Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00200

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
& Jewish Floridiai m
I Volume 5 Number 15
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICI" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Comity
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, July 27,1979
Price 35 Cents
_.^a."<:..
1

Bums
America?
Local Leader Named
To UJA Women's Board
Mrs. Jeanne Levy has been
pppointed to the board of
directors of the National
Women's Division of the United
Jewish Appeal. Mrs. Levy was
Selected because of her in-
volvement in and commitment to
ner own Jewish community and
lo the people of Israel.
For the past two years, Mrs.
evy has served as president of
Ihe Women's Division for the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County. From 1975 through 1976
fhe was the Women's Division
apaign chairman. She has
ved on the Federation's
Nominating Committee and
lhaired the Budget and
Allocations Committee. She was
ecretary of the Federation for
vo years and is presently on the
xecutive board as a vice
President.
She is a past president of
emple Beth El Sisterhood and is
member of their board. Mrs.
vy has served on the board of
Erectors for the Jewish Com-
mnity Day School since its
ception. In 1977 she served as
> leader of the first Palm Beach
ounty community mission to
irael and took part in the first
iternational Women's Division
*Li l^e Council of Jewish
Federations. She is a member of
fRT, National Council of Jewish
f/omen and is a past president of
famar Hadassah.
National Women's
sion Board is a unique group
women who over the past 33
years have worked tirelessly in
partnership with other national
UJA leaders to provide a full
range of human support services
in Israel and in other countries of
the world.
The Women's Division,
established in 1946 by a few
hundred women, today numbers
some 30,000 Jewish women from
throughout the United States
who participate actively in the
annual UJA fund-raising
campaign.
Jeanne Levy
Arab Takeover
How America
Is Losing
The Quiet War
By HOAG LEVINS
This is a story about a loud
peace and a quiet wax.
It is the lengthy, complex tale
of a six-year effort by more than a
dozen Arab nations to fashion a
new ultimate weapon. The story
of a continuing battle for annihil-
ation of a Jewish State in the
Middle East. The account of a
soundless offensive that jeopar-
dizes the safety and well-being of
200 million Americans.
That ultimate Arab weapon
has now been perfected. And
even as the world has been
celebrating the Israeli-Egyptian
peace engineered by Jimmy
Carter, its full force has been
positioned and detonated.
THAT WEAPON is money:
unlimited petrobillions now being
used in a secret, organized cam-
paign that has already over-
turned the world's monetary
system; revolutionized
traditional concepts of inter-
national battle and accomplished
the most drastic realignment of
world power since World War II.
That campaign employing a
potent, seven-pronged oper-
ational strategy inside the United
States has directly involved
every American as an unwitting
pawn on a global Arab battle
board where every move has one
initial goal: the breakdown of the
American support that has
enabled Israel to withstand three
decades of Arab ground and air
attacks.
A good place to start the story
is amid the gaudily-colored col-
lection of circus tents which were
stretched across the lawns of the
fioag Levins, a nation-
ally-known investigation
reporter, is the only jour-,
nalist to have won the
Philadelphia Grand
Award for Best Reporting
for three consecutive
years. Pulitzer nominee
Levins also received the
1978 Keystone State
Award for Best Investi-
gative Reporting and the
Philadelphia Bar Associa-
tion's first annual Media
Award for Outstanding
Journalism. His report
here is puhlinhed courtesy
of Expo Magazine.
Through the efforts of the Russian Resettlement program of the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, two families recently arrived in this country to settle in West Palm Beach.
Pictured above are (l-r) Stephen Levitt, executive director of the Jewish Family & Children's
Service, Pavel Spivak, Gennady Spivak, Rozalia Kantsler, Irina Spivak, Irina Busel, Boris
Busel, Mikolay Busel, Tema Rozenfeld, Ruth Horen, Russian case coordinator for JF&CS; and
Marina Busel. (front) The Russian Resettlement Program is being coordinated by the Jewish
Family & Children's Service. Feature stories on these families will appear in future issues.
White House on Mar. 26. There,
thousands of revelers and cele-
brants pranced before the TV
cameras to declare peace and sit
down to a feast of steak and
champagne.
BUT THOSE TV cameras did
not show the entire story of the
day to their audiences around the
world. They did not show how
two of the private firms Chase
Manhattan and the Bank of
America which donated funds
for that peace banquet have been
serving as willing and creative
partners in the revolutionary
form of secret warfare first un-
leashed back in 1973.
They did not show how the
brother, best friend and various
other political and business col-
leagues of President Carter have
taken a direct and aggressive
part in that secret war.
They did not show how, on the
same day the peace treaty was
signed, Arab leaders of this new,
unorthodox secret effort met in
Geneva to map out a new battle
strategy.
Their initial move was masked
as yet another oil price hike an
increase that brought the cost per
barrel to an unprecedented
$14.55. In effect, that increase
opened a harsh offensive in the
quiet war whose prime targets
are now Egypt, Israel and the
United States.
WHAT FOLLOWS is the
story of the complete evolution of
that six-year war: a global
Continued on Page &


jQttiOj A-MU^.^t.
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, July 27.1979
With the ; !
Organizations
J F & C S Announces Staff Expansion
HADASSAH
Shalom is participating in
Chapter Charity Day to be held
at Palm Beach Mall Sunday,
Sept 16. Bertha Rubin and Mae
Podwol, Shalom chairpersons,
welcome contributions of hand-
crafts, plants, baked goods
(wrapped) and new salable items,
to be sold for the benefit of
Hadassah.
The West Palm Beach Chapter
of Hadassah, which consists of
the three groups in Century
Village: Shaolm. Yovel, and Tik-
vah, is sponsoring a buffet
luncheon and theater party at the
Royal Palm Dinner Theater,
Boca Raton, on Aug. 8. The show
is "Sound of Music."
Hadassah is having its 65th
national convention at the
Palmer House, Chicago, Aug. 19
to 23. The following delegates
will attend: Myra Ohrenstine,
president of West Palm Beach
Chapter; Jeannette Greenberg,
president of Shalom; Claire
Brown, president of Yovel;
Frances Rose, president of Tik-
vah; Laura London, chapter
recording secretary; Rosalyn
Weinshenker, chapter financial
secretary; and Ann Hopfan, vice
president of Florida Region of
Hadassah.
JEWISH
WAR VETERANS
Jewish War Veterans Post 408
will meet on Sunday, Aug. 5, at
9:15 a.m. For location, contact
Sidney Katz, 2863 J. Crosley Dr.,
W., West Palm Beach.
Mrs. Betty Jacket, president of
Palm Beach Region, added that
"We welcome women of every
age group, economic and social
state of life, every woman who
cares about issues of concern in
our society."
For more information contact
Betty Siegel, Delray Beach.
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN
National Council of Jewish
Women has a trip scheduled for
Oct. 25-31 to New Orleans. Only a
few more spaces are left on the
bus. For further information call:
Erma Hecht, Etta Levine or
Ruth Glass, all of Century
Village
JF & CS executive director
Stephen Levitt, Mildred Moss,
Personnel Committee chairman
and Evelyn Blum, second vice
president recently announced a
staff expansion.
Added to staff is Linda Cohen,
MSW, a recent arrival to the area
from New York. Mrs. Cohen was
with the Chicago school system's
Individualized Guided Education
Program prior to her graduate
Musical Program
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISHOLOM
Members of Sisterhood and
Congregation Anshei Sholom are
invited to a musical program on
Tuesday, Aug. 28, at 1 p.m. at
the synagogue. Debbie Chiat,
daughter-in-law of Carrie and
Jack Chiat, will entertain.
I
Linda Cohen
studies at Adelphi University,
New York.
Her graduate school experience
in social work led her to the Self-
Help Clearview Senior Citizen's
Center in Whiteatone, New York
City, where she conducted
Neo-Nazis
ORTForms a New Chapter in Area Bombed Car
West Palm Beach Region,
Women's American ORT
(Organization for Rehabilitation
through Training) announces the
formation of the Oriole Chapter.
Instrumental in forming the
chapter were: Betty Jacket,
president of the region, Betty
Siegel and Gert Pollack of the
Delray Chapter and Rose Myers,
who hosted the expansion teas.
ORT is an international
organization, which for almost a
century has brought freedom to
world Jewry. ORT has enabled
1,500,000 people to become
productive members of society.
Betty Jacket, region president,
stated, "We welcome every
woman from every age group and
every strata of life, every woman
who cares about issues of concern
in our society."
For more information, contact
M. Jacket, Rose Myers or I.
Siegel.
PARIS (JTA) A
mysterious neo-Nazi organiza-
tion, "Odessa," has assumed
responsibility for the bomb ex-
plosion which last week
destroyed the car of Nazi-hunter
Serge Klarsfekl. "Odessa" is the
secret organization which used to
smuggle wanted Nazi criminals
out of Europe in the post-war
years.
clinical and social services to the
Jewish elderly. Mrs. Cohen spent
the last year at Queens Children's
Psychiatric Center, Bellerose 1
N.Y., where she worked with aii
interdisciplinary mental health
team dealing with children aeed
5-16. K
Levitt said Mrs. Cohen's
duties at the agency would be
twofold: "She will enable the
agency to decrease the waiting
time for families to be seen for
individual, marital and parent-
child probelms." And she will be
available to local synagogues,
PTA's and rabbis to help develop
programs and group directed
toward enhancing Jewish family
living.
Interested parents in the area
who would like to discuss
possible Jewish family life group
topics are urged to contact Mrs.
Cohen at the main JFCS office.
Mrs. Blum emphasized that
one of the agency's primary goals
in upcoming years would be to
"help in the prevention of serious
family problems." The proposed
groups will enable families to
check out how they've been
handling matters and to team
new and helpful skills as well as
interesting information per-
taining to family living. "The
Family Life Group is a valid
method of enhancing people's
skills and coping ability," ac-
cording to Mrs. Cohen.
Levitt, congratulated the
board of directors of the JF & CS
for their "quick response" to the
agency's growing personal needs
and thanked the Jewish
Federation for making "funding *
possible for this vital program for
our Jewish community."
Delray Temple Emeth to Host Guest Rabbi
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Are you a working woman
looking for an organization to
join?
Are you in the Delray Beach
area?
Women's American ORT is in
the process of forming an evening
chapter for you.
Women's American ORT
(Organization for Rehabilitation
through Training) is the
vocational training program of
the Jewish people, supports
vocational career education for
70,000 students in 24 countries.
ORT members take an active role
in local, state and national issues
seeking quality education in the
United States.
Temple Emeth of Delray Beach
announces that Rabbi Jerome
Kestenbaum of Miami Beach wilt
be the guest rabbi during services
on Friday, Aug. 3 at 8 p.m. and
Saturday, Aug. 4 at 9 a.m.
Rabbi Kestenbaum is a
graduate of Yeshiva College. BA
cum laude. and was ordained by
the Jewish Theological Seminary
of America. He holds a Master of
Arts degree from the University
of Illinois and Doctor of Divinity
degree from Vanderbilt
University in Nashville, Tenn.
The topic on Aug. 3 will be, "Is
Tish B'A v Relevant Todav?"
On Aug. 4 the topic will be
"The Eternal Challenge of the
Ten Commandments." The
community is invited.
NCJW Coffees Set
Two new membership coffees
will be given by the
Boca Delray Section of the
National Council of Jewish
Women. They will be held on
Friday, July 27, at9:30a.m., and
on Monday, July 30, at 8 p.m.
Anyone interested in attending,
or for further information, should
call P. Lyons, Boca Raton.
/ Local News Notes /
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Haas
of Cocoanut Row in Palm Beach
recently participated in a
groundbreaking ceremony for the
Jack G. Soltroff, M.D. Pavilion
Investment Equity
Real Estate
DON VOGEL
REGISTERED REAi ES'A'E BROKER SALESMAN
Residential-Condominium-Investment
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JL
a
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evitt memorial chapel
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PHONE NO. Ut-1700
13385 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY. NORTH MIAMI FL PHONE 4fl
B21-7200
to be constructed at North-
eastern Hospital in
Philadelphia, Pa. The late Dr.
Soltroff, in whose memory the
building is named, was Mrs.
Haas' brother.
The construction of the
Pavilion is part of the hospital's
expansion and modernization
program. The Soltroff Pavilion
will house the Radiology and
Physical Therapy Departments
on the first floor and the
Laboratory and Medical Records
Department on the second floor.
A graduate of the University of
Maryland School of Medicine
(M.D., 1930), Dr. Soltroff 11905-
1978) was an active member of
Northeastern's staff for 23 years.
Not only did he refer his patients
to Northeastern but he also took
an active part in hospital affairs
by serving terms on the Medical
Board and the Executive
Committee.
The groundbreaking ceremony
was attended by members of the
Haas and Soltroff families as well
as members of the hospital's
board of directors, medical staff
and administration.
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inMumdma
The assurance
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Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a family of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft. Lauderdale(Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
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For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Kenneth M. Kay/ Arthur Grossberg/ Joseph Rubin
#*Wm


Friday, July 2T, 1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
PagB.3
1^
Tempte fletA Douid officers and board are (left to right) Cantor Nicholas Fenkel, Rabbi William
Marder, Dr. Stuart Wanuck, Martin Levine, Lynn Klinger, Gary Samwick, Fred Berh, Anne
Sloop, Martin Schwalberg, Jutes Priven, Howard Debs, president Naomi Rothstein, Jack
Kaplan, Louise Ross, Sisterhood president. Not pictured: Joseph Schiff, Barry Present, Irene
P Berson, Henry Gilbert, Leon Schwartz, Seymour Fine and Leonard Gilman.
Temple Beth David of North-
ern Palm Beach County recently
installed temple and Sisterhood
officers and board members at a
joint ceremony at the Colonnades
Beach Hotel on Singer Island.
Marion Block, chairperson of
the day, welcomed the guests and
recited the Ha'motzi. A buffet
brunch followed. Cantor Nicholas
Fenakel led the singing of the
Bircat Hamazohn.
Using "Pirke Avot" ("Ethics
of the Fathers") as his text,
Rabbi William Marder, spiritual
leader of the temple, installed the
newly elected officers and board
members.
For the second year, Howard
Debs of North Palm Beach will be
temple president. Debs, publisher
of educational works stressed in
his installation address that each
congregant must feel a sense of
real commitment to Beth David's
value and future and work
toward its development.
Presentation of a gift to the
outgoing president of Sisterhood,
Thelma Miller, was made by
Sheila Debs. Thelma Miller listed
Sisterhood's achievements
during her tenure and presented
the temple with a check. Anne
Sloop then presented a gift from
the temple to president Howard
Debs.
After being installed as
Sisterhood president for 1979-80,
Louise Ross of North Palm Beach
spoke of the continued success of
Sisterhood both as a right arm to
i temple and as an organization
which strives to enrich the Judaic
education of its members.
The ceremony ended with the
presenting of special awards in
recognition of important con-
tributions made by temple
members. Plaques were given to
three members for outstanding
service during the previous year.
Recipients were: Jules Priven
(House Committee) for
distinguished service; Louise
Ross (publicity) for outstanding
effort; and Len Miller (fund-
raising) for significant
achievement
Temple Beth David of Nor-
thern Palm Beach County is a
conservative congregation
serving the north county area.
French Force for Oil Fields
PARIS (JTA) The French army is setting up a
special strike force which will be ready to intervene abroad
and especially in order to protect the oil fields supplying
France and other West European countries.
The strike force is being set up by the French
Ministry of Defense, but, according to reliable reports, no
basic political decision has been taken at the Presidential
level on where, when and how it will be used.
THE FORCE, which will consist of volunteers, will
be ready to be used only on major occasions and on the
President's orders.
^Jvlenoiah CljapeJoS.
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A funeral requires every convenience and consideration available
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Knowing that Menorah Chapels are close by, in three prime
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Rabbi William Marder (left) and Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
(right) are shown with Jules Priven who received the
Distinguished Service Award from Temple Beth David
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JACK D. GORDON. PiMktont. ARTHUR H. COURSHON, Chairman ____________________________IOUAL OWOfTUNrlY CMAOttt *~w


"r-"
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, Jujy 27,1979
The Quiet War We're Losing
The article we are publishing today by Hoag
Levins on the quiet war America is losing as the
Arabs take over and subvert American banking and
other corporate enterprises may raise feelings of deep
anxiety.
Levins is an outstanding investigative reporter,
and his series is excellent. But we are moved to
observe that the general thrust of our series, if not all
of its juicy facts, have appeared in our pages in the
past. They continue to do so in other forms, as well,
even as the series is being published.
Perhaps it is Levins' concentrated study that is
making the difference that is causing readers to
ring our phones off their hooks and to ask whether
this Arab war is commonly understood.
We think so. President Carter long ago dubbed
the energy crisis precipitated by OPEC and our need
to respond to it as a "moral equivalent of war." It is
clear that the President has understood the Arab
strategy almost from the beginning.
With due apologies to Clausewitz and Veblen
and their own moral equivalents, we may take issue
with the President on the "moral equivalency" of any
kind of war under any circumstances, and whether
his adapted terminology is apt in this case. But, from
the beginning, Mr. Carter has shown his under-
standing of the Arab strategy. So, of course, have
many others.
It is in this sense, and only in this sense, that
we wonder about the startled and even anxious
reaction to the series. It was our purpose to add to
our readers' knowledge, not to frighten with the
unknown.
But in either case, we believe it is performing an
invaluable service. It is about time that Americans
understood the absolutely Machiavellian purpose of
Araby beyond Jews, Zionism and the existence of
Israel.
A Forgotten Promise
There can be no more clear example of the
jaundiced expediency upon which political battles are
based than Joe Clark and his victory over Prime
Minister Trudeau in Canada.
It would be absurd to believe that Clark won
because of the Jewish community's support of him.
Trudeau had survived in office a long time. His was a
turbulent tenure and, as is so often said in American
presidential battles, it was time for a change.
But Clark did make a vow to his Jewish con-
stituents that if elected, he would move Canada's
embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
We don't have to review the significance of such
a promise. Suffice it to say that while Israel desig-
nates Jerusalem as its capital city, the rest of the
world acknowledges it as Tel Aviv, not the least of
this faction being the United States.
Now that Clark is in office, his promise has
already been delayed for "further study" for a year.
There is no need to take bets on what will happen
after that.
It is about time that Jewish voters, wherever
they may live, stop permitting themselves to be lied
to in such ugly sectarian terms. One way would be to
discourage candidates from thinking of them as
"Jewish" voters.
Aren't Canadian Jews who took Prime Minister
Clark at his word feeling foolish these days?
We might add, something like American Jews
who recall all those things Jimmy Carter said about
Israel when he asked for our "Jewish" votes.
~ Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BE ACH COUNTY
Combmme "OUR VOICE" end "FEDERATION REPORTER'
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Couniv. Inc
Combined Jewish Appeal
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
3300 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. Pla *32 Phone M8-XW1
Printing Office 120 NE 6th St.. Miami. Pla SJ132 Phone 17J-4A9S
FRED K SHOCHET SUZANNB SHOCHET RONN1 TARTAKOW
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DC-10's and the American Spirit
I DON'T understand all the
excitement about the decision to
restore the DC-10 to the air. Days
before the FAA lifted its ban, I
flew a Lufthansa DC-10 from
Frankfurt to Nassau.
There was no fear among any
of the passengers I could detect.
Neither was there any applause
when it took off and landed as
occurred on the first DC-10 flight
on a United jet from Chicago to
Baltimore when the FAA lifted
its ban as capriciously as it was
laid down in mid-June. Or when
National sent its first DC-10 from
Miami to Los Angeles over the
weekend.
MAYBE NO ONE applauded
on my DC-10 flight because,
being denied air access to the
U.S. at the time, we were forced
to land in Nassau, and that is not
a happy prospect to look forward
to under any circumstances. To
be blunt about it, what is there to
applaud in so catastrophic an
occurrence? Next to Las Vegas,
Leo
Mindlin
Nassau is the last place on earth
I'd ever want to visit, and I
suspect most everyone else on the
plane shared that same feeling,
going to Mexico City as mostly
they were.
Knowing how unattractive
they are, Nassau forces you to go
through immigration even if
you're just waiting for a con-
necting flight elsewhere just so
the Bahamians can then scalp
you for a $4 head tax,
A Tk^HT JQUECZE
OTA
presumably to cover the use of j
their antiquated airport facilities
at the conclusion of your "joyous
stay" on their scruffy little
island, which is about as boring
an experience for civilized man as
can possibly be imagined.
Anyway, my DC-10 flight from
Frankfurt was smooth, com-
fortable and lovely. I spent my
time sorting out notes for an
extensive report I am in the
midst of preparing on my stay in
Germany. I was sitting at the
window overlooking the long
expanse of the left wing, and I
must confess that, once or twice,
I stared more with curiosity than
anxiety at the motor quivering on
its pylon just beneath it the
very same motor that went for a
ride of its own at O'Hare late in
May and I took to figuring the
statistical possibilities of a repeat
performance.
My sole solace was a note I'd
written to a friend before I took
off in Frankfurt: no Germar
plane, even of foreign manufac-
ture, would dare crash without
first asking for permission.
BUT A youngster seated next
to me kept interrupting my
thoughts with questions about
America and whether the Grand
Canyon is as ungeheuer und
hunstlerlich ("mighty and ar-
tistic") as it is said. I assured her
it was and complimented her on
her choice of adjectives for one of
my country's most exquisite
natural wonders. She didn't seem
to be giving one single darn
about that wing or that quivering
engine on its questionable pylon.
Neither did anyone else. I saw
a lot of books, newspapers, back-
gammon boards and earphone-
listening to a recording of
Madame Butterfly, which I
myself heard though inter-
mittently three times before
landing.
All of this massive indifference
to bureaucratic czars like Lang-
home Bond and the DC-10 flap
got me to thinking about us as a
nation. Certainly, there were eco-
nomic considerations involved in
the decision of the European
nations to get their DC-10's back
into the air regardless of FAA
prohibitions against them. But
Continued on Page 10
Battered Wives
A Haven for Them in Herzlia
Friday, July 27, 1979
Volume 5
3 AB 5739
Number 15
By GLORIA DEUTSCH
London Chronicle Syndicate
HERZLIA They all have
the same haunted look around
the eyes, these women who have
been beaten up by their
husbands. They're from different
ethnic backgrounds North
African, Yemenite, Falasha
but always the same cowed
bodies, lines of pain on the face,
and fear, a terrible implacable
fear in the eyes.
In the women's shelter in
Herzlia, run by Ruth Rasnic with
a dedication borne of a life-long
concern with women's rights,
there is an atmosphere of com-
mune. The old house has been
surrounded by a high wire fence
to keep out enraged husbands
seeking revenge against their
wives who, unable to take the
brutality any longer, fled to this
haven. The gate is kept locked,
but a genuine visitor can get in as
long as the key can be found,
which is forever going astray.
INSIDE the small house, a
kind of organized chaos reigns,
with beds in every available
space, linen neatly folded, a tele-
vision in the corner, cots, babies
and children children every-
where. In the kitchen, a huge pot
simmers with lunch for the
present inhabitants, eight women
and 12 children, from babes-in-
arms to junior high school age.
It is not generally known
that there are many Jewish
women who come under the
description 'Battered Wives.'
Gloria Deutsch writes here of
her visit to the women's
shelter in Herzlia.
There is one bathroom con-
stantly being used to bathe one of
the infants. The walls are covered
with children's paintings, and
there is an incongruous poster of
a beautiful woman dressed in Ed-
wardian lace looking out through
the French windows of an elegant
sitting room to gracious gardens
below a far cry from the lives
these women have known.
Shoshana is 26, and after seven
years of violence from her
husband she escaped with her
two small children to the shelter.
She will not go back to him now.
The experiences she describes are
terrifying, and one of the results
of her maltreatment is that she is
going to lose all of her front teeth
because of the beatings. But she
still speaks of her husband
without hate.
"YOSSI WAS a nice boy when
I married him seven years ago,
and I really loved him. After six
months he began hitting me. He
started to play cards, and to
cover his debts, he began to sell
the furniture. One day. I came
home from my job as a hygiene
inspector for the municipality
and everything had gone the
fridge, the cooker, my sewing
machine.
"He tried to push me out of a
window, then he burned my legs
with cigarettes saying he would
spoil my best feature. He
couldn't bear to see me in my
uniform, clean and neat, earning' >
good money, while he gambled it
away. He beat me every night.
Once he pushed my head into the
toilet, and once he tore my hair
out in handsful.
"He gets hysterical about
something small like a cup and
saucer not being quite straight,
but afterwards he's terribly sorry
and swears he won't do it again.
Six years ago, I applied for a
divorce but he wouldn't agree to
a get, although the rabbis spoke
to him for three hours. I could see
it was hopeless so I went back to
him."
THE LAST straw came two
months ago when Yossi hit her in
front of a neighbor. The shame
was too much. The years of secret
beatings she could endure, but
the public disgrace finished her*
and she fled to Herzlia.
Yona has. lost 22 kilos in six
months. Her face is still swollen
with the last punching she got, as
she has only been at the shelter
Continued on Page 12


mnmm
^n^ewisf^londiar^^alrr^eacr^ounty
Page 5
Progress at Beth Shalom
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg,
who has shepherded Con-
servative Temple Beth Sholom of
Lake Worth for more than half of
its quarter century existence,
enthusiastically tells of the
Temple's progress to fully serve
the religious and fellowship needs
and wants of an ever-expanding
Jewish community.
From its first private home
sanctuary and a handful of
deeply dedicated congregants,
there followed three stages of
expansion where it now ac-
commodates a membership of
approximately 850 persons, with
a Men's Club and Sisterhood
membership of several hundred.
The latest and crowning im-
provements and additions in-
clude a larger and beautifully
adorned chapel in response to the
growing Monday and Thursday
morning minyans; a dignified
study for the rabbi; a private
office for the secretary and a
special board of directors room
that will also serve as a classroom
to accommodate its growing
Hebrew School attendance.
In addition, the two main
pillars in the social hall have been
removed, thus enabling an
unobstructed view of the pulpit
for the convenience of the
overflowing High Holy Days
attendance.
OUR
Rea6eps
wpite
Lit I
K With justifiable pride, Rabbi
Eisenberg calls attention to the
fact that these costly im-
provements were made without
benefit of a building fund subsidy
or an increase in its low dues. He
credits the year-round generous
support of its members and the
selfless dedication and guidance
of its officers and directors.
IRVING I. WOLSER
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Last week I called the Jewish
Community Center Senior
Transportation Division for the
first time, to see if I could be
taken for a doctor's visit. It had
never occurred to me before to
take advantage of this service
and, not having a car, it made me
very happy to be told that I
would be picked up and delivered
back to Century Village ac-
cording to schedule.
I simply had to write to say
how grateful I am, as well as the
other people on the van, for the
wonderful service we all had. We
were picked up on time, told
when we would be called for at
the doctor's and taken back with
the utmost comfort and courtesy.
I'd like particularly to mention
the young lady who drove the
van. She was very kind and
considerate to people who needed
help walking or getting in and
out of the van and very pleasant
throughout the entire trip.
Now that I got this off my
chest, thank you again most
heartily. I will tout this aloud to
all who will listen in the future!
Sincerely,
SHOSHANA FLEXER
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Page 6
IHIMMM>M'4M
. Vi.wft
TA JiwaA Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, July 27, 1979
C/7C Update
By JOHN I. MOSS,
Co-Chairman
International and Soviet
Task Force
Community Relations Council
A great deal of attention is
being given to ways and means to
encourage Soviet Jews to go to
Israel instead of other countries.
I would like to share an item
published in the latest issue of
"Scientists Committee of the
Israel Public Council for Soviet
Jewry," published monthly in Tel
Aviv:
A successful experiment has
just been concluded, which has
exciting possibilities and
potential for the future. After
months of tireless efforts by
Aliya emissaries influencing
parents in Vienna and Rome to
extend their permission, a group
of 27 youngsters, aged 14-18,
children of dropout families, were
brought to Israel in mid-April
under the auspices of Youth
Aliya for a month's visit.
The idea for the project was
conceived by Youth Aliya
supervisor Gesya Kamaisky,
herself a Soviet Jewish im-
migrant While here, they visited
the large cities, kibbutzim (which
they described as an experience
defying description) and army
camps which proved to be the
most significant encounter.
THEY MET cadet pilots
whose commanding officer
happened to be a Soviet Jewish
new immigrant, which com-
pletely changed their opinion of
the Israeli army. Previously, they
had viewed it as frightening and
hostile, but reality made their
suspicious ungrounded. They
could not imagine the friendly
relationship between officers and
menso different from the Red
Army.
They attended the Indepen-
dence Day eve torchlighting
ceremony on Mt. Herzl and met
the just-arrived Prisoners of
Zion. Meeting some of them
again in the home of Mrs.
Kamaisky, who was in charge of
the project, they described it
afterward as an event they would
not forget, a once-in-lifetime
happening.
Mrs. Kamaisky has termed the
project"s success as exceeding all
expectations: "The youngsters
came to the country which was an
enigma to them, from which they
felt uprooted, thought it was
small, poor and provincial.
Suddenly they discovered that it
has some sizable advantages -
mainly because it's their
country."
She plans to work for having
this experiment become a per-
manent study-tour program for
children of dropouts. Their
parting words upon leaving were:
"It opened a new revolution in
my life" "It was an experience
I'll never forget" "It opened a
new page in my Ufa" "You
helped us become infatuated with
Israel, we're not saying shalom
but r hit mot (see you again).."
And they promised to transmit
their impressions to their parents
in order to try to convince them
to make aliya.
A HIGHLIGHT of their visit
to Jerusalem was a meeting with
President Yitzhak Navon.
Following are some excerpts of a
report on it by Judy Siegel in The
Jerusalem Post:
"Perhaps it was visions of the
hated President Leonid Brezhnev
that made the teenagers so tense
as they filed into Beit HaNassi to
meet the president of Israel.
Perhaps it was the sight of
policemen feared in their native
Russia who good-naturedly
searched their bags at the gate.
Probably the main reason why
the youngsters were so taciturn,
solemn and even defensive was
that they are in limbo their
future hanging on a single
decision taken by their parents.
Looking at their blank faces,
the president realized that he was
facing a Jewish tabula rasa and
proceeded to spend two hours in a
dialogue about their past and
their future: "I had lunch
yesterday with a nun.ber of Jews
who sat for many years in Soviet
prisons under difficult conditions
because they wanted to go to
Israel. Not every Russian Jew
has had to go to jail. Many can
come directly to Israel.
"Why do you think they want
so much to come? Because we are
very old people, with a history
that many nations don't have.
The last time we were in-
dependent here was 2,000 years
ago. Israelis come from 102
countries. Why did they come?
Because they wanted to live in a
country where they could decide
their own fate and not have an
outsider tell them what to do.
"JEWS WERE accused of
being non-productive and lazy, of
being cowards. But here we have
produced one of the best
agricultural systems in the world,
and our army has gained the
respect of our enemies.
"I have a proposal to make to
you. You must learn Jewish
history and religion and the
contribution of Jews to the world.
Only after than can you decide
what you want to do. If you don't
know what you're rejecting,
you'll go through the rest of your
lives wondering why. If I thought
that giving you a presidential
order to come would do any good,
I would issue an order (with a
smile). But I hope that I'll see
you here next Independence Day
as citizens of Israel. '
These were but some of the
things the president of Israel said
in his ad lib message. (The
Jewish Agency's Aliya Depart-
ment has approved a proposal to
send copies of a tape of this
encounter to the transit camps in
Vienna and Rome. The
president's conversation with the
teenagers will be played to all
interested Russian emigrants
during the days they must decide
whether to go to Israel or
elsewhere). Since the visit,
Marina Kipnis of Kiev persuaded
her mother, a neurologist
determined to go to America
without even visiting Israel, to
come here on aliya.
ME
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A


Tnda^ul^2^979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page!
Jewish Community Center Presents
The Fall Brochure is being
readied for the printer. Contact
p -^fshe center to get on the mailing
^*> < 4 PRE SCHOOL and
KINDERGARTEN PROGRAM
The preschool and kinder-
garten rooms are being painted
and prepared for the 1979-80
school year. Interested parents
should register their children
quickly since classes are filling
up.
NO-SCHOOL HOLIDAY
PROGRAM
In answer to the community's
needs, the center is preparing a
three-week "no school holiday
program" starting Aug. 13. Bro-
chures will be sent to the children
presently attending camp as well
the general community.
Interested parents should
contact the center for detailed
information.
9 GENERATION TO
GENERATION
Sunday, July 29, at 1 p.m., the
center's television show "Gener-
ation to Generation" will present
several presidents of
organizations. Included are the
American Jewish Congress, rep-
resented by Joe Cohen;
Hadassah, represented by Ann
Hopfan; Lela Seidler, immediate
past president, National Council
of Jewish Women; and Debbie
Sabarra, B'nai B'rith Women.
Also on this show will be two
Israeli Scouts who have come to
Palm Beach from Israel
especially to help in the summer
camp program. Barbara
Weinstein is hostess for the
program.
ADULT PROGRAMS
DISCO: Saturday Night Fever
happens every Wednesday
^evening with Ron Schenberg.
. dinners start at 7-8:15 p.m.
md intermediate classes at 8:15-
9:30 p.m.
BRIDGE: Al Merion, bridge
consultant, conducts two dif-
ferent types of bridge sessions
duplicate and homestyle bridge
at the center, Sunday evenings
at 7.
SOFTBALL: Calling all men!
Softball is played every Sunday
morning. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at
Field No. 3, Lake Lytle Park.
This group welcomes newcomers.
SAFRAS KOSHER
AN-NELL MOTEL MEALS
OPEN ALL TEAR daily
Intertebmeat, Saacial 0l.1i,
S "MM TV, lla vater,
14 Nr. Ph...! Meh)l. Pill*>
V10 Doable Occ.
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|700 EUCLID AVE. 305-
\MIAMI BEACH, it O 1 i i Ai
FLORIDA 33139 3J I I Tl.
PRIME-TIME: Activities are
being planned for the season. The
group needs homes for these
activities.
YOUNG SINGLES: Watch
for the news about the Spec-
tacular being planned. Call Hal at
the center for details.
ULPAN: Ulpan classes for
adults will begin in the Fall. Call
and put your name on a growing
list of beginner and intermediate
classes planned for Tuesdays and
Thursdays starting at 9 a.m.
SENIOR NEWS
"The Power of the Senior Con-
sumer" series continues every
Thursday at the Comprehensive
Senior Service Center at 1:30
p.m. Hear professionals in many
fields, learn about your rights,
and protect your dollars.
Programs scheduled are:
Aug. 2, David Brown, Health
Department. "Be a superior food
consumer and become wealthier
and healthier."
Aug. 9, Philip Weinstein,
Levitt Memorial Chapel, "What
you must know about funerals
but were afraid to ask."
Aug. 16, Leonard Cohen,
Pharmaceutical Society, "Con-
sumer Drug Watch."
TRANSPORTATION
The transportation program
RESERVE
NOW FOR
THE HIGH
HOLY DAYS
Tha oceonfront Algier't IsAjkure
than a hotel. It's a recreational
resort on over 400' private
sandy beach, tonnii, pool*,
volleyball, handball, health
spa, restaurants, lounge*. With
a S-OAY "Split Stay" or a com-
plete 12-DAY STAYI 3 strictly
kosher MEALS daily, Prominent
CANTOR officiating at SIRVICf S.
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CALL RES. 305-538-3333
DIAL mi S0033T-3147
Ol*n KOSHII
Algiers
OCEANFRONT AT 26th ST.
MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 33140
has been very active this sum-
mer, and in spite of the gas
situation the van has been kept
running. The transportation
service is available to seniors, 60
years or older, within the desig-
nated area. Call the center for
further information.
Classes and Activities
Paul Oblas, who has been
teaching "Know Your Car" in the
community to adults and high
school students, will be at the
CSSC to instruct on how to save
on gas, what to do in emergen-
cies, how to communicate with
your mechanic, how to drive
defensively and how to avoid rip-
offs. The class will be held on
Aug. 8 and 29 at 1:30 p.m.
Everyone is invited to par-
ticipate.
Calling all men: Round table
talk on Mondays from 1:30-3:30
p.m.
Calling all women: Timely
Topics for Thinking Women on
Mondays from 1:30 3:30 p.m.
Do you have a special craft?
The center is having a craft fair.
Call and ask for Florence for
additional information.
How Florida's banking laws
affect you! Tuesday, Aug. 7 at
1:30 p.m. An officer of a neigh-
borhood bank will be on hand to
discuss banking rules and
regulations.
Adult education classes will
begin on Sept. 17. Classes will be
announced in August.
The children of the Jewish Community Center's Camp Shalom
are shown presenting their program in celebration ofthe'Yearof
the Child' at the camp.
The Jewish Community Center's celebration of the Year of the
Child' was done in song and dance by the children attending
the camp. Shown above is the eight-year-old group._____________
Under The Supervision
Of Rabbinical Council
Of Use Palm Beachee
Dally Supervision of
Rabbi Shapiro
Open t 7
Mon-Thurs
-5Fri.
-4 Sun.
Closed Sat.
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-~-
Page 8
inejewisn tionaian oj raunaeacn county
riday.Tuly 27, lH'/tf
iflra/? Takeover
How America is Losing the Quiet War
Continued from Page 1
conflict that now involves dozens
of combatant countries, wildly
innovative war-making tech-
niques, Arab operatives,
prominent American col-
laborators. And a new battle tool
whose awesome potential for
international havoc exceeds that
of any weapon ever used by one
nation against another. Except
possibly the atomic bomb.
Strangely, what follows has
never been told before in its
entirety, although much of this
information has been readily
available to anyone curious
enough and sufficiently con-
cerned about the future of
Israel. And America.
Despite the denials of govern-
ment officials and the silence of
the media. Expo has discovered
that tens of billions of petro-
dollars collected from U.S. con-
sumers have been recycled since
1973 to finance a nationwide
campaign through which Arab
officials, operators and entre-
preneurs have bought their way
into America's highest social
financial, military and political
circles.
RECORDS at the Depart-
ments of State, Commerce and
Defense; at the Securities and
Exchange Commission; in federal
and local courts, Congressional
testimony and published
financial reports and records
indicate that Arab nationals have
been involved in hundreds of
billions of dollars worth of
financial activity in America
during the past sue years.
Cross-referencing the patterns
of these transactions, Expo has
been able to reconstruct a seven-
pronged petrodollar penetration
strategy through which Arab
countries have gained entry into
and rapidly expanding influence
on the mainstream institutions of
American life.
Those seven areas of activity
are:
DIRECT PHYSICAL ac-
quisition, through takeover, buy-
in or merger, of hundreds of
properties including billion-dollar
banks; office buildings; hotels
and other real estate; brokerage
houses; manufacturing plants;
construction companies; cattle
ranches, farms and grain futures.
t FINANCIAL "paper" ac-
quisitions involving various
stocks, bonds and similar com-
mercial paper investments.
Treasury Department records
indicate that Arab investment in
U.S. Treasury bonds, bills and
notes rocketed from $2.2 billion
in 1973 to $10.7 billion in 1975.
Treasury Bulletins and Inter-
national Capital Movement
Reports indicate that between
1973 and 1977, Arab investment
in non-Treasury stocks went from
S365 million to $1.4 billion;
holdings in other bonds zoomed
from $685 million to $1.7 billion.
However, this includes only
directly traceable investments
made openly in the international
market. Much of the recent Arab
investment in all fields has been
made through third-party
countries or international cor-
porations set up to hide the
investors' true identities. At the
same time, a 1978 survey by
Business Week magazine found
that Saudi Arabia is now the
largest holder of the paper of the
Federal National Mortgage
Association. The association,
which has $40 billion in assets
and is the sixth largest cor-
poration in America, is the major
supplier of home mortgage loan
money in this country.
SHORT-TERM bank
deposits for use as immediate
political leverage. Late in 1975,
the Senate Foreign Relations
Subcommittee on Multinational
Corporations tried to determine
exactly how much control foreign
investors had in American banks,
and sought to subpoena
American bank records as part of
that investigation. Kuwait and
Saudi Arabia openly challenged
the Subcommittee and said they
held about $11 billion in
American banks including
$7.3 billion in short-term
deposits; and that they would
transfer the money to European
institutions if the Subcommittee
did not stop trying to subpoena
the American bank records that
showed the extent of Arab
holdings.
The Subcommittee backed
down and stopped that portion of
its investigations; Subcommittee
members explained that they had
"no other choice." It was the
second time since the 1974 Rabat
Summit that the Arab bloc
threatened to collapse the
Federal Reserve System if they
did not get their way. They
apparently succeeded both times;
Congress never did pass legis-
lation to control or even require
registration of Arab investments
in America.
PETRODOLLAR court-
ships aimed at buying contacts
and "advisors" in the highest
circles of government. Among
those currently known to be
directly involved in representing,
counseling or in the direct employ
of Arab financial operatives are a
major candidate for the United
States Presidency in 1980; the
former U.S. Director of the
Budget and close friend of
President Carter; the brother of
President Carter; a former poll-
taker and personal friend of
President Carter; a former U.S.
Vice President; a former CIA
director; two former CIA station
chiefs; two former Senators,
including the former head of the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee; a former U.S. Attorney
General; four former Assistant
Secretaries of State; a former
Assistant Secretary of the U.S.
Treasury; a former Secretary of
Defense and former Secretary of
the Air Force.
"LINKAGE" programs
designed to draw segments of top
U.S. industry close to Arab
governments. This is reflected in
the reports of Arab-American
Ventures Inc. of San Francisco,
which indicate that U.S. exports
to Arab countries just prior to
the 1973 Mideast war were less
than $1 billion annually. By late
last year, that figure had in-
creased to more than $15 billion.
The extent of this new wave of
"linkage" is also seen in the
recruitment efforts of the Arab-
American Association for Com-
merce and Industry, head-
quartered in New York and open
to "any private corporation,
partnership or membership which
is interested in the aims and
purposes of the Association."
The Association, which rep-
resents the member nations of
the Arab League, is financed by
dues paid by the 167 member
companies. Those dues, ac-
cording to the Association's
records, support Arab research,
forum meetings, business
briefings, informal luncheons,
conferences, industry workshops
and trade missions across the
United States. Records show that
the dues-paying member com-
panies include 18 of America's
top 100 defense contractors,
among them Western Electric,
Westinghouse and General
Electric; 21 of Fortune
magazine's top 100 U.S. cor-
porations with combined yearly
sales totaling $400 billion such
companies as the Ford Motor
Company, IBM, ITT, Union Car-
bide and U.S. Steel; and ten of
America's top 20 banks with
combined assets of about $280
billion, including the Bank of
America, Chase Manhattan and
Bankers Trust Company.
One of the most recent new
recruitments is Hill and
9l
to
Holding the deadly
sniper's rifle to his
shoulder and peer-
ing through its tele-
scopic sight, the
now-deceased King
(Faisal) swung the
barrel in a westerly
direction toward
distant America...
'
Knowlton, Inc. Headquartered in
New York, the company is the
world's largest public relations
firm. Hill and Knowlton signed
on with the Arab Association last
November.
DIRECT political action
through a greatly expanded and
highly sophisticated lobbying
effort in Washington and
through direct financial involve-
ments in the home districts of
legislators whose actions have
displeased the Arabs. The Arab
lobby, now acknowledged as
"formidable" in the capital, is
credited with being the pivotal
force in last year's controversial
Congressional vote on the F-15
jet deal.
A chilling example of local
political action can be seen in the
situation of Idaho's Sen. Frank
Church. Church has investigated
Arab financial dealings, helped
block military equipment ship-
ments to Arab countries and
opposed such proposals as the F-
15 agreement. In an effort to
neutralize Church, the Arabs
have now landed in Idaho and
begun buying support for a pro-
Arab candidate who is gearing up
to run against Church in 1980.
EDUCATIONAL grants
and endowments through which
Arab nations, according to the
State Department, have in-
creased their "linkage" with
American colleges more than ten
times over since 1973. At least 75
universities and colleges have
accepted gifts from various Arab
states for the establishment of
Arab Studies programs. Typical
is a $1 million gift from Saudi
Arabia received by the Univer-
sity of Southern California to
fund a professorship in Arab
Studies. To get the money, the
University agreed to allow the
Saudi government to approve the
instructors chosen to direct the
program.
Even when university officials
stand fast against Arab attempts
to dictate hiring policy and
violate federal anti-dis-
crimination regulations, alternate
routes are found to accomplish
the same goal. One device in-
volved an Arab-endowed $1.5
million working grant to MIT for
engineering studies of various
problems in desert societies.
When the grant stipulated that
no Jews be allowed to participate
in the program, the school balked
at signing such an agreement. So
the Arabs hired away all the non-
Jewish MIT experts they needed
to set up the identical program
as a "private business" with no
official ties to MIT's resources.
THERE ARE no indications
that the Arabs have softened on
their stated intention of using all
business dealings and "linkages"
in America as a direct political
tool:
Middle East magazine is the
official business organ of the
Arab world and journal used by
American firms seeking trade
there. The opening pages of
Middle East's October 1978 issue
pull no punches. In an editorial
directed toward readers, adver-
tisers and prospective clients, the
magazine states bluntly, "The
day when you can expect to do
business with the Arab world and
not take note of what they believe
in and fight for is long gone. The
Continued on Following Page
w^ dictwctacUetsatc

All Sunshine cookies and crackers are baked with 100h vegetable shortening


y, July 27, 1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
How the Plot Began
ab Battle Plan Against U.S. Institutions I Definition Changes
1
itinucd from Preceding Page
world is sufficiently strong
not only to fight for v.hai it
ves in, but to expect that its
and allies will stand up
se counted.
today, politics and economics
[only mix, but are totally
dependent. There is a con-
ns among the Arabs that to
business with the Arab world
taking a political stand
incompatible with Arab
sts and legitimate rights."
HOW IT BEGAN
; real beginning of this story
lhalf a dozen years in the
-at a time when America
scant attention to the
lie East The price of oil
red at a constant and
lortable $2.42 per barrel.
on a sunny, shocking
er day, headlines suddenly
to chronicle the flaming
ss of another, familiar,
I of war.
[is late October, 1973, and the
along the Golan Heights is
with the smell of spent
losives and scorched steel.
Overhead, the sky is webbed
the exhaust trails of F-4
^tom jets shrieking north and
into Syria. Bomb thunder
hbles through the afternoon.
ck oily plumes of smoke boril
rom a dozen points along the
son.
JELOW, the sands are littered
ragged clusters of still-
oldering tanks whose sides are
-blackened and gutted out-
W, like burst metal melons.
trn haphazardly among these
Ichines are the grotesquely
shapes of former crewmen,
sir bodies already beginning to
Soat and crack pink in the desert
eat
j This was the turning point, the
ace at which the Syrian in-
Ition to the south was broken.
r'rian armies are now scattering
orth, in disorganized retreat.
he American-made M-60 tanks
lich roar past are marked with
ars of David and hastily-
awled slogans: "On to
imascus.".
| To the west, in the Sinai, the
inks of the' Suez Canal are
led with fire and carpeted
twisted remnants of the
.issian ZIL trucks, rocket
lunchers and artillery pieces
fhich the Egyptian Third Army
1 to front its assault across
waterway on Yom Kippur.
TAPES
CARTONS
IIAMCCDC
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS-LABELS
BAGS-BOXES
WIPES
Now, two weeks into that war,
the Egyptian Third has been
badly mauled and out-
maneuvered. Surrounded by
Israeli forces, its 20,000 sur-
viving members and 400-odd
tanks sit immobile in the
relentless sun, facing the choice
of total surrender or certain
annihilation
OUT ACROSS the Atlantic
Ocean, the skies are hung with a
hovering archipelago of U.S.
military tanker planes,
positioned for continuous mid-air
refueling of the fleet of El Al
74 7" s ferrying supplies from
Peace Air Force Base in New
Hampshire to Israel.
Meanwhile, in Delaware,
caravans of U.S. C-54 cargo
planes lumber off the runways of
Dover Air Force Base, round the
clock, headed for Tel Aviv. The
largest airlift in history is un-
derway.
In the Arab capitals of the
Middle East, eyes which have
spent months gazing downward
in confident perusal of desert war
maps abruptly lift skyward,
bringing that airlift into hostile
focus. That American airlift.
That military jugular that has
enabled Israel to score its fourth
triumph over Arab invaders since
1948.
ONE PAIR of those eyes
broods in the Riyadh throne room
of Saudi Arabia's King Faisal.
An angry Faisal dispatches a
message to U.S. President
Richard Nixon. The king's
messenger is Adnan
Khashoggi a man whose name
will become increasingly familiar
in the quiet war that is just
beginning. A member of the
Saudi royal court Khashoggi is
frequently used by Faisal as an
emissary and operative
In this case, Khashoggi is
particularly useful. Six years
before, the Saudi courtier had
taken it upon himself to back
Nixon's campaign; during the
intervening years, Khashoggi has
made a conscious effort to retain
Nixon's friendship and easy
access to the President.
KHASHOGGI MEETS with
Nixon in Washington repor-
tedly at the Watergate Apart-
ment House suite of Presidential
secretary Rosemary Woods. He
delivers the message in which
Faisal suggests that if the White
House really wants to end the
war, it can do so by merely
halting the resupply efforts that
now permit Israel to continue the
conflict
lEACfc
832-021)
|ROWARD
APER &
ACKAGINC
The
KOSHER
^BW AIR CONCMTIONEC
Cftoum
oaufRONT
HOTEL wo. u>
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By Cantor JACOB FRIEDMAN
Tennis Facilities Sauna Hand laN VoSeybal *^*'***!"
Pool FuN Block of Private Beach Entertainment TV in Rooms Daily
Synagogue Services Therapeutic Whirlpool
Tour Hosts. Hichael tefkowitz I Alex SibHow
For Bwervitioii* Phono: | "53 1 "577
Faisal's suggestion is ignored.
The resupply continues. The
Israelis move to within 50 miles
of both Damascus and Cairo.
And even as the troops are still
engaged and flaming planes still
fall from the skies, Arab leaders
meet again in Kuwait
They charge that they have
once again been cheated of
victory. They announce the
formation of a united Arab front
and the opening of yet another
campaign against Israel. This
time, they vow publicly, they will
"unsheath the sword of oil."
They also vow to punish the
Western nations whose support
and supplies have enabled the
Israelis to repulse Arab attacks.
Thus began the oil embargo
and the first round of massive
price hikes.
IT IS ONE year later. The gas
stations of America have roiled in
shoutfests, fistfights and even
shoot-outs as drivers have been
forced to queue up for hours to
receive small rations of gasoline.
The stock market caroms off
kilter, still unable to right itself
after a series of shocks which
have struck at its foundations.
Industry after industry has been
forced to cut back and shutdown
operations.
NEXT ISSUE: How much do the
Arabs really control?
LONDON (JTA) The latest edition of Collins
English Dictionary has dropped a definition of a Jew as a
"skinflint, miser or cheat." Collins, the publisher, said the
change had been made because the usages were no longer
appropriate. It denied'that it has anything to do with
Manchester businessman Marcus Shloimowitz who has
pressed dictionary publishers for the past 10 years to
remove "vulgar" and "offensive" definitions of the word
Jew. However, Shloimowitz said he was delighted by the
change.
JEWISH FAMILY AMD CHILDREN'S SMVfCf
An outstanding profess/ono/ and counseling agency serving the
Jewish community of Palm Beach County. Professional and con-
fidential help is available for
Problems of the oging
Consultation and evaluation services
Vocational counseling
Manlal counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Private Offices:
2411 Olceechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Telephone: 684-1991
Or
3200 North Federal Hwy. Saite 226
Boca Raton, Fla.
Telephone: 395-3640
Moderate fees are charged in family and individual counseling to
those who can pay (Fees are based on income and family size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
LIFE
TJBEKIY
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When two people are joined together in
pursuit of happiness, thet can save In
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When either partner dies, the fact
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II both partners die at the same time.
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and joint mortgage protection are avail-
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\sk vour lamily Liberty National agent
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When you think if life, think cfLiberty.


Page 10
. -i\Ukt.j iVjani'^xil #n tri.v'.^iVn ic.)iu* jU'
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, July 27, 1979
Leo Mi ml I i ii
DC-10's and the American Spirit
Continued from Page 4
the Europeans don't want air
disasters any more than we do.
that we are more
accustomed to falling down. We
are daily encouraged to become
more and more individually self-
centered and self-indulgent, to
celebrate our individual rights
humane, more considerate of life without regard to the awesome
and less money-conscious than
they? Is that why we delayed our
resumption of flights to discover
no more about the O'Hare crash
than we know now? I don't know
whether the answer to that
question should cause me to
laugh first or to cry first.
But the fact is that, somehow
in the last quarter-century, we
have lost our pizzazz as a people.
Only a decade ago, we were
celebrating our flights to the
moon. The other day, we were
offering apologies to the Aus-
tralians for the crash of Skylab
on their territory.
We don't go up anymore
except perhaps in the cost of
living. We have become a nation
erosions this causes our national
consciousness, our national
integrity, our national culture,
our national history, our national
"lift."
THE EUROPEANS are as-
tonished by our creeping col-
lective psychiatric depression.
These days, we are the leaders of
the free world nominally only.
Time and again, I heard in Ger-
many that we have lost the wings
of our imagination the very
spirit that has been changing the
character of their own national
consciousness and that now
apparently leaves them betrayed
in their desire to emulate our free
spirit and our free institutions,
abandoned midstream because.
7 row '0'
Harry Lerner, left, president of Congregation Anshei Sholom,
presents a check for $5,000 to Barry Krischer, president of the
Jewish Community Day School This check is for all monies
received at Anshei Sholom for their Yiskor appeal in April.
Congregation Anshei Sholom has for the past three years
donated their monies received for the Yiskor Appeal to the
school, and has been a major supporter of the Day School in all
of their activities.
Inflation Hits
Orthodox With
Special Blows
Project COPE also aims to
retrain and place Orthodox Jews,
often supporting large families,
who are employed in low paying
jobs often within the Jewish
educational system.
ORTHODOX JEWS main-
taining unprofitable small
businesses and professional
Kactices will also benefit from
oject COPE's emphasis on
retraining and career guidance.
By JUDITH ROSEN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Orthodox Jews completing the
Kolel (post-graduate yeshiva
study) are among those hardest
hit by rising inflation in the New
York area In a recently com-
pleted study by Project COPE,
the career guidance and job
training agency of Agudath
Israel of America, Orthodox Jews
were found to be unable to take
advantage of new jobs opening in
management and related fields
not meet subsistence level living
requirements.
In an interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
Rabbi Menachem Lubinsky,
director of Project COPE, said
that a typical entry level salary of
$13,000 for a family of four is "far
below" that needed to maintain
basic living expenses. Lubinsky
added that his agency has opened
a special desk to deal with the
hardship cases.
THE SPECIAL desk is run by
Rabbi Moshe Bornstein, who will
work with the estimated 100
unemployed Orthodox Jews
throughout the metropolitan area
who have registered so far.
Bornstein, who faced similar
problems in his own career
direction, will attempt to place
these unemployed in suitable
and retrain others to meet
demands of changing job
markets.
Project COPE also assists the
wives of the Kolel students in
finding better paying careers in
order to support their husbands
and families. In this way, many
graduate students who would be
forced to abandon their studies in
order to obtain more lucrative
employment, are able to continue
their careers in Jewish education
and communal affairs.
quite suddenly, the leader has
turned leaden with incalculable
despair.
Even President Carter in his
energy address Sunday night
failed to give a lift to the nation.
He spoke of the energy war, but
he didn't define the nature of the
war, or of the enemy. Why should
the nation respond to that? He
spoke of the need for windfall
profits tax, but he didn't say who
is making the windfall profits and
why.
It was contrary to the success-
ful greed of those enterprises
truly in control of the nation, it
was contrary to their own best
interests that he not do so, and
for this reason he merely skirted
the issue of what he has come to
call the "moral equivalent of
war," but without sounding a
rallying cry by pointing out our
adversaries as the enemy.
IN CALLING on us to stop
being self-centered, to rise to
higher ethical and moral prin-
ciples, the President failed by
example to demonstrate how to
do that. He was no less hypo-
critical than any of the rest of us
who seek the safety of the
ground, not the excitement of
soaring on the wings of our
nation's eagle. He cried war, war,
but as Churchill once said, all he
did was jaw-jaw, and in a
deliberately obfuscatory way.
In this regard, I note the other
day South Florida's successful
circumvention of the Federal
guideline on cutting back bi-
lingual instruction in the
elementary school system. Is it
conceivable to the American
spirit people who want to live
in America but not be
Americans? And to insist on their
self-centered "right" that other
Americans pay the cost of their
insular choice?
I suppose it is safe to be on the
ground, to gather in the coastal
clusters of ethnocentricity and
pretend that one is part of the
vaster society beyond. In this
self-delusion, one feels free to
impose his ethnocentricity upon
others as the national norm.
ALL OP this is central to the
DC-10. We permit this freedom in
others as a juridical respon-
sibility. We soar no more. The
self-serving ethnocentrics who
are noisy in their espousal of the
right to celebrate their "roots"
are not the only cultural cowards
with which a once great
American past must now reckon.
Too many of us seem to be
Too many of us seem to be
groveling with them in the inter-
stices of our quiet greed building
a burrow back to the primordial
womb.
Tune in
'Mosaic9
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TUNE IN TO MOSAIC
"Mosaic," Jewish Federation's sponsored program
is aired on
Sunday mornings ovor WPTV Caannsl S, at 9 a.m. with
hosts Barbara Shohnon ami Stava Gordon.
PROGRAM SCHEDULE
Soaaay, Aug. 5 Jaaga Jarome Hanmiail
Samtay, Aug. 12 Ma Dimont
#

To send the DC-10 back into
the air is an anachronism. These
days, we are more comfortable
with visions of Da Vinci's glider'0
providing the FAA first^
guarantees that it's okay.
Otherwise, sue.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
ORTHODOX
i Congregation Century
i Beach. Telephone: 689-4675. Sabbath Services'
REFORM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407 833-
8421 Rabbi irving B. Cohen Joel L. Levine, Associate Rabbi
Sabbath Worship Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday Torah
Seminars nt 10:30 am
TEMPLE BETH El OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Ft. 33432 391-8900 Rabbi
Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath services, Friday at
8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah Study with Rabbi Merle E.
Singer 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Service
THE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION Of DELRAT
At St. Pauls Episcopal Church, 188 So. Swinton Ave., Delray Friday
at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver President Jerome Gilbert 499-
5563
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:15p.m.
/. PnviH's in the Pinp-. c. -r- -.i 0~..-.ol n.-rrO II R'"H. or>W
Wellington Trace Mailing Address: 1125 Jack Pine St., West Palm
Beach, Fl. 33411 President Ronnie Kramer 793-2700
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
THE FREE SYNAGOGUE, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton, Florida 33432 368-
1600, 391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 8:15 p.m. at
Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West, Glades Rd. (1 Mile
West of Boca Turnpike)
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fl. 33407 833-0339
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan at 8:15
a.m., Sunday at9a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach. Fla. 33409 684-3212 Off ice
hours 9 a.m. to. I p.m. Robbi Harry Z Schectman Cantor Arthur
B. Rosenwasser Services: Daily 8:30 a.m., 7:30 p.m., Friday 8:30
a.m., 5 p.m.; Friday late service 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 8:30 a.m., 7
p.m.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. 732-2555 Rabbi Avrom L Drazin Sabbath'
Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9 a. m. Congregational
Church, 115 N. Federal Highway.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 N. "A" St., Lake Worth, Fl. 33460 585-5020 Rabbi Emanuel
Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Services: Mondays and Thursdays
at8:15a.m., Friday at 8:15p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services. Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10 a.m. West-
minister Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach
Gardens, 321 North lake Blvd., North Palm Beach, Fl. 33408 Ph.
845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
224 N.W. Avenue "G", Belle Glade, Fl. 33430 Jack Slateman,
Cantor Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeido Drive, Palm Springs, Fl. 33461 Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. President Barnett Brisk man,
967-4962 Mondays and Thursdays at 9 a.m. Services held at Faith
United Presbyterian Church, Palm Springs.
B'NAI TORAH C0HGREG ATI0N
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fl. 33432 392-8566 Rabbi
Nathan Zelizer Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15p.m., Saturdays at
9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE
DELRAT HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, Fl. 33446 276-3536
Morris Silberman, Rabbi Leonard Price, Cantor Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Daily minyans at 8:45 a.m.
and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1190 North County Road, Palm Beach, Fl. 33480 832-0804 Cantor
avid Dardashti Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:30p.m., Saturday at
P a.m.


by, Jury 27.1979
Throughout U.S.
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
tescue Work Boosted by National Women's Council
DENISE WEIGHER
tie did Arkady Siegel know
[he left his home in Kharkov
Soviet Union a few years
that he would wind up in
Jersey and fall in love with a
Russian girl, Svetlana
^vich, recently arrived from
The young couple decided
wry, but found that they
l't afford the kind of
jmg they dreamed of.
en, to the rescue, came
ela Melezin, a volunteer
the National Council of
lh Women, who had been
ma's interpreter when she
rived in Teaneck.
Melezin convinced her
to donate his services,
for a synagogue in
J to hold the ceremony, got a
pr to promise to make a gift
I wedding dinner and this
Arkady and Svetlana will
a glorious Orthodox
ling with all of their friends
[family, and Mrs. Melezin,
nt.
IDY AND Svetlana are
two of a growing number of
et Jews being permitted to
the USSR and enter the
States. Communities
ughout this country are
ig the effect of the latest tide
jviet immigration: from
Ltgomery, Ala., which is
king the arrival of its first
Bian family, to Miami, which
:ts an influx of 550 new
let immigrants before the end
ke year.
eaneck, N.J. will resettle 100
let Jews in 1979, as compared
i in 1978 In many such cities
fW is the only volunteer
lanization working with
Sessional agencies in the
jttlement of these individuals
families. Thousands of
iteers like Mrs. Melezin are
[olved in established NCJW
Igrams which help ease the
licult transition to a new
culture, new home and new
lifestyle.
One of the busiest resettlement
programs is carried out by
NCJW's Miami Section, which
has had an active Rescue and
Migration Service since the early
part of the century.
"Over the year, NCJW women
have helped resettle Hungarians,
German Jews, Cubans," noted
Judy Levin, who was herself a
Russian refugee and is now
volunteer chairwoman of the
Miami program.
"THE extensive program
which we not have for Soviet
immigrants is the result of 60
years of experience. Our 75
volunteers are currently in-
volved, and I expect that this
year they will put in a total of
30,000 hours working on
resettlement.
"Our volunteers meet every
immigrant family arriving at
Miami International Airport, and
bring them back into the city,"
explained Mrs. Levin. "They
travel in caravans of cars, always
led by one woman who likes to
head the procession in her mobile
home. We bring each family to its
own hotel efficiency apartment,
where we've already stocked the
refrigerator and prepared a
'welcome home' meal.
"Afterwards, we give them a
day or two to recover from the
long flight from Rome, and then
every family is visited by either
myself or another volunteer
who's fluent in Russian. Some
volunteers teach them how to
shop, others bring them to the
Social Security office and set up
counseling appointments, and
furnish them with donations from
our thrift shop. We've also
arranged for several doctors,
dentists and lawyers mostly
either NCJW members of their
husbands to donate their
services to those who need them.
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of the palm beaches, inc
Mil OMICHOIII 1UVD WIST PALM IIACH. FLA. 1S40I
"Every child who arrives is
tested for language skills by one
of our volunteers, a woman who
has an M.A. in audiology. Based
on the tests, she makes
recommendations as to what type
of language program would best
suit the child's needs. We also
offer English classes for all ages
efery night in a local public
school, about 40 teachers have
volunteered their time to instruct
the Russians in English as a
second language. And for those
who can't get out to the classes
mother of young children, or
older adults we hold at-home
group tutorials.
"GENERALLY, families re-
ceive assistance from NCJW for
about three months," concluded
Mrs. Levin. "But the friendships
that are made during those
months last for years."
In Indianapolis, NCJW
resettlement work is carried out
in a slightly different way
using a unique family approach.
Upon arriving in the city, each
Russian family is assigned a
"family circle" of five or six
American families who will work
with them for six months,
helping them to join the com-
munity and become self-
sustaining as soon as possible.
"There are several advantages
to this technique of reset-
tlement," reports volunteer
chairwoman Karen Goldstein.
"First of all, it offers the Russian
family an immediate, broad circle
of friends, which helps overcome
the intense loneliness they tend
to feel on arrival. It also benefits
the volunteers because the work
load can be shared. And finally, it
provides the Soviet family with a
window on American life on
everything from shopping to
child discipline. This role model
of how to conduct family life is
immensely helpful in the ac-
culturation process."
"VOLUNTEERS MUST par-
ticipate in six hours of training
before becoming involved in the
program and must make a
commitment to stay with their
family circle for six months,"
explained Mrs. Goldstein.
"About 80 Indianapolis families
have participated so far with a
number of them becoming
'repeaters' and about 20
Russian families have been
resettled using this approach. We
expect three more families by
mid-May, and we're thrilled."
In Worcester, Mass., NCJW
runs its own office of
Immigration and Naturalization,
which is accredited by the
government to process all papers
for immigrants within 10 days
after their arrival in the U.S. The
only such office in the country
which is run by a volunteer
agency, it is open to all im-
migrants, and has been heavily
used by Iranian and other
refugees in recent years, as well
as by Soviet Jews.
"We also have an active
resettlement program going on
here in Worcester," stated
section president Elaine
Feingold. "Our city expects 100
Soviet immigrants to arrive in
1979 that's double that
number we had last year."
Similar resettlement services
are offered by close to 100 NCJW
sections, but the type and extent
of each program is determined by
the size of the community, the
number of Soviet immigrants,
and the experience of the section
in dealing with resettlement.
THE HARTFORD, Conn, sec-
tion of NCJW has a whole gamut
of service to meet the needs of a
large influx of immigrants.
"We've been involved in this
tor five years and have worked
with 135 immigrants during that
time," noted volunteer Gale
Weinstein. "Now, in 1979 alone,
we'll be settling 100 more im-
migrants a tremendous
number for a city of this size. We
welcome new arrivals at the
airport with flowers and from
that time on work in four-woman
teams. Each team works with one
family for whatever length of
time it takes to get that family
acclimated to life in Hartford."
NCJW volunteers in Teaneck
have 85 years of resettlement
experience, including the
assistance they provided to the
waves of Egyptian Jews who
arrived here about 20 years ago.
As a result, the section has quite
a comprehensive and
sophisticated resettlement
program.
Each family circle has pre-
arrival responsibilities which
include furnishing and stocking
the apartment, using ap-
propriated funds and donated
goods. Members of the circle
meet their Russian family at the
airport and share a welcome meal
with them. Over the course of the
next few weeks, the volunteers
share the responsibilities of
orienting their new family to the
resources of the community,
obtaining medical care and Social
Security cards, and enrolling the
children in school.
JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY, INC.
Main Campus 2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
WE ARE ACCEPTING ENROLLMENT
FOR THE 1979/80 SCHOOL YEAR
FOR EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION
FOR AN OUTSTANDING SECULAR AND
JUDAIC STUDIES PROGRAM
ENROLL YOUR CHILD NOW!!!
Superior Accredited Faculty
Small Classes
Individualized Studies
Complete Secular Studies
Hebraic '' Judaic Studies
Basic Skill Achievement Emphasis
Co Curricular Activities
Transportation available
ENROLLMENT ALSO OPEN FOR OUR
SOUTH COUNTY BRANCH IN BOCA RATON
For full particulars call 832-8423 / 4
or visit the school
11N
BRESCHOOL^ancH
INDERGARTEN
CLASS SIZE LIMITED
CERTIFIED TEACHERS
HOURS: 8:30-1
8:30 3
8:3d 5
Special Enrichment Program
Supervised Free Play
TRANSPORTATION AVAILABLE
Call 689-7700
(For Information & Brochure)
Iris Murray Debbie Sabarra Zelda Plncourt
Chairpersons President
^*^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
IT TOOK OVER 5000 YEARS TO PRODUCE
THESE MONUMETALTWO HOURS OF TELEVISION.
American Savings is proud ro provide rhe funding for Srruggle for Israel
A vivid and unique documenrary rraong rhe evenrs leading ro rhe creanon of rhe Srare of Israel.
AMERICAN SAVINGSF*
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA ^


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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, July yj
Battered Wives
A Haven for Them in Herzlia
Continued on Page 4
for two days. She appears to be in
a state of shock. She does not
want to tell her story again; she
has told it so often, to police,
doctors, rabbis, social workers.
"Until I came here, no-one
could help me," she said. But this
much she reveals her husband
is an alcoholic. What about her
family? She laughs sardonically.
She is one of 16 children: four
brothers art' in prison, and three
sisters are prostitutes.
She doesn't want to see
her two little girls end up like
them. s<> when the last beating
brought her to the hospital, and
the psychiatrist told her about
the shelter, it seemed the answer,
temporarily, to her prayers. She
has no idea what she is going to
do.
MIRIAM IS 19 and was locked
inside her apartment for two
years by her husband, a soldier.
He let her out once in the two
years to have the baby. She
planned her escape for a year.
Why did he do it? "He's very
primitive," she said.
Rivka is a sweet-faced Falasha
child. She came from Ethiopia a
year ago and was married,
without quite realizing what she
was doing, to a fellow Falasha.
She was 15. When he began to
abuse her. she ran away, and now
Ruth Rasnic has been appointed
her legal guardian. She studies
Hebrew and lives each day as it-
comes.
"We have got to change
holacha," says Ruth. "Some
humane loophole must be found
whereby the wife can get a
divorce without having to spend
on receiving a get The rabbis'
only weapon (since there is only
religious marriage and divorce
in Israel) is to imprison the
husbands, and even that doesn't
always work. One husband died
in prison after living there quite
happily for 16 years, rather than
give a get The wife, deeply
religious, could never have chil-
In the women's shelter in
Herzlia. run by Ruth Rasnic
with a dedication born of a
life-long concern with wom-
en's rights, there is an at-
mosphere of commune. The
old house has been surround-
ed by a high wire fence to
keep out enraged husbands
seeking revenge against their
wives who, unable to take
the brutality any longer, fled
to this haven The gate is
kept locked but a genuine
visitor can get in as long as
the key can be found, which
is forever going astray.
dren as she wasn't prepared to
bring mamzerim into the world."
SINCE THE shelter opened a
year ago. 131 women and 156
children have passed through,
some staying a few days, others
for months. Many have since
returned to their husbands. But
fortified with knowledge that
they now have a place to turn to,
their situation at home usually
improves.
The local police are now much
more cooperative than they used
to be and will lock up a violent
husband for 48 hours, whereas
before they would treat the whole
problem as a joke.
The reaction of "Oh well, she
must have done something to
deserve it," is far leas common
to th* feminist
movement in general. With the
help of the WIZO legal depart-
ment, the women who come to
shelters now have first priority to
have their cases heard in the
courts.
RUTH RASNIC dismisses
with fury the theories put for-
ward by recent researches into
the wife-battering phenomenon
that these women have a maso-
chistic tendency which invites
abuse. "It is absolute nonsense,"
she said. "The only thing these
women have in common is their
wretched livee. It could happen I
to anyone. Why did they 8Uv
around so long to be beaten?
Certainly not out of masochisin
but simply because they had nr>
where else to go."
But now, thanks to the noble I
work of Ruth and others like her
there is an alternative.
is worse
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