Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00212

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Volume 6 Number 1
Palm Beach, Florid* Friday, January 11,19801
I frd Shochtl
Price 35 Cents
Ball Would Punish
An 'Intransigent9 Israel
By VICTOR M. BIENSTOCK
George W. Ball no longer holds
an official position in the United
States Government but he is a
ranking member of the small,
permanent establishment which
dominates American foreign
jHilicy regardless of which party
is in power. Under Secretary of
State in the Kennedy and
Johnson administrations and a
former Ambassador to the
United Nations, Ball has closely
followed Middle East develop-
ments and has long been a
trenchant critic of Israeli policy.
He has been particularly severe
in his appraisals of Israel's
policies toward the Arabs and
has long advocated the Rogers
Plan, with minor modifications,
I as the solution of territorial
His viewpoint must be
Mewpoi
in lari
[accepted as, in large part, an
I expression of the position of our
I foreign policy establishment.
WRITING in the January
Issue of Foreign Affairs, the
influential quarterly published by
Ihe Council on Foreign Relations,
jail warns that American-Israeli
elations are "approaching a
tnsis state." He warns bluntly
that "unless American-Israeli
relations are radically redefined
either in a closer or looser
lirection the search for an
Arab Heads
Told They
Abdicated
Responsibility
BOSTON- Dr. Elias EI-
k, executive director of the
merican Lebanese Information
fcnter in Washington, has
Jarged that the Arab heads of
ate, at their meeting in Tunis
month, "abdicated their
sponsibilities toward the
kest and smallest member of
(Arab) League (Lebanon) by
idling it with the burden of the
lestinian struggle at the ex-
Inse of the security and peace of
Y Lebanese people."
In a letter published in the
Iristian Science Monitor, El-
a.vek noted that at Tunis
esident Elias Sarkis of
ebanon finally broke his long
fence about the Palestinian
Jcroachment on Lebanese
(vereignty and demanded at the
feting of the Arab heads of
te that they withdraw
south Lebanon and stop
inching attacks on Israel, or
liming responsibility for
rrorist acts inside Israel."
[Kl-Hayek observed that "The
|mpromise which finally was
lopted by the summit is in fact
i endorsement of the PLO view:
Palestinians will keep their
imtary bases in the south, but
Mge to halt temporarily their
{tacks on Israel from the area.
e Arab states promise to give
billion over a live year period
the reconstruction of
ebanon."
Young Leadership Mobilizes
For Washington Conference
On Feb. 24-26, the United
Jewish Appeal young leadership
will convene their second national
conference in Washington, D.C.
This major gathering of young
Jewish leadership will serve to
brief thousands of committed
American Jews on issues which
affect their daily lives and Jewish
life around the world.
Major addresses will be given
by senators, Israeli officials,
noted guest speakers and
academicians.
Issues addressed in
Washington will range from
energy, human rights (Soviet,
South American, Ethiopian
Jewry), and America's
Israel / Mideast policy.
Reservations are now being
taken for the conference on a
first-come, first-served basis. The
registration fee for the conference
will be $30, and group flights will
be available from West Palm
Beach to Washington Atten-
dance in Washington is now
anticipated to reach over 2,000
young Jewish leaders.
As part of a Florida regional
recruitment effort, economist
David Kotok, partner in the
investment counseling firm of
Cumberland Advisors of Vine-
land, N.J., will be visiting Palm
Beach County and speaking to
participants in the Young
Leadership program.
Kotok is well-versed in the
areas of economics and foreign
policy, having acted as an ad-
visor on foreign affairs to mem-
bers of Congress.
He is presently national asso-
ciate chairman of the Young
til
George Ball
Arab-Israeli peace will be
completely thwarted and the
interests of both nations in-
creasingly jeopardized."
He describes Israel's position
vis-a-vis the United States as
"dependence without respon-
sibility," American and Israeli
interests not always identical and
the immediate problem: how can
"our relationship with Israel be
brought into line with the
national interest?"
Ball's basic complaint is that
the United States has never,
since the Eisenhower-Dulles
days, stood up to Israel but has
yielded to the Israeli hard line on
peace. He accuses Israel of
following policies harmful to
American interests while, at the
same time, demanding and
receiving American aid.
THE ACTIVITIES of the
Israeli lobby in Washington, he
says, "exert a strong and con-
tinuing influence" on American-
Israeli relations, contributing "in
a major way to the constrictions
Continued on Page 7
Lily Nesher to Speak
At Pacesetters Lunch
Lily Nesher, a former member
of the Israeli Foreign Ministry,
will be the guest speaker at the
Women's Division Pacesetters
Luncheon on Wednesday, Jan.
16. The luncheon will be held at
the home of Mrs. Morris Messing
in Pahn Beach at 11a.m.
Mrs. Nesher was born and
educated in Besarabia. She
studied languages and history at
the University of Uralsk. In 1946,
she decided that her fate lay with
the survivors of Hitler's
Holocaust, so she joined the
underground. In Germany, she
was active in the organization of
the Jewish displaced persons in
the U.S. Zone of Germany. In
1948, she arrived in Israel and
served as an Army lieutenant in
charge of absorption of
newcomers to the State. Since
then, she has had several
governmental missions abroad
including three missions to the
Soviet Union.
Sheila Engelstein. chairman of
the event, stated, "We are very
Lily Nesher
fortunate in the Women's
Division that a woman of Mrs.
Nesher's stature and talents will
be speaking to us on Jewish
needs in 1960. It is vital for every
one of us to open our minds and
hearts to the words of this ex-
traordinary woman." Marlene
Burns, co-chairman of the event,
stated, "We have had a won-
derful response so far from the
community and our committee is
excited in anticipation of this
day."
This scene of Israeli folk dancing in Washington, D.C, may be
repeated when the United Jewish Appeal's national young
leadership conference takes place in the nation's capital next
month.
Leadership Cabinet of the United
Jewish Appeal and a member of
the executive committee of New
Jersey's regional board of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Kotok has been deeply in-
volved with special projects for
the Young Leadership Cabinet of
the national United Jewish
Appeal and, as part of his in-
volvement with the cabinet, he
will address the 1979/1980
Young Leadership group on
Saturday evening, Jan. 12. Also,
on Sunday evening, Jan. 13, he
will speak to recent part parti-
cipants in the Young Leadership
programs of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County.
The meeting on Sunday
evening will be at the home of
Arnold and Marilyn Lampert,
and all past participants are
welcome.
Kotok's address will focus on
"The Role of Jews in the Amer-
ican Political Scene" in the
1980's.
For more information on the
meeting Sunday evening, Jan.
13, and the National Young
Leadership Conference in
Washington, D.C, call Paula
Ruth Kass. director, at Young
Leadership, at the Federation.
%
Energy Group Applauded
Department of Energy
Washington. D.C. 20585
0FC 2 B1979
Mr. George Golden
Chairman, Enrrgy Task Force
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, Florida
501 South Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida 33401
Dear Mr. Golden:
The conservation efforts undertaken by your organization
have been brought to our attention.
The Department of Energy believes that much of the
responsibility and many of the opportunities for energy
conservation rest with the States, local communities,
and ultimately, with individual citizens. By your
organization's taking local initiative to promote energy
conservation, you are doubly benefitted. Not only are
there energy savings, but you also retain for your
community the flexibility to develop and implement energy
management plans that best meet your local needs and
conditions.
On behalf of the President and the Department of Energy.
I commend the Jewish Federation Of Palm Beach County for
your awareness and actions taken in recognition of the
importance of energy conservation.
Sincerely,
[Michael Power
iDirector
Policy, Planning and Evaluation
Office of Assistant Secretary
Conservation and Solar Energy


Page 2
The Jewish Mnjgjg of Palm Beocft County
Friday, January 11.1980
71
With the
Organizations
HADASSAH
Shalom Hadaasah, West Palm
Beach chapter, will hold an open
meeting on Monday evening,
Jan. 21, 7 p.m., at Congregation
Anshei Sholom, Century Village.
Guest speaker will be Dr.
Jacob Taub, well-known
authority on medicine in the
Bible.
Shalom's day at Hialeah Race-
track takes place on Thursday,
Jan. 24. Donation of $11 per
person includes transportation,
entrance fee, reserved seat,
program. For reservations, call
Gene Fermaglich or Jean Peck-
man.
On Jan. 28, Tamar Hadaasah
will hold an Education Day
program at the Village Hall in
Royal Palm Beach. The meeting
will start at 11 a.m. and is ex-
pected to terminate at about 2
p.m. Bring a sandwich. Coffee
and cake will be served.
Guest speaker will be Mrs.
Eleanor Weinstock, state rep-
resentative in Tallahassee for our
area. Additional speakers,
selected from among our
members, will talk on varied and
interesting topics. Clothing
which has been designed and
sewn by students in Israel will be
displayed. Guests are welcome.
Our study group, under the
guidance of Ruth Streiner, will
meet on Monday, Jan. 21, at 10
a.m. at the home of Helen Feigin.
Isabel Katz, regional adviser,
will lead the workshops and dis-
cussions which will comprise the
forthcoming Hadaasah Leader-
ship Course. The first session will
take place at the Indian Trail
Country Club in Royal Palm
Beach on Tuesday, Jan. 15, from
9:45 a.m. until approximately 2
p.m. Lunch may be purchased on
the premises. Those interested
should contact Frances Freiman.
The annual Sweetheart Dinner-
Jance wui be held on Saturday
night, Feb. 9, at the Ramada Inn
in West Palm Beach. Reser-
vations may be made through
Florence Cooper.
The Riahona Group of the
Palm Beach chapter of Hadasaah
will hold its regular meeting on
Thursday, Jan. 24, at noon at the
North Palm Beach Public
Library, 303 Anchorage Road,
North Palm Beach.
Guest speaker will be Dr.
Robert K. Alsofrom. Refresh-
ments will be served.
The Henrietta Szold Group of
Hadasaah will hold its general
meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 15, at 1
p.m. in the clubhouse of Lakeside
Village, Lillian Road west of
Congress Avenue in Palm
Springs.
The guest speaker will be
Thomas A. Kelly, editor of the
Palm Beach Post.
Reminder: Jan. 27 the
Henrietta Szold Group of
Hadassah is going to the
Musicana Supper Club in West
Palm Beach, 6 p.m. For reser-
vations, call Midge Cole.
Chai Group of Hadassah will
hold a regular meeting on Thurs-
day. Jan. 24, at 12:30 p.m. at the
Challenger Country Club, Poin-
ciana Place.
In honor of the International
Year of the Child, a playlet en-
titled "I Never Saw Another
Butterfly" will be presented by
the Chai Players under the
direction of Annette DuBey.
The Habima Players will per-
form at the Youth Aliyah dinner
and dance at the Challenger
Country Club on Sunday, Feb.
10. Since seating is limited,
secure tickets early by calling
Ruth Schwartz.
The Bat Burion chapter of
H
LeVITT We
EINSTEIN
memorial chapels
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689-8700
STATE OF
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BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
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WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES.

TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE.
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Securities
Bank Laumi k-Iitmi b M
18 East 48th Street
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(212) 759-1310
Corporation Tot! Free (800)221 -4838
P1-lliO
Hadassah will hold a number of
functions in the coming weeks.
On Thursday, Jan. 17, a member-
ship tea will be held at the home
of Barbara Schwartz. West Palm
Beach, at 8 p.m. For more in-
formation, contact Vicki Bern-
stein.
A Game Night will be held at
the home of Phyllis and Jeffrey
Penner on Saturday. Jan. 19
Come and join the fun. Bring
your own games or come and play
ours. Watch the Bulletin for
details.
The general meeting this
month will be a book review of
"Evergreen" by Belva Plain at
the home of Diane Frank on Jan.
24 at 8 p.m. Elsie Leviton will
review the book.
The annual Youth Aliyah
luncheon will be held on Feb. 14
at the Vintage Restaurant in
Boynton Beach. Susan Kahlen-
berg and Frimi Alalu are chair-
persons. A very special afternoon
is planned. Mark your calendar.
PIONEER WOMEN
The newly formed Eirat Club
of Pioneer Women residing in
Lake Worth, Poinciana Place,
Covered Bridge, Mead Village.
Fountains, Lucerne Lakes and
vicinity, will receive its charter
on Tuesday, Jan. 15. at the home
of Mrs. Bennet Lee, Lucerne
Lake Homes, Lake Worth.
Mrs. Grace Hershkowitz will
be the speaker. Refreshments will
be served. Husbands of the mem-
bers have been invited. This
group helps provide funds for
child care centers in Israel.
HEBREW UNIVERSITY
The Century Village chapter of
the American Friends of the He-
brew University of Jerusalem
celebrates its third year of
existence.
Leon Colon was appointed
chairman of the chapter by
Stanley Rosenberg, director of
the Southeast Region.
Anyone wishing information
about the chapter is asked to
write to Leon Colon, Kent 1-157,
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409.
WOMEN'S ORT
The Palm Beach chapter of
Women's American ORT (The
Organization for Rehabilitation
Through Training) will hold its
monthly meeting at 8 p.m. in the
Churchill Room of the Palm
Beach Holiday Inn on Monday
evening, Jan. 14.
Sylvia Lewis, executive
director of the Palm Beach Anti-
Defamation I-eague, will discuss
"The Power Structure of the PLO
and Us Threat To All Of Us."
All members and friends are
invited to attend. Refreshments
will be served.
The Palm Beach County
Region of Women's American
ORT announces that this year
the annual donor luncheon will be
held at the Poinciana Club in
Palm Beach, Tuesday, Feb. 12, at
noon.
Become a donor in 1980, our
"centennial year," help put our
second century of service in the
forefront of organizations.
Women's American ORT,
Palm Beach Region, is holding its
fourth annual Mid-year Planning
Conference on Monday, Feb. 4, 9
?"?; t0,3 Pro- at the Helen
Wilkes Hotel, West Palm Beach.
Every member of every board
is invited to attend this moat
important conference. Hear what
we have accomplished, and leam
now to reach your goals and
assignments.
Lunch will be served. Put this
date on your calendar.
For further information,
contact Mrs. Alice Kushner
chairman.
BRANDEIS WOMEN
The Palm Beach Weat chapter
of Brandeia Univeraity Women's
Committee will meet at 10 a.m.
on Tuesday, Jan. 22, at Congre-
gation Anshei Sholom.
PMl-H
Professor Richard Onorato,
associate professor of English at
Brandeis University, wul speak
on "People in Fiction, People in
Pact."
AU members are urged to
attend and bring their friends.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
The Donor Luncheon of the
B'nai B'rith Women's Mitzvah
Council will be held at the
Breakers Hotel, Palm Beach,
Tuesday. Jan. 22, at noon,
featuring our "Queen For a Day"
celebration.
The lucky winner will receive
prizes and gifts.
Our chairpersons again this
year will be Frances Gewirz,
Bettye Shapiro, Doris Starr, and
Hennie Stern, all of Palm Beach.
For donations and reservations
call Shirley Bloom or Roz
Ornstein.
FREE SONS
OF ISRAEL
Free Sons of Israel, Palm
Beach Lodge No. 221, will hold a
luncheon meeting on Friday at
1130 a.m., Jan. 25, at the
Sweden House in North Palm
Beach, as its regular monthly
meeting and to welcome several
official dignitaries from the
Grand Lodge in New York.
Reservations may be made by
calling '*" rsui..*-*- ~ .
Ketzis.
Lou Dickstein or Bob
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
On Jan. 23, the Palm Beach
Section of National Council of
Jewish Women will hold its
Annual National Support
Luncheon at the Breakers Hotel.
The guest speaker will be Mrs.
Marice Halper of Minneapolis,
Minn. Mrs. Halper is a past
national vice president, soon to
be the president-elect of the
International Council of Jewish
Women.
Proceeds from the luncheon
will benefit the National Council
of Jewish Women's project in
Israel. "Manof," a youth town
for wayward boys.
Mrs. Frederic Singer, chair-
person, promises an enjoyable
and informative afternoon. Mini-
mum donation ia S25.
For more information and
reservations call Mrs. Singer.
->
Investment Equity
Real Estate
DON VOGEL
Registered Real Estate Broker Salesman
Residential-Condominium-Investment
2352 PGA Boulevard Business 626-5100
Palm Beach Gardans, Fla. 33410 Residence 622-4000

JEWISH FAMILY AMDCNIUNKN'SSMVICE
An outstanding professional ond counseling agency serving me
Jewish community of Palm Beach County. Professional and con-
fidential help is available for
Problems of the aging
Consultation and evaluation services
Vocational counseling
Marital counseling
Porent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Private. Office*:
2411 Okeechohee Blvd.
West Peim Beech, He. 33409
Telephone: 684-1991
Or
3200 North Federal Hwy. Sofa 226
Boca Raton, Fla.
Telephone: 395-3440
Moderate fees are charged in family and individual counseling to
those who can pay (Fees are based on income and family size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary ogency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
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Memorial Cnapei inc Funeral Director*
For generations a symbol:
of Jewish tradition.
Now two Chapels to serve you
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4714 Okeechobee Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Florida
683-8676
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P-MIM


.
Friday, January 11, I960
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Former UJA Staffer to Head Campaign
'
George Silverman, former staff
member of National United
Jewish Appeal, is the Lakeside
Village chairman for the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign
1980.
Silverman brings to
position many years of
in
the
ex-
perience in fund raising and allied
community endeavors.
Until his retirement several
years ago, he was associated with
the public relations department
of the United Jewish Appeal in
New York City, holding this post
for 27 years.
He was also involved in public
Lucerne Lakes Effort
Again Led by Klein
An expanded effort on behalf
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund is being
planned and organized for the
Lucerne Lakes complex under the
leadership of Joe Klein.
In again appointing Klein as
campaign chairman of the
Lucerne Lakes unit, Robert S.
Levy, general chairman of the
Jewish Federation's campaign ,
cited his success in organizing
last year's first effort in securing
support from the Lucerne Lakes
residents for the annual drive.
Since moving to Lucerne
Lakes, Klein has continued his
active interest in Jewish
organizations and community
affairs. One of the founders and a
past president of the local B'nai
B'rith Century Lodge, he now
serves as a member of the district
boards of B'nai B'rith and the
Anti-Defamation League.
Preparing for the 1980 CJA-
IEF drive at Lucerne Lakes,
Klein is concentrating on
enlisting a larger team of workers
to cover the growing community.
\ Being one of the newer
residential developments in the
Joe Klein
west Lake Worth'area, Lucerne
Lakes has witnessed a sharp rise
in Jewish population this past
year and is likely to maintain its
steady growth for several years.
Preliminary to active
solicitation, Klein will host a
meeting of the campaign workers
to review the goal and needs as
they relate to Israel, world Jewry.
and the local community.
Harry Sher Is Named
Campaign Chairman
Harry L. Sher has accepted the
chairmanship of the Golden
Lakes Division in the 1980
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign.
Sher has conducted a number
of business enterprises in other
communities and assumed
several leadership roles in each.
He was the assistant campaign
manager for the Federation in
Portland, Maine, and was a
temple president and camp
director at Portsmouth, N.H.
In assuming the direction of
the current campaign, Sher
expressed the opinion that
Golden Lakes can become a vital
factor in Palm Beach County's
greater Jewish community.
"The potential for gift giving is
greater than previously
evidenced and Sher feels that
in, more intensive solicitation will
raise the level of giving in that
condominium complex," he said.
Sher's campaign committee
consists of:
Mrs. David (Martha) Cooper,
Chazkd Falik, Mrs. Albert
(Rose) Fechter, William H.
Glater, Dr. Nathan and Mrs.
(Lilyan) Horvitz, Nettie S.
Krantz, and Mrs. Albert (Rose)
Kirsch.
Also, Mrs. Ira (Vicki) Kuchler,
Mrs. William J. (Frances)
Minsky. Mrs. David (Ida)
Nathanson, Mrs. Michael (Ethel)
Siegel and Mrs. Dorothy N.
Swedelson.
This group will be augmented
by additional people in the near
future.
The actual fund raising will
begin with an Advanced Gifts
series of five parlor meetings.
These will be hosted by Ida
Nathanson and Ethel Siegel on
Jan. 15; Rose Kirsch on Jan. 16;
Nathan and Lilyan Horvitz on
Jan. 17 and Frances Minsky on
Jan. 23.
The Advanced Gifts effort will
be followed by the regular overall
campaign._____________________
relations productions, ad-
vertising, visual education
techniques and equipment and
printing. Much of the printed
material issued to local
federations for distribution from
UJA was the product of
Silverman's inventiveness and
bold approach to the field of
publicity and public relations.
In 1977, responding to an
urgent call for help, Silverman
held the post of campaign
associate for the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County and was instrumental in
raising the level of giving in the
areas under his supervision.
Silverman and his wife Libby
have been residents of Lakeside
Village for the past six and a half
years.
In addition to his interest in
Jewish communal affairs, he has
Arnon Quits as
Bonds Solon
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Michael Arnon, president and
chief executive officer of the
Israel Bond Organization for the
past six years, is returning to
Israel to assume the post of
chairman of the Israel Securities
Authority, which is equivalent to
the American Security and
Exchange Commission. He will
continue to serve as a consultant
to the Israel Bond Organization.
Under Arnon's leadership, the
international Israel Bond drive
achieved record results by in-
creasing its annual rate of sales
every consecutive year. Total
sales of Israel Bonds and other
financial instruments are now
nearly S4.5 billion.
ARNON ASSUMED
leadership of Israel Bonds early
in 1974, when Premier Golda
Meir released him from his post
of secretary of the Cabinet
because of the importance the
Israel government attaches to
the Israel Bond program as an
instrument for the economic
development of the country.
Little Known Facts Concerning
ISRAEL BONDS:
Third most widely held security in the
United States!
* Proceeds are spent with U.S. manufac-
turers to supply industrial and agricultural
equipment to Improve Israel's economy
and create new jobs in.
? Matured Israel Bonds should be rein-
vested, since Israel places proceeds at
Chase Manhattan Bank for these pur-
poses; you don't help Israel by holding
matured bonds.
Stop in for a glass of Sabm at the
State of Israel Bonds Office
Bert Sales, Florida Manager
100 Sunrise Avenue, Palm Beach
1659-1445!
a number of diverse hobbies
including music, fishing, or-
nithology and that of being a
soccer coach for pre-teens with
the Palm Springs Recreation
Department. Currently, he is also
a member of the board of
directors of the Palm Springs
Public Library.
Silverman has enlisted an
initial solicitation team which is
beginning to' visit potential
givers on a selective basis.
The members of this team are
Maurice Hassan, Victor Muller,
Morris Nieperent, Morry A.
Ross, Libby Silverman and
Gertrude Zaretsky. Additional
members will be appointed in the
near future.
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reflection and thoughtfulness; in
solemnity, strength of purpose
and hope.
Menorah Chapels, to preserve the
traditions of our faith, wishes to
offer a gift of remembrance. A
Yahrzeit Calendar in the name of
the departed. A part of our
religious life, now and through
the ages.
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BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME DATE
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Chapels also in Deerf ield Beach and Margate
1


Page
The Jewish Floridian ofPalmBeachCounty_
Friday, January 11,1980
A Complex Argument
There is a growing tendency in American
organizational life to strike out against those
Russian Jews who opt out of going to Israel once
they leave the Soviet Union. The argument goes
something like this: No one has a right to tell Jews
where they shall live. On the other hand, Russian
Jews who prefer America to Israel should not be
given financial assistance to get here or once they
arrive.
We understand the nature of the argument.
Why should Jewish philanthropic funds be used
against Israel's most urgent need, aliya? We un-
derstand it, but we do not necessarily agree.
For one thing, such an approach puts Israel in
the position of being a punitive agency. Israel is not
a penal colony; to place the country in that light is to
demean one of the most vital democracies in the
world and the privilege of being an Israeli citizen.
For another, it places in question American
Jewish concerns in the cause of human freedoms
elsewhere. How can we rationalize our efforts in
behalf of, say, the Cambodians and their settlement
here if we deny the same Jewish philanthropic
assistance to Russian Jews?
No Easy Answers
Another facet of this terribly complex question
is the issue raised that our assistance to Russian
Jews who opt out of their Israeli visas only assists
these Jews to become non-Jews once they arrive on
our shores. The tragic fallacy here is that the Jewish
experience in America is necessarily assimilationist
in nature. Equally shortsighted is the automatic con-
clusion that the Jewish experience in Israel is neces-
sarily binding to a Jewish continuum.
The facts are just the opposite. There are
ass im ilia t ion is t tendencies in both countries, as weU
as there are lives steeped in rich Jewish experience,
depending of course upon individual convictions.
In either case, it seems not only hollow but even
punitive to "legislate" our view of just which Jews
shall live where, particularly when these American
organizational tendencies are precisely that
American.
Those who would legislate in the comfort of their
American experience ought at least to examine their
hearts in terms of their own responsibility of aliya.
A Long-Needed Move
The United Nations General Assembly finally
did something constructive. In the closing days of
the 34th General Assembly, after years of delay on
acting against international terrorism, the Assembly
adopted a convention outlawing the taking of
hostages.
The convention adopted by consensus last
month was first proposed by West Germany three
years ago. The Iranian crisis apparently had some-
thing to do with this lack of opposition to the
resolution, as diplomats realized that they, too, can
be targets of terrorism, despite diplomatic im-
munity.
The new convention compels nations who sign it
either to prosecute hostage-takers or to send them
back to the country of nationality to stand trial. A
hostage-taker is defined as anyone who seizes
another to compel a state or government
organization to take some act. This no doubt covers
the terrorist activities of the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
""Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Comb.Hn* -OUR VOICE' and "FEDERATION REPORTER
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc
Combined Jewish Appeal
. PALM BEACH- BOCA RATON OFFICE
30 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton, Fla 33432 Phone 398 3001
Printing Office 120 N.E. 6th St.. Miami. Fla 33132 Phone JT*4805
FREDK SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
RONNI TARTAKOW
News Coordlnatoi
Published Bl Weekly
Of Tht Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
FORM 3679 returns lo The Jewish Floridian
3200 North Federal Hirhway Boca Raton. Fla US PS 864303
Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton. Fla
Federation officers: President, Alan L Shulman. Vice Presidents Dr Richard
Shugarman. Dr Howard Kay, Kenneth Scherer. Jeanne Levy, Jerome Tlshman
Treasurer Staci Lesser. Secretary Bruce J Daniels: Executive Director
Norman J Schimelman. Submit material for publication to Ronnl Tartakn.,'
Director of Public Relations *'
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) OM Year S7.J6, or by membershle ,
Jowls* Federation of Palm Beech County, Mi sotrtti Floater DrlvtTwestpii*
UN: A Fantasy for the 1980's
THIS IS a fantasy for the new
decade of the 1980s. The fact.'
are these:
Long after the news was out
that the "students" holding the
hostages in the U.S. Embassy in
Teheran are not students at all.
but terrorists trained by the
Palestinian Liberation Organiza-
tion instead, Secretary of State
Vance in the final weeks of 1979
was still welcoming the proffered
assistance of Yasir Arafat to
intercede in the hostages' behalf.
This was not the first time that
Arafat had been at the source of
international mayhem only to
appear moments later as "dis-
interested negotiator" in the
cause of a humanitarian reso-
lution of the mayhem.
FOR THOSE who do no more
than read a good newspaper, it
will be recalled that Arafat had
staged the very same per-
formance in Cyprus and then in
Turkey long before his Teheran
gesture. And if this recollection
fails to ring a bell, there is
Arafat's statement in Teheran
yJTA
immediately after the Khomeini
takeover at the beginning of the
last year of the decade of the
1970's about the western im-
perialist dogs, the Christian
infidels and the racist Zionists
who would soon be getting theirs
too.
Didn't Vance and President
Carter know? Didn't they under-
stand that you can not harbor
sentiments such as these at the
same time that you offer yourself
as "disinterested negotiator" for
the lives of 53 Americans? The
likelihood is that they did. But
also the likelihood is that, in their
dealings with the Arabs, as in the
case of everybody else, the im-
pulse has been to dismiss the
known political and religious
patterns of Arab behavior as
Zionist propaganda.
Well, now they know. And if
they are not yet convinced about
Arafat and his PLO, surely they
are convinced about the anti-
westernism of the Third World in
general.
PRESIDENT Carter's efforts
at the United Nations during the
last week of 1979 finally gave him
a good dose of what Israel has
been suffering there for years.
The brutal reality is that the
United Nations is a battlefield for
the explosive exercise of growing
Moslem power against the in-
dustrialized nations.
The struggle there is not
against Israel and Zionism. That
would be too parochial, too
miniature a campaign for the
Third World to be waging. Until
now, Israel and Zionism have
been mere surrogates for the
much larger war and the
vaster stake-
Furthermore, the UN
afforded the Soviet Union
opportunity to side with
Third World at brutal expense to
the industrialized nations and at
no expense to itself.
THIS IS not to say that the
Continued on Page 14
far
has
the
the
Question: After Begin, What?
Friday, January 11, I960
Volume 6
22TEVETH6740
Number 1
HAIFA The constant
discussions here with respect to
Menachem Begins possible
successor as Prime Minister have
their basis in various and often
conflicting motives. There are
those in the opposition who are
interested in shaking the boat,
and feel that every reflection on
Begins health or abUity to
govern, will weaken the present
Government. And there are those '
who are just as intent on
maintaining Likud supremacy,
but feel that it is wise to have an
agreed-upon successor available
just in case Begin should step
down.
It is also no secret that Begin
has been faced with revolt from
within. The extremists, those
who feel he has betrayed his own
I nationalist principles and
capitulated to the Egyptians,
have already withdrawn and
formed their own party, Hatehiah
(Revival). On the other hand,
some of his colleagues consider
him still too extremist, and are
surreptitiously conniving to have
him edged out of office. In this
they are of course receiving
indirect encouragement from the
Labor opposition.
IT IS open talk that the
chairman of the Jewish Agency
Aryeh Dulzin, is the master mind
behind the internal efforts to
unseat Begin. Dulzin presents
himself as the spokesman of
world Jewry, and implies that
those overseas who supply the
funds are also against Begin.
i nis kind of pressure is seriously
resented here, and the Jewish
Agency chairman's latest effort
to engineer what has been called f
Carl
Alpcrt
a Putsch exploded in his face.
The problem of an eventual
successor still exists. The most
popular prospect spoken of at the
moment is Ezer Weizman,
present Minister of Defense.
Every straw poll puts him at the
very head of the list of potential
successors. He has personal
charm, enjoys splendid relations
with the Egyptian leadership,
hr.8 an excellent military
background, is convivial and
possessed of a strong sense of
humor, a quality lacking in most
Israeli leaders.
However, some who have
observed him closely for many
years are disturbed by a certain
boyish attitude that he has never
outgrown. He is said to be im-
pulsive and to make snap
decisions. He deals with matters
lightly. His defenders maintain
that his perpetual optimism and
nis sense of humor give a
misleading impression of his true
character.
THERE ARE also ideological
difficulties. In contrast to Begin,
and the still dominant hawkish
Herat group in the Likud,
Weizman is considered a dove.
Not a dove like Abba Eban or
others on the left, but relatively
moderate "> his attitude toward
settlement in areas of Judea and
Samaria and toward definition of
autonomy. He might be called a
"dawk".
Still, a political machine is
always concerned for its own
survival. In the event of Begins
exit from the stage, for any
reason, there is no one in the
entire Likud constellation, who
commands widespread popular
appeal except Weizman. One can
run through the list of names of
the various Cabinet members -
competent, devoted, intelligent
men most of them but none yet
of the calibre one expects in a
Prime Minister. It takes years of
exposure to the public in position
of responsibility to develop the
image and the qualities that
attract public support.
The Likud people have had
such exposure for only two ye*rS;
and are poor in "personalities.
They have not had the op-
portunity to develop names like
those in which the Labor op-
position is so rich. Names like
Shimon Peres, Yigal Alton,
Yitzhak Rabin. Abba Eban,
Chaim Herzog and others reflect
many years of public service
during which these men have
built up a reservoir of public faith
and confidence.
Hence, if it has its eyes fixed
on the elections to be held some
two years from now, Likud would
appear to have no choice other
than Weizman to lead its ticket in
the competition for electorate
support. At the same time, it can
not be denied that other factors -
economic, military and political
also have a way of influencing
voter decisions.
a

....


Friday, Jimuaty 11,19ft)
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beech County

4-?
in-
UJA 's New Chairman Is from Washington
NEW YORK Herschel W.
Blumberg of Washington, D.C.,
has been elected national
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal for 1981, Frank R.
Lautenberg, UJA President,
has announced.
Blumberg will take office in
May, succeeding Irwin S. Field
of Los Angeles, who is com-
pleting his second year as
chairman of the annual national
UJA campaign.
"The United Jewish Appeal
is particularly fortunate,"
Lautenberg said, "in this
succession of one outstanding
leader by another. Irwin Field
guided us brilliantly through a
highly successful 1979 and the
opening of the 1980 campaign.
"It is deeply gratifying to
know that, in Herschel
Blumberg, campaign leadership
is being assumed by a man
whose skill, experience and
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dedication make him an ideal
leader for our 1981 campaign.
The board of trustees is con-
fident that we are going from
strength to strength, with a
continuation of exemplary
leadership."
Blumberg, who is 56, will be
the 17th national chairman in
the UJA's 41-year history.
Blumberg's initial activity in
a national leadership capacity
was in 1963 as a founding
member of the UJA Young
Leadership Cabinet.
Following long and
distinguished service on the
UJA executive committee and
the UJA national campaign
cabinet, he was named a
national vice chairman in 1977.
He also serves on the board of
trustees of the United Israel
Appeal, UJA's major con-
stituent agency.
The national chairman
designate has an illustrious
record of service in his home
community of Washington,
D.C. He was president of the
United Jewish Appeal
Federation of Greater
Washington for three terms,
after years of prime campaign
leadership as general chairman,
general co-chairman, vice
president, and chairman of
the planning committee.
Also in Washington, he has
served the Jewish Community
Council as treasurer and is now
a trustee of the United Jewish
Endowment Fund. He is vice
president of the Washington
Jewish Foundation, a trustee of
the Jewish Day School and a
past president of Congregation
H'nai Israel.
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Page!
TtoJtwUhFW'"' fP<*"B*ach County
Friday. January 11, i960
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Tht subject tatter eust depict soae form of Jewish Life or
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No pictures will be returned; all pictures becoae tht property
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Applicant will be judged on creativity and originality. Tht
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w*^^F^^^^
_*ridi>.'Jmtiary 11, i
v
an *J*
kQ-
w
TheJlujiah Fhridian of Palm Beach County
9 *
'Page17 =
Energy Crisis
Israel Must Shape Up Or Ship Out Seen as Potential 'Disaster'
Continued from Page 1
imposed on American freedom of
diplomatic action toward Israel."
The Israeli influence in
Washington is so strong, he
complains, that "practically no
actions can be taken, or even
discussed, within the executive
branch without it being quickly
known to the Israeli govern-
ment."
Ball's immediate concern is
that the Israelis are refusing to
settle the Palestine Arab
question, that failure to resolve
this issue is preventing establish-
ment of peace in the Middle East
and that the present state of
affairs the absence of peace
is highly detrimental to
American interests.
He charges that the ultimate
aim of the Begin administration
is to whittle down the Camp
David agreements on the West
Bank and ultimately to annex the
territory. His comments on the
Israeli emphasis now on retaining
West Bank control are caustic
and he cites a little known fact
that in July 1968 when he was
U.S. Permanent Representative
to the United Nations, Prime
Minister Levi Eshkol authorized
him "to tell King Hussein that, in
return for peace, Israel would be
prepared to return the West
Bank with minor modification to
his authority. Hussein,
however," Ball narrates, "was
not at that time a free agent"
because of the Khartoum
Declaration barring any talks
with Israel.
THE CURRENT position of
the Israeli government, Ball
asserts, "offers no hope whatever
of progress toward resolution ol
the problems of the West Bank
and Gaza, the core of the
Palestine issue which, in turn, is
the key to lasting peace." He
condemns the Israelis for en-
croachment on the West Bank
with settlements and land
purchases and for conducting in
southern Lebanon 'a policy of
savage and wide-ranging air
attacks that inflict casualties
THE CURRENT position of
the Israeli government, Ball
asserts, "offers no hope whatever
of progress toward resolution of
the problems of the West Bank
and Gaza, the core of the
Palestine issue which, in turn, is
the key to lasting peace." He
condemns the Israelis for en-
croachment on the West Bank
with settlements and land
purchases and for conducting in
southern Lebanon "a policy of
savage and wide-ranging air
attacks that inflict casualties out
of all proportion to the occasion."
Arabs, he says, can hardly be
blamed "for believing that Israel
is engaged in a deliberate policy
of expansion and consolidation."
The former ranking State
Department official asserts that
although Israel's policies are
"profoundly antithetic to
American interests and prin-
ciples," Israel- nevertheless
continues to expect and to
demand military and economic
aid from the United States and
has become "a ward a kind of
welfare dependent of
America." Israel's dependence on
the United States, he claims,
"has now reached the point of
totality."
America's overriding interest
in the Middle East, Ball says, is
to promote peace, particularly
between Israel and the Arab
states, because "America needs
to establish friendly relations
with the Arab states that are
becoming increasingly significant
elements in the economic life of
the world." That is not possible,
he says, as long as Israel is at
odds with the Arabs.
FURTHERMORE, peace fe
necessary because "we need to
keep the Middle East out of the
fHMNnhl fldJifclJhslJHiyWR.
not only peace between Israel and
the Arabs but the avoidance of
divisive issues that set Arab
states against each other and
seeking to play one superpower
against the other.
American support of the
Israeli-Egyptian peace efforts, he
contends, has contributed to "the
polarization of the Arab world"
and he warns that "particularly
now that the Soviets have beach-
heads in the Horn of Africa and
South Yemen, America must do
everything possible to maintain
and strengthen the nations on the
littoral of the (Persian) Gulf
which is at the moment the
strategic heart of the world."
In this connection he asserts
that "there is no possibility
whatever of Israel playing any
useful part in the direct military
or strategic sense" because the
Arabs will not cooperate with the
Israelis. Defense Secretary
Brown's mission to the Middle
East countries to ascertain
defense needs, he says, "was told
in the most categorical terms
that any project that involved
Israeli territory or forces would
be highly disruptive." Assuming
that Ball is correctly reporting
the Arab position and there is
no reason to assume otherwise in
this case that would mean that
in the event of an emergency,
American ships would not be able
to use Haifa's facilities or U.S.
fighters and bombers would not
be able to use Israeli bases
without the United States in-
curring Arab displeasure.
THESE CONDITIONS, Ball
insists, dictate an American
policy that would require Israel
to desist from planting set-
tlements on the West Bank and
that the current Israeli-Egyptian
negotiations on the West Bank
and Gaza be completed by their
May 1980 deadline "in such a
way as to assure elections that
will lead on to genuine Palestin-
ian participation in the major
governing functions of the area."
Under the Camp David
Accords, he asserts "this would
mean an agreed transition period
of genuine but limited
autonomy." Camp David implied
and President Carter clearly
intended, Ball declares, that the
process "must inevitably lead to
self-determination by the Pales-
tinians at the end of the tran-
sition period."
Ball finds no merit in the
argument that Israeli security
requires retention of control of
the West Bank, iterating that
there is no such thing as a totally
secure border and that security
can be attained only through
development of peaceful
relations. "What Israel needs
more than anything else is
peace," he advises, "for it will
suffer a severe erosion of national
elan and self-esteem if it is forced
to continue armed to the teeth,
squandering its human and
i material resources on maintain-
ing a garrison state and de-
pendent for its economic livlihood
on American generosity."
In an exaggerated acknow-
ledgement of the power of the
Israeli lobby and the American
Jewish community, Ball says
that "ordinarily, such a con-
frontation would be out of the
question in an election year."
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By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Cabinet and the Knesset are
preparing to tackle Israel's
energy problem which Energy
Minister Yitzhak Modai has
described as a potential
"disaster." Energy conservation,
including a plan to ban the use of
private cars one day a week, was
to have been discussed by
Finance Minister Yigal Hurwitz's
"economic cabinet," but the
ministers decided to defer the
issue to a general Cabinet
meeting.
Modai said he would ask the
Cabinet for special powers to
regulate the use of energy. Under
present rules, the State is obliged
to supply electricity to any client
regardless of wastage.
MODAI APPEARED at the
first meeting of the Knesset's
new Energy Committee, headed
by MK Micha Harish of the
Labor Alignment. The new body
was formed by members of the
Finance Committee and the
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee, who have taken a
special interest in energy.
Previously, energy matters were
handled by four separate com-
mittees.
In his presentation, Jodai said
the recent meeting of the
Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries in Caracas
created new obstacles for Israel's
purchase ot oil.
He said the inconclusive
outcome of the latest OPEC
meeting resulted in the disin-
tegration of the world's oil price
structure. The instability of oil
prices on the free market makes it
even more difficult than in the
past to calculate the feasibility of
potential oil transactions, Modai
said.
HE SAID the trend toward oil
transactions between govern-
ments was a negative
development for Israel because
most OPEC countries will not
deal with it. Modai said there
may be an increase in the supply
on the spot market in Rotterdam,
but prices there are almost
impossible to predict. The spot
market price has been con-
siderably higher in the past than
OPEC prices.
Modai said that by 1964 Israel
will obtain about 40 percent of its
electricity from coal-fired power
stations. The first of that kind
will start operating in Hadera
within a year.
Modai emphasized that the
gravity of the energy situation
must be brought home to every
Israeli. Therefore, he supported
the proposed one-day-a-week ban
on private cars even though past
experience has shown that
savings of fuel are only marginal
/r
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. January 11, 1980
Temple Plans Culture Weekends
Dr. Ilene Gerber, Temple
Israel's cultural commission
chairperson, has announced that
subscription tickets are now on
sale for the Temple's expanded
cultural series.
Rabbi Michael Cook, associate
professor of intertestamental and
early Christian literature at the
Hebrew Union College Jewish
Institute of Religion, will be
scholar-in-residence the weekend
beginning Feb. 29.
His theme will be "The Jewish
People in Christian America:
Some Old Problems and Some
New Dilemmas."
HIGHLIGHT LECTURES
include "Confronting the Jewish
Breed of Christian Missionaries"
and The Question of the Role of
the Jews in Jesus' Crucifixion."
Sylvia Leighton is chairperson.
Jerome and Dena Skalka are
associate chairpersons.
The premiere musical event of
the series will be Debbie
Friedman, the "first lady of
Jewish folk song," the weekend
of March 14.
Debbie Friedman is the most
prolific female Jewish composer.
Her talents range from liturgical
music to the toe-tapping sounds
of Jewish folk music.
STILL in her twenties,
Friedman has recorded three
best-selling albums of her own
compositions and has presented
Cummings Runs
For Town Council
Alan H. Cummings recently
announced his candidacy for
Town Council of Palm Beach at a
press conference at his campaign
headquarters, which have been
established at 139 N. County
Road.
Cummings said he is prepared
to address himself to the
multiplicity of issues confronting
the town of Palm Beach.
Political articles and ad-
vertisements are not to be
considered endorsements by
'The Jewish Floridian" or the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
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several compositions
Jerusalem as premiere events.
In addition to her Friday
evening presentation March 14, a
highlight weekend event will be a
Professor Janowski
special Havdalah Folk Concert
on March 15.
Ceceil Tishman is chairperson.
Sylvia Brainen is associate chair-
person.
Debbie Friedman
The series will conclude with
an Israel Independence Day
festive weekend. April 18-19,
featuring Professor Max
Janowski. internationally ac-
claimed Jewish organist-com-
poser.
Professor Janowski's liturgical
settings are utilized in major
North American synagogues
regardless of denomination.
IN ADDITION to a major
Friday evening event, Professor
Janowski will present a highlight
Havdalah Concert with the
Temple Israel Choir.
Jewel Duberstein and Edythe
Metzker are co-chairpersons of
the weekend.
Each cultural commission
ticket is good for an entire family.
They are available on a sub-
scription basis at SI00, S36 and
$18.
Patrons tickets at $100 per
family include three Saturday
evening cocktail receptions with
an additional cultural program.
Call the Temple office at 833-
8421 or write to Temple Israel
Cultural Series. 1901 North
Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach,
Florida 33407, for an illustrated
brochure and order form.
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i
Friday, January 11,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
-
Page 9
(
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ORT Will Celebrate Its Centennial Jan. 28
The Palm Beach chapter of
Women's American ORT (The
Organization for Rehabilitation
Through Training) will celebrate
the 100th anniversary of the
founding of ORT, and will honor
Mrs. Isidore Suchman as the
"Mother of the Year" at the
seventh annual Mother to
Another Luncheon on Monday,
Jan. 28, at noon in the Mediter-
ranean Ballroom of the Breakers
Hotel.
Mrs. Samuel Harrison and
Mrs. Mac Marshall are chairmen
of the event.
They are assisted by Mrs. Nat
Heiman, reservations chairman,
Mrs. Ethel Cohen, gift chairman,
and the following members of
their committee: Mrs. Murray
Bittner, Mrs. Harry Becker, Mrs.
Carl Goldstein, Mrs. Lee Korn,
Mrs. Nathaniel H. Levi, Mrs.
Henry Pariser, Mrs. Isidore
Suchman, Mrs. Harry Schwartz-
man, and Mrs. Theodore Siff.
National vice president Mrs.
William Katz will be the guest
speaker.
Entertainment will be provided
by The Opus III Singers,
featuring Linda Mudono and
Warren Broome.
Golden Circle Pins will be
presented by Mrs. Nathaniel H.
Levi, president of the Palm
Beach Chapter.
There will be an Early Bird
(Drawing for reservations paid for
by Jan. 15. Mrs. Abe Judd and
Mrs. David Colby are chairmen
of special projects.
Funds raised will be donated to
the social assistance program
which provides kitchen, canteen,
dormitory facilities, clothing,
textbooks and other necessities
to ORT students in the U.S. and
the 26 other countries throughout
the world where ORT operates
facilities.
Jewish Leaders to Honor Senary
American Jewish leaders from
across the nation will assemble to
honor Dore Schary, playwright
and producer, at the National
Inaugural Dinner of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. Schary will receive ADL's
Haym Salomon Award at the
dinner, to be held Thursday, Feb.
7, at 6 p.m at the Breakers Hotel
in Palm Beach.
In announcing the award, ADL
national chairman Maxwell E.
Greenberg cited Schary for both
bis "inspired contributions to
artistic expression in our
society," and "for enriching
Jewish life"
Matthew B. Rosenhaus,
president and chairman of the
board of the J. B. Williams
Company, Inc., is chairman of
the tribute.
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of
Massachusetts will be the
principal speaker.
The black tie affair will
highlight ADL's National
Executive Committee meeting in
Palm Beach. Feb. 7-10. Each
year, members of ADL's
polkymaking body convene at
the meeting to explore problems
and resolve issues vital to ADL's
national program of education
and social action.
Active in a variety of political
and community affairs, Schary
currently serves as an honorary
chairman of ADL, one of the
oldest and largest human rights
agendas in the United States.
Now in its 67th year, the League
conducts an extensive in-
formational program on the
Middle East and Israel and
works in this country and abroad
to combat anti-Semitism and
other forms of bigotry and
promote interreligious and in-
tergroup understanding and
cooperation.
Author of an autobiography,
"Heyday," Schary has also
written two other books, "Case
History of a Movie" and "For
Special Occasions," which he is
presently dramatizing for the
theater.
He is the author of 40
screenplays, including the
Academy-Award winning "Boy's
Town," "Edison the Man,"
"Young Tom Edison," "Battleof
Gettysburg," "Lonely hearts,"
and "Sunrise at Campobello." He
has been involved as producer or
executive producer with more
than 350 films, including
"Farmer's Daughter," "The
Swan," "Lili," "Battleground,"
"Red Badge of Courage,''
"Ivanhoe," "Bad Day at Black
Matthew Rosenhaus
Rock" and "Blackboard Jungle."
He has also written, produced
and directed a number of
Broadway plays, including
"Sunrise at Campobello" and
"The Devil's Advocate." He is
the recipient of an Oscar and two
Tony Awards, and more than 170
professional, charitable, and
community awards.
Matthew B. Rosenhaus is vice
chairman of the board of Nabisco,
Inc. and serves on their executive
committee. He is also chairman
of the executive committee of
Columbia Pictures Industries,
Inc., and a member of the board
of directors. Chairman of the
board of the Eleanor Roosevelt
Cancer Foundation, he is a
member of the board of trustees
for the Fund for Peace, the
Huxley Institute for Biosocial
Research, and the Daughters of
Jacob Geriatric Center in the
Bronx, NY.
A graduate of Rutgers
University, Rosenhaus currently
serves on the board of overseers
of the Rutgers University
Foundation.
The J. B. Williams Company,
Inc., which Rosenhaus heads,
manufactures pharmaceuticals
and toiletries which are
distributed worldwide.
The ADL operates through its
national headquarters in New
York, 27 regional offices around
the country, an office in
Jerusalem and one in Paris.
The ADL Palm Beach regional
office is located at 120 South
Olive Ave., West Palm Beach.
OPEN 7 DAYS
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Dore Schary
Preparing for the Palm Beach ORT chapter's Jan, 28 "Mother
to Another" luncheon are (left to right) Mrs. Samuel Harrison,
luncheon chairman; Mrs. Isidore Suchman, ORTs Mother of
the Year, and Mrs. Mac Marshall, luncheon co-chairman.
Having a
Cousins' Club?
Don't forget to invite
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Maxwell House"
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Maxwell House" Coffee has thai rich.
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Page 10
1 tie Jewisn t lonctan of faim Beach Lounty
Brandeis Women Plan Biddie Kramer Heads ^nnerj^mnmee
'University on Wheels'
The Brandeis University
National Women's Palm Beach
East chapter will hold a "Univer-
sity on Wheels" program at 9
a.m., Monday, Jan. 21, at the
Holiday Inn, South Ocean Blvd.,
Palm Beach.
Those attending should bring a
brown bag lunch. Cake and coffee
will be served.
Tickets are $7, and can be
obtained by calling Helen
Biernbaum.
The subjects to be covered
include "Fact, Fiction, Foot-
lights and Film." It will be an
informative program lasting
most of the day.
Professors Maureen Henegan-
Tripp, Martin Halpem and
Richard Onorato, all from Bran-
deis University, will discuss a
view behind the scenes of stage
and film, the kinds of stories that
interest us and why, and how his-
torical data becomes transmitted
into theatrical art.
WWwW-W-w-w
Brandeis professors Maureen
Henegan-Tripp, Martin Halpem
and Richard Onorato.
| Community Calendar 1
i &
SJm.11 8
S ::
ft Hadassah Ahyah Board 9:30 a.m. Jewish Theological ,'v
jtj: Seminary Planning Luncheon, P.B. Country Club ftj
| Jon. 12
$ JEWISH FEDERATION YOUNG LEADERSHIP :j:j
ljM.11 |
j: B'nai B'rith AAitzvah 9:30 a.m. Congregation An*hei Sholom >j:
j:j Men's Club 9:30 a.m. Israel Bonds Golden Lakes Village :|:j
ft Brunch 10 a.m. B
3
i
I
.V
''
%

Jan. 14
| Women's American ORT Poinciana board 10:30 a.m. B'nai
: B'rith Women Boynton I p.m. Women's American ORT -
; Palm Beach board 10 a.m. Women's American ORT Royal
Palm Beach 12:30 p.m. United Order of True Sftters board 11
a.m. mtg. noon Temple Emanu-EI board 8 p.m.
Jan.15
Temple Israel board 8 p.m. Hadassah Yovel Youth Aliyah
Luncheon Temple Beth El Sisterhood Breakers Hotel Donor -
1 p.m. Women's American ORT Golden Lakes 1 p.m.
Hadassah Henrietta Szold 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3041 8
p.m. Temple Beth David board 8 p.m. Congregation
Anshei Sholom Installation Pioneer Women Theodore Herzl
- book review
Jan.16
Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood board 10 a.m. JEWISH
FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION PACESETTERS $500 LUNCHEON
Women's American ORT Palm Beach County Region 9:30
a.m.
Jan.17
Hadassah Yovel 1 p.m. Hadassah Tikvah luncheon noon
National Council of Jewish Women Okeechobee Unit 12:30
p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Ohav board 8 p.m. Hadassah -
Golda Meir- 12:30p.m.
Jan. 18
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood Sabbath 8:30p.m.
Jan.19
Hadassah BatGurion 8 p.m.
Jan. 20
Temple Beth Sholom Congregational Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 21
Hadassah Tikvah 1 p.m. Temple Israel Sisterhood noon
Jewish Family & Children's Service board 7:30 p.m.
Hadassah Shalom 7 p.m. Temple Emanu-EI Petite Buffet
Jan. 22
B'nai B'rith Women Mitzvah donor luncheon noon
Congregation Anshei Sholom 1 p.m.
Ion. 23
jewish federation women's division board meeting 7:30
p.m. National Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach 11:30
m. Pioneer Women Golda Meir board 1 p.m.
Ian. 24
jdossah Chai 12:30 p.m. National UJA Women's Division
5,000 event American Jewish Committee 8 p.m.
dassah Aliyah 1 p.m. Hadassah Bat Gurion 9:45 a.m.
ngregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood card party Hadassah -
;e\ Study Group
I
Mrs. Arnold (Biddie) Kramer
has been chosen as chairman of
the Jan. 13 Scopus Award Dinner
held at the Breakers Hotel in
Palm Beach, Stanley Bogen,
president of the American
Friends of the Hebrew Univer-
sity, announced.
According to Bogen, "Mrs.
Kramer has made the develop-
ment of the Hebrew University
one of the main causes in her life,
visualizing it as the means by
which Israel will be able to take
her place in the forefront of en-
lightened nations."
Mrs. Kramer is a member of
the board of governors of the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
and is vice president of its
American Friends. Mrs. Kramer
was presented with the Scopus
Award in recognition of her out-
standing service to the
university.
Her support of the Hebrew
University has been com-
memorated by the naming of an
auditorium in her honor and of a
rotunda in the library of the
university's Martin Buber
School.
Mrs. Kramer, a pioneer for
Israel, was in on the meeting
when the notion was first con-
ceived that the State of Israel
could successfully float a bond
issue in the United States.
Another time, she was the only
woman among eight leaders to be
presented with the Israeli Peace
r
Biddie Kramer
Citation at the Israel Indepen-
dence Ball, commemorating
Israel's 31st anniversary. The
citation was for "exceptional
service to the State of Israel
throughout its existence."
Dinner co-chairman is Peter
committee are: Madame Bee
Alexander, Mr. and Mrs. Theo-
dore Baumritter, Mr. and Mrs.
Arthur Belfer, Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Bishop, Mrs. Peter
Cummings, Mr. and Mrs.
Leonard Davis, Mr. and Mrs.
David Fogelson, Mr. and Mrs.
David Gold, Mr. and Mrs.
Nathaniel L. Goldstein, Mr. and
Mrs. Merwin K. Grosberg, Ben-
jamin Hornstein, Arnold Kramer,
Mr. and Mrs. Saul Kramer, Dr.
and Mrs. Sanford F. Kuvin, Mr.
and Mrs. Maurice Linder, Mr.
and Mrs. Bert Mack, Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Meyerhoff, Mr. and
Mrs. Jesse Newman, Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Perlman, Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Rapaport, Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Resnick, Dr. and Mrs.
Marvin Rosenberg, Mr. and Mrs.
David Rosenthal, Mr. and Mrs.
David Schwartz, Mr. and Mrs.
Carl Shapiro, Mr. and Mrs.
Michael Singer, Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney Solomon, Mr. and Mrs.
Marty Walker, Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Wohl.
Now Mora Tom Ivor
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The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
American Savings Distributes Pins
ver 100.000 Amricn Pi- r* **+*m\,o M. IIin
'age
Over 100,000 American Flag
^ pins will be distributed to
(Vie public by American Savings
and Loan Association of Florida
during its American Pride Cam-
paign now beginning at 32 Amer-
ican Savings branch offices
throughout five Florida counties.
American Savings Gives You
Something Money Can't Buy
Pride" is the theme of the new
campaign introduced by the
Association. The advertisements,
on radio and in newspapers, will
mphasize the entire concept of
Americanism stressing strength
ind freedom for all Americans.
!h announcing the new
Wericanism promotion, Barry
D. Swgel, vice president of
American Savings, reiterated
American Savings' longstanding
commitment to the American
ideal and invited the public at
large to come to any American
Savings office for a free flag pin.
American Savings has 32
savings offices located through-
?olrf I?rida- The As9aation has
12 Dade County offices located in
Miami, Miami Beach, Bay
Harbor Islands, Coral Gables
Kendall, North Miami and North
Miami Beach. Thirteen Broward
County officies are located in
peerfield Beach, Fort Lauder-
dale, Hallandale, Hollywood,
Lauderhill, Margate, Pembroke
f

Residents of Poinciana Place recently met at a special gifts
affair on behalf of the 1980 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign of the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach, to hear an update of conditions in the Middle East as
viewed by Dr. Arieh Plotkin. Dr. Plothin is a scholar and
lecturer on Middle East affairs. He took a very optimistic and
positive approach on the prospect of peace during the coming
year. He felt that Egypt and Israel were much closer to
agreement than was reported in the general l
)an B. Giber, chairman of the Poinciana Place 1980 Combined
ewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign for the
ewish Federation of Palm Beach County, presents an award to
'{ Sylvia Sigelman in recognition of her efforts for the 1979
>aign.________________________
0
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Offering a Flna Variety of
International, Gourmet and Natural Fooda
Senior Citizen Discount
EAST WEST FOODS
Mon.-Sat. 9-5:30 PM
(305)582-1515
617 Lake Avenue
Lake worth, Fla. 33460
Sewing Machines
Repairs SALES Parts
Cabinets Crafts Notions
Visit our two stores conveniently located
in Central and Northern Palm Beach county
MYERS ABLE
SEWING MACHINES JEXSEEL
AND NOTIONS 2415 BROADWAY
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Lakes, Plantation, Pompano
Beach, Sunrise and Tamarac. In
Palm Beach County, the offices
are located in Boca Raton, Delray
Peach and West Palm Beach.
The Association has one office in
Port Charlotte in Charlotte
County and one in Venice in
Sara sot a County.
Cash Is Urgently Needed
Send Your Chock Today
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Let Delta help
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Stay an extra dayor weekif you can. Delta will be
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Delta's schedules to the North
To New York Ten flight-times daily with arrivals at all
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lb Philadelphia Choose from seven departures a day,
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To Hartford/Springfield Fly straight thru with one
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To Boston The only afternoon nonstop is Delta's at
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lb Chicago The only Wide-Ride Lockheed L-1011 TriStar
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lb Detroit The only Wide-Ride TriStar going, a one-stop
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lb Columbus,0. Seven flight-times every day, including
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lb Dayton Our one-stop thru-jet at 10:10pm is a low-fare
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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, January 11. H
ORT Centennial Hailed at Two Conclaves
The 100th anniversary of the
founding of ORT the
Organization for Rehabilitation
through Training in Russia in
1880 was saluted last month
through special presentations at
the annual conferences of both
the Council of Jewish
Federations in Montreal and the
United Jewish Appeal in New
York City.
In making the CJF presen-
tation in Montreal, Harry B.
Smith, CJF vice president, noted
that "ORT was a response to the
poverty and oppression of the
Jewish communities of Eastern
Europe a century ago, and has
been with the Jewish people
through wars, revolutions, the
Holocaust and renewal in Israel
and the Diaspora.
The CJF award, which was>
accepted on behalf of ORT by
Sidney E. Leiwant, of Verona,
N.J. (formerly South Orange),
president of the American ORT
Federation, was presented to
ORT "for its historic role as a
bridge between past, present and
future; between the Diaspora and
. Israel and among Jewish com-
munities throughout the world;
and in recognition of its world-
wide educational, vocational
training and rehabilitation
programs for the Jewish people
and its contribution to the
development of Israel."
"The ORT idea of equipping '
people with the skills to make
them independent remains as
relevant to the needs of the
contemporary world as it was
during the last century."
American ORT Federation
president Sidney Leiwant ac-
cepted the CJF citation "as
recognition and a tribute by the
representatives of the entire
American Jewish community to
one of its chosen instruments."
"The seeds planted in Russia
100 years ago," Blumberg added,
"have blossomed beyond our
wildest expectations. ORT now
reaches more than 100,000
students in 24 countries on five
continents.
"TODA r" ORT remains a
dynamic force in the Jewish
world for the modernizing of
Jewish communities in India, the
absorption of hundreds of
thousands of North African Jews
by the French community, the
essential servicing of Soviet
Jewish refugees, an educational
renewal throughout Latin
American Jewry, and for many
other programs in many areas of
the world, including the United
States.
"Most important of all, over
50,000 students attend ORT
schools in Israel, attaining a level
of technical and intellectual
capabilities that will enrich the
nation for generations to come."
Citing the "extraordinary
commitment" of Leiwant, Mrs.
Minkoff and other ORT leaders,
Blumberg made the presentation
of the special UJA scroll with the
words: "May the coming years of
peace and fulfillment see us
working together even more
closely and effectively to achieve
and surpass our common goals."
Accepting on behalf of ORT,
Mrs. Minkoff, Women's
American ORT president, ex-
pressed the organization's ap-
preciation to UJA, "that great
humanitarian creatino of the
American Jewish community,"
for "recognizing in ORT still
another creation of our people
at another time and place but
today very much alive and well
and, in fact, more relevant than
ever to the welfare of our people
everywhere.
"I ACCEPT this award," she
declared, "for the five
generations of ORT who have
held high that truly great idea of j
the right to livelihood for our I
men, women, youngsters
refugees, DPs, ghetto and
concentration camp inmates
for that endless parade who came |
through the doors of ORT for
solace.
"I accept for the 100,000young |
people. I accept for the more tf
two million human beings
people who are this year studying I
in ORT schools whether in Tel
Aviv of Haifa or Paris or I
Casablanca or Buenos Aires orl
here in New York not to forget I
the Soviet migrants in Rome and I
other places and for the ORTl
men and women in far-flung I
communities of the Jewish!
world."
UJA's presentation, which was
accepted by Mrs. Beverly
Minkoff, of Rockville Centre,
N.Y., president of Women's
American ORT, honored ORT
and its officers and staff "for a
century of unsurpassed service,"
and for its monumental con-
tribution to the historic task of
rebuilding and renewing our
people by helping more than
2,000.000 men, women and
children achieve lives of dignity
and fulfillment."
IN ADDITION, a photo-
history of ORT, titled "A Bridge
One Hundred Years Long," was
prominently featured at both
conferences. The montage was a
presentation of the National
Committee for the ORT Cen-
tennial, a joint project of
Women's American ORT and the
American ORT Federation and
their 160.000 members in the
United States.
NOTING that the award had
described ORT as "a bridge
between past, present and
future," Leiwant declared that
today ORT continues to be "a
bridge to the future in Israel,
the United States and other free
countries for young men and
women who will spend most of
their working lives in the
Twenty-First Centuty.
"The fact that today ORT's
help is reaching more people than
in any earlier year in its history is
the best indication that ORT's
historic mission its role as the
instrument of the entire Jewish
community has not yet been
completed."
The presentation to ORT on
behalf of the United Jewish
Appeal was made by Herschel W.
Blumberg, national chairman
designate of UJA, who noted
that "this extraordinary organi-
zation has always occupied a
special place in the Jewish world
and in the Jewish heart.
NCJW Brings Cheer to Nursing Homes
On Dec. 18, the National
Council of Jewish Women, Palm
Beach Section, spent the day
bringing "holiday cheer" to
residents of area nursing homes.
Gertrude Pesacov, president,
with the assistance of Rose
Pesacov and Ann Madier,
assembled 50 fruit baskets to
give to the patients. These
baskets were brought to the Palm
Beach County Home on 45th
Street, the Lakeside Nursing
Home and the Convalescent
Center of the Palm Beaches.
Participating in the program
were Mildred Drees, Helen Fine,
Betty Golden, Ruth Knox, Belle
Lacher, Naomi Rothstein and her
nine-year-old son Elliot, Doris
Singer and Rabbi Alan R.
Sherman, chaplain of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
"At the Palm Beach County
Home, we were met by Andrea
Wold, director," said Gertrude
Pesacov. "We visited both
Jewish and non-Jewish patients.
Elliot played 'Rock of Ages' and
'America, the Beautiful' on his
violin. Some of the patients sang
along with us as we walked
through the halls. It was a
heartwarming experience for all
of us."
While visiting the Lakeside
Nursing Home Betty Golden
spent time with one of the
patients, speaking Yiddish.
Rabbi Sherman said it was the
first time this woman had talked
about her past.
The National Council of Jewish
Women is volunteer
organization which in the spirit of
Judaism is dedicated to fur-
thering human welfare in the
Jewish and general community |
locally, nationally and in-
ternationally. Through in-1
tegrating programs of education,
service and social action, it
provides essential services and
stimulates and educates the
individual and the community
toward responsibility in ad-
vancing human welfare and the
democratic way of life. The top
priorities of the National Council
of Jewish Women are women's
issues, children and youth, Israel, [
Jewish life and the aged.
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January 11, i960
mmsmmsm
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
__ -.**-
Page 13
tassers Volunteer as Chaplain's Aides
I MURRAY J. KERN
tin's Advisory Committee
|ne baritone voice of Louis
is heard regularly at
nursing homes
nit this area. He chants
'i<1;iv evening Sabbath
Mrs. Jeanne Glasser and
iplains aides participate
Jrvice, distribute wine and
and assist the residents in
the Sabbath candles.
Jeanne and Lou
bd a Chanukah service at
Beach County Home.
jlassers started doing
candlelighting services
|y Hall Nursing Home
^ree years ago. Requests
Jar services came from
ktitutions and the service
pitually integrated into
plain's Aide Program of
pish Federation, which
impasses visitations to
at hospitals, nursing
gd retirement centers.
ctivities of the Glasser
I Jewish affairs were very
I evidence at their former
Sty in Tyler, Tex., where
Jasser was president of
ation Ahavath Achim,
me presided at Temple
^od. Under their
Ahavath Achim
the highly successful
jes System and is one of
United Synagogue af-
i structured.
Jlasser's involvement in
affairs dates back to
years in Utica,
Glasser as a youth in
; City was a boy
[from 1922 to 1931, in the
, such cantors as Joseph
ktt, Joseph Shlitsky and
llirschmaa. Glasser
St a year on the Yiddish
Ji Max Gabel, Jennie
i, and Max and-Florence
Idish Culture
rcle Meeting
22 violinist Irving
play for the Yiddish
Circle accompanied by
I Birnbaum. Mr. and Mrs.
will then play piano
Weinstein will read a
[Cossick will sing English
[dish songs, accompanied
thy Goldberg.
The Glassers came to Palm
Beach in 1977 from Texas, and
now reside in the Lucerne area.
They are members of Temple
Beth hi and serve on the
( iiaplain's Advisory Committee.
^fc>#5UaW. j.
Louis and Jeanne Glasser
Cornerstone
The Argus
Hebrew University Award
To Elizabeth Taylor Warner
Elizabeth Taylor Warner will
receive the Scopus Award on
Sunday, Jan. 13, at the American
Friends of the Hebrew Univer-
sity's National Dinner at the
Breakers Hotel in Palm Beach, it
was announced today by Mrs.
Arnold Kramer, chairman of the
dinner.
"In conferring the Scopus
Award (to Mrs. Warner), we
express the joy which her artistry
has given to millions throughout
the world, as well as our ap-
preciation of her warmhearted
support of the people of Israel,"
said Mrs. Kramer.
"In light of the many ways in
which she has manifested her
deep personal interest in Israel
and in the Hebrew University,
Elizabeth Taylor Warner has well
earned the honor we will confer
on her," adds Mrs. Kramer.
Among past recipients of the
Scopus Award are former
Supreme Court Justice Arthur
Goldberg, Leonard Bernstein,
Isaac Stern, Gregory Peck and
former President Gerald Ford,
said Otto Stieber, Florida state
chairman of the American
Friends.
I Elizabeth Taylor Warner is
Jewish by conversion some 20
years ago. Says the actress: "In
embracing Judaism, I have also
established a close and lasting
identification with Israel."
Store Offers
$100 Donations
"Nobody's Perfect," a men's
and children's clothing store
located at 1248 Military Trail, is
offering a donation to religious,,
civic and social organizations.
Once a customer's sales re-
ceipts total $1,000, the store will
donate $100 to an organization or
group of the customer's choosing.
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Choose from an
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Available at your favor-
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Oiler expire* February 15.1980


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
LeoMindlin
UN: A Fantasy for the 1980's
Continued from Page 4-
Third World nations are unaware
of the terrible price you pay for
Soviet friendship. Afghanistan
tells this story explicitly. But
what the UN arena has afforded
the Third World nations is ideo-
logical support from Moscow at
great political advantage to
Moscow and at no cost to itself.
The Third World is not!
Afghanistan only. There is, for
example, Vietnam that in the end
calls its own shots.
What we must come to reckon
with is that both Russia and the
Third World are the only power
blocs that enjoy any advantage
as a consequence of the existence
of the United Nations
organization. This includes the
OPEC nations, the robber baron
conglomerates, many of which
would have no real political
integrity except for the UN.
So far as Russia is concerned,
what we must come to reckon
with is that Russia and the
Soviet Union are not
synonymous. Russia is merely
the pivotal Communist state
power in a confederation of
captive multi-ethnic states, many
of which would prefer to be in-
dependent of Russia and its
Soviet Union hegemony many
of which frankly fear cultural
genocide at the hands of the
Soviets.
FURTHERMORE, while
Russia is essentially a western
power clamoring for techno-
logical equivalency with the west,
Knesset Beats Move
To Legalize 'Bank'
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Knesset defeated by
a massive majority a proposal by the ultra-nationalist
Tehiya Party that Israel apply its law to Judaea, Samaria
and Gaza. Tehiya submitted a vote of no-confidence on
the issue and some Labor Party members joined with
the government coalition in defeating it.
Prime Minister Menachem Begin, replying for the
government, said Israel was committed under the Camp
David agreements not to change the status of the areas
during the transitional period. Begin said Israel had never
regarded Judaea and Samaria as "occupied" and it
retained its right to demand sovereignty over them in
eventual negotiations for the "permanent status" of the
areas.
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other of the Soviet states run the
gamut from outright Oriental to
Middle Eastern and Moslem
whose interests are about as far
removed from this Russian
ambition as are their ethnic roots.
What the Soviet Union has
been able to do in the United
Nations arena better than it
would be able to do outside of it is
to maintain a balance between
these two seemingly contra-
dictory objectives.
It enjoys its base of power over
these subjugated states, par-
ticularly since all too many of
them at the UN have the
cosmetic appearance of indepen-
dent nationhood with indepen-
dent voting rights in essence,
the UN thus serving as official
sanctification of enforced Soviet
dominion over others. At the
same time, the Soviet Union
scrambles for technological
ascendancy. Reckoned in these
terms, the UN gives it the op-
portunity to exploit the best of
two worlds.
SO MUCH for the facts. Here
is the fantasy for the new decade
ofthel980's:
Now that we in America, as a
consequence of Iran, are perhaps
for the first time inaugurated into
the meaning of the UN as a
growing tactical weapon against
western civilization, it will strike
us to remove ourselves from it
indeed, to consider having the
UN remove itself from our midst.
Opponents of this viewpoint
will argue that the Soviet Union
vould immediately otfer itself as
the new site for a successor
"world peace organization," thus
leaving us on the periphery of
international exchange. Hut that
is highly unlikely, given that the
UN in New York today is one of
the most complex intramural
espionage agencies on the face w
i he earth, which the Soviets
would rarely not want in the
shadow of the Kremlin.
Similarly, it is inconceivable
that any of the western indus-
trialized nations, including
Japan, will move in to fill the
breach. Once stripped of its
Camelot costume and seen for
what it is in the U.S., no one else,
with the possible exception of
ever-meddlesome France, will
care to supply the UN with a new
wardrobe.
AS FOR the Third World, it
will be unable to proffer the
prestige necessary for such a
stage and disinclined to supply
the funds. Furthermore, were
these not sufficient reasons for
the Third World to keep hands
off, there is always the
question of the incestuous real-
potitik such a new United
Nations location would surely
pose. There, the Third World
would be performing only for
itself and therefore without the
international theatrical effect
that is its primary objective.
Given a successor body to the
present United Nations under
any circumstances, the shakeup
will force a reorganization of
member nations according to
more realistic power patterns
than presently exist, the power
patterns laid down after World
War II, and this will be bound to
work against the Soviet Union,
which can be relied upon to
struggle to retain its old position
of primacy against Third World
Friday/January 11.1980
clamorings for a. greater share of
it.
A
\lWe~
This will force Russia, not
Soviet Union but Russia, to make
a choice between its role as a
western nation, and all that that
implies to the Third World, and
as the pseudo-paternalistic linch-
pin in the larger Moslem-Oriental
complex of the Soviet system.
WHAT ALL of this will mean
is a scramble for Third World re-
alignment. At "worst," it will
mean no successor organization,
leaving the Third World isolated
from its warfare arena in New
York, and the Soviet Union
without a stage on which to
produce its endless self-aggran-
dicing scenarios.
What does this fantasy for the
1980 s also envision? It foresees a
basic struggle against such a
possibility by the continuing
western civil libertarian bleat in
the suicidal cause of humanity
suicidal because the Soviets and
the Third World have only
contempt for what the civil liber-
tarians talk about anyway. .
The fantasy has staged a
rebuttal to the bleat in which it'
contrasts the Soviet Union's
constant threat to veto United
Nations sanctions against Iran as
a means of gaining the freedom of
the American hostages with the
Soviet Union's invasion of
Afghanistan.
THE FANTASY takes delight
in the notion that not even a civil
libertarian will be able to argue
himself out of that political
contradiction.
But then, this is all only
fantasy.
Runner
Jim Thyne
Returns Home
After 12 years in Atlanta, Ga.,
runner Jim Thyne has returned
to his home, the Palm Beaches,
along with his wife.
Jim came back home to run
the family owned and operated
business of Athlete's Haven Inc.
in Lake Worth. For Jim, running
a sports shop with an emphasis
on running is more pleasure than
work.
Jim has been running for 14
years. He started at age 12 and
has been running ever since.
Some of the many races he has
run are the Boston Marathon,
AAU Marathon, AAU Cross
Country Championships and the
Michigan 50 mile Ultra Marathon
where he placed third.
Coming back from foot
surgery, Jim trains nine miles a
day with the intention of moving
his training up to 15 miles a day
as soon as he is completely
healed. If all goes well Jim's goal
is to run the London to Brighton
52 mile race in England next fall.
In the meantime, Jim helps
other runners with problems
ranging from shoes to their own
injuries. He helps older runners
by getting them on a sensible
running program to lose weight
and generally feel good.
Jim says, "If you're not going
to run, it s better to at least walk
than get no exercise at all." Jim's
father will agree with this
because Jim got him to start
running at age 55.
THE
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BO I B
January 11,1980
Th* Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
earn s Schedule
ien He Meets Sadat Next Week
Page 15
'ag
K
DAVID LANDAU
tUSALEM (JTA)
least two lengthy
^gs between Prime
sr Menachem Begin
esident Anwar Sadat
)t have been sched-
[during the Israeli
|s four-day visit to
sgypt.
Officials said the two
men would meet at Sadat's
rest home on the Nile in
Aswan on the first evening
of Begin's stay, and at a
hotel in Aswan on the fol-
lowing day.
Begin'a subsequent schedule is
flexible enough to allow for an
additional aession should this be
required, the officials noted.
Tal Brodie Named Top Athlete
TEL AVIV (JTA) Mewiv has named Tal
Brodie, the American-born basketball player, as the
Israeli athlete of the 1970s. Brodie, from Trenton, N.J.,
immigrated to Israel after participating on the U.S.
basketball team in the 1965 Maccabiah Games. He was an
all-American at the University of Illinois. Maariv said the
athlete of the world for the decade was heavyweight
ASIDE FROM his political
talks expected to focua on the
autonomy negotiations but to
embrace, too, a regional strategic boxing champion Munammed Ah.
review in light of the Iranian n .. # ,
Dr. Alsofrom to Address
Ground
By STACI LESSER
I Around the Town" would like to bear bom you. Send
i typewritten and doable spaced to SUci Leaser, c/o The
th Floridian, 501 Sooth Flagler Drive, Suite 306, West
i Beach, FL 33401.
I Hail O Hail to Madison High! After 40 or more years,
er students of James Madison High School of Brooklyn,
, will be holding their reunion in the Palm Beach area on
24. It is a reunion for all students who attended Madison
1 its inception through the year 1939.
Committee chairman A. Harold Fox wishes that those
sted would contact him at his home at the Fountains.
h how they danced on the night Harry and Rose
low of Century Village were honored at two parties
(rating 50 beautiful years of marriage.
Dec. 8, the actual anniversary date, friends from
Jsor Q held a lawn party for Harry and Rose.
Dec. 22, daughter Gerrie and husband Leonard Karaaik
vada, Colo., and son Marvin and wife Brenda of Fairfax,
Ihosted an anniversary party at the Indian Trail Country
[for the Klemows. Grandchildren Beth and Jason Klemow
lark, Joel, and Susan Karaaik joined their parents in
; this marvelous occasion.
elatives came from San Francisco, Dallas and as far away
fgentina. Harry and Rose received personal congratulatory
from President Jimmy Carter, Prime Minister Menachem
and Sen. Richard Stone. We would also like to add our
Mazol Tov!
Justin Henry, move over. Make room for Kim and Allison
er, stars of the recent Lake Worth Playhouse production of
Emperors New Clothes." The play was done in Japanese
and the girls are now weary from all that bowing and ah-
Kim, a seasoned performer in three community pro-
ms, and Allison, in her first play, won kudos for their
siasm and acting ability -
The theater comes naturally to these young stars because
lather, Judge Lewis Kapner, began his acting career with
jlorida Players at the U. of Fla. He has also appeared in
is community productions. Lewis will appear in the
lean premiere of "The Savage Parade" by Anthony
author of Sleuth. "Savage Parade" is a powerful drama
_ of the search and capture of a major Nazi war criminal
also stars Hal Monchick, Nolan Shapiro and Peter Zaff.
ag night is Jan. 25 at Lake Worth Playhouse. Break a leg!
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crisis the Prime Minister will
visit the Aswan high dam, the
temples at Abu Simbel (near the
Sudanese border) and the tombs
and temples of Luxor (Valley of
the Kings).
Begin and his wife Aliza and
aides will be spending three full
Idays and nights in Aswan,
arriving Monday, Jan. 7, and
departing Thursday, Jan. 10.
The Prime Minister's program
also includes attending an
evening of folk dancing by local
Nubian artists, and a helicopter
ride with Sadat over newly
developed agricultural areas
bordering upon Lake Nasser
(below the high dam).
Some 50 Israeli journalists and
100 foreign journalists stationed
here are expected to accompany
the Prime Minister on this trip.
Local B'nai B'rith Lod$e
Grand Opening
Pack o pastes
Tri-Bikes
Bikes
Moto-Cross
Sales
Repairs
6474 Lake Worth Road
& Jog Road
Lake Worth 968-7401
B'nai B'rith Lodge 3041. Lt.
Col. Netanyahu of Palm Beach,
will hold its next meeting on Jan.
15, at the Holiday Inn, 2830
South Ocean Blvd., Palm Beach
at 8 p.m.
Dr. Robert Alsofrom,
psychologist, will present a
program on "World Terrorism
and the American Jew."
All members' wives and friends
are invited to attend without
charge.
Dr. Alsofrom is an expert on
human relations problems. He is
the founder of The Alcohol and
Drug Abuse Council and also
"The Crisis Line" of Palm Beach
and Martin Counties. He is the
professional adviser to Parents
Without Partners and the founder
of the Parents in Need
organizations.
He conducts a television
program, "What's on Your
Mind" daily on station WPEC -
Channel 12, and a radio program,
"Calling Dr. Alsofrom" on
Saturday mornings on Station
A'
h
I
Dr. Robert Alsofrom
WPBR in Palm Beach.
There will be a question and
answer period. Refreshments will
be served. For further in-
formation, phone Lester Levy.
TndrrThr Hupei
Of Rabbinical Council
Of The Palm Beaches
Oaenf-7
Mon-Thwrt
MFri.
I 4 Sun.
Closed Sat.
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rhtJtwiih Fbridion of Pmim Btmek County
Friday, January 11,
THE GREAT
CAPER
(And how to get in on the fun.)
It's simple.
To get the whole picture, look below.
But to get any one of these 28 fabulous brand name gifts, just
look at the chart Decide what you'd like and then see what kind
of deposit you have to make to get it.
Depending on the amount you put in you can pick up your
premium absolutely free, or at a remarkably low price
For example? $1,000 in a minimum One Year Savings Certrfr-
lf[
cate gets you a free Vespucci Umbrella, 8-piece snack set by Ingrid
or a 24-piece classic flatware service. $10,000 in a Six Month
Savings Certificate entitles you to a free Hamilton Beach Blender,
16-piece ironstone service for 4 or Seiko AM/FM radio, among
other things.
But see for yourself.
The Great Savings Caper is going on right now. At Financial
Federal Savings and Loan.

:Wfc
M&
*
tig*,1,m ~*


23
-*
^i- 1
/,l\
24
~
25
ticaleaccounis
money market ceiWicales ana
cerMicale renewals No mistrial
tlnM (]
One Year Minimum
Savings Certificates
goo
Dtooti
$1000
Dna i
$5000
$10000 Or More
Minimum
Six Month
Money
Market
Certificate
i 9 & Poc!e' Pprtaf* RaoV)
2 4 Piece Stoneware
o_Ramekins
in Aluminum Tea Keme
Pill So.
with cioissone lop
5 Beacon Blanket
_6 ingndS-PieceSnack Set
7 ingnrj Wheeiea Planter
8 Vespucci UmbreM
9 National Silver 24-Piece Classic
Fatware Service tor 4
Hawaii pattern
t0 4-Pwce Sizzling Skillet Set
*4h Inletchangeable
hand*
It GE CanOpener
'2 5-Piece konslone Compiewt Set
'3 Vespucci Deluxe Shoulder Foko
'4 Vespucci Dome Tole
15 NatonalSilver24-Piece
Stainless Regal Manor
flatware Service tor 4
- Pianissimo & Sonora patterns
16 Sherwood 7 Piece Kitchen Tool Set
17 Hamilton Beach Blender
'6 Ixjraiite Beach Chan
19 16 Piece Ironstone Servo tor 4
20 Vespucci Shopping Tole
I 22 Se*o AM/FM Rao
24 GE Ctocfc Radjo__
25 Edison 1500 Wan Healer
26 Vesupucci Kangaroo Tote
27 Vespucci 20" 3^T^nmeni ^
28 Vespucci 26' Pulman Space Saver

26
27
?8
And while you're enjoying the savings, your savmas are
SSoS) Smt tSS?! allowed by law. S3 foe
TrS'cl^Moday ^ y0U Waiting f0f? <**in "
Effective
Determined
at Tim* of
Purcheee
&33%
8.06%_____
Determined
at Tana of
Purchaee
182 Day Money
Market Certificate
$10,000 minimum
intaraatRatM
smssr
Purctiaaa
Eight Year Certificate 8jOO%"
Six Year Certificate 7.78%
7.79%
6.98%
Two and one half year
certificate Interest based
on yield from 30 month
US. Treasury securities.
Four Year Certificate
at Time of
Purchaae
7.50%
6.72%
6.18%
Thirty Month Certificate 6.75%
One Year Certificate
555%
Three Month Certificate
Statement Savings or
Passbook Account
25 minimum deposit
650%
64)0%
550%
am-V Fmanci Fee** carmo, ^^rt^^Sr"' On,, on. g4t p.
prohibit the ccf>oundnnntinZ!?!i 200 Tefm 182 <* Federal regulation*
$40,000 by an agency of toeF^2r&S!^?* JS"'""""O* " premature withdrawal of saw^erwSateT^ ubantal penally is required for
mmm
"W^t --"" -...Kjrawai or savings certificate
financial Federal
S"SSSS*l4n Association
r ~ i
.....i-MiuM^ih.;^^:]
ll'-llllH.^hC.jrJ,,,.. fh
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vl
EsSKmrar* ^^^^s^tt^stsS^S^^sa
l.'RjJk.Nhl.kl


luary 11, 1980
The Jewish Floru
"* '** Vlnnrtinn nf Unhm Mnr>h I ntint-u
of Palm Beach County ________^^^
Page 17
|th Sholom Honors Three
t Bonds Testimonial
Marchand, Israel
firman of Temple Beth
Lake Worth, an-
today that three
of the congregation
Inored at a testimonial
kple on Jan. 26 for their
rjg services to the
the Jewish com-
h te of Israel will confer
Leadership Award on
fdman, Jack Miller
^ard Mycorn at the
which will be the
a Israel Bonds Cam-
med by Marchand and
i Jerome Feinberg.
[id said, "It will come
t>rise to the community
three gentlemen are
)gnized at this time.
ve, all three, been
the community and
tributed much hard
Friedman, who was
|and vice president of
eth-El in Cedarhurst,
is honorary treasurer
|life, has been active in
drives for UJA,
eration, and ADL. He
the recipient of many
tr his outstanding ef-
lalf of Israel Bonds
Since moving to
th in 1972 he has served
^ard of B'nai B'rith, as
lent and president of
lolom. in addition to his
lunity services.
liller was a member of
, of Temple Beth Israel
N.J., and Temple Beth
Toms River, N.J., as
contributing member of
^ith. For two years he
j a member of the Town
rf Richfield, N.J. Since
Lake Worth, he has
itinuously as a member
oard of Temple Beth
|tnd has served as vice
(1977) and president
Mycorn moved to
am Stamford, Conn., in
[ served Beth Sholom for
as vice president and
[years as president, in
to serving as vice
president of B'nai B'rith in 1977,
78, and 79. He chaired the
Temple Sholom Israel Bonds
Campaign in 1974 and 1975.
Marchand, in announcing this
award, said that Temple Beth
Sholom was not only honoring
the three presidents, but also
adding maximum support to the
local effort to expand the sale of
Israel Bonds in the Lake Worth
area.
"An especially great challenge
faces us all this year. Israel's
economy has made giant strides
in the past three decades, but
now, with the treaty of peace
between Egypt and Israel, it is
ever more important that we
support the purchase of Israel
Bonds. Peace mandates the
redeployment of civilian and
military populations from the
Sinai to the Negev. This program
will cost billions, and it is the
responsibility of Israel Bonds to
supply the necessary funds."
Special guest at the reception
will be Joey Adams, American
humorist and raconteur, who is
known as a good will am-
bassador.
Jerome Feinberg added that
the Israel Bonds Committee,
which includes George Breslaw,
Carl Epstein, Sydelle Golden-
berg, Abe Halpern, David Hilton,
Benjamin Jaffa, Harry Lenett,
Harry Madwed, Norman
Mutterperl, Samuel Perkins,
Harry Seltzer, Charles Stuback,
Dr. Sander V. Smith, and Irving
Wolser, has been working long
and hard to make the campaign a
huge success.
"It is encouraging to note," he
stated, "that one quarter of all
Israel Bonds purchases are by
the non-Jewish community,
especially by banks and other
investment institutions. We are
confident that our committee will
succeed in reaching our goals for
this year's campaign."
Beth El Sisterhood Luncheon Set
Temple Beth El Sisterhood will
have its annual Donor Luncheon
at the Breakers on Tuesday, Jan.
15, at noon.
Co-chairing the "Our Woman
of Many Hats" Donor Luncheon
are Selena Jacobson and Florence
Katz. Chairman of the Donor
Committee are president, Gloria
Werner, Ester Levy, Barbara
Weinstein, Staci Lesser, Lenora
Walkover, Anita Sakowitz,
Naomi Rampell and Mildred
Goldstein.
Blanche Lang will be honored
for her outstanding participation
in temple life. The Star Troupe
Repertory Productions" will
present a variety musical of song
and dance.
For further information,
contact Temple Beth El.
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"Now M-ure Than Ever"


Page 18
TheJevish Floridan of Palm Beach County
Friday, January 11,1990

* &lMltmml uorntt
Coordinated by
Rabbi Asber Bar-Zev, Ph.d
fever*** to dhctniUm of tfc*ist and tSMwa
r*J*v*nt t* Jewish Ufa ssjt and artiest
^4 Resolution for Nations
By RABBI
HARRY Z. SCHECTMAN, D.D.
Congregation Anshei Sholom
Century Village
West Palm Beach
As we enter the new secula.
year we are bidding farewell to a
year of many uncertainties and
frustrations.
It is customary to make new
year resolutions, but I doubt
whether the resolutions we made
at the beginning of this year were
fulfilled, not mainly because of
our individual disregard for
them, but because of national and
international situations.
How could we have foreseen
the turn of events in the economic
field, in the political field, and
especially in the events that are
leading up to our frustrations in
the disregard of Iran for inter-
national law.
In our prayers on our religious
New Year, on Rosh Hashonoh
we can discern the wisdom of oui
liturgists who understood the
subjugation of individual desires
to national and international
vicissitudes of conditions.
After we accept the truth of
retribution of our own trans-
gressions, the liturgist continues
"And concerning the nations, it
is decreed on this day, which are
destined for the sword and which
for peace, which for famine and
which for plenty."
For the benefit of mankind as a
whole, and for the peace of the
Editor's Note: The views
expressed by the rabbis are
strictly their own and in no way
reflect the views of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
world, it would seem most im-
portant for the nations to make
resolutions of this new year, reso-
lutions to trust each other, not to
blackmail one another, not to
seek more power, and not to sub-
jugate their subjects by acceding
to industrial potentates.
As we approach the new year,
we can hear the bells tolling, not
for peace, even though the
Christmas spirit is supposed to
portend peace, but for war, with
powerful nations arming them-
selves to the teeth, as if chal-
lenging each other on the field of
battle.
Are wars inevitable? Would a
nation be justified in declaring
war? Perhaps the Festival of
Chanukah just passed could
provide us with an answer.
The Jews during the years
before the Hasmonean uprising
were acceding to the assimila-
tionist propaganda of the Hel-
lenists until they realized that if
they permit the Syrian king to
proselyte the people and by force
instill the idol-worship in Judea,
their faith and their way of life
would be destroyed.
When an entire civilization like
that of the Jewish way of life is
threatened, then death is better
Rabbi Schectman
than a tyrannical slavery.
It was at that point that the
zealots realized that such peace
was worse than revolution, and
so the war was considered
necessary.
Appeasement cannot be long
lasting. It only brings about the
subservience of the appeasers,
and at long last the constraint
must break, and war is the result.
World War II proved that.
So let us hope that perhaps a
miracle like that of Chanukah
may again come to pass, that
some divine intervention may
bring the nations to their senses,
and man's desires for a year of
peace will be realized.
Perspectives on Jewish Education
Jewish Educator's Job Isn't Easy
By MORDECAI LEVOW
This past week I was
privileged to attend the 25th
anniversary convention of
NATE, the National Association
of Temple Educators, the
professional educator's group of
the Reform Movement. I was
heartened by the dedication,
concern and creativity of my
colleagues in the liberal wing of
Judaism. The range of creative
ideas ran the gamut from in-
novative pre-school curricula tc
exciting family education.
I could not help but note
several exciting developments
that I should like to share with
you.
Rabbi David Syres, in his
keynote address, commented on
the increased intensiveness of
Reform Jewish education.
Increasingly, there is a
recognition that to teach Hebrew
effectively requires a minimum of
six hours per week of instructbn.
Almost all of the educators in
NATE now have schools that
meet thrice weekly.
Now More Than Evor
cud is urgently needed.
Send your check to the
Jowu^Fedoratkwofr^iaii^adiCoaaty
Tune in to 'Mosaic'
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TUNE IN TO MOSAIC
"Mosaic," Jewish Federation's sponsored program
isairadan
Sunday mornings ovar WPTV Channel 5, at 9 a.m. with
hosts Barbara Shalman and Steve Gordon.
Jan. 13 -Bella Abzog
JOT. 20 Cantor Harold Ohrbach
Set furniture by Worrells Interiors
Sat interior design by Carol Lavold
Mordecai Levow
He cited the trends toward
adult and family education.
Throughout the country, much
effort is being directed to this
area. One great idea that I'm
planning to adopt in our own
school is "the Refrigerator '
Curriculum." In an effort at '
family education, each week a
Jewish education sheet is mailed .
home for posting on the
refrigerator door. The rule is that '
every time family members go to
the refrigerator for a "noah,"
they must take a few moments '
for "Jewish education."
The Day School, according to
Rabbi Syres, has grown in
stature as a major component of
Reform education. It has come to
be recognized as the most ef-
fective way to transform "Jews
by birth into Jews by con-
viction."
The task to the last generation
the generation of the
Holocaust was to save Jews.
Our task the task of thif
generation is to save Judaism.
Only through intensive, ef-
fective Jewish education can we
do so!
Synagogues in
Palm Beach
County
ORTHODOX
AITZ CHAIM CONGREGATION CENTURY VILLAGE
W. Palm Beach Phone: 689-4675 Sabbath Services 9 a.m..
and 5 p.m. Dally Services: 8:15 a.m. and 5 p.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
551 Brittany L, Kings Point, Delray Beach 33448 Harry Sliver,
President. Services daily 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdays and
Holidays 9 a.m. Phone: 499-7407. Temple No. 498*229
REFORM
[TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida
33407 833-8421 Rabbi Irving B. Cohen Joel L Levins,
Associate Rabbi Sabbath Worship Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. Saturday Torah Seminars at 10:30 a.m.
ITEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourt Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Phone: 391-
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath
Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.* Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah Study
with Rabbi Merle E. Singer 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Ser-
vices
I THE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION OF DELRAY
At St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swlnton Ave., Delray
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla. 33444 Fri-
day at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver President Lawrence
Sommers, 272-2908
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. At. St. David's In the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill
Blvd. and Willington Trace Mailing address: 1125 Jack Pins
St., West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 President Ronnie
Kramer 793-2700 _____
CONSERVATIVE-LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
The Free Synagogue, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 368-
1600,391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 8:15 p.m.
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West Glades Rd. (1
mile west of Boca Turnpike)
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fl. 33407 Phone:
833-0339 Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sab-
bath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Dally
Mlnyan at 8:15 a.m., Sunday at 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Grove Strsst, Wsst Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 Phone 684-
3212 Office hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schect-
man Cantor Arthur B. Roeenwasssr Services: Dally 8:30 s.m.
and 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.; Late Service &15
p.m. followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday, 8:30 am., 5 p.m.
followed by Shalah Sudos. .
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH
Boynton Bsach, Fla. Phona 732-2555 Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazln Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9
a.m. Congregational Church, 116 N. Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 N. -A Strsst, Lake Worth, Fla. 33400 Phone: 585-
5020 Rabbi Emanusl Eisenbsrg Cantor Jacob Elman Ser-
vices: Mondays and Thursdays at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services, Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. West-
minster Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm
Beach Gardens. (Office) 321 Northlake Blvd., North Palm
Bsach, Fla. Phone: 845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor
Nicholas Fenaksl
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
224 N.W. Avenue 'G,' Belle Glads, Fla. 33430 Jack Statsm.n
Cantor Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m. ow*mn.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alsmslda Drlvs, Palm Springs, Fla. 33461 Sabbath ssr-
vlcas: Frldayat 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. President Barnatt
Briskmsn Phons: 967-4982 Mondays and Thursdays at 9
a.m Services held at Faith United Presbyterian Church. Palm
springs
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Avs., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Phons 392
8566 Rabbi Nathan Zelizer Sabbath Services: Friday at 815
p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
52JSTI utta1,lc ?""' ^''"y BMCn' Fl- 3344 *><>":
for Shh.^0"^! f,lb6rman' Rabbi Leonard Pries, Csn-
tor^Ssbbath Services: FrWsy at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9
a.m. Dally Mlnyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m. aa,uraay 8
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
190 North County Road, Palm Bsach Fla a.'Uflri ',. >><.
0804-Rabbi Myer S. KrtoM c7nt0V D.v^rd2hJ
bath Ssrvlce.: Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturday at 9 am



fanuary 11, I960
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
I Page 19
(BctxxJ ^^nt^^4t^ JVeAMA^L
IPLE BETH DAVID
today, Jan. 11, the
Council of Jewish
will participate in the
service at Temple Beth
They will sponsor a
neg Shabbat in honor of
ssian families in the
ity.
fiday, Jan. 18, there will
nily service. Everyone is
i attend.
f-KMPLE ISRAEL
lie Israel Sisterhood will
| regular monthly meeting
lay, Jan. 21, at noon in
zberg Hall. Sisterhood
will present an original
"Show and Tell," which
ips the display and
(ntary of personal,
items associated with
and traditions of Jewish
[collection, assembled by
Golden, includes
kbilia, art objects, and
[imports of fashions and
Me items for home use
rial holidays. Lunch will
to this meeting, the
iiing Education Group will
the Music Room from
I to 11:30. Rabbi Irving
nd Carolyn Ring conduct
ries of discussions related
ent day attitudes and
fnts affecting Jewish life.
ne is invited to participate
tiscussions.
bit- Israel's Saturday
Seminars are now in
This series meets every
ky from 10:30 a.m. until
|nd includes a Kiddush.
are held in the Temple's
|nity Service Library of
1901 North Flagler
Pine. Seminars are open
ablic.
Joel Levine conducts
ksion. The Torah portion
peek is read, interspersed
estions end comments
tie rabbi and the par-
Last summer, Rabbi
^pent time at the British
The Museum has
fcd the results of several
bgiral digs which have
Undertaken since World
Habbi Levine reviews
esulls and other major
bgical discoveries along
faditional rabbinic com-
MPLEEMANU-EL
'Men's Club of Temple
I in Palm Beach an-
Fun Night" for
of Temple Emanu-El
>ir friends on Tuesday,
[at 8 p.m.
be an evening with the
irticipants'own choosing.
ches, no appeals, no
lment.
light refreshments and
3f guidance for interested
players by experts Henry
er and Dr. Kalman Apfel
Nd.
ISondra Elliot, president
krhood of Temple Emanu-
aunces that the Monday,
I meeting and petite buffet
Iture Yiddish and Jewish
B. Feldhuhn will be
r this program. A retired
M in the New York City
System, Mrs. Feldhuhn is
n "Who's Who in
Women in Education"
the "International
Jhy of American Women."
|he author of several plays
emporary topics, which
she directs and produces. Articles
on parent-child relationships
written by Mrs. Feldhuhn have
appeared in Child Study
Magazine.
She is one of the organizers oi
Brandeis Women in Palm Beach
County. She has conducted
symposia on the topic of
"Successful Aging and
Retirement."
The program will be conducted
by Genevieve Silberman,
program vice president. Buffet
and table decor will be arranged
by Dee Cohen, hospitality
chairman.
Standing, I to r: Paula Harmon, Barbara Wunsh
Elizabeth Lassoff, Ruth Liebowitz, Dorothy
Kudisch, Ida Coplon, Ann Weinrib. Seated, I tor
Bert Sales, Myra Ohrenstine, Lil Dorf.
, Ann Gilston,
Kay, Lillian
: Ann Hopfan,
Hadassah Chapters to Honor Rose Burns
Mrs. Rose Burns, a leader in
the Palm Beach Jewish com-
munity, will be honored by the
five Palm Beach County
Chapters of Hadassah and by the
State of Israel at an Israel Bonds
luncheon to be held at the
Breakers on Jan. 20.
Mrs. Burns is the founder and
moving spirit of the annual
Hadassah Angel Luncheon. In
addition, she is nationally known
for her continuing work for the
Guild for the Bund and other
charitable organizations. In
recognition of her many years of
devoted service, Mrs. Burns will
be presented the David Ben-
Gurion Award of the State of
Israel at the luncheon.
Mrs. Ann Hopfan, coordinator
for the Hadassah Israel Bonds
campaign, reports that there is
great enthusiasm for this tribute
to Mrs. Burns. In additional
tribute, Dr. Miriam Freund-
Rosenthal, former national
president of Hadassah and
national chairman of Ya'al and
the Youth Survey Committee,
will be the guest speaker.
Dr. Rosenthal is a noted author
and contributor to many Zionist
publications and to books and
magazines on Jewish life and
education. She served as the
Hadassah delegate to the 29th
World Zionist Congress in 1978,
and was named a life member of
the Zionist General Council of the
World Zionist Organization.
Mrs. Hopfan expressed her
gratitude to the Israel Bonds
chairmen of the chapters and
groups who have worked so hard
to make this year's Israel Bonds
campaign a success. These in-
clude Gail Pariser of the Bat
Gurion Palm Beach Chapter;
Dorothy Kaye of the Golda Meir,
Boynton Beach Chapter; Shirley
Greenberg, Lake Worth South
Palm Beach Chapter; Helen
Smith, Aliya Group; Ruth Mark-
man, Chai Group; Minette Gross,
Henrietta Szold Group; Ruth
Liebowitz, Palm Beach Chapter;
Ceil Rich, Rishona Group; Lillian
Kudisch, Tamar Group;
Elizabeth Lassoff, Z'have Group;
Ann Hopfan, West Palm Beach
Chapter; Gladys Bisgaier,
Shalom Group; Ida Coplon, Tik-
vah Group; and Diana Levine,
Yovel Group.
Now More Than Ever
cash is urgently needed.
Send yoer check to the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Bernard D. Epstein M.D.
Diplomate American Board of internal Medicine
Announces the opening
of His office for
The practice of Internal Medicine at
900 Northwest 13th Street
Boca Raton
BY appointment (305) 368-6030
Richard G. Schwartz, M.D.
IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
THE OPENING OF MIS OFFICES
FOK THE PRACTICE OF
PLASTIC AXD RECONSTRUCTIVE 81IROERY
HIROKKY Or THE HAND
COHMETIC HIHCiKHY
ISOO N DIXIE HIGHWAY SUITE 304
WEST PALM BEACH FLORIDA 33Oi
i30V 833 AOZZ
1O8C JOHN F KENNEDY CIRCLE
ATLANTIS FLORlOA 3 3482
i305i 984-Stee
Dr. Miriam Rosenthal
Mrs. Rose Burns
FREE
Eye Examination by Computer
Have your eyes checked free of charge by
our NASA computer. Bring u, your old
glasses to compare with the computer
prescription.
No appointment necessary.
Geoffrey M. Farmer, O.D.
222 Datura Street Hours: Mon. Frl. 9-6
(Harvay Bldg.) Sat. 9-12
I Watt Palm Beach CJotad Wadnaadayj.
I 655-2020
*- _____H
BE
Dr. I. Goodman
Chiropractor
Boynton.Plaza
153'/. N. Congrats Avt. IN. W. 2nd Aval
Boynton BsBttcn
Backaches Headaches
Pinched Nerves Disc Problems
Arthritis Sciatica Neuralgia
Phone 737-5591
Otflca Hra Moo Tuas Wad.. Fri.
t-12,2-5
MEDICARE, WORKMEN'S
JOHN S. WEITZNER, M.D.
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
Obstetrics and Gynecology
THI KIT BUILDING
701 NORTHLAKE BLVD.
SUITI 108
NORTH PALM BEACH, FLA.
v
BY APPOINTMENT
842-4400
4


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SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION


Full Text
Page 18
The J ex ish Floriaan of Palm Beach County
Friday. January 11, I960
* Sabbatical
(toner
Coordinated by
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev. Ph.d
devoted to discos sioa of ffwmec e*d isssws
rokvont te Jewish Mf ant and artsMt
A Resolution for Nations
By RABBI
HARRY Z. SCHECTMAN, D.D.
Congregation Anshei Sholoni
Century Village
West Palm Beach
As we enter the new secula.
year we are bidding farewell to a
year of many uncertainties and
frustrations.
It is customary to make new
year resolutions, but I doubt
whether the resolutions we made
at the beginning of this year were
fulfilled, not mainly because of
our individual disregard for
them, but because of national and
international situations.
How could we have foreseen
the turn of events in the economic
field, in the political field, and
especially in the events that are
leading up to our frustrations in
the disregard of Iran for inter-
national law.
In our prayers on our religious
New Year, on Rosh Hashonoh
we can discern the wisdom of oui
liturgists who understood the
subjugation of individual desires
to national and international
vicissitudes of conditions.
After we accept the truth of
retribution of our own trans-
gressions, the liturgist continues
"And concerning the nations, it
is decreed on this day, which are
destined for the sword and which
for peace, which for famine and
which for plenty."
For the benefit of mankind as a
whole, and for the peace of the
Editor's Note: The views
expressed by the rabbis are
strictly their own and in no way
reflect the views of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
world, it would seem most im-
portant for the nations to make
resolutions of this new year, reso-
lutions to trust each other, not to
blackmail one another, not to
seek more power, and not to sub-
jugate their subjects by acceding
to industrial potentates.
As we approach the new year,
we can hear the bells tolling, not
for peace, even though the
Christmas spirit is supposed to
portend peace, but for war, with
powerful nations arming them-
selves to the teeth, as if chal-
lenging each other on the field of
battle.
Are wars inevitable? Would a
nation be justified in declaring
war? Perhaps the Festival of
Chanukah just passed could
provide us with an answer.
\
Rabbi Schectman
The Jews during the years
before the Hasmonean uprising
were acceding to the assimila-
tionist propaganda of the Hel-
lenists until they realized that if
they permit the Syrian king to
proselyte the people and by force
instill the idol-worship in Judea,
their faith and their way of life
would be destroyed.
When an entire civilization like
that of the Jewish way of life is
threatened, then death is better
than a tyrannical slavery.
It was at that point that the
zealots realized that such peace
was worse than revolution, and
so the war was considered
necessary.
Appeasement cannot be long
lasting. It only brings about the
subservience of the appeasers.
and at long last the constraint
must break, and war is the result.
World War II proved that.
So let us hope that perhaps a
miracle like that of Chanukah
may again come to pass, that
some divine intervention may
bring the nations to their senses,
and man's desires for a year o*
peace will be realized.
Jewish Educator's Job Isn't Easy
By MORDECAI LEVOW
This past week I was
privileged to attend the 25th
anniversary convention of
NATE, the National Association
of Temple Educators, the
professional educator's group of
the Reform Movement. I was
heartened by the dedication,
concern and creativity of my
colleagues in the liberal wing of
Judaism. The range of creative
ideas ran the gamut from in-
novative pre-school curricula tc
exciting family education.
I could not help but note
several exciting developments
that I should like to share with
you.
Rabbi David Syres, in his
keynote address, commented on
the increased intensiveness of
Reform Jewish education.
Increasingly, there is a
recognition that to teach Hebrew
effectively requires a minimum of
six hours per week of instruction.
*J* of the educators in
NATE now have schools that
meet thrice week!v.
Now More Than Ever
ch is urgently needed.
Send your check to the
Jewish Federation of Poim ch Coty
Tune in to 'Mosaic'
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TUNE IN TO MOSAIC
"Mosaic," Jewish Federation's sponsored program
is aired on
Sunday mornings over WPTV Channel 5, of 9 a.m. with
hosts Barbara Shvlman and Stovo Gordon.
Jan. 13-Bella Abzug
Jon. 20 Cantor Harold Ohrbach
Set furniture by Worrell* Interior*
Set interior design by Carol Lavold
Mordecai Levop
He cited the trends toward
adult and family education.
Throughout the country, much
effort is being directed to this
area. One great idea that I'm
planning to adopt in our own
school is "the Refrigerator
Curriculum." In an effort at
family education, each week a
Jewish education sheet is mailed
home for posting on the
refrigerator door. The rule is that
every time family members go to
the refrigerator for a "nosh "
they must take a few moments
for "Jewish education."
The Day School, according to
Rabbi Syres, has grown in
stature as a major component of
Reform education. It has come to
be recognized as the most ef-
fective way to transform "Jews
by birth into Jews by con-
viction."
The task to the last generation
the generation of the
Holocaust was to save Jews.
Our task the task of thi*
generation is to save Judaism.
Only through intensive, ef-
drfso? JeWi"h education CM we
Synagogues in
Palm Beach
County
ORTHODOX
AITZ CHAIM CONGREGATION CENTURY VILLAGE
W. Palm Beach Phone: 689-4675 Sabbath Services 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Dally Services: 8:15 a.m. and 5 p.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
551 Brittany L, Kings Point, Oelray Beach 33446 Harry Silver,
President. Services dally 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdays and
Holidays 9 a.m. Phone: 499-7407. Temple No. 499-0229
REFORM
ITEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Plagler Drive, West Palm Beech, Florida
33407 833-8421 Rabbi Irving B. Cohen Joel L Levins,
Associate Rabbi Sabbath Worshlo Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. Saturday Torah Seminars at 10:30 a.m.
|TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourt Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Phone: 391-
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath
Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.* Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah Study
with Rabbi Merle E. Singer 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Ser-
vices
[ THE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION OF DELRAY
At St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swlnton Ave., Delray
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla. 33444 Fri-
day at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver President Lawrence
Sommers,272-2908
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. At. St. David's In the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill
Blvd. and Wllllngton Trace Mailing address: 1125 Jack Pine
St., West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 President Ronnie
Kramer 793-2700 _____
CONSERVATIVE-LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
The Free Synagogue, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 368-
1600, 391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 815 p m
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West Glades Rd (1
mile west of Boca Turnpike)
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
f?o5nN^.r,hr,Flafl,er Df,veWe8t p,lm B#ach' Fl- 33*>7 Phone-
8330339 -Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev Cantor Elaine Shapiro-sS
bath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m.. Saturday at 9:30 am DalW
Minyan at 8:15 a.m., Sunday at 9 a.m. y
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM
53 SSfcKS Woe8t Pa'm Boach' Fla" 33409 Phone 684-
3212 Office hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harrv Z Srhrt
T2> f^^;KFr,^y 8:3 ,Lm- "* 5 P-m-: Le Service 8:15
.&Ie3,0^&?3Jfhabbi, *""* &3 *- >-
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. Phone 732-2555 Rabbi Avrom L
Drazin Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday .t 9
a.m. Congregational Church. 116 N. Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
SflM?aJL.* \V Worth- F,- 33460. Phone: 586-
5020 -Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman SeT
| TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services. Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. West-
*^**m..**+. 10410 N. Military Trail, TSn
Slrh ^"oT" <0oMlcCe) W1 No"lke Blvd.. North Pam
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemelda Drive, Palm Springs Fla TUfli -
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
or Sabbam'serv^T V.1 8* XSTL*?- <*t
..m..D..lyM.nyans.t8:45.my.nc5pr-' *"**" 9
TEMPLE EMANUEL
O^X^Kr^Krinr Stt ^ ""on* 832-


1
try 11. I960
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
11 .vtMitrv
Page 19
^^ll^^l^ tA/e^WL\
! BETH DAVID
iy, Jan. 11, the
Duncil of Jewish
participate in the
/ice at Temple Beth
will sponsor a
: Shabbat in honor of
families in the
Jan. 18, there will
[service. Everyone is
end.
|PLE ISRAEL
srael Sisterhood will
liar monthly meeting
Jan. 21, at noon in
rg Hall. Sisterhood
present an original
Show and Tell," which
the display and
ry of personal,
kerns associated with
I traditions of Jewish
ction, assembled by
olden, includes
art objects, and
>rt8 of fashions and
items for home use
holidays. Lunch will
this meeting, the
Education Group will
tie Music Room from
[11:30. Rabbi Irving
[Carolyn Ring conduct
I of discussions related
day attitudes and
affecting Jewish life.
i invited to participate
ssions.
Israel's Saturday
linars are now in
lis series meets every
am 10:30 a.m. until
I includes a Kiddush.
held in the Temple's
Service Library of
1901 North Flagler
le. Seminars are open
Bel Levine conducts
1. The Torah portion
is read, interspersed
lions and comments
[rabbi and the par-
~ nt time at the British
The Museum has
the results of several
lal digs which have
|rtaken since World
labbi Levine reviews
lit1- and other major
lal discoveries along
Itional rabbinic com-
>LE EMANU-EL
s Club of Temple
in Palm Beach an-
"Fun Night" for
>f Temple Emanu-El
friends on Tuesday,
Tp.m.
an evening with the
icipants'own choosing,
lies, no appeals, no
snt.
?ht refreshments and
iidance for interested
pers by experts Henry
land Dr. Kalman Apfel
idra Elliot, president
' of Temple Emanu-
ices that the Monday,
ting and petite buffet
Yiddish and Jewish
Feldhuhn will be
u program. A retired
the New York City
em, Mrs. Feldhuhn is
"Who's Who in
[Women in Education"
the "International
' of American Women."
[author of several plays
nporary topics, which
she directs and produces. Articles
on parent-child relationships
written by Mrs. Feldhuhn have
appeared in Child Study
Magazine.
She is one of the organizers or
Brandeis Women in Palm Beach
County. She has conducted
symposia on the topic of
"Successful Aging and
Retirement."
The program will be conducted
by Genevieve Silberman,
program vice president. Buffet
and table decor will be arranged
by Dee Cohen, hospitality
chairman.
Standing, I to r: Paula Harmon, Barbara Wunsh,
Elizabeth Lassoff, Ruth Liebowitz, Dorothy
Kudisch, Ida Coplon, Ann Weinrib. Seated, I to r:
Bert Sales, Myra Ohrenstine, LUDorf.
Ann Gils ton,
Kay, Lillian
Ann Hopfan,
Hadassah Chapters to Honor Rose Burns
Mrs. Rose Bums, a leader in
the Palm Beach Jewish com-
munity, will be honored by the
five Palm Beach County
Chapters of Hadassah and by the
State of Israel at an Israel Bonds
luncheon to be held at the
Breakers on Jan. 20.
Mrs. Burns is the founder and
moving spirit of the annual
Hadassah Angel Luncheon. In
addition, she is nationally known
for her continuing work for the
Guild for the Blind and other
charitable organizations. In
recognition of her many years of
devoted service, Mrs. Burns will
be presented the David Ben-
Gurion Award of the State of
Israel at the luncheon.
Mrs. Ann Hopfan, coordinator
for the Hadassah Israel Bonds
campaign, reports that there is
great enthusiasm for this tribute
to Mrs. Burns. In additional
tribute, Dr. Miriam Freund-
Rosenthal, former national
president of Hadassah and
national chairman of Ya'al and
the Youth Survey Committee,
will be the guest speaker.
Dr. Rosenthal is a noted author
and contributor to many Zionist
publications and to books and
magazines on Jewish life and
education. She served as the
Hadassah delegate to the 29th
World Zionist Congress in 1978,
and was named a life member of
the Zionist General Council of the
World Zionist Organization.
Mrs. Hopfan expressed her
gratitude to the Israel Bonds
chairmen of the chapters and
groups who have worked so hard
to make this year's Israel Bonds
campaign a success. These in-
clude Gail Pariser of the Bat
Gurion Palm Beach Chapter;
Dorothy Kaye of the Golda Meir,
Boynton Beach Chapter; Shirley
Greenberg, Lake Worth South
Palm Beach Chapter; Helen
Smith, Aliya Group; Ruth Mark-
man, Chai Group; Minette Gross,
Henrietta Szold Group; Ruth
Liebowitz, Palm Beach Chapter;
Ceil Rich, Rishona Group; Lillian
Kudisch, Tamar Group;
Elizabeth Lassoff, Z'have Group;
Ann Hopfan, West Palm Beach
Chapter; Gladys Bisgaier,
Shalom Group; Ida Coplon, Tik-
vah Group; and Diana Levine,
Yovel Group.
Now More Than Ever
cash is urgently needed.
Send your check to the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Bernard D. Epstein m.d.
Diplomate American Board of internal Medicine
Announces the opening
of His office for
The practice of Internal Medicine at
900 Northwest 13th Street
Boca Raton
By appointment (305) 368-6030
Richard G. Schwartz, M.D.
IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
the opening or his orncES
rON THE PRACTICE OF
PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SIIROERY
SIROEHY OK THE HAND
COSMETIC SI-ROEHY
ISOO N DIXIE HIGHWAY SUITE 304
.WEST PALM BECH FLORID* 3340i
I30S' B33 AOZZ
lOO E JOHN r KENNEDY CIRCLE
ATLANTIS FLORIDA 33402
'3051 94Me
n
h
a
vi
Dr. Miriar
Mrs. Rose Burns

FREE
Eft Examination by Computer
Have your eyes checked free of charge by
our NASA computer. Bring ir. your old
glasses to compare with the computer
prescription.
No appointment necessary.
Geoffrey M. Farmer, O.D.
222 Datura Street Hour*: Mon. Fri. 9 5
(Hmrty MOf.) Sat. 9 12
Wa*t Palm Beach ctoMd Wadnaadayi.
655-2020
*
Dr. I. Goodman
Chiropractor
Boynton Plaza
153% N. Congrau Ay. (N W. 2nd Aval
Boynton Ba.ch
Backaches Headaches
Pinched Nerves Disc Problems
Arthritis Sciatica Neuralgia
Phone 737-5591
Mon.. Tiw., ad.. Fri.
Thurs. bSM
e-12
OfBcaHra.
H2.2S

JOHN S. WEITZNER, M.D.
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING Of HIS OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
Obstetrics and Gynecology
THE KIY BUILDING
701 NORTHLAKE BLVD.
SUin 108
NORTH PALM BEACH, FLA.
BY APPOINTMENT
842-4400


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