Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00206

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
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of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Volume 5 Number 21
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, October 19,1979
f ita Shochtt
Price 35 Cents
Federation Request Okayed for Home for Aged
The local Health Planning
Council of the State Department
of Health and Rehabilitative Ser-
vices has approved a request by
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County to construct a 120-
bed nursing home for the aged.
The announcement was made
this week by Federation
president, Alan Shulman.
Stanley Brenner serves as
chairman of the Home for the
Aged Steering Committee of the
Federation.
The proposal must now be
approved on the state level
through the HRS Department of
Community Medical Facilities.
Construction is expected to take
18 months. Technical assistance
for the nursing home proposal
was provided by the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged.
The proposed facility will
Alan Shulman-
Stanley Brenner
Presidents Recognized
Women's Division Sponsors
Special Assembly Nov. 28
M *0MEN's
By RONNI TARTAKOW
Director of
Public Relations
"The 1980's have been
recognized as a "Decade of
Decision" for the American
Jewish Community," stated
Barbara Shulman, Women's
Division president, Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
"We as Jewish women have a
H ^|nPII^II,llll_, v" '..... I-U iui
selves and become better in-
formed members of this com-
munity, as we move forward
together to face the challenges of
the future. For this reason, we
have planned a unique and in-
novative program open to every
Jewish woman living in Palm
lieach County."
The Jewish Women's
Assembly will take place on
Wednesday, Nov. 28, from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. at the Breakers in Palm
Beach. The program will include
various workshops facilitated by
experts and dealing with issues of
current concern for "today's
Jewish woman."
The workshops will include
discussions on the Holocaust,
presented by Helen Fagin,
chairman of the Judiac Studies
Department of the University of
Miami and advisor to the
President's Commission on the
Holocaust; The Middle East,
presented by Dr. Seymour
Liebman, professor emeritus of
the University of Miami, and
editor of the Mid-East Review;
and the Family, presented by Dr.
Ateret Cohen, director of
programming for the Milwaukee,
Wis., Jewish Community Center.
The program will open with an
k address by Brenda Shapiro,
executive director of the
American Jewish Committee,
Southeast Region. In addition, a
keynote address will be delivered
^


*>
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/
by a prominent Jewish leader at
the Assembly luncheon, when the
presidents of the major Jewish
women's organizations in the
community in attendance that
day will be recognized.
"We are very encouraged by
the response we've had to date
from so many of the Jewish
women's organizations in the
Palm Beach County com-
munity," stated Beth Siskin,
chairperson of the Jewish
Women's Assembly. "It is ex-
citing to be a part of this in-
novative program and see the
collective efforts of the total
Jewish women's community
working towards a common goal
- "a quality Jewish life for all
our people."
As of this date, presidents
from the following organizations
have been involved in the
planning of the Jewish Women's
Assembly: American Israeli
Lighthouse, American Mizrachi
Women, B'nai B'rith Women,
Brandeis University Women,
Hadassah, Jewish Community
Center, Jewish War Veterans,
National Council of Jewish
Women, Women's American
OUT, Temple Sisterhoods, and
the Women's League of Israel.
For further information on
your participation in the Jewish
Women's Assembly, contact the
Women's Division at the Jewish
Federation office.
provide complete health, social
and recreational services in a
traditional Jewish environment
to all eligible residents of the area
designated as Health Systems
Agency Region No. 7, comprised
of Palm Beach, Indian River, St.
I.ucu\ Okeechobee and Martin
Counties. It is estimated that 60
percent of the Jewish population,
or approximately 27,000, living in
this region are over age 65, and
there are presently no nursing
home beds available which ob-
serve Kashruth and other Jewish
laws in the area.
CONSTRUCTION of the
three-story, 54,000 square foot
building is expected to cost
$3,862,000. It will be located
south of 45th Street on Haverhill
Road, on a 15-acre site owned by
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. The Home will be
built adjacent to a day school to
encourage cross programming
and interaction between youth
and older people. The close
location also will allow a more
efficient use of community
services.
"We are seeking to enhance the
quality of life and richness of
experiences of both children and
elderly parents through this
interaction." said committee
chairman Brenner. "In many
cases, the elderly have families
living in distant communities,
and the children may not have
the benefit of grandparents living
close to them, he said.
'Services at the home lor the
aged will be designed to
maximize the individual's func-
tional abilities, us well us to
provide meaningful and dignified
activities," said Federation
president Alan Shulman in his
announcement. The services
include inpatient medical rare,
rvhaliiliial ion. group work, social
adjustment therapy, reality
orientation, motivation. and
occupational and diversional
therapies.
During the next 18 months the
Steering Committee will be
addressing a number of critical
issues including admission
criteria, capital fund raising and
specific architectural plans.
Anyone interested in becoming
involved in this community
process should call Norman J.
Schimelman, executive director
of the Federation.
Meet the JCC
Executive Director
Zelda Pincourt, president of
the Jewish Community Center,
announces the appointment of
Martin M. Goldberg as executive
director of the center. Goldberg
has been working in the com-
munity center field since 1964.
Marty, as he prefers to be
called, is a graduate of the
University of Cincinnati and
received his master's degree
(MSW| at Case-Western Reserve
University of Cleveland.
OoidberK was born and raised in
Cincinnati and uSS been married
for the past 12 years. He and hi
wife Barbara have two girls, ages
6 and 8. Barbara, also a native of
Cincinnati, has a teaching
background.
Goldberg was program director
of the Cincinnati Jewish Com-
munity Center for 10 years and
from there went to the Memphis
Jewish Community Center as
assistant director for two years.
For the past three years, he has
acted as director of group ser-
vices for the Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center in the
Miami area.
The board of directors of the
center felt strongly that Gold-
berg was a man with the ex-
perience to bring new and in-
Martin M. Gol. berg
novative ideas to the center and
to the community-at-large, said
Ms. Pincourt. She said. "The
center feels privileged to have
Marty at the helm as its
executive director.
Mr. and Mrs. Goldberg will be
residing in Palm Beach Gardens
starting this month. The Jewish
Community Center invites the
community to come to the center
and meet Goldberg.
Nazis Train in Uruguay
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) A Nazi organization
in Montevideo, Uruguay, the National Socialist Party,
has a training camp some 12 kilometers from Montevideo,
according to a report here in La Lux which quoted from an
article in Nuevo Mundolsraelita published in Caracas.
Venezuela. The aim of the party, the report stated, is to
"liquidate Jews and Communists" and to achieve "the
unity of all the Uruguayans."


\ .. .; .- --. .
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, October 19,1979
With the
Organizations
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Carrying with them the
statement of Israel's Foreign
Minister, Moshe Dayan, that
"the impressive achievements of
ORT in giving skills to our youth
is well seen here in Israel as well
as in other parts in the world,
Palm Beach County delegates
will leave on Oct. 21, for their
25th Biennial National Con-
vention to be held in Boston.
Some 1,500 delegates,
representing 137,000 members of
Women's American ORT in over
1,100 chapters from coast to
coast, as well as distinguished
guests from here and abroad, will
attend the convention.
Members of the Palm Beach
area delegations representing the
region are: Betty Jacket,
president, Caroline Ring,
executive of the board; Ann
Cohen, past president; Esther
Sugarman, vice president; and
Betty Siegel, corresponding
secretary-
All Points Chapter, Women's
American ORT, general meeting
will be held Tuesday, Oct. 23, at 1
p.m. at Delray Community
Center. Philip H. Wishna,
Manager of American Savings &
Loan, W. Delray, will talk on
"You and Your Money."
Refreshments will be served
courtesy of American Savings &
Loan. Husbands, neighbors and
friends are welcome.
Reservations are being taken
for a three-day trip to St.
Augustine Nov. 1 to 6. Contact
Mollie Lieberman, 169-D Saxony,
Delray Beach 33446, for details.
HADASSAH
The next meeting of Aviva
Chapter of Hadassah will be held
Oct. 24 at 12:30 p.m. at the Boca
Teeca Clubhouse.
A "New Member" Breakfast
will be held Oct. 23 at 9:30 a.m.
at Boca Lago Card Room. For
additional information, phone
Ella Wepman or Elinor Newman.
On Nov. 4, Hadassah Ben-
Gurion Chapter will have an
Israel Bond Drive at Temple
Emeth, 5780 W. Atlantic Ave.,
from 2 to 4 p.m. Wine and cheese
will be served. Member Sid Wirth
will be honored.
Tikvah Group of Hadassah
Calendar of Events is as follows:
Board meeting: Thursday,
Nov. 8, 10 a.m. Phone Frances
Rose for location.
Membership luncheon
meeting: Paid-up life, regular and
prospective members invited to
Anshei Sholom on Monday, Nov.
19, at 12:30p.m.
Thanksgiving weekend
reservations are still being taken.
Call Jeanne Raskin for par-
ticulars. Proceeds for Hadassah
Medical Organization.
Dinner Theater at Royal Palm,
Boca Raton, for "Mame,"
Wednesday matinee, Dec. 19.
Make arrangements with Louise
Lipkin or Irene Botwinick.
The Palm Beach Chapter of
Hadassah is planning Education
Day on Tuesday, Nov. 13, from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Temple
Israel, 1901 North Flagler Drive,
West Palm Beach.
Rose Dorfman, vice president,
National Hadassah, will be
speaker.
The Lake Worth South Palm
Beach Chapter is invited.
The board of Lake Worth-
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South Pain Chapter of Hadassah
with Helen Smith, president in
charge will meet on Wednesday,
Nov. 4, at 10 a.m. at the First
Bank and Trust of Lake Worth
on Military Trail. They will
formulate plans for Hadassah
Education Day.
Shalom Hadassah is accepting
last minute reservations for the
chapter Thanksgiving weekend,
Nov. 22-25, at Algiers Hotel
(kosher), Miami Beach. Trans-
portation available, free parking
and many extras. Contact Lillian
Schack, Mae Podwol or Toba
Brown.
On Sunday. Oct. 28, a Flea
Market and White Elephant Sale
will be held at Atlantic Bank,
Okeechobee Blvd., from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Salable merchandise is
needed. Phone Lillian Schack or
Mae Podwol.
The first session of the Study
Group takes place on Tuesday,
Oct. 23, at 10 a.m., in Classroom
2. Herbert Sperber will lead a dis-
cussion on the Book of Psalms.
All welcome.
Golda Meir-Boynton Beach
Chapter of Hadassah's first
luncheon and card party get-
together will be held at Kristine's
on Tuesday, Oct. 30 at noon. For
tickets, contact Ann Sherrow or
Rebecca Dubin.
The Palm Beach Chapter of
Hadassah has changed the name
of the Hadassah Thrift Shop to
The Hadassah Bargain Store,"
526 Clematis St., West Palm
Beach.
The Rishona Group of the
Palm Beach Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its regular meeting on
Thursday, Oct. 25, at 12:30 p.m.
at Temple Israel, 1901 North
Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach.
Program: Reports of the
National Convention which was
held in Chicago; also, Jewish
short stories. Refreshments will
be served.
Aliya Group of Hadassah will
hold its paid-up membership
luncheon on Oct. 25 at Temple
Beth Sholom, 315 North "A" St..
Lake Worth, at 12:30 p.m. All
paid-up members, life members
and transfers are eligible to
attend. Payment of dues at the
door will be accepted.
The program will be "A
Unique Hat Show." produced
and directed by vice president
and program chairman. Bee
Rocklin. For further information,
contact hostess. Dora Altman,
vice president and membership
hairman.
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TUNE IN TO L'CHAYIM
Sunday, Oct. 21 and 28 at 10:30 a.m. WPBR Radio
Sponsored by The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
On Oct. 21, Rabbi Marc Tannenbaum, ecumenist, will discuss
"The Effects of the Pope's Visit on the American Jewish
Community."
Oct. 28: "An Interview with
Ambassador to the United Nations.
Yehuda Blum," Israeli

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each
County
rageo
ZOA to Honor Levy With Kfar Silver Chair
The Zionist Organization of
America, which together with the
Zionist Organization of Canada
and the Latin American Confed-
1 eration of General Zionists, is
sponsoring an International
Leadership Conference at the
Doral Hotel in Miami Beach, Oct.
24 to 28, will conclude the
meeting with a dinner honoring
Florida real estate developer and
philanthropist H. Irwin Levy.
The ZOA Brandeis Award
Dinner will be held Saturday,
Oct. 27, at 8 p.m. at the Doral
Hotel.
Scheduled to address the
dinner, which will be attended by
Zionist leaders from the U.S.,
Canada and Latin America, are
the Israel Ambassador to the
United Nations, Yehuda Z. Blum,
and former Supreme Allied Com-
mander (NATO), General
Alexander Haig.
GENERAL chairman of the
Dinner Committee is Alan L.
Shulman of Palm Beach. Co-
chairmen are Norman Braman
and Robert Russell, both of
Miami.
Levy will be presented with the
Justice Louis D. Brandeis Award
in honor of the late Supreme
Court Justice and pioneer
American Zionist leader. This
In Miami Beach
H. Irwin Levy
coveted award is given to those
who epitomize the essence of
Zionist commitment and com-
munity service, as exemplified by
the eminent jurist.
Levy is the president and chief
operating officer of Cenvill Com-
munities, the developers of Wyn-
moor Village and Century
Villages, the largest builders of
adult condominium communities
in the United States. Plans also
are underway for a Century
Village in Caesarea, Israel.
Levy has been a practicing
attorney in Florida since 1961
and is a senior partner of the law
firm Levy, Plisco, Perry, Shapiro,
Kneen and Kingcade of Palm
Beach.
HIS philanthropies and service
to Jewish causes are as farflung
as his business interests. In 1977
he was given the Community
Merit Award of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach. He is a
member of the board of the Fed-
eration, the board of the Jewish
Community Day School, the
National Council of the American
Israel Public Affairs Committee,
the National Campaign Cabinet
of the United Jewish Appeal,
American Jewish Congress,
American Jewish Committee, the
board of the American Com-
mittee of the Weizman Institute
and the Israel-Florida Chamber
of Commerce.
Levy and his wife, Jeanne,
have a daughter, Lynn, and a
son, Mark.
About Kfar Silver
Kfar Silver, the leading secon-
dary school in Israel is sponsored
by the ZOA and is attended by
600 students, many of them
needy. Among these are recent
immigrants from Iran, the Soviet
Union and Latin America-
Located on a 520-acre campus
near AshkeIon, it offers a balance
Erlich, Dulzin and Evron Address ZOA
An international Zionist
Leadership Conference, spon-
sored by the Zionist Organization
of America, the Latin American
Confederation of General Zionists
and the Zionist Organization of
Canada, will take place in Miami
Beach, Oct. 24-28.
Already confirmed as ad-
dressing the conference are
Simcha Erlich, the Minister of
Finance of the State of Israel;
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
Jewish Agency; and Ephraim
Evron, ambassador of the State
of Israel to the United States.
The theme of the conference
is "Issues and Problems
Affecting Israel and World
Jewry." Chairman is Gordon
Zacks, a national vice chairman
of the UJA and past chairman of
the Young Leadership Cabinet of
the UJA.
American Zionist leaders who
will address the conference are
ZOA president, Ivan J. Novick;
Rabbi Joseph P. Sternstein,
president of the American Zionist
Federation; and Jacques Tor-
czyner, president of the World
Union of General Zionists.
Investment Equity
Real Estate
DON VOGEL
Registered Real Estate Broker salesman
Residential-Condominium-ln vestment
2352 PQA Boulevard Business 626-5100
Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. 33410Residence622-4000
A ZOA "Commission on
Zionist Ideology." under the
chairmanship of Donald Wolpe of
Washington, D.C. also will report
to the conference on its
deliberations. The academic
world will be represented in a
discussion by Prof. Gil AlRoy,
professor of political science at
Hunter College and the Graduate
Center of The City University of
New York, and Prof. Fred
Gottheil, chairman of the
American Professors for Peace in
the Middle East. Other speakers
are to be announced.
The conference will close with a
banquet honoring Florida real
estate developer and philan-
thropist H. Irwin Levy, under the
chairmanship of Alan L.
Shulman.
The Zionist Organization of America, along with the
Zionist Organization of Canada and the Latin American
Confederation of General Zionists, will sponsor an Inter-
national Leadership Conference at the Doral Hotel on
Miami Beach Oct. 24-28. H. Irwin Levy, right, real estate
developer and philanthropist will be honored at a special
dinner when he will receive the Zionist Organization of
America Brandeis Award. Pictured with him are, left to
right, Alan L. Shulman, general chairman of the Dinner
Committee; Barbara Shulman and Jeanne Levy.
and comprehensive academic
program, conforming to the cur-
ricula of American high schools.
A varied range of Hebrew and
Judaic studies is provided. In
addition, agricultural and
vocational skills are taught,
including those required to
develop technical skills. The
Levy Chair in Social Studies will
provide further enrichment of the
school curriculum.
THE ZOA was founded in 1897
immediately following the first
World Zionist Congress called by
Theodor Herzl in Basel, Switzer-
land. Through more than 80
years of leadership it has
presented the case for Israel
before the bar of American public
opinion and has set an example in
charitable work with youth in
Is.ael and in the United States.
Its 130,000 members across
America identify with the Jewish
pride, Jewish self-respect and
Jewish courage personified in the
Zionist ideal.
Series for Parents
Of Preschoolers
The Jewish Family & Chil-
dren's Service and the Jewish
Community Center began a
"Parents of Pre-Schoolers"
family life series Oct. 10, at the
JF & CS, 2411 Okeechobee Blvd.,
West Palm Beach.
Parents of pre-schoolers have
many questions about them-
selves and their children. What
are reasonable limits? How are
they set and by whom? Dis-
ciplining, sibling rivalry, con-
sistency and separation are
among the many topics which
will be covered by Linda Cohen,
MSW, the JF & CS's family life
group leader.
Stephen Levitt, executive
director of JF & CS. and Martin
Goldberg, executive director of
the JCC, in a joint announcement
to the Floridian, indicated that
"this group marks an important
new step in inter-agency pro-
gramming. It is hoped that other
Family Life Groups, devoted to a
wide variety of topics, will see
fruition in the future," they said.
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Light tY\e candle
and remember?
As our fathers before us, light the
candle and remember those who
have left us. Hold this day for
reflection and thoughtfulness; in
solemnity, strength of purpose
and hope.
Menorah Chapels, to preserve the
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Paint Beach County
Friday, October 19,1979
The Word from Clearwater \
From Clearwater, Fla. way comes the news that
Judaism has finally been elevated to the same rank of
esteem previously held exclusively by Christianity.
It is the Ku Klux Klan that has done the elevating.
They've taken to burning Stars of David in the same
way that they once reserved exclusively for the
Christian Cross.
Neither Jew nor Christian ought to be flattered
by this, or offended, whatever road our religious
sensibilities may direct us toward.
Indeed, this latest selection for special KKK
honors accorded the Star of David ought to be
sufficient reason for Jews and Christians to join
hands more firmly than ever in their repudiation of
such gross and ignorant action.
If we seem to have difficulties in doing that
under the best of circumstances, the two great
Western religions ought at least have no such dif-
ficulties under the worst.
The Papal Message
There is no doubt of the impact that Pope John
Paul's visit to the United States "has had on all
Americans, no matter what their faith. People are
reaching out for some sort of leadership they feel
they can trust.
Certainly, there is no such trust they any longer
believe they can have in their governmental leaders.
Nor, indeed, in the leaders of the nation's commerce
and industry that once made them the richest and
most powerful country on earth.
Right or wrong, the orchestration of Pope John
Paul's visit here showed him to be a man of benign,
beneficent power, and it is this that seems so at-
tractive to the masses of Americans
So far as the Jewish community is concerned,
there is little doubt that it also felt the warmth of his
feeling. Not even in the three-ring circus called the
United Nations did he shy away from reminiscing
about Auschwitz as a lesson in human morality in
that arena where things Jewish these days are reviled
and held in contempt.
Perhaps 'it is that the Pope understands that
history is consistent in this single lesson: Jews are
the harbinger of the future, and thus, such
humiliation as is currently being visited upon them
at the United Nations must be regarded as
humiliation-to-come in the not distant future for all
mankind by the forces of immorality that have seized
that body of world opinion and cynically twisted its
high ideals into a mockery of their original intent.
Auschwitz was the Pope's warning to the world,
and we are not a little frightened that, applaud him
roundly though they did, the nations of the world
still do not pay heed.
On Making Friends
Since people are inclined to seize upon the ac-
tions of individual Jews as characteristic of all Jews,
it would seem we must be especially careful in the
choice of actions that we make.
This is especially true in our prospensity for
adopting the high and the mighty as spokesmen for
our various causes. Beginning with the distinguished
journalist. Dorothy Thompson, our contemporary
history is rich in the experience of stellar per-
sonalities who took our money, spoke our sen-
timents, and then stuck a knife in our backs.
It is therefore with some degree of concern that
we note our most recent adoption: this time of movie
actress Jane Fonda and her husband, Tom Hayden,
as spokesmen in the cause of Israel.
Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE"and "FEDERATION REPORTER
In conjunction with Jewish federation of PaJm Beach Count v Inc
Combined Jewish Appeal
P ALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
3200 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 388 3001
Printing Office 120 N E 8th St Miami. Fla 33132- Phone 373-4805
That Time for Nobel Thoughts
TIME AND again. I have
written about the Nobel Prize as
a political instrument too often
unrelated to the area of excellence
it recognizes. The criteria by
which we judge a great novelist
or poet, an innovative scientist or
earth-shaking humanist too
easily and too frequently take
second place to the Nobel
Academy's favorite political
cause of the year.
Consider, say, Jorge Luis
Borges for the Academy's prize
in literature? That might well
depend on whether or not the
Academy's'cozying up to Argen-
tina these days. The reasoning
might go something like this:
BORGES IS a breathtaking
novelist and philosopher, all
right. Also, he's blind and
FRED K. SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
Mindlin
IN
growing older by the minute. He
may not be around next year for
us to enshrine him in the halls of
our immortals. If we do not give
him the prize right now, Borges
may have to join the ranks of the
RONNI TARTAKOW
News Coordinator
The Jewish Floridian Does Nof Guarantee The Kashruth
Ol The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
FORM 3579 returns to The Jewish Floridian
3200 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. Fla TJSPS 864303
Published Bl-Weekly Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton. Fla.
Federation officers: President. Alan L. Shulman. Vice Presidents Dr. Richard
Shugarman. Dr Howard Kay. Kenneth Scherer, Jeanne Levy. Jerome Tishman,
Treasurer: Stacl Lesser. Secretary. Bruce J Daniels. Executive Director.
Norman J Schimelman Submit material for publication to Ronnl Tartakow.
Director of Public Relations
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Jewh* Fodarartar. at Palm Baach County, Ml Wvtt, FUjflar Drivs, Watt Palm
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Friday. October 19.1979 28 TISHR116740
Volume 5 Number Zl
1UQOFVIAR
-OTA
other unheralded masters whom
the Nobel Academy snubbed and
whom, one would therefore think,
the world has since forgotten:
Joyce, Proust, Woolf, Lawrence,
Pound, to name but a few.
Still, the Academy might say,
we must gamble, and Borges
must wait. Argentina is fascist,
and the fact that Borges was one'
of the most outspoken opponents
and heartrending victims of
Argentine 'fascism from the
earliest days of Juan Peron is
beside the point. For Ladislaus
Lutoslawski can not wait. His
gallant stand on the palace steps
of the capital city in Central
Transylvania was last year's shot
heard round the world.
Without Lutoslawski's
courage against the 500-man
insurgent force seeking the
destruction of freedom in Central
Transylvania, an entire continent
might today be enslaved and the
rise of the free world with it.
BE IT KNOWN, too, that in
his spare time Ladislaus Lutos-
lawski is a poet of no incon-
siderable power. Nighttime Press
of Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn,
whose gallant editor, Yussi
Steinberg, is a 17-year-old
director of the Central Transyl-
vania Security Force in Behalf of
Democracy Abroad the entire
Five Boroughs Chapter has
received a copy of the collected
works of Lutoslawski through
the underground, "38 pages in all.
Yussi Steinberg is now preparing
a definitive Nighttime edition of
these poems on vellum which, he
says, were smuggled out through
the frontline action on the palace
steps.
Steinberg considers that they
rank with the rankest of Chile's
Pablo Neruda. Anyway, Central
Transylvania today. Argentina
tomorrow even if it remains
fascist and, of course, providing
Borges is still alive.
Now, who am 1 to say that
politics will enter into the Nobel
Continued on Page 13
xamines
When Harlem Was Jewish Community
NEW YORK Jews and
Blacks lived peacefully together
in Harlem during the first two
decades of the twentieth century,
with the Jewish population
leaving largely for reasons of
upward mobility, says Dr.
Jeffrey Gurock, professor of
Jewish history at Yeshiva
University's Bernard Revel
Graduate School in his newly
released book, When Harlem
Was Jewish 1870-1930. published
by Columbia University Press.
"The first large incursion of
Blacks into Harlem, then a
predominently Jewish neigh-
borhood, did not precipitate a
mass exodus of Jews. Although
some opposed Black settlement,
more stayed, and lived har-
moniously with and among
Blacks until new economic op-
portunities and better built
neighborhoods beckoned in the
1920s. Indeed, Jews were among
the last whites to leave what was
to become the renowned Black
ghetto," Dr. Gurock says.
THE BOOK, which "grants
long overdue recognition to a
once important and until now
uncelebrated American Jewish
community," offers many
descriptions of heretofore
unknown or unrecognized events,
issues, and presonalitiee.
It also seeks to extend the
knowledge of issues such as
urban growth and decay, im-
migrant settlements and
relocations and internal Jewish
communal organization and
conflict. For Dr. Gurock, it is on
this comparative and analytical
level that there is most to be
gained.
Dr. Gurock believes that
previous historians of mid-
nineteenth century German-
American Jewish life centered
either on "the changing com-
munal structure of early Atlantic
coast Jewish centers under tha
impact of large-scale Central
European migration, or upon the
trials and travels of the im-
migrant peddler the Jewish
component in America's manifest
destiny story who plies his
wares in the Western wilderness
and who ultimately succeeds in
establishing focuses of Jewish
economic and religious life in
most major entrepot cities on the
road."
He explains that "historians
recognize the absence of sub-
stantial communications between
the older Eastern centers and the
new pioneer communities of the
West, and have examined the
valiant attempts at national
unification initiated by several
groups of religious leaders within
a dispersed American Jewry. Yet
no one has analyzed the economic
life and community-building
activities to those other German
Jews who were neither really part
of the seaboard communities nor
of the remote midwestern set-
tlements the Jews of the early,
nineteenth century suburbs,"
which Harlem, New York's
uptown suburb, was one.
A DETALIED study of turn of
the century East European
migration from the lower East
side to Harlem illuminates the
complex set of forces directing
intra-city migration, upsetting
many commonly held views of
contemporary analysis, who see
uptown migration as a "signal
milestone" in the changing
economic and social life of the
new American, and who maintain
that the poor and unacculturated
immigrant at the tum of the
century had no option but to
settle in the densely populated,
run-down sections of the city
already occupied by his co-
ethnics and co-religionists.
Dr. Gurock explains that
Harlem, at least after 1900, was
home to both poor and affluent
Jews, and that, apparently, more
immigrants moved to Harlem in
the hope of financial success than
as a sign that they had already
achieved that success.
"Many of the same forces
which pushed the poor out of the
ghetto may well have con-
tributed, ironically, to the
persistence there of many of their
more affluent fellow im-
migrants," he says.
AS ONE example of his
maverick theory. Dr. Gurock
cites new law tenement and
public park legislation, which, in
improving the physical con-
ditions of life on the Lower East
Side, created more modern, but
also more expensive housing for
the newly affluent manufac-
turers, dealers and shopkeepers,
and inadvertently forced many
poor Jews either to crowd in with
friends and relatives downtown
Continued on Page 13


Friday, October 19,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
.... ....
Page 5
Holocaust 'A Last Desperate Warning'
ARLINGTON, Va. One of
the nation's leading authorities
on genocide said that the Nazi
death camps have led to a world
society which "will not raise a
finger to halt" a Holocaust.
Dr. Henry L. Geingold,
professor of history at the
Graduate Center of New York's
City University and Baruch
College, told 200 social scientists
assembled at the Hospitality
House in Arlington, Va., to heed
the Holocaust as "a last
desperate warning that a world
which can consume its own
children is out of control."
Dr. Feingold was the keynote
speaker at the two-day National
Conference on Teaching About
Genocide and the Nazi Holocaust
in Secondary Schools, sponsored
by the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith's Center for
Studies on the Holocaust in
cooperation with the National
Council for Social Studies.
In welcoming remarks,
Maxwell E. Greenberg, ADL
national chairman, said the
conference "marks tbe coming of
age of Holocaust education in
America's schools." He called
such education "a legal, ethical
i and educational imperative ... in
, a world where cross-burnings and
swastika paintings more often
than not turn out to be the work
of teenagers."
The conference also featured
reports on two major studies:
A survey of secondary
school history texts by Dr. Glenn
Pate, assistant professor of
secondary education at the
University of Arizona, which
found that not a single textbook
in current use by high schools in
the United States adequately
covers the subject of the
Holocaust;
A poll of Christian clergy
conducted by Dr. Robert
Wuthnow, director of the
Program in Science and Human
Affairs of the Sociology
Department, Princeton
University, which revealed a
widespread belief that a
Holocaust is "an ongoing threat
to human society" and that
Christians may be marked as
potential victims.
The 200 participants -
educators, administrators,
sociologists and human relations
specialists from every section of
the country also reviewed
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problems in developing in-
struction programs since a
previous conference on the
Holocaust in 1977, and par-
ticipated in workshops on new
programs, materials, teaching
and training methods. In ad-
dition, there were showings of
films, film slides and other audio
visual material, displays of print,
art and graphic materials, and an
exhibit of German documents
relating to the Holocaust.
In his address, Prof. Feingold,
director of the Faculty Holocaust
Seminar at the City University
Graduate School, said that the
slaughter of 6,000,000 Jews
presented the world with "an
alternate solution to the age old
problem of living together in a
society though we are different.
"The final solution," he said,
"was an extension of the in-
dustrial system, the hallmark of
European civilization which
permitted it to dominate the
world in previous centuries.
"Those piles of hair," he
declared, "children's shoes,
glasses are the differentiated by-
products of the factory system
gone awry. The raw material had
become not ore or minerals but
human beings and the end
product was death, so many units
per day."
And he asked: "With Ausch-
witz in our closet, how can we say
anything of the G ulag?''
Prof. Feingold called the
Holocaust "unique" because in
applying the most modern
techniques "to grind the Jews
into ashes, it in fact murdered the
most representative of its own
children, the most universalistic
of universalists, the most
European of Europeans, the most
Jewish of Jews."
Continuing, he said: "it was in
fact an act of social cannibalism
on an unprecedented scale. Had
the Nazi death machine been
allowed to continue, entire
sections of Europe, especially in
the East, would have been
depopulated. Europe would
Literally have consumed itself in
flame. The Jews were merely the
first and most representative to
go up the chimneys of Auschwitz.
There were others to follow."
The consequence, he stressed,
is that Jews talk of the Holocaust
"incessantly, research deeper and
deeper into its intricacies."
The reason, he emphasized, "is
not to satisfy some perverse need
to herald our victimization or to
garner goodwill for the Jewish
enterprise" but because it is "a
portent, a last desperate warning
that a world which can consume
its own children in fire is out of
control."
Among the local educators
attending from Florida was
Richard Clarke, chairman, Social
Studies Department, North
Shore Senior High School, West
Palm Beach.
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Page 6
The Jewish Flondan of Palm Btach County
Friday, October 19,1979
South County /Mews
Temple Beth El Sets Lecture Forum Series
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
announces its Second Annual
Lecture Forum Series. The series
will bring to Boca Raton seven
national and international per-
sonalities in literature, politics,
religion, international affairs and
the arts.
The series will begin on
Sunday, Oct. 28, at 8 p.m. with
Dr. Michael Cook, associate pro-
fessor of Intertestimental and
Early Christian literatures at
Hebrew Union College. Dr. Cook
will discuss "The Citation of
Jewish Scriptures in Christian
Missionizing and the Jewish
Response."
Michael Medved will speak on
Sunday, Nov. 18, at 8 p.m.
Medved is a best-selling author
and national TV personality. His
book. What Really Happened to
the Class of 65? sold over one
million copies, and became the
basis for a weekly series on NBC.
His new book. The Shadow
Presidents, was published in
September 1979. A series of TV
specials are being created based
on the book as a six-part
dramatization. He recently com-
pleted work on the screenplay of
"The Journey of Simon
McKeever," which will feature
Jane and Henry Fonda in
starring roles. He will speak on
"Jews and American Politics:
Past, Present and Future."
Dr. Bernard Reich is professor |
of political science and inter-
national affairs and chairman of
the Department of Political
Science at the George Washing-
ton University in Washington,
D.C.. where he specializes in the
politics of the Middle East. Dr.
Reich will speak on Sunday, Dec.
2, at 8 p.m. on "Prospects for
Peace in the Middle East." He
has lectured on this subject
extensively at many govern-
mental agencies as well as
throughout the Middle East.
Max I. Dimont is an author
and lecturer. His first book Jews,
God and History has become a
classic in its own time, a Jewish
history book selling over a
million and one half copies in 15
years. It has been translated into
French. Spanish. Hindu and
Dimont
Reich
Cook
Potok
Medved
Ben Gad
Japanese. Dimont will speak on
Jan. 6, 1980 at 8 p.m. on "The
Paradox of Zionism in a World of
Racism."
Dr. Chaim Potok is an author,
rabbi, painter and lecturer. Dr.
Potok is the author of four best
selling novels of contemporary
Jewish life in America The
Chosen, The Promise, My Name
is Asher Levi and In the Begin-
ning. His latest book is entitled
Wanderings, a history of the
Jews from ancient times to world
Jewry today. Dr. Potok will
speak on Feb. 10, 1980, at 8 p.m.
and his topic will be "An Evening
with Chaim Potok."
Dr. Bernard Schechterman is a
professor of international affairs
and former chairman of the
Department of Political Science
at the University of Miami in
Coral Gables. He is also the
elections analyst for Channels 4,
6 and 10 in the Miami area. Dr.
Schecterman will speak on March
2, 1980 at 8 p.m. on the subject
"An Analysis of the Coming
Presidential Elections in Florida
and the Nation."
Dr. Yitschak Ben Gad is the
deputy mayor of Netanya, Israel,
as well as a correspondent for
several Israeli dailies as well as
preparing his columns on Middle
East commentary in numerous
Anglo-Jewish papers in the
United States. Dr. Gad is fluent
in Hebrew, Arabic and English
and appears as a commentator on
Israeli TV and radio in all three
languages. Dr. Gad will speak on
March 23, 1980 at 8 p.m. on the
subject "An Incisive Analysis of
the Current Mideast Situation
and a Knowledgeable Look into
the Arab Psyche."
South County Calendar
Oct. 20
Hadossah Sabra Group -
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
Dinner Dance JEWISH FEDERATION
Oct. 21
Temple Beth El Board Golf Deborah Hospital La* Vegas Trip
Oct. 22
B'nai B'nth Women Naomi Chapter noon
Oct. 23
Hadossah A vivo Breakfast 10 a.m.
Oct. 24
National Council of Jewish Women 8 p.m. Hadassah Aviva -
noon
Oct. 25
Temple Beth El Soc. Act 8 p.m.
Oct. 2*
Tempi* Beth El Youth Group Service 8:15 p.m.
Oct. 21
Temple Emeth Brotherhood Breakfast 10 a.m. Temple Beth E
Adult Ed 8 p.m. JEWISH FEDERATION COMMUNITY RELATIONS
JVXJL/NCIL BREAKFAST ISRAELI RETREAT BOCA TEECA
Oct. 2*
Women's American ORT East Board 12:30 p.m. Deborah
Hospital Board 12:30 p.m.
Oct. 30
Deborah Hospital 12:30 p.m.
Oct. 31
Women's American ORT-Delray- 10a.m.
Mov. 1
Brandeis University Women Sordines 9 a.m. Hadassah Sabra
Group Board-8 p.m. -
The entire series is open to the
public. Tickets to the individual
lectures will be available on the
evening of each lecture.
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
is located at 333 SW 4th Ave.,
Boca Raton, not far from the Pal-
metto Park Road exit at Boca
Raton in 1-95. Call the temple
office for directions. All lectures
will begin on Sunday evenings at
8 p.m.
BRANDEIS WOMEN
On Tuesday, Oct. 30, at 12:30
p.m., the Brandeis University
National Women's Committee
(Delray Chapter) will hold its
first meeting of the season at the
Delray Square Theater.
Registration for the study group
Showcase can be done either by
mail or by registering at tables in
the lobby prior to the meeting.
A film on Brandeis University
will be shown. Moderator for the
program is Belle Jurkowitz, an
alumna of Brandeis University
and also a member of the national
board of Brandeis.
Refreshments will be served.
Members and prospective
members are welcome to attend.
BRANDEIS WOMEN
Palm Beach West Chapter of
Brandeis University Women's
Committee will hold its first
meeting of the season at 1 p.m.,
Wednesday, Oct. 24, at
Congregation Anshei Sholom.
THE WORKMEN'S CIRCLE
The Workmen's Circle Branch
No. 1041 will have as its guest
speaker, Tom Kelly, editor of The
Palm Beach Post. He will speak
on "Overview of the Middle East,
Where We Are and Where We
Are Going." The meeting will be
held at the Odd Fellow's Hall,
410 Datura St., on Thursday,
Oct. 25, at 2 p.m. Free admission.
Workmen's Circle Branch 1051
will meet on Wednesday, Nov.
14, at 1 p.m. at the Delray Beach
Community Center, 100 NW 1st
Ave., Delray Beach.
DEBORAH HOSPITAL
FOUNDATION
Deborah Hospital Foundation
will meet Monday, Oct. 29, at
noon at Congregation Anshei
Sholom.
A Thanksgiving weekend is
being planned at the Carillon
Hotel, Thursday, Nov. 22,
through Sunday, Nov. 25. There
will be entertainment nightly,
free golf. Contact Pearl Kolbert
(South Hampton B 128) or Kate
Green (South Hampton B 228). A
Jungle Queen Cruise will be held
New Year's Eve. Contact Eve
Sladkus (Canterbury F. 140).
MID-COUNTY
MEDICAL CENTER
The Duplicate Bridge Club of
Continued on Following Page
Reform Group to Install Officers, Rabbi
Officers and the rabbi of the
one-year-old Reform Hebrew
Congregation of Delray will be
formally installed at a Sabbath
Eve service at The First Presby-
terian Church, 33 Gleason St.,
Delray Beach. Friday, Nov. 20, at
8:15 p.m. it was announced today
by Lawrence Sommers.
president. .
Rabbi Lewis Bogage of Miami,
director of the Southeast Region
of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, will be the in-
stalling officer and guest
preacher. Rabbi Bruce Warshal,
associate director of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, will take part in the
service.
Rabbi Samuel Silver is the
spiritual guide of the
congregation.
Weekly Friday night services
are conducted by the Con-
gregation at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 188 S. Swinton St.,
Delray Beach.
Series Set on Marital Communications
The Jewish Family &
Children's Service of Palm Beach
County, in cooperation with
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton's
adult education program, will
jointly sponsor a series on Im-
proving Marital Com-
munications. The series will be
conducted in six sessions which
will variously teach com-
munication skills via mini-
lectures, group discussions, role
playing, exercises and other
assignments.
Persons interested in regis-
tering for this family life series
should contact Temple Beth El.
This series is part of an on-
going commitment by the Jewish
Family and Children's Service
toward improving Jewish family
functioning. The agency invites
suggestions for other "Jewish
Family Life Education'' topics:
these suggestions should be
directed to Linda Cohen, of the
JF ACS staff.
According to Rose Schwartz,
president of the JF & CS, "We
are embarking upon an ambitious
program of service to the com-
munity." Qualified Jewish
fraternal, social and religious
organizations which may be
interested in having their own
Jewish Family Life Education
group are urged to contact the JF
& CS office.
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Friday, October 19,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
'
South County /Mews
Continued from Preceding Page Junior College.
Century Village, at Hastings
Club House, under directors
Norman Sirota and Al Lipton, is
planning a card party to benefit
the Mid-County Medical Center.
This event is not limited to
bridge. Players of other card
games and table games are
welcome. The date: Thursday,
Oct. 25, at 12:30 p.m.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The Palm Beach Chapter of
Women's American ORT is
holding its first meeting of the
new season on Monday, Oct. 22,
at 1 p.m. in the Churchill Room of
the Holiday Inn, 2830 South
Ocean Blvd., Palm Beach.
The program will include a talk
on "One Hundred Years of
ORT," as well as a film on the
Bramson School in New York
City, which is an ORT school.
Refreshments will be served.
ORT Mid-Palm Chapter will
hold its paid-up membership
luncheon Monday, Oct. 22, at
noon, at Temple Beth Shalom,
315 No^A St., Lake Worth.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
Jewish War Veterans, Golden-
Century Post 501, will meet at 10
a.m. at Junior's Restaurant,
Palm Beach Mall; members and
prospective members are invited.
State commander and staff of-
ficers will be visiting.
Sunday, Dec. 2, the group will
meet at 10 a.m. at Junior's
Restaurant, Palm Beach Mall.
Atty. Barry Cohen will speak on
criminal justice. Guests are
welcome.
Sunday, Dec. 16, Chanukah
Dinner-Dance at Ramada Inn,
Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. Dinner
6 p.m. For reservations, contact
Alex Block.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
On Wednesday, Nov. 14, at
9:30 a.m., National Council of
Jewish Women, in conjunction
with Palm Beach Junior College,
will present a Women's
Education Day.
The theme for the day will be
"Women's Economic Future
What Do We Want, Where Are
We Going ?" What Is Being
Done to Assure Economic
Equality For Women?
The main topics will be broken
down into the federal govern-
ment, state government, county
government, and community
resources.
Ruth Blumrosen, special
consultant to the Equal
Employment Opportunity
Commission, will be guest
speaker. Helen Hoffman, former
assistant Dean of Law, Rutgers
University, will be moderator.
The event will be held in the
Allied Services Building of the
Shabbos
Fri. Eve. Sat. Aftn.
Bat-Bar Mitzvahs
without instruments
PERFORMED WITH DIGNITY
AND IN KEEPING WITH THE
SABBATH
Supervised activities for
the children (With prizes)
Adult Audience Participation
Let the Tummlers
Make Your Party
A Day to Remember
The Tummlers
Mike Filed*
1-742-4614
We also furnish orchestras for
All Occasions
i
On Oct. 24, the Palm Beach
Section of National Council of
Jewish Women will host its paid-
up membership luncheon at the
North Palm Beach Library
lower level, 30 Anchorage Drive,
North Palm Beach, at 11 a.m.
Reservations are being taken
by Mrs. George Pesacov and
Mrs. Garland Holland. Guest
speaker will be Rep. Elanor
Weinstock. Make reservations by
Oct. 20.
REFORM HEBREW
CONGREGATION
The Reform Hebrew
Congregation of Delray was
honored by the presence of
Mayor Weekes of Delray Beach
at the Rosh Hashanah Eve
service at the First Presbyterian
Church, Gleason Street.
The mayor was introduced by
Rabbi Samuel Silver. The mayor
wished everyone a Happy Rosh
Hashanah holiday and presented
a plaque to president Larry
Sommers for the congregation.
The service was further enhanced
by the singing of "Eli Eli" by
Mark Plant.
Services will resume every
Friday night at St. Paul's
Episcopal Church, 188 So.
Swinton Ave., at 8:15 p.m. with
Rabbi Silver officiating.
Sisterhood of Reform Hebrew
Congregation meets every fourth
Monday of the month at Pompey
Park Community Building, 1101
NW 2nd St., Delray, at 12:30
p.m. Sisterhood membership is
open to all.
Sisterhood of Reform Hebrew
Congregation of Delray will have
a gourmet lunch and card party
Monday, Oct. 29. For in-
formation, call Anne Gottlieb,
Delray Beach, or Ray Kowitt,
Delray Beach.
lMu* cB. Setf>a/tf
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER
ACTtEAGE-HOMES-UJTS,-APARTMENTS-INCOME PROPERTY
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Reform Leader to Speak
At Temple Israel
Rabbi Leon Fram, founding
rabbi of Temple Israel, Detroit,
Mich., will deliver the sermon at
Temple Israel, West Palm Beach,
Sabbath Services, Friday, Oct. 26
at 8:15 p.m. in the sanctuary,
1901 North Flagler Drive.
Rabbi Fram is here to honor
the Bat Mitzvah of Susan
Mitteldorf, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Marvin Mitteldorf, of Palm
Beach Gardens. Susan, an
honorary granddaughter of
Rabbi Fram, will receive a special
blessing from the rabbi, known as
the dean of the Michigan rab-
binate.
Rabbi Fram organized Temple
Israel of Detroit in 1941, and the
congregation quickly grew to
become one of the foremost and
largest Reform congregations in
the United States. Rabbi Fram,
whose long list of honors includes
serving as a former member of
the national executive board of
the Zionist Organization of
America, was one of the first
Rabbi Fram
Zionist-oriented rabbis who
actively supported the establish-
ment of the State of Israel.
Rabbi Irving B. Cohen and
Rabbi Joel L. Levine will officiate
at services that evening, assisted
by the Temple Choir, directed by
Warren Canfield.
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, October 19,1979
Seminary to Honor ]VL Mac Schwebel
M. Mac Schwebel of White
Plains, N.Y., and Palm Beach, a
lawyer and leader of religious and
communal causes, has been
named to receive the Louis
Marshall Memorial Medal of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, one of its highest
honors, it was announced by Dr.
Gerson D. Cohen, chancellor of
the Seminary. The presentation
will be made at a dinner at the
Hotel Pierre in New York City on
Thursday, Nov. 8.
Schwebel was for many years a
trustee of Temple Israel Center of
White Plains and also served as
chairman of the Synagogue
Council of Wall Street, the
synagogue of the financial
district. When he established. a
residence in Palm Beach recently,
he became a trustee of Temple
Emanu-El.
Schwebel is the board chair-
man and co-founder of the
Solomon Schechter School in
Westchester, a religious day
school which is part of a network
of such schools associated with
the Jewish Theological Seminary.
He and his wife, Irene, have also
established a scholarship at the
Seminary's Rabbinical School.
The Seminary honored him with
its National Community Service
Award in 1972.
M. Mac Schwebel
In the Westchester area,
Schwebel has also served as a
trustee of Mt. Vernon Hospital
and of the Hackley School in
Tarry town.
The Louis Marshall Medal is
named for the constitutional
lawyer who was the Jewish
Theological Seminary "s board
president for the first quarter of
this century, and played a key
role in establishing it as an in-
stitution of world stature in
Jewish religious and academic
DISTRIBUTION OF 1t7 ALLOCATIONS
APPROVED MAY 30.197
The Board ol Directors has approved the distribulion ol t2.BBS.227 Irom pledges railed in
the 1979 campaign The Budget and Allocations Committee reviewed the requests ol the
local, national and overseas agencies and submitted their recommendations to the Board
for final review and approval Jeanne Levy served as Chairman of the Budget and
Allocations Committee
I OVERSEAS
United Jewish Appeal
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society
Eiras Torah Fund
American-Israel Cultural Foundation
Federated Council of Israeli Institutes
II. NATIONAL HUMAN RELATIONS AGENCIES
American Jewish Committee
American Jewish Congress
B nai B'nth Anti-Defamation League
Jewish Labor Committee
Jewish War Veterans
National Conference on Soviet Jewry
National Jewish Community Relations Advisory Council
Synagogue Council of America
American Academic Association tor Peace in the Middle East
III NATIONAL CULTURAL. EDUCATIONAL AGENCIES
Joint Cultural Appeal
American Association tor Jewish Education
American Jewish Archives
Dropsie University
Jewish Chautauo.ua Society
Jewish Theological Seminary
Relorm Jewish Appeal
Yeshiva University
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Fellowship in Jewish Education Leadership
National Jewish Conference Center
IV NATIONAL SOCIAL SERVICE AGENCIES
National Jewish Weilare Board
Council of Jewish Federations Media Service
B nai B'rith Youth Service
North American Jewish Students Appeal
Jewish Braille Institute
Association of Jewish Family & Children s Agencies
Conference of Jewish Communal Service
Council of Jewish Federations Dues
V REGIONAL SERVICES
B nai B nth Hiiiei Foundation of Florida
Central Agency for Jewish Education of Miami
VI LOCAL AGENCIES
Jewish Family Children s Service
Jewish Community Day School
Jewish Community Center
Jewish Federation Administration
Federation Campaign
VII JEWISH FEDERATION SERVICES
1 Community Relations Council
2 Fkxidian Newspaper
3 River Garden Home tor the Aged (Jacksonville)
4 Jewish Education Committee
5 Leadership Development
8 Mission Program*
7. Refugee Resettlement
8 Social Services
9 Mosaic TV Program
10 Endowment Fund
11. Community Contingency Fund
12. Israel Independence Day
13 Grant Consultant
14 Radio Program L'Chayim
1822 000
6.000
100
275
220
Total 1 828.595
2.600
1.350
2.800
440
385
500
935
200
890
Total 9.860
500
550
165
100
275
500
500
500
500
550
250
Total 4.390
1 550
500
100
500
330
165
60
13 765
Total 16.970
10.000
450
Total 10 450
120.650
119.000
84.000
381.589
127.248
15 High School Program
VH CAMP SHALOM
Maintenance
Capital improvements
Insurance
Total 832. 487
6.000
21.000
7,200
2.000
4.000
1.000
23.000
600
2.000
30.000
8,000
2.000
16.000
2.000
10,000
Total 134,800
10,000
5.000
3.000
Total 18.000
life. The award that bears his
name is given in recognition of
outstanding leadership in that
same tradition.
The Jewish Theological
Seminary's board president for
the first quarter of this century,
and played a key role in
establishing it as an institution of
world stature in Jewish religious
and academic life. The award that
bears his name is given in
recognition of outstanding
leadership in that same tradition.
The Jewish Theological
Seminary, now in its 94th year, is
the central institution of Con-
servative Judaism, the training
ground for the movement's
leaders and educators. It has a
West Coast campus and another
in Israel and maintains a wide
range of educational programs
for laymen of all ages, with
special emphasis on youth.
A leader in developing in-
terfaith understanding and
action, the Seminary is widely
known for its "Eternal Light"
radio and television broadcasts
on NBC. It also sponsors the
world-famous Jewish Museum of
New York and maintains a
library considered one of the
greatest collections of Judaica
and Hebraica in the world.
With more than 800
congregations and a million
members, Conservative Judaism
comprises a majority of Jewish
congregants in this country and
Canada.
DDDDDD
DDDDDDD
DDDDDDD
DDOnDDD
DDDD
Community
Calendar
^
Oct. 20
Jewish Community Day School Art Auction Women's American
ORT Evening "kickoff" parly 8 p.m.
Oct. 21
Temple Beth Sholom Men's Club Temple Beth El Cultural Event 8
p.m. Congregation Anshei Sholom 1 p.m.
Oct. 22
Women's American ORT Poinciana 12:30 p.m. Women's
American ORT Poinciana Trip to Sarasota Women's American
ORT Palm Beach
Oct. 23
Congregation Anshei Sholom 1 p.m.
Meir Sarasota Bus Trip
Pioneer Women Golda
CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
$
6:30
28TISHRI-5740
Oct. 24
National Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach Paid-Up
Membership 11:30 a.m. Temple Beth David Sisterhood Paid-Up
Membership dinner 7 p.m. Pioneer Women Golda Meir -
Sarasota Trip International Zionist Conf. Miami Beach through
Oct. 28
Oct. 25
Hadassoh Chai 12:30p.m. B'riai B'rith Women -Medina -8p.m.
Hadassah Aliyah 1 p.m. Congregation Anshei Sholom Card
Party Pioneer Women Golda Meir Sarasota Bus Trip Hadassah -
Yovel Study Group
Oct. 27
Temple Beth El Social Set Hadassah Bat Gurion 8 p.m. Zionist
Organization of America Leadership Conference, Miami Beach
Oct. 29
B'nai B'rith Women Boynton Beach board 1 p.m. Women's
American ORT Golden Lakes Captiva Island through Oct. 31
Oct. 30
FEDERATION COMMUNITY PLANNING MEETING 8 p.m.
Oct. 30
FEDERATION COMMUNITY PLANNING MEETING 8 p.m.
Oct. 31
JEWISH FEDERATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING 8 p.m.
Pioneer Women Golda Meir board 1 p.m. National Council of
Jewish Women board 10 a.m.
C^r***

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Terence
All Sunshine cookies and crackers are baked with 100% vegetable shortening


[riday, October 19,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Fagey
SPECIAL EVENTS
An Art Auction will be held
jturday, Nov. 3, at the Flagler
Juseum, Whitehall Way in Palm
T-jh. The works of Chagall,
"jcTsso, Calder, Miro, Neiman,
Utwrman, Silva, Agam, Hibel,
hii and Rockwell will be among
[ose featured-
Drs. Thomas Davidoff and
oward Sabarra, chairpersons,
mounce that a special preview
investment art for purchase or
,se through the Jewish
immunity Center has been
ranged and that all pieces and
imes can be exchanged at any
ne. This auction benefits the
ide community. There will be a
[owing at 7:30 p.m., and the
iction will start at 8. There is no
Imission fee.
PRESCHOOL
I^Qne of the 3-year-old classes
rtes you to meet their teacher,
:abeth Calloway. Liz has been
irking with the children for the
jt eight years, six years with
JSWpwish Federation, and two
Krs with the JCC. She feels
Hvileged to have been able to
^ch siblings of the same family,
r objectives are: To establish a"
_:ure feeling in the child; To
ive the child develop a strong
If-concept: to grow socially to
ivebp good inter-action with
children.
This month the classroom is
of circles, squares, triangles
\d rectangles, as the children
< being taught different shapes
[d colors. Parents are welcome
visit, but please call the Center
|d ;isk for Fran Witt to clear the
te and date.
SPECIAL NOTE
'he Jewish Community Center
the Palm Beaches will be
fering through the Katz
notional Consultants a
_iolastic aptitude test (SAT)
fSll'.iration Course for the Dec. 1
i'l' examination. The course
include 16 hours of in-
ruilion in eight two-hour
locks. The classes will be given
i he JCC on Tuesday and
mrsdays from 7 9 p.m.. begin-
|ng Thursday, Nov. 1, and
iding Thursday, Nov. 29 (there
be no class on Thanksgiving,
Jewish Community Center Presents
Nov. 22|. Registration must be in
no later than Friday, Oct. 26.
CLUB 5,6
This co-ed club for fifth and
sixth graders meets every
Monday from 7-8:30 p.m.
Programs include:- Model
Rocketry, Dramatics, Kosher
Cooking and Creative Crafts. The
group will also be having
monthly specials such as: pizza
parties, rollerskating, movies,
water slide and more.
TWEENS
This group meets every
Thursday from 7:15-9:15 p.m.
They have had a pizza night,
gone to the movies, and had a
"Quiz Bowl" night. The next
activity is Thursday, Oct. 25,
when they are off to the Water
Slide. Advance registration is a
must. Call Joel Levine for further
information.
TEENS
Every Tuesday is Teen Night
at the center. On Tuesday, Oct.
23, Harriet Rowe, project
coordinator of the Department of
Sexual Assault, will present
"Sexual Assault Awareness or
Prevention." The session will
begin at 7:30 p.m.
JCC TEEN DIVISION
BASKETBALL
Tween Boys Basketball Team:
Grade 6-9 meets Thursday from
5:45-7:15 p.m. Teen Boys
Basketball Team: Grade 10-12
meets Tuesday from 6-7:30 p.m.
League play begins the first week
in November.
The JCC is looking for girls
who are interested in forming a
Basketball Team. Contact Joel
Levine at the JCC.
CHILDREN'S PROGRAMS
Afterschool care: Children of
members of the Jewish Com-
munity Center are eligible for this
program. Monday through
Friday, children will participate
in sports, games, arts and crafts
and supervised free play.
Whenever possible, children will
be integrated into existing JCC
Afterschool Enrichment
Programs.
AFTERSCHOOL
ENRICHMENT CLASSES
Classes are offered for children
in K-6 grade each afternoon at
the Jewish Community Center.
Highlighting the program
schedule are the following
classes: Ballet /Tap Monday
4-5 p.m.; Red, Yellow, Blue &
Glue Monday, 4-5 p.m.; Baton
Twirling, Wednesday 4-5 p.m.;
Sports World Wednesday 4-5
p.m.; Abracadabra, Wednesday
5-6 p.m.; Karate, Thursday 4-5
p.m.; Creative Visuals,Thursday
4-5 p.m.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Join a group at the Ballet
Thursday evening, Nov. 1 for
"Cinderella" and Saturday
evening, Dec. 29, for "The
Nutcracker." For further details,
contact Lisa Rubin at the center.
NO SCHOOL HOLIDAY
Oct. 29 Roller Skating and
Make Your Own Sundae 9 a.m.-5
p.m. Space is limited for all
programs, so register as soon as
possible. For information about
all the Children's Programs,
contact Lisa Rubin, supervisor of
children's programs.
SENIOR NEWS
Transportation, provided
through a Federal Grant Title 111
OAA, is available to transit
disadvantaged seniors, 60 years
or older, within our designated
area.
Adult education classes are
underway at the CSSC. Anyone
wishing to attend the following
may call the center for
registration. Monday, oil
painting, 9 a.m.-noon. Tuesday,
Transactions! Analysis, 10 a.m.-
noon, Wednesday, Writers
Workshop, 9:30 a.m.-noon.
Wednesday and Friday, Walking
Tall After 60, 1.30-3 p.m.
OTHER CLASSES
AND ACTIVITIES
Consumer Credit Information
the fourth Monday of every
month. Louis Levine, retired
attorney, will present a monthly
class on all phases of credit.
Learn how to protect yourself in
buying, selling and investing.
Class meets on Monday, Oct. 22,
at 10 a.m.
Creative Knitting &
Crocheting, second session on
Oct. 23 at 1:30 p.m. Last session
on Oct. 30 at 1:30 p.m. Mini-in-
structional series will teach how
to make belts, scarves, hats,
bags. Class is limited. Call to
register. Instructor, Sonna
Simon.
AAA Art Appreciation for
Adults meets the fourth Thur-
sday of the month. The National
Council of Jewish Women will
present an art appreciation series
at the JCC. Martha Nadelman is
chairperson, who has arranged to
have leaders in the field of art
conduct the program each month.
Great masterpieces and other
works of art will be studied. Class
will be meeting on Thursday,
Oct. 25, at 1:30 p.m. First guest
speaker will be Frieda Majzlin.
Everyone is invited to par-
ticipate.
Speakers Club meets on
Thursdays at 10 a.m. to noon.
Call the CSSC for further in-
formation.
Artist of the Month: Esther
Molat. chairperson, announces
the Artist for the Month of
October will be Murray Mugmon
of Cresthaven. His brother
displayed his works at the center
last year. Murray specializes in
plastics, which he developed
himself and paints birds, flowers
and landscapes. Stop by the
center and view his works. The
center is open Monday-Friday
from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Second Tuesday Club an-
nounces its annual Card Party to
be held on Sunday, Oct. 21, from
12:30-4 p.m. Special refresh-
ments will be served for lunch.
Arrange your groups and call
Sam Rubin for reservations.
New Year's Eve Jungle
Queen trip. Bus will leave the
west gate of Century Village at 5
p.m. Trip includes bus tran-
sportation, boat cruise, dinner
and entertainment. Call Sam
Rubin or the center for reser-
vations.
Wednesday, Jan. 16 Viz-
caya Museum & Gardens The
group will be leaving the west
gate of Century Village at 10 a.m.
Arrive at Vizcaya at 11:30 a.m.
Lunch (on your own on the
grounds) from 1-2 p.m. See the
gardens on your own from 2-3:30
p.m. Arrive back at Century
Village at 5 p.m. Fee: Members
$10.00, non-members $13.00. Call
Sam Rubin or the center for
reservations.
The Second Tuesday Club
celebrated Sukkoth on Tuesday.
Oct. 9, at their regular meeting,
the JCC pre-school children and
seniors together experienced a
Kiddush in the outdoor Sukkah.
The group expresses thanks to
Cantor Fenakel for performing
the service. A program was
arranged by Ruth Hyde, program
chairperson, with Lillian Kessler,
soprano, Jackie Lorber and Phil
Herman, violinists, Ruth Hyde,
pianist. Sol Ganeles, Joe Molat
and Charles Jarrow performed
the Kiddush for the pre-school
children during the week of
Sukkoth.
Special Program for Frail
Elderly Twenty-eight people
from retirement homes were
brought to the Jewish Com-
munity Center for a special
activity. Forty-two children from
the JCC pre-school program
entertained and sang "Happy
Birthday'' to five seniors. Taking
part were Ruth Hyde, Nate the
Magician and Jack Kant.
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Page iu
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, October 19,1979
Jlround
cTodon :
By STACILESSER
Robert S. Levy to Head Camp
Robert S. Levy, a local at-
torney, has been appointed to
serve a second term as general
chairman of the 1980 Combined
Uncle Phillip Fisher told us that Oct. 3 was a special day in I
the lives of Peter and Julie Cummings. Anthony Fisher Cum-
mings was born at Good Samaritan Hospital. Proud grand-
parents Mr. and Mrs. Max M. Fisher and Mr. and Mrs. Robert I
M. Cummings were thrilled with their 7 lb., 12 oz. bundle of
grandson.
Rona and Dick Shugarman are busy with last minute
preparations. The big event, daughter Marcy's Bat Mitzvah at
Temple Israel. Marcy is in the ninth grade at Cardinal Newman.
Last year she was Valedictorian of her class and received the
DAR Award. Brothers Keith and Todd, along with family and
friends, will join Rona and Dick at the Breakers Beach Club ,
toasting Marcy on her Bat Mitzvah.
Atlanta here they come. Ruth and Al WUensky have every
reason to feel pleased. Son Bob is engaged to an Atlanta girl.
The happy occasion will take place on the second of December.
H. Irwin Levy is going to receive a double honor on Oct. 27
at the Doral Beach Hotel. The Zionist Organization of America
is awarding Irwin the Justice Louis D. Brandeis Award at the
International Leadership Conference. A Chair in social studies
at Kfar Silver is also going to be established in his honor.
Congratulations to both Irwin and Jean.
Bonnie and Marvin Turk are back from Washington, D.C.
Their touring of the art galleries has inspired Marvin to produce
enough paintings for another show. Bonnie is busy with her
nursing career, but still able to keep tabs on her active family.
Daughter Andrea is at the J.C., son Doug works for a computer
compny in Tampa. Daughter Margot and son-in-law Avi
Calacuda are now living in Haifa, Israel. It wouldn't be a sur-
prise if plans for an Israel visit were on the drawing board.
Detra and Howard Kay are off to Israel leading a National
Young Leadership Mission. Young leaders from all points, east,
west, north and south will be joining Howard and Detra.
Our own Ronni Tartakow will be flying with the Young
Leadership Mission. No, Ronnie will not be in the pilot's seat
this time. (Ronnie is a licensed pilot.) She will be a press member
of the mission. Bon Voyage to Detra, Howard and Ronni.
HiHMHIiMMiMHMMd
before, since the end of World
War II, are moving from op-
pression to freedom. About
50,000 will leave the Soviet Union
this year. Wherever they go, they
will need help for resettlement. In
our own Palm Beach County
community and in Israel, in-
flation is seriously threatening
our network of human support
programs. We accept all these
challenges because we are one
people."
Levy stated that Jews
traditionally help each other.
aign
"and in this year of great 1
we must now do more than
before."
Levy has been active in he
Palm Beach County Jewish
community since he first arrived
in West Palm 20 years ago with
his wife Ceil. In 1962, he helped
found the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County and served
as its second vice president
Three years later he was elected
president of the Federation. ;,n,i
in 1969 he served
campaign chairman.
n, and
as general
NCJW 'Holiday on Wheels'
Robert S. Levy
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign, announced Alan
L. Shulman, president of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Last year Levy led the Palm
Beach County community to the
most successful campaign in its
history.
"There is no doubt that human
needs in Israel, overseas,
nationally and in our own
community represent a vast
challenge and opportunity as we
begin this decisive year," said
Shulman. "In accepting this
most vital and demanding
position, Robert Levy will be
calling on the leadership and
members of our Jewish com-
munity to accept their fullest
responsibilities."
"There is a peace treaty with
F.gypt and negotiations con-
tinue," said Levy. Military
redeployment and human
resettlement from the Sinai to the
Negev will be tremendously
costly. More Jews than ever
On Monday and Tuesday,
Sept. 24 and 25, "Holiday on
Wheels," was brought to four
nursing homes in Boynton
Beach, Delray Beach and Boca
Raton communities by the
National Council of Jewish
Women, Boca-Delray Section.
The shofar was sounded, and
then traditional blessings, foods
and songs were shared with the
Jewish patients and their
families. Musical accompaniment
was provided bv Helene Grantz,
a NCJW member. Rabbi Alan R.
Sherman, chaplain of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, conducted the holid
program.
The "Holiday on Wheels"
program has been on-going for
two years. The group of womcgi
visit the nursing homes on the
holidays of Rosh Hashanah
Yom Kippur, Sukkoth,
Chanukah and Passover, ac-
cording to Joy Cohen, vice
president of community services
for the NCJW Section.
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman, chaplain of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County, blows the shofar at an
area nursing home as part of the "Holiday on Wheels"
program sponsored by the National Council of Jewish
Women of Boca-Delray.
What a lunch!
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A CENTURY OLD TRADITION


fiday, October 19,1979
n
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
Lindsay Lashes Out at
Carter Mideast Policy
NEW YORK John V.
mdsay recently faulted the
arter Administration for a
iddle East policy "charac-
rized by unsuredness and
onfusion."
The former New York mayor
nd U.S. congressman said that
espite "the accomplishment of
ill that led to Camp David,"
here is today a lack of clarity in
he U.f. Mideast position "both
the policy we seek and in the
ast of characters in Washington
ho make that policy."
Speaking before an Anti-
efamation League of B'nai
rith luncheon at the St. Regis
_ tel, Lindsay said: "The best
iope for peace in the Middle East
s the relationship between Israel
d Egypt; the comprehensive
egional approach now advocated
by Washington has never worked
n the past and there is absolutely
to reason to believe it could ever
work in the future."
LINDSAY WAS keynote
speaker at the annual luncheon of
he Furniture and Allied
Industries Division of the ADL
appeal. The program also
featured presentation of the ADL
Human Relations Award to Sol
Uerwin, executive vice president
f Sachs New York, Inc.
In a speech marked by
general criticism of the
Administration for its "ab-
dication of leadership," Lindsay
blamed the White House for
allowing "the falsehood to spread
that the Government of Israel
and its supporters were
responsible" for Andrew Young's
resignation as U.N. Ambassador.
He said "it is reprehensible that
the White House should have
remained largely silent on this
matter," because it "seriously
damaged relations between
Jewish and Blacks, undercut
domestic support for Israel and
signalled ambiguity as to
America's commitment to Israel,
the Middle East's one
democracy."
Lindsay went on to say that
"there are fundamental principles
about Israel that ought to be
incontestable, but in the wake ol
recent events need clear
reiteration." He cited the
following:
Israel must "always be
assured of security, including
resolution of the problems of the
West Bank and Gaza in such
fashion that they will not
become, again, time bombs on
Israel's front and back door-
steps";
Israel's "unique place in the
world" must never become a
"bargaining chip" for oU;
Hillel Foundations Director
To Address B'nai B'rith
"The indivisibility and
oneness of Jerusalem must
endure";
The Palestine Liberation
Organization, "as distinguished
from Palestinians in gen-
eral," remains a force of
terrorism and "must be met with
condemnation and disdain."
The ADL luncheon, chaired by
Ira Ostrow of Pem-Kay Furniture
Co., was held in behalf of the
agency's educational programs
and activities to combat anti-
Semitism and other forms of
bigotry and promote intergroup
and interreligious understanding.
Rabbi Frank A. Fischer, newly
appointed director of the seven-
unit Florida area Hillel Foun-
dations, will be the guest speaker
at the Oct. 22 dinner meeting of
Past Presidents Club of B'nai
B'rith at 6 p.m. at the Beau
Rivage Hotel, Miami Beach.
Rabbi Fischer comes to Florida
after a career as director of Hillel
Foundations at University of
Georgia, Brooklyn College,
Hofstra University and as staff
coordinator of the New York area
Hillel Foundations.
A BA graduate of Brooklyn
College, Rabbi Fischer was or-
dained at the Hebrew Union
College and took graduate
courses in sociology at Adelphi
University and University of
Georgia.
His community activities in-
clude the vice presidency of the
Ministerial Association of
Athens, Ga.; member of the
board of education of the
Brandeis School; the Rabbinical
Assembly of America and the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis.
Judge Milton A. Friedman,
circuit judge of the Eleventh
Judicial Circuit of Florida and
president of the club, will preside.
Past B'nai B'rith Council presi-
dents will be honored by the
presentation of service cer-
tificates. Lou Shor, comedian,
will entertain.
Dinner reservations can be
made by calling general secretary
Hank Meyer.
Free Yahrzeit Calendars
Are Now Available
Several hundred Yahrzeit
Calendars already have been
nailed at no cost to members of
|he South Florida Jewish com-
lunity in a special program
being conducted by Menorah
. hapels.
The calendars translate the
late of death of a loved one from
|he standard calendar date to the
lebrew date. Anniversaries of
Ihe memorial date are then listed
)y the standard year, day of the
Veek and date for the next 20
ears.
"In keeping with the holiday
leason, we are making the
lalendars available at our three
lacilities, in Sunrise, Deerfield
Beach and Margate," noted
(tlark Weissman, funeral director
the Jewish owned-and-oper-
rted chapels.
"It's a convenience to have a
bminder of when the Yahrzeit is
joming up, since there is quite a
lifference in dates on the
Itandard calendar from year to
fear."
To request a Yahrzeit calendar,
prite Menorah chapels at 6800
Temple Beth El
I Child Education
?or Non-Members
The board of education of
Temple Beth El has decided that
families need not be a member of
fhe temple in order for their
children to enroll in the early
Child education program. This
Dlicy will be in effect for the next
peveral weeks.
The pre-kindergarten and
kindergarten classes meet on
indays from 9 a.m. to noon. The
curriculum includes Jewish
eritage and tradition, Jewish
Holidays, the Sabbath and Bible
Btories. Creative dramatics,
igs, rhymes, and craft projects
' all part of the program.
Contact Ruth Levow, school
lirector.
W. Oakland Park Boulevard,
Sunrise or call and indicate the
name of the loved one, date and
time of death and cemetery. A
calendar will be mailed at no
charge.
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13



-'
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
i
Friday, October 19,1979
ADL Official Criticizes Jesse Jackson
A major American Jewish
leader charged recently that the
Rev. Jesse Jackson has
"mischievously intruded into the
peace negotiations in the Middle
East tinder box area."
Arnold Forster, general
counsel of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. went on
to say: "This self-appointed
ambassador began by agitating
Black Americans against Jews
and Israel in connection with
Ambassador Young's
resignation. He is now adding to
his performance in the Middle
East for the benefit of the
Palestinians, other Arabs and the
PLO."
Forster, speaking before the
League's Society of Fellows of
Sullivan, Ulster and Orange
Counties at the Concord Hotel in
Kiamesha Lake, N.Y., charged
that "Jackson is employing
transparent rationalizations in
alleged justification for Black
concerns about Palestinian
issues."
"Rev. Jackson asserts, for
example,' Forster said, "that if
the Egyptian-Israeli treaty
negotiations come to a halt,
Arabs will then punish the U.S.
by cutting off oil supplies. Rev.
Jackson concludes that poor
Blacks in America will be the
first to suffer. Rev. Jackson
forgets that all Americans will
suffer if the Arab petrc-powers
try to use oil to blackmail Israel
into submission."
The ADL official said Jackson
"implausibly castigates Israel for
trading with South Africa but
fails to add that the total Israeli
exports to South Africa are one-
half of one percent. Compare this
to the Black African nations
which export eight times more to
South Africa than Israel. The
Reverend also ignores the fact
that Black African nations
import six times more products
from South Africa than Israel."
Rev. Jackson, Forster said,
cites as a reason for his alleged
NEW YORK "The fact that
Jacobo Timerman, an innocent
man, is now free is due to the
worldwide outburst of in-
dignation and protest at the
injustice of his arrest, im-
prisonment and prolonged
detention," his wife, Rische, said
at a news conference at the
national headquarters of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith in New York.
The former publisher of the
Argentinean newspaper. La
Opinion, who had been held
without judicial charges for 29
months, flew to Rome Sept. 25
via an Aerolineas Argentines
flight with a visa for Israel. The
release of Timerman came eight
days after the Argentine
Supreme Court issued a ruling
that the military junta had no
legal grounds to continue holding
him. With Mrs. Timerman at the
news conference were her sons
Hector and Javier. Mrs.
Timerman and Javier left the
United States Sept. 27 for Israel.
Hector is a graduate student at
Columbia University.
Rabbi Morton M. Rosenthal,
director of ADL's Latin
American affairs department,
which has been deeply involved
in the struggle to free Timerman,
said: "Argentina's best known
political prisoner is free: this is
an historic moment." He added,
however, that there are hundreds
of other Argentine citizens
"unjustly incarcerated, and we
will continue our efforts on their
behalf."
Nathan Perlmutter, national
director of the League, said that
Timerman had been released
"because a free press stood up
and had its say loud and clear"
and because U.S. officials and
organizations such as the Anti-
Defamation League and the
American Jewish Committee
worked "so tirelessly in his
behalf."
Perlmutter particularly cited
Patricia Derian, assistant
secretary of state for human
rights and humanitarian affairs:
Senators Paul S. Sarbanes of
Maryland and Richard Stone of
Florida; Congressmen Benjamin
A. Oilman of New York, Silvio
Conte of Massachusetts and
Ralph Lagomarsino of California.
The three congressmen had
visited Jacobo Timerman when
he was in jail.
JF&CS Board Notes \
The following contributions were received and cards were mailed:
Mrs. Bernie Blinchikoff in memory of Bernie Blinchikoff from Mr.
and Mrs. Larry Blinchikoff.
Mrs. Jesse Halperin and daughter Linda and Mrs. Marvin
Fruchter in memory of Jesse Halperin from Linda and Eugene
Kalnitsky.
Mrs. Mark Sternfeld.
Steve Gordon in memory of his mother from Bette and Mort
Gilbert.
Mrs. Kurt Leighton in memory of her mother from Bette and
Mort Gilbert.
Mrs. Val Silberman for a speedy recovery from Bette and Mort
Gilbert.
Mrs. Laura K. Cohn in honor of a friend's birthday.
Keith Shugarman in honor of his confirmation from Bette and
Mort Gilbert.
Mark Rapaport in honor of his confirmation from Bette and Mort
Gilbert.
Nancy Lee Shapiro in honor of her confirmation from Bette and
Mort Gilbert.
Jerry Tishman in memory of his father from Linda and Eugene
Kalnitsky.
Jerry Tishman in memory of his father from Slema and Willie
Uhlfelder.
Jerry Tishman in memory of his father from Dorothy and Frank
Israel.
Jerry Tishman in memory of his father from Margaret and
Stephen Levitt.
The family of Jerry Tishman in memory of his father from Nora
and Soil Boroff.
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concern with Mideast problems
that Blacks make up a majority
of American soldiers and
therefore suffer if war come-
that area. "Conveniently^
Forster said, "he fails to menUw,
that never ever has Israel asked
for the intervention of a single
American soldier, nor has a single
American soldier ever been
assigned to combat in behalf of
Israel. And, in fact, Israel has
specifically pledged that it will
never ask for American military
manpower."
JacoboTimerman's Freedom
'Due to Worldwide Protest'
3
rd
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GALA ART AUCTION

mu'.m'
, c i',"iT,ir-H,iT':rrr
Saturday November 3, 1979
Flagler Museum
Whitehall Way Palm Deach
Champagne Preview Auction
730 000
Conducted by:
Droword Art and Froming Gallery
Fort Louderdole
Licensed ond Donded Auctioneer* ond Apptoiseis
Oils. Etchings. Lithographs. Woodcuts
Limited Editions Many out of print
All professionally matted and custom framed
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Miro Liberman Agom
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Special Preview of Investment Art
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Tom Davidoff D.DS Howard Sabarro, M.D.
Chairpersons
OPEN TO THE PUDLIC
Sponsored by
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF THE PALM DEACHES INC
669-7700


(lay, October 19,1979
^teJewislH^loridiar^P^almBeacf^,
ounty
- ,'
Via* TYme for TVbfce/ Thoughts
Continued from Page 4
again this year? That is,
i I to say for sure?
NE THING 1 can say for
e is that if politics don't enter
the choice, the choice itself
v well enter politics. The case
point is President Carter, who
pears to be so desperate in his
lection bid that he's counting
avily on his nomination for a
>bel Peace Prize to bolster his
gging fortunes.
Only Jimmy the Greek would
re to lay odds on this one, but it
>es seem that to cite Carter for
s role in the Israel-Egypt peace
cord would be to replay just
e year later the granting of the
ize to Menachem Begin and
war Sadat in 1978.
iA true sporting man would be
ore inclined to lay odds on
utoslawski in either the liter-
ure or peace categories this
and, say, on the Rev. Jesse
ckson in 1980 for his work in
shaping the gene content of the
alestine Liberation
frganization. Since Jackson's
would be an award in either
physics or biology rather than in
peace or literature, why Borges,
given that he's still around, and
Argentina is still fascist, should
certainly remain in the running at
that time.
ON THE other hand, it is not
improbable that the Nobel
Academy would make a redun-
dant choice and give the nod to
President Carter, since so many
of its other choices, if not redun-
dant, are certainly irrelevant.
President Carter has as good a
press as, say, Ladislaus Lutos-
lawski of Central Transylvania,
given that his 38 pages of poetic
masterpieces on vellum win out
in the end. Or Halldor Kiljan
Laxness, of Iceland, of whom no
one heard before he won the prize
or after, for that matter.
Certainly, he has a better press
than, say. Bertha von Suttner, of
Austria, who turned the Nobel
Academy's head back in 1905. Or
even Mi Hard Fill more. Carter's
predecessor in the presidency, of
whom absolutely no one has
When Harlem Was Still
A Jewish Community
,i
Continued from Page 4
else seek lodging outside the
hetto.
Dr. Gurock has also indicated
at contrary to what is generally
lii'vi'd. resettlement of
arlem's Jews was not in-
cative either of their adoption
or acceptance of a new
|merican way of life.
HARLEM'S upwardly mobile
sidents did not necessarily
ndon their religious and/or
nic cultural identity, and the
orer relocating ghetto Jews
ilt hundreds of landmanshaft
ugogues serving as testimony
their desire to retain their
migrant identity. Although
me of Harlem's residents may
ve been eager to embrace rapid
nericanization. Dr. Gurock
ints out, others sought to
lintain and even strengthen
t-ir Jewish identification.
One of the greatest values of
hen Harlem Was Jewish in the
esent day lies in its sketch of
e earliest Black-Jewish
lations in an urban setting and
interpretation of the factors
fecting immigrant .migration
t of Harlem following World
far I.
For Prof. Gurock, the ex-
edingly rapid Jewish migration
>m Harlem was not directly
H'. or especially in response to,
the mass arrival uptown of
Blacks, but was instead merely
part of a general immigrant
relocation out of the downtown
ghetto and New York's other
densely populated Jewish neigh-
borhoods in the post-war years.
THE JEWISH migration was
due most basically to the desire
and ability to live in better ac-
comodations, and escape the
neighborhood's physical
deterioration. The Black's
decision to settle in the decaying
neighborhood only hastened the
departure.
Dr. Gurock s key evidence in
support of this argument is that
from the time the Blacks first
arrived uptown, beginning
around 1905, to their con-
solidation in the neighborhood
after World War I, limited
numlwrs of Blacks and Jews
almost immediately penetrated
one another's enclaves, with no
apparent issue.
This final aspect of Harlem's
history, which suggests that the
dynamics of physical neigh-
borhood decay, and the upward
mobility of the residents were
more important than the arrival
of Blacks uptown in the earlier
settlers' decision to leave their
own neighborhood or other parts
of the city, holds significant
implications for future resear-
chers, Dr. Gurock says.
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heard these 130 years since his
election.
Unless you pit Fillmore in a
presidential preference primary
against Chester A. Arthur, of
whom no one heard either before
or after his election, and who with
Fillmore also failed to win a
Nobel Prize but not for want of
trying: the first prizes weren't
offered until after both had died.
But this is a rather quaint
regulation among the Nobel's
rules, that nominees must be
living at the time of their nom-
ination, considering that there
are so many dead winners under
any circumstances.
IN THE END, though, it is to
be hoped that President Carter
has another ace up his sleeve
than the annual Nobel pro-
duction, which bombs about aa
much as it abhorred the bombing
in Vietnam and for the stopping
of which it gave prizes to Henry
Kissinger and Le Due Tho, the
Amos and Andy of the world of
Ho Chi Minh.
The President will need more
than that if he's to win out
against Sen. Kennedy. Hey,
speaking of nominations, now
that's an idea .
County Hadassah Chapters
Coordinate T.V. Program
The Hadassah chapters of
Palm Beach County have co-
ordinated an in-depth TV
program to be aired on the
Jewish Federation's "Mosaic"
program on Sunday, Oct. 28, at 9
a.m. to inform the community of
Hadassah's programs both in
Israel and the United States.
The participants are: co-hosts,
Barbara Shulman and Steve
Gordon: coordinator, Beth
Kinsey: and panel members
Pauline Coler, Ann Hopfan.
Dorothy Kaye and Fanny Sch-
wartz.
The topics will cover the origin
and progress of Hadassah
through the following projects:
Hadassah Medical Organization,
Hadassah Israel Education
Services and Youth Aliyah and
Youth Activites.
Material for the telecast was
furnished by the National
Hadassah Publicity Department
through the courtesy of Mrs.
Henry Goldman, chairman.
Bernard D. Epstein M.D.
Announces the opening
of His office for
The practice of Internal Medicine at
900 Northwest 13th Street
Boca Raton
by appointment (305) 368-6030
Sometimes a frightening burden is placed on a child.
By a father, a mother, or both.
What happens is abuse. Sometimes brutal abuse.
It happens when a child is less the object of a parent's
affection, caring, and comfort. And more the object of a
parent's discontent, frustrations, and needs.
Physical, emotional, sexual abuse and neglect scar
a child and a familyfor life. And abused children often
leave their scars on their own children.
When does the hand of correction become the hand
of attack? The voice of direction become the voice of
i
belittlement? And the much needed show of affection
become replaced with twisted overt sexual use? There
are no simple answers.
What does your child mean to you? The object of
your affectionsr Or the victim of your needs? If the
answer is a deep, dark secret, get helpthrough Parents
Anonymous, United Way, Family Counseling Services,
or the Child Welfare Department in your area. And write
us for a free booklet on child abuse. Liberty National,
Dept. A. Parents should know what they're doing.
Lives depend on it.
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PO BOX 2612/B1RMINGHAM ALABAMA 3520?


age xt
" The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, October 19^979
-
** ^Rabbinical Coordinated by
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev, Ph.d
dtvottd to diic$ik)B of thtmti titd istiMis
ralevant to Jowish lift past and prtitirt
In Unity There Is Strength'
By RABBI
JEROME KESTENBAUM
Vice President,
Rabbinical Council
Greater Palm Beach
The cycle of the major festivals
of the Jewish New Year 5740
Rosh Hashonah, Yom Kippur
and Sukkoth has been ter-
minated, hopefully in the spirit of
thanksgiving. Indeed, we have
much for which to be grateful for
the tremendous privilege that is
ours living in two mutually
compatible great civilizations,
the American and Jewish way of
Ufe.
Authorities in the social
sciences are unanimous in their
conviction that the four major
social institutions in life are the
home, the school (religious and
secular), the synagogue and the
community. We must, therefore,
constantly be conscious of our
individual responsibility to
strengthen these fortresses of
creative survival.
Probably the single most
important quality required of
each of us is to fortify these four
pillars that undergird our
country and religion is
COOPERATION.
OFTEN WE become the
victims of our pursuit for rugged
individualism and self-
assert iveness. Too often we
forget and neglect the in-
dispensability of cooperative
endeavor.
There is a poignant
illuminating fable in our Jewish
tradition which informs us that a
righteous man died and went to
heaven. Upon approaching the
keeper of the gates, he made the
strange request to visit hell a few
days before taking up his
heavenly residence. Permission
was granted and he was amazed
at what he found below. He
noticed huge banquet tables piled
high with delectable food fit for
kings. But all the people present
were emaciated and anemic. They
were starving to death. Knives
and forks six feet long were
strapped to their hands and
fingers so that they could never
reach their mouths Try as they
did, they not get one bite of food
into their mouths.
The startled visitor had
enough. He hurried back to
heaven and on entering there he
saw practically the same scene:
The same kind of banquet tables,
long knives and forks strapped to
the hands and fingers of those
Editor's Note: The views
expressed by the rabbis are
strictly their own and in no way
reflect the views of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
MM
present. But there was one
big difference. The
residents in heaven were pic-
tures of health and strength as
they came into dinner laughing
together. As the newcomers
stood by breathlessly, they
approached the table and
gathered generous helpings of
food with their clinking silver-
ware. Then heaven's happy hosts
turned around and began to feed"
each other!
THIS HAD never occurred to
the people in hell. According to
the table, that is precisely why
they were down there in the first
place.
May the New Year 5740 be
abundant for all of us in
cooperative endeavor in behalf of
our homes, schools, synagogues
and the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County.
In the words of our rabbis and
sages, "The Almighty blessed be
He, rewards those who are
engaged in the needs of their
community."
How true it is that in unity
there is strength.
Synagogue News
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
This year Cantor Nicholas
Fenakel is celebrating his 50th
year as a cantor. Temple Beth
David of Northern Palm Beach
County has planned a cocktail
party in his honor to be held on
Oct. 21 at the President Country
Club.
On Friday evening, Oct. 19,
Adam Bassuk, son of Renee and
Henry Bassuk, will help conduct
the service in honor of the an-
niversary of his Bar Mitzvah.
On Saturday, Oct. 20, at the
Shabbat service, Joseph Schiff
will chant the Haftarah on the
anniversary of his Bar Mitzvah.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El's United
Synagogue Youth groups are off
to a flying start this year.
Kadima grades 6-8 have had a
bagel brunch in the youth lounge,
followed by a volleyball game and
paperbag dramatics. The event
was attended by 23 youngsters.
A Sukkah decorating party
with dinner afterwards was held
Thursday, Oct. 4. Kadimaniks
hung fruit, strung cranberries
and popcorn and made signs for
the Sukkah. Future programs
include a pool party and bar-
beque, creative dramatics, a
Chinese auction and bowling.
USY grades 9-12 started the
year off with a pool party and
barbeque. Future plans include a
rap session with Rabbi Bar-Zev,
Havdalah services, car wash,
bike riding and a Chanukah
party. The youth group's purpose
is to involve Jewish youth in a
meaningful relationship to
Judaism in an environment that
is religious, educational and
social.
All youth in grades 6-12 are
invited to join in the activities.
For further information, contact
Larry Goldberg, Temple Beth El
youth director.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
The next meeting of the Men's
Club of Temple Beth Sholom will
take place Sunday, Oct. 21. The
scheduled speaker will be County
Commissioner Dennis Koehler.
All members are welcome.
Refreshments will be served.
Tune in to 'Mosaic9
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TUNE IN TO MOSAIC
"Mosaic," Jewish Federation's sponsored program
is aired on
Sunday mornings over WPTV Channel 5, at 9 a.m. with
hosts Barbara Shulman and Steve Gordon.
Sunday, Oct. 21 Diaspora Museum


Marcy Pam Shugarman,
the daughter of Rona and
Richard Shugarman, will be
Bat Mitzvah at Temple Is-
rael on Oct. 19.
Statement of Ownership
Management and circulaUon ( required
by 39 USC 3688). TlUe of publication.
Thi' Jewish Flondian of Palm Beach
County, publication No 884303; date of
filniK. Sept 2X. 17; frequency of Issue,
A- no. of issues published annually. 26;
U- annual subscription price $7 80;
lo< atlon of known office of publication,
33X1 N Federal Highway, Boca Raton,
1- lurid,! gMSa location of headquarters
ol general business offices of the pub
120 \'K 6th St., Miami. Florida
Publisher, editor managing
editor, Fred K Shochet, no NE 6th St.,
Miami. Florid* MISS; owner, Fred K
BlKX het, 130 NE Sttl St., Miami, riorida
S31S3,
Known bondholders, mortgagees and
"thcr security holders owning or holding
1 percent or more of total amount of
bonds, mortgages or other securlUes
Nona Extant and nature of circulation,
given in this order average no. copies
each issue during preceding 12 months
followed by actual no copies single
UMUS published nearest to filing date.
A I total no copies printed met press
run i 10.009, 10,200; B) paid circulation;
1 sales through dealers and carriers.
street vendors and counter sales, x, x; 2-
mall subscriptions; 9,497, 8,860, Ci total
paid circulation: 9,497, 8.860; Dl free
distribution by mall, carrier, or other
means, samples, complimentary and
other free copies, 116, x, E> total dis-
tribution, 9,613, 8,860; Fi copies not dls
trlbuted: n office use, left over un-
accounted for, spoiled after printing.
398, 1,340; 2) returns from news agents
x. x; G) Total; 10.009, 10.200 I certify
that statements made by me above ars
correct and complete
s Fred K Shochet, publisher.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach
County
ORTHODOX
IAMzQi^(>)i>UiaBatknCantu^VI|Ba
w. Palm Beach Phone: 689-4675 Sabbath Services 9 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Dally Services 8:15 a.m. and 8 p.m.
I Congregation Anshai Emuna
551 Brittany L, Kings Point, Dtlray Beach 33448 Harry Silver,
President. Services dally 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdays and
Holidays 9 a.m. Phone: 499-7407. Temple No. 499-9229
REFORM
ITEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagier Drive, West Palm Batch, Florida
33407 833-8421 Rabbi Irving B. Cohan Joel L Ltvlne,
Associate Rabbi Sabbath Worship Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. Sunday Torah Seminars at 10:30 a.m.
.TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourt Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Phone: 391-
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath
Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.* Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah Study
with Rabbi Merit E. Singer 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Ser-
vices
I THE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION OF DELRAY
At St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swinton Avt., Dtlray
Mailing Addrtss: P.O. Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla. 33444 Fri-
day at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver President Lawrence
Sommers, 272-2908
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Sabbath Services, Frldty tt 8:15
p.m. At. St. David's In the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill
Blvd. and Wllllngton Tract Mailing address: 1125 Jack Pine
St., West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Prealdtnt Honnie
Kramer 793-2700
CONSERVATIVE-LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
The Free Synagogue, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 368-
1800,391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 8:15 p.m.
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West Gladas Rd. (1
mile west of Boca Turnpike) ____________
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagier Drive, Wast Palm Batch, FI. 33407 Phone:
833-0339 Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev Cantor Elaine Shtplro Sab-
bath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Daily
Minyan at 8:15 a.m., Sunday at 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 Phone 684
3212 Office hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schtct-
man Cantor Arthur B. Rosenwasser Services: Daily 8:30
a.m., 7 p.m. Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m.; Friday Late Service 8:15
p.m.; Saturday 8:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m.
CONQREQATION BETH KODESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. Phone 732-2555 Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazln Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9
a.m. Congregational Church, 115 N. Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 N. A' Street, Lake Worth, Fla. 33480 Phone: 585-
5020 Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Ser-
vices: Mondays and Thursdays at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services, Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday at 10 a.m. West-
minster Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm
Beach Gardens, 321 Northlake Blvd., North Palm Beach, Fla.
Phone: 845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor Nicholas
Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
224 N.W. Avenue 'G,' Belle Glade. Fla. 33430 Jack Stateman,
Cantor Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeida Drive. Palm Springs, Fla. 33461 Sabbath ser
vices: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. President Barnett
Bnskman Phone: 967-4962 Mondays and Thursdays at 9
a.m. Services held at Faith United Presbyterian Church, Palm
Springs
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla 33432 Phone: 392
8566 Rabbi Nathan Zelizer Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15
p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446 Phone:
276-3536 Morris Silberman, Rabbi Leonard Price, Can-
tor Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9
a.m. Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Road, Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 Phone: 832
0804 Cantor David Dardashti Sabbath Services: Friday at
8:30 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m.
*1


Iday, October 19,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 15
i i i >i ii '" i
Brownstein Named Chairman Of Defray Bond Campaign
[Following a September
iniK of Jewish leaders, called
Ben Kessler, president of
nple fcmeth. Mom's Brown-
.ji, veteran Israel Bond
,ader. was named Delray area,
hairman for the 1979-80 Bond
ampaign.
In accepting the post,
vjce
mem-
Temple Bulletin); and
president in charge of
bership.
Among those who attended the
initial meeting of the Delray
Israel Bond Council were:
Benjamin Kessler, president. Temple
Emeth, Mollie Brownstein, Dr. Morris
Tear, co cnatrman ot trie 1979 80 Delray
Israel Bond Campaign; Harry Fine,
Temple Emeth treasurer and Temple
Emeth's Israel Bond honoree this year;
Dave Marowitz, Yiddish Culture;
Marion Tobins, Singles; Rita Lewitas,
president, Sisterhood, Temple Emeth;
Abe Yarmack, B'nai B'rith, Kings
Point, Charles Leiberman, Master
Masons. Irving Wolfson, Master
Masons, Harry Silver, Congregation
Ansnei bmura, Belie isanott, Ben
Gurion Hadassah; Charles Kantor,
Jewish war Veterans. Sylvia waldner
and Betty Siegel, Delray ORT
Also, Helen Eisler, president, Ben
Gurion Chapter of Hadassah; Pauline
Fellner, B'nai B'rith Women, Delray.
Lawrence Sommers. president. Reform
Congregation of Delray Beach, Dorothy
Hessel, president. Knights of Pythian
women. Joseph S. Schenk, Temple
Emeth, president. Brotherhood, H.A.
Bloom and S.I. Rosenthal, Temple
Emeth; Louis Medwin, Kings Lodge
,HOKOL editor); Carl Miller, Temple
Emeth; Charlotte Metz, Blanche
Herzlich and Sid Worth, Ben Gurion,
Hadassah; Morris H. Kaminetsky,
Temple Emeth, Henry Merrin and Abe
Eisenstein, Congregation Anshei
Emuna.
tMorris Brownstein

rownstein said, "Having seen
kie tremendous impact which
srael Bonds have had on the
raeli economy, I consider it a
igh honor and grave respon-
bility to serve as general
?airman. I am indebted to the
any men and women who have
ledged their support, and
lpport of their organizations, as
e begin to shape plans for the
.\>|fljpter campaign.
%3 Brownstein continued. "Mrs.
^Brownstein and I have recently
^turned from a trip to Israel
here we witnessed the good that
Irael Bonds have done.-Men
ftnl women working in Israel
I cause Israel Bonds have
rovided jobs for them... Har-
are, roads, industrial and
fcricultural projects throughout
le country as a result of $4
illion dollars of bond purchases
the past 28years."
Born in Cincinnati, Ohio,
rownstein served three years in
Air Force during World War
After the War, he became an
dive leader in Jewish activities.
In Minot, N.D., from 1947 to
55, he served as president of
e Minot Hebrew Congregation,
ad for two years during that
me period, he was president of
e Minot Lodge 842. Starting in
949, he also served two years as
resident of the Dakota Council
nai B'rith. Then, in 1973, he
erved two years as president of
tie B. Goldstein-R. Rosenberg
ancer Foundation in Chicago,
1.
For a year in 1977, Brownstein
rved as vice president of Kings
)dge 1095 in Delray Beach.
Currently, Brownstein is active
Temple Emeth affairs where he
votes his time and energy as
ember of its House Committee;
sociate editor of HAKOL (the
JEFFER
>.
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for great ariisls;
for great music;
for more choices.
The Florida Philharmonics
rd Season
19794980
9th. Pah B6ach (Season
Brian Priestman, Musk Director/Conductor
The)car of the subscriber
Two Series to choose from.
Outstanding soloists World-renowned virtuosi. An
orchestra of dedicated and accomplished
musicians who are leaders in the performance of
their art.
Four Philharmonic
Concerts
All contribute to the concerts and recitals of the
Florida Philharmonic, traditionally Palm Beach
County's most exceptional musical value.
Celebrate good music with us during the entire
season. And help to build one of the nation's fine
orchestras.
Philharmonic Recitals
at the Flasjer
November 7, 1979
Wednesday
Auditorium
8:15 p.m.
A
u
Flagler Museum
8:15 p.m.
RAINER MIEDEL. Guesi Conductor
BARRY TUCKWELL. Horn
Mozart Overture .11 Seraglio." K 384
Strauss Concerto No 1. Op 11. E flat Major
Bruckner Symphony No 7, E Major
2
November 28, 1979
Wednesday
3
4
Auditorium
8:15 p.m.
KENNETH SCHERMERHORN. Guest Conductor
RICHARD STOLTZMAN, Clarinet
Rossini,'Barber o( Seville Overture
Mozart Concerto, Clarinet. K 622. A Major
Prokofiev/Symphony No 5, Op 100
January 13, 1980 Paramount
Sunday 8:15 p.m.
BRIAN PRIESTMAN. Conductor
VIRGINIA ALONSO. Soprano
"ALL MOZART PROGRAM"
Overture "Manage of Figaro"
Ana "Vol che sapete"
Ana "Dei vieni non tardar"
Serenade No 2. K. 101
Overture "L'Oca del Cairo"
Ana "Exultate Jubilate"
Symphony No 31. K 297 in D ("Pans, I
April 22, 1980 Auditorium
Tuesday 8:15 P m
YURI KRASNAPOLSKY. Guest Conductor
EDWARD VITO. Harp
Copland/Appalachian Spring
Pieme/Morceau de Concerto
Moussorgsky/Ntght on Bald Mountain
Sibelius/Symphony No 3
5
December 13, 1979
Thursday
YOURI EGOROV. Piano
The twenty (our year old Soviet emigre and recipient of
an unprecedented private award after the 1977 Van
Cliburn Competition, Egorov is truly "one of the most
sensational, poetic and genuine new talents to emerge in
years, (with) the technique that made Horowitz famous;
an intuitive interpreter, whose feelings, instincts, and
intuitions are right." (New Yorker)
February 17, 1980 Flagler Museum
Sunday 8:15 p.m.
FLORIDA PHILHARMONIC WIND QUINTET
Principal players from the Florida Philharmonic
Orchestra A great favorite of South Florida audiences
C March 2, 1980 Flagler Museum
Sunday 8:15 p.m.
METROPOLITAN OPERA MADRIGAL SINGERS
Vocal chamber music by a congenial group of four
principal supporting artists of the Metropolitan Opera.
who sing contrjpuntally in Renaissance and ensemble
ana styles for the sheer joy of it Audiences seem to
respond most, the singers say, to the give and take
wherein each person has to sublimate his own voice and
ego for the whole effect "After all, the original madrigal
idea was social singing for your supper "
DMarch 26, 1980
Wednesday
Flagler Museum
8:15 p.m.
SALVATORE ACCARDO, Violin
A brilliant performer long overdue on our shores,
Acrardo is regarded in London as "a violinist's violinist
(who gives) an interpretation of rare nobility, the kind ot
performance around which legends are built Our own
contribution to the Palm Beaches' "Week of the Violin"
when Isaac Stern and Ruggiero Ricci will also be heard.
$30 on Subscription to Philharmonic subscribe.* and Muwum members. $35 to
aH others $10 each recital
Seating is unreaerved. and limited 10 300
Grand Ballroom'The Flagler MuseunvOne Whitehall Way/Palm Btath
SEATING FOR FULL SEASON OF FOUR CONCERTS
IS AVAILABLE AT $12, $18, $25, and $32.
CALL 655-1357 or 845-0434 TO RECEIVE FOLDER AND ORDER FORM.


iriL'i'2'..J-VviJZiMm- -/&_";_ o-i /:._..
Page 16
The Jewish Floridan of Palm Beach County
Friday, October 19
Montreal to be Site for CJF General Assembly
NEW YORK Historic
events and circumstances
converging on the Jewish
communities of North America
during the coming decade will be
a major focus of the 48th annual
General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations, Nov. 14-
18 in Montreal, Que.
Priority items on this year's
agenda, according to Lawrence
H. Williams of Cleveland,
chairman of the GA Program
Committee, include the Middle
East peace process; expanding
and allocating Federation
financial resources in a time of
inflation: demographic changes
in the Jewish community, and
World Jewry in the 1980's.
Set in the continental at-
mosphere of Quebec, the 1979 G A
will bring together leadership
from 190 Federations in the
United States and Canada. The
GA, which includes over 150
sessions covering every major
aspect of contemporary Jewish
life, has become the central
convocation of the organized
Jewish community in North
America.
CJF president Morton L.
Mandel of Cleveland will be
keynote speaker at the opening
plenary session on Wednesday
evening, Nov. 14. Leon Dulzin.
chairman of the Jewish Agency,
will address the Assembly
Thursday. Nov. 15, on "A New
Era in Israel Diaspora
Relations." while the Plenary on
Saturday evening, Nov. 17. will
be devoted to the challenge of
meeting human needs in a period
of inflation and recession.
Scholar-in-Residence for the
1979 GA is Dr. Irwin C. Cotler of
McGill University Law School,
who will participate in a variety
of formal and informal sessions.
At the concluding Plenary
Session on Sunday, Nov. 18, Dr.
Cotler will explore "The
Federation as an instrument of
Qualitative Jewish Survival."
Four Forums are scheduled to
provide in-depth examinations of
selected issues. They include
"Planning Challenges for the
1980's The Impact of
Population Shifts"; "The
Continuing Quest for Peace in the
Middle East"; "The Impact of
Increased Soviet-Jewish
Immigration on the Advocacy
Movement," and "Inside the
Arab World."
Sabbath observance will in-
the theme of a planning sym-
posium with three concurrent
workshops. Other sessions
covering issues that have become
a pressing concern to the Jewish
community during the past year
include the impact of step-parent
families, the aging, Black-Jewish
relations, and the Quebec in-
dependence movement.
The CJF Women's Division
will sponsor a special program of
sessions on leadership and
campaign skills and con-
temporary issues. A similar
variety of topics will be pursued
in 22 sessions led by the CJF
Leadership Development
Committee, including a sym-
posium on World Jewry led by
Dr. Cotler. For college students
attending the GA, special
"Jewish Civics" sessions will
examine Federation governance
and decision-making.
Other sessions at the 84th
General Assembly will be
devoted to Campaign; LCBC;
elude a Friday Oneg Shabbat Multiple Appeals; Soviet-Jewish
with Dr. Ruth Wisse, director of
Jewish Studies at McGill
University, who will discuss the
Yiddish renaissance. An in-
novative program of "Judaica
Teach-ins" is being developed for
Saturday, with three concurrent
sessions concentrating on the
application of traditional Jewish
values in contemporary com-
munal affairs. At the Saturday
Oneg Shabbbat, three past GA
Scholars-in-Residence will reflect
on "The 70s Revisited The
80s Projected."
"AGING: Challenges and
Opportunities in the 1980's" is

JEWISH FAMILY AMD CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professionol and counseling agency serving fhe
Jewish community of Palm Beach Counfy. Professional and con-
fidential help is available for
Problems of the aging
Consultation and evaluation services
Vocational counseling
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Or
Private Offices:
241 lOkeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Telephone: 684-1991
g 3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 226
^ Boca Raton, Fla.
Telephone: 395-3640
Moderate fees are charged in family and individual counseling to
those who can pay (Fees are based on income and family size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is o beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
for the
fashion side
of your life..
OPMI duly ratal* SuivlrtyT.ikr W.
PJmkWhKM rmnCayMABnyniu
Ur.nh .iikI (-1 Pwn I-
ouniains
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Resettlement; Jewish Singles;
Public Relations: Federation-
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Budgeting; United Way;
Government Funding;
Endowment Funds: Canadian
and U.S. Models for Jewish
Community Service; Jewish
Culture; AAJE; Small, Inter-
mediate and Large Cities; and
others.
Several receptions flavored by
the spirit of Quebec will be~hosted
by the Montreal Allied Jewish
Community Services. A
'Women's Division "Soiree
Canadienne. "Boit A Chanson"
for college youth, and a general
reception for all GA participants
are among the social activities
being planned by the Montreal
Jewish community. During a
reception and tour of the
Montreal Jewish community
complex, an exhibit on the
Holocaust and Yiddish theater
oerformance will be available.
REGISTRATION information
for the General Assembly is
available from local Jewish
Federations pr directly from the
CJF, 575 Lexington Ave., New
York, N.Y. 10022.
The Council of Jewish
Federations is the association of
more than 190 Federations,
Welfare Funds and Community
Councils which serve nearly 800
communities and embrace over
95 percent of the Jewl
population of the United Stj
and Canada. Established in 19
the Council serves as a ratio
instrument to strengthen
work and the impact of Je
Federations through leadei
in developing programs to 1
changing needs in the Je
community; through the
change of successful experien
to assure the most effa
community services; thn
establishing guidelines
fundraising and operation;
through joint national plann
and action on common pur
dealing with local, regi
national and international ne
The following people
represent the Palm Beach Cou1
Jewish community at the Gen,
Assembly in Montreal: Mr.]
Mrs. Floyd Bachrach, Mr. |
Mrs. James Baer, Phyllis(_
Dr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Faj
Bette Gilbert, Paula KassJ
and Mrs. Arnold Lampert,!
Lesser, Mr. and Mrs. H.
Levy, John Moss. Mr. andl
Myron Nickman. Ber
Rogers, Norman Schimel
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Shulmad
and Mrs. Nathan Tanen an]
and Mrs. Bruce Warshal.
After theatre
there's nothing like a delicious
cup of coffee. Maxwell House
Coffee always makes it great.
Pleasant company after the theatre is bered cup after cup. year after year.
never the same without a cup of piping Maxwell Housea tradition in Jewish
hot Maxwell House"- Coffee. Its rich, lifestyle for over half a century,
satisfying taste is brewed to be remem-
*
Good
to the
Last Drop"
ia
MWICM
K
Certified
Koaher
A living tradition in (ewish homes for more than half | century


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