry, announced a campaign to
"make certain that Anatoly
knows that he has not been
forgotten." He said birthday
Cings should be sent in the
of cards, letters or cables to:
Anatoly Sharanskv. Chistopol
Prison, UCHR.6110/1. UE,
Moscow, RSFSR. USSR.
IN ADDITION, noted
Levinson, Mar. 15 will mark
Sharansky's third year of im-
prisonment at which time he is
expected to be transferred from
the rigors of Chistopol Prison to
an undesignated labor camp to
carry out the rest of his sentence.
He noted that messages and
appeals should be sent to Soviet
authorities urging that
Sharansky be released and
allowed to emigrate to Israel
rather than transferred as
scheduled, to a labor camp.
The Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County will once again host the
annual Burdines gala evening in
support of the 1980 Women's
Division Combined Jewish
Appeal Campaign. Chairing this
event will be Carole Klein along
with Judy Waltzer and Renee
Kessler as her co-chairmen.
'' As chairman of the Kevnoiers
Category," said Carole Klein, "it
is our special honor to have this
gala evening hosted by the
Women's Division in cooperation
with Burdines.
"Our entire committee of
dedicated women along with my
co-chairmen and myself, are
excited in" anticipation of this
grand celebration. This year, at
the new Burdines in the Paim
Beach Mall, the Women's
Division will be hosting a
champagne and hors d'oeuvres
reception. Along with the ex-
citing new displays which
Burdines has developed in this
new store, the highlight of the
evening will be a specially
choreographed fashion preview of
Burdines fashions for the 1980s."
"As the chairman of the 1980
Women's Division Campaign,"
stated Anne Faivus, "it is with
great joy that we plan this
evening at Burdines, which
comes at the close of the most
successful campaign in the
history of our Women's Division.
"We see this event as a special
time in our campaign calendar.
All of those who have worked in
our Women's Division Campaign
effort have the unique op-
portunity to join together in a
feeling of true unity and
strength. Now more than ever,
we need to be as one people
working for one common goal,"
said Favius.
Working with Carole Klein.
Judy Waltzer and Renee Kessler
are Anne Faivus, campaign
chairman and Marilyn Lampert,
associate campaign chairman and
their community, Renee Bassuk
Penny Penny Berrs, Mary
Broadman, Renee Gleiber,
Frances Golden, Anna Jacobson,
Fruema Klorfein, Staci Lesser,
Ruth Levow, Martha Nadelman,
Betty Ross, Roberta Sade,
Suellen Schiff, Wally Sherman,
Ilene Silber, Adele Simon, Anne
Small, Judith Supran, Barbara
Tanen, Joan Tochner, Bonnie
Turk. Arline Warner.
THE 9**$ THE Rp$$IAti$ 7UV



Page 2
Friday, February m
Registration Opens for Midrasha Term
. rt-l.....iiit mil
The Midrasha Judaica High
School is now accepting registra-
tion for the spring term which
begins on March 10. All Jewish
teen-agers in grades 9 through 121
are invited to attend.
The Midrasha is completing its
historic first term, and the wide
range of courses has appealed to
students who have completed
eight years of day school
education as well as those with no
previous training at all.
Several new courses will be
added for the spring semester, a
Community Calendar
Feb. 23
Temple Beth El Sociol Set 7 p.m.
Ftb. 24
Temple Beth El Men's Club Art Auction JEWISH FEDERA-
TION YOUNG LEADERSHIP RETREAT WASHINGTON, D.C.
Ftb. 25
Women's American ORT Poinicana 12:30 p.m. B'nai
B'rith Women Boynton Board 1 p.m. Women's
American ORT Palm Beach JEWISH FEDERATION -
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COUNCIL 7:30 p.m.
Feb. 26
Women's American ORT Lake Worth 1 p.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom 1 p.m. JEWISH FEDERA-
TION COMMUNITY PLANNING 8 p.m.
Feb. 27
Hadassah Shalom luncheon Breakers JEWISH
FEDERATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS 8 p.m. Temple Beth
David Sisterhood 8 p.m. Pioneer Women Golda Meir -
board 1 p.m.
Feb. 28
Hadassah Chai 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women -
Medina 8 p.m. Hadassah Aliyah 1 p.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom Card Party Hadassah -
Yovel Study Group
Feb. 29
JEWISH FEDERATION ENDOWMENT FUND BREAKFAST 8:30
March 2
Temple Beth El Purim Carnival- 1-8 p.m. Pioneer Women
- Ezrat Theatre Party 4 p.m. JEWISH FEDERATION -
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COUNCIL 7:30 p. m.
March 3
Women's American ORT Palm Beach Book review
Temple Beth El Sisterhood board 8 p.m. Temple
Emanu-EI Sisterhood board 9:45 a.m. Temple Israel
Sisterhood board 10 a.m. American Jewish Com-
mittee board 7:30 p.m. Women's American ORT -
Royal Palm Beach board 9:30 a.m. Jewish Family &
Children's Service Executive 7:30 p.m. Hadossah -
Golda Meir Study Group 10 a.m. Jewish Community
Day School board 8 p.m. Congregation Anshei
Sholom Sisterhood board 9:45 a.m. Congregation^
Anshei Sholom Men's club Executive board 10 a.m.
March 4
American Jewish Congress 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith
#2939 board 10 a.m. Temple Beth El board -8p.m.
Pioneer Women Theodore Herzl board Pioneer
Women Ezrat 1:30 p.m.
March 5
Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary #408 1 p.m Temple
Beth Sholom Sisterhood Prof. Watson Duncan 8 p.m.
JEWISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION EXECUTIVE
MEETING 11:45 a.m. Hadassah Lake Worth South
Palm Beach boord 10 a.m. Women's American ORT -
Palm Beach County Region Executive 9:30 a.m.
March 6
Hadassah Chai boord 11 a.m. Nationol Council of
Jewish Women Okeechobee Unit board 10 a.m.
Hadassah Palm Beach County board 10 a.m.
Hadassah West Palm Beach board B'nai B'rith Ohav -
1 p.m. Women's American ORT Evening 8 p.m. B'nai
B'rith Women Medina board 8 p.m. National United
Jewish Appeal Women's Division $ 1,250 event
I
H
The only Jewish family owned
and operated funeral home
in Palm Beach County.
L
WE
EVITT WWEINSTEIN
memorial chapelt
Formerly Levitt Memorial Chapelt
5411 Okeechobee Blvd. Telephone ttt-WOO
W. Flm Beach, Fla. 53409, vm*m*STmH,v.9.
course on the Holocaust will be
offered as well as a class on the
Jewish Calendar and the Politics
of Israel. Jewish History
Hebrew, and Israeli rolk,
Dancing are some of the ongoing
courses. Additional courses will
be announced shortly.
One of the outstanding
features of the Midrasha is the
Israel scholarship program. After
participation in Jewish studies
through the eleventh grade ot
high school, qualified students
will be offered financial
assistance to enable them to
participate in study trips to
Israel. The Midrasha committee
of the Jewish Federation is
currently considering this year s
candidates, and the names will be
announced in the near future.
The spring term of the
Midrasha will meet for nine
weeks beginning March 10, in the
classrooms of Temple Israel.
The Midrasha is a community
program of Jewish education
offered through the cooperative
efforts of Temple Beth David,
Temple Beth El, West Palm
Beach. Temple Israel, the Jewish
Community Day School and the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County. The students come from
many backgrounds and degrees
of Jewish observance. In-
formation on courses offered and
registration is available by
calling the Jewish Federation.
0
Riverside
Memonel CMP*' >"c Funeral Directors
4
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Now two Chapels to serve you .
West PalmvBeach Lantana
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Joseph Rubin, F.D.
Vice Prrudrnl and Mjugrr
Rabbi Cook
To Speak at
Temple Israel
"The Question of the Role of
the Jews in Jesus' Crucifixion"
will be discussed by Rabbi
Michael Cook at a breakfast
Sunday, March 2, at 9:30 a.m. at
Temple Israel.
Rabbi Cook is an authority on
early Christian literature. As the
Temple's 1980 Scholar in
Residence, Rabbi Cook will be
presenting a full weekend of
lectures and discussions spon-
sored by the Cultural Com-
mission. Admission is by ticket
only.
Rabbi Cook was ordained by
the New York branch of the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion. His doc-
toral work, pursued at the
Cincinnati :ampus of HUC-JIR,
focused on the history and
literature of the period of the
Second Temple, with
specialization in the area of New
Testament.
k, He is the author of numerous
articles about intertestamental
fend early Christian literature. He
has lectured extensively on how
K confront Christian
issionaries, and the question of
converting to Judaism unaf-
ifiliated non-Jews.
Sylvia Leighton is chairperson
d Jerome and Dena SkaUca are
ciate chairpersons of the
eekend. Dr. Ilene Gerber is
airperson of the Cultural
ommission. Seating for all
events is limited.
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trinity', VenrTjdry iz. ivmj

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'atgCffeacn' 'County


ragi
>f"*_
Spotlight on

Benjamin S. Hornstein, Jewish Philanthropist
mi Amnviiiftn In..... i i
"The future of American Jewry
is in the hands of our Jewish
youth," stated Benjamin S.
Hornstein, noted Jewish
philanthropist, in emphasizing

his ongoing support and
mitment to the Jewish
munity Day School of
Beach County.
com-
Com-
Palm
Benjamin S. Hornstein
Elementary School Named
Continued from Page 1
agencies, has matured to the
point of establishing a permanent
facility within the Jewish
community of Palm Beach
County.
"This significant event is a
milestone in the development of
what we all hope will become
one of the outstanding Jewish
communities in this country. It
marks a commitment by our
community to enrich and ennoble
a quality of life that will insure a
Jewish lifeline."
Mr. and Mrs. H. Irwin Levy
have agreed to serve as honorary
chairpersons for the school's
Capital Development Committee,
and they have been instrumental
in establishing the "Master
Builders Fund" through a "most
generous" gift of $100,000 from
the H. Irwin and Jeanne Levy
Philanthropic Fund. Mr. and
Mrs. Levy stated that they have
made this commitment in honor
of Benjamin S. Hornstein, "who
has devoted his life to improving
Jewish culture, education and
communal services," and because
of their belief in and .long
dedication to the Jewish Com-
munity Day School.

For information call:
Brager & Co., Inc.
2301 Collins Avenue, Suite M-30
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Miami Phone: 673-8393
Out of local area call collect
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"The Day School fills a great
educational and cultural need of
the Jewish community of Palm
Beach County. The Jewish
Community Day School,
organized seven years ago has
made great progress and is now
establishing permanent facilities
for its expanding enrollment and
enlarged activities.
"I am proud to associate my
name with this fine institution,
and I am confident that the
community will respond in
support of this important new
structure enabling the school to
meet the increasing needs of our
young people."
Benjamin S. Hornstein, bom in
New York City and educated at
City College there, was for many
years the owner of the Charles
Stores, Inc., a highly successful
department store chain. Now
retired and living in Palm Beach,
he formerly resided in New York
City and Baltimore, Md.
Long active in Jewish cultural,
educational and communal life,
his benefactions have been
numerous. A member of the
Brandeis University Board of
Fellows for many years, he was
benefactor of the University's
Hornstein Program in Jewish
Communal Service.
He established a chair in
Hebrew Education at New York
University, underwrote the
Hornstein Youth Center of the
Associated YM and YWHA's in
New York City, and is a founder
and honorary vice president of
the Albert Einstein College of
Medicine.
He is founder and overseer of
the Jewish Theological Seminary
and an elector of the Spanish and
Portuguese Synagogue in New
York, a trustee of the New York
Jewish Federation of Philan-
thropies and a founder of the
Greater New York United Jewish
Appeal.
In 1976, he was guest of honor
of the UJA New York
Federation Campaign Event held
in Palm Beach. He is a longtime
member and trustee of the
American Jewish Committee.
In Palm Beach, Hornstein is a
member of Temple Beth El, is a
former vice president of the Palm
Beach Country Club and was for
12 years chairman of its ad-
mission committee. He has been
a primary force in insuring the
financial solvency of the Jewish
Community Day School from its
beginning.
Along with his many com-
munal and civic activities, he
finds time to express his artistic
talents through his oil paintings.
The board of directors of the
Jewish Community Day School
recently announced that its new
elementary school facility (to be
constructed on Haverhill Rd.)
will be named the Benjamin
Hornstein Elementary School.
S.
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1701 Meridian Avenue/674 6612
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JACK D GORDON, President ARTHUR H COURSHON, Chairman of the Board


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm BeachCounty_
Friday, February 22,1980
YJewisli
Manuscripts Attract Interest
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER
In conjunction with Jewish federation or Palm Beach County. Inc
Combined Jewish Appeal
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
3300 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. Fla 334S2 Phone 368-3301
Printing Office 120 N E 6th St Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 3T3 4605
FREDK SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
Published Bl Weekly
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
FORM 3578 returns to The Jewish Floridian Q0<0,
3200 North Federal Highway Boca Raton, r la I
Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton. Fla
JERUSALEM Israeli
experts on ancient manuscripts
and Foreign Ministry officials are
perturbed by what they regard as
wild competition among Israeli
rOnni tartakow institutions and overseas Jewish
News Coordinator communities for access to
priceless Jewish manuscripts in
The Jewish F loridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth Cairo.
Criticism has been expressed in
the wake of the announcement by
Greville Janner, president of the
Federation officers President. Alan L Shulman. Vice Presidents Dr Richard Hoard of Deputies of British
ShiiKarman. Dr Howard Kay. Kenneth Srherer. Jeanne Levy. Jerome Tlshman. Jews, that he had secured per-
Treasurer Staci Lesser; Secretary Bruce J Daniels. ExecuUve Director. :ssion from President Sadat for
Norman J Schlmelman Submit material for publlcaUon to Ronnl Tartaaow f'ndpx to be
Director of Public Relations lni nen-rtsner umr.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Aroa) On* Yar V_.. or by membership to removed from hgypt temporarily
xhibition.
Officials in Jerusalem point out
that similar promises have been
made by the Hgypt ian
authorities in the past to other
prominent diaspora figures.
THESE INCLUDE, U.S.
Yoram
Kegfgj
Jewish Federation of
Beach, FL 13401 Phone
Friday, February 22. 1980
Volume 6
nrw tne nen-rtsner v i
ES: (Local Aroa) On* Y**r ., *r by momborshi* to removed from Egypt
P*lm Beach C*ufy, JCi Sooth Flakier Drive. W*st Palm ,()r r,,storation and e)
ttll-1110 (Out of Town upon Request)
5 ADAR5740
Number 4
We Must All Care
The plight of the people of Indochina, whether
homeless boat people or other refugees, or the
starving masses of Cambodia, has brought a warm
response from the Jewish community. Jews are
among the leadership of the persons aiding refugees,
Jewish organizations are lending expertise in helping
refugees and resettling them and the Jewish com-
munity has been generous in its financial con-
tributions. But Jews, like all Americans, must do
more.
Perhaps Jews have more empathy with the
refugees than others because of our traditions and
our history. Jews have 2,000 years of experience as
refugees. The plight of the boat people reminds us of
the 1930s when Jews escaping from Nazi Germany
found that the doors of most countries were closed to
them. The situation in Cambodia, in which those in
power appear to be starving to death most of the
population, awakens memories of the Holocaust.
Elie Wiesel, who survived Auschwitz to become
a novelist describing the Holocaust, was one of a
group of Americans and others who joined an effort
by the International Rescue Committee recently in
an attempt to deliver supplies to Cambodia from
Thailand.
American Jews have always stood in the fore-
front of aiding those who need help when no one
cared, whether Jew or others. It is a tradition that
will continue by not letting the world forget the
plight of the Indochinese.
Secretary of Commerce Philip M.
Klui/nuk, at present on leave of
absence as president of the World
Jewish Congress, and Nwn
(iiion. the president of the World
Sephardi Federation.
It is unfortunately playing
into the hands of (he Egyptian
authorities. This is a matter
which should be left to the ex-
perts." Prof. Malachi Beit-Arie
said.
The professor, who is the
director of the National and
Hebrew University Library.
headed a delegation of prominent
Israeli scholars to Egypt last
month t" assess the state of the
manuscripts held by the Karaite
community there.
Permission was obtained by
the delegation to photograph and
arrange the documents. Prof.
Beit-Arie said he hoped this
would "not be jeopardized by
these wild-cat approaches to the
Egyptian political leadership by
well-intentioned diaspora
leaders."
FOREIGN MINISTRY of-
ficials expressed concern that
these approaches might un-
dermine plans to forge direct
cultural links between Israel and
Egypt
Prof. Beit-Arie stressed that,
since the manuscripts were in the
possession of the handful of
Karaites still in Cairo, their
future could not be decided by
Continued on Page 17
minous
Soviet Forces in Syria
Top Middle East Total
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) Defense Secretary
Harold Brown's annual report to Congress justifying the
Defense Department's new budget has disclosed that
Soviet and East European military technicians in Syria
have exceeded all those in the Middle East and South
Asia except for Afghanistan.
Brown's statistics said that Soviet and East Euro-
pean military personnel in 1978 in Syria totaled 2,580
vvhiii t,iit' totai in tne remainder oi tut Mideast anu South
Asia was 2,050.
THIS WAS made up of 1,200 in Iraq, 150 in North
Yemen, 550 in South Yemen and 150 in India. In
Afghanistan as of Jan. 4 there were 50,000 Communist
technicians, he said. Cuban forces numbered 150 in North
Yemen and 1,000 in South Yemen.
'That instability in the Middle East will be the rule
rather than the exception seems highly probable for some
years to come," Brown reported.
HE NOTED that "the moderate Arab states, except
for Oman and the Sudan, have opposed" the Egyptian-
Israeli peace treaty and "Iraq and Iran may yet come into
formal conflict."
"The situation in southern Lebanon, where Israeli-
supported Christian militia forces continue to confront
Palestinian guerrillas and Moslem leftists, could erupt
into larger-scale violence and draw in both Syria and
Israel," Brown said.
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ti. #....-. Vl~w.~.. ~f to/~ Uanrh I ruintv
tucev
Friday, February 22, 1980
V
ZVe/icf Demonstrated
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page b
Jewish Population Moves South
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Continuing a pattern of
recent years, the Jewish
population of the United
States is moving in in-
creasing numbers from the
Northeast to the Sun Belt
the Southern and
Western parts of the
country. This trend is
demonstrated in
demographic reports that
appear in the 1980 edition
of the American Jewish
Year Book. The new
edition, Volume 80 in the
annual series, has just
appeared.
The American Jewish Year
Book is published jointly by the
American Jewish Committee and
the Jewish Publication Society of
America. Its editors are Milton
Himmelfarb and David Singer.
Morris Fine is editor emeritus.
FIGURES ON world Jewish
population in the Year Book
show an increase of 110,000 over
the previous year, or a total
current world Jewish population
of 14,396,000.
However, Prof. Leon Shapiro,
of Rutgers University, who
compiled the world statistics,
cautions that "there are no
precise data on Jewish
population in the various
countries. The figures presented
represent the best possible
estimates The figures are of
varying degrees of accuracy and
are subject to substantial
margins of error."
Similarly, the authors of the
demographic report on Jewish
population in the United States,
Alvin Chenkin and Maynard
Miran, research consultant and
associate respectively of the
Council of Jewish Federations,
warn that two factors combine to
make their total estimate
problematic: "The extent of the
shift to the 'sun-belt' states may
not yet be fully reported. On the
other hand, the New York City
area estimate is, in all likelihood,
overstated."
THEY ESTIMATE that the
current U.S. Jewish population is
5,860,900 a modest increase over
the previous year's figure of
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5,780,960. The South and West
comprise 30.2 percent of the
total, as compared to 29.1 in 1978
and 27.8 in 1977. The Northeast
and Northcentral states
represent 69.8 percent of the total
Jewish population, as compared
to 70.9 and 72.2 percent in 1978
and 1977 respectively. Jews
comprise 2.7 percent of the total
population in the U.S.
Estimating the New York City
Jewish population at 1,228,000, a
figure based on the 1970 National
Jewish Population Study, the
authors point out that unofficial
estimates by the New York
Department of City Planning
show a 13.5 percent drop in the
city's white population between
1970 and 1977. "An extrapolation
of this figure to 1979 could reduce
the Jewish population figure for
New York City to around
1,000,000," they added.
After the United States,
countries with significantly large
numbers of Jews are: Israel,
3,135,000; Soviet Union,
2,666,000; France, 650,000;
Great Britain, 410,000; Canada,
305,000; Argentina, 300,000;
Brazil, 150,000; and South
Africa, 118,000.
AMONG THE Jewish
population figures for U.S. cities
listed in the Year Book's tables
are: Greater New York,
1,998,000; Los Angeles
Metropolitan Area, 445,000;
Philadelphia Metropolitan Area,
295,000; Chicago Metropolitan
Area, 253,000; Miami, 225,000;
Boston, 170,000; Greater
Washintrton. 160.000; Bergen
County (N.J.), 100,000; Essex
County (N.J.), 95,000; Baltimore,
92,000; Cleveland, 75,000;
Detroit, 75,000; San Francisco,
75,000; Montgomery County
(Md.|, 70,000; St. Louis, 60,000;
Fort Lauderdale, 60,000;
Hollywood (Fla.), 55,000; in
Pittsburgh, 51,000.
In Europe, including Asiatic
USSR and Turkey, there are
4,142,450 Jews. The Jewish
population of the Americas is
6,783,220. In Asia, there are
3,221,010 Jews; in Africa,
174,320; and in Australia-New
Zealand, 75,000. The Jewish
population in major cities in the
Soviet Union is: Kharkov,
80,000; Kiev, 170,000;
Leningrad, 165,000; Moscow,
285,000; Odessa, 120,000;
Sverdlovsk, 40,000; and
Zhitomir. 20.000.
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Page 6
The Jewish Fhridan of Palm Beach County
Friday. February 22,1980
_____ ____ -m (consisting of $145.1100 to the
Tax Pitfalls and Benefits in sssHeKS
Canada, the estate would get a
full deduction for everything
going outright to the wife.
Result: tax equals $0.00.
Changing Legal Residence
By ARNOLD J. HOFFMAN
Partner: Wien, Lane & Malkin,
Palm Beach and New York.
Former Attorney Advisor,
United States Tax Court, and
Adjunct Professor, Graduate Tax
Division, New York University
School of Law.
This article is the first of a
series on aspects of estate
planning, which should interest
Floridian readers. A logical '
starting point is the change of
legal residence.
Most readers probably have
already changed their legal
residence, although some readers
perhaps have not y<* done so.
Most persons, however, do not
entirely understand all of the
important tax benefits and
dangers, and this subject always
is of great interest to most
people.
The purpose of this article is to
provide a brief summary of some
highlights of the tax benefits and
pitfalls involved in changing
legal residence.
How Estate Taxes
Are Saved
A change of legal residence to
Florida generally will save state
estate taxes. In most cases the
saving is an amount equal to
several percent or more of the
value of the entire estate. The
saving depends largely upon the
size of the estate, and the tax
rates of the northern home state.
Most northern states impose a
tax which is greater than the
federal credit allowed for state
taxes. On the other hand, Florida
keeps a tight ceiling on its estate
tax. This Florida ceiling is
designed to tie in with the federal
ceiling on the credit allowed for
state taxes.
In effect, therefore, Florida
collects part of the federal tax for
itself, but it does not collect an
additional sum, which the
northern states do. That is the
reason it sometimes is said,
somewhat incorrectly, that there
is no Florida estate or inheritance
tax.
Example: The estate is about
$1,000,000. The will gives one-
half to the wife so that there is a
marital deduction, and the rest to
adult children. The federal tax
could be about $145,000. The
federal ceiling on the credit for
the state tax might be about
$10,000, a sum which all of the
states, including Florida, will
collect. The Estate might have to
pay an additional sum of (1)
about $10,000, if New York,
which happens to be low in this
case, (2) about $43,000, if in New
Jersey, (3) about $42,000, if in
Connecticut, (4) about $36,000, if
in Massachusetts, and (5) $0.00,
if in Florida.
The Florida tax simply does
not hurt because it is absorbed by
the federal tax. By contrast, the
northern estate taxes do hurt,
and this is one of the tax pains
which Florida residence often
eliminates.
How Income Taxes
Are Saved
A change to Florida legal
residence generally will result in a
significant reduction in annual
taxes, such as income tax. The
amount of the tax saving
depends upon the particular
facts.
To determine the saving, it is
necessary to examine the tax
system of the particular northern
state, and to consider the amount
and types of income which are
involved.
As a general rule, in the case of
most retired persons, the nor-
thern income tax frequently can
be entirely eliminated if the
taxpayer gives up northern legal
residence. This is another tax
benefit provided by Florida legal
residence.
The Effect of the
Florida Tax on
"Intangibles"
In order to determine the true
annual tax saving, the northern
state income tax, which is being
eliminated, should be compared
with the Florida tax on "in-
tangible personal property." This
Florida tax applies to legal
residents. It is an annual tax on
investments such as stocks and
bonds, but not bank accounts.
The Florida tax for the year is $1
per $1,000 of fair market value as
of Jan. 1.
In the case of the typical
taxpayer, this annual Florida tax
general will be substantially less
than the annual tax of any (1)
the high income tax northern
states, such as New York, and
even appreciably less than the
annual taxes of (2) the low in-
come tax northern states, such as
New Jersey.
Example: Taxpayer has
$1,000,000 in common stock and
corporate bonds, and he receives
about $100,000 income, of which
3/5 is investment income and
2/5 is earned income. The
Florida intangible tax would be
about $1,000. The income taxes
of northern states would be
approximately (1) $10,000, if in
New York, (2) $2,300, if in New
Jersey, (3) $2,700, if in Con-
necticut, and (4) $8,000. if in
Massachusetts.
With respect to a low income
tax northern state, any com-
parison should take into account
the difference between (i) the
Florida annual tax payable over
the years with (ii) the potential
saving in the state estate tax.
As a general rule, the estate
tax saving is much more
significant than the Florida
intangible tax, altogether aside
from state income tax savings.
This is particularly true in the
case of the average substantial
estate of a typical elderly person,
where calculation will show that
the most important factor is the
estate tax saving.
Pitfalls and Opportunities
It is a mistake to act too
quickly without adequate
planning. There are benefits
available for the careful and traps
waiting for the careless.
Example: Let us assume the
i taxpayer expects a large capital
gain, and that he comes from a
I high income tax northern state
which splits the taxable year on
change of residence, as does New
York. He should consider
speeding up his change of
residence in order to avoid state
tax on the capital gain.
Example: Let us suppose the
taxpayer expects to change legal
residence towards the end of a
year. He should consider post-
poning the timing until early the
following year, and avoid one
year of Florida intangible tax.
The above are samples, and
relatively simple. There are many
aspects which are more com-
plicated. Factors of this type
should be taken into account in
planning a change of residence.
The Taj; Threats from
the Northern Home State
An attack can come from the
former home state, usually on one
or both of two occasions.
First, the taxpayer can expect
follow-up questions from the
northern state when he stops
filing income tax returns. He
should be ready to present hard
facts showing that he has
changed his legal residence,
particularly if he has been filing
substantial tax returns in the
past and he comes from a high
tax bracket state which is
aggressive in tax collection, such
as New York.
After the state income tax
Arnold.1. Hoffman
examination period for the year
of change has passed, this threat
usually is over.
Second, if the taxpayer con-
tinues to retain significant
contacts which his former home
state of a type which could create
doubts as to his legal residence, it
is helpful to avoid coming to the
attention of the Tax Department
of the northern state. Otherwise
the planned estate tax savings
can be lost.
Real estate creates the greatest
danger. Real estate is a form of
property which attracts special
attention in various ways from
various parties, including the
County Court Clerk in recording
transfers, potential purchasers,
title insurance companies, banks
and mortgage companies, in
checking titles, liens, real
property taxes, and so forth.
Furthermore, a northern state
estate tax often is payable on the
real property, which causes
additional attention. In this
process, the northern Tax
Department may get into the act
with a claim that the entire estate
is taxable in the north.
Example: The taxpayer owns a
home in his old state where he
stays five months of the year. He
retains affiliations with his
northern temple, country dub,
bank, and other contracts. These
circumstances could cause
northern estate tax trouble if
questions are raised. The tax-
payer probably would be well
advised to consider transferring
ownership of the real estate,
perhaps to another family
member or to a family trust, or
family corporation, or other
similar satisfactory disposition.
Then, upon death, nothing
happens or has to be done to the
northern real estate, and the
northern Tax Department
remains undisturbed.
In short, northern real estate
can be a time bomb which goes
off at death and wrecks all of the
careful tax planning.
Change of Legal Residence
from Foreign Countries
Many per ons from Canada,
Europe, and South America are
settling in Southern Florida
Some change citizenship, but
many keep their original
citizenship and establish Florida
legal residence. This presents a
tricky situation which requires a
close look at foreign property law
as well as foreign taxes, and the
results can be surprising.
Example: Taxpayer is a
Canadian with a $1,000,000
estate. He has no children. His
will leaves everything to his wife.
He dies. (1) If in the United
States and in Florida, the estate
would get the marital deduction
of roughly $500,000, and the total
tax would be about $155,000.
Of course, nothing is ever that
simple, and there are other
aspects to consider, including
income tax, the future taxes upon
the wife, the advantages of
Canadian social security and
medical plans, and so forth. This
illustrates, however, that the
benefit of legal residence in the
United States or in Florida
should not always be taken for
granted.
Tax Advantage by Giving
Up Florida Legal Residence
A few hardy souls are not
satisfied with avoiding northern
taxes. They want to avoid United
States taxes as well, which take
the biggest bite. A change of
legal residence will not ac-
complish such result, but a
change of citizenship can have
interesting consequences.
Example: Taxpayer has an
estate of $5,000,000. He is a
widower or bachelor, and there
will be no marital deduction. (1)
He does nothing. The federal tax
on his estate could be ap-
proximately 82,500,000. (2) He
moves his legal residence abroad
to a fancy foreign locale. He may
not realize that the United States
imposes a full tax on the estates
of its citizens, regardless of
foreign residence. The federal tax
on his estate would be the same
$2,500,000. (3) He takes intricate
steps to give up United States
citizenship, and he carefully
arranges to acquire citizenship in
a tax haven country, perhaps an
attractive spot close to the
Caribbean Sea, which he
establishes as his legal residence.
He spends a great deal of time in
the Palm Beaches, and he visits
his foreign legal residence
frequently. Result: If this is done
correctly, the United States
estate tax might be $0.00.
This is a tricky area, with other
significant consequences, and
any action requires detailed
planning. Most persons would
not give up their citizenship
despite any tax saving. The
example demonstrates, however,
that the golden grail of total tax
washout may be within grasp, in
certain circumstances, to the
strong of heart.
Conclusion
Substantial tax savings are
available to most persons as the
result of changing to a Florida
legal residence. The change can
be made in various ways at
different times. The change can
bring side effects, side benefits
and side detriments. There is no
mystery about these aspects, and
analysis will flush out such
factors.
This article is intended to give
only a quick rough sketch, and
does not go into details or furnish
all of the solutions. From all of
the above, it is clear that it is
important to avoid shooting from
the hip and to take careful aim at
the target, as in all matters of
estate and financial planning.
Other significant aspects of
estate planning will be treated in
subsequent articles in this series,
including important articles
which will describe advantageous
tax methods of making gifts to
the Federation and other
charities, a matter which is vital
to the healthy future of this
Jewish community.
The Lenal and Tax Committee
of the Jewish Federation is
sponsoring this series of articles
as a public service. Questions and
comments are welcome, and
should be submitted to Henry /..
tucker. Federation Endowment
Consultant at 501 So. Flagler
Drive, No. 306, West Palm
Beach, Fl. 33401 or telephone
832-2120.
(nEwmmh
Rokeach
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Friday. February 22,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
rage:
Page 7
Sen. Kennedy Links Energy, National Security
"No member of a Kennedy
Administration will ever
negotiate or deal with represen-
tatives of a PLO committed to
the destruction of Israel," Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy declared at
an Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith dinner in Palm
Beach.
The senator accompanied by
his mother. Rose, and sister,
Patricia Lawford was the
principal speaker at the opening
banquet of ADL's national
executive committee meeting
(Feb. 7-10) at The Breakers hotel.
Maintaining that American
military guarantees to oil-rich
Arab countries should be
reciprocated with lower oil prices,
he told the 500 assembled guests:
"We must obtain a better
bargain with the oil-producinK
states in return for American
security guarantees in the Middle
East. They should be willing to
assure more certain supplies of oil
at more stable prices."
THE ADL dinner, chaired by
Matthew B. Rosenhaus,
president and chairman of the
board of the J.B. Williams
Company, was a tribute to Dore
Schary, playwright / producer.
Schary, an honorary chairman of
the League was presented with
its Haym Salomon Award, in
recognition of his contributions
Technion Group to
Visit Israel, Egypt
Members of the Southern
Region of the American Technion
Society-Israel Institute of
Technology will travel to Haifa,
Israel, site of the Technion, as
part of their 14-day mission to
Israel, Egypt and London.
The Mission, which departs
Presenting the Haym Salomon Award to Dore Schary (c) are
Matthew B. Rosenhaus (I) and Maxwell E. Greenberg.
Tuesday, June 17, and returns
July 1, will coincide with the
annual meeting of the Technion
international board of governors.
Technion supporters from
Atlanta, Hallandale, Hollywood,
Miami, New Orleans, Orlando,
Palm Beach, Sarasota and other
parts of the southeastern United
States will participate in the
groundbreaking and dedication
ceremonies of three capital
building projects on the Technion
campus.
They are the Greater Miami
Education Center, Greater Palm
Beach Married Students* Dor-
mitory and the Sarasota Medical
School Research Laboratory.
Stock Brokerage
Firm Opens
A new stock brokerage firm
specializing in Israel securities,
particularly in State of Israel
Bonds, has opened at 2301
Collins Ave. at the Roney Plaza
in Miami Beach.
Brager & Co., Inc. has been in
business as long as Israel Bonds
have been sold to the public
(since the early 1950s.)
Brager offers its services as the
only broker of its kind in Florida
to individuals, banks, other
brokers and to estate attorneys.
to artistic expression and "for
enriching Jewish life."
Sen. Kennedy, who noted that
he had accepted the speaking
engagement prior to announcing
his candidacy, reiterated his
criticism of what he called
"President Carter's on-again off-
again flirtation with the PLO."
Elsewhere, the speech stressed
that the U.S. must combine its
desire to achieve energy security
with "a readiness to protect our
interests in the Persian Gulf."
"There must be no doubt that
America will do what it can and
must to keep strategic sea routes
open, and to strengthen the
region against internal disruption
and aggression from the Soviet
Union and radical Arab states,"
he said.
The senator underscored the
link between energy security and
national security, stating: "Only
by putting our energy house in
order can we free our foreign
policy from pressure and the
appearance of pressure by the
OPEC nations and by the
Soviet Union. Only an energy
secure America can do what is
right for the Middle East and the
Persian Gulf. Only an energy
secure America can assure a
thriving Israel and maintain our
Atlantic and Pacific allies."
IN ADDITION to rationing of
gasoline, the senator urged the
following as energy-saving
measures:
An aggressive energy
conservation program which
includes tax credits for com-
mercial and industrial users;
Increased domestic oil
production in the event of
shortages:
Protecting against sudden
cut-off of foreign oil with a boost
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>ai ,,..-....,,..- -..-.-.--v^-.v.v.v.v.-.-.-.-.-.
= .-.-..-.-..-.-.-.-".-..-.-. ....-.-....v:-.-.--.-^v.v.-.v.-.v.-. ...v.-.v.vv.v Friday; Fabruary 22; 1980
Page 8 The Jewish Ftoridjfin of Palm Beach County
*browsing in books
'The Jews of Toronto"
By Stephen A. Speisman
In recent years many Canadian
and American cities have had the
occasion to celebrate the cen-
tenary of the advent of their
Jewish population, and the
course of their development as an
ethnic minority.
In some cases, cases like
Charleston, South Carolina, the
origin of the first Jewish settlers
goes back well over two hundred
years.
In the current popular search
for roots, as well as the desire to
study the pattern of sociological
development of ethnic minorities,
it is not surprising that we have
witnessed a spate of books that
give us the history of Jewish
groups in some of the larger cities
of Canada and the United States.
In Canada the lead has been
taken by Dr. Stephen A.
Speisman in a volume entitled
"The Jews cf Toronto," a history
to 1937.
He is highly qualified for his
post as the Director of the
Archives of the Central Region of
the Canadian Jewish Congress
and the archives of the Jewish
Community of Ontario.
Editor's
given to
by Dr.
Brown,
Toronto.
Note: This book was
Temple Israel Library
and Mrs. Alexander
winter residents from
Thus we are not surprised to1
find that he devotes considerable
space to the early settlers and the
There follows a detailed study
of the residential pattern, the
educational needs, the religious
leadership, and the cultural
development of the community.
Today, Toronto holds a place
of eminence in the communal
achievements of Canadian Jews
and the explanation can be found
in the well-documented details of
this book. Included also are
nostalgic photographs taken by
Dr. Speisman at the time of the
relocation of the Toronto Jewish
community to the suburbs.
To a student of research of
Old Community 1849-1875.
The religious development of
the Holy Blossom Synagogue, as
the early leading synagogue, is
gone into at great length,
someone with roots in Ontario,
the book is a veritable mine of
information.
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lay, February 22, 1980
1he Jewish Floridian of Falm Beach Uounty
rages*
Because Someone Cared
N
By STEPHEN LEVITTT,
A.C.S.W.
A personal view from the
executive director of the Jewish
Family & Children's Service
All case names mentioned in
these artices are fictitious; client
information at Jewish Family &
Children's Service is held in the
strictest of confidence./
Our community again has the
honor and privilege of welcoming
two internationally distinguished
scholars for a day of learning and
experience.
I refer to our "Family Service
Institute," co-sponsored by the
Jewish Family & Children's
Service and several other leading
k>cal social welfare and coun-
seling service.
This year's topic is "Emotional
Depression in a Kapidly
Changing Society." The date is
Wednesday, Feb. 27, 9 a.m. 4
p.m. This is an oft-avoided
subject, and our two qualified
speakers are prepared to pierce
the taboos surrounding this, one
of the most commonly ex-
perienced yet widely misun-
derstood of human emotions.
Richard Lowell Rubenstein,
formerly B'nai B'rith Hillel
chaplain at the University of
Pittsburgh, and currently a
distinguished professor of
religion and the director of the
Center for the Study of Southern
Culture and Religion at FSU, will
join us on this date.
Dr. Rubenstein s experience in
the field of existentialist
literature and analysis will enable
our audience to gain a deeper
appreciation of the significance of
depressive tendencies, both in
one's personal experience and
also in the chaotic and ever-
increasing bureaucratic societies
in which people live.
Dr. Rubenstein has authored
After Auschwitz: Radical
Theology and Contemporary
Judaism, as well as many other
more recent volumes, which
.
Stephen Levitt
include The Cunning of History
(Mass Death and the American
Future), a searing exploration
into the origins of
dehumanization in the 20th
Century. He is a former professor
of mine, in Pittsburgh, and I can
easily conjur an image of a highly
spirited and an informative
presentation on the part of Dr.
Rubenstein on the 27th.
Joining him will be Dr. Dean
Schuyler, professor of psychiatry
at Georgetown University School
of Medicine. Dr. Schuyler
authored The Depressive
Spectrum, a volume devoted to
both diagnostic and treatment
possibilities for emotional
depression, the most commonly
experienced of all emotional
states. For both the lay public, as
well as professionals in at-
tendance, Dr. Schuyler will
outline a cognitive approach to
the problem and an easy-to-
understand treatment modality.
The consortium of agencies
sponsoring this event, again at
the Holiday Inn Okeechobee
Boulevard, West Palm Beach,
has labored many hours to put
together the kind of quality day-
long learning experience rarely
seen in our community. What are
you doing Feb. 27? If you feel
challenged to leam and meet two
truly gifted and unique in-
dividuals, please call the Jewish
Family & Children's Service
(684-1991) immediately, as there
are only limited seating
possibilities remaining for the
$15 admission charge. See you at
our Institute.
SUNDAY
1 -4 P.M.
AT THE JCC
S41B OKEECHOBEE BLVD.
WEST PALM BEACH
booths^games prizes
food funhouse
COSTUME PARADE
COME DIME
COME ALL
RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Who named the Turkey'?
A: Luis de Torres who called it -TUKKI -
The Hebrew word for peacock!
The first of Columbus' crew to set foot in the
"New World" was Luis de Torres, a Jewish
crewman, a master of languages and one of
Columbus' trusted friends. Thinking that any
natives they might meet may be descendants of
the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel, Columbus sent
de Torres ashore first, to find out if the natives
were friendly and whether they spoke Hebrew
or some other known language of the day.
The beauty and richness of the land captivated
de Torres' imagination and he prevailed upon
Columbus to let him settle there. In writing
to his friends 'back home' de Torres used the
Hebrew word for peacockTUKKIto describe
a new bird he encountered. And through
usage, the American bird came to be called a
Turkey (probably because there is no known
Hebrew word for Gobble Gobble)
ANOTHER RARE FACT...
A big part of Jewish warmth and affection
is to quickly become completely open and
informal with people and things they par-
ticularly like. Samuel is called "Sammyr
a snack is a "nosh" and the famed Chicken
Soup has become known as "Jewish
Penicillin" And right in keeping with this
inherent warmth, J&B Rare Scotch has
come to be regarded as a favorite part of
the 'mishpocha'. Because along with
its elegance at formal affairsJ&B
is also the kind of 'relative' one can take
his shoes off with, loosen the tie and
relax with friends at home.
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f Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, February 22,1980
ih the
Organizations
HADASSAH
Chai Hadassah will bold a
regular membership meeting on
Thursday, Feb. 28, at 12:30 p.m.
in the Challenger Country Club
at Poinciana Place. Sylvia
Gelman will review "Sophie's
Choice." Refreshments will be
served.
The West Palm Beach chapter
of Hadassah, Myra Ohrenstine,
president, is having a Hadassah
Shabbat at Congregation Anshei
Sholom on Friday, Feb. 29, at 8
p.m. The speaker will be Dorothy
(Mrs. Harry) Kaye, who is
Region Conference Chairman.
Dorothy Lieberman is education
coordinator of the chapter.
The West Palm Beach chapter
is participating in the annual
Myrtle Wreath Achievements
Awards. This will be held on
Thursday, March 6, at 7 p.m. at
Temple Israel, West Palm Beach.
Gladys Bisgaier is chairman. The
honorees are Clyde Phyffe,
known in the cultural arts
community, and Eva W. Mack,
commissioner of Palm Beach
County. Also honored will be all
life members and associates.
Entertainment will be The
Aspinwalls of Radio Station
WPBR. Refreshments will be
served in the social hall after the
entertainment.
Golda Meir Boynton Beach
chapter of Hadassah is planning
a deli-lunch and games party on
Thursday, Feb. 28, at noon at
Temple Beth Sholom, Lake
Worth. Donation. Gert Shep-
pard, chairperson.
Golda Meir Boynton Beach
chapter will have its own
Dorothy Kaye as the keynote
speaker on Friday, Feb. 29, at 7
p.m. at the Anshei Shalom
Synagogue in Century Village.
The West Palm Beach chapter is
hosting an Oneg Shabbat at this
time.
Education Day will be held on
Monday, March 3, at 10 a.m. at
the Congregational Church on
Federal Highway, Boynton
Beach. Education Day occurs
once a year. All Hadassah'
members are invited. Speaker,
Reuben Lefkowitz. The
Hadassah Squares and
Goldaliers have prepared a
musical program. Refreshments
will be served.
Yovel Group of Hadassah is
announcing that its luncheon and
matinee performance of
"Showboat" at the Royal Palm
Dinner Theatre in Boca Raton on
Wednesday, Feb. 20, has been
postponed until Thursday af-
ternoon, March 6. Members and
friends holding tickets for Feb. 20
may use those tickets for the
performance on March 6.
Tamar Hadassah's turn-about
meeting will be held on Monday,
Feb. 25, at the Village Hall in
Royal Palm Beach. The men of
Hadassah will conduct the
meeting. The guest speaker will
be Dr. John Lowe, vice president
of ZOA. The meeting will begin
at 12:30 and refreshments will be
served. Men and other guests are
invited.
The Aspinwalls of WPBR and
Eva Mack, Commissioner of the
city of West Palm Beach, will be
the honored guests at the Myrtle
Wreath Award Night at Temple
Israel on Flagler Drive on
Thursday, March 6, at 8 p.m. The
evening will honor Hadassah
associates and new life members.
All are welcome.
The next meeting of Tamar's
study group will be held on
Monday, Feb. 18, at 10 a.m. at
the home of Fran Freiman.
Guests are invited.
The Aliya Study Group of
Hadassah will meet at the home
of Claire Schatz on Thursday,
March 6, at 2 p.m. Mrs. Tillie
Mutterperl will give a disser-
tation on "The Jews in Egypt."
Mrs. Shirley Greenberg,
president of the Aliya Group of
Hadassah, announces that there
will be a board meeting at the
home of Sylvia Sacks on
Thursday, March 13, at 9:45 a.m.
One of the topics of discussion
will be the final plans for the
Annual Donor Luncheon being
held at The Breakers on March 26
at noon.
Shalom Hadassah highlights:
Friday, March 14, do-it-yourself
flea market at Miller's Super-
Valu Lot, hours 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Volunteers needed. Phone Lillian
Si-hack or Bertha Rubin.
Wednesday, March 19.
Another day at the races.
Transportation to Gulfstream
(from West Gate), entrance fee,
program, and reserved seat. Call
Gene Fermaglich or Jean Peck-
man.
April 22 24, a Shalom Tampa
Special to Circus World, Busch
Gardens, Cypress Gardens. Fee
includes transportation, ac-
commodations, three dinners
with entertainment, two break-
fasts, admissions to all listed
attractions, taxes, tips. Reser-
vations now being taken by
Lillian Schack, Mae Podwol, Lee
Golden.
Shalom is participating in a
chapter drawing for a Hibel
lithograph. Call Ray Lesser.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
National Council of Jewish
Women, Okeechobee unit, will
hold its next board meeting on
Thursday, March 6, at 10 a.m. at
the home of Martha Stoffer, and
its next regular meeting on
Thursday, March 20, at 12:45
p.m. at the Century Village
Holiday Inn. A luncheon and
card party in support of Annual
National Support will be held at
Dixon Li's Great Wall on March
2, Sunday. Donation.
There is still space available for
the second "Self Development
Series" sponsored by the Palm
Beach Section of National
Council of Jewish Women. There
is a small fee for the series and
BUNTZES tMATZO BALLS CHOPPED LIVER
When it comes to good taste and extra value,
KIN6 KOLD always gives you more.
Buy 3 packages of KING KOLD FROZEN CHEESE
BLINTZES, FRUIT-FILLED CREPES, MATZO BALLS
OR CHOPPED LIVER and send us the UPC symbols
from the back of the packages (see illustration
below) along with the completed refund form
from this ad, and we'll send you a coupon good
for a FREE package of the item you selected.
Or, combine any 3 and receive a coupon good
on a package of Blintzes/Oepes.
"Available at your favorite supermarket" j
Enclosed are 3 UPC Symbol* trom King KoW
frozen: D tlinbes/Crepes D Matzo tals
? Chopped Liver (Check one or fill in appro-
priate number of proofs from each product)
Please fend my FREE coupon to:
Name---------------------------------------------------------------
I
;>, IL 60608
Addrea*.
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.State.
Zip Code-
to: King Kold Frozen Foods. Inc 70 South Water Market.
LChicago. IL 60606 Void where prohibited or taxed bylaw Limit one I
per family or organization Offer expires August 31. 1960.
text book. For information and
reservations call Mrs. Philip
Sher. North Palm Beach.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN OUT
Women's American OUT will
be featured on television on two
Sunday programs. On Sunday,
March 9, Channel 5, 8:30 a.m.,
"Small Still Voice." Sunday
April 13, Channel 6, 8 p.m.,
"L'chaim."
Women's American ORT is
seeking former ORT students. If
you are one, or know of a former
ORT student, please have them
contact Mrs. Betty Siegel, 499-
2761, or Frieda, 964-4520.
The Golden Lakes chapter of
Women's American ORT will
hold its next meeting in the
clubhouse on Tuesday, March 25.
A video-slide presentation,
discussing family services in
Palm Beach County, will be given
by the Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Palm Beach
County.
On Sunday, March 9, at 8:30
a.m., Channel 5 will present an
ORT program. A panel
discussion will follow the
showing of the film, "What a
Small World."
The Mid Palm branch of the
ORT branch of West Palm Beach
is holding it next meeting Feb. 25
at 1 p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom
Lake Worth.
Featured will be the Century
Village Players in a playlet
called," The Story of ORT.'' "
The public is invited.
The Palm Beach chapter of
Women's American ORT will
hold its monthly meeting at 1
A
QUICHE TO
KVELL OVER
from Swiss Knight, of course
Recipe
One 9" prepared pie crust,
unbaked
One 6 oz. pkg. Swiss Knight
Gruyere Cheese, cut into
small pieces
1 cup milk
Preheat oven to 425"F.
In small saucepan,
combine Swiss
Knight Gruyere
Cheese and milk;
cook over moderate
heat until cheese
melts and mixture
is smooth; remove
from heat and set aside
In small bowl, combine
eggs, onion, salt, pepper and
3 eggs
Vi cup minced onion
1 measuring teaspoon salt
% measuring teaspoon white
pepper
'/ measuring teaspoon nutmeg
nutmeg; beat slightly
Slowly add cheese
milk mixture
to eggs, stirring
constantly. Pour
into prepared pie
shell. Place on
cookie sheet. Bake
at 425F for 15
minutes. Then bake
at 350"F for 15-20
minutes. Makes 6 servings.
Imported from Switzerland. Swiss Process Gruyere Cheese Is mellow
_______flavors, Swiss Knight is a treat because of Its quality.
IMPORTED BY THE NESTLE COMPANY, INC. CHEESE DIVISION
100 Bloomingdale Road, White Plains, NY. 10605
PASSOVER
CARIBBEAN
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Now for the first time
Universal Kosher Tours
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'P
Friday, February 22, 1980
p.m. in the Churchill Room of the
Palm Beach Ocean Hotel (for-
v merry The Holiday Inn), 2830
- South Ocean Blvd., on Monday
Feb. 25.
Nathaniel H. Levi, art lecturer
and docent at the Norton
Museum, will present a slide
show and lecture on the
"Treasures and Pleasures of
Pompeii."
Dessert will be served.
Members and friends are invited
to attend.
J.W.V. LADIES AUXILIARY
Golden Century Ladies
Auxiliary Post No. 501, no
meeting on March 3.
They will hold a luncheon and
card party at the Great Wall
Chinese Restaurant, at Century
Corners, on Monday, March 24,
at noon. There will be prizes.
-v BNAI B'RITH WOMEN
The Masada chapter of B'nai
\B'rith Women is sponsoring a
night at the races on Saturday
evening, Feb. 23, at 6 p.m. at the
Pompano Harness Track,
Pompano Beach.
Donation includes entrance fee,
reserved seat, tax and gratuities,
chicken dinner in the Sulky
Room, and parking.
PIONEER WOMEN
The Theodore Herzl Club of
Pioneer Women will hold a leap
year party Friday, Feb. 29, at
noon, Lake Worth Shuffleboard
Courts. Bring lunch. Refresh-
ments and prizes. Donation, one
book of S&H green stamps or
|1.60.
FREE SONS OF ISRAEL
Free Sons of Israel, Palm
Beach Lodge No. 221, will hold
its next monthly meeting on
Wednesday evening, Feb. 27, at 7
p.m. at the St. Christophers
Episcopal Church Rectory, West
Palm Beach.
Dr. Simon S. Silverman will
speak on, "Impressions of China
Trip."
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
i
YIDDISH CULTURE GROUP
On March 4, the Yiddish
Culture Group will present its
annual Purim program.
Dr. Rabbi William H. Shapiro
will talk about the significance of
the holiday. Joe Rownin will sin*
Yiddish, Hebrew and English
songs, and David Gottlieb of the
music appreciation group will
play the piano.
The March 11 program of
the Yiddish Culture Group's
marks the 10th anniversary of
The Yiddish Culture Group's
existence in Century Village, will
include the chorus under the
direction of Mildred Bimbaum
with Dorothy Goldberg at the
piano.
Short congratulatory messages
will be delivered by Jack
Doroshkin, Louie Bialy, a
representative of the chorus, and
Shirley Fleishman.
The Musical Friends con-
sisting of Lillian Kessler, singer
and pianist, Jackie Lorber, Phil
Herman and Sam Finkenthal on
violins plus John Fine on mini-
flute, will perform.
Mildred Bimbaum and
Dorothy Goldberg will play duets
on the piano.
Directly after the program
about 200 people will go to the
Ramada Inn on Palm Lakes
Blvd. for a luncheon to continue
the celebration.
Page 11
An original poem com
Chana Safron will be
Clare Kay
companied by
baum.
will sing ac-
Mildred Birn-
Dora Dasher will play the
Hawaiian guitar, with Ethel
Philips at the piano, George
Levine on banjo and John Fine
on mini-flute.
David Altman will play the
concertina and Sol Winig ac-
companied by his wife Tillie on
piano will sing.
Short speeches of greetings
will be delivered by Sam Siegel,
Nat Berlin, Sam Klein and Sam
Finkenthal.
r Mad by
by her.
On March 18 the Yiddish
Culture Group commemorates
the great Jewish author and poet
I. L. Peretz, who died 65 years
ago. Louie Bialy will tell about
his life and times, and Chana
Safron will read excerpts from his
works.
Sol and Tillie Winig will play
and sing some of his musical
compositions.
The March 25 program of
Yiddish Culture will be devoted
to two artists who have been here
many times before, Hershel
Gendel and his wife Manya.
Hershel is a Jewish humorist and
Manya is a soprano.
DEBORAH
Deborah Hospital Foundation
will hold its paid-up membership
luncheon meeting on Wednesday,
March 19, at noon at
Congregation Anshei Sholom.
A luncheon and theater party
is set for March 8 at the Royal
Palm Theatre in Boca Raton
where "Showboat" is being
featured. Contact president Pearl
Kolbert for reservations.
March 31 April 4, Passover at
the Moumarte. Contact Pearl
Kolbert.
WORKMEN'S CIRCLE
On Feb. 28 at 1 p.m., Work-
men's Circle, Br. 1041, will meet.
iDr. Also from, psychologist,
will be the speaker. Refreshments
will be served. All are welcome.
PRIME TIME SINGLES
The Prime Time Jewish
Singles of the Palm Beaches,
located at the Jewish Community
Center, West Palm Beach, ages
45-65, will hold an open meeting
feb. 24, Sunday, 7 p.m. Refresh-
ments, social hour.
ott
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v LABOR ZIONIST ALLIANCE
The Labor Zionist Alliance of
Palm Beach County will hold its
annual Histadrut Purim
Celebration on Thursday, Feb.
28, at 7 p.m. at Congregation
Anshei Sholom, Century Village.
Entertainment featuring Cantor
Moshe Freidler from Miami
Beach in a concert of English,
Yiddish and Israeli songs.
Hamentashen and coffee will be
served.
AMERICAN ISRAELI
LIGHTHOUSE
American Israeli Lighthouse
will hold its next meeting
Thursday, March 13, at noon at
th_e Holiday Inn. White elephant
sale, followed by auction sale.
GLATT (I KOSHER

NftaHnaM
lnUMVMMUU ACT.
Phon: 1-5U-M31
0" Tht Oiimii ;i,i II Miami inch
/ Thefil ATT KOSHI H
Kina Mciiii'
tn* dulypnmadearott
'|X Mil 4ioMm W-'Mof MOroa
**** MOT INCLUDING rASSOVIl
INCLUDING KOCM1 MEALS DAIL1
I OM lAltATa Ntghdr 1M koo.
PAS&6\
V- SI toApr)
10 D^o NkjiM$925 err
214 wk.Packaiei lncl.Pwao*CT Avail.|
ImlmCiaoatlll
tSHIMONi
Full iiotVPiK l*ack roofracltitkri
' How PkoM Scntcffnt toack Chain
tmeiuiawal Duill| Colot TV ThlllH
Mo.lt. kuajo Card kooai
Dally iyaaaofm Jtrwn
L
Phone Miami Bch
1-531-0761 or 1472 0SSS
?|iilfd by iht IEAKOWITZ Family j
Now
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(in
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io tat nwi

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1979 STORE COUPON
A\ 46 U<


Page 12
The Jewish PinriAian of Palm Beach County
Friday, February 22. 1980
ADL Reports on Dangers of
Axis
The Palestine Liberation
Organization has become the
"cutting edge" for Soviet
penetration of the Middle East,
according to a comprehensive
analysis of Moscow-PLO links
prepared by the Anti- Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith.
The ADL report said that
PLO declarations of support for
the Soviet invasion of
Aghanistan, as well as backing
for Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini,
underscored the danger to the
U.S. and its allies from a
Kremlin-PLO axis that has been
in existence since the early
1970's.
ADL's associate national
director, Abraham H. Foxman,
commenting on the report,
warned that any attempt to set
up a separate Palestinian state
would only lead to another
Soviet-dominated
"Afghanistan" and tighten the
Kremlin pincer movement on the
Middle East and Western oil
supplies.
FOXMAN, who also heads
ADL's International Affairs
Division, spoke at a session of the
League's National Executive
Committee meeting (Feb. 7-10),
at The Breakers hotel in Palm
Beach, before Jewish community
leaders gathered from all sections
of the country.
In detailing the Soviet-PLO
alliance, Foxman pointed out
that Moscow was using the PLO
as a terrorist arm to foment
revolution and unrest in the
Middle East.
He said that since 1974, more
than 1,000 PLO terrorists
comprising an "elite cadre" of the
organization have reportedly
been trained and politically
indoctrinated in the Soviet Union
and supplied with AK-47
Kalashnikov rifles and rockets.
The ADL leader gave as an
example a special training camp
near the Black Sea where trainees
undergo a six-month course in
terrorist tactics including use
of a full range of explosive
devices and familiarization with
chemical and biological warfare
agents.
"In the Soviet Union's steady
penetration of the Middle East,"
Foxman declared, "the PLO, like
Castro's Cuban Communist
legions and the East Germans,
serves as an ally and a surrogate
for the Kremlin. The Arab
terrorists aid Moscow in its
attempts to destabilize the area,
to keep it in turmoil by blocking
efforts for Arab-Israeli peace, and
to gain effective control of the
Middle East's strategic
geography and vital resources."
THE ADL analysis noted that
PLO leader Yasir Arafat has
made 14 trips to Moscow, 10 of
them since 1973, to coordinate
strategy with Soviet leaders.
In describing the extent of the
Soviet-PLO alliance, the League
quotes a PLO defector as saying,
"Arafat is an opportunist and
would not make an important
move without first consulting
with the Soviet ambassador. He
meets once or twice a week ... in
order to report his plans and
current activities. When he
comes back to Beirut (from
Moscow visits) ... he has fully
detailed new plans designed by
the Russians.'
"The pattern of Arafat's visits
to the Kremlin," the report said,
"reveals the increasingly close
relationship between the USSR
and the PLO terrorita that has
seen the PLO emerge as the key
cutting edge for Soviet influence
and troublemaking in the Middle
East."
Nevertheless, it continued,
there are "disquieting signals"
that some "influential" quarters
in the U.S. believe that one
avenue for bringing stability to
the Middle East, for shoring up
American interests in the Arab
world and for blunting the Soviet
threat is to seek a speedy set-
tlement of the Palestine question
based on a separate state.
THE ADL report stated that
"the notion that a PLO-
controlled 'Afghanistan' between
Israel and Jordan will bring
stability to the Middle East
despite the already massive
Soviet threat, the continuing
inter-Arab and inter-Moslem
feuds and the other chronic
divisions that pervade the area,
appears to be an illusion that the
U.S. will pursue at its own peril."
Discussing PLO support of the
Soviet invasion of Afghanistan,
the report notes the comment of
Farouk Kaddoumi, a member of
the Fatah wing of the PLO who
has been described as the
organization's "foreign
minister": "Russia rendered
selfless assistance to the
government of Kabul. All the
U.S. is interested in is to exploit
the natural resources of Iran and
Afghanistan and to try to create
military bases in the Middle
East."
The PLO also "ran in-
terference" for the Soviets,
according to ADL, in the recent
conference of Islamic nations
held in Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
Although the conferees con-
demned Moscow's invasion of
Afghanistan, the "Soviet bloc"
managed to push through
another resolution condemning
the U.S. for sponsoring the
Israeli-Egyptian peace moves.
The representatives listed in
Moscow'8 camp were the PLO,
Algeria and Libya.
The Soviet military and
political support for the PLO,
Foxman said, "fits into
Moscow's long-range policy of
actively supporting
revolutionary movements around
the world it considers to be 'anti-
imperialist' and therefore anti-
American."
ACCORDING to the ADL
analysis, the Kremlin-PLO
alliance did not take shape until
the early 1970's because the PLO,
up until then, was linked to the
Communist Chinese. Fur-
thermore, the Kremlin had gone
on record in 1967 in support for
U.N. Resolution 242, which the
PLO rejected. The Russians and
the PLO were also at opposite
ends of the spectrum, at that
time, over airplane hijackings
and other terrorist tactks, which
Moscow feared were coun-
terproductive.
But with the expulsion of
Soviet advisers from Egypt in
1972 and the ascendancy of U.S.
diplomacy in the Middle East
after the 1973 Yom Kippur War/
Moscow decided, the report
asserts, "to use the PLO card to
maintain its flagging momentum
in the Middle East."
It goes on to say that in order
to draw the PLO into its orbit,
Moscow has thrown its full
support behind the PLO's drive
for a separate state on the West
Bank. And since the signing of
the Camp David agreement, the
Kremlin-PLO links have become
even tighter to try to sabotage
the Israel-Egypt peace.
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686-2688
Bernard D. Epstein m.d.
Diplomate American Board of internal Medicine
Announces the opening
of His office for
The practice of Internal Medicine at
900 Northwest 13th Street
Boca Raton
by appointment (305) 368-6030
Chiropractic Physician
Dr. Hugh T. Deitz
Nutrition Therapy
Physical therapy Post Stroke Arthritis Acupuncture
In Palm Beach
44 Cocoanut Row (Palm Beach Towers) 833-4825
130 Sunrise Avenue (Sun & Surf) 832-7645
SI
PERMANENT
WEIGHT CONTROL

Dr. Maria A. Romanelli
announces the opening of her new office
for the practice of
Chiropractic
Hrs. by
Appt.
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CONTACT LENSES
Firm, flexible and Soft lenses Sod Lenses lot Astigmatism
Extended Wear Contact Lenses Bifocal Lenses
EXTENDED CARE AND SERVICES
Eye examination* and eyeglass service Prosthetic (artificial)
eye service. 24-hour emergency eye care service 966-7173.
Medicare, Workman's Compensation and Insurance assign-
ments occepted. Office hours Monday Friday, 9-5.
DR. N. SCOTT
GORMAN

Dr. I. Goodman
Chiropractor
Boynton Plaza
163'A M. Congress Awe. IN.W. 2nd Avt.l
oynton Beach
Backaches Headaches
Pinched Nerves Disc Problems
Arthritis Sciatica Neuralgia
Phone 737-5591
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Op*n 7:30 Ait-8 PM
1


miary 22,1980
-----
-'' -""'- -' A..*>;.
The Jewish Fbridian of Palm Beach County
V. */*
FageTC'
laplamcy volunteer
Titian Linshes: Happiness Is
ieing Involved With People
i
u need help finding
to care for an ailing
j>r friend? Do you need
[of help for a worthwhile
lerman Linshes is the
"crisis line" to whom
neighbor often turn.
ly comes up with the
less is being involved
jple," says Herman
member of Chaplain
Sherman's Advisory
[His involvement runs
It of human affairs with
iphasis on the Jewish
at Doctors Hospital
inaffiliated, or members
lie Beth Sholom, are
egularly by Linshes or
compatriots. He has
for Federation as
of United Jewish
a number of con-
as, and as president of a
forth chapter. He at-
|his success in enlisting
to the fact that he
is them to do anything
It do.
Herman Linshes
Temple Beth Sholom has.been
a benefactor of Herman Linshes'
Investment Equity
Real Estate
DON VOGEL
listered Real Estate Broker salesman
jntial-Condominium-lnvestment
52 PGA Boulevard Business 626-5100
pen Qardans, Fla. 33410Raaldance 622-4000
activities. He served on the
Temple board for two years, co-
edited tbeTemple Bulletin, and is
a first vice president of the Men's
Club.
HIS ACTIVITY and charitable
causes began in 1925 when he
was instrumental in getting his
weekly card game cronies to
contribute their earnings to
"Sons of the Orphan," an or-
phanage in Westchester County,
New York. In Wilkes-Barre, Pa.,
he was involved for 25 years with
the home for the indigent.
Linshes operated a successful
retail specialty shop in Wilkes-
Barre for 30 years. Before that he
worked for Gimbel Brothers and
Bloomingdale's department
stores in New York City as a
department manager. He at-
tended New York University and
the Carver Chiropractic School.
Usering in the Shabbat is
the high point of the week for
Herman and Sally Linshes, who
have been married 56 years.
Friday evening sees Herman's
three sisters and some neighbors,
generally widows and widowers,
often numbering 10, gathered at
I the Shabbat table. Sally
prepares the Shabbat meal with
meticulous respect for every
detail of the Jewish tradition.
Sally and Herman have two
daughters, four grandchildren
and one 2-year-old great-
grandchild.
mist moor D CUP and SAVE $ \j wama woof
FACTORY PVC PIPE FURNITURE SALE
ME TO THE FACTORY & SAVE MONEY!
SPECIAL GROUP SALE ON PALM BEACH'S FINEST CASUAL FURNITURE
T* PI1CIS
2 PAIIO CHAKS
WITH CUSHIONS
1 24" PATIO TAW
2 PWCIS
I PATIO CHAISt lOUNGf
I PATIO CHAISE TABlf
| TOUR CHOICE
trWTtl Ull I Will'
*98M
&
OMICHOMI ID
AG HOUIT fftmB
231
\ whitno *yi ;
I f;
OfNTOM >0 W^
"Tl-LUSTHE PIPE Q
WHY PAY MOM ? W. mok. Ih. best looking I no*
rjurabk PVC fumrrur* you will r w or buy Wo
ouoronW* it CoM of Hop by oof factory ihowroom
Cluck our pficoi & 9* I No gunmkki WHY
PAY MOM ? Wo or* mm/tot o onywhoro m Palm ImcIi Cowry Ookvory r
ovailabh Wo ovfro you to comooro our pocol and
quality bofor. you buy.....WHY PAY MOMT
toies cum ottowib
#>S0(S LAMPS CrttlSl 10WSES
iecimi eimom is i iu stoois
POLY-PIPE PVC FURNITURE
INDOOR OUTDOOR PATIO POOL
END Of N. 8th ST. & WHITNfY AV* IANTANA
Convonwnrty localod botwoon Dili* Hwy. (U.S. I)
and 1-93. oH lonrarro Id. Turn Nor*. oH Lontano
Rd at 8* St." on *o fort udt ot mo AG. HoUty
Hovpital Follow 8th Stroot to ** vory and. to our
Factory Showroom.
PlfASI PHONf FOB IASY DWECTIONS
SAVE THIS AD
D.MHMMXWI
586-0197
IkIhi SMMMV 0f*
Mm Sil 105 Sin I? b
Mitlei Ck|f 1 tin
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Full Time Rabbi &
Full Time Cantor
Wanted by Adult Conservative congregation
(no Hebrew School) Retired or approaching
retirement preferred.
Temple Emeth of Delray Beach
5780 W. Atlantic Avenue
Delray Beach, Florida 33445
i 498-3536
CHATTAHOOCHEE EPOXY
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[ PATIO DttVtWAYS WAUS
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714 N.E. M StrMt, Boyntor. tooch, rlo.
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
CRUISE FROM MIAMI
117-5
1BD
World Renaissance March 31-April 11,1980
Why is this cruise different from all other
cruises9 It s Passover at seathe first cruise of
its kind to depart from Miami The entire ship
will operate under the strict rabbinical super-
vision of including the presence of a Kosher
chef to plan menus and meal service Traditional
Seder services will be conducted by a rabbi and
a well-known cantor A synagogue setting will
accommodate daily prayers And entertainment
will feature Jewish and Israeli artists Visit
San Juan, St Croix. Curacao. Aruba. Nassau and
Freeport Rates from $995-51580 per person,
double occupancy, plus $195 Kosher for
Passover supplement per person Money saving
air/sea packages available from your city.
See your travel agent World Renaissance of
Greek Registry
COSTA CRUISES
One BiscayneTower Miami. Fla 33131(305)358-7330
i.-iTllTiTliiiiiiiiiiTiiijiji::
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Top Prices Paid
BUYING ALL:
U.S. Silver Coins Pre-19*4
old Coins
Sterling Silver
Gold Jewelry
Prices based on Daily Market Conditions
Gold & Silver Exchange
1528 N. Dixie, Lake Worth, Suite 4
Across from Steve Moore Chevrolet
586-8608
Come In for a free eppralsel
'Security on premises
Private consultation room


19
Page 14
The Jewish *i~*Minn of Palm Beach County
Friday. February 22. lftWO
Village Royale Holds Breakfast
About 350 men and women
attended a breakfast on Feb. 10
to signal the beginning of Village
Royale on the Green's 1980
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign.
The event was pointed up by
guest speaker Henry Levy, who
emphasized the never-ending role
of American Jewry in financially
supporting the life-line to Israel.
Levy said that although 1979
was a difficult year for Israel, it
was his opinion that 1980 would
be a "good year." He dwelt in
detail on the sacrifices for peace
that Israel made in relinquishing
the three Sinai airfields and the
Alma oil fields.
While these twin acts made for
normalization of Israel-Egypt
relationships, it meant that
purchasing of oil on the open >
market, the erection of new air
bases and the resettlement of
those living in the Sinai to the
Negev, would cost billions of
dollars.
Levy emphasized that it was
world Jewry's inclination "to
come to the aid of stricken Jews
after the event but now it is
imperative that our financial and
moral help be extended at the
beginning of a situation and
maintained indefinitely."
Al Moskowitz, chairman of
Village Royale's Campaign, said
Village Royale on the Green 1980 Combined Jewish Appeal -
Israel Emergency Fund campaign breakfast Feb. 10.
that active solicitation of gifts
would begin the next day, and he
emphasized the need for in-
creases. He also thanked the
various arrangement committees
and especially Mrs. Ann
Moskowitz who structured and
chaired the food preparation and
serving committees.
Helping Mrs. Moskowitz were
Hilda Zell, Esta Kaye, Rose
Ziffer, Roz Kuperman, Gert
Eagle, Rhoda Collier, Anne Levy,
Ethel Flaum, Dorothy Cole, Rose
Bazilian, Audrey Gordon, Minnie
Sonn, Malvina Gutman, Judy
Beth El
Art Auction
Temple Beth El Men's Club is
sponsoring an art auction to be
held at the Temple, West Palm
Beach, on Sunday evening, Feb.
24.
The works include Chagall,
Dali, Calder, Peter Max, Matisse,
Neiman, Silva, Hibel and many
others. A champagne preview
will be at 7 p.m. and the auction
will take place at 8 p.m.
Admission is free.
The proceeds are used to help
the youth of Temple attend
seminars in other cities and
Camp Raman.
c Ktz Murray Collier. Sid Weias.
Temple. Sally RJ. Sara ^uTterrnan. Irv Friner Harry
Wortman and Ann Sne.der. jJJ^ ^ MUsh Jack WoUwff,
Physical arrangements were and i^is Flaum.
ade bv Bill Lillie, Irv Koch. Ben ____
made by
For Boys & Girls 6-16
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White Water Canoeing Mt. Trail Hikes Pro Golf A
Tennis Arts A Crafts Sailing Scuba Gymnastics
and Dance Go Carts Trips by Canoe
Rock Climbing Basketball Soccer Softball
Hockey Zoological & Science Program
All Dietary Laws Observed Shabbat Services
Medical Staff Available at All Times
Member American Camping Association
Your Camp Directors
COACH J.I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS & SHEILA WALDMAN
STAN & BARBARA MINTZ
a
Miami Beach Phone 1-538-3434 or Write
P.O. Box 2888. Miami Beach. Fla. 33140
STAFF INQUIRIES NOW
9
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BIGGER & BETTER
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(Formerly Reeves Carpet,)
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Standing, left to right: Irving Guttman, Murray Collier,
Edward Brandt, Max Harris, Herman Young, Louis Flaum,
Harry Seltzer, Hanna Fox, Irving Friner, Belle Gottlieb, Bill
Marx, Irving I. Koch, Ben Katz. Seated, left to right: Min
Cooper, Pauline Levin, Joyce Rost, Roz Kuperman, Chairman
Al Moskowitz.
I niliT The Supervision
Of RabblnlraH'ounrll
Of The Plm Beacheii
"THE NEWirviAGE'
Opn-7
Mon-Tnurs
-J Fri.
I 4 Son.
CloiedSat.
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4774 OKEKHOIH IIVD., WIST r>*LM IUCN
Between Military Trail A HavrrhUI In the Mini Mall
THE MOST MODERN & COMPLETE KOSHER SUPERMARKET
Murray Collier, Co-Chairman; Ben Katz, Co-chairman: Al
Moskowitz, chairman; Henry Levy, guest speaker; and
Norman W. Shapiro, Campaign Associate.
|:BLUE RIDGE[\
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IT'S THE COFFEE THAT'LL
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suddenly drop in. Maxim? the 100% freeze
dried coffee that'll make everyone think you
took the time to make fresh perked coffee
when you didn't!
*
{
f^ \


lary 22, 1980
The Jewish Flortdian of Palm Beach County
Page 15
',& Federations Provide
re Funds for Education
)RK Federations in
States and Canada
lover $31.8 million to
lucational institutions
bs in 1978, according to
luncil of Jewish
|s' latest annual survey
Ition allocations to
tcation.
|expended for Jewish
by 109 surveyed
rose 48 percent from
^8, while allocations for
purposes (exclusive of
r"y grants) increased 44
ing that time.
[1978 is compared with
1977, a continuing pattern of
growth for Jewish education is
disclosed with 13 percent increase
in Federation financial support.
In 1978, Jewish education
received approximately 24
percent of all monies expended by
Federations for local purposes.
Among large cities, New
York's expenditures for
education grew to almost $5
million in 1978, an increase of
over 70 percent from the
preceding year.
Chicago and Toronto allotted
well over $2 million each;
Baltimore, Boston, Cleveland,
Detroit, Los Angeles and
Philadelphia allocated S1-S2
million for Jewish education.
Day schools received over 48
percent of total Federation
allocations to Jewish education in
1978.
CJF PRESIDENT Morton L.
Mandel of Cleveland pointed out
that the results of this latest
survey demonstrate the con-
tinuing strong commitment of
Federations to Jewish education.
| "At a time of increasing
economic pressures and need in
90 many areas, our Federations
are upholding their support for
Jewish education. It is our
conviction that the future vitality
of the North American Jewish
community depends on the
degree to which we are able to
1 capture the imaginations of our
young people with creative,
educational programs," Mandel
said.
"Along with other
organizations and institutions
funding Jewish education, and
with the support of parents, we
hope to continue meeting the
requirements of this vital service
area."
THE CJF IS the association of
more than 190 Federations,
Welfare Funds and Community
Councils which serve nearly 800
communities and embrace over
95 percent of the Jewish pop-
ulation of the United States and
Canada.
Established in 1932, the
Council serves as a national
instrument to strengthen the
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leadership
in developing programs to meet
changing needs in the Jewish
community; through the ex-
I change of successful experiences
| to assure the most effective
community services; through
establishing guidelines for fund
raising and operation; and
through joint national planning
and action m common purposes
dealing with local, regional,
I national and international needs.
the Campaign Trail
iidential Contenders Offer Sweet Nothings
;helle wolk
IDRK farter reaffirmed the
strategic" value of
srael ties and said he
|ted to "an undivided
and opposed to a
[state in response to
jbmitted to him and
|r Pridential can-
Istionnaire was com-
ic editors of the bi-
by Rabbis Abraham
Daniel Landes of the
esenthal Center for
[ Studies at Yeshiva
Los Angeles.
ktionnaire covered a
jt subjects, including
| action, state aid to
chools, and Soviet
they focused pri-
the Middle East.
er nor those seeking
him in the White
jnded directly to the
tionnaire.
SAID he "will work
bring us still closer
ause close U.S.-Israel
lie moral and strategic
both our nations."
Ling his commitment
bvided Jerusalem" he
Idicate whether this
Jerusalem should be
>ital or if it should
bra el.
Palestinian state, he
Vhat he has stated on
tasions that such a
be "a destabilizing
he Middle East and
berve the interests of
Hates.
yard Kennedy (D.,
is challenging Carter
locratic Presidential
also advocated close
in his statement.
bserved that "The
Israel is indispensable
irity of the United
eight
[queried,
Presidential
only former
Texas Gov. John Connelly ex-
pressed viewpoints not calculated
to appeal to Jewish voters.
Connally replied to the question-
naire by submitting the text of
the controversial address he
delivered at the Washington
Press Club last fall which in-
furiated Jews by linking a
solution of the Palestinian
problem to America's need for an
assured oil supply from the
Middle Fast.
Connally said, "Except for
minor border rectifications,"
Israel must withdraw from the
West Rank, Gaza and the Golan
Heights, all of which would be
demilitarized. According to
Connelly's plan, "Israel will be
permitted to lease military
strongpoints in each of these
areas."
He added that "the United
States should maintain a strong
military presence in the vital
area, including major Air Force
components ..."
IN DISCUSSING the future of
Jerusalem, Connally mentioned
several "workable alternatives,"
including "Arab or Israeli
sovereignty based in residential
patterns (or) a dual sovereignty
for the entire municipal region,
with individuals deciding which
passport they prefer to carry
. He cited acceptance of UN
Security Council Resolution 242
as the criterion for talking with
"the Palestinian leadership."
Of all the candidates, only
former California Gov. Ronald
Reagan had no answer for the
question, "Should U.S. officials
have formal contact with Yasir
Arafat's PLO?"
Six others either answered
"no" or said the U.S. should not
negotiate with the PLO unless it
recognizes Israel's right to exist.
The six are Rep. John Anderson
(R. III.); Sen. Howard Baker (R.,
Term.); Gov. Edmund Brown Jr.,
of California, a Democrat; former
UN Ambassador George Bush, a
Republican; Kennedy and Carter.
Anderson stressed that the
W *
L 11 r -" -*'
'- ^-*
tk:
2*
9 ^>
, y,
U.S. should not try to impose a
solution in the Middle East
because such a solution would
"tend to unravel, leaving all the
parties worse off." On the ques-
tion of moving the U.S. Embassy
from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, he
said he does not presently
support such a move but could
see it as part of a future "larger
set of actions."
DISCUSSING arms sales,
Anderson said that weapons
should be sold to Middle East
countries "only if there is a com-
pelling military requirement
consistent with our own national
security interest." He added that
Israel's ability "to maintain the
regional military balance" must
be considered.
Baker said the U.S. commit-
ment to the security of Israel is
fundamental to the security of
the U.S. He added that he
strongly supports the Camp
David process and that the U.S.
can assist the maintenance of
peace by fostering economic
development in the Middle East.
On the matter of arms sales,
Baker said his decision would be
based on "the degree of com-
monality of interest between the
United States and the recipient
country and whether the sale will
enhance or degrade the stability
of the region."
BROWN mentioned the re-
lationship between energy and
the U.S. role in the Middle East.
"Until the U.S. can develop its
energy independence, the
country's leadership must recog-
nize that Israel is the foremost
democratic and stabilizing
political and military presence in
the Middle East," he said. Brown
added that on both "moral
grounds" and "the self-interest of
the United States," he advocated
continuing and strengthening the
commitment to Israel.
Keagan, who presented his
views in the form of a xeroxed
copy of an article published in
The Washington Post, expressed
the need for close U.S.-Israel ties.
i good old days whan tha coat ol living waa twanly cairta a botiia?'
The Natal Mercury
He observed
"perhaps the
that
only
Israel is
remaining
strategic asset in the region on
which the United States can truly
rely." He added that ". if
Administration policies should
serve to weaken Israel ... a de-
termined barrier to Soviet expan-
sion in the region would have
been withdrawn ..."
Egyptians Will Get
Tougher, Areas Warns
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Moshe Arens, chairman of the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee, warned here
that Israel's economic woes
might weaken its defense ability.
"Israel is facing now a shor-
tage of funds and resources and
that might influence its
security," Arens said in an in-
terview with the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency at the
conclusion of his two-and-a-half
week visit to the United States.
ARENS, a member of Likud,
was among the 25 MKs who
voted against the Camp David
accords in the Knesset. Asked if,
in retrospect he would still vote
again against the Camp David
agreements in view of the
Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty and
the normalization process that
followed he replied: "I voted
against the agreements because I
thought Israel was taking
unreasonable risks. My op-
position was not to the peace
agreements but rather to its
terms. I was especially concerned
over the oil fields in the Sinai and
the airfields Israel agreed to give
back to the Egyptians."
He added: "As far as I am
concerned Israel's energy
problems today are even worse
than it used to be. The same
situation is with the
redeployment of Israel's forces in
the Negev. Today it's not dear at
all how we are going to finance
this redeployment. If we will not
get the necessary funds we are
going to face difficulties." He
said the redeployment of the
Israel Defense Force in the Negev
will require at least $5 billion.
Arens said that those in Israel
who assumed that President
Anwar Sadat of Egypt is not
really interested in solving the
Palestinian problem and that he
will ease the pressure on Israel as
far as Judaea and Samaria are
concerned once Sinai is restored
to Egyptian control, were
mistaken.
"ISRAEL IS finding that it is
under stronger Egyptian
pressure now for concessions in
Judaea and Samaria," Arens
observed, "with a threat hanging
on the horizon that if Israel wiU
not be forthcoming, a situation
. will be created in which Israel will
have neither the Sinai nor a peace
with Egypt."
Noting that Israel uses about
160,000 barrels of oil daily. Arens
said that the energy situation in
his country is "grave," con-
sidering the high cost of gasoline
and the fact that many countries
refuse to sell oil to the Jewish
State. "This situation can be
even graver if one day Egypt
decides it is not going to provide
Israel with the 40,000 barrels of
oil (a day) she is seeking."
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Page 16
The Jewish Fkmdian of Palm Beach County
Friday. February 22. 1980
/JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
2415 Okeechobee Blvd. West Palm Beach, Fla. 689-7700
GENERATION TO GENERATION
AGO flGHfl
The fnost important resource of the
Jewish people is its youth. (
In an age where young people are
alienated, apathetic and uncommitted,
we at the Jewish Community Center are
both proud and privileged to service
such a fine group of vibrant Jewish
youth. Our youth program, grades
7-12 encompasses over 150 young
people who are involved in the on-
going Teen Group, our summer camping
program, the photography contest and
various sports activities, all of
which have the flavor of Judaism pre-
vailing. This past September we
inaugurated "Club 56" which is a co-
ed friendship group for 5th and 6th
graders and has a nucleus of 15 child-
ren.
One youth who deserves special
recognition is our Teen President,
Evan Jagoda. Evan is a
North Shore High School
to attend the Univ. of
study Marine Biology. The
meant a great deal to Evan as he says,
"The Center is a great place tor
Jewish kids to go because it doesn't
matter to what temple you belong. The
J.C.C. has a relaxed atmosphere where
Jewish Teens can be with other Jewish
Teens and learn about themselves and
their culture." Evan really says it
all.
We're very proud of our Teens at
the J.C.C.
mm&dw
Senior at
who hopes
Miami and
J.C.C. has
JCC Seniors Events
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available at
the Jewish Community Center
Monday Friday, from 9 a.m. 5
p.m., for senior adults, 60 years
or older, who are transit
disadvantaged, within our
designated area. Call the Center
at 689-7703 for further in-
formation.
ADULT COMMUNITY
EDUCATION +
SCHOOL BOARD OF
PALM BEACH COUNTY
The Jewish Community
Center's senior service center is
providing instructors and classes
through the adult community
education program of School
Board of Palm Beach County.
Classes are in session through
March 21. Call 689-7700 and ask
for Bonnie for information.
Monday 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Oil
Painting (Registration closed).
Tuesday 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. -
Transactional Analysis.
Wednesday 11 a.m. Coping
with Stress. 1:30 p.m. Yoga
after 60. 2 p.m. Writer's
Workshop.
Friday 1:30 p.m. Yoga after
60.
JCC EXTENSION
PROGRAM
Poinciana Place Club House -
"Joy Through Movement"
Instructor Celia Golden,
licensed therapist Thursdays.
Century Village: Art
Needlework "Knitting and
Crocheting" under the leadership
of Sonna Simon, 2nd & 4th
Mondays 1:00 P.M.
Tanglewood, Palm Beach
Gardens Transactional Analysis
- I'm O.K. You're O.K., Mon-
days 6 week session.
TIMELY TOPICS
FOR THINKING WOMEN
AND ROUND TABLE
TALK FOR MEN
Dennis P. Koehler will address
joint session on Feb. 25 on the
County's bicycle path con-
struction program.
NEW DIMENSIONS
Richard Helstein Adventures
in Music "What's Classical
About Classical Music" Last
session Feb. 26, at 1:30 p.m.
Everyone is invited.
Jacob Taub, M.D., physician
and author, will speak on
"Medicine in the Bible" on
March 4, at 1:30 p.m.
AAA ART APPRECIATION
FOR ADULTS
National Council of Jewish
Women presents this program
every fourth Thursday of the
month at 1:30 p.m. Guest
speaker on Feb. 28 is Augusta
Sandier.
ASSERTIVENESS
AND GROWTH
Two sessions presented by
Esther Pastor on March 6 and
March 13 at 1:30 p.m. Call 689-
7700 for information.
ARTIST OF THE MONTH
Irving Miller Stop in and view
his paintings.
TRIPS
A variety of trips are being
planned both day and overnight
Call 689-7700 and ask for Bonnie
for information.
A Fun Filled
Summer Adventure
Amits Your Child
County Programs Are Topic
Commissioner Dennis Koehler,
District No. 3, will be at the
Jewish Community Center on
Monday, Feb. 28, at 1:30 p.m. to
speak to a joint open meeting of
the discussion groups, Timely
Topics for Thinking Women and
Round Table Talk for Men.
Koehler will discuss the
proposed county road bond and
the county's bike path program.
The Timely Topics for
Thinking Women group has been
discussing the need for bicycle
and walking paths along
Okeechobee in the interest of
encouraging persons to conserve
energy and for safety reasons.
Koehler is a member of the
Jewish Community Center and
his son attends the pre-school
program.
Discussion leaders Sylvia
Skolnick and Joseph Greenberg
invite the public to attend.
THE ULTIMATE IN CAMPING
L^r^ ,?nlo on 15 "8h,#d PWlllUliU courts, staffed by well
known Tennis Pro and 10 Instructors! OoH. on our own nrlvate run.
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(S&aaipa
1t14


tbruary 22, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 17
-Federation Golf Event
I
it'/ Country Club was the host course for Royal Palm
trst annual U.J.A.-Federation Golf Tournament and
Ipictured at top) which attracted a capacity 144
i generously responded to an appeal by Henry Levy,
European and Middle East representative of the Joint
m Committee, now residing in Israel and currently in
m behalf of the United Jewish Appeal. Shown with
^ht in above photo) are Royal Palm Beach division
co-chairman fl-r) Louis Silk and Irving Burten. In
\f arrangements and prizes for the event were golf
nit chairman Dan Jatlow (second from right in photo
\d committee members fl-r) Sam Lamstein, George
tike Cohen, Darwin Kabat and Murray Siegel

T^Ktm
GOLF /.
SCHOOL L ^
.w-wjrl
Mltr & COUNTRY II B IV
oug Ford, Jr. has established
the only Golf School in
Palm Beach County
e day will extend from 9 AM to 4 PM and will
limited to three persons per professional
ch-day. For the three day school, the co6t s
30 per person. All this includes lunch, range
Hs, a 9-hole playing session with a pro and
'la-Vision replays.
or more information call
964-6011
LAY THE MOST EXCITING
OLF COURSE IN FLORIDA
WEEKDAY RATES $18
WEEKEND RATES $20
per person corf included (2 players per cart)
Reduced Rotes after 2:00 PM
Attractive Monthly and Annual
Memberships Available
6151 Lyons Road, Lake Worth Florida
OH laniana Rood '
Call 305 964-6011
Manuscripts ]
Continued from Page 4
Egyptian officials alone.
There are 22 such manuscripts,
all extremely valuable. The most
highly prized is the Ben-Asher
Codex, a section of the Prophets.
Dating from 895 or 896 CE, it is
the earliest known extant
Hebrew manuscript.
Prof. Beit-Arie contested
Janner's assertion that the Codex
is "falling apart" and requires
urgent restoration, although
saying that better methods of
preserving it were required. The
codex should not be kept bundled
up together with other.
manuscripts in a safe, as at
present.
PLANS HAD already been
drawn up for a team of qualified
experts to visit Cairo next month
to photograph and arrange all the
manuscripts, Prof. Beit-Arie
continued.
There was no intention of
attempting to prevent the ap-
propriate diaspora Jewish
organizations from becoming
involved in the efforts being
made to preserve the various
elements of Egyptian Jewry's
cultural heritage.
However, this had to be done
in a coordinated manner. A
special group representing of-
ficial bodies, Israeli institutions
and overseas Jewish
organizations with the necessary
expertise had already been set up
and had held preliminary
meetings.
Prof. Beit-Arie said that a
proposal had been put forward
that the National and Hebrew
University Library in Jerusalem,
as the central library of the entire
Jewish people, should be en-
trusted with the task of caring for
the manuscripts as far as any
outsiders would be allowed to do
so.
Bonds
Golf Tourney
March 3
Entries are now being accepted
for the second annual Israel Bond
golf tournament at Sherbrooke
Country Club, Monday morning,
March 3, at 7:30 a.m.,
The first 160 registrants will
have play for a series of prizes,
including a trip to Israel for two,
on the championship golf course
owned by Sam Levy.
P.G.A. pro Doug Ford, Jr..
noted for a long and
distinquuhed career on the
national tour, is assisting with
the arrangements for the tour-
ney, which promises to be an
enjoyable one in the Palm Beach
season.
The championship course, on
Lantana Road at Lyons Road in
Lake Worth, is in prime condition
this winter," Doug Ford said,
"and we expect a field of fine
golfers, both men and women.
Calloway system handicaps will
be Computed, and trophies and
pri/cs will be awarded in a
number of categories. "
A continental breakfast will be
served previous to the 9 a.m.
start and where an awards
luncheon is scheduled for 2 p.m.
after the tourney.
Co-chairmen of the gol
committee are Alan Keiser, Loi
Pen son. Daniel Jatlow, and Jo
Schenk. Members include, foi
Lands of the President, George
Golden, Chloe Bruskin, anc
Arnold Black; for Boca Teeca.
Irving, Rifkin, Reuben Viener,
and Bernard Schachman; for
Harbor House, Irving Korn and
Isadore Such man; for
Cresthaven, Norman Marcus and
Hy Goldstein; for Poinciana
Place, Philip Farbman; for
Covered Bridge, Sid Elin; for
Century Village, Max Shapiro; I
and for Royal Palm Beach, Mel j
Hershenson
Jlround
tTfia
%own
By STACI LESSER
Paul Shapiro will become a Bar Mitzvah on Feb. 22 at
Temple Israel. Parents Peggy and Sidney Shapiro are looking
forward to a beautiful weekend capping it off with a brunch at
Bernards.
Grandmother Mrs. Mary Shapiro, Great Aunt Augusta
Bischon, both of Brooklyn, will join Uncle Dr. Daniel Hillis of
Ft. Lee, N.J.for this special visit to the Palm Beaches.
Aunt and Uncle Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Speuis of Lake Worth
and New York will join other family and friends in Paul's honor.
Cousin Steven and sister Ellen are jetting in from Boston
U. for this family occasion.
The Shapiros are a tennis playing family including sister
Nancy who is a member of the Forest Hill High School team.
Paul is in the gifted class at Conniston Junior High and a
member of the Honor Society. He is also active in various
sports, but his main interest is tennis. Congratulations Paul,
and Bjorn better watch out.
Special congratulations to Diane and Arthur Belfer who
recently received the Humanitarian Award at the Silver Jubilee
Palm Beach dinner for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
Mr. Belfer is a trustee on the Yeshiva board and an Einstein
overseer. Mrs. Belfer serves on the national board of Einstein
Women's Division and is a member of the executive council of
the New York Chapter. The Belfers have been supporters of
UJA Federation and are members of Temple Beth El in
W.P.B.
Hear Ye, Hear Ye! The Dorchester-Roxbury-Mattapan As-
sociation of Boston, Mass., will be holding a dinner-dance oh
Sunday, March 9, at 6:30p.m. at Williamson's Restaurant, 1401
S. Federal Highway in Fort Lauderdale. All interested should
contact Laura and Michael Hyman of Lake Park.
A multi-talented young lady, Maria Diane Perlman will
become a Bat Mitzvah at Temple Beth David on Feb. 22 and 23.
Maria is in the eighth grade at Howell Watkins Junior High.
She was elected to the School Choir, the Concert Choir, and the
Treble Choir. She is on the newspaper and year book staff, a
member of the Drama Club, and on the Academic A-B Honor
Roll.
Maria has studied voice for four years and ballet for seven
years. She has performed with the Cultural Arts Society of
North Palm Beach.
Grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hecht of Lake Worth
and Grandmother Mrs. Muriel Perlman of Bal Harbour will be
sharing this simcha with sister Marjorie and brother Mathew.
Mon Barbara Perlman, a teacher at the Jewish Community Day
School, is certainly proud of her Bat Mitzvah girl.
Light tt\e candle
and remember?
Menorah\Chapels, to preserve
the traditions of our faith,
wishes to offer a gift of re-
membrance. A Yahr7eit
Calendar in the name of the
departed and a Yearly Re-
minder of the Yahrzeit
observance date. A part of
our religious life, rfbw and
through the ay**.
CALL OR WRITE FOR YOUR
YAHRZEIT CALENDAR AT
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313
742 6000
In Dade. call 861-7301
In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME, DATE AND TIME OF
DEATH OF THE DEPARTED
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Mb o e
Tflyy^^TTiiiuAi'Or*""1"'
UtUUI v uu.'ij
rnuny, wivm j ~t
** ftabbinical Coordinated by
Rabbi Aaher Bar-Zev, Ph.d
devoted to dhcimion of themes and Useea
rtkvwtt to Jewish ttft post and present
Prophets of Doom
By Rabbi Dr. Asher Barzev
Temple Beth El
One of the trends which I
detect in contemporary Jewish
life is the tendency for Jewish
pokesmen to harp constantly on
the theme of the coming
destruction of Jewish life.
Time and again we are told by
so-called "experts" in fields
ranging from sociology to rab-
binics that the end of the Jewish
people is in sight.
We are told that mixed
marriage is increasing,
assimilation is making enormous
inroads and the ignorance of the
Jewish masses dooms us to
annihilation.
WHILE EVERY one of these
experts can make a case for the
Editor's Note: The views
expressed by the rabbis are
strictly their own and do not
necessarily reflect the views of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
end of the Jewish people and
Jewish civilization, I believe that
these prophets of doom really
don't appreciate the vitality,
strength, and resources which the
Jewish people have that will
guarantee not only their con-
tinued existence, but a period of
intense growth and development
in the coming decades.
It is very easy to point to one
or another statistic and ex-
trapolate from it, making the
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prediction of the end of Judaism.
Those who do so fail to realize
that by any logic and any
statistics, our civilization should
have come to an end thousands of
years ago.
Yet we remain not only viable
but extremely influential
throughout the civilized world.
There seems to be an intangible,
almost mystical, drive that
allows us not only to function but
to flourish under the most ad-
verse conditions.
THERE IS NO other people in
history that has survived under
the adverse conditions that have
enabled our people to continue
down to the present day. We
have endured exile, persecution,
political disabilities, economic
discrimination, forced religious
conversion, rape, plunder, and
pillage and in spite of all of these,
have come through the past few
thousand years stronger than
ever.
A mystic might attribute this
to God's protection of Israel. A
rationalist would no doubt look
for logical reasons that would
counter all of these forces of
destruction and explain our
presence in the world. Whatever
approach you take, the fact
remains that there have been
prophets of doom that have
predicted our end many, many
times in the past. They have all
been wrong.
I believe that the present-day
prophets of doom are also wrong.
I see the Jewish people standing
on the threshold of a new Golden
Age.
NEVER BEFORE in Jewish
history have Jews been as highly
educated in both secular and
Jewish subjects than they are
today.
Never before in Jewish history
have Jews been organized into
institutions which function to
meet the full spectrum of the
needs of the Jewish people from
education to charity to religious
expression.
Never before have we seen so
many synagogues so vitally
involved in programs to meet the
spiritual and cultural needs of the
Jews of their time.
Never before have we had so
many professionals highly
trained to function in these in-
stitutions.
Never before have there been
so many periodicals and books on
Jewish subjects published in
both Hebrew and other
languages.
Never before have there
existed hundreds of programs on
University Campuses dealing
with Jewish subjects and staffed
by professors of Judaica.
Our youth movements are
flourishing. Our adult education
programs are packed. There is a
hunger abro d on the part of
Jews for seeking their roots.
There is a thirst for the very
philosophy and theology of
Judaism in order to give direction
to the Jewish people.
FOR ALL of these reasons I
am convinced that, in spite of the
very real problems of anti-
Semitism, mixed-marriage,
assimilation, and lack of
knowledge, Judaism will con-
tinue to grow and to flourish in
the foreseeable future.
The prophets of doom are
merely expressing a view that we
have heard before and has been
disproved by history and the
Jewish people time and time
again. Let us not be misled by
their misconceptions.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach
County
ORTHODOX
AITZ CHAIM CONGREGATION CENTURY VILLAGE
W Palm Beach Phone: 689-4675 Sabbath Services 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Dally Services: 8:15 a.m. and 5 p.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
551 Brittany L, Kings Point, Delray Beach 33446 Harry Silver
PrlsZZ. Service! daily 8 e.m and 5 P.m^Sa.urdays and
Holidays 9 a.m. Phone: 499-7407. Temple No. 499-9229
REFORM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida
33407 833-8421 Rabbi Irving B. Cohen Joel L Levlne,
Associate Rabbi Sabbath Worship Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. Saturday Torah Seminars at 10:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourt Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Phone: 391-
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath
Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.* Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah Study
with Rabbi Merle E. Singer 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Ser-
vices
THE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION OF DELRAY
At St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swinton Ave., Delray
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla. 33444 Fri-
day at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver President Lawrence
Sommers, 272-2908
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. At. St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill
Blvd. and Wlllington Trace Mailing address: 1125 Jack Pine
St., West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 President Ronnie
Kramer 793-2700
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
The Free Synagogue, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 368-
1600, 391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 8:15 p.m.
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West Glades Rd. (1
mile west of Boca Turnpike)
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fl. 33407 Phone:
833-0339 Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sab-
bath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Daily
Minyan at 8:15 a.m., Sunday at 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 Phone 684-
3212 Office hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Select-
man Cantor Arthur B. Rosenwasser Services: Daily 8:30a.m.
and 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.; Late Service 8:15
p.m. followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday, 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m.
followed by Shalah Sudos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. Phone 732-2555 Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazin Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9
a.m. Congregational Church, 115 N. Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 N. -A' Street, Lake Worth, Fla. 33460 Phone: 585
5020 Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Ser-
vices: Mondays and Thursdays at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday at 9 a.m.
^TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services, Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. West-
minster Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm
Beach Gardens. (Office) 321 Northlake Blvd., North Palm fl
Beach, Fla. Phone: 845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor
Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
SlKftSS.^ ^"e 1'ade' FU' ^^ Jack SUteman,
Cantor Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeida Drive, Palm Springs, Fla. 33461 Sabbath ser-
vices: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. President Barnett
Briskman Phone: 967-4962 Mondays and Thursdays at 9-
a.m. Services held at Faith United Presbyterian Church Palm
Springs
B'NAI TORAH CONQREQATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Phone: 392-
8566 Rabbi Nathan Zelizer Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 15
p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
r52J* A,,ant'c Avenue, Delray Beach. Fla. 33448 Phone:
276-3536 Morris Sllberman, Rabbi Leonard Price, Can-
tor Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9
a.m. Dally Mlnyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
Mo/*.to^?Mty Rc* faJm *?ach' Ra- ^ Pnone: 832-
0804-Rabbi Myer S. Krlpke Cantor David Dardashtl Sab-
bath Services: Friday at b oO p.m., Saturday at 9 a m



>ruary 22. 1980
Synagogue News
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
PagTl*
rLE BETH DAVID
:ial Club of Temple
of North Palm Beach
II have a wine, cheese
social on Saturday,
at 8:30 p.m. at the
Clubhouse in Palm
Beach Gardens. There will be
dancing and entertainment. The
cost is $6 a couple for members
and $7 a couple for non-members.
Reservations and payment must
be made by March 1. Contact
Judy Margolis, Nettie Berk or
;ress, Israel Envoy
it for Bonds Gala
fatherton. noted enter-
]1 be featured at the
International Am-
Ball on Tuesday,
at The Breakers in
fch.
Evron, Israeli
lor to the United
rill be the principal
ement of the event
by Irv Kupcinet, syn-
ilumnist, who serves as
I Chairman for Special
Dr the Israel Bond
Ion.
tt noted that the ap-
|of Miss Heatherton is
sreciated.
Jewish leaders from
United States and
(re expected to attend
tie dinner-dance.
|arvin M. Rosenberg,
ch County Chainr
I Bonds and Chairman of
ssadors Ball, said:
of tne Israel Bond
pon are pleased to pay
Miss Heatherton who
(t talent, while at the
i speeding economic aid
Ve hope to reach a total
pillion in Israel Bond
that night. With the
Miss Heatherton
we may even surpass
ael Bond Organization
ajor source of develop-
Joey Heatherton
ment capital for Israel. Since its
founding in 1951, Israel Bond
purchases have provided more
than $4.5 billion to help build
every aspect of Israel's economic
infrastructure.
Israel looks to Israel Bonds to
help provide solid economic foun-
dations for the development of
the Negev and the building of a
peace economy.
"Besides," Dr. Rosenberg said,
"we are helping our own economy
with the purchase of Israel
Bonds. The money produced is
spent in this country to buy the
materials needed in Israel.
"It is a privilege to be able to
provide aid to both economies
while enjoying an evening at the
Ambassadors Ball."
untryside
Car Wash
O
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1450 S MMary Trail
us! North ot Forest Hilt Brvd
Phone 964-0505
Arlene Gordon. Call the Temple
office for more information.
TEMPLE EM ANU EL
The Adult Education program
of Temple Emanu-El got un-
derway on Wednesday afternoon,
Feb. 13, and will continue for six
consecutive sessions until March
19 at the Temple.
A class in elementary Hebrew
reading and a class affording an
opportunity to brush up on
Hebrew reading in the Siddur is
being held at 1 p.m. each
Wednesday afternoon on the
above dates. From 2-3:30 p.m.
Rabbi Myer S. Kripke is con-
ducting individual sessions
relating to the Jewish attitude
toward such topics as: Abortion,
blood transfusion, autopsy, etc.,
in the modern medical field;
Jesus and Christianity; Prayer;
Relevancy of the Bible.
It is not too late to join the
above groups since each session
is an entity.
The Adult Education Com-
mittee consists of the following
representatives:
Chairman and Sisterhood
Representative, Genevieve
Silberman; Hebrew instructor,
Sheila Holmstock; Temple
board of trustees; Louis
Weissblatt, Men's Club; Judge
Harry Batshaw, Representative
at Large; Marion Siner Gordon,
Teacher and consultant; Rabbi
Myer S. Kripke.
CONGREGATION
ANSIIEI SHOLOM
On Sunday evening, 8 p.m.,
Feb. 24, the Men's Club of
Anshei Sholom will present Dr.
Charles Krenner, famous Nazi-
nun tpr no the second Dart of the
Cultural Series.
Dr. Krenner has been in-
strumental in tracking down and
bringing to trial many Nazi war
criminals. His lecture will be
educational and interesting.
Tickets will be 93 per person.
Sisterhood of Congregation
Anshei Sholom will hold a broad
meeting on Monday, March 3, at
9:45 a.m. and its regular meeting
on Tuesday, March 18, at 1 p.m.
at which time we shall celebrate
Jewish Music Month with Fannie
Uskow and her Melodears. The
Purim Musical Festival will be
held Sunday evening, March 9,
featuring the international singer
Bina Landau.
CONGREGATION
BETH KODESH
The Sisterhood of Congrega-
tion Beth Kodesh will meet at the
Congregational Church, 115 N.
Federal Highway, on Wed-
nesday, Feb. 27, at 12:30 p.m.
AITZ CHAIM
CONGREGATION
At a recent meeting of the
membership, officers were elected
by Congregation Aitz Chaim of
Century Village for the year 1980.
Congregation Aitz Chaim,
founded seven years ago, is the
only traditional orthodox
synagogue in the Palm Beach
area. Services are held daily at
8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Shabbat
services begin at 9 a.m. and 5:30
p.m. All services are conducted at
the Clubhouse, Century Village.
West Palm Beach. New members
and visitors are invited.
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The newly elected officers are:
' Morris Stern heim, President;
' Norman Werner, First Vice
President; Harry Turbiner,
Second Vice President; Harry
Horn, Financial Secretary;
Edward Weinstein, Treasurer,
and Louis Schaffer,
Corresponding Secretary.
TEMPLE BETH EL
The Adult Education Institute
of Temple Beth El announces
that registration is now taking
place for courses for the spring
i trimester which begins on March
I 3.
Classes are offered in
elementary Hebrew and in-
termediate Hebrew on Monday
nights. The Yiddish circle will
continue to meet on Thursday
afternoons, and invites those who
have a speaking knowledge of
Yiddish to join in their hour of
reminiscences.
Tuesday morning the Mishnah
group that studies with the
Rabbi will meet, and the lun-
cheon group continues the study
of Bible with the book of
Deuteronomy. Newcomers are
invited to join.
The Jewish History lecture
series featuring Rabbi Bar Zev
will continue the focus on the
Middle Ages. On Monday night,
March 3, the lecture will be, the
Cabala, the Shulhan Aruch and
Their Civilizations; on March 17,
Ghetto Economics, Society and
Religion will be discussed, and on
March 24, the lecture will be,
Three Personalities, the Baal
Shem Tov, the Vilna Gaon, and
Moses Mendlessohn.
Encounter with Judaism will
be offered as a three week mini-
series this trimester. Passover
skills will be the focus of these
workshops, and included will be
the "how-tos" of conducting a
Passover Seder. Also, a course in
synagogue skills will be offered.
For information on registration
for courses, call the Temple
office.
Purim services at Temple Beth
El will take place on Saturday
night, March 1, at 7 p.m. and
Sunday morning at 9:30 a.m.
On Saturday night the
Megillah reading will be followed
by a social hour and celebration
featuring Israeli dance specialist
Etie Nave, who will give in-
struction in Israeli folk dancing.
Crunch With Kremlin Won't Pinch Emigres
PHILADELPHIA Despite
the current U.S.-Soviet con-
frontation, the Kremlin is likely
to continue to permit Jewish
emigration from the USSR at or
near current levels, according to a
key State Department official.
Robert W. Farrand. officer in
charge of bilateral relations at
the Soviet desk of the State
Department, made the prediction
in an address to the annual
assembly of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council here.
FARRAND SAID the Soviets
are likely to maintain the current
rate of Jewish emigration now
running at more than 50,000 per
year because it was "in their
interest to do so."
He said it was his "personal
view" that "while difficulties do
lie ahead, the likelihood is that
the Russians will not let the
current crisis in their relations
with the U.S., resulting from the
invasion of Afghanistan, seriously
affect the emigration process.
"The Soviet Union may wish
to continue emigration to 'score
points' with the U.S. in any
future negotiation with
Washington on the eventual
resumption of normal relations
between the two countries,"
Farrand suggested.
Little Known Facts Concerning
ISRAEL BONDS:
Third most widely held security in the
United States!
|aProceeds are spent with U.S. manufac-
turers to supply industrial and agricultural
equipment to improve Israel's economy
and create new jobs in.
^Matured Israel Bonds should be rein-
vested, since Israel places proceeds at
Chase Manhattan Bank for these pur-
poses; you don't help Israel by holding
matured bonds.
Stop In for a glass ofSobra at the
State of Israel Bonds Office
Bert Sales, Florida Manager
100 Sunrise Avenue, Palm Beach
659 14451
The Tie That Binds
Florida to Chicago
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The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach bounty
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i'i- i_..w-. vin.ViVi>.AfV'ai mm* i vwinw
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Friday, February 22, 1980
v
Trend Demonstrated
Jewish Population Moves South
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County__________________
Page 5
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Continuing a pattern of
recent years, the Jewish
population of the United
States is moving in in-
creasing numbers from the
Northeast to the Sun Belt
the Southern and
Western parts of the
country. This trend is
demonstrated in
demographic reports that
appear in the 1980 edition
of the American Jewish
Year Book. The new
edition, Volume 80 in the
annual series, has just
appeared.
The American Jewish Year
Book is published jointly by the
American Jewish Committee and
the Jewish Publication Society of
America. Its editors are Milton
Himmelfarb and David Singer.
Morris Fine is editor emeritus.
FIGURES ON world Jewish
population in the Year Book
show an increase of 110,000 over
the previous year, or a total
current world Jewish population
of 14,396,000.
However, Prof. Leon Shapiro,
of Rutgers University, who
compiled the world statistics,
cautions that "there are no
precise data on Jewish
population in the various
countries. The figures presented
represent the best possible
estimates The figures are of
varying degrees of accuracy and
are subject to substantial
margins of error."
Similarly, the authors of the
demographic report on Jewish
population in the United States,
Alvin Chenkin and Maynard
Miran, research consultant and
associate respectively of the
Council of Jewish Federations,
warn that two factors combine to
make their total estimate
problematic: "The extent of the
shift to the 'sun-belt' states may
not yet be fully reported. On the
other hand, the New York City
area estimate is, in all likelihood,
overstated."
THEY ESTIMATE that the
current U.S. Jewish population is
5,860,900 a modest increase over
the previous year's figure of
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5,780i960. The South and West
comprise 30.2 percent of the
total, as compared to 29.1 in 1978
and 27.8 in 1977. The Northeast
and Northcentral states
represent 69.8 percent of the total
Jewish population, as compared
to 70.9 and 72.2 percent in 1978
and 1977 respectively. Jews
comprise 2.7 percent of the total
population in the U.S.
Estimating the New York City
Jewish population at 1,228,000, a
figure based on the 1970 National
Jewish Population Study, the
authors point out that unofficial
estimates by the New York
Department of City Planning
show a 13.5 percent drop in the
city's white population between
1970 and 1977. "An extrapolation
of this figure to 1979 could reduce
the Jewish population figure for
New York City to around
1,000,000," they added.
After the United States,
countries with significantly large
numbers of Jews are: Israel,
3,135,000; Soviet Union,
2,666,000; France, 650,000;
Great Britain, 410,000; Canada,
305,000; Argentina, 300,000;
Brazil, 150,000; and South
Africa, 118,000.
AMONG THE Jewish
population figures for U.S. cities
listed in the Year Book's tables
are: Greater New York,
1,998,000; Los Angeles
Metropolitan Area, 445,000;
Philadelphia Metropolitan Area,
295,000; Chicago Metropolitan
Area, 253,000; Miami, 225,000;
Boston, 170,000; Greater
Washington. 160.000; Bergen
County (N.J.), 100,000; Essex
County (N.J.), 95,000; Baltimore,
92,000; Cleveland, 75,000;
Detroit, 75,000; San Francisco,
75,000; Montgomery County
(Md.), 70,000; St. Louis, 60,000;
Fort Lauderdale, 60,000;
Hollywood (Fla.), 55,000; in
Pittsburgh, 51,000.
In Europe, including Asiatic
USSR and Turkey, there are
4,142,450 Jews. The Jewish
population of the Americas is
6,783,220. In Asia, there are
3,221,010 Jews; in Africa,
174,320; and in Australia-New
Zealand, 75,000. The Jewish
population in major cities in the
Soviet Union is: Kharkov,
80,000; Kiev, 170,000;
Leningrad, 165,000; Moscow,
285,000; Odessa, 120,000;
Sverdlovsk, 40,000; and
Zhitomir, 20.000.
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r*8 Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. February 22, 1980
"Jewish
Manuscripts Attract Interest
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY _,.
Combinim "OUH VOICE"and "FEDERATION REPORTER
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Oountv. Inc
Combined Jewish Appeal
P AIM BE ACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
3300 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 388 01
Printing Office 120 NE th St.. Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 3T3 460S
FREDK SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
RONNI TARTAKOW
News Coordinator
The Jewish Floridian Dcei Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Ol The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
FORM 3570 returns to The Jewish Floridian _,,
3200 North Federal Hiuhway. Boca Raton. Fla TJSPS864303
Published Bi Weekly S~econd Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton. Fla
Federation officers President. Alan I. Shulman. Vice Presidents Dr Richard
Shuearnian, Dr Howard Kay. Kenneth Scherer. Jeanne Levy. Jerome Tlshman.
Treasurer Staci Lesser. Secretary Bruce J Daniels. Executive Director.
Norman J Schlmelman Submit material for publication to Ronnl Tartakow.
Director of Public Relations
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) On* Yr SMI. or by memborahlB h)
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, Ml South Flaoler Drlvt. Wtt Palm
Beach, FL 33*01 PhoneHI J110 (Out of Town upon Reoueit)
Friday, February 22. 1980 5 ADAR 5740
Volume 6 Number 4
We Must All Care
The plight of the people of Indochina, whether
homeless boat people or other refugees, or the
starving masses of Cambodia, has brought a warm
response from the Jewish community. Jews are
among the leadership of the persons aiding refugees.
Jewish organizations are lending expertise in helping
refugees and resettling them and the Jewish com-
munity has been- generous in its financial con-
tributions. But Jews, like all Americans, must do
more.
Perhaps Jews have more empathy with the
refugees than others because of our traditions and
our history. Jews have 2,000 years of experience as
refugees. The plight of the boat people reminds us of
the 1930s when Jews escaping from Nazi Germany
found that the doors of most countries were closed to
them. The situation in Cambodia, in which those in
power appear to be starving to death most of the
population, awakens memories of the Holocaust.
Elie Wiesel, who survived Auschwitz to become
a novelist describing the Holocaust, was one of a
group of Americans and others who joined an effort
by the International Rescue Committee recently in
an attempt to deliver supplies to Cambodia from
Thailand.
American Jews have always stood in the fore-
front of aiding those who need help when no one
cared, whether Jew or others. It is a tradition that
will continue by not letting the world forget the
plight of the Indochinese.
JERUSALEM Israeli
experts on ancient manuscripts
and Foreign Ministry officials are
perturbed by what they regard as
wild competition among Israeli
institutions and overseas Jewish
communities for access to
priceless Jewish manuscripts in
'Jairo.
Criticism has been expressed in
the wake of the announcement by
Greville Janner. president of the
Hoard of Deputies of British
Jews, that he had secured per-
mission from President Sadat for
the Ben-Asher Codex to be
removed from Egypt temporarily
tor restoration and exhibition.
Officials in Jerusalem point out
that similar promises have been
made by the Egyptian
authorities in the past to Other
prominent diaspora figures.
THESE INCLUDE. U.S.
Secretary of Commerce Philip M.'
Khu/nuk. a. present on leave of
absence as president of the World
Jewish Congress, and Nessim
Oaon, the president of the World
Sephardi Federation.
"It is unfortunately playing
into the hands of the Egyptian
authorities. This is a matter
which should be left to the ex-
perts," Prof. Malachi Beit-Arie
said.
The professor, who is the
director of the National and
Hebrew University Library,
headed a delegation of prominent
Israeli scholars to Egypt last
month to assess the state of the
manuscripts held by the Karaite
community there.
Permission was obtained by
the delegation to photograph and
arrange the documents. Prof.
Beit-Arie said he hoped this
wnnlH "not be jeopardized by
these wildcat approaches to the
Egyptian political leadership by
well-intentioned diaspora
leaders."
FOREIGN MINISTRY of-
ficials expressed concern that
these approaches might un-
dermine plans to forge direct
cultural links between Israel and
Egypt
Prof. Beit-Arie stressed that,
since the manuscripts were in the
possession of the handful of
Karaites still in Cairo, their
future could not be decided by
Continued on Page 17
Soviet Forces in Syria
Top Middle East Total
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) Defense Secretary
Harold Brown's annual report to Congress justifying the
Defense Department's new budget has disclosed that
Soviet and East European military technicians in Syria
have exceeded all those in the Middle East and South
Asia except for Afghanistan.
Brown's statistics said that Soviet and East Euro-
pean military personnel in 1978 in Syria totaled 2,580
while the totai in tn remainder oi the Midoast ana South
Asia was 2,050.
THIS WAS made up of 1,200 in Iraq, 150 in North
Yemen, 550 in South Yemen and 150 in India. In
Afghanistan as of Jan. 4 there were 50,000 Communist
technicians, he said. Cuban forces numbered 150 in North
Yemen and 1,000 in South Yemen.
"That instability in the Middle East will be the rule
rather than the exception seems highly probable for some
years to come," Brown reported.
HE NOTED that "the moderate Arab states, except
for Oman and the Sudan, have opposed" the Egyptian-
Israeli peace treaty and "Iraq and Iran may yet come into
formal conflict."
"The situation in southern Lebanon, where Israeli-
supported Christian militia forces continue to confront
Palestinian guerrillas and Moslem leftists, could erupt
into larger-scale violence and draw in both Syria and
Israel," Brown said.
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