Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00202

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisti Florid}i&m
1*9
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
M conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Volume 5 Number 17
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, August 24,1979
FrdShoch*t
Price 35 Cents
CJA-IEF Campaign
Draws to Close
"The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County's
)79 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign is rapidly coming to a close," said Robert S.
Levy, General Campaign Chairman.
"We are still confident that every member of the
community will join us by making his commitment this
year for Jewish survival. The impact of inflation continues
to grow in Israel. More Soviet Jews are being allowed to
emigrate from Russia than ever before, and with this
comes the increased need to expand resettlement
programs both in Israel and here in our own community.
"It is imperative that we have 100 percent par-
ticipation from our local Jewish community in order to
make this the most successful campaign in the history of
Palm Beach County."
If you have not made your pledge to the 1979
campaign, please contact the Federation office at 832-
2120.
Vance Assures Stone
There's No Shift
On Pivotal Res. 242
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Concern in government circles
that the United States was
seeking a change in United
Nations Security Council
Resolution 242 as a way to woo
the Palestine Liberation
Organization to the peace
negotiating table was eased
somewhat by a message from an
ADL
Attacks Continue
Against CBS-TV
NEW YORK (JTA) -
CBS-TV has come under
fresh attack from Jewish
The Petrobillions Conquest
The Seven-Pronged
Arab Invasion of America
By HOAG LEVINS
Sen. Frank Church has not had
an easy time of it with the
member nations of the Arab
League.
The first, major public con-
frontation came with the
Khashoggi investigation.
Digging in, the Subcommittee
exposed extensive details of a
worldwide web of connections in
which people like Khashoggi
shuttled petrobillions and war
materiel which generated a
copious "commission" flow. The
Church hearings opened the
window on a lot of the new
connections and inroads the
Arabs have made in Washington
and other seats of power. When
the Subcommittee investigated
his dealings with American
defense contractors, Khashoggi
was represented by Clark Clif-
ford, former Secretary of
Defense, known as the dean of
the capital's lawyers.
DEMOCRAT CHURCH,
Chairman of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, is one of
the most powerful men in
Washington. He has consistently
opposed moves to sell highly
sophisticated military hardware
to the Arabs. Last year, Church's
fight against the controversial F-
15 proposal was bitterly criticized
by the White House.
Vance Denies Day an
Claim U.S. Policy
Now Shuns Israel
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA) Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance has denied a claim by Israeli Foreign
Minister Moshe Dayan that there has been a "turn" in
United States policy against Israel.
Specifically stating he had read Dayan's interview
published in Yediot Achrunot, Vance declared: "I want to
state categorically that there has been no change in our
policy toward Israel. Our long-standing support for the
security and well-being of Israel is firm and unshakeable.
It remains our policy to work towards a comprehensive
peace settlement which is based on UN Security Council
Resolutions 242 and 338."
STATE DEPARTMENT spokesman Tom Reston,
.who read Vance's statement to reporters, said it clearly
Continued on Page 2
In another arena, Church has
become locked in a low-profile but
high-intensity battle behind the
scenes with Libya, which has
been lobbying for the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee to
drop the prohibitions that have
held up the export of military
equipment to that country.
The controversy began some
years ago, when Libya purchased
five C-130 Hercules planes, two
Boeing 727s, large numbers ol
Oshkosh trucks and spare parts
from American manufacturers.
The equipment was to add to the
formidable arsenal Libya has
already assembled with $2 billion
in Russian military equipment,
including 100 MIG jets manned
by crack North Korean fighter
pilots.
The C-130s were the central
part of the American purchase.
Although usually characterized
in press reports as only "cargo"
planes, the Hercules is the most
versatile warplane ever built. It
has been the workhorse of the
American military for 20 years.
THE FOUR-ENGINE turbo-
prop aircraftknown to U. S.
troops as "Herks" or "Herky
birds" are designed for rough-
field landings and lightning
military strikes; Israeli troops
flew C-130s to make their famous
1976 rescue raid at Entebbe
Airport in Uganda. The planes
are also designed for rapid
paratroop drops, have a 5,000-
mile range and can carry 110,000
pounds of jeeps, trucks, heavy
artillery and similar cargos.
Herks are also easy to convert
into lethal gunships, like the ones
which ravaged the Ho Chi Minh
Trail during the Vietnam War.
These seemingly innocuous
Continued on Page 12
organizations for selecting
Vanessa Redgrave, an out-
spoken supporter of the
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization, for the role of a
Nazi concentration camp
survivor in a TV film based
on Fania Fenelon's book,
Playing for Time.
The latest denunciations
came from the Anti-Defa-
mation League of B'nai
B'rith and the American
Jewish Congress.
Dore Schary, honorary ADL
chairman and a producer,
playwright and author, said that
casting Miss Redgrave for the
Continued on Page 3
American Congressman that the
U.S. would veto a pending
Kuwaiti-sponsored draft
resolution on Palestinian rights
now pending in the Security
Council.
Sen. Richard Stone (D., Fla),
chairman of the Senate Foreign
Relations subcommittee on the
Middle East, was quoted here as
saying that U.S. Secretary of
State Cyrus Vance had told him
ul a breakfast meeting that the
U.S. would adhere to its promise
not to deal with the PLO until it
recognized Resolution 242 and
recognized Israel's right to live
peacefully within secure borders.
STONE ALSO said that Vance
assured him the U.S. would veto
the Security Council resolution
on Palestinian rights as it now
stands because it would alter 242
by calling for granting
Palestinian self-determination
and the right to an independent
slate. In Washington, the State
Department declined meanwhile
to comment on what Vance said
to Stone.
Stone's statement, issued in
Washington, contrasted strongly
with the gloomy view presented
earlier in the day by Foreign
Minister Moshe Dayan who said
in interviews with the press that
the American stance towards
Continued on Page 7
Feeling the Repercussion
From Young's Resignation
UNITED NATIONS -
The enormity of the rift be-
tween the American Jewish
and Black communities is
becoming increasingly clear
in the wake of the resigna-
tion last week of Andrew
Young as America's Am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions.
Young resigned on Aug.
15 following the discovery
that he had met with Zehdi
Labib Terzi, a represen-
tative of the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization here,
and that he had subse-
quently lied about the
meeting.
THE RIFT in Jewish Black
relations, which traditionally
has been marked by Jewish
leadership and other forms of
contribution to the civil rights
movement, is clearly indicated by
the statement of Rev. Joseph
Lowery, president of the
Southern Christian Leadership
Conference.
"We have been allies in our
Andrew Young
struggle because of similar
histories," said Lowery. "But
something has happened along
the way."
This observation is mild com-
pared to previous SCLC charges
that Young's resignation was a
"Jewish conspiracy" stemming
from the UN Ambassador's
position on the PLO and Pales-
tinian "rights" to the establish-
ment of yet another Palestinian
state on Israeli soil.
WITHIN HOURS after
Continued on Page 10


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August 24,
With the
Organizations
The officers of the Chai Group Kobinson has been decorated
of the Lake Worth-South Palm tw><* by the late David Ben-
Beach Chapter of Hadassah were Ourion for his services to the
installed by Helen Smith, State of Israel and awarded the
president of the chapter, at the Congressional Medal of Merit for
regular meeting at the Challenger volunteer services to the United
Country Club on May 24.
The officers serving for the
fiscal year July 1, 1979 to June
30, 1980 are: president, Fanny
Schwartz; vice president,
education, Sonia Rappaport; vice
president, membership, Sadie
Rosenberg; vice president, fund-
raising, Dorothy Greenberg; vice
president, program, Ann
Greenberg; financial secretary,
Nettie Kliger; recording
secretary, Sara Singer; corres-
ponding secretary, Emily
Magidson; and treasurer, Irene
Strasburg.
A large group of members and
friends of the Chai Group of the
Lake Worth South Palm Beach
Chapter of Hadassah enjoyed a
three-day holiday in August at
the Boca Raton Hotel and
Country Club.
The event for the benefit of
Hadassah Medical Organization
was led by the president of Chai,
Fanny Schwartz and her commit-
tee: Evelyn Andelman, Cora
Bolog, Etta Chapin, Beatrice
Fried, Miriam Friedson, Ann
Greenberg, Elaine Hillman,
Yetta Komroff and Sonia
Rappaport.
AMERICAN
MIZRACHI WOMEN
American Mizrachi Women
will hold its first meeting
Tuesday, Sept. 4, in the club-
house meeting room in Century
Village. Installation of officers
for 1979-80 will be held Tuesday,
Sept. 11.
AMERICAN-ISRAELI
LIGHTHOUSE
The American Israeli Light-
house, Arthur S. Cowan Chapter,
which helps the blind and handi-
capped in Haifa, will hold its next
fall meeting on Thursday, Oct.
11, at 12:30 p.m. at the Holiday
Inn.
PIONEER WOMEN
Theodore Herzl Club of Pioneer
Women plans a used book sale
booth at the Palm Beach
Festival, Aug. 26, at Bryant
Park, Lake Worth.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Women Boynton
Chapter, will hold the first
meeting of the 1979-80 season on
Monday, Sept. 10, at 12:30 p.m.
at Temple Beth Sholom, Lake
Worth. Guest speaker for the
meeting will be Sol Robinson.
States. Guests are invited.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The Golden Lakes Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
hold a luncheon and card party at
their clubhouse on Tuesday,
Sept. 11. A light lunch will be
provided. Tickets are now on
sale.
The first meeting of the season
will be held in the clubhouse on
Tuesday, Sept. 25. Anyone in-
terested in a trip to Southseas
Plantation on Captiva Island
Oct. 29,30 and 31, should contact
Kathryn Koffs, chairwoman, for
additional information.
Century Chapter of Women's
American ORT will have its first
meeting of the season on
Thursday, Sept. 13, at 1 p.m. at
Temple Anshei Sholom. Ruth
Johannes, program chairwoman,
has arranged a musical program
featuring Simon Kalick, violinist,
accompanied by Mildred Birn-
bauin at the piano.
Plans and projects for the
coming year will be announced by
president Gertrude Altsheler and
special projects chairwoman,
Lillian Goldberger. Guests are
invited.
The North Palm Beach
Chapter ORT paid-up mem-
bership luncheon will be the
Tanglewood Club House at 10800
North Military Trail, Palm Beach
Gardens, on Wednesday, Sept.
12. 1979 at noon.
For reservations, contact
Rosalie Fox, 557 Greenway Dr.,
North Palm Beach; Carol
Goldsline, 2202 Carib Circle,
Palm Beach Gardens; or Marlene
Rudner. 119 Martin Road, North
Palm Beach.
HADASSAH
Bat Gurion Chapter of
Hadassah will hold a golf
tournament at the Sherbrooke
Golf and Country Club in Lake
Worth on Sunday, Sept. 9. The
public is welcome.
This fund-raising outing in-
cludes a continental breakfast,
greens fees, shotgun scramble,
golf cart, buffet lunch, door
prizes and trophies. Registration
begins at 7:30 a.m.
For more information and
reservations. contact Hank
Harman, 5012 El Claro No. West
Palm Beach, FL 33409.
Tikvah Group of Hadassah will
hold its board meeting Thurs-
Investment Equity
Real Estate!
DON VOGEL
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER SALESMAN
Residential-Condominium-Investment
2352 PQA Boulevard Business 626-5100
| Palm Bcrt Gardens, Fla. 33410 Residence 622-4000
PHILIP WEINSTEIN.F.D.
evitt memorial chapel
Mil OKEECHOBEE BLVD.. WEST PALM BEACH. FLORIDA
PHONE NO. Mf 7M I
133SS WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY. NORTH MIAMI FL PHONE p
MM
m\
day, Sept. 13, at 10 a.m. at the
home of Rose Novick, Golf's
Edge 16-F. The regular meeting
will be held on Monday. Sept. 17,
at 1 p.m. at Anshei Sholom.
There will be a card party and
luncheon at Massey's, Wed-
nesday, Oct. 17. at noon.
The West Palm Beach Chapter
of Hadassah, which includes the
three Century Village Groups, is
participating in Charity Day at
(lie Palm Beach Mall on Sunday,
Sept. 16, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
There will be sales of arts and
crafts, hand knits, plants,
homebaked goods and new
salable items. Any contributions
and help in sales wiii be ap-
preciated by chairperson, Ida
Goldstein of Shalom.
Golda Meir Boynton Beach
Chapter of Hadassah will hold
its first regular meeting of the
new year at Temple Beth Sholom,
315 No. A Street, Lake Worth, on
Sept. 13 at 12:30 p.m.
Golda Meir Boynton Beach
Chapter of Hadassah will hold its
first board meeting of the new
year at the Bonanza Restaurant
(Gulfstream Mall), 3675 South
Federal Highway, on Sept. 6 at
12:30 p.m.
BRANDEIS WOMEN
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee of Delray
Beach is sponsoring a weekend at
Sandpiper Bay in Port St. Lucie
on Sept. 21-24. Contact Rose
Hoffman for reservations.
8. County News
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Women's American ORT, Del-
ray Chapter, will meet Aug. 29 at
12:30 p.m. at Delray Community
Center. A beauty seminar is
planned.
The chapter has scheduled a
luncheon card party fashion
show for Sept. 12 at noon at Boca
Del Mar. Call Mary Kaplan or
Gert Pollack for reservations.
A Rosh Hashanah weekend is
set for Sept. 21-24 at the Sand-
piper Bay Hotel in Port St. Lucie.
Call Terry Shear or Henrietta
Riegler.
Delray-Boynton chapters plan
a new Thrift Shop in September.
Members are urged to collect
merchandise.
p-s-14-rt
REFORM HEBREW
CONGREGATION
OF DELRAY
The Reform Hebrew Congre-
gation of Delray announces that
Rabbi Samvo' M. Silver will be
conducting his first Friday night
service Sept. 7 at St. Paul's Epis-
copal Church, 188 South Swinton
Ave., Delray Beach, at 8 p.m.
Rabbi Silver is the newly ap-
pointed permanent rabbi. He is a
writer and lecturer. All are
welcome. For further in-
formation, call Marge Aaron or
Bernard Etish.
TEMPLE EMETH
Temple Emeth of Delray Beach
is planning an after school
religious education program for
children ages nursery through
Bar Mitzvah. For further in-
formation, call the temple office.
The Singles Club of Temple
Emeth will hold their first
meeting on Monday, Sept. 10, at
noon at the temple, 5780 W.
Atlantic Ave. This first meeting
of the season will feature a card
party. For more information, call
Marion Tobins or the temple
'office.
*-M4-7?
Vance Denies Dayan's Claim
Continued from Page 1
sets forth the Carter Administration's opinion and policy.
He said he did not know whether any U.S. official in Israei
had been in to see Day an about his interview remarks. *
Vance repeated his statement later after a luncheon
meeting he attended at the White House with President
Carter, Israeli Ambassador Ephraim Evron and Zbigniew
Brzezinski, Carter's National Security Adviser.
Vance said there had been "full and long discussions
on a number of issues" at the hour and a half meeting. He
said the meeting was "useful, helpful and constructive."
He said Evron would now be reporting back to the Israeli
government.
WHILE VANCE did not go into details of the
subjects discussed at the White House luncheon, it was
believed that the broad spectrum of Israeli-American
relations was gone over, including the tough resolution
adopted by the Israeli Cabinet rejecting any negotiation
with the Palestine Liberation Organization and warninL
against any changes of UN Security Council Resolution
242 to meet Arab demands on Palestinian rights.
Also believed on the agenda was the Israeli rejection
of the U.S.-Soviet proposal for having the United Nations
Truce Supervisory Organization (UNTSO) police the
Israeli pullout in the Sinai.
YAHRZEIT TABLETS
For Dignified Fund-raising
Over 52 years experience In furnishing all
kinds of Bronze and Aluminum Tablets,
Memorials, Donor Plates, Trees of Life Awards
Portrait Tablets, Letters, Testimonials,
Dedicatory Tablets, Original Sculpture, Etc.
Send for free catalog or call.
UNITED STATES BRONZE
& ALUMINUM CORP.
1065 E. 28th St. Hialeah, Fla. 33013
836-2880 or 836-2906
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a fami ly of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft.Lauderdale(Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
ED Riverside
Memorial Chapel. Inc./Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Kenneth M. Kay / Arthur Grossberg/ Joseph Rubin
P-B-M-Tt


CRC Update
By JOHN I. MOSS
Chairman
International-Soviet Jewry
Task Force
In recent months we have
witnessed important develop-
ments affecting Jews in the
USSR. The following represents
the consensus of the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry
regarding the current, basic
issues of concern, as adopted by
its Executive Committee, July
18.
EMIGRATION
The NCSJ notes that in the
'recent period an average of over
4,000 Jews have been permitted
to leave the USSR each month.
This represents a significant
improvement in the granting of
exit visas. We regard this as an
important development which
offers hope that there may be a
turning point in Soviet policy.
However, while Soviet Jews
are being sent some 16,000 af-
fidavits each month from Israel,
the number permitted to leave
does not correspond to the
number of those wishing to leave.
The NCSJ will continue its ef-
forts to ensure that objective.
THE PRISONERS OF
CONSCIENCE
Jews have been imprisoned for
Ihcir desire to leave for Israel, a
form of abuse and harassment we
deplore. The NCSJ is deeply
aware of the fact that there are
still such Prisoners of Conscience
incarcerated, or in exile. We call
for their immediate release and
the granting of exit visas to them
and their families.
THE REFUSENIKS
Despite the increase in the
number of exit visas granted,
thousands of Refuseniks have
been denied exit visas for many
years, some for as long as a
decade. The NCSJ will continue
to publicize their plight and
cooperate with various groups
and individuals to effectuate
their immediate emigration.
JACKSON-VANIK
AMENDMENT
The Jackson-Vanik Amend-
ment to the Trade Act of 1974
provides an adequate framework
for encouraging further Soviet
performance in the area of
emigration and should not be
modified. Should the level of
emigration continue to improve,
and should the Soviet Govern-
ment now free the remaining
POC's and allow the Refuseniks
and their families to emigrate,
and should President Carter
receive the assurances that meet
the test of the existing waiver
provision of the law, including
implementation of emigration
procedures free from harassment,
the USSR could receive the trade
benefits it seeks on the annual
basis now provided by the law.
ANTISEMITISM
The NCSJ denounces the
vitriolic campaign in the USSR
vilifying the Jewish people, the
Jewish religion and the State of
Israel. Today, the USSR is the
largest producer and
disseminator of anti-Semitic
materials in the world. Its crude
campaign of slander, conducted
in the mass and publications,
must be seen as a serious threat
to the status and security of Jews
in the USSR.
A parallel expression of anti-
Semitism is the increased
evidence of discrimination
practiced against Jews in ad-
mission to higher education
facilities and in employment and
promotion.
The NCSJ calls upon all people
who fight against racial or
religious hatred to demand that
Soviet authorities halt these
policies and practices.
JEWISH CULTURE AND
RELIGIOUS RIGHTS
For decades Soviet authorities
have been suppressing the
Jewish religion and culture and
forcing assimilation. The USSR
is the only country with a Jewish
community in which there is not
a single approved Jewish school,
or means for passing on Jewish
history and traditions. This
policy is in conflict with the
Soviet Union's own constitution
and various international
agreements, including the
Helsinki Final Act, to which the
USSR is a signatory.
The NCSJ will continue to
mobilize the support of
educational, cultural and
juridical organizations and
various human rights groups to
seek an end to such
discrimination in culture, religion
and education. We will continue
all efforts to enable those who
wish to do so to study and teach
the Hebrew language and to have
JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY, INC.
Main Campus 2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
WE ARE ACCEPTING ENROLLMENT
FOR THE 1979/80 SCHOOL YEAR
FOR EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION
FOR AN OUTSTANDING SECULAR AND
JUDAIC STUDIES PROGRAM
ENROLL YOUR CHILD NOW!!!
Superior Accredited Faculty
Small Classes
Individualized Studies
Complete Secular Studies
Hebraic / Judaic Studies
Basic Skill Achievement Emphasis
Co-Curricular Activities
Transportation available
ENROLLMENT ALSO OPEN FOR OUR
SOUTH COUNTY BRANCH IN BOCA RATON
For full particulars call 832-8423 / 4
or visit the school
access to books and other
materials on Jewish subjects in
Hebrew, Russians and Yiddish
MONITORING
DEVELOPMENTS
The NCSJ will continue to
closely monitor the situation of
Jews in the USSR in terms of
emigration, Refuseniks, POC's,
anti-Semitism and religious and
cultural discrimination.
Violations of the basic rights of
Soviet Jews will be documented
and provided to the Commission
on Security and Cooperation in
Europe and to representatives of
other governments who were
signatories to the Helsinki Final
Act, in advance of the 1980
Madrid Conference.
The NCSJ will continue to
provide documented evidence of
the violations of the basic rights
of Soviet Jews to the
Administration, the Congress,
and to the entire American
people. We will continue our
efforts to mobilize and involve
every segment of this nation in
this great and historic endeavor.
Anatoly Skin
And Bones
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Anatoly Sharansky "looks very
bad, and is very skinny," ac-
cording to his brother Leonid
who, with his mother Ida
Milgrom, was permitted a two-
hour conversation with him
Monday at the Christipol Prison,
500 miles from Moscow.
The talk had to be conducted
through a glass partition under
the eyes of two guards. Leonid
was reached by phone by Mrs.
Lynn Singer, president of the
Long Island Committee for
Soviet Jewry.
SHARANSKY said his
brother's condition is "awful,
intolerable. We're afraid some
tragedy may take place." Despite
substantial foreign protests,
Sharansky told Mrs. Singer,
Anatoly has received no medical
care.
According to the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry and
Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews, and London activist
Michael Sherbourne, Mrs.
Milgrom reported separately that
"although we knew it was Tolya
(Anatoly), it was impossible to
recognize him. He was just skin
and bones. He had a sharp nose
like a knife and staring eyes.
Attacks Continue
Against CBS-TV
Continued from Page 1
film dealing with Miss Fenelon's
memoirs about musicians who
were forced to play for the Nazis
in concentration camps indicated
that CBS had a "profound lack of
sensitivity and understanding."
HE SAID that Redgrave, "an
actor of talent, has opportunities
to play many other roles, but to
cast her as one of the victims of
the Holocaust is, we suggest, a
trick, a stunt, a misguided
judgement."
Schary suggested that perhaps
she chose to play this part "as a
might learn something "about
Ithe Nazi slaughter of the Jews"
and "recognize at last that the
Jewish people have a right to a
{state of their own" that seeks
I only "to live in peace with its
Arab neighbors."
At the same time, Arthur
Miller, who wrote the screenplay
for the film, said in a statement
j that "Miss Redgrave was offered
the role of Fania Fenelon as an
I actress suited to it.
"TO FIRE her
political views
now for
would
her
be
gesture of redemption because of { blacklisting. Having been
her close alliance with the | blacklisted myself in time past, I
terrorists of the PLO the film ,
she made, The Palestinians,
showed little children practicing
ihe killing of Jews and aiding the
obscene propaganda of the
PLO."
However, Schary added, "If
redemption is not the aim,
perhaps CBS believes that her
performance will make her aware
of the necessity for the creation of
Israel and make her realize how
necessary it is for that small,
beleaguered country to defend
itself against 60 million ad-
versaries who seek its
obliteration."
THE CASTING of Miss
Redgrave in the TV film
"degrades, offends, depreciates
those who survived the death
camps and defames the names of
those who died in them."
Howard M. Squadron,
AJCongress president, called the
Redgrave casting "grotesque"
and certain to be "offensive to
the Jewish community." He
expressed the hope that Miss
Redgrave, in that performance.
have fought against the practice
abroad as well as here, and I
cannot participate in it now."
Miller added, "No actress can
possibly play Fania in this play
without generating the
profoundest sympathy for the
Jewish people, as well as a deeper
understanding of some of the
experiences that cried out for the
creation of the State of Israel"
Meanwhile, responding to
casting Miss Redgrave in the
film, David Wolper, producer of
television documentaries and
dramas, including Roots, and
Lionel Chetwynd, a writer with
many screen and television
CBS Entertainment, said
Redgrave was chosen because
"the feeling was'" that she was
"the best actress for the part,
that we should never position
ourselves where we penalize
people for their personal or
political views, that our business
was show business and that it
was our responsibility to come up
with the best actress we could
find."
HERB and ELLEN LIPPE
BEST PRICES ON
Vertical & Levelor Blinds
DIVISION OF
PJB. CUSTOM FRAME & WALL DECOR INC.
607A NORTHLAKE BLVD.
NORTH PALM BEACH. FLA. 33408
South County North County
278-4799 848-2977
Light tlje candle
and remember?
As our fathers before us, light the
candle and remember those who
have left us. Hold this day for
reflection and thoughtfulness; in
solemnity, strength of purpose
and hope.
Menorah Chapels, to preserve the
traditions of our faith, wishes to
offer a gift of remembrance. A
Yahrzeit Calendar in the name of
the departed. A part of our
religious life, now and through
the ages.
CljapelS
THE ONLY JEWISH-OWNED CHAPELS
IN BROWARD COUNTY
AEPRESEN1ING
KIHSCHENBAUM BROS INC USER MEMORIAL CHAPELS
STANETSKV. SCHLOSSBERG'SOLOMON
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
MartW*
/!<* Kaun. Iw< tunrrel Itemon
Call or write for your Yahrzeit Calendar at:
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313
742-6000
In Dade, call 861-7301
In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME DATE
AND TIME OF DEATH OF THE PEPARTED.
Chapels also in Deerfield Beach and Margate


Page 4
~Th*Jeun8n"FlbRdian'6}Palm Beach County
r naay, August zi, i3(t
Dr. Mengele's End ?
It is hard to forget the indifferent way in which
the Allied powers let Josef Mengele out of its grasp
at the end of World II. Even the defeated Germany,
which one would have thought anxious to
rehabilitate itself in the eyes of the civilized world
after the Nazi era, did nothing to retrieve him.
And it was all so easy to catch up with the in-
famous concentration camp doctor, too. Mengele had
simply gone home toGinsburg, where his father and
the family of Alfred Mengele virtually own the whole
town and environs.
What is even more unbelievable is the equally
indifferent way in which all concerned let Mengele
escape to Latin America, where he found ultimate
refuge in Paraguay's large German colony and the
odious Nazi revivalist movement there.
But if no one else has learned from the past,
certainly West Germany has. Now, Paraguay has
acted to remove citizenship status from Dr. Mengele,
and it is hoped that extradition to West Germany
will not be far behind.
The difficulty is that Mengele is as slippery as
an eel. He has proven this time and again in the past,
when reports of his whereabouts made Mengele move
from one Latin hideout to another.
We hope that this time the butcher will be
caught.
Poor Vanessa
Poor Vanessa Redgrave.
After several years of courting the PLO, she now
finds that her political activities may not permit her
to be the star of a movie on the Holocaust. It seems
she was to be cast in the role of a survivor of Ausch-
witz. Members of the Jewish community in England
and now United States organizations are objecting to
her playing this role.
It is past time for some public figures to realize
that they can not publicly embrace terrorists and
murderers who call for the extinction of a country
and the annihilation of its people and then expect to
be treated as fine upstanding citizens.
We are judged by the company we keep, Miss
Redgrave. Maybe your companions should be
changed. For the good of the world and maybe even
your own career.
More Sensitivity Needed
The Carter Administration appears tired of try-
ing to convince the Arab countries of joining the
Israeli-Egyptian peace efforts and is on the verge of
agreeing to the Palestine Liberation Organization
that United Nations Security Council Resolution 242
be amended to include something about Palestinian
self-determination.
1 This lack of sensitivity was especially demon-
strated by Carter's statement comparing the Pales-
jtinian issue with the civil rights movement in the
! U.S. This statement not only angered Jews, but also
1 Blacks, who took umbrage that a peaceful drive for
I legitimate rights could be equated with a movement
that is based on terrorism.
Unless the Administration stands fast on 242
and stops its practice of making off-the-cuff state-
ments that can only serve to add to Israel's concern,
it will destroy all the good work it has done in the
Mideast.
Carter's Evangelism is Showing
Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE and FEDERATION REPORTER
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Countv. Inc
Combined Jewish Appeal
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
3200 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. Flu 33432 Phone 368 2001
Printing Office 120 N.E. 6th St.. Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone 373 4805
KKEDK.SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET KONNI TARTAKOW
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor News Coordinator
MORTON GILBERT Advertising Representative
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
FORM 3579 returns to The Jewish Floridian
3200 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. Fla. USPS 864303
Published Bl-Weekly Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton. Fla
Federation officers: President, Alan L. Shulman. Vice Presidents: Or. Richard
Shugarman, Dr. Howard Kay, Kenneth Scherer, Jeanne Levy. Jerome Tishman:
Treasurer: Stacl Lesser, Secretary: Bruce J Daniels; Executive Director.
Norman J. Schlmelman. Submit material for publication to Ronni Tartakow.
InriTtorof Public Relations.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Ares) One Year $7.50, or by membersh.p to
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, SOI South Flakier Drive, Wast Palm
Beach, FL 13401 Phone 032 21 JO. (Out of Town upon Request)
NEW YORK The debate is I
fierce here about the Carter
presidency, far more fierce than
anywhere else I've been in the
past month or so, including
Europe, where it was certainly
fierce enough. One reason for this
overriding passion may be that
New York is a concentrated
center of the political power upon
which the President had to draw
in order to be elected Blacks,
Hispanics, Jews, labor.
Jews, particularly, are con-
gregated here in high con-
centration. Furthermore, in
addition to sharing with the rest
of the city and the country the
domestic disappointments Mr.
Carter has engendered in them,
they are angry about his foreign
policy toward Israel. They find
this policy a betrayal of their
trust in him, which he asked for
in specifically spiritual, indeed
religious, terms when he was
running for office.
Mindlin
MORE "mundane" betrayals,
however important they may be
because they deal with the very
political, economical and social
fabric of the nation, do not in the
end possess the spiritual and
religious qualities that the
President invested in his appeal
to Jewish voters and the Jewish
voters' fierce identification with
Israel.
That is why his betrayal of this
sector of the electorate elicits
such passionate debate.
It strikes me that Mr. Carter
understands, for the first time,
what has occurred here, and he is
trying to turn a liability into an
asset. The President, particularly
during his address to the nation
in which he launched his energy
program, and in other of his
statements since then, has at-
tempted to inject an aura of
spiritual and religious thought
and feeling into his domestic
policies, as well.
IT IS hard to see how an
economic problem such as in-
flation and /or energy can be
defined in religious terms. Or how
the President can hope to rally
the nation around his faltering
performance, domestic or foreign,
this way.
Furthermore, ecumenical
religious appeals, which he is now
firing at all of us broadside in his
effort to crystallize the national
malaise,' are not the fabric of the
religious and spiritual feelings
that Jews have for Israel and
which he evoked so successfully
in them during his candidacy; il
they were, these feelings would
not be so passionate, nor the
Jewish belief that they have been
betrayed, debated so
passionately.
Besides, ecumenical religion is
not Mr. Carter's way either. And
however bland it may be, it is not
the nation's way, which is
traditionally accustomed to
heartfelt but secular straight-talk
indeed, which is suspicious of
sermons in high places because it
is so fiercely concerned about
separation of church and state as
u principle if not entirely as a
practice.
THAT IS why the character of
Mr. Carter's appeal to the Jewish
vole in his campaign for the
presidency was so strange in the
first place and so dangerous to
boot. Now that he is in such
desperate trouble, the President
s expanding his religious and
spiritual appeals beyond the
ecumenical. "Your God is my
God," he once told an affluent
Continued on Page 9
'
Lttames of Alienation
Mixed Marriage Kids: A Mixed Bag
Friday, August 24, 1979
Volume 5
1 ELUL5739
Number 17
NEW YORK The children
of religiously-mixed marriages,
are the subject of a series of case
studies in the just-published
summer issue of Present Tense,
quarterly magazine published by
the American Jewish Committee.
In an article titled "Half-Jews:
Sooner or Later the Children
Grow Up," Paula Span, a free-
lance writer, presents five
vignettes people whose
parental backgrounds were half
Jewish and half Christian. Span
makes a point of acknowledging
that "five interviews are no
substitute for a real research
effort."
HOWEVER, she maintains
that "these stories, these per-
sonal litanies of alienation or
attachment, commitment or
indifference, contentment or
bewilderment or regret, are one
way to present the world of the
halt-Jews."
Her subjects include two men,
two women, and a 14-year-old
girl. The adults range in age from
the early 20s to middle 30s. They
come from widely different
geographical areas in the United
States two from New York
City, and one each from
Baltimore, Salt Lake City, and
Santa Monica, Cal.
Despite their differences in life
styles, and despite the fact that
only one of the five subjeci
the 14-year-old girl is actively
involved in Jewish religious
observance, all of them indicated
a desire to retain an identification
with Judaism, on an ethnic level
if not on a religious one.
EVEN THE least Jewishly
identified of the group a 24-
year-old New York woman, a
highly successful producer of
television commercials, the child
of a Catholic mother and a Jewish
father who claimed that
Judaism "doesn't make a dif-
ference in terms of anything I
do," added: "I still consider
myself Jewish."
The one other subject whose
mother was not Jewish is a writer
and story editor for a film
company in Salt Lake City.
Acknowledging that Jewish
law maintains that religious
identification stems from the
matriarchal line, and that it
would therefore reject his claim
to Jewishness, he stated: "It
makes me feel that when I say it,
I'm telling a lie. It keeps me
somewhat detached, too. I'm not
one or the other of anything."
Nevertheless, he added: "I
always felt part of Judaism. I
think it had to do with Jews
turning out so many brilliant
scholars and artists. They were
such a preeminent force in this
i v and in others I saw. I was
proud to say I was Jewish."
A JOURNALIST in Santa
Monica, the daughter of a Jewish
mother and a Protestant father,
is described by Span as "com-
fortable with, even a little proud
of, the continuing contradiction
of her lineage."
"I've always wanted to break
away from stereotypes," the
journalist said, "and I think I've
come to like it this way. I can't be
the Jewish princess and I can't be
the WASP committeewoman. I
can be me"
A chemist in Baltimore
declared that in his early youth
he had been a sort of "bi-religious
person," celebrating the religious
holidays of both bis Jewish
mother and his Southern Baptist
father, although he attended He-
brew school three days a week
and was bar mitzvah "to appease
grandfather." His break with all
religion came, he stated, when he
began to study science at a tech-
nical high school.
"I COULDN'T bring the two
things together," he declared.
Discussing his life today, and
his relationships with his very
intermarried family, he said:
"I get into these arguments
with my relatives about being
Jewish. My argument is that you J'j
have to specify being ethnically
Jewish or religiously Jewish. My
uncle says that being a Jew
means l>emj; religious. And 1
always say, 'What about Ein-
stein?'


Friday, August 24,1979
Victor Bienstock
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
SALT: UNEF: Our Alphabet Diplomacy
Letter to the Editor
There must have been in
credulous laughter and
congratulatory toasts in the
Kremlin the other day when the
news came through from United
Nations headquarters that the
United States State Department
had extricated the Soviets from
an embarrassingly uncomfortable
position. What made the news
even more piquant to the lords of
the Kremlin was the fact that the
State Department had done this
by renegging on a solemn
commitment to an ally Israel.
It all had to do with
ratification of the SALT II treaty
currently under fire in the Senate.
I ('s not much of a treaty, but it is
better than no treaty at all.
AVERELL H ARRIM AN, who
probably knows the Kremlin
1^ thought processes better than
any living American, says that if
the Senate rejects SALT II, it
would strengthen chances that a
hard-line anti-American might
succeed Leonid Brezhnev as the
Soviet boss while ratification
would make negotiation of a
SALT III treaty somewhat
easier.
President Carter needs the
agreement as the centerpiece of
his reelection claims of a suc-
cessful foreign policy. Comrade
Brezhnev wants it as a sort of
political memorial to his
otherwise undistinguished
overlordship.
Because Brezhnev wants the
treaty so badly, the Kremlin is
doing everything it can not to
rock the boat and give the Senate
reason for rejecting the treaty.
As a public relations gesture, it
released five political dissidents
in exchange for two convicted
spies. It has been letting Jews
emigrate at the rate of about
5,000 a month to show that it is
permitting freedom of movement
aa prescribed by the Jackson
Vanik amendment as a condition
of Soviet-American trade ex-
pansion. (It has been able to do
this without angering its Arab
allies because most of the
emigrating Jews do not go to
Israel.)
BUT THE Soviets were put on
the spot by the expiration of the
mandate of the United Nations
Emergency Force operating as a
buffer between the Egyptian and
Israeli armies in the Sinai.
Extension of the mandate
required Security Council ap-
proval.
The radical Arab states, the
most vociferous critics of the
Egyptian-Israeli peace accords,
had extracted a promise from the
Kremlin to veto any Security
Council resolution prolonging the
UNEF mandate which, at this
stage, it is an important factor in
the fulfillment of the accords.
Were the Soviets to exercise
their veto and thus jeopardize the
implementation of the accords in
which the United States played
so vital a role and in whose
success we are so concerned, they
might very well have angered
enough senators as to make
SALT II ratification impossible.
THE SOVIETS were in a bind:
on the one hand, they risked
alienating their Arab friends; on
the other, they risked raising
barely dormant doubts in
Washington about the USSR's
pacific intentions in general.
At this critical point, our State
Department gallantly jumped in
on its rescue mission, and showed
the Kremlin the way out of the
dilemma. The American proposal
was simple: we'll just let the
emergency force mandate die and
authorize the UN Secretary
General to deploy his unarmed,
not very competent truce ob-
server forces between the two
armies in the Sinai.
The Soviets gratefully ac-
cepted the scheme and went I
along with it; the Egyptians had
no objections; Israel had ob-
jections, and strong ones, indeed,
but the Security Council disposed
of the agenda item as the two
superpowers wanted.
HOWEVER, a handful of
unarmed truce observers is not
the buffer force called for in the,
Camp David accords and which |
the United States guaranteed. At
the time of Camp David, the
United States was so strongly
impressed with the case Israel
made for a buffer force that
President Carter, in letters to
President Sadat and Prime
Minister Begin, pledged that if
the UNEF mandate were not
extended, the United States
would organize a multinational
buffer force to stand between the
Egyptian and Israel lines in the
Sinai.
Now, Secretary of State Vance
is described as incensed over
Israel's chutzpah in demanding
that the United States live up to
Carter's promise, and the State
Department argues that the
promise is not applicable to the
present situation and that, in any
case, the observer force is an
adequate alternative. The
Israelis, the State Department
spokesman reiterated, were
guilty of "over-reaction."
The truce observer force is not
responsible to the Security
Council but to the UN Secretary
General, a Central European
politician who had Soviet
backing in his election and has
always been keenly responsive to
Soviet wishes.
UNLIKE HIS predecessors
who were friendly or scrupulously
neutral so far as Israel was
concerned, the current Secretary
General is decidedly unfriendly to
the Jewish State and highly
responsive to extreme Arab
views. The Israelis cannot forget
that the Six-Day War was
started when a browbeaten
Secretary General pulled the UN
truce observation force out of the
Sinai and exposed Israel's
borders to Nasser's tanks.
The Israelis proved their desire
for peace in the tedious,
protracted negotiations that
resulted in the Camp David
accords. They also revealed that
their paramount concern is their
national security.
They cannot now be expected
to entrust any part of their
security to a force which has
proved incompetent, unable and
unwilling to live up to its
obligations in the past, and they
can be expected to do their ut-
most to make Carter live up to
the promise he made them.
THE EPISODE, illustrates a
fundamental flaw in the Carter
Administration's approach to the
whole problem of peace in the
Middle East an insensitivity to
Israel's security concerns and to
Israeli opinion. It may well be
that the State Department is
correct in its assessment that the
unarmed observer force
scheduled to replace the 4,000-
man UNEF would prove
adequate since, if the Egyptian-
Israeli peace is a sincere and
lasting one, probably no outside
force is necessary.
If there should be a breakdown
in the peace process, and the two
countries should again resort to
war, all a UN force could do
would be to get out of the way
just as fast as it could.
The real problem is that the
United States has lost a great
deal of what credibility it had left
and has shaken the confidence of
many Israelis who now much
question whether Israel can
safely put its trust in the
American word.
V
TAPES
CARTONS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS-LABELS
BAGS-BOXES
WIPES
PALM 8ECfl
832-021)
ROWARO
APER &
ACKAGING
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I have had a long affiliation
with the American Red Cross,
and I find that there is a great
deal of misunderstanding among
Jewish people here and
everywhere as to the relationship
Itetween the International Red
Cross Society and Israel.
The popular belief is that the
Red Cross refuses to admit the
Israeli Red Magen David to
membership in the international
society; one of the reasons given
is that its emblem is the Star of
David. But this is incorrect and a
lucid explanation is in order.
The Red Cross was founded in
1863 by a Swiss businessman
named Henri Dunant. He was a
great humanitarian, and he
envisaged a world-wide body of
people like himself who would
come to the assistance of their
fellow man in time of disaster or
other critical need. In his honor,
the Swiss flag, which is a white
cross on a red field, was inverted
Red
Cross
the
Silberman Named Chairman
Of UJA Florida Cabinet
NEW YORK Morton
Silberman of Miami has been
appointed chairman of the
Florida Regional Cabinet of
United Jewish Appeal. The
announcement was made by UJA
National Chairman Irwin S.
Field.
Field described Silberman as a
"dynamic Jewish leader whose
invaluable contributions to
Jewish life make him an out-
standing choice to lead his region
as we enter a decade of decision in
Jewish life. There are few among
us as energetic, committed and
effective as Mort, and the
national leadership of UJA looks
forward to a long and productive
association with him."
"Silberman's involvement in
Jewish communal life goes back
many years, and he has served in
numerous leadership roles on the
local, regional and national
levels. He is currently vice
president of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee, and
recently received the Human
Relations Award of the American
Jewish Committee.
From 1976 to 1978, Silberman
served as president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation; prior
to that he was vice president of
the Federation for six years.
Before moving to Miami, he was
founding president of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Secretary-treasurer of the East
Coast Supply Company,
Silberman resides in Miami with
his wife Val and two daughters.
to form the present
emblem, the red cross on
white field.
Today every civilized nation in
the world has a Red Cross
organization. However, many
nations, mistaking the red cross
as a religious symbol, insisted
they would not use it, but
adopted emblems of their own, so
lliat today more than a dozen
countries use emblems like the
Islamic Red Crescent, the Iranian
Red Lion, etc. The Red Magen
David was founded in Palestine
in 1930 and for the same reason
adopted their own emblem, the
Star of David.
Upon application for mem-
bership in the International Red
Cross Society, however, they
have been denied admission, even
though the Red Magen David
has worked with the Red Cross in
both war and peace to aid
prisoners, render medical aid and
provide relief in disasters,
assisting many countries in their
Red Cross programs.
But its admission to the
International Red Cross Society
is a political issue, not a
humanitarian one. Every member
nation has a vote. The Christian
nations have always voted to
admit Israel, but the Arabs and
Eastern bloc countries have
always voted against, and they
are a substantial bloc.
It should be clearly understood
by our people here that the
American Red Cross is in favor of
admission, but the countries
which are Israel's foes are the
ones who are holding up the
move. To repeat, the emblem is
only an excuse. The real reason is
political.
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin,
chairman of Operation
Recognition with offices in
Lawrence, N.Y., heads a serious
campaign to counter this
resistance and gain complete
admission for the Israel Red
Magen David.
MRS. FRANCES LEVY
West Palm Beach
3!lS**
Criers
^%&3&2&essr
flo
tnaV*
W^anosV^
ebeSunshve
-^ffiSK5*^

and *
$&&&&
All Sunshine cookies and crackers are baked with 100 b vegetable shortening


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August 24,1979
Jewish Community Center Presents
PRESCHOOL
The school bell for preschool
will ring at 8:30 a.m., Wednes-
day, Sept. 5. There are just a few
openings left in the 2'/i-year-old
group. Chairpersons are Iris
Murray and Debbie Sabarra.
They are taking names on a
waiting list for 3- and 4-year-olds.
Contact the center and ask for
Fran Witt in administration.
CHILDREN'S PROGR/ MS
NEW AFTER SCHOOL
CARE PROGRAM:
In keeping with the center's
policy to serve the community,
plans are being formulated for an
Afterschool Care Program. This
program is designed primarily for
children in grades 1 through 6 of
working parents. Wherever
possible, the children will be
integrated into existing JCC
programs. In addition, there will
be special activities and super-
vised free play. Transportation
from school to the JCC will be
included in the cost of this
program.
FALL PROGRAMS:
Here are a few of the new
activities that will be in the Fall
Brochure: Jewish Holiday
Cooking: Mondays 5 to 6 p.m.;
Beginning Tap Dancing: Mon-
days 4 to 5 p.m.; Folk Dancing:
Tuesdays 4 to 5 p.m.; Creative
Visuals: Tuesdays 4 to 5 p.m.;
Sports World: Wednesdays 4 to 5
p.m.; Bread Baking: Thursdays
4 to 5 p.m.
JUNIORS. .
NEW 5 and 6 CLUB:
Under the direction of Joel
Levine, camp director, fifth and
sixth graders will be offered a
special club every Tuesday from
7 to 8:30 p.m. Club members will
be introduced to many different
activities during the season, such
as model rocketry, creative
crafts, drama, kosher cooking
and special events.
TWEEN NITE
The Tweens will once again
meet Wednesdays at 7 p.m. for
activities, specialized for 7th and
8th graders.
TEEN NITE
NOTE NEW TIME ... Teens in
ninth through twelfth grades will
meet on Thursdays at 7 p.m. If
interested in signing up, contact
the center.
Joel Levine is planning many
activities with the new Junior
High Activity Council and Senior
High Advisory Board. Contact
Joel for detailed information.
A Teen Sports Division will be
developed. Tryouts will begin
early in September for basket-
ball.
ADULT PROGRAMS
A Life Drawing Class will be
held Tuesday from 9 to 11 a.m.
Live models are included in the
fee.
Learn how to "Rejuvenate
Your Energy." This will be held
twice a week on Wednesday and
Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m.
Ulpan classes will be held for
beginners and intermediates on
Tuesday and Thursday. Begin-
ners will start at 9:30-11:30 a.m.
and Intermediate 11 a.m.-12:30
p.m.
Early registration is advised
for all classes mentioned above.
These are just a few of the ac-
tivities that will be listed. Look
for more in the Fall Brochure.
> SENIOR NEWS
"Power of the Senior Con-
sumer" series continues on
Thursdays at 1:30 p.m.
Aug. 23, Panel Alice
Skaggs, director of consumer
affairs, and Henry Grossman,
advisor in community relations.
Topic: "The Store Manager and
You There Are Always Two
Points of View."
Aug. 30, K. Machach, presi-
dent, Mental Health. Topic:
Some future Olympic swimmers need a little coaxing, as shown
being done by one of the water-front counselors at the JCC's
Camp Shalom this summer. Others are waiting patiently for
their instructions.
?I
Israeli Scouts Ruthie Sharoni, left, and Tali Gatron, right, are
shown raising the Israeli flag at the JCCs Camp Shalom this
summer.
M
"Thought for Thought How to
Reach Out."
Sept. 6, Charles Gates,
executive director, Consumer
Credit Counseling of Palm Beach
County "Do's and Don'ts of
Consumer Credit."
Sept. 13, Lt. Mulford, West
Palm Beach Police Department
"Crime and You."
Sept. 20, State Rep. Tom
Lewis "The Latest Legis-
lation." (Conclusion of Series)
"How Florida's Banking Laws
Affect You," Wednesday, Sept.
5, at 1:30 p.m. A neighborhood
banker will speak on the new
rules and regulations concerning
banking.
TRIPS
Labor Day Weekend: Sept. 2 -
4, Holiday Inn, Palm Beach,
three days, two nights at the
Holiday Inn in Palm Beach. Call
Bonnie at the center to make
reservations.
"Musicana" Thursday, Oct.
18. Includes full dinner and
shows. Call Sam Rubin for
reservations.
Lido Spa Holiday, Dec. 2 5, in
Miami Beach. Trip includes three
meals a day (diet or regular),
daily massage, entertainment,
saunas. Call Bonnie at the center
to make reservations.
New Year's Eve 1980: Jungle
Queen Cruise, dinner and enter-
tainment with transportation
from Century Village. Call Sam
Rubin or the center.
Adult Community Classes will
begin the week of Sept. 17. Call
the center to register. Classes
are:
Oil Painting, Monday, 9 a.m.
to noon; Transactional Analysis,
Tuesday, 10 a.m. to noon, two 3-
week sessions: Sept. 18 Oct. 2,
Oct. 30 Nov. 13; Writers
Workshop, Wednesday, 9 a.m. to
noon; Walking Tall after 60
(Relaxation through breathing
techniques): Wednesday and
Friday, 1:30 to 3 p.m.
ARTIST OF THE MONTH
Esther Molat, chairperson, an-
nounces that the two-year pro-
gram is continually expanding,
attracting artists 60 years and
older from all over the county,
giving them the opportunity to
exhibit their work for a month in
the CSSC. Artist Ruth Dinowitz,
member of the Delray Art
League, will display a variety of
impressionistic and semi-abstract
work during the month of
September. She works in
watercolor, acrylic oil and does
batik. All are invited to view this
exhibit.
TRANSPORTATION
The transportation program
has been very active this summer
and, in spite of the gas situation,
the van has been kept running.
Transportation service is avail-
able to seniors, 60 years or older,
within a designated area, through
a federally funded Title III OAA
grant. Call the center for further
information.
"Know Your Car'" Don't let
details about your car care boggle
your mind. Note change in date:
Aug. 28. Paul Oblas, who has
been teaching "Know Your Car"
in the community to adults and
high school students, will be at
the CSSC to instruct on how to
save on gas, what to do in emer-
gencies, how to communicate
with your mechanic, how to drive
defensively. The class begins at
1:30 p.m. Everyone is invited.
Calling all men Round Table
Talk, Mondays at 1:30 p.m.
Calling all women "Timely
Topics for Thinking Women,"
Mondays at 1:30 p.m. Sound off,
exchange opinions, and enjoy the
afternoon. Everyone is welcome.
Hospitality Corner is open
every day. Drop in to the CSSC,
join a class, hear a lecture, meet a
new friend.
YOUNG SINGLES
The Jewish Community Center,
sponsors a Young Singles/
Organization which periodically
runs activities for the young
unattached singles of Palm
Beach County.
On Aug. 4 the Young Singles
met for dancing in the Starlight
Ballroom at the Breakers Hotel.
Having a
Bridge
Party?
Great tasting
Maxwell
House1
Coffee is
the perfect
partner.
=^
A bridge party is never the same with- brewed to be remembered cup after cup.
out a cup of piping hot Maxwell House year after year. Smart Jewish hostesses
Coffee. Its rich, satisfying taste is have been serving it for half a century.
Good
to the
Last Drop"*
K
Certified
Kosher
A living tradition in Jewish homes for more than half a century.
*
=1
*


r naay, August 24,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
Temple Beth David To Hold Open House Kidney Failure Fells Refusnik
Temple Beth David of northern
Palm Beach County will hold an
frf from 2 to 5 p.m. at Westminster
> 0 Annex, 10410 No. Military Trail,
Palm Beach Gardens. The temple
extends an invitation to all to
learn more about membership in
the first and only Conservative
congregation serving the north
county area.
Rabbi William Marder, Cantor
Nicholas Fenakel, members of
the board of temple and
Sisterhood, and members of the
congregation will be present to
discuss religious facilities, the
school program and numerous
other activities for the coming
year.
The open house is being held in
plenty of time to make
Allege Israeli Prof Was
In Service of El Fatah
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Dr. Uri Davis, an Israeli
college professor who has
been teaching abroad, was
remanded to prison for
. Vance
Continued from Page 1
Israel was "not just an erosion,
(but a fundamental change in
'policy."
j The U.S., he said, was
concerned and preoccupied with
oil supplies and prices and sought
to reach an accord with Saudi
Arabia.
THE SAUDIS, Dayan said,
had made the sale of oil and the
level of oil prices conditional on
American recognition of
Palestinian rights and the PLO.
The Saudis, for their part, Dayan
added, are seeking to placate the
PLO because they fear a PLO-
inspired revolution against their
government.
Dayan, in his press interviews,
had also warned that Israel's
view abroad that it is "dying
economically" has led foreign
f statesmen to believe they could
pressure Israel for new con-
JRL cessions. He blamed primarily
iQgg i he government coalition and
ministers responsible for the
economy for this state of affairs.
Meanwhile, Dayan's sen-
sational press interviews in which
he hit out at the government's
economic policy, has exacerbated
tensions within the Likud. One
effect it seems to have had is to
increase the widespread feeling
within the factions comprising
the Likud bloc that radical
changes in the composition of the
Cabinet are needed, urgently.
ACCORDING TO some
reports. Prime Minister
Menachem Begin was both
shocked and upset by the Dayan
interviews, and he intends to
i uise the matter at next Sunday's
Cubinet meeting if he is well
enough to resume his post by
then. There has been no in-
dication at all that Begin may
ask Dayan to resign as certain
^Btf^l.ikud members have urged.
In another development, the
government announced that
Robert Strauss, President
Carter's special Mideast envoy,
informed Begin that he intends to
visit Israel Sunday, earlier than
originally planned for talks with
the Prime Minister and Cabinet
ministers.
Officials did not say why
Strauss was coming earlier, but
observers said it was apparently
connected with the strain in U.S.-
Israel relations. Strauss did not
attend the fifth round of
autonomy talks which ended in
Haifa. James Leonard, the U.S.
representative to the talks did
attend, but kept a low profile.
SAFRAS KOSHER
ANNUL HOTEL
OPEN ALL YEAR oSffv
ttrtahiHiat, S.tctel Diet*.
lM'l TV, lle.ater,
M Nr. Molei. p.ti.i
$1Q50 Dally per peri.
V V Double Occ.
to Nov 4 Holidays Not Included
m Free Beach Chair
700 EUCLID AVE. o^c
MIAMI BEACH. -'? i "
FLORIDA 33139,53 1-1 191
eight days by a Jerusalem
magistrate pending in-
vestigation of allegations
that he was acting in the
service of El Fatah, the
terrorist arm of the
Palestinian Liberation
Organization.
Davis, 36, who has been a
lecturer at Bradford University
in England, was arrrested on his
arrival at Ben-Gurion Airport
from London.
THE THIN, bespectacled,
bearded academician has been an
outspoken advocate of the
Palestinian cause and a critic of
Israeli policies. According to
police, a warrant for his arrest
was issued as a result of a
statement made a suspected
terrorist ringleader, Mohammed
Mounir Shehade, who was
captured recently.
arrangements for the High
Holidays and to register children
for the religious school. Temple
Beth David is formulating plans
to build a synagogue center on
recently acquired land on Hood
Road and Military Trail in Palm
Beach Gardens. Contact the
temple office for more in-
formation.
Synagogue
News
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
David of Northern Palm Beach
County invites the public to the
first regularly scheduled meeting
at the Westminster Presbyterian
Annex, Military Trail, Palm
Beach Gardens, on Wednesday,
Aug. 29, at 8 p.m. Author Maria
Gordon-Smith of Palm Beach will
discuss her book, Chopin, and
present rare slides on his life and
times. A discussion period led by
Mrs. Gordon-Smith will follow
the slide presentation.
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISHOLOM
Sisterhood Anshei Sholom
plans the following major events:
On Oct. 21 at 1 p.m. a dedication
ceremony of an ambulance for
Israel is planned; and on Nov. 11
at 8 p.m. Ed Klein, the
"Swinging Cantor," will be
presented in concert. Tickets will
go on sale on Aug. 28.
NEW YORK (JTA) Leningrad refusnik
Tamara Ioffe died last week, apparently the result of
kidney failure, according to information received by the
National Conference on Soviet Jewry.
Ioffe, her husband, Yakov, and their child first ap-
plied for an exit visa in May, 1976, and were refused the
following January. Tamara had suffered from kidney
failure, and the most recent reports from Leningrad in-
dicated she was about to start dialysis.
ira. .^,^r.n (Uhio) Clinic, felt she would have been a good candidate
for a kidney transplant.
The Air Conditioned
kosher WJJITCHOUSS TEL
Reserve Now For the
HIGH HOLY
DAYS
12 days I 11 nights u-i |J| par parson
3 KOSHER MEALS DAILY P-i.OU double occ.
_____ Services Conducted on Premises by Centor Israel Zygeltwum
:?
SPECIAL YEARLY RATES
Live in a Modern Oceanfront Hotel
Beautiful Air-Conditioned Rooms
Beauty Salon
For Reservations
Phone
11-531-64831
Pool
300 ft. Pr.v. Beach
TV in All Rooms
Giant Screen Color TV
Mashgiach on Premises
ON THE OCEAN AT 15th ST. MIAMI BEACH. FLA. 33139
Owner Mgmt
Bdumrind, Ehrenreich. Waldman
NOW
passbook rates
arc up!
New increased rate on passbooks.
Compounded daily from day of deposit.
Annual yield of (Sj6k5%
0: Washington Savings
**^^T* AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF FLORIOA
ASSETS EXCEED $950,000,000
CONVENIENT OFFICES SERVING YOU IN FLORIDA

MIAMI REACH
1701 Meridian Avenue/674-6612
1234 Washington Avenue/674-6550
1133 Normandy Drive/674-6563
1500 Bay Road/673-8306
517 Arthur Godfrey Road/674-6710
810 Lincoln Road/674-6868
NORTH MIAMI REACH
633 N.E. 167th Street/652-9200
2221 N.E. 164th Street/940-3975
CORAL CARLES
520 Biltmore Way/445-7905
AV HARIOR ISLANDS
1160 Kane Concourse/865-4344
HOLLYWOOD
450 North Park Road/981-9192
ROCA RATON
899 E. Palmetto Park Road/391-8903
WEST PALM REACH
4766 Okeechobee Blvd./686-7770
VOUR ACCOUNT IS INSURED UP TO S40.000 BV AN AGENCY Of THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
JACK D. GORDON, President ARTHUR H. COURSHON, Chairman of the Board
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
louu muses
LENDER


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August 24,1979
The Petrobillions Conquest
The Seven-Pronged Invasion of America
Continued from Page 1
"cargo" planes can be quickly'
fitted with an astounding array
of weapons, including 105
milimeter howitzers, 40 milimeter
cannons, bomb racks, missile
pods, grenade dispensers and the
infamous six-barrel "Vulcan" 20
milimeter machine gun which can
shred a truck convoy or a
barracks in seconds with its
3,000-rounds-per-minute firing
capacity.
THREE PRESIDENTS, the
State Department and the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
decided that it was not a good .
idea to put such equipment in the
hands of Libyan strongman
Muammar al-Qadaffi. Qadaffi has
openly allowed his country to be
used as a haven and staging ba-
for PLO commandos, hijackers
and other international terrorists.
Libya was the only country in the :
world to aid Ugandan dictator Idi
Amin in the revolution that led to
his overthrow this spring.
Qadaffi has been unable to get
the U. S. export licenses he needs'
to move the C-130s and other'
equipment from American
warehouses to military bases in
Libya. He has vowed to change
American opinion about Libya,
and has mounted an all-stops-out
campaign to persuade the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee to
approve those export licenses.
BUT COMMITTEE Chairman
Frank Church has refused to
relent or even soften his views
on the Libyan planes.
So, late in 1977, the Arabs
began an economic invasion of
Idaho aimed at "neutralizing"
the Senator.
First, Kuwait bought up the
sprawling Idaho Harding
Livestock and Land Company,
one of the largest land and cattle
companies in the state.
Then Libya began making
arrangements to buy almost
everything else.
Idaho can best be described by
the short list of things it is
nationally famous for: baking
potatoes, exploding grain silos,
Sun Valley's ski slopes. And
Frank Church. It is the least
populated state in the Union,
with fewer than 800,000 residents
on its 84,000 square miles.
Seventy percent of those people
live on the rural farmlands that
are Idaho's economic backbone;
22,000 of them belong to the
Idaho Farm Bureauthe state's
most powerful political group.
TWO YEARS AGO, the Arabs
started arriving in this unlikely
spot in America's isolated north-
western corner. They began to
buy thingsin units measurable
in tens of millions of dollars.
Officially, Washington has
made no mention of what is
happening in Idaho. Unofficially,
senior State Department officials
have expressed increasing
concern with Arab activities they
describe as "an interesting end
run around the federal govern-
ment to establish a beachhead
in the mountains of Idaho."
So far, this is what has hap-
pened in Frank Church's
backyard:
t After Kuwait purchased
Idaho Harding, Libya sent a
seven-member "trade
delegation" which prowled the
state, meeting with state of-
ficials, farmers, sheep ranchers,
newspaper editors and university
officials; They mentioned two
things very frequently: their
desire to make massive purchases
of local products and their
displeasure that Senator Church
was helping to hold up delivery of
their carj:<> planes.
Three separate junkets of
Idaho congressmen, state of-
ficials, farmers and university
leaders have toured Libya, where
they were wined, dined, en-
tertainedand introduced to
Arab officials who invited them
to discuss "the possibility of new
,rade programs."
Then Arabs began meeting
frequently in both Idaho and
Washington D. C. with Idaho
Congressman Stevens Symms, a
Republican who has announced
that he will run against Frank
Church next year. An arch-
conservative with seven years in
Congress, Symms is not
popularly known in Idaho for any
major legislative ac-
complishments. He is perhaps
best known for his right-wing
rhetoric, his backing of the
"liberty Amendment" which
calls for the abolition of all in-
come taxes, and his catchy
campaign slogan, "Take a bite of
government."
Symms' office has told the
local press that the Libyans
aren't so bad, that Qadaffi has .
promised that Libya will mend,
its ways and "no longer give aid
or support to terrorists," and
"We believe him."
Arabs have negotiated the ,
purchase of about $40 million in
wheat. They have stated an'
interest in making future buys
into Idaho's corn, soybeans and'
lamb products.
Arabs have announced they
intend to give a half million dollar
Agricultural Studies grant to the
University of Idaho.
Libya has coyly suggested
that it might want to establish its
U. S. trade mission office in
Boise, Idahoif it would be
"welcome."
The 22,000-member Idaho
Farm Bureau is now aggressively
trying to "convince" the Libyans
to put their trade mission in
Boise. It has begun caustic
criticism of Senator Church for
not actively backing the project.
Sen. Church, who is
preparing to open his campaign
for reelection in Idaho next year, i
is keeping a very low profile on
the subject.
"IN EFFECT, Sen. Church is
running for election against the
Arabs. I don't think there has
ever been a race like this in which
a foreign country has taken such
a direct part. And let me tell you,
we're watching it," explained one
Washington Congressional aide
who has been on the Hill since
1970.
"But Church is not the only
one feeling pressure from the
Arabs," the aide continued.
"They are now a major force in
Washington. The progress they
have made is incredible. Four
years ago, the Arab lobby was a
joke. You had maybe two people
here who knew what they were
doing. The rest of them were
tiptoeing around like nuns in a
whorehouse. They didn't know
what they were doing or even
how to find out. They didn't even
understand the theory of the
system, let along how it works
here on the Hill.
"No more. They are well
organized, highly polished
and it goes without
sayingextremely well financed.
They have good staff people and
they know how to keep their
fingers on the pulse and deliver
well-documented position papers
or backgrounders to 'balance' the
issues. They also have some
dynamic law firms and former
Hill people ex-senators,
representatives and
aidespounding the drum for
them.
"THE JEWISH LOBBY is
still far more formidable because
it can bring down the public
wrath of the local communities.
But the Arabs are closing. They
have tightened their act to the
point where they have real clout.
You only have to look at the F-15
deal to understand that. I mean,
that was all-out war. We have
every Jewish organization you
can imagine, and bigwigs from
Israel, coming in. There was arm-
twisting like you can t
believe on both sides.
Everything but the kitchen sink
came floating down the halls on
that one.
"And the Arabs won. Israel
has never lost a vote like that one
before. It was 55-54 to sell the
planes to the Arabs. Israel had
gone all out to defeat it. But they
lost. I don't think most folks out
there in the real world un-
derstand just how significant
that was.
"From where we sit, it was a
major watershed. The Arabs
demonstrated they now have the
know-how and connections to
affect the passage of legislation.
"Not a lot of people will admit
it publicly, because the topic is
such a touchy one. It's explosive
now with the oil situation. But
Israel lost ground behind the
scenes on that vote. They've lost
ground in general; you could see
that in the concessions they made
for the Egyptian negotiations.
There is a growing undercurrent
hereif we want to keep the oil
flowing, we've got to take a new
look at our relationships with the
Arabs.
"Egypt and Israel may be
friends now, but that doesn't
lessen the tensions. Egypt is a
bankrupt country armed with
equipment left over from the
Russiansequipment they can't
get parts for. They are not an oil
power and we expect them to
stay under fire from the Arab oil
states for striking a deal. Right
now, you can't move on an issue
involving the Mideast until you
take Arab oil money into ac-
count. When it comes to the
Midwest, man, 'balance' is the
new catchword here."
THE F-15 DEAL was at the
center of a story of controversy in
the winter and spring of 1978. It
involved something more than
the sale of jets to Arab countries.
The legislation set a major
precendent by linking sales of
top-of-the-line military equip-
ment to Israel with mandatory
sales of the same equipment to
Arab states.
The F-15 is no mere jet, but a
superplane: the sleek, twin-tailed
fighter is the most advanced
aircraft in the world. It is a
flying, computerized, total
overhead destruction machine,
armed with 20 milimeter machine
guns, Sparrow air-to-air missiles,
Sidewinder rocketsand an
arsenal of other ordinance for
destroying buildings and
bunkers, men and machines, like
no other plane can.
With the fall of the shah in
Iran, the "balance" achieved by
selling the jets to both Israel and
Saudi Arabia in 1978 now ap-
pears to have gone out of kilter.
One of the first public acts of
Khomeini's Islamic regime was
to pledge lull support to the
PLO's campaign to destroy
Israel. That pledge carried with it
the weight of the arsenal of
American weapons that the new
Iranian government inherited
from the old. Overnight, a new
fleet of F-15s was added to those
now being purchased by Saudi
Arabia, shifting the "balance" in
drastic lopsided favor of the Arab
League.
The coffee arrives in delicate
bone china cups rimmed with
gold flake, set on an antique
mahogany serving tray.
Vanishing as quickly as she
materialized, the secretary closes
the thick wooden door, leaving
the two men alone again. Across
the desk, the man in the blue suit
remains standing. For the second
time in as many minutes, he
seeks verbal assurance that the
interview is off the record.
Strictly off the record. Speaking
in vaguely apologetic tones, he
gestures toward the window and
the Washington streets below as
he explains. "The Arab-Israeli
situation is a very, sensitive
subject at this time
Mr. Bluesuit has been in and
around Washington's central
power core for more than two
dozen years. A former high of-
ficial in two government agen-
cies, he is now a private con-
sultant to government and in-
dustry on legal and financial
matters involving international
trade.
BLUESUIT UNFURLSa
large map of the world across his
desk. Its corners are held down
by crystal paperweights and
empty gold-rimmed coffee cups, j
Its surface is etched with colored |
lines that criss-cross heavily in
some places, obscurring large
sections of geographical detail.
Red lines. Green lines. Blue
lines. Yellow fines. Each starts at
some major point in the Americas
or Europe or Asia and stretches
seaward, to join with others. The
lines form colored cables that arc
across the oceans, round the
capes, cross the channels and
traverse canals that bring them
to one final massive coagulation
in the vicinity of the Persian
Gulf.
Tanker routes. Traced across
the globe like some enormously
complex elecrical schematic,
wiring the continents together.
Outling the delicate and color-
fully intricate structure through
which the black viscous blood of
industrialized civilization flows.
From the desert kingdoms of the
Middle East to the refineries and
factories and gas pumps of the
rest of the world.
BLUESUIT LEANS across
the map, ignoring the cigarette
ash that begins collecting in the
area of Australia. "This," he
says, tapping to indicate the
entire surface of the world, "is
the new strategy map for the
Mideast War.
"Journalists and the general
electorate of America have failed
to comprehend that there has
been a genuine revolution in the
world since 1973," he continued.
"We have experienced a drastic
change in the definition of the
basic units of monetary value and
a radical alteration in the
previous-recognized concepts of
international 'power.'"
"In effect, the Western in-
dustrialized societies which ruled
the world in 1972 have been
transformed into revenue-
producing colonies of the Arab
world in 1979. This reality has
not yet been throughly absorbed
by the general c;tizenry or
political machinery of our
country. It is not a concept that
the traditional American psyche
can readily tolerate.
"WE HAVE also seen the
evolution of a new kind of warfare
that you might term 'econo-
conflict,' in which one national
group battles another without
ever firing a shot. Sure, economic
measures of one form or another
have always been a part of
modern war. But not quite like
this. The billions of dollars worth
of various Arab transactions in
America you asked me about
earlier are only one portion of a
larger picture. The Arab nations
have spread out to use the entire
planet as a strategy board on
which they plan to settle their
border dispute with Israel. In
short, what they failed to do in
the desert with their tank
charges, they are now attempting
to do in board rooms and
brokerage houses-with their
petrodollars.
"You're too young to
remember, but just prior to
World War II, there was a
controversy over the question of
using airplanes and aircraft
carriers as primary weapons of
war. It had never been done and
Americans did not want to think
about the crazy idea that ships
with airplanes on top of them
could be major weapon of war.
It was too unusual a thought. So
for years, while the controversy
continued, we did nothing. We
sat there, confident in our own
battleships and watched the
horizon for the enemy battleships
to comebecause that is how
war had always come in the past.
Then, at Pearl Harbor, in the
space of a few hours, a handful of
planes bombed the hell out of us.
We were forced to take notice of
the fact that the art of war had
changed, and battleships did not
matter so much any longer. You
see. it took a catastrophe to bring
home that simple realization.
"THIS IS SIMILAR to what's
happening in Washington right
now. The old heads of the Jewish
movement down here insist on
thinking in old terms. In effect,
they are still watching the
horizon for the next wave of Arab
tanks to come. That is how war
has always happened in the
Mideast. But that is now how the
Arabs are operating any longer.
Now they are attacking with
money.
"The influential American I
Jews with whom I deal on a'
regular basis seem to dwell on the
old vision: Israel has little to
worry about because it has
proved its invincibility in tank
battles, muzzle-to-muzzle, time
and time again. Their primary
concern here is to make sure that
Israel receives enough new tanks
and other hardware. Quite
frankly, I've been amazed by
l their inability as a group to see
that they are now engaged in a
war of nozzles, rather then
muzzles: the nozzles on every
gasoline pump in America. I'm
not being at all facetious when I
suggest that the ultimate fate of
Israel may well be determined on
the freeways of Los Angeles or
the New Jersey Turnpike.
"If I were Jewish and felt a
deep personal attachment to
Israel as it now exists, I'd be
pretty damned worried about this
country's devil-may-care attitude
about energy. The Arabs have
used our own moneyeach one of
us gave it to them when we filled
our cars with gasolineto
acquire the new position of power
and influence from which they are
subtly changing American at-
titudes about Israel."
Rolling up the map, Bluesuit
reached inside a desk drawer and
handed his visitor a manila folder
whose contents he characterized
as "a little more food for
thought."
INSIDE THE FOLDER were
the results of a national Gallup
poll conducted within the last
year. The poll surveyed American
attitudes about Arabs and Israel.
The report showed that 42
percent of the Americans sur-
veyed were more sympathetic to
the Arabs than they had been a
year before.
During the same year, 34
percent of the Americans sur-
veyed had become less sym-
pathetic toward Israel.
As this series concludes,
events and changes continue with
lightning speed across the Middle
East. Two disturbing
newspaper stories appeared
within a single week:
WASHINGTON D.C.A
Senate report drawing on sub-
poenaed oil company documents
concludes that Saudi Arabia will
limit its oil production in the
1980s to not more than 12 million
barrels a daya level so low it
could possibly touch off 'a fierce
political and economic struj'jle'
among the consuming countries.
(The present daily production
level stands at an alarming eight
and one-half million barrels.)
The causes of Fahd's declining
influence still are not clear to
U.S. analysts. But the decline
has suddently become a major
preoccupation for the Carter
administration, which fears that
the Fahd problem may be part of
a potential crisis in Saudi
leadership that could vitally
threaten the most fundamental
and basic premises of the U.S.
foreign and energy policy.
Expo Magazine
9


ly, August 4,lVy
i wmmn mrnmwrnmmmmmiT
TSge*
Mimllin
barter's Evangelism is Showing
Continued from Page 4
Jersey congregation of Jews
ird the end of 1975. "Your
k is the Book from which I
tut this is timid stuff. Now,
President is withdrawing into
at he knows best born-
lin Christianity. If nothing
! can seem to solve his political
es, he apparently hopes that
as this can. What is worse,
is showing up in the strangest
fees. Americans not only he**^
jstantial snippets of it in his
trgy address by way of in-
duction.
Jut there is also the bizarre
turrence in Seoul in June, when
, Carter tried to convert South
Irean President Park Chung
to Christianity.
IS not only an ultimate
- year long Christian
itzpah that they should per-
cute, plunder, pillage and pluck
i death the bodies and souls of
hers in the name of their belief;
is a tenet of their faith that
Ihers must believe it, too.
I In the latter case, there are
gentler persuasions, such as
"for-your-own-good" conversion,
in which Mr. Carter is apparently
expert even by his current exper-
ience as a Sunday school teacher.
To attempt to assault Park via
the misplaced route of diplomatic
evangelism as the President did
is a special absurdity if for no
other reason than that Park is a
Buddhist, and the serenity of his
religion makes Christianity look
like' Slaughterhouse-Five by
comparison.
Worse than all, it is a blunder
so vast in dimension as to
stagger the imagination. How
dare an American President set
aside the tradition, culture and
principles of his country and to
act instead like a sleazy
proselytizer?
YET THAT is precisely what
Mr. Carter did, according to a
UPI report that quotes him as
saying, "I told him (Park) about
our faith. He was very interested.
I said I was sorry we didn't have
more time to discuss it."
OPEC? Inflation? The dollar
tobaggoning downward on the
international money market?
(Executive Discrimination
Aided by Indifference
JEW YORK Religious
^crimination in the executive
liteparticularly in banking,
steel, utilities., shipping, auto
inufacturing, among others
is abetted by the "con-
tinuous failure' ot govern -
L>nlal agencies to curtail
criminatory hiring practices,
official of the Anti-Defamation
ugue of B'nai B'rith told the
fcnatc Banking Committee
cently.
[Ira Gissen, ADL'a national
.riminations department
ector, also noted that federal
unties are indifferent to the
of private clubswhich
telude from membership certain
ucial and religious groupson
Executive level employment.
THE TREASURY Depart-
ment's "dereliction" is not
united to its "history of non-
knforceinent in employment
compliance," Gissen said,
furring to that agency's
tsponsibilities to discriminatory
clubs.
He pointed out that a 1977
Internal Revenue Service
publication specifically states
lal a club "will lose its tax-
neinpt status if its charter, by-
aws, or other governing in-
strument, or any of its written
jlicy statements contain a
provision which allows for
iscrimination against any
s'i son on the basis of race, color,
^r religion."
Yet, Gissen said, "there is no
hiuuningful or effective en-
lorcemenl of this. "
"IT IS NO wonder that the
btlii-i'rs of many corporations
have an attitude of cavalier in-
difference to the continuing
Problem of religious
llisciimination in employment in
Lite executive suite. The in-
difference of federal agencies to
Bub problem is pervasive."
The road to the executive suite
is "lined with pitfalls for the
Jewish aspirant," Gissen con-
tinued, noting that "vast areas of
\merican enterprise are con-
spicuous by the absence of Jews
urn among the corporate
Rulers."
Gissen called "the evil of
religious discrimination in
tanking a national problem,"
'ith most bankscommercial
lianks are the worst violator-
shaving only "a token
representation of Jewish officers"
banks are the worst violators
having only "a token rep-
resentation of Jewish officers."
FOLLOWING publication in
1978 of a two-year ADL study of
"Jewish Employment Problems
in the Big Six Oil Company
Headquarters," in which there
was a segment about private
clubs, Gissen said, "Two of the
most exclusionary clubs in San
Francisco admitted their first
Jewish members and a major oil
company changed its policy
regarding club memberships.
He noted also that last year,
the Georgia state legislature
adopted a resolution forbidding
the holding of any committee or
subcommittee meeting in any
discriminatory private dub. The
South Carolina legislature
adopted a resolution that
provides that the invitations
committees of both the senate
and house of representatives not
accept invitations to any function
held at discriminatory dubs.
The ADL official said it is
"within the province of this
committee" to move the U.S.
Department of Housing and
Urban Development and the
Internal Revenue Service to
These are mere side issues by
comparison.
No matter what Mr. Carter
quotes President Park as having
replied when he asked Park which
evangelist he might prefer to be
contacted by when Carter got
back to Washington and could
make the arrangement, surely it
would be to Park's credit if he
secretly thought Carter a
madman.
THE UPI report concludes: '
" 'I don't know what will hap-
pen,' Carter said. 'Now it's in
God's hands.' "
Writing in the New York
Times, Eugene Kennedy, a pro-
fessor of psychology at Loyola
University, analyzes President
Carter's energy address as con-
taining "a wind of uncertain
prophecy" and statements "some
imperial and some evangelical."
Kennedy describes Carter as
"the parson" who speaks
solemnly "of oil and sin" and
who, in an effort to eradicate the
sad image of his slipping
executive powers, "mounts the
pulpit to blame the people for the
miscarried innocence of his own
calling: they are to blame for the
fact that he has never understood
them."
ENERGY APART, the
American people "rightfully mis-
trust the easy analyses that
describe Carter's conflict as be-
tween his pastor's heart and his
engineer's mind ..." At the
same time, "the people will not
tolerate indecisiveness, endless
meditation, or an attempt to lay
on them a style of moralizing as
self-serving and inappropriate as
that in a Somerset Maugham
minister."
Undoubtedly, Prof. Kennedy's
is not the last word on the Carter
crisis in the presidency, whether
or not he will be able to carry on
into a second term in office
whether or not he should be per-
mitted to. The debate here, as
everywhere, rages on, only more
fiercely so.
Gore Vidal's superb bon mot
comes to mind: 'I'm a born-1
again atheist." Vidal hardly ,
speaks for the nation, but it
would be the better part of
political discretion for Mr. Carter
to remember that religious zeal
must be his private passion, if
that is what he wants.
PRIVATE IS the key. It can
not be his passion as President,
for it has not been a part of the
nation's tradition to hear ser-
mons from the Oval Room
Mount. And if the President,
continues to deliver them as his
"solution" to our problems,
domestic and foreign, he courts
disaster for himself. And for all of
us.
'enforce the law."
Jewish Media Centers Directors Meet
A national conference of
directors of Jewish Media
Centers was convened by the
Jewish Media Service/JWB on
Aug. '21-22 at Grata College.
Philadelphia.
Among members of the Jewish
Media Service Committee is
Barbara Shulman of Palm Beach.
*
HEBREW TEACHER
AND/OR YOUTH DIRECTOR FOR A LEADING PALM
X BEACH COUNTY RELIGIOUS SCHOOL. PART TIME OR I
? FULLTIME _________CALL833-0339 ?
????????????????????????? ? ????
Uader The Supervision
Of Rabbinical Council
Of Toe Palm Beeches
Dally Supervision of
Rabbi Shapiro
"THE NEW IMAGE"
.(Zoniury
Open f-7
Mon-Thurj
f-SPrl.
-4 Sun.
Close* Sat.
4774 0KHCH0.lt IIVD., WIST PALM HACK
Between Military Trail HaverfclU In the Mini Mall
THE MOST MODERN OOMPLETE KOSHER SUPERMARKET
; '/''
The"Tui
KOSHER
jjkg* AIR CONCNTIONEO
Cftoum
OCfMtMNT
HOTEL 4otn to
41 st Streets
<8>
GUI!
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUKKOTH
LABOR DAY WEEK-END
5 Days II4 Nights tQC I 6 Days I 5 Nights $ f | f?
Aug. 31 to Sept. 4 i3D Aug. 30 to Sept. 4 llU
Tennis FaciMies-Sauna-Hand lafrtofeybafrOtymafc Swimming
PoohFuN Block ot Private leach-Cntertammenl-TV in Rooms-Daily
Synagogue Servtces-Therapeutic Whirlpool
Tour Hosts. Michael lefkowttz i Ales Smtiow
for ReservilHMis Phone: > 1-538-9045
Shaare Zedek Medical Center Announces
In Search of Our Roots
3 EXCITING 1979 TOURS
For Further Information Call or Write:
SHAARE ZEDEK OFFICES
MIAMI AREA TELEPHONE 531-8329
605 LINCOLN ROAD, SUITE 211, MIAMI BEACH, 33139
FT. LAUDERDALE AREA TELEPHONE 566-9552
3101 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY, FORT LAUDERDALE
33306
October 8-25 Poland-Romania-lsrael-Egypt
October 15-26 Israel-Egypt
October 15-22 Israel

JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of the palm beaches', mc
i4isoMCCCMoeceai.vo st l.iich.u i
Ijovv Acczftina l^isir^ton
JK
or
&
/RRESCHOdtTancK
^KINDERGARTEN
/
CLASS SIZE LIMII hU
CERTIFIED TEACHERS
HOURS: 8:30-1
8:30-3
8:30-5
Special Enrichment Program
Supervised Free Play
TRANSPORTATION AVAILABLE
Call 689-7700
(For Information & Brochure)
Iris Murray Debbie Sabarra Zelda Plncourt
" Chairpersons President


Page 10
The Jewish FioruRan of Palm Beach County
rriyuy.A'Bg
Aftereffects of Young's Resignation Are Felt
Continued from Page 1
Young's resignation, Lowery said
at the SCLC annual meeting in
Norfolk, Va., that "We have
always supported the State of
Israel's right to exist, but we
question Israel's relationship
with South Africa."
The confused focus of Rev.
Lowery's charges indicates just
how angry Black leaders are, and
how prone they are to blame
Israel and the American Jewish
community for Young's latest
debacle.
The Rev. Jesse Jackson, a syn-
dicated columnist and longtime
Black civil rights leader, joined
the charge with statements of his
own about the Carter adminis-
tration's succumbing to
"Zionist" and "Jewish pressure"
which, he said, "surprised" him.
YOUNG, in the wake of his
resignation, did several things
not calculated to soothe the
gathering storm:
He announced that he was
not "a bit sorry" about his
meeting with Terzi, since he
believed he was right;
9 He resigned only to make
things easier for President
Carter, the implication being that
"Jewish pressure" was so strong
on the President to oust Young
that Young wanted to spare his
boss;
He declared his intentions to
meet Terzi again, or any other
PLO representative, in the future
principally this month
because, resigned or not, as U.S.
Ambassador to the United
Nations, it is Young's turn to
serve as president of the Security
Council, and since President
Carter is delaying the appoint-
ment of a successor, Young will
be completing his term;
He expressed surprise at the
apparent rift in Jewish Black
relations and got on the phone to
the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,
the Urban League, and Black
mayors across the country.
Young's message to them was
simple and double-edged: "We
trust that thi event will not
incite or exacerbate tensions be-
tween the Black and Jewish com-
munities." At the same time,
Young called for a summit con-
ference between leaders of both
communities.
NEWS THAT Young was in
his latest difficulty with the
administration for speaking out
on foreign policy in terms not in
accord with administration policy
was first reported Tuesday. The
meeting between Terzi and
Young on July 26 came to light
because of Israel's complaint to
the State Department on the
basis that America had pledged
to refuse all official contact with
the PLO until the PLO accepted
Israel's right to exist.
What came to light was that
Young had not informed the
State Department or Secretary of
State Cyrus Vance about the
meeting in Terzi's apartment.
This led to speculation about how
Israel knew of the meeting and to
further speculation that Mossad,
the Israeli Secret Service, had
shadowed Young en route to the
meeting.
Complicating the matter
further was Young's confession.'
that the meeting did, indeed,
occur, but that nothing "sub-
stantive" had passed between the
two men, a statement which the
State Department promptly
flashed around the world.
WHEN ISRAEL'S UN
Ambassador Yehudah Blum dip-
lomatically suggested that
Young's report of the meeting
was not entirely accurate and
that substantive discussion had,
in fact, taken place, two new
developments followed:
Young admitted that the
Israeli report was correct. At the
same time, he declared that his
meeting with Terzi was arranged
on his own and that he did what
he did "in the best interests of
my country." Young also denied
that he had lied to President
Carter, Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance and the State Department,
declaring, "I didn't lie. I didn't
tell the whole truth."
Speculation became rampant
about just how Israeli Secret Ser-
vice personnel knew what had in
fact taken place between Terzi
and Young.
IN NEW YORK, Israel's Dep-
uty Prime Minister Yigal Yadin
categorically denied that Israeli
Secret Servicemen were involved,
calling it "rubbish." They are, he
said, given far more credit for
undercover work than, in fact,
they do, to which he added,
"unfortunately."
Young's meeting with the
Kuwaiti diplomat in his New
York apartment was presumably
to discuss the Kuwait-sponsored
resolution in the United Nations
for a full-dress debate on a Pales-
tinian state scheduled for Aug.
23. The debate was postponed
from July 31 on the request of the
United States, which has already
declared its intention of vetoing
the resolution.
Tune in
'Mosaic'
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TUNE IN TO MOSAIC
"Mosaic," Jewish Federation's sponsored program
is aired on
Sunday mornings over WPTV Channel 5, at 9 a.m. with
hosts Barbara Shulman and Steve Gordon.
PROGRAM SCHEDULE
Sunday, Aug. 26 -Garson Cohan
Sunday, Sept. 2 Rabbi Alvin Reinos
m m
TMPL Mr\NU-L
Of PfcLM Br\CH
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES AT THE
ROYAL POINCIANA PLAYHOUSE
PALM BEACH
Rosh Hoshonah Sept. 21, 22, 23
Yom Kippur Sept. 30, Oct. 1
Service* Conducted by:
RABBI STANLEY SCHACTER
Vica Chancellor Jewish Theological Seminary
CANTOR DAVID DARDASHTI
$60.00 Per Person
Twnpk Imow-fl it o comervcrtM synagogue and invites Mm unafffliatod of lh Palm
Saochos So join if in momborthip and worship.
fm KnmHtu: Mmmw: S32-0S04 9 am to 4 pm
Writ*: 190 So County Rd. Palm ftaoch, Ft 334*0
Sendees
For The UnafMiated and Area Visitors At
Temple Beth El's
Senter Hall
Officiated By Rabbi Arnold Lasker
And Cantor Albert Koslow
September 21, 22, 23, 30 October 1
Limited Seating
$40.00 Donation Per Person
Moil Reservations to
Tempi.- Beth El 2815 Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach Florida 33407
Phone 833-0339
Synagogues in
Palm Beach
County
ORTHODOX
I AHzCheimCongroaBtlon Century V*eo
W. Palm Beach. Telephone: 686*4675. Sabbath Service* 9 a.m. find
7:30p.m.Dally Services8:15 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Congregation Anshei Emuna
1561 Brittany L, Kings Point Del ray Beach 33446 Harry Silver]
President Services dally 8 a.m. & 6 p.m. Saturday & Holidays 9|
a.m. Phone 499-7407 Temple No. 499-9229
REFORM
[TEMPLE ISRAEL
Il901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407 833-
18421 Rabbi Irving B. Cohen Joel L. Levlne, Associate Rabbi *
ISabbath Worship Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday Torah
ISeminars at 10:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
1333 S.W. Fourth Avenue Boca Raton, Fl. 33432 391-6900 Rabbi
I Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath Services, Friday
at 8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah Study with Rabbi Merle E.
Singer 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Services
THE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION OF DELRAY
I At St. Pauls Episcopal Church, 188 So. Swlnton Ave., Delray *
Friday, at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Sliver President Jerome
Gilbert -499-5563
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:15
p.m. At St. David's In the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill
Blvd. and Wlllington Trace Mailing Address: 1125 Jack Pine St.,
West Palm Beach, Fl. 33411 President Ronnie Kramer 793-2700
CONSERVATIVE-LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
THE FREE SYNAGOGUE, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton, Florida 33432
368-1600, 391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 8:15
p.m. at Boca West Community UMC 8900 Boca West Glades Rd. (1
Mile West of Boca Turnpike)
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fl. 33407 833-0339 *
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan at 8:15
a.m. .Sunday at 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 664-3212 Of-
fice hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman Cantor I
Arthur B. Rosenwasser Services: Dally 8:30 a.m., 7:30 p.m.,
Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m.; Friday Late Service 8:15 p.m.; Saturday
8:30 a.m., 7 p.m. '
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. 732-2555 Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin Sabbath
Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Congregational
| Church, 115 N. Federal Highway.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 N. A' St., Lake Worth, Fl. 33460 585-5020 Rabbi Emanuel
Elsenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Services: Mondays and Thur-
sdays at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services, Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10 a.m. West-
minster Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach
Gardens, 321 Northlake Blvd., North Palm Beach, Fl. 33408 *
Phone 845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
224 N.W. Avenue G,' Belle Glade, Fl. 33430 Jack Stateman, Can-
tor Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
|TEMPLEB'NAI JACOB
275 Alemelda Drive, Palm Springs, Fl. 33461 Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. President Barnett Briskman,
967-4962 Mondays and Thursdays at 9 a.m. Services held at
Faith United Presbyterian Church, Palm Springs.
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
UOfN.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fl. 33432 392-8566 Rabbi
Nathan Zellzer Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday
at 9:30 a.m. '
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
j 5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, Fl. 33446 276-3536 *
Morris Silberman, Rabbi Leonard Price, Cantor Sabbath Ser-
vices: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Dally Mlnyans at 8 45
a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Road, Palm Beach, Fl. 33480 832-0804 Can-
tor David Dardashtl Sabbath Services: Friday at 830 om
Saturday at 9 a.m. K- "'
<


Arab otnciais wno invium mem


y, August 24,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
Place for 'Happenings'
Tel Aviv's City Hall Plaza
By SAM YURMAN
tar Malchei Yisrael, Tel
's City Hall plaza, is now Tel
's favorite site of mass
bs and celebrations. Be it the
i-ish Peace Now or the
-religious Gush-Emunim
bical assemblies, Purim or
grations of Simchat Torah or
bpendence Day, the folks con-
rate by the tens of thousands
[demonstrate solidarity or
! in tune with the occasion.
i "happenings" of Abie
lan, the maverick peace pilot,
i draw an audience when
by a bevy of big-name
fertainers. As for the stately
ling itself, it stands un-
by the blare of speeches
music or the squeaks of
tic hammers the revellers
ice off each other's heads.
its glassed front twinkles
the reflections of projectors
fireworks, as if musing
itly about the city's past.
; all started on April 11,1909,
60 families set out to build
60 homes on 110 dunams of
dunes north of Jaffa. In 70
this has grown to 350,000
le occupying 190,000
using units on 50,000 dunams,
th 350,000 vehicles daily
Dking its 550 kilometers of
Is.
TEL AVIV, having absorbed
mother city Jaffa in 1949, is
known as Tel Aviv-Jaffa and
le hub of a metropolitan area
pulated by more than a million,
lone out of three Israelis. It has
distinction of being the only
city in the world whose
at ion is 99 percent Jewish.
a bright Saturday morning
issid (pious Jew) wearing a
\treimel (fur hat), with a prayer
lawl across the shoulders of his
lack kaftan (overcoat) might be
sen window-shopping the
egant Dizengoff Street stores
the way home from the
^nagogue.
His less observant neighbors
re packing the sandy beaches or
dcnicking in the spacious
[arkon and Clore parks. The
ilture-minded flock to the Tel
kviv or Haaretz museums where
itrance is free in deference to
if orthodox who oppose the sale
i tickets on the Sabbath.
Symbolic of the social gap
eated over the years, the
lhalom Shabazi slum whose
ie honors a Yemeni Hebrew
set nestles in the shadow of the
lhalom Mayer Tower, an edifice
[lorify ing the name of a business
fcoon from Rumania. While a
iuth center wall collapsed
cently in the poor quarter, the
luent continue to enjoy the
vanky facilities of the Tel Aviv
>untry Club. An inevitable
ling ground for crime and
egeneration, such slums, unless
ebuilt, could threaten to upset
moral fabric of society. This
nd other problems, like illegal
luatting and construction, are a
onstant worry for the city
istration.
ELSEWHERE, it is a daytime
ightmarf to try and drive
rough the business center.
fith parked cars lining both
|des of the narrow streets, the
nly way to make deliveries is by
Duble-parking, with the ac-
>mpanying horn-blasting
Dttlenecks. In vain are drivers
rged to use public trans-
lation; many buses are old
id overcrowded, with too few
engere paying heed to laws
ihibiting smoking and lit-
An ambitious bus station,
^tended to be a showplace of the
East, and meant to
place the present ramshackle
cility, which defies description,
close to completion when
ork was halted for the lack of
i. Started 13 years ago, it
remain in its ghostlike state
it is made obsolete by a
away now suggested as a
During the seven decades of
their history, the people of Tel
Aviv-Jaffa have learned to
"overcome." There was exile by
the Turkish masters in 1917,
repeated bloody Arab riots, and
even some Italian air raids in
World War II.
Who can forget preparations
for dealing with possible victims
of the 1967 War or the grim
atmosphere of the first days of
the Yom Kippur War?
IN MORE recent incidents like
the Savoy Hotel attack, the
seaside bus carnage and the
Carmel Market bombing, each
produced its heroes and the true
moral fiber of individuals came to
the fore.
It was the same people who
over 30 years ago bore the brunt
of the victorious struggle for
independence against tre-
mendous odds; here they rejoiced
when the State was born and here
they saw death and destruction
dealt out mercilessly and hap-
hazardly on their own coastal
road, over 30 years later.
solution to the traffic snafu.
Meanwhile, Acre and Afulah
have pleasant, modern and
adequate bus depots and Tel
Aviv doesn't.
However, the ambitious
Ayalon Project, with such daring
steps as the diversion of one of
the two river beds within the city,
a system of cloverleafs, bridges
and tunnels, and the recently
completed Hayarkon road ser-
ving the beachside hotels, go a
long way towards speeding up
transportation.
THOUGH IT willingly
relinquished to Jerusalem its
brief status as the national
capital after the establishment of
the State, Tel Aviv-Jaffa remains
the vortex of the country's every
banking and financial center, the
site of much of the country's
commerce and industry, and a
mecca for tourism with its ex-
tensive accommodation, dining
and entertainment facilities-
Visitors are equally attracted to
the Oriental Carmel Market and
the Exhibition Gardens, often
displaying the latest techno-
logical marvels; the Beit
Hatefutzot museum of the
Diaspora is a "must" for the
serious. Most Israeli books and
newspapers are published within
the city limits.
Not only is it the theater and
film center but also a focal point
for popular as well as classical
music, for classical and modern
dance and for opera. Even over-
seas circuses open as a matter of
course in Tel Aviv. It is well
equipped for international
sporting events with a 50,000-
seat Ramat-Gan stadium, an
Olympic-size swimming pool, and
the Ramat Hasharon Tennis
Center, to name a few. There is
even an iceless skating rink
invented by an Israeli.
Tel Aviv is Israel's major
sphere of activity. Famous for its
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra
and Habimah Theatre, the large
Tel Aviv and Bar-1 lan univer-
sities within its metropolitan area
head a host of other secular and
religious learning institutes.
Israel May Not Get Egypt's Oil
In addition, Hilal said that each January, Egypt will
put up international bids on the oil from Alma. If Israel is
the highest bidder it will get the oil. Otherwise some other
country will get it, Hilal said.
TEL AVIV (JTA) Oil from the rich Alma oil-
field on the Gulf of Suez, which Israel discovered and
developed, may not go to Israel as promised after the area
is returned to Egypt in November if Israel is not the
highest bidder for the petroleum.
This possibility emerged from statements by
Egyptian Fuel Minister Ahmed Ezzadin Hilal to Israeli
reporters accompanying Israeli Energy Minister Yitzhak
Modai on a visit to Cairo to seek assurances on the
continued flow of Alma oil to Israel. Oil from the Alma
fields now provides 25 percent of Israel's needs.
mmmmmmm_mmmmmmanmmmmmMa
z


The city of Tel Auiv view towards the north with the smoke-
stack of the Reading power station in background.
vincial" Jerusalemites (who have
A visitor recalls arriving at
night during a blackout in Tel
. Aviv at war in 1948. When
morning broke the gloom of the
night, he took a walk along Roth-
schild Boulevard. To his amaze-
i ment, he saw several men on
. stepladders busy trimming the
trees lining the street.
What other proof is required of
the spirit of citizens who came in
peace and are here to stay? For
the average Tel Avivian is an
equally strong critic and patriot
of his city. To live elsewhere is
unthinkable for he enjoys being
the biggest and best and feels |
exactly the same feelings towards
them). Tel Aviv may be hot and
crowded, but it is alive, up-to-
date, ambitious and dynamic.
Speaking of peace, the greatest
challenge is still to come. The
name Tel Aviv Hill of Spring
has been taken from a novel by
Theodor Herzl depicting his
Utopia of a Jewish State. Having
achieved part of the dream, how
will Herd's heirs muster the
stamina to carry on the struggle
of the prophets of Israel for a just
society, with equal opportunities
for all? If the past is any proof.
somewhat sorry for the "pro-1thev certainly will.
Ben Zuckerman, Ready-to- Wear Leader
Ben Zuckerman, a leader of the
American ready-to-wear coat and
suit industry, died Aug. 10 at his
home in Palm Beach after a brief
illness. He was 89.
Mr. Zuckerman, who retired
from the clothing business in
1968, was born in Romania and
came to New York as a child. He
went from a floor sweeper at a
dress factory to the owner of a
fashion designer's label bearing
his name.
He was a charter member of
(Obituaries
BINN. Sylvia. 68. West Palm Beach,
Aug. 3. Riverside.
I'ROTER, Herman B., 65. Boynton
Beach, Aug. 3. Riverside.
STEIN, SidneyA.,67, Palm Beach. Aug.
l. Riverside.
WEINSTEIN. Shirley. Boca Raton,
Aug. 6. Riverside.
ZIMMERMAN. Harry, 64, Delray
Beach, Aug. 3. Riverside.
the Council of Fashion Designers
in 1973. He won the Coty Amer-
ican Fashion Critics Award in
1952 and the Neiman-Marcus
Award in 1951.
Surviving is a brother, Joseph,
of Los Angeles.
Services were held Aug. 11 at
New York's Riverside Memorial
Chapel.
AFTER MASTECTOMY
The new Patent KNOCHE NATURAL BREAST PROTHESIS from
Europe (Exported to 48 countries in the world), now available in the
manufacturer's own mastectomy salon. Looks and feels un-
believably natural (nipple, areola, weight, shape and color).
Developed together with doctors, hospitals and 350 mastectomy
patients. Totally different, no-fluid filled wear in regular or sheer bra
(no special pocket needed). Won't slip or press on the scar, no heat
build up. Different skin colors, sizes 26-50. Fantastic for swimming,
sports, etc. Ideal for the underdeveloped women, because it is
natural. 4 year guarantee. $QQ H in
For color brochure call Miami call 667-0332
-bbd, fda approvedFt. Lauderdale564-0220fl|k
____________Coveted Oy Medicare and mosl insurance ompaniaa KNOCHE CORP
Bernard D. Epstein M.D.
Announces the opening
of His office for
The practice of Internal Medicine at
900 Northwest 13th Street
Boca Raton
by appoi ntm ent (305) 368-6030
j JEWISH FAMILY AMD CHILDREN'S SEHVKE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
Jewish community of Palm Beach County. Professional and con-
fidential help is available for
1 Problems of the aging
' Consultation and evaluation services
Vocational counseling
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Private Offices:
2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
Wast Palm Beach, Ha. 33409
Telephone: 684-1991
Or
3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 226
Boca Raton, Flo.
Telephone: 395-3640
Moderate fees are charged in family and individual counseling to
t those who can pay (Fees are based on income and family size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
I the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
DR. FRANK J. PANARELLI
CHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIAN
508 N.E 2nd Avenue
Boynton Beoch. Florida 33435
COWIETE EXAbMATM
wmn X JAY FACUTES
* FULL SPINAL ADJUSTMENTS
MA M AGEMl NT OF CMMOrtACTK MOOU
RELATED TO:
AJtaar
* INSURANCE CASES WELCOME
. AUTO ACaOfMT UMWM OOOUf
WORKMAN'S COMP. INDUSTRIAL ACODCHT
737-3232
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
VICE
FAMILY CHIROTR ACTK CARE
DAYS, EVENINGS, SUNDAYS HOLIDAYS
FOR HELP WHEN YOU NEED IT ....
S0t N.E. 2ND AVE. BOYNTON REACH


* r r\ t w
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August 24,1979
Time Is
Running Out!
This is Your Last Chance to Join with
Your Community and Make Your Pledge
For Jewish Survival
/ JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
^m Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund
MIS HAGLER DRIVE 3200 N TEUSMAl HIGHWAY
rE 124
DM01 B A RA'ON f.ORIDA 13*31
nb m 2\io josi jee 2>v
AC( OUNI NUMBER
1979
PIV
NAME
ADDRESS.
PHONE NO.
i xati
. r
1976
1977
1978
d
IN CONSIDERATION Of THE GUIS Of OIMIRS AND IN RECOGNITION THAI FUNDS HA ,1 BUI. AUOCAIIO AND "~\ M M I, nf.,u
DISBURSED fOR OUR BENfflOAR. AGENCIES AND SERVICES AS SET fORIH ON THE REVERSE SiDI HERIOl IN Rl J l '
Wl PROMISE TO PAY "O IHf JEWISH FEDERATION )! PA1M IE AC H COUNT < I OR
UANCI UPON THIS PIFDGE
I9H
.DOUARS _
SIGNATURE X.
SOLICITOR
-DATE.
IA s
IFF s 111 P >
FOR OFFICE USE ONIY
1 3 T
Is I A
B
A.I Hi HI *fIIH
wi >RKf -,. API Rl
s
?< Me k i (cash CR Bill AS FOUOWS ? monthly uquar1erly ? payrou DEOUCIION F D H 1 G


? S'ARI BlUING BATCH NO hah
This is a Pledge Card... With Your Signature on it, It Becomes a Lifeline
GIVE TO THE
COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL-ISRAEL
EMERGENCY FUND
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
SOI South Flagler Drive, Suite 3s, West Palm Beach,
Florida 33401 83X-M2
*>or of Jewish Renewal at Home ond Overseas


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EU6LUB1FK_GJEQD5 INGEST_TIME 2013-06-11T03:29:27Z PACKAGE AA00014311_00202
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES