Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00199

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
fiJemsti Floridi&u
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR YOKE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
hi conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Point Beach County
16 Number 14
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, July 13,1979
. Price 35 Cents
EC Strategy
iplomatic Offensive Launched Against Israel
.FRED SCHROEDER
|N (JTA) The
government is
ig a large-scale dip-
offensive in the
East, involving
lly all Arab nations
Sgypt. Israel, too, is
Foreign Minister
ietrich Genscher
to clarify German
[East policy which
far-reaching com-
ive peace settle-
fthe region.
verture to the Arabs
kh the three-day visit of
Foreign Minister
Boucetta. It was fol-
the visit of Qatar's
linister Sheikh Suhaim
id Al-Thani. In the
few weeks, Genscher
Iraq, Syria, Saudi
Foreign Minister Genscher
Jordan, Libya
solution, which will consider the
interests of all states and peoples.
SOME POLITICAL observers
here believe that this position is
the expression of a policy of
moving away from Israel. The
Foreign Ministry spokesman
rejected the accusation. Bonn, he
said, is trying to stay close to
Israel and Egypt, but also to the
other Arab countries. It is im-
portant that Cairo and Jerusalem
don't stop their peace efforts but
continue.
In that context, the German
Foreign Minister regretted the
continuation of the Israeli settle-
Continued on Page 9
and
Arabia,
Algeria.
ASKED WHY he did not stop
over in Cairo and Jerusalem, and
if that was a snub at the Israeli-
ng Debate Ends
\atute of Limitations
War Crimes Abolished
>NN (JTA) The West German Bundestag
. Tuesday to abolish the Statute of Limitations
id continue with the prosecution of former Nazi war
Us without any time limit. The vote at the second
jj was 253 238, making it almost certain that the
>uld be adopted at the third reading later in the
B-
le bill's first reading was in March, when the gap
in supporters and opponents was much narrower.
Continued on Page 5
Chancellor Schmidt
Egyptian peace efforts, Dr.
Juergen Sudhoff, a spokesman
for the Foreign Ministry, rejected
such speculations emphatically.
"We first had top-level talks with
Egypt-' he said, "and as far as
Camp David is concerned, we are
in close contact with the
Americans and Israel knows our
position quite well. What we
intend to do now, is to talk to
those Arab nations which are so
far rejecting a peace solution. We
want peace and that is why we
attempt to influence others in
that direction."
The German Foreign Minister
intends to focus his talks with his
Arab colleagues on two major
aspects of Bonn's Middle East
policy: the German government
is interested in seeing unity in the
Arab camp because this is
considered a prerequisite for
peace. Bonn is in favor of a
comprehensive Middle East
Attending the special General Assembly meeting in Denver
were Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County representatives,
Norman J. Schimelman, executive director (left), and James B.
Boer, South County Campaign Chairman.
CJF Assembly Okays
Three-year Study
DENVER (JTA) A
three-year study charting
the future of Jewish Fed-
erations and Welfare Funds
and their umbrella agency,
the Council of Jewish Fed-
erations, for the 1980s was
adopted at a special CJF
General Assembly here by
an overwhelming majority
Kinys Point Joins S. County Drive
ty Robert Levy, campaign
lan of the 1980 Federation
announces that Kings
will be part of the South
County division in the upcoming
campaign.
The South County division,
covering Delray Beach and Boca
Raton, was formed for the 1979
campaign. The South County
office is at 3200 North Federal
%
^
rown at the first planning meeting for the Kings Point 1980 Jewish Federation Campaign are,
fm left to right: Dr. Robert Greenberg, Betty Siegel, Cele Magid, Miriam Greenberg, Rabbi
ruce Warshal, South County Federation executive, and Izzy Siegel, chairman of the Kings
"u'nr Drive and a member of the South County Campaign Cabinet.
Highway in Boca Raton.
Levy commented, "Obviously,
Kings Point should
geographically be in our South
County campaign. We held it
back for a year until our South
County office grew to the size
where it could properly handle
such a large campaign as Kings
Point."
Izzy Siegel, Kings Point
chairman, said, "We are
delighted to be a part of the
South County office, and we are
already actively planning the
1980 campaign. We may be the
first condo to have started on the
1980 campaign. We are aiming to
triple, that's right, to triple, our
1979 figures."
Siegel also stated, "Obviously,
the needs of Soviet Jewry,
Iranian Jews, and the costs of
peace in Israel make this up-
coming campaign crucial."
Anyone interested in working
on the Kings Point campaign can
contact Izzy Siegel.
of the 300 delegates rep-
resenting most of the 190-
member Federations in the
United States and Canada.
The community represen-
tatives adopted the final review
report which emerged from three
years of analyses and con-
sultations involving more than
1,500 community leaders in the
United States and Canada.
Morton L. Mandel of
Cleveland, CJF president, said
the review report examines every
major aspect of the CJF
philosophy, operation and ob-
jectives and how the CJF can
best meet the needs of its
member Federations.
REVIEW COMMITTEE re-
commendations approved by the
delegates covered the following
areas: strengthening com-
munities and Federations;
United Jewish Appeal-CJF
relations; priorities and plan-
ning; national and overseas
Jewish agencies cooperation;
governance of CJF; com-
munications; human resources
and staff organization; and
budget. Mandel said periodic
evaluations will be made of the
implementation of the recom-
mendations and results reported
to the Federations.
Mandel said the review "took
account of the major changes
taking place in Jewish life both
here and in North America and in
Israel and overseas. The CJF has
a responsibility to identify and
anticipate change and to help
Continued on Page 2


Page 2
MM I*
MB
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, July 13,1979
'
With the
Organizations
CJF Assembly Approves Study
Charting Future for Federations
HADASSAH
On Sunday, July 15, at 7:30
p.m., Tamar-Hadassah will hold
a dessert and card party at the
Recreation Hall at Greenway
Village South in Royal Palm
Beach. Men and women are
invited. For reservations, call the
hostesses, Lillian Goldblatt or
Helen Gintz.
A tea for new members will be
held in July. Those interested
should call Irene Burns.
A few rooms are still available
for Thanksgiving weekend at the
Boca Raton Hotel. For further
information, call Florence
Cooper.
Yovel Group of West Palm
Beach Chapter of Hadassah will
participate in a theater party,
Wednesday, Aug. 8, when
"Sound of Music" will be pre-
sented at the Royal Palm Dinner
Theater in Boca Raton. For
reservations, phone Sylvia Lip-
nick or Essie Goldberg. Trans-
portation is available.
The National Hadassah Con-
vention in Chicago, Aug. 19 22,
will have representation from the
West Palm Beach area. Myra
Ohrenstine, newly installed
president, will head a delegation
comprised of Ann F. Hopfan.
immediate past president of
Chapter and a vice president of
Region, who will meet the group
in Chicago directly from Israel;
Jeanette Greenberg, president of
Shalom Group; Frances Rose,
president of Tikvah; and Claire
Braun, president of Yovel; Laura
London, recording secretary of
Chapter: Rozalyn Weinshenker,
transfer chairman of West Palm
Beach Chapter, and a Region
officer.
Yovel is planning a chicken
dinner social, Sunday, Sept. 9, at
6:30 p.m. at the Kirklane School,
with Tom O'Brien calling square
dancing for all levels. Phone Tillie
Pottish or Bea Devins.
Members and friends of Yovel
are asked to contact Lotte
Strauss to plan for Sunday. Sept.
16. at the Palm Beach Mall. Lotte
will demonstrate and teach hand-
crafts that may be sold on that
day for the benefit of Hadassah.
Homemade goodies and plants
also will be welcome.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
The Palm Beach Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
sponsor a matinee theater party
and buffet luncheon on July 18 at
the Royal Palm Dinner Theatre,
Royal Palm Plaza, Boca Raton.
The play will be the comedy-mur-
der mystery, "Catch Me If You
Can."
At the annual Honor Roll
Luncheon of Women's American
ORT Palm Beach Region, among
those sitting on the dais were Ida
Friedman, chairman of the day,
Pearl Hartman, outgoing
chairman of the Executive Board
and Marcia Light, vice president
of District VI.
Ann Cohen, outgoing
president, was attending her
daughter's wedding and could
not be present at the luncheon.
TEMPLE EM ANU EL
SISTERHOOD
Mrs. Sondra Elliot, president
of the Sisterhood of Temple
Emanu-El of Palm Beach, an-
nounces the election of several
new members to its Executive
Board of Trustees:
Ruth Birnbaum, donor
treasuer; Anita Brover, Jewish
family living chairman; Sara
Troubh, assistant program
chairman; Etta Ross, publicity
chairman; Helen Fisher, gift
shop chairman; Gladys
Klebanoff, assistant hospitality
chairman.
This is in addition to the
present board, comprised of:
Sondra Elliot, president;
Genevieve Silberman. progress
vice president; Helen Coopman,
ways and means vice president;
Ruth Rudolph, secretary; Sara
Weissblatt, treasurer; Frances
Korn, membership vice presi-
dent; Augusta Sandier, nom-
inating chairman; Dee Cohen,
visual aids and hospitality chair-
man; Genevieve Silberman, adult
education chairman; Anita Levy,
Oneg Shabbat and special evengs
chairman; Bertha Miller, assis-
tant Oneg Shabbat chairman;
Gerda Bettauer, pulpit honors:
Frances Korn, Augusta Sandier.
Rose Schloss, donor division
chairmen; Jen Cohen, telephone
chairman: and Regina Basin,
fund-raising chairman.
The petite buffet luncheons are
being finalized, and the programs
will be ready for publication in
approximately one month. For
further information, call the
temple office.
Continued from Page 1
communities cope with them as
quickly and effectively as
possible."
He added that the review
"recommends a number of
specific revisions in the Council's
services, procedures, structure,
staffing and budget. All the
recommendations are in the
context of developing more
cohesive and stronger Jewish
communities."
The delegates also unan-
imously adopted the report of the
CJF Personnel Task Force
recommending a comprehensive
personnel development program
to meet the future professional
staff needs of Federations.
THE DELEGATES also
changed CJF by-laws im-
plementing key provisions of the
review report providing for
greater involvement of com-
munity representatives in the
governance of CJF. The
necessary budget changes also
were approved by the delegates
to permit implementation of the
24 countries.
More than 140 communities
were visited during the review
process to obtain information,
with Federation officers,
executive committee members
and staff professionals con-
tributing their views.
The review committee which
drafted the final document was
headed by Raymond Epstein of
Chicago, former CJF president.
Forty lay and professional
community leaders worked with
him. as did a CJF professional
consultant staff team headed by
Henry L. Zucker, vice president
emeritus of the Jewish Com-
munity Federation of Cleveland.
The CJF Personnel Study
Task Force report was presented
by Samuel J. Silberman of New
York. He noted the three key
Task Force recommendations:
extension of the CJF Federation
Executive Recruitment and
Resettlement Committee
Says Thanks
At a recent Russian Reset-
tlement Committee meeting, a
resolution was adopted thanking
various members of the com-
munity for their contributions on
behalf of Soviet resettlement.
Chairman Bette Gilbert cited
the Miami Rug Company for its
generous contribution of car-
peting padding und installation
at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Spektor, recent
newcomers from the Soviet
Union.
In addition to these gifts, the
firm of Tishman & Tisnower, the
Jewish Community Day School.
Camp Shalom, and Drs B.
Seidler. R. Freilich. E. Kalnitsky.
S. Leviton, and T. Davidoff were
also thanked by a unanimous
vote of the committee
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Mandel said key provisions for
the new by-laws adopted at the
special General Assembly specify
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calendar year, and be involved in
guiding CJF programs
throughout the year;
enlargement of the CJF Board of
Directors to include leaders from
more cities; and reorganization of
CJF committees.
CJF President Morton L. Mandel of Cleveland, center, presents
special recognition gifts to Raymond Epstein of Chicago, left,
chairman of the CJF Review Committee, and Henry L. Zucker
of Cleveland, right, Review Committee chief consultant,
following adoption of the review by a special General Assembly
June 14 in Denver.
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Friday, July 13,1979
However Small
Gromyko Urges Creating
State for Palestinians
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko, outlining his country's
views on the Arab-Israeli
situation, said that "the Arab
people of Palestine" should have
"a small state of their own."
Gromyko's remarks, made at a
press conference in Moscow with
Soviet and foreign journalists,
related to issues discussed by
President Carter and Soviet
President Leonid Brezhnev at
their summit meeting in Vienna.
Tass, the Soviet news agency,
distributed an English version of
his remarks.
ACCORDING TO Tass,
Gromyko said, "The principled
stand of the Soviet Union in
Middle Eastern affairs has been
and remains the same as it was
formulated many years ago. Its
essence is as follows: Firstly, all
lands which Israel captured
should be returned. Secondly, the
Arab people of Palestine should
get an opportunity to create if
only a small, and I repeat it, if
only a small state of their own.
Thirdly, all countries, including
Israel, should have a possibility
to exist and develop as in-
dependent and sovereign states."
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
Foreign Minister Gromyko
At Camp Shalom
Israeli Scouts
Ruthie Sharoni and Talila
Gatron are the two Israeli Scouts
who have been assigned to Camp
Shalom this summer. Ruthie is a
tenth grade graduate and has
been a leader for two years. She is
staying with Barry and Eva
Krischer.
Talila is an eleventh grade
graduate. Her talents include
playing the piano and guitar. She
is staying with Arnold and
Marilyn Lamport.
Tass added that Gromyko
pointed out that "The Soviet
Union has never objected to
Israel's existence. The Israeli
leaders, however, are obsessed
with a craving for the acquisition
of territories of others, and that is
not a far-sighted point of view."
AN INDEPENDENT news
source reporting from Moscow,
quoted Gromyko as saying, "It is
not for us to say that Israel
should cease to exist. We our-
selves proposed the creation of
Israel at the United Nations. In
Israel they should understand
our position." The Tass version
of the press conference did not
contain those statements.
In Washington, reaction to
Gromyko's statement on a
Palestinian state was to refer to
President Carter's conference
prior to the Vienna summit, at
which he said that a Palestinian
state would have a
"destabilizing" effect on the
Middle East.
He offered that view when
questioned about alternative
suggestions for a Palestinian
state, an autonomous entity or an
entity linked to Jordan. The
President had previously said he
preferred a Palestinian entity
connected with Jordan.
THE TASS report also said
that Gromyko pointed out that
the U.S. and Soviets differed at
the Vienna summit. In the
opinion of the U.S. side, the
Soviet Union should have
supported the separate treaty
between Egypt and Israel,"
Gromyko was quoted as saying.
"It goes without saying that the
USSR cannot agree to such a
point of view.
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Hadassah Plans National
Convention in Chicago
NEW YORK- Hadassah will
hold its 66th annual national
convention at the Palmer House
in Chicago Aug. 19-22, Bernice S.
Tannenbaum, national president
announced.
"At our last convention in
Chicago in 1968, plans were
announced for the reopening of
the Hadassah University
Hospital on Mount Scopus in the
recently reunited Jerusalem,"
Mrs. Tannenbaum recalled.
"Our medical facilities at the
Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center in Ein Karem,
western Jerusalem, were
stretched to capacity with
soldiers who had been injured in
the Six Day War with Arab
patients from east Jerusalem and
the West Bank, many of whom
came to Hadassah to resume
treatment suspended 19 years
earlier when access to Hadassah
had been cut off as a result of the
1948 War of Independence."
SHE CONTINUED, "Arthur
Goldberg, former U.S.
representative to the United
Nations was the opening speaker
and the recipient of our Henrietta
Szold Award, Hadassah's
highest honor. Baroness Alix de
Rothschild, European chairman of
Youth Aliyah, reported on the
famed child rescue and
rehabilitation movement."
Over 2,500 delegates and
guests representing over 360,000
members in 1,6000 chapters and
groups from every state and
Puerto Rico will attend the four-
day convention.
Founded by Henrietta Szold in
1912, Hadassah is the largest
women's volunteer organization
and the largest Jewish
organization in the United
States. It is, also, the largest
Zionist organization in the world
today. Hadassah spends millions
annually for its health, education,
vocational, social welfare and
land-redemption programs in
Israel, and its education and
youth programs in the United
States.
In addition to hearing reports,
projecting plans, adopting
budgets and participating in
seminars and workshops, the
delegates will honor
distinguished guests and hear
addresses by government leaders
and international authorities in
the fields of Hadassah's ac-
tivities health, education.^
youth, and American and foreign*
affairs.
Frieda S. Lewis of Great Neck,
N.Y. is national convention
chairman, and Edith Zamost of
Highland Park, N.J. is co-
chairman.
HADASSAH MAINTAINS a
network of medical institutions in
Israel providing healing,
teaching and research radiating
from the two campuses of the
Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center in Ein Karem and
on Mount Scopus in Jerusalem.
Many United States agencies,
such as the National Institutes of
Health, the Departments of
Labor, of Health, Education and
Welfare, and of Agriculture have
shown great interest in
Hadassah's medical, youth
rehabilitation work, vocational
training, and programs for the
educationally deprived as they
are carried out through Youth
Aliyah and by Hadassah Israel
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In the United States,
Hadassah conducts an American
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members on vital community,
state, national and international
developments and through which
its members contribute
thousands of volunteer hours to
school programs and services to
the aged. The Zionist Affairs
Department educates and
participates in activities on
behalf of Israel and of Jews living
here and abroad.
Hadassah fosters creative
Jewish living through Jewish
education; and sponsors a Zionist
co-educational youth movement
(Hashachar The Dawn), which
provides a variety of programs
for youth from 9 to 25 years,
including seven Young Judea
camps located throughout the
country, and work-study and
summer-in-Israel courses for
American high school and college
students.
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Pacrr-9
Page 4
Mmmh .*,) >aaaBV^ .,1* u i nd
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, July 13,1979
Strauss in Israel
Robert Strauss, President Carter's special envoy
to the autonomy talks, is now in Israel. Much has
been made of his skills as a negotiator. Nevertheless,
from the start, we were not thrilled by the ap-
pointment.
Strauss may be a latter day Lyndon Johnson
arm-twister and a negotiator without peer, but his
being Jewish is simply too much to ignore in the
negotiating process that lies ahead.
It would be absurd to say, as both Strauss
himself and President Carter have already done, that
his Jewishness is not a Machiavellian masterstroke
maneuvered by Carter to achieve the adminis-
tration's preconceived notions about the West Bank
and Gaza.
That Strauss has elected to accept the appoint-
ment and be used in this way should not be sur-
prising in light of the visit in Israel this week of yet
another American Jew of some considerable renown
Dr. Henry Kissinger.
But Dr. Kissinger's statements in Israel today
are a far cry from his commandments as Secretary of
State for Richard Nixon: one is the purr of a pussy-
cat; the other was the menacing swish of the taloned
American bald eagle.
All of which is by way of saying that, in light of
past experience relevant to such matters, Mr.
Strauss may be expected to serve as an ad-
ministration hatchetman in Jewish drag.
Strike Two Called
The autonomy talks should be taking a more
difficult turn now what with two of Israel's favorite
negotiators in Egyptian eyes knocked out of the box.
Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan's surgery for
intestinal cancer at least temporarily puts him on the
sidelines, and Defense Minister Ezer Weizman has
resigned his seat on the negotiating team. Both men
were deemed, especially by President Sadat, as more
amenable to flexibility than Prime Minister
Menachem Begin.
With three sessions of the autonomy talks
already over and little to show for them, even then-
presence was hardly as salutary in Egyptian eyes as
they may have anticipated.
What lies ahead is difficult to say. In the end,
not only are the face-to-face negotiations delicate at
best, but Weizman's permanent departure and the
sidelining of Dayan for an indeterminate time will
make them even more difficult.
And once Carter's pitchman, Robert Strauss,
gets going, the progress between Jerusalem and
Cairo may be bogged down even more.
Helping the 'Boat People'
The plight of thousands of refugees in Southeast
Asia, the "boat people," is becoming a world
calamity. Many compare it to the flight of Jews from
Nazi Germany in the 1930s. There are some striking
parallels especially in the racist drive by Vietnam to
force out the more than one million ethnic Chinese
living there.
President Carter, during the economic summit
in Tokyo, announced that the U.S. will double its
quota of Southeast Asians refugee immigrants from
7,000 to 14,000 a month. But the President must
increase the American share.
He must especially see to it that the up-
coming world meeting on the subject in Geneva does
not become another session where a problem is talked
about endlessly, but nothing concrete happens. Jews,
too, well remember the 1938 conference in Evian,
France, where Western nations failed to agree to
provide refuge for Jews from Germany.
"Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER'
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Countv. Inc.
Combined Jewlah Appeal
P ALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
1300 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton, Fla. SMS] Phone 386-3001
Printing Office -120N.E. 6th St.. Miami, Fla. 33132 Phone 37S-4S05
FREDK.SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
Published Bl Weekly
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Federation officers: President, Alan L. Shulman; Vice Presidents: Dr. Richard
Shugarman, Dr. Howard Kay, Kenneth Scherer, Jeanne Levy, Jerome Tlshman;
Treasurer: Staci Lesser; Secretary: Bruce J Daniels; Executive Director,
Norman J. Schimelman. Submit material for publication to Ronnl Tartakow,
Director of Public Relations
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Ares) One Year t'.SO, or by memberjh.p to
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, 241S Ofceechobec Boulevard, West Palm
Beach, Fla. JMOf. Phone Mt-SFM. (Out of Town upon Request)
Friday, July 13, 1979 18 TAMUZ 6739
Volume 5 Number 14
SUZANNE SHOCHET RONNI TARTAKOW
Executive Editor News Coordinator
MORTON GILBERT Advertising Representative
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
FORM 3570 returns to The Jewish Floridian
3200 North Federal Highway, Boca Raton, Fla.TJSP
Qaddafi Strong Amin Supporter
IT IS three years since Idi
Amin, Uganda's imitation Hitler
with the wide girth and limited
mentality, helped make captivity
hell for the 103 hostages held by
terrorists at Entebbe Airport, the
wild man of Kampala has been
caged, crushed and humiliated.
Most of the world will rejoice.
But not Col. Muammar el-
Qaddafi, Libya's strong man,
who was one of the few friends
Amin had left when his empire
fell. Responding to Amin's
whimpers for help as an aroused
Tanzania rained blows of
destruction on the Uganda dic-
tator's army, Qaddafi dispatched
1,000 or so troops and a Tupolev
(Soviet) bomber to the fray in a
desperate and losing gamble to
save a cornered buddy.
QADDAFI OWED Amin that
bit of a lift. For it was at the
Libyan leader's request that Idi
Amin had ordered out of his
domain those Israelis who had
come a few years ago to bolster
his economy. True to his charac-
ter, the mad ruler of Uganda, who
ISRrMEU WpNCO BUSTER
C
had trained in Israel to be a para- .^
chuter, had paid back his Israeli
benefactors in typical coin of the j
Amin realm.
In October, 1975, as President
of the Organization of African
Unity (OAU), he arose in the UN
General Assembly demanding
Israel's expulsion from all UN
organizations and the extermina-
tion of the State of Israel. In that
season, Sen. Daniel Patrick
Moynihan, then U.S.
Ambassador to the UN, branded
Amin a "racist murderer*'! in a
speech in San Francisco.
This served to inflame Aroxn's
hatred for Israel. Urged on bythe
PLO, which kept a large cadre in
Kampala, and poisoned by that
part of his meager education
derived from reading the Pro-
tocols of the Elders of Zion, Amin
offered the Arabs the assistance
of his 12,000 troops "to wipe out
the Jews."
THE DEGREE of his
refinement was reflected further
in his dispatch of a letter to
Golda Meir (then Israel's Prime
Minister) extolling Hitler's
savagery, specifically the
Fuhrer's slaughter of six million
Jews. Had not friends in Moscow
dissuaded him, Amin would un-
doubtedly have gone ahead with
his announced plan of erecting a
statue to Hitler. (His pet pigeons
would have loved that.)
When 20 of his soldiers were
killed as the Israeli rescue squad
dropped from the skies over
Entebbe, his first reaction was to
cry revenge against Jerusalem;
his next characteristic act was to
ask Israeli Lt. Col. Baruch Bar-
Lev, who had helped with his
military training, to send in spare
parts for his crippled tanks.
Dictators with hands dripping
blood are one of the world's
oldest and most grievous stories.
Amin comes close to registering
as top prize winner in that realm
Continued on Page 9
New Book Reveals
Nuremberg Trials Questioned
By ERIC MOONMAN
WERE THE Allies right to
provide a public trial for the Nazi
War Criminals at Nuremberg?
This disturbing question is again
brought to the surface by Airey
Neave's astonishing new book,
Nuremberg.
Sir Winston Churchill. An-
thony Eden and other members
of his war cabinet were inclined
towards a summary execution of
the 21 top Nazis. I am glad they
were overruled by the American
and Russian leaders. As Rebecca
West says in the foreword: "The
Nuremberg trial was conceived in
hatred of war, and it was nur-
tured by those of peace."
The trial was not a perfect
instrument. How could it be? It
had to deal with new crimes for
which there was no provision in
national law or international law.
The judges were themselves not
of the same legal background and
found it hard to agree and the
hearings were often incompre-
hensible.
AIREY NEAVE then was
given a remarkable opportunity.
He spoke German, he had been
captured by the Nazis, he knew of
their interrogation methods, he
had been brought to Colditz. His
incredible escape from that
fortress, just prior to his
despatch to an extermination
center, has already been written
about but at the age of 29 he
was able to serve the Allies in the
preparation of the indictments
against the top Nazis awaiting
trial at Nuremberg jail.
This is not a bitter, violent
book in the manner of Lord
Russell's Scourge of the
British Labor MP Eric Moonman is chairman of the
British Zionist Federation and of British Poale Zion. At
50, Moonman manages to combine intensive Par-
liamentary activity with one of the most important
positions in Anglo-Jewish life.
Swastika. It is educative and
revealing. Thus through the trial
and Neave's visits to the prison,
we pursue the relationship be-
tween the 21 men and Hitler.
Take Hans Frank. From 1939
to 1945, he ruled as Governor
General of Poland. He had a
menacing record. Although
Hitler abused him he adored his
master:
"He demanded 'only one
jurisdiction the Fuhrer's. The
truth is that after his accession to
power, Hitler had no use for
Frank or indeed any other
lawyer. Despite his adulation,
Frank was never again invited to
discuss legal matters with him.
As the years went by, Hitler's
attitude to lawyers became in-
creasingly violent and hysterical.
Lawyers were 'traitors to the
nation,' 'idiots' and 'utter fools.'
On April 26, 1942, he said to the
Reichstag that he 'would not rest
until every German sees it is a
disgrace to be a lawyer.' Frank
had something of the bumptious-
ness and grandiloquence of a
Nazi buzfuz but he must have
winced when Hitler roared,
'There is no one to whom the
lawyer is closer than to the
criminal.' "
FRANK LIVED in a dream
world, pretending that those
principles of law were actually in
force in Nazi Germany which, he
knew, had been abandoned in
1933.
And what of Julius Streicher,
soon to become known as the
Beast of Nuremberg? His sexual'
habits in prison were openly dis-
cussed by the press and in court.
"He liked to expose himself like
an animal in a cage at the zoo."
The Nazi war marhiru* was-
dependent on the factory owners
as well as the fear created by the
SS. A fascinating chapter deals
with the attempts by Neave and
his team to prepare evidence
against the Krupp family. The
Krupp's empire produced guns,
tanks, and U-boats and brought
victory to Hitler in the West. But
that was not the basis of the
indictment.
KRUPP had used slave labor.
They had on the premises women
and children brutally transported
from Rumania and Hungary
where they were penned in at
night by SS guards and barbed
wire. They were marched to the
factory in that last winter of the
war, their legs blue with cold ari'
scarred by frostbite. They liv
on a slice of bread and a bow'
watery soup. At the trie
Alfred Krupp it was proved
they were horse-whipped.
And what was the Krupp trialV
It lasted from August 16, 1947 "
until July 31, 1948. The
Continued on Page 9


Friday, July 13,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page.'
Bonn IJfts Limitations
Statute on War Crimes
Continued from Page 1
Only 21 votes were cast here in favor of a counterpro-
posal, which would have maintained a Statute of
Limitations for murderers not convicted of genocide and
racial killings.
MOST OF the Social Democratic deputies voted in
favor of continued prosecution. They were joined by a
relatively large number of Christian Democrats. There
was an exceptional interest in the Bundestag debate
throughout West Germany.
Radio and television stations interrupted their
normal programs to beam the news. Hundreds of people
crowded the important visitors and press galleries during
the debate, including many former concentration camp
inmates. Some interviewed over West German Radio said,
"We have come to be vindicated and to see that justice
triumphs."
CHANCELLOR HELMUT SCHMIDT said over the
radio that he was "highly pleased" with the vote. "It was
necessary for justice and good order.
Letter to the Editor
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
The Jews have always been
substantial contributors to all
charitable causes, whether or not
they benefit Jewish organiza-
tions, and the Red Cross, in war
and in peace, has shared in this
benevolence.
Jews, therefore, ought to be
interested in the fact that the
International Red Cross does not,
and has never recognized its
Israel counterpart, the Magen
David Adom.
The Red Crescent of Moslem
countries is affiliated with the
International Red Cross, as are
Red Cross organizations in
almost every other country in the
world. Arab pressure in the
organization has however thus
far prevented recognition of the
, Israel group, despite the fact that
[Arabs within Israel are benefited
| by it as are the Israelis.
At the 54th National Con-
[ vent ion of the American Red
I Cross in Kansas City, Mo., Mark
Powers, on behalf of the Red
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Cross Chapter of Harrisburg,
Pa., introduced a proposal that
the American Red Cross lend its
influence with the parent
organization to pursue recog-
nition of Magen David Adom.
The proposal was roundly
rejected. Magen David Adom
remains outside the international
Red Cross union.
HERMAN HERST, JR.
Boca Raton
Rabbis Pray for Sharansky
Rabbis attending a United
Jewish Appeal Young Rabbinic
Leadership Seminar in
Washington, D.C. recently, went
en masse to a site just opposite
the Soviet Embassy to pray for
Anatoly Sharansky.
Their action came after Avital
Sharansky, wife of the im-
prisoned Jewish dissident, told
the rabbis that she had recently
received information that her
husband's health had
dangerously deteriorated.
Mrs. Sharansky, who received
the information initially from a
source in Israel on June 10, has
been in contact with a number of
sympathetic Washington of-
ficials whose help now, she said,
"is more urgent than ever."
Sharansky is suffering from
severe loss of sight, rapid weight
loss, constant fevers and per-
sistent migraine headaches,
according to additional reports
which have reached Mrs.
Sharansky over the last several
days.
As the rabbis recited first the
mincha (afternoon) service and
then tehillim (psalms) they were
observed by Soviet Embassy
personnel and by several
policeman, one of whom crossed
the street to request and record
details about the quiet gathering.
After prayers and promises to
Mrs. Sharansky of further action
on behalf of her husband, the
rabbis departed to their home
cities across the eastern and
midwestern portions of the
country.
During the June 12 13 Con-
ference, the young rabbis at-
tended briefing sessions with
White House officials, including
Edward Sanders, Presidential
Advisor, and Zvi Brosh, an of-
ficial of the Israeli Embassy.
Their program also included
discussions with Dr. Michael
Berenbaum, Deputy Director,
President's Holocaust Com-
mission, and several sessions
devoted to an overview of the
American Jewish community and
the 1980 UJA campaign. Session
leaders were: Rabbi Stanley
Rabinowitz, chairman of the UJA
Rabbinic Cabinet, Melvyn H.
Bloom, UJA assistant executive
vice chairman, and Rabbi Melvin
L. Libman, director of the UJA
Rabbinic and Faculty Advisory
Cabinets.
After several group
discussions, the rabbis expressed
their unanimous decision to meet
again for further delineation of
their group goals, to hold
seminars across the country to
involve other committed young
rabbis, and to consider plans to
bring more young rabbis into the
UJA Rabbinic Cabinet.
In addition, the rabbis declared
their determination to become
more actively involved in their
local campaigns and work with
increased effort on behalf of
Soviet Jewish Prisoners of
Conscience.
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, July 13, U
Scenes Atom tlie 1979 9fe(fa
Alan L. Shulman (right), President of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, presents an award of appreciation to
Robert S. Levy, general campaign chairman for the 1979 CJA-
IEF.
Members of the new 1979-80 executive committee of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County (left to right): Bette Gilbert, Stanley Brenner, Dr. Richard Shugarman, Jeanne Levy,
Robert List, Barbara Tanen, James Boer, Robert Levy, Alan L. Shulman. Not pictured: Dr.
Howard Kay and Myron Nickman,
Maw
Norman J. Schimelman, ex-,
ecutive director of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, presented a report at
the annual meeting.
Jeanne Levy (left), president
of the Women's Division of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, presents a
Golda Meir Award to Barbara
Shulman, Women's Division
Campaign chairman.
Members c
recipientpi
paign chaii
Shulman, V
left to right
Tochner, E
Sheryl Dav
Klorfein, Bt
Scherer, Be\
1

Women's Division Campaign Award recipients pictured are (seated left to
right) Irene Kornhauser, Rhona Shugarman, Gail Weinstein, Marjorie
Schimelman. (Standing left to right) Staci Lesser, Barbara Tanen and Renee
Kessler. Not pictured, Barbara Ackerman, Mary Bachrach, Renee Bassuk,
Marlene Burns, Rhoda Cole, Diana Daniels, Muriel Fried, Florence Katz,
Roberta Sade, Marilyn Silfin, Dorothy Siskin, Ann Small, Lorraine Virshup
and Rose Witten.

Stephen R. Gordon left
from Alan L. Shrnnc
Federation-sponsonw tt
producer and co-hosmf t
a
John Moss (left) receives a Community Service Award for his
work with the Community Relations Council as chairman of the
Soviet Jewry Task Force and his assistance in the resettling of
Russian Jews in Palm Beach County.
Barbara Shulman (right), pre-
sents a special campaign
award to Marilyn Lampert.
\
I !
Leadership of the 1979
campaign for the Jewish t
special campaign award* i
Levy, general campaign ck
paign chairman; Norman I
man; and Dr. Richard Shu
ibi
Alan L. Shulman (right) presents a Community Service Award
to Jack Stateman for his volunteer service to the community as
chaplain in the outlying areas of Palm Beach County.
5W.
i-
0
&
Campaign
Engelstein
(Standing
- -
Award recipients for the 1979 CJA-IEF Campaign (seated left to right): Alec
Irving Gennet, Julius Friedlander, Jules Jacobson, Carl Epstein, Jerome Tishman.
left to right) Morris Robinson, Heinz Falikman, Dr. Samuel Rothfeld, Dr. Jeffrey
ichael Blank, H. Philip Cohn, Dr. Gerald Robinson, Herman Linshes, Dr. Karl
Members of the Men's Campaign Cabinet and special award#'*'
right) Alan L. Shulman, Marvin Tanen, John Moss, GeorgtW
Tanen, AlMoskowitz, Irving Burten, Abe Bisgaier, Rev. MartM


dfetotion JkmaaH uUeetfng
A special Award of
Appreciation is presented to
Robert Regulbuto, General
Manager of Channel 5, for 15
years of public service tele-
vision in cooperation with the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
V Jewish
Federation
of
Palm Beach
County
Rabbi William Marder of
Temple Beth David, Palm
Beach Gardens, served as the
installing officer for the new
board of directors.
lembers of the Women's Division Campaign Cabinet and special award
cipient pictured above are (seated left to right) Anne Faivus, associate cam-
lign chairman; Jeanne Levy, president of Women's Division; Barbara
hulman. Women's Division Campaign chairman; Marilyn Lampert (standing
ft to right), Carole Klein, Penny Beers, Cissie Tishman, Charlene Sholl, Joan
ochner, Esther Barrish and Naomi Jacobson. Not pictured, Barbara Chane,
heryl pavidoff. Sheila Engelstein, Elizabeth Freilich, Detra Kay, Freuma
lorfein, Barbra Lifshitz, Cynnie List, Marvin Perin, Shelly Robinson, Marci
-Merer, Beth Siskin, Judy Waltzer, Ruth Wilensky and Barbara Wunsh.
Albert D. Chernin, executive
vice chairman of NJCRAC,
was the keynote speaker at
the annual meeting.
Anne Faivus (right), associate
Campaign chairman, accepts
an award from Barbara Shul-
man for her dedicated service
to the 1979 Women's Division
campaign.
979 0 nbined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
wish deration of Palm Beach County, who received
arih i the annual meeting are (left to right) Robert S.
gnJch man; James B. Boer, South County general cam-
man me, Arnold Lampert, associate campaign chair-
I Shut nan, associate campaign chairman.
ieorge Golden, chairman of
1 the nominating committee for
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, places into
nomination the officers and
board of directors for 1979-80.
The slate was unanimously
approved.
Alan L. Shulman (right) presents a special award to Jeanne
Levy, outgoing president of the Women's Division.
9ients (pictured above, left to
blden, Max Tochner, Nathan
idolf and David Kend.
Members of the Boca Women's Campaign Cabinet and special award recipients are (left to
right) Shirley Enselberg, Geri Glassman, Betty Stone, Charlotte Robinson, Gladys Weinshank,
Margie Boer, Rose Rifkin, Gertrude Newman and J. P. Listick. Not pictured: Phyllis Cohen,
Margaret Kottler, Florence Melton, Esther Omansky and Lynn Persoff.
Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County held its
annual meeting on June 12 at
the Breakers, Palm Beach.
Cynnie List served as chair-
person of the event.


aaa

PageS
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, July 13,1979
Jewish Community Center Presents
preschool &
kindergarten program
Registration is underway for
the 1979-80 school year. Classes
are filling up fast. Call Frances
Witt, who has charge of the
programs to insure a place for
your child.
ADULT PROGRAMS
Disco: Disco dancing is for
everyone. Join the class with Ron
Schenberg Wednesday evenings.
Beginners start at 7 p.m. and
intermediate, 8:15 to 9:30 p.m.
This is an on-going program.
Bridge: Al Merion. bridge con-
sultant, conducts two different
types of bridge games at the
center on Sundays at 7 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge is a sophis-
ticated game for the connoisseur
of bridge. Homestyle Bridge, a
new and relaxing game, is also
offered in a separate room.
Prime Time: Activities are
being planned for the full season.
Homes are needed for these
activities. Contact the JCC.
Young Singles (under 35
years): New activities for the
young singles. On July 15 at 7:30
p.m., meet at the home of Hank
Gilbert, 840 Ocean Drive, Juno
Beach. Bring your bathing suit.
On July 20 at 8 p.m. the group
will meet at Temple Beth El, 2815
Flagler Drive. There they will
begin a tour of all the synagogues
in Palm Beach County.
Single Parent Program: The
Single Parent Program is plan-
ning activities. Watch for further
information in August.
Ulpan: Ulpan classes will
begin in the Fall. Registration is
important now. For further infor-
mation, contact the center.
JCC Women's League: The
Women's League is planning a
Labor Day Weekend for families
at Marco Island. Contact Sheryl
at 964-8348 for further in-
formation.
Fall Brochure: The Jewish
Community Center is now in the
process of putting together the
Fall Brochure for 1979-80. Any-
one who wishes to be placed on
our mailing list for any of the
activities should contact the
center.
SENIOR NEWS
Transportation is available
from the Comprehensive Senior
Service Center, Monday to
Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
within the designated area for
transit disadvantaged seniors, 60
years or older, to go to doctors'
offices, dentists, lawyers, social
service agencies, nutrition sites
and food shopping. Call the
center for further information.
Adult community education
classes have ended for the
summer but will resume in
September. Classes will be an-
nounced in August.
Medicare Assistance in filling
out forms and obtaining in-
formation is available at the
Comprehensive Senior Service
Center on the third Monday of
the month. This month it will be
held on July 16 from 1 to 4 p.m.
Stop in and speak to Morris
Rosen or Carl Sitzer, chair-
persons, who work with Social
Security to provide this service.
Calling All Men: Round Table
Talk with Marshall Dan will meet
every Monday afternoon from
1:30 to 3:30. This is the first all-
male activity at the Senior
Center.
Calling All Ladies: Timely
Topics for Thinking Women
will meet every Monday after-
noon from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. A
committee of women meet to set
up their group to discuss current
events and other subjects of
interest. Women are invited to
bring in newspaper or other
clippings that might stimulate
discussion. Sylvia Skolnik will be
the discussion leader.
The first Personal Life History
Class at the CSSC will end on
July 18. This class was funded by
OAA Title IV A through Aging
and Adult Program Service
Office, Department of Health Re-
habilitive Services of Florida De-
partment of Education. Par-
ticipants shared and recorded all
types of memorabilia and life
experiences. Jean Scher was
instructor.
Thursdays from 1:30 to 3 p.m.
at the CSSC are now devoted to
"The Power of the Senior Con-
sumer."
Programs planned are: July
12, Alice Skagga, director of Con-
sumer Affairs of Palm Beach
County, on "Consumer Affairs."
July 19, Alan Bernstein, attorney
Topic: "You and Your Legal
Rights." July 26, Jerry Tishman,
Tishman & Tisnower, Insurance.
Topic: "Be Insurance Wise."
Tuesday, July 17 from 1:30 to
3:30 p.m. Join Florence Dan with
an afternoon of George Gershwin,
narration and musical excerpts.
Wednesday, July 25, from 1:30
to 3:30 p.m. Living with 1979's
Energy: Phil Jacobson, chairman
of the Energy Advisory Board,
will be speaker.
TRIPS
July 31, "See Miami On Your
Own." The bus leaves from the
Westgate of Century Village at
9:50 a.m. and the center at 10:10
a.m. Call Sam Rubin or the center
for further information and reser-
vations.
Lido Spa Holiday, Dec. 2 5.
Make your reservations early.
Additional rooms have been
made available to accommodate
the group. Bus transportation
will be available, and the price
announced at a later date due to
the increase in gasoline prices.
Call the center.
Artist of the Month. Samuel
Schwartz, a retired industrial
designer who paints every day, is
this month's featured artist. He
works in pen and ink, oils,
pastels.
The Jewish Community Center's preschool and kindergarten,
children are shown performing the operetta "Peter Rabbit as
part of their closing of the year program.
i ~
'
The preschool's 2 'A-y ear-old group are shown doing their
portion of the program which was held June 7 at the Jewish
Community Center.
Dr. K. on Record
Autonomy Talks May Get Tougher
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
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President
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JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Former Secretary of State Dr.
Henry Kissinger declared Sun-
day night that in the absence of
an American-Israeli under-
standing on the meaning of the
autonomy, the talks over the
autonomy would become even
more difficult.
Speaking at a dinner given in
the Knesset on the eve of the con-
ferring of honorary degrees on
himself, Sen. Henry Jackson and
other public figures, Kissinger
therefore urged both countries to
reach an agreement on the
meaning of autonomy and self-
government.
ONCE SUCH an agreement
was reached, Kissinger said, both
parties could live with tactical
disagreements. "I am not saying
this because I have a precise idea
(on the meaning of autonomy and
self-government). I say it only
because if there is no precise idea,
the process of negotiations may
become more difficult than is
otherwise necessary."
Kissinger said he was amazed
at the changes that have taken
place in the area since his famous
shuttle trips which led to the
disengagement agreement of
1975. "Even more important
than the terms of what has been
achieved, is this growing con-
fidence that has developed be-
tween at least one Arab nation
and the State of Israel."
Kissinger said the startling
fact that the Egypt-Israel peace
process should have occurred is
"testimony to a great Arab
leader who willingly overcame
the preconceptions of a
generation, but also, and in a
deeper sense, to the courage of a
great people which had to make
perhaps even more complicated
choices.
"HISTORY WILL pay tribute
to a people who for 4,000 years
had little reason to trust its
neighbors but which was ready to
exchange its tangible security for
intangible benefits of peace, was
ready to trade physical pos- ~?" a Partner to neg-
sessions for hope."
However, Kissinger issued a
warning that peace must be well-
founded. "No people knows
better than the Jews that peace
must be related to justice. Peace
in itself becomes the blackmail of
the powerful and the tool of the
ruthless. Worthwhile peace
depends on limits, and readiness
to accept the legitimacy of the
other party."
He explained that that was the
reason he had never believed that
a group that depended on terror
nations.
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Friday, July 13,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
Bonn Leads Europe's Tough Line Against Israel
Continued from Page 1
ment policy on the West Bank as
'it was not useful for a peace
I solution.
The visit of Morocco's Foreign
Minister is welcomed in Bonn, as
German-Moroccan relations have
always been close and of a
I friendly nature.
GENSCHER intended to
assure his colleague from Rabat
I that the European Economic
I Community's Middle East policy
| will be continued. The three-day
I talks also included trade ques-
I tions and development assistance
I as Morocco is among the favored
I recipients of German aid. It has
I so far received almost one billion
[Marks in capital and technical
and there are sizeable Gor-
an private investments in the
ountry.
The visit by Qatar's Foreign
linister was a "first" because
has never before been a
by an official delegation
[lom that Persian Gulf state. By
protocol, the visit was labeled
private, but the number of talks
Between the Foreign Minister
gjftd leading German politicals
Htainlv Kave it a political note.
ere
Qatar's Ambassador to Bonn has
voiced the conviction that his
country's head of state, Emir
Khalifa Bin Hamad A-Thani, will
come on an official state visit to
Bonn before the end of the year.
German-Israeli relations are
rather cool at the moment. For
that reason, Chancellor Helmut
Schmidt does not plan to make
his long planned visit to Israel in
the near future.
THE GOVERNMENT has
gained the impression that
Jerusalem is not willing to
continue further far-reaching
peace efforts and pursue a course
toward a comprehensive peace
solution in the Middle East,
Bonn sources said. That filled the
government here with concern.
Originally, Schmidt's visit was
scheduled for 1977, and the post-
ponement has been criticized in
Israel. There was also anger over
Bonn's critical views on the peace
process. The German govern-
ment regrets that Jerusalem ob-
viously does not consider suf-
ficiently the importance of a com-
prehensive Middle East solution
for the international stability.
The Germans have always
Qaddafi Still Strong For
Old Friend Uganda's Am in
Continued from Page 4
tivity. In recent weeks, Am-
International has
ated murders committed or
rated by Amin at 300,000.
the people around Yusufu K.
| the scholar fetched from
1 to serve as Uganda's new
[ of state, place the figure at
THERE an Amin coat of
? All manner of sadistic
tures should be com-
lorated thereon: the tyrant's
mlsion of some 50,000 Asians
had tried to bolster his
Iging fortunes; his penchant
clubbing fellow Ugandans to
kth with his own hands; his
, as dictator, in the 1975
:ution of the Chief Justice of
nda; his reference to Tan-
President Julius Nyerere as
oward and a prostitute; his
ision for playing off against
:h other tribes of his own land;
role in the murder of the
glican Archbishop of Uganda;
sinister part he played in the
"disappearance'' and eventual
demise of Mrs. Dora Bloch, who
was 75 when hospitalized as one
of the Jews forced to endure the
hell of Entebbe.
If the OAU is meant to
symbolize anything, that
obligation is for each member
state to adhere to the vow not to
attack another member state.
When Amin's forces attacked
Tanzania in the fall of 1978, the
madman of Uganda shattered
that vow. Tanzania, to defend its
soil, had to violate the pledge by
striking back.
HENCE, Amin, the arrogant
President of the OAU, became
the architect of African unity's
disunity. And may world opinion
not forget that Libya's Qaddafi,
in attempting to help Amin by
way of paying him back for the
Ugandan's shameless treatment
of an old benefactor Israel
has had his fingers properly
singed.
Nuremberg Trials Scrutinized
In New War Crimes Book
Continued from Page *
irosecution provided 200 wit-
isses, but Alfred Krup argued
at he did not know of the
matters they revealed although
his secretary admitted she could
hear from her desk the screams of
the slave workers, and further-
more, he said he was expected to
recruit the slave workers. This is
not true: industrialists in Ger-
many were given the choice of not
employing foreign workers. Even
Hitler, says Neave, was surprised
that a company like Krupp's
should insist on doing so.
Alfred Krupp was sentenced to
2 years imprisonment of which
ie only served five. The
Western Allies then restored him
to his inheritance. Within a year,
his operations were put together
. and he achieved L83
mdhon worth of business. In
law, his turnover was L 300
million. The firm has now sur-
vived the Kaiser, the French
Occupation of the 1920's, Hitler,
the RAF and the trial at Nurem-
berg of the head of the family.
IRE ARE major questions
this book throws up which,
frankly, have not been faced since
1945. Have we all been so pre-
"m\ occupied?
1 "Should there have been a
Nuremberg Trial? Was it, aa
some say, merely 'victor's
justice1? One distinguished leader
said, 'I accept that the circum-
stances of 1945 made a trial
politically necessary: that there
are certain rules of war: but these
war criminals of a defeated state
should not be tried in future.'
"If there are to be no trials in
future, how are 'war criminals of
a defeated state' to be treated?
How are the 'rules of war' to be
enforced if there is neither a code
of international law nor a
tribunal? Those who criticize
Nuremberg with moral fervor
should answer these questions. It
is true that the presence of the
Russians on the bench, sitting in
judgment on the SS, after per-
petrating the horrible massacre
of Katyn, adds a certain strong
prejudice against the trial. But is
it relevant?T'
THIS IS a powerful book. The
question still persists however:
What difference has the public
nature of the trial made to public
thinking and attitudes 30 year*
later?
The National Front still
marches in London's Brick Lane.
Terrorism is a flourishing in-
dustry across the world, from
Vietnam to Germany and
Northern Ireland. Planes are
hijacked with a callous disregard
for the arbitrary victims, and so
on. Have we forgotten so easily,
or did we ever take in the
message at all?
viewed the Egyptian-Israeli
peace treaty as a valuable first
step, which must be followed by
more, as quickly as possible. The
Germans fear that Israel is
content with the first step, and
they see proof for that in the con-
tinuation of the settlement
policies.
CHANCELLOR SCHMIDT is
obviously not prepared to risk his
international reputation for the
attempt to bring Israel and the
other Arab nations closer
together an attempt, which he
believes is doomed to failure at
least at the moment.
The Germans and their Euro-
pean partners believe that an
agreement with the OPEC
countries on moderate oil prices
is impossible as long as the Arab
oil producers continue to use
petroleum as a weapon in the
Middle East conflict. This is also
the reason for Bonn's criticism of
Washington that it does not
continue its peace efforts with the
same persistence it has used for
the Israeli-Egyptian treaty.
The Germans fend off criticism
from Jerusalem by referring to
Bonn's policies of maintaining
good contacts with the Arab
world a policy, it is argued
here, which has been kept up also
in the interest of Israel.
1 aa
mimmmm
After
shopping.
relax with a
great cup of
coffee.
Maxwell
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Coffee says
welcome
home.
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- -
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, July 13,1979
Temple Israel Elects Michael Small
expansion of the school to include
a North County Branch serving
Palm Beach Gardens and North
Palm Beach, and a very active
Michael B. Small was recently
elected as the new president of
Temple Israel at the annual
congregational meeting. Officers
for 1979-80 include Mrs. Jack
Ackerman, Kurt Leighton and
Dr. Richard Shugarman, vice
presidents; Aaron Duberstein,
secretary; and Burton Sharif,
treasurer.
Small is an active civic,
community, and political leader.
He has previously served as a
vice president of Temple Israel, a
member of the Board of
Trustees, and as chairman and a
member of numerous com-
mittees.
He has served or is currently
serving as a member of the
Young Leadership Committee
and the Community Relations*
Council Domestic Concerns Task
Force of the Jewish Federation,
and he has been active in the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service.
He has served on the Board of
Directors of the Jewish Com-
munity Day School. He was the
chairman of the State of Israel
bonds for Palm Beach County
Michael Small
from 1975-1977. Following his
term as chairman, he has served
on the Palm Beach County
Cabinet for the State of Israel
Bonds and has been a member of
its national Board of New
Leadership. Small is the recipient
of the Solidarity and Scroll of
Honor Awards from the State of
Israel.
Small is the former county
attorney for Palm Beach County,
having served from 1971-1975.
During that period he was a
member of the Palm Beach
County Area Planning Board,
president-elect of the State
Association of County Attor-
neys, and active in numerous
Florida and Palm Beach County
Bar Association committees and
activities.
Small is also active in the Palm
Beach Civic Association, Palm
Beach Chamber of Commerce and
the Forum Club. He maintains
his private practice of law in
Palm Beach as a principal in the
firm of Small, Oakes, Vosko,
Clark and Meyer and currently
serves as counsel to the Broward
County Planning Council.
The newly elected president's
family is also active. His wife,
Ann, is currently fundraising
vice president of Temple Israel
Sisterhood. Their children, Lisa,
Bradley, Jodi and J.D. are active
in the Temple Religious School
and youth program.
JCDS Staff Appointed
Mordecai Levow, director of
the Jewish Community Day
School of Palm Beach County,
has announced his two new'
appointments to the staff of the
JCDS.
Dr. Ilene Gerber has been
appointed as assistant director of
the JCDS. She will direct the new
South County branch in Boca
Raton. She will be coordinating
Srofessional growth activities
Dth at the main campus and the
South County branch.
Dr. Gerber is a graduate of
New York University and
received her doctorate in
educational administration from
Nova University. She is Florida
certified, Rank I, in elementary
and secondary administration,
junior college, guidance and
elementary education. She holds
a New York state supervisor and
principal's certificate. She has
lectured in many areas of New
York and is the author of many
books and articles.
She is a member of Pi Lambda
Theta and Phi Delta Kappa. She
holds membership in many
national organizations and has
chaired many communal
associations. She holds
professional membership in the
National Educational Asso-
ciation; International Reading;
Association; and numerous other,
groups dealing with education
and children.
Hadassah Weiner has been
appointed as Hebrew language
Day an Leaves Hospital;
Back on Job Shortly
JERUSALEM Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan,
who had a malignant tumor
removed from his intestines
recently, was discharged from Tel
Hashomer Hospital and can
return to work after a short
period of rest, his doctors said.
They described his recovery as
"surprisingly rapid."
Dayan was informed that the
tumor was cancerous but had not
spread. His physician, Dr.
Boleslaw Goldmann, made his
condition public in a television
interview and indicated that
prospects for a full recovery were
very good.
IN A BEDSIDE interview
published in Yediot Achronot,
Dayan said that had the prog-
nosis been otherwise he would
have resigned from the govern-
ment immediately.
"A public servant in my
position must be in full physical
condition. If he is incapable in
any way he must resign. That's
what I told Prime Minister
Begin," he said, adding "and so I
shall do," had he felt could not
canyon.
Dayan said, "I demanded that
the doctors tell the whole truth
about my physical condition" not
only because the public had the
right to know but because the
reputation of the hospital would
have been compromised
otherwise.
Dr. Gerber
coordinator at the main campus,
and heed Judaic studies teacher
for the Boca Raton South County
branch. Mrs. Weiner is from
Tel Aviv, Israel, and has lived in
Chicago, 111., where she earned
her degrees from the Department
of General and College Jewish
Studies. She has a degree from
Mundelein College
She is a certified teacher by the
Board of Jewish Education of
Chicago and a trainer for the
Educational Materials Cor-
poration in the Audio-Visual
method of B'yad Ha'lashon
materials. She has conducted
many seminars for faculties of
individual schools as well as the
Board of Jewish Education.
Tune in
'Mosaic9
TEMPLE ISRAEL
west Palm Beach Is accepting
applications for the position of
Please send resume and request
for interview to
Temple Israel
1901 no. Flagler Drive
west palm Beach Fia. 33407
ATT: PERSONNEL COMMITTEE
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TUNE IN TO MOSAIC
"Mosaic," Jewish Federation's sponsored program
is aired on
Sunday mornings over WPTV Channel 5, at 9 a.m. with
hosts Barbara Shulman and Stove Gordon.
PROGRAM SCHEDULE
Sunday, July 15 -Folk Dancing
Sunday, July 22 Euthanasia


> > ........
Small has pledged to continue
with many of the innovative
programs recently instituted at
Temple Israel, including the
Cultural Commission series, the
youth program.
Temple Israel was founded in-
1922 and is the oldest synagogue
in the county and the largest'
family congregation.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
ORTHODOX
Aitz Chaim Congregation Century Village
W. Palm Beach. Telephone: 689-4675. Sabbath Service* 9 a.m. and ,
7:30 p.m. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 6 p.m.
REFORM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407 833-
8421 Rabbi Irving B Cohen Joel L. Levine, Associate Rabbi
Sabbath Worship Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m! Saturday Torah
Seminars at 10:30 a. m
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Fl. 33432 391-8900 Rabbi
Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath services, Friday at
8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah Study with Rabbi Merle E.
Singer* 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Service
THE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION OF DELRAT
At St. Pauls Episcopal Church, 188 So. Swinton Ave., Delray Friday
at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver President Jerome Gilbert-499-
5563
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.
At St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd. and
Wellington Trace Mailing Address: 11686 taurel Valley Circle,
West Palm Beach, Fl. 33411 President Joan Moskowitz 793-2700
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
THE FREE SYNAGOGUE, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton, Florida 33432 368-
1600, 391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 8:15 p.m. at
Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West, Glades Rd. (1 Mile
West of Boca Turnpike)
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Polm Beach, Fl. 33407 833-0339
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan at 8:15
a.m., Sunday at9a.m.
C0HGREGATI0N ANSHEISH0L0M
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 684-3212 Office
hours 9 a.m. lo.l p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman Cantor Arthur
B. Rosenwasser Services: Daily 8:30 a.m., 7:30 p.m., Friday 8:30
a.m., 5 p.m.; Friday late service 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 8:30 a.m., 7
p.m.
CONGREGATION BETH K0DESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. 732-2555 Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin Sabbath'
Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Congregational
Church, 115 N. Federal Highway.
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
315 N. "A" St., Lake Worth, Fl. 33460 585-5020 Rabbi Emanuel
Eisenberg Cantor Jacob E'man Services: Mondays and Thursdays
at 8:15a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services, Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10 a.m. West-
minister Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach
Gardens, 321 Northlake Blvd., North Palm Beach, Fl. 33408 Ph.
845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
224 N.W. Avenue "G", Belle Glade, Fl. 33430 Jack Stateman,
Cantor Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeida Drive, Palm Springs, Fl. 33461 Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. President Barnett Briskman,
967-4962 Mondays and Thursdays at 9 a.m. Services held at Faith
United Presbyterian Church, Palm Springs.
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fl. 33432 392-8566 Rabbi
Nathan Zelizer Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15p.m., Saturdays at
9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE
DELRAT HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, Fl. 33446 276-3536
Morris Silberman, Rabbi Leonard Price, Cantor Sabbath Services:
Fridoy at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Daily minyans at 8:45 a.m.
and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1190 North County Road, Palm Beach, Fl. 33480 832-0804 Cantor
IDavid Dardashti Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturday at
%
a.m.


'13,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
erican Jewry Plays Major Role in Assembly
Fisher of Detroit,
[of the Board of
>f the Jewish Agency
ad honorary chairman
lited Israel Appeal,
[that American Jewry
prominent role in the
ibly of the Jewish
I Jerusalem from June
F28.
isembly," says Fisher,
llarly significant as it
rated the 50th an-
lof the Jewish Agency
established in Zurich
The Assembly is the
/erning body of the
ency.
Jghth Assembly was the
assembly ever," says
C. Hoffberger of
chairman of the
Israel Appeal. "The
Hoffberger con-
Twas the first gathering
Jewish leadership in
since the signing of
i pact between Israel and
[United Israel Appeal
epresenting the United
Appeal and the
on communities, had
sponsibilities throughout
embly as Chairmen of
i and workshops."
PILLING the American
Bnt to assist in the
lent and absorption of
in Israel, UIA super-
flow and expenditure of
ised for these purposes
The Jewish Agency is
Eile operating agent.
[Fisher presided at the
| of the Assembly on June
ing on "The Challenges
President Yitzhak
ind Aryeh Leon Dulzin
of the World Zionist
Ition and the Jewish
gave the opening ad-
orientation session, in-
a briefing for workshop
In and first-time members
[Assembly, was held on
This session was chaired
tty Stanley Sloane of New
Rational vice chairman of
Bnd Bert Rabinowitz of
ey, Mass, president of the
Education Fund of UJA.
[year's Assembly focused
jlure tasks of this unique
vhich has served for the
years as the largest
expression of Diaspora
Dn behalf of the people and
d of Israel. Three main
[were discussed a three-
[ budget projection, im-
lion and absorption, and
Renewal. Among the
rs representing the
can Section of the WZO
fharlotte Jacobson of New
rice chairman of UIA, who
1 an important session.
INDAY, JUNE 25, was set
|for the Three-Year Budget
and led by Mdvin
^sky of St. Louis, honorary
aan of UIA and chairman of
budget and Finance Com-
of the Jewish Agency
of Governors. During the
Ing session, Simcha Ehrlich,
kter of Finance, spoke on
's needs in the next three
, and Akiva Lewinsky,
irer of the Jewish Agency,
on the Jewish Agency's
-year budget projection. The
jeer was Morton L. Mandel of
Hand, president of the
Icil of Jewish Federations
member of the Board of
ptorsofUIA.
June 25 afternoon session
on budget needs for
*ment and youth aliyah.
Zuckerman of Detroit,
["man of the Jewish Agency
of Governors Rural
f>ent Committee and co-
er of UIA, chaired the
ion entitled "Settlement -
ction and Needs." Speaking
[is session was Prof. Ra'anan
head of the Land Set-
[nt Department of the
M Agency.
Blowing the settlement
session was a session entitled
"Youth Aliyah Projection and
Needs," chaired by Raymond
Epstein of Chicago. Yosef
Shapira, an initiator and founder
of the World Bnei Akiva
Movement, was the speaker.
During the budget workshops
which followed, members
established budget priorities.
These workshops were chaired by
Marilyn Brown of South Bend,
Ind., vice chairman of Project
Renewal; Amos Comay of Pitts-
burgh; Martin E. Citrin of
Southfield, Mich., and Herbert
Katz of Hollywood, Fla.,
members of the Board of
Directors of UIA; and Sidney
Lei want of South Orange, N.J.,
president of American ORT
Federation.
The Immigration and
Absorption Plenary was held on
June 26. In a year of greatly
enlarged Jewish migration, the
issues to be discussed involved
not only Israel but numerous
communities in the free world,
both as sources of aliyah and as
havens for Jewish refugees from
areas in Eastern Europe and the
Moslem world.
RAPHAEL KOTLOWITZ,
director general of Immigration
and Absorption for the Jewish
Agency, presented his annual
report. Specific topics relating to
aliyah and absorption were
then discussed during the
workshops. Jane Sherman of
Birmingham, Mich., chairman of
Young Women's Leadership of
UJA, and Bernice Waldman of
West Hartford, Conn., Campaign
Chairman of National Women's
Division of UJA, chaired
workshops entitled "Community
Responsibility for Aliyah;" Dr.
Sylvia Friedman of New York,
president of New York
Association for New Americans
(NYANA), and Annette Dobbs of
San Francisco chaired workshops
dealing with the topic of noshrim
(emigrants who decide not to
settle in Israel); and Alan
Shulman of Palm Beach
chaired a housing workshop. The
reorganization of absorption
services was discussed in a
workshop.
June 26 was reserved for the
Open Session Plenary, chaired by
Max Fisher. This Plenary in-
cluded a discussion of questions
and proposals submitted in
advance by delegates as well as a
briefing by Moshe Day an,
Minister for Foreign Affairs.
Dayan was introduced by Frank
R. Lautenberg of metropolitan
New Jersey, president of UJA
and vice chairman of UIA.
The 50th anniversary
celebration was held on June 26.
Irwin Field of Los Angeles,
national chairman of UJA and a
member of the Board of Directors
of UIA, gave the major address.
The third focus of the
Assembly was Project Renewal, a
comprehensive social
rehabilitation program aimed at
bringing 54,000 immigrant
families living in 160 distressed
neighborhoods into the main-
stream of Israel's society. The
Project Renewal Plenary, chaired
by Jerold C. Hoffberger,
chairman of the Project Renewal
committee of the Jewish Agency
Board of Governors, took place
on June 27. Developments in this
program which began one year
ago were discussed and evaluated
from the vantage points of Israel
and the Diaspora. Eliezer Rafaeli,
director general of Project
Renewal, spoke from the Israeli
perspective; Philip Granovsky of
Toronto spoke on the view from
abroad.
YIGAEL YADIN, member of
the Knesset, Deputy Prime
Minister, and head of the
Interministerial Committee on
Project Renewal, also spoke at
this session. He was introduced
by Sylvia Hassenfeld of
Providence, member of the
Executive Committee of the
National Women's Division of
UJA and the Board of Directors
of UIA. The afternoon was set
aside for visits to Project
Renewal neighborhoods.
The Budget and Assembly
Plenary took place on, June 28.
During this Plenary, reports on
the Three-Year Budget
workshops were presented, as
well as draft resolutions on the
three areas of discussion the
budget, immigration, and Project
Renewal. Robert Russell of
Miami, national chairman of
Project Renewal and member of
the Board of Directors of UIA,
gave the reports and resolutions
on Project Renewal.
Aryeh Leon Dulzin presided at
the closing of the Assembly on
June 28, when addresses were
given by Prime Minister Begin
and Max Fisher. The assembly
clarified key issues confronting
Israel and the Jewish Agency,
and the resolutions resulting
from the Assembly are expected
to have a greater influence on
Jewish Agency programs and
priorities than ever before.
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Shulman
from Palm Beach were among
those delegated to represent
American Jewry at this eighth
Assembly of the Jewish Agency.
Polite Talk
Strauss in 'Getting to Know' Meetings
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The U.S. special envoy to the
autonomy talks, Robert Strauss,
met Monday with Prime Minister
Menachem Begin and the chair-
man of the Israeli team, Dr.
Yosef Burg, in what he described
as "getting to know" meetings.
There were no dramatic and
sensational announcements, and
the feeling in Jerusalem was that
the parties refrained so far from
getting down to the real issues at
stake.
HE MET with Begin for more
than an hour, and as he came out
of the meeting, he said, "I guess
it was a rather philosophical talk
than a talk with great specificity.
I find it very useful and helpful,
and I trust he (Begin) finds the
same." Strauss said the meetings
were but setting the stage for
more specific discussions as time
went on.
Strauss handed Begin a letter
from President Jimmy Carter.
The contents of the letter were
not revealed, although it was
described as a "friendly" letter,
and Begin was reportedly pleased
with it.
At noon Strauss met the head
of the Israeli negotiations team,
Dr. Burg. Burg, too, described
the meeting as a chance "to get
better acquainted.''
TALKS ON the delicate issues
ahead were expected to begin
later Monday evening, when
Strauss would once again meet
with the Israeli negotiating team.
Tuesday morning Strauss was
scheduled to meet once again
with Begin, before holding a
press conference.
Later Tuesday, Strauss was
scheduled to be flown in an Air
Force helicopter over the West
Bank to get a bird's eye view of
Arab League Threat
Should be Ignored
OTTAWA (JTA) -
Finance Minister John Crosby
said that "Canadians should not
lose sleep over the statement put
out by the Arab League
Monetary Fund in Abu Dahbi
threatening to suspend any
financial transactions and
boycott Canadian banking and
financial institutions."
He was referring to a report
from Bahrain that the Arab
Monetary Fund, an Arab League
agency based in Abu Dahbi, has
suspended all financial dealings
with Canada to protest the
Canadian government's plans to
move its embassy in Israel from
Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
CROSBY SAID that he has
asked the Arab countries for
clarification and that he would
abstain from any further com-
ments at the moment. He an-
nounced, however, that the Inner
Cabinet will discuss the matter at
its meeting.
Meanwhile, Roland Frazee,
president of the Royal Bank of
Canada, Canada's largest bank,
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that "I have never heard
of the Arab Monetary Fund."
the territories
negotiations.
involved in the
IN HIS capacity as Carter's
special advisor on the economic
aspects of peace, Strauss met
Monday with Industry Minister
Gideon Patt and Bank of Israel
Governor Araon Gafni. ,
In the meetings, Strauss
stressed the importance of
economic development to the
routine of the peace process.
"I am certainly aware of the
fact that as political negotiations
go on, there is also an economic
side to this ... we should hold
talks of the mutual problems we
face today, such as our problem
of inflation and your problem of
inflation." Strauss said he'
wanted to check the sort of con-
tribution the U.S. could make in
the area beyond the contribution
of "military hardware."
Gov. Gafni said he was op-
timistic about economic invest-
ments in the region in the peace
era. "With the correct policy we
can see prospering economies
with a high rate of development,
industrialization ... it will take
years, but it is important to begin
this process as soon as possible."
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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian ofPabn Beach County
^^y. July I3,i
Fedorenko Reversal Widely Applauded
New Inquiries Ahead?
By ROCHELLE WOLK
ALBANY, NY. -
(JTA) Walter J. Rockier,
head of the newly-organized
federal special unit respon-
sible for Nazi war criminal
investigations, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that a New Orleans federal
appeals court ruling
against Feodor Fedorenko
would "tend to strengthen
the position of the office of
special investigation."
Rockier made the state-
ment in a telephone inter-
view from Washington. The
special investigation unit is
in the criminal division of
the U.S. Justice Depart-
ment.
the Fifth Circuit Court of
Appeals in New Orleans recently
reversed the decision by U.S.
District Judge Norman C. Koett-
ger, Jr. in Fort Lauderdale, Fla..
that had held that Fedorenko, a
one-time guard at the Treblinka
death camp, could retain his U.S.
citizenship.
IN A 3-0 ruling, the appeals
court instructed Judge Roettger
to revoke the citizenship of
Fedorenko because he had bed
about serving as a Treblinka
guard when he entered the
United States in 1949. Fedorenko
told immigration authorities then
that he had been a farmer and a
factory worker during World War
II. Judge Roettger had ruled that
Fedorenko's lie had not been
serious enough to justify
revoking his citizenship.
The appeals court held that by
concealing his Nazi past. Fedo-
renko prevented the government
from conducting an investigation
at the time of his entry. Such an
investigation might have pro-
duced evidence that would have
warranted denial of his entry or
granting of citizenship
The appeals court instructed
Judge Roettger to "cancel the
certificate of naturalization
issued to the defendant" in 1970.
The denaturalization order,
which can be appealed to the
Supreme Court, will presumably
be followed by deportation pro-
ceedings to return Fedorenko to
his native Ukraine.
"IMMIGRATION law does
not allow a defense in a natural-
ization case, that a material mis-
representation was motivated by
fear of what might have resulted
if the applicant told the truth."
the appeals court ruled.
Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman ID..
N.Y.), chairman of the House
Judiciary subcommittee respon-
sible for Nazi war criminal cases,
issued a statement in Washing-
ton that she was "extremely
gratified" by the appeals court
ruling.
She also said "this is a
tremendously important victory
which will help facilitate the
prosecution of all suspected war
criminals who have found sanc-
tuary in the United States. I
heartily congratulate the Justice
Department and the Solicitor
General's office which argued the
appeal for their fine efforts."
IN NEW YORK, Howard M.
Squadron, president of the
American Jewish Congress, said
he was "deeply gratified" by the
court ruling. He recalled that the
AJCongress had led a deli
to the Justice Departraea'
Washington, which succeajl
urged Attorney General Gri
Bell to appeal the lower,
decision which held
Fedorenko could remain ia
U.S. as a citizen.
The AJCongress also wife]
friend of the court brief,
mitted to the appeals
which argued as the
eventually ruled
Fedorenko's false statement^
entering the country
grounds for revoking
citizenship.
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