Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00198

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisii Florid lam
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Polm Beach County
Volume 5 Number 13
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, June 29,1979
Price 35 Cents
17th Annual Meeting
By RONNITARTAKOW
Director of Public Relations
Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County
"We live in a time of
highly dramatic events
both in Israel and here in
our own community, and
we all hav been privileged
to be part of these events,"
stated Alan L. Shulman, as
he presented his Pres-
Campaign Breaks All
ident's Report at the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm
Beach County's 17th an-
nual meeting held on June
12.
The event, chaired by Cynnie
List, was attended by over 250
members of the Palm Beach
County Jewish community and
recognized the many achieve-
ments of the Federation over the
past year.
Shulman announced that the
1979 Combined Jewish Appeal-
cam-
On His Centennial
Einstein Recalled
As Devoted Jew
Israel Emergency Fund
paign "reached an all time high
under the outstanding campaign
leadership of Robert S. Levy,
general campaign chairman, and
Barbara Shulman, Women's
Division campaign chairman.
SHULMAN ALSO noted that
the Federation has expanded its
staff to meet the needs of the
growing community, including
the hiring of Bruce Warshal as
associate director for the South
County Division of the Jewish
Federation, and Henry L. Zucker,
former executive vice president of
the Cleveland Federation, as con-
sultant for the Endowment Pro-
gram. A chaplain / Community
Relations Council director will
join the staff in September.
Shulman commended the
Community Relations Council,
chaired by Bruce Daniels, for a
"very productive year," and
reported that "we now have an
active and viable Community
Relations Committee in our south
county area under the leadership
of Al Gortz." Shulman called
1979 "a year of new beginnings,"
making reference to the recent
approval of a 99-year lease for
three acres of land (of the newly
acquired Federation property on
Haverhill Road) presented to the
Jewish Community Day School
and the recent dedication of that
land for construction of their new
facility. He also noted the estab-
lishment of a south county
division of the school.
"Two years ago," Shulman
continued, "under the leadership
of Stanley Brenner, the Fed-
eration board approved to take
the initial steps to plan for a
health-care facility for the Jewish
aged here in Palm Beach
County." As a result of this
action, Shulman announced that
over the past year the Federation
has entered into "an agreement
with the Douglas Gardens Jewish
Home in Miami for their tech-
nical assistance in helping to plan
for the nursing home facility. At
the last Federation Board
meeting approval was given for
the filing of a Certificate of Need
to establish a 120-bed total health
care facility "to be constructed
on the Haverhill site."
Other successful programs of
the past year which Shulman
cited included Mosaic the Fed-
eration sponsored television
program on WPTV-Channel 5.
which has been extended to a 52-
Cootinued on Page 8
By WENDY ELLIM AN
This year marks the centennial
of the birth of Albert Einstein,
.and academic institutions
i throughout the world are vying
Blum
Rejects^
Waldheim
Request
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim is seeking a "counter
gesture" on the part of Israel in
the wake of an announcement by
the Palestine Liberation
Organization that it began
closing down its offices in the
port town of Tyre and pulling its
members out of villages in south
ebanon to head off Israeli st-
acks against Lebanese civilians.
According to the spokesman
for the Israeli UN Mission,
Waldheim made his request in a
meeting with Israel's UN
Ambassador Yehuda Blum.
During this meeting, which
lasted an hour, the Israeli envoy
told Waldheim the PLO an-
nouncement cannot be considered
a gesture."
THE ANNOUNCED decision
of the PLO to withdraw from
south Lebanon, Blum contended,
"is a result of the Israeli activity
in the area of the city of Tyre,
which brought pressure from the
cal populace to remove the
terrorists from the i
to outdo one another in paying
him tribute. Einstein was born in
Ulm, Germany, on March 14,
1879.
One of the largest com-
memorations was in Jerusalem,
as Israel claims a special
association with the Jewish
scientist. Einstein joined the
Zionist movement in 1919, and
until his death in 1955 he lent his
name, time, and sasfgios to the
Zionist cause.
He was a founder of Hebrew
University, and delivered a
deeply emotional inaugural
address there in 1923. In 1946, he
appeared with Chaim Weizmann
before the Anglo-American
Commission of Inquiry, adding
his enormous prestige to the plea
to lift restrictions on the im-
migration of Jews to Palestine.
And following the death of
Weizmann in 1952, Einstein was
invited to become the second
President of the State of Israel
an invitation which he declined.
EINSTEIN WAS born into an
assimilated Jewish family, and
spent much of his early life in
Switzerland. He did not become
Jewishly-aware until his mid-
thirties. "When I lived in
Switzerland. I did not realize my
Continued on Page 7
Negotiations Tough Enough
Stop Trying to Shape Autonomy Talks,
Sen. Church Warns Administration
By YITZHAK RAW
NEW YORK-(JTA) -
Sen. Frank Church (D.f
Idaho), chairman of the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, called on the
United States not to inter-
fere in the current nego-
tiations between Egypt and
Israel over autonomy for
the Palestinians in the
West Bank and Gaza.
"We have a duty to encourage
that process without inter-
ference," Church said in a speech
at the annual dinner and convo-
cation of Bar Ilan University at
the Pierre Hotel here.
HE ADDED: "Admittedly,
the opening positions axe far
apart, but compromise is the
meat of negotiations To try to
force any proposal upon Israel or
Egypt would surely redound to
our detriment as happened
during the one nearly fatal phase
of the post-Camp David talks. It
is imperative that we allow the
negotiations to proceed un-
hindered by any suspicion of par-
tiality. Let us respect," Church
continued, "not denigrate, the
political process in Israel where
major political decisions cannot
be taken by simple fiat."
But Church, noting the
"serious problem" facing Egyp-
tian President Anwar Sadat who
has been a subject of political and
economic pressures by the Arab
world as a result of Egypt's peace
agreement with Israel, said that
it is urgent that the U.S. will
solicit help "on a global scale" for
Egypt.
Church

Washington s Role
'Clarifications' Have
Happy Outcome
Blum also said, during hi*
conversation with the Secretary
General, that even after the
reported withdrawal from south
Lebanon by the PLO, terrorists
belonging to other terrorist
organizations will stay in the
area.
In addition, Blum pointed oat
e presence of "hundreds" of
terrorists in the area under
UNIFIL control in south
Lebanon.
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The "clarifications" between
Israel and the U.S. over Wash-
ington's role in the autonomy
talks appear to have had a happy
outcome. The U.S. reply to
Israel's queries on this issue was
transmitted to Prime Minister
Menachem Begin. High Israeli
sources said Jerusalem was
thoroughly satisfied with it
"The U.S. endorses oar
position entirely," one Cabinet
source told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency. A U.S. Em-
bassy spokesman in Tel Aviv
said that if Israel saw the U.S.
reply as endorsing its own
position he was delighted.
American sources appear to
feel that the American reply,
drafted by Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance, should be ac-
ceptable to both Israel and
Egypt Israel's position has been
that the U.S. role should be that
of "full participation" or "part-
ners" in the negotiations but not
a "party" to the eventual agree-
CoatinaedeaPaget
Visa Procedures Okayed
JERUSALEM (JTA) A system whereby
Israelis and Egyptians will be able to obtain visas to visit
each other's countries was agreed to during Foreign
Minister Moshe Dayan's talks with Egyptian officials in
Cairo..
The Foreign Ministry is expected to announce the
procedure here within the next few days.
A SPECIAL unit was established by the Ministry
here. Under the agreement it will act aa a "consulate" for
the Egyptian Foreign Ministry and pass on visa requests
to the authorities in Cairo. They in turn would be expected
to respond within 10 to 14 days.
A similar procedure would apply to Egyptians
seeking visas for Israel. The first Israeli tourists in fact,
arrived in Port Said over the weekend, all of them with
foreign passports in addition to their Israeli passports.
One young woman, however, had only an Israeli passport
but received an Egyptian entry visa nonetheless.


A-
-4.- -U>-U-.. .
- ---..
Pajre2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 29,1979
]
oi
C
P
jt
S
ai
C(
tl
n
tl
b
F
c
d
With (he :
Organizations
HADASSAH
The West Pahn Beach Chapter
of Hadassah had its first annual
installation of executive officers
on May 24 at the Sheraton Inn.
Terry Rap a port, president of
the Florida Region, was the
installing officer. Myra
Ohrenstine is president; Martha
Sheffrin, fund-raising vice presi-
dent; Pearl Weinstein, member-
ship vice president; Dorothy
Lieberman, education vice presi-
dent; and Mary Rodd, program
vice president; Rosalyn Wein-
shenker, financial secretary;
Laura London, recording sec-
retary; Dorothy Segelin, corres-
ponding secretary; and Lulu
Kahn, treasurer.
On Wednesday, Aug. 8,
Shalom Group will participate in
a luncheon and theater party,
sponsored by West Palm Beach
Chapter of Hadassah, at Royal
Palm Dinner Theatre. "Sound of
Music" will be presented, in
addition to a full smorgasbord
luncheon. Members and friends
are welcome. Contact Shalom
reservation chairwoman, Lillian
Schack.
Tikvah Group of Hadassah has
many events planned for the
coming months for members and
friends. Make your reservations
now for two already in the works.
On Wednesday, Aug. 8, Tikvah
Group will attend a matinee per-
formance of "Sound of Music*' at
the Royal Palm Dinner Theatre,
Boca Raton. Call Regina Parness
for details. Thanksgiving
weekend, the group will go to the
Algiers Hotel for four days. Call
Jeanne Raskin for details.
Sarah is known as Palm Beach
Region's elder stateswoman. She
has been a member of ORT for 37
years. She was president of the
Bronx Central Chapter for five
years, was the first Bronx Region
president and in 1959 was invited
to serve on the National Execu-
tive Committee.
She has served the organ-
ization in many capacities and
held many portfolios. She was
national financial secretary and
national vice president for four
years. She is Region health chair-
woman.
For Women's American ORT
the centennial year will be ob-
served from July 1 through June
30, 1980. The celebration will
continue through the 13th
national conference in October
1980.
Women's American ORT Palm
Beach Region held its fourth
annual Honor Roll Luncheon on
June 13 at the Breakers Hotel.
The event was attended by 550
women.
Among the guests was Mrs. D.
(Ruth) Rothfarb of Atlanta,
president of District. Sitting on
the dais with Mrs. Rothfarb was
Mrs. D. (Zelda) Magid, of Miami,
vice president of District VI;
Mrs. Murray (Bett) Jackel, newly
elected president of Palm Beach
Region; and chairman of the
Executive board Mrs. J.
(Carolyn) Ring.
Entertainment was supplied
by the Chase Federal Savings
and Loan Association, which pre-
sented Veronica McCormick and
Peter Fuchs. Peter is a pianist,
arranger and conductor. Veronica
is a singer and actress.
Beth David CO ilinnanJs me (front -ou: left to right) Julie Daniels, Jill Ross, Beth Gam, Julit
Stolzer, Douglas Silfen, Marc Sherman, Ian Fox and Richard StrassU (Back row, left to righ(
Rabbi William Marder Jnd Cantor Nicolas Fenakel. Photoby Lou Kiel
Confirmation Service at Temple Beth David
Confirmation ceremonies were
held at Temple Beth David of
Northern Palm Beach County on
Friday evening, June 1, cul-
minating the year-long study
during weekly classes with Rabbi
William Marder. The con-
firmation class included the
South County News
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
"On the Way Up" was the
theme for the Boca / Delray Sec-
tion of the National Council of
Jewish Women, Inc., at its third
installation luncheon at the Boca
West Club in Boca Raton.
Micky Salkind, National
Council's Washington represen-
tative, was the guest speaker.
Installation of the new officers of
the section was conducted by
Doris Singer, a NCJW Board
member, and a Southern District
vice president. Newly installed
were Helen Wexler as president,
and five vice presidents: Joy
Sarah Davidman
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Women's American ORT (Or-
ganization for Rehabilitation
through Training) joins the
Men's ORT in celebrating their
centennial year. Palm Beach
Region, the executive board of
ORT has appointed Mrs. Nathan
(Sarah) Davidman as "Centen-
nial Year" chairman.
Pictured above at the installation ceremonies of Women's
American ORT, Palm Beach Region are Mrs. Helen Wilkes,
mayor of West Palm Beach, at the lectern. Seated left to right
are Mrs. Harvey Cohen, past president; Mrs. Paul Jaspan,
chairman of the event; and Mrs. Murray Jackel, newly elected
president.
Investment Equity
Real Estate
DON VOGEL
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER SALESMAN
Residential-Condominium-lnvestmenl
2352 PGA Boulevard Business 626-5100
Palm Ben Gardens, Fla. 33410 Residence 622-4000
PHILIP WEINSTEIN, FD.
evitt memorial chapel
Mil OKEECHOBEE BLVD.. WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
PHONE NO. Mf-7M
i WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY, NOHTH MIAMI FL PHONE 949
217300
_
MM
nttLe CRk
BEDSPREAD
SAVE as much as 40%
On beautiful high puff outline
quilted, custom quality, bed
spreads NOW IN STOCK.
MO WAITING.
FREE GIR
with ,)d ,ind
bedspiead
. purchase
INTERIORS
... .
5 *
Cohen, Lisa Blumenthal, Maxine
Copulsky, Laurie Greene and
Helene Grantz. Secretaries are
Judy Bailyn. Karen Kaufman
and Sue Silver; and treasurer,
Ellen Hall. The three directors
are Tina Hersh, Mary Menkin
and Phyllis Lyons, the immediate
retiring president.
The luncheon was planned by
the chairperson of the day, Judy
Bailyn.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Delray Chapter, Women's
American ORT will meet
Wednesday, July 25 at 12:30
p.m.
following students: Julie Daniels,
Ian Fox, Beth Ganz, Jill Ross,
Douglas Silfen, Marc Sherman,
Julie Stolzer and Richard
Strassler.
The confimands participated in
the Friday evening service and
recited readings in both Hebrew
and English from classical
Jewish sources on the theme of
Shavuoth with Rabbi Marder
providing the narrative.
The students were presented
books consisting of two volumes
of the Jewish Catalogue as a gift
from the congregation. Con-
firmation certificates were pre-
sented by congregational vice
president Jack Kaplan. In ad-
dition, students of the Hebrew
School sang a medley of holiday
songs, under the direction of
Cantor Nicholas Fenakel. The
service was followed by a festive
Oneg Shabbat sponsored by the
families of the confirmed.
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a fami ly of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
Miami Beach/ Miami/ North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft.Lauderdale(Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
E3 Riverside
Memorial Chapel. Inc / Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Kenneth M.Kay/Arthur Grossberg/Joseph Rubin


Friday, June 29,1979
Th* Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Synagogue News
Pe 3
1
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
A joint installation of Temple
Beth David of Northern Palm
Beach County and Sisterhood
officers for 1979-80 will be held
during a brunch at the Colon-
nades Beach Hotel, Singer Island
on Sunday, July 1, at 11 a.m.
Rabbi William Marder, spir-
itual leader of the temple, will
install the following officers:
president, Howard Debs; vice
president, Jack Kaplan;
treasurer, Joseph Schiff; finan-
cial secretary, Barry Present;
recording secretary, Anne Sloop;
corresponding secretary, Lynn
Klinger; education, Irene Ber-
son; fund-raising (ways and
means), Martin Schwalberg;
membership, Dr. Stuart
Wanuck; building, Steven
Stolzer; house, Julius Priven;
ritual, Henry Gilbert; bulletin,
Naomi Rothstein; at large:
Martin Levine, Fred Berk, Sey-
mour Fine, Gary Samwick,
Leonard Oilman and Leon Sch-
wartz.
Sisterhood Officers are: presi-
dent, Louise Ross; vice president,
program, Helen Schwalberg; vice
presidents membership, Merry
Kaplan, Carol Gay; vice presi-
dents ways and means, Marilyn
Dias, Susan Mark; vice presi-
dents youth, Marjorie Wolfson,
Esther Kosowski; corresponding
secretary, Karen Wanuck;
recording secretary, Sheila Debs;
financial secretary, Marlene
Rudner; treasurer, Marilyn
Samwick; parliamentarian,
Conine Kaplan; D'var Torah
Carol Schiff; hospitality, Marilyn
Malmad; Oneg Shabbat, Marion
Block; publicity, Roberta Strass-
ler; telephone Evelyn Jacobs;
donor Sharon Chaitman; sun-
shine fund, Lynn Klinger; gift
shop, Vivian Ganz, Renee Tare,
Carol Coopersmith; School Com-
mittee, Sheila Debs; social ac-
tion, Deena Gordon; Jewish
family living, Mimi Marder; ad-
visors, Molly Fenakel, Thelma
Miller.
The public is invited. Call Mrs.
Marion Block, chairman of the
day.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Temple Beth Shalom of Lake
Worth reached another milestone
this Shavuoth. On June 1 it grad-
uated its largest class of con-
firmands. The confirmation and
Sabbath Eve services were con-
ducted by the confirmands.
Confirmands were Randi
Crane, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Barry Crane; Sharon Kovner,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney
Kovner; Rona, Gabrielle and
Sheryl Herman, triplet daughters
of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Her-
man; and Mark Shalloway, son of
Judge and Mrs. Michael
Shalloway.
The reading and staging of the
Ten Commandments were done
by the confirmands and the entire
tableau was created by and under
the leadership of Rabbi Emanuel
Eisenberg.
Milton Freedman, president of
Temple Beth Shalom, delivered a
short message to the young
people and presented them with
certificates and copies of the
Holy Scriptures.
Judge Hal Cohen, speaker of
the evening, presented the Neyr
Tamid Award, the Boy Scouts
Religious Medal, to Mark
Shalloway.
Following the services, the
members of the congregation
were guests of the parents of the
confirmands at a kiddush.
Tlariflt^ionsVHave Happy Outcome
Continued from Page 1
ment or to its subsequent imple-
mentation.
THE ISSUE came up during
the first working session of the
autonomy talks in Alexandria.
Egypt's Minister of State for
Foreign Affairs, Butros Ghali.
seemed to suggest that the U.S.
would be a party to the nego-
tiations and also involved closely
in the implementation of the
eventual agreement. Ghalil built
his thesis on the phrase "par-
ticipate fully in all stages of the
negotiations" in the "joint
letter" that accompanied the
peace treaty.
But Israeli negotiators Yosef
Burg, Moshe Dayan and Shmuel
Tamir immediately rejected this
reading, pointing out that the
Camp David framework implies a
role of participation but not of
party, for the U.S. What would
happen, Dayan asked the Egyp-
tians, if Israel and Egypt agreed
over some point and the U.S., as
a "party,' imposed a "veto?"
Dayan demanded that the U.S.
clarify its position before the
talks proceed further.
Officials of the three
delegations are due to meet in
Herzliya to work on the agenda
for the talks. The next plenary
session has been tentatively set
for June 25, also at Herzliya.
CljapelS
SER VING SOUTH FLORIDA AND ALL 50 STA TES.
DADE
861-7301
BROWARD
742-6000
PALM BEACH
833-0887
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale (Sunrise), Florida 33313
2305 We$t Hilltboro Boulevard
Deer field Beach. Florida 33441
5915 Park Drive al C.S. 441
Margate, Florida 33063
KIRSCHENBAUM BROS.. INC.
New York
REPRESENTING
PISER MEMORIAL CHAPELS
Chicago
STANETSKY* SCHLOSSBERG SOLOMON
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
Boston
m mmytm ivron rieligious School presents a $100 check to the Jewish Federation. Pictured are
(left to right) Dr. Richard Shugarman, associate campaign chairman; Dr. Jeffrey Faivus, chair-
man of the temple's religious school committee; Jason Horowitz, representing the religoius
school tzedaka council; Rabbi Joel Levine; and Michael Small, Temple Israel president. The
funds were raised by the temple's students during their annual tzedaka campaign.
Rabbi Fischer Heads Florida Hillel
WASHINGTON Rabbi
Frank A. Fischer has been ap-
pointed executive director of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Jewish
Students Centers of Greater
Miami and the Hillel Foun-
dations of Florida, Rabbi Oscar
Groner, international director of
the Jewish student movement,
and Joel Karpay, chairman of the
Hillel board of governors for
Florida, have announced.
He succeeds Rabbi Stanley A.
Ringler, who has been named
national director for community
affairs and development for Hillel
in Washington.
Rabbi Fischer, 48, has been
with Hillel for 16 years, serving
as director at Brooklyn College,
the University of Georgia and
most recently at Hofstra Univer-
sity. While in Georgia, he was
also a pulpit rabbi.
During that period, he was a
member of the faculty of the
National Hillel Summer Institute
and since 1971 has served as
rabbi for B'nai B'rith Perlman
Camp at Starlight, Pa.
He is president of the Inter-
national Association of Hillel
Directors; a member of the exec-
utive committee of the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Commission, the
board of directors of Brooklyn
College's Alumni Association
and the board of trustees of the
Brandeis School of Lawrence,
N.Y. He is a member of the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis and the Rabbinical
Assembly of America.
Rabbi Fischer, who is a native
of Germany, received his BA
degree from Brooklyn College
and his MA from Hebrew Union
College, from which he was or-
dained in 1962.
lr%
ov'
MASTECTOMY
Professional Fittings
In our Knoche-Mastactomy
Salons:
Holiday Inn-lslamorada
Mile Marker 80
Wed. June 27 3:00 p.m.
*+'
&>
V*".
m
L
>

%.-
*
A Completely Realistic
Breast Prosthesis
Holiday Inn-Plantation
1711 North University Drive
Thurs. June 28 3:00 p.m.
THE NEW KNOCHE
NATURAL BREAST
PROSTHESIS
Looks and feels so very natural
nipple, areola, weight, shape and
color. You forget you are wearing a
prosthesis! Totally different not
fluid filled wear in regular or sheer
bra. (No special pocket needed.)
Available in three skin colors and in
sizes 26 50. Won't slip or press on scar
no heat buildup. Will not absorb
water. Fantastic for swimming,
tennis and other sports. Also ideal for
the underdeveloped woman four
year guarantee.
UNO
Sat AM 0FF
*3UT~ Introductory Otter
IN ORLANDO AREA Call: (305) 855-6886
Visit the Salon without obligation.
OR FOR PRIVATE FITTING
in your home call
MIAMI 667-9866
POMPANO BEACH 428-2629
NEW exclusive patent custom made
prosthesis made with the Knoche
impression material for the very
radical surgery. By Appt only.
TAX FREE BONDS'
AA RATED-7.00%
(Standard and Poors)
Rating
Free of federal income tax
J.B. HANAUER AND COMPANY
211 Royal Poinciana Way
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
ATTN: Mr. Rabin
3 Please tend your brochure on tax-tree municipal bonds
Address
ZIP
City.
Tel at
tjtmmomi NASD yk
See us dotty
at 4 45 PM
on Channel 51
cJbVi
|MUNlClPAl BOND
SPECIALISTS SINCE W3t
I65&3300



VlWlUi-J x\:,..-. ..

Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 29,1979
What Happened to POC's?
The report by Robert Hawke, president of the
Australian Council of Trade Unions, that he was told
by Aleksei Shibayev, the Soviet trade union chief,
that the USSR will ease emigration restrictions and
release the Soviet Jewish Prisoners of Conscience
still in prison, has raised hopes in the Jewish com-
munity. Whether they are true or false hopes still
remains to be seen.
Hawke revealed the statement to Moscow
Jewish activists who released the news. But since
then, other Jewish activists in the Soviet Union have
said they were told by an Interior Ministry official
that no one had been authorized to make such a
statement.
At the same time, it is hard to believe that a
Soviet trade union leader would make such a
statement to a foreigner unless he had some official
authority. Observers have also speculated that the
information was given in preparation for Soviet
President Leonid Brezhnev's meeting with President
Carter in Vienna and as part of the Soviet effort to
get United States trade benefits in compliance with
the Jackson-Vanik Amendment which conditions
this on the USSR easing its emigration policies.
Turning the Clock Backward
The point is increasingly being made, and with
growing justification, that the United States effort to
dictate peace terms in the Middle East that are
detrimental to Israel's survival has only just begun.
There were clear indications of this tendency,
not only in the State Department where one would
most likely expect it, but in the Carter ad-
ministration as well, from the earliest days of the
Camp David meetings between Israel and Egypt.
But as the current talks between the two
countires over the autonomy issue are getting under
way, the tendency now seems to have become a frank
bludgeon of intent.
As retired Admiral Elmo Zumwalt is noting
these days, we are submitting to the crassest
possible petroblackmail and are clearly willing to
sink Israel and to rely on our capacity to build up the
Arabs militarily as an alternative agent for our need
for an American presence in the Middle East.
This is not only suicidal to Israel by definition;
it is also suicidal to our own best interests by past
experience with Arab capabilities, let alone Arab
reliability in the long term.
Selfish American Motives
The major issue, of course, goes beyond this.
And that is that there is every indication that
Egypt's President Sadat is far more amenable to
settling the Gaza-West Bank autonomy question
along lines favorable to the Israeli position this in
the face of his desire to convince his Arab brethren
that he is pursuing Palestinian demands than is
apparent on the face of it.
But continuing American obsequiousness before
Arab petroblackmail encourages Sadat away from
the more realistic view of the autonomy problem.
In the end, the realpolitik of both Israel and
Egypt has progressed far beyond the selfish
motivation of American foreign policy in the Middle
East. In attempting to impose its own terms on a
settlement, the U.S. is turning the clock back and not
forward.
Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE and "FEDERATION REPORTER
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Oountv. Inc
Combined Jewish Appeal
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
3300 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. Flu 33432 Phone 368 3001
Printing Office 120 N.E 6th St.. Miami. Fla. 331S2 Phone 373 4605
FRED K SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
RONNITARTAKOW
News Coordinator
MORTON GILBERT Advertising Representative
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
FORM 3S78 returns to The Jewish Floridian
3200 North Federal Highway, Boca Raton. Fla C
Published Bl-Weekly
S 864303
Second Class PosUge Paid at Boca Raton, Fla
Federation officers: President. Alan L. Shulman; Vice Presidents: Dr. Richard
Shugarman. Dr. Howard Kay. Kenneth Scherer, Jeanne Levy. Jerome Tlshman,
Treasurer: Stacl Lesser: Secretary: Bruce J. Daniels; Executive Director,
Norman J. Schlmelman. Submit material for publication to Ronnl TarUkow,
Director of Public Relations
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year W.SO, or by "m*r*,,'P1,0
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, 2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, west Palm
^toajaja^ssVJssssssssssssWssssVsssssViAati
OCONOMOWOC, Wise. -
Moved by the presence and mes-
sage of freed Soviet Jewish
Prisoner of Conscience Mark
Dymshitz and stirred by a hard-
hitting presentation on the cost
of the peace process to Israel's
people by former Ambassador
Simcha Dinitz, 150 members of
the United Jewish Appeal
National Campaign Policy Board
concluded a two-day annual
meeting here recently with
pledges of significantly increased
giving to the 1980 UJA cam-
paign.
"In setting this high standard
for the coming campaign," UJA
national chairman Irwin S. Field
declared, "our leadership is
giving spirited advance notice of
the crucial nature of the Jewish
imperatives involved." To meet
heightened needs at home and
overseas, he reported, the
national leadership group was
projecting a 1980 drive calling for
an additional sum in the regular
campaign currently estimated at
about $80 million, and a
minimum of $40 million for the
crucial social rehabilitation
programs of Project Renewal.
Sources of heightened need
identified by the Policy Board in
an intensive round of workshops
and discussions, according to
Field, are: the high cost in Israel
of human redeployment and
social readjustments flowing
from the peace treaty with
Egypt; greatly increased Soviet
Jewish emigration to Israel and
the U.S., and severe inflationary
pressures in both countries.
AMONG the representatives
from cities throughout the nation
from all eight UJA regions were
seven leaders from the Florida
Region Charles Rutenberg of
Pinellas County, 1978 Regional
Chairman; Frank Beckerman of
Hollywood; Irwin Levy of Palm
Beach; Norman H. Lipoff of
Miami; Robert Russell of Miami;
Kenneth J. Schwartz of Holly-
wood; and Alan L. Shulman of
Palm Beach.
In a dramatic and highly
emotional plenary session led by
UJA national vice chairman
James L. Weinberg of New York,
Mark Dymshitz described his
years of imprisonment and ex-
pressed warm appreciation for
American Jewry's supportive
actions which, he said, helped
sustain him during his confine-
ment and aided in the process of
gaining his freedom.
"The struggle to liberate
Soviet Jewry is not ended," he


I

\
Mark Dymshitz (second from left) inspired a meeting of 150
members of the United Jewish Appeal National Campaign
Policy Board recently. The recently released Soviet Jewish
Prisoner of Conscience called for a continuation of the struggle
to liberate Soviet Jewry. With Dymshitz are (left to right)
Irwin S. Field, UJA national chairman; James L. Weinberg of
New York, national vice chairman; and Irving Bernstein,
executive vice chairman.
support for Project Renewal, the
comprehensive program to re-
habilitate the lives of 300,000
residents of Israel's distressed
immigrant neighborhoods. The
session was featured by a report
from Robert Russell of Miami,
chairman of the UJA National
Project Renewal Coordinating
Committee, on his recent on-the-
scene review of the program in
Israel. Grass roots social plan-
ning in the neighborhoods, he
indicated, is producing visible
results and raising hopes which
must be fulfilled swiftly and
decisively through community
Project Renewal campaigns.
Russell was supported in his
presentation by Eliezer Rafael i.
director-general of the Jewish
Agency Project Renewal Depart-
ment; and Dov Sinai, national
coordinator of Project Renewal.
Five workshop sessions de-
veloping plans for the 1980 cam-
paign resulted in projections for
an earlier start, parallel efforts at
all levels of giving, increased
mass campaigning and inten-
sified programs of solicitor
training and education in key
issues and basic Jewish values.
UJA national vice chairman Joel
Breslau of Washington, D.C.
presented the coordinated work-
shop report and led the ensuing
discussion. Workshops were con-
ducted by national vice chairmen
Daniel M. Honigman of Detroit.
Robert E. Loup of Denver, Neil J.
Norry of Rochester, H. Paul
Rosenberg of Kansas City and
Herbert J. Solomon of San Diego.
OTHER highlights of the
annual meeting included a report
Continued on Page 7
declared. "Many of my friends
are still in jail or in the camps.
Hundreds of Jews in the Soviet
Union are still refused visas to
Israel. When our children refuse
to serve in the Red Army, they
are being sent to jail for several
years. Our fight for freedom goes
on."
Dymshitz, who has begun a
new life in Israel after rejoining
his wife and two daughters,
called for added campaign
support to strengthen Jewish
Agency absorption programs.
Earlier, the director-general of
the agency's Immigration and
Absorption Department, Yehuda
Dominitz, outlined the challenge
of resettling more than 35,000
immigrants expected to arrive in
Israel in the next 12 months,
largely from the Soviet Union
and other areas of Jewish
distress. Akiva Kohane, co-
ordinator of East European Mi-
gration Affairs of the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee, added an
account of growing Soviet Jewish
transmigration needs in Italy.
FORMER Ambassador Dinitz,
while welcoming the opportunity
for peace afforded by the treaty
with Egypt, stressed the chal-
lenges created for Israel's people.
"The months ahead," he
declared, "particularly as we
move into 1980, will be a decisive
era which will shape the resilience
of Israel's society and test our
capacity to withstand the costs
and pressures of peace, to survive
as a nation and to mature as a
people."
An extended plenary session
was devoted to another major
1980 challenge increased
Increased Pledges Promised "
Washington Savings.
Unbeatable Rates
and a Free Gift too!
Washington Savings
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
ASSETS EXCEED $950,000,000
CONVENIENT OFFICES SERVING VOU IN FLORIDA

MIAMI REACH
1701 Meridian Avenue/674-6612
1234 Washington Avenue/674-6550
1133 Normandy Dnve/674-6563
1500 Bay Road/67 3-8306
517 Arthur Godfrey Road/6 74-67K)
810 Lincoln Road/674 6868
NORTH MIAMI REACH
633 N.E 167th Street/652 9200
2221 N.E. 164th Street/940-3975
CORAL GABLES
520 Biltmore Way/445-7905
BAY HARBOR ISLANDS
1160 Kane Concourse/865 4344
HOLLYWOOD
450 North Park Road/981 9192
OCA RATON
899 E Palmetto Park Road/391 8903
WEST FALM REACH
4766 Okeechobee Blvd /686-7770
VOUB ACCOUW IS NSUQED UP to 540 000 BY AN AGENCY Of THE EEDERAl GOVERNMENT
RfMRRssR
"R""BM
7
fa



Friday, June 29, 1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
PRE SCHOOL AND
KINDERGARTEN PROGRAM
Registration is underway for
the 1979-80 school year. Call
Frances Witt, who has charge of
programs to insure a place for
your child.
ADULT PROGRAMS
Slimnaatics: Exercise to Music
with Irene Genovi every Tuesday
and Thursday from 7:30 to 8:30
p.m. There will be two sessions:
16 sessions twice a week for eight
weeks and eight sessions once a
week for eight weeks. For further
information, contact the center.
Disco: Disco with Ron Schen-
berg. Beginners will meet from 7
to 8 p.m. and Advanced Classes
8:15 to 9:15 p.m.
Sunday Nite Bridge: Duplicate
Bridge with Al Merion is played
every Sunday at 7 p.m. A game
home-style bridge,
Jewish Community Center Presents
County consumer affairs, will
open the series.
July 19, 1:30-3:30 p.m.: "You
and Your Legal Rights" Alan
Bernstein, attorney.
Adult Community Education
Classes have ended for the
summer but will resume in
September. Classes will be an-
nounced in August.
Medicare Assistance in filling
out forms and obtaining in-
formation is available at the
Comprehensive Senior Service
Center on the third Monday of
the month. In July it will take
place on the 16th from 1-3 p.m.
This is the first volunteer pro-
gram of this type in the country,
and other states are looking at
the West Palm Beach area as a
model. Morris Rosen and Carl
Sitzer, chairpersons, and their
committee who work with th
Calling All Men: Round Table
grourtr,ecomnp^ivea than focial Security Office provide al,
^plicate bridge, also is played. SVediSS. """ W"
Single Parent Get-Together:
Plans are being formulated. Call
the center and ask for Hal
Farancz for details.
Men's Athletic Council: Joe
Karp, chairman, announces that
the Softball League meets every
Sunday at Lake Lytle Park at
8:30 a.m. All players are wel-
comed. (Meet at Field No. 3.)
Women's League News: Plans
for a family weekend at Marco
Island are being made by the
Women's League. Contact
Michele Schweiger for in-
formation.
SENIOR NEWS
The Comprehensive Senior
Service Center Summer Pro-
gram: Jean Rubin, director,
invites you to stop by at the
CSSC during the summer. Lec-
tures, discussion groups, films
and meetings will be on-going. A
new series, "The Power of the
Senior Consumer," will be offered
each Thursday beginning July
12.
Watch for special musical
afternoons of George Gershwin,
Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, etc.
Sunday for Seniors meets every
second and fourth Sunday. The
Second Tuesday Club will be
active with meetings, trips and
flea market.
PROJECT GOOD HEALTH
will meet July 5 with guest
speaker Steven Levitt, director of
the Jewish Family & Children
Services. His topic: "J.F.C.S. &
You."
Personnel Life History Class is
held on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. in
the Senior Center. The instructor
is Jean Scher. Students are
joining with thousands of older
adults in Florida who are record-
ing their personal life histories
and experiences to share with
their family and friends. The
class will be over on July 18.
THE POWER OF THE
SENIOR CONSUMER A new
series to make seniors become
knowledgeable about misrep-
resentations, injustices and pos-
sible fraud that the average con-
sumer might meet in his every-
day living.
July 12, 1:30-3:30 p.m.: "Con-
sumer Affairs," Mrs. Alice
Skaggs. director of Palm Beach
oTeNING JUNE 28 SPECIAL
Talk with Marshall Dan will meet
every Monday afternoon from
1:30-3:30 p.m. This is the first all
male activity at the Senior
Center.
Second Tuesday Club: Sam
Rubin, president, announces the
regular meeting for the Second
Tuesday Club will be held on
Tuesday, July 10, at 1 p.m.
Everyone is welcome.
Artist of the Month: Esther
Molat, chairperson, announces
Sam Schwartz will be the Artist
for the Month of July. Schwartz
specializes in black and white,
graphics, watercolors, scratch
board work, charcoals and every
medium. Stop by and view his
works at the center, Monday-Fri-
day, from 9 a.m. -5 p.m.
SENIOR NEWS
Transportation is available
from the Comprehensive Senior
Service Center, Monday Friday,
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., within the desig-
nated area for transit dis-
advantaged seniors, 60 years or
older, to go to doctors' offices,
dentists, lawyers, social service
agencies, nutrition sites, and food
shopping. Call the center for
further information.
TRIPS
On July 18 join the crowd for
"Musicana," a night of music
and entertainment. The buses
will leave from the clubhouse ot
Century Village and the Jewish
Community Center.
Dec. 2 5, join the group at the
Lido Spa. Call the center and ask
for Bonnie.
Another trip to Sarasota is
planned for Aug. 10, 11, and
return to West Palm Beach on
Aug. 12. The Asolo Theatre
presents on Friday evening
"History of the American
Theatre," a comedy, and on
Saturday, "The Cherry
Orchard," a drama. Call the
center and ask for Bonnie.
Philip Weinstein of the Levitt Memorial Chapel presents U.S.
Savings Bond awards in the Israel Projects Fair to two of the
first prize winners, Anita Karney of Palm Beach Gardens High
School in the high school division and Rena Horowitz of the
Jewish Community Day School in the junior high division.
Kristinr alacious of the Westward School won first prize in the
eiemcuary division. The class award went to Mrs. Phyllis
V gan's seventh grade at Temple Beth Ets Religious School
dl participants will receive 5739 Israel coin proof sets on order
,rom Israel Mordecai Levow, director of the JCDS, was the
chairman of the Israel Projects Fair for the Israel Independence
Day Committee.
Mordecai Levow, director of the Jewish Community Day
School; Philip Weinstein of Levitt Memorial Chapel; Susan
Tenzer, Sharon Frankel, and Lisa Simon, seventh and eighth
grade students; watch as Rabbi William Marder and Mitchell
Frank cover the "Sheimos," or sacred remnants, at a special
burial ceremony, held recently at the dedicated Garden of
David at the Royal Memorial Park. Rabbi Marder explained to
the students the reverence for sacred texts and religious objects
inherent in Judaism. The event was arranged through the
cooperation of the Rabbinical Council, the Jewish Cemetery
Association and the Levitt Memorial Chapel.
Under The Supervision
Of Rabbinical Council
Of The Palm Beachea
Dally Supervision of
Rabbi Shapiro
"THE NEW I MAGE"
,Gentun?
Open*-7
MetvThurt
SFri
-4 Sun.
Closed Sat.
4774 OIHCNOM HVD., WIST f AIM IE ACM
Between Military Trail HavrrhUI In the Mint-Mall
THE MOST MODERN & OOMPLETE KOSHER SUPERMARKET
'23
*
Pc Ptison
OoyHi Occupmcv
70 Of 145 Room*
10 AUGUST 23
5% DISCOUNT FOR 14 MY STAY
2 GREAT KOSHER MEALS
LUNCHEON SNACK DAILY
CHILDREN'S DAY CAMP
MANY ARTS A CRAFTS
CALL (305)866-8831
SIJitiAM'MVil
DAVID ROfMI'l
ItMWNtl M MSMhJTN r>M ft. !""
0s tat 0c.au H 7th Strut
Miami Mick. Florid 33141
HIGH HOLY DAYS SEPT. Zf-OCT. 2
WAXtM
1000/0 FREEZE DRIED COFFEE
Rich ground aroma and
the fresh perked taste,
right for any occasion.
Maxim tastes so close to fresh-perked coffee that
every Jewish woman can take pride in serving it
to her family and guests.
K Certified Kosher

IIHHniTiTnml
liliiiMiiHIIIMI
$L*h Period feste
IliilHI
sr^
nil
pll
infill
ioo" freeze~drid < offer



m.-; iv.in
Page 6
The Jewish Fbridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 29,1979
At A Ion Moreh
3,000 Peace Demonstrators
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Some
3,000 angry members of the
Peace Now Movement encircled
the controversial new Gush
Emunim settlement of Alon
Moreh on the West Bank near
Nablus to protest its sanction by
the government and ex-
propriation of Arab lands.
The demonstrators, who came
by bus and private car from
cities, towns and kibbutzim,
blocked a newly-carved access
road to the hilltop site with large
boulders. They dispersed
peacefully after Defense Minister
Ezer Weizman flew to the scene,
agreed that they had a right to
protest, but convinced them to
move their demonstration to
Jerusalem that night.
THE PEACE NOW group
charged that the settlement could
have adverse effects on the peace
process and accused the
government of acting clan-
destinely and in great haste to
erect the settlement because it
was aware of the opposition on
the part of a large segment of the
Tune in
'Mosaic9
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TUNE IN TO MOSAIC
"Mosaic," Jewish Federation's sponsored program
is aired on
Sunday mornings over WPTV Channel 5, at 9 a.m. with
hosts Barbara Shulman and Steve Gordon.
PROGRAM SCHEDULE
Sunday, July 1 Temple Beth El
<>
population.
Alon Moreh was approved by a
majority of the Cabinet a week
ago, and the first settlers all
men who left their wives and
children at home for the time
being were at the site
bulldozing the land and erecting
temporary shelters. Tents were
provided by the army.
In their exchange with
Weizman, the protestors
declared, "This is not our con-
ception of settlement." But the
Defense Minister, who was one of
the Cabinet minority who op-
posed Alon Moreh, told them
that it was an accomplished fact
since the government has decreed
it.
WORK CONTINUED on the
site following a meeting of the
government-Jewish Agency
coordinating committee which
added its approval to that of the
Cabinet.
The Military Governor
declared the new settlement
closed but not before the Peace
Now demonstrators reached the
site in an organized but secret
operation similar to the Gush's
own tactics in the past.
Troops were sent to prevent
confrontations between the
protestors and the settlers. The
latter, apparently secure in the
knowledge that they had the
backing of the government and
the army, observed the Sabbath
quietly. They hinted, however,
that they would have called in
Gush reinforcements had it not
been the Sabbath.
THE KIBBUTZ ARTZI
Law School Grad
Alice S. Harary of West Palm
Beach was among the first grad-
uates of Yeshiva University's
Benjamin N. Cardozo School of
Law at its first commencement
June 10 in Manhattan's
Washington Heights.
Jewish Community Center
of the Palm Beaches, Inc.
Summer Programs
COUNTRY DAY CAMP: Ayes 5-12 Camp Shdlom. locnt*d one mile West
of lliu Turnpike on Belvedfcre Road is a sprawling 18 acre site
C.A.P.A.: Ages 14 A Creative h Performing Arts Program designed
to develop your child's special skills in Drama. Dance. Music. Voice. Art ft
Costume, under professional supervision.
PKi-SCUOOL: Ages 2% 4 Parents have choice of the Jewish Community
Center's facilities at 2410 Okeechobee Blvd. or Camp Shalom.
C.A.T. PROGRAM: Ages 13 15 This program is for mature boys and girls who
will at least be entering 8th Grade.
TEEN TRAVEL: Age* 13-18 Featuring two three week trips to places North
and West.
CAMP FEES
r--------------------- Camp Shalom 'J 15 A M 3 45 PM. 1 Ueels SI35 00 S.'Ci on Reg. hee 8 IVaaka S25500 $40 00 Keg Fee
CAP A. 9 15AM 1 5 I'M Not Available I9S.00 40 00 Keg Fee
Prc-Sr.hnol Cimp A 45 A M .1 00 P M 135 00 t 20.00 Reg. Fee 25500 40 00 Reg Fee
CAT 915 AM 1-4SP.M Not Available NoFm
Teen Travel To be Announced
for information and applications
please call 689-7700'
movement released a statement
protesting the settlement as did a
group of 11 Knesset members,
among them former Foreign
Minister Abba Eban of the Labor
Party, Hillel Seidel of Likud and
David Glass and Abraham
Melamed of the National
Religious Party.
The Labor Alignment also
denounced the new settlement as
another instance in which the
government has surrendered to
the demands of the militant
Orthodox Gush and other groups
"which do not conceal their aim
to undermine the peace
agreement" with Egypt.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
ORTHODOX
Aitz Choim Congregation Century Village
W. Palm Beach. Telephone: 689-4675. Sabbath Services 9 a.m. and
7:30 p.m. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 6 p.m.
REFORM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407 833-
8421 Rabbi Irvinq B Cohen Joel L. Levine, Associate Rabbi
Sabbath Worship Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday Torah
Seminars at 10:30 a. m
TIMPIF RFTH EL OF FtOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, PI. 33432 391-8900 Rabbi
Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath services, Friday at
8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah Study with Rabbi Merle E.
Singer 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Service
INF RrH)WV HfttE* <(HiT.eFr.MION OF OilHAT
At St. Pauls Episcopal Church, 188 So. Swinton Ave., Delray* Friday
at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver President Jerome Gilbert -499-
5563
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Sabbath Services, Friday ot 8:15 p.m.
At St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd. and
Wellington Trace Mailing Address: 11686 Laurel Valley Circle,
West Palm Beach, Fl. 33411 President Joan Moskowitz 793-2700
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
THE FREE SYNAGOGUE, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton, Florida 33432 368-
1600, 391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 8:15 p.m. at
Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West, Glades Rd. (1 Mile
West of Boca Turnpike)
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fl. 33407 fl33-0339
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan at 8:15
a.m., Sunday at 9a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SH0L0M
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 684-3212 Office
hours 9 a.m. o 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z Schectman Cantor Arthur
B. Rosenwasser Services: Daily 8:30 a.m., 7:30 p.m., Friday 8:30
a.m., 5 p.m.; Friday late service 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 8:30 a.m., 7
p.m.
CONGREGATION BETH K0DESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. 732-2555 Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin Sabbath'
Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Congregational
Church, 115 N. Federal Highway.
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
315 N. "A" St., Lake Worth, Fl. 33460 585-5020 Rabbi Emanuel
Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Services: Mondays and Thursdays
at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services, Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10 a.m. West-
minister Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach
Gardens, 321 Northlake Blvd., North Palm Beach, Fl. 33408 Ph.
845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
224 N.W. Avenue "G", Belle Glade, Fl. 33430
Cantor Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
Jock Stateman,
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeida Drive, Palm Springs, Fl. 33461 Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. President Barnett Briskman,
967-4962 Mondays and Thursdays at 9 a. m. Services held at Faith
United Presbyterian Church, Palm Springs.
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4lh Ave., Boca Raton, Fl. 33432 392-8566 Rabbi
Nathan Zelizer Sabbath Services: Friday ot 8:15p.m., Saturdays at
9:30a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE
DILRAY HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, Fl. 33446 276-3536
Morris Silberman, Rabbi Leonard Price, Cantor Sabbath Service*:
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Daily minyans at 8:45 a.m.
and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Rood, Palm Beach, Fl. 33480 832-0804 Cantor
David Dardashti Sabbath Service*: Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturday at
*


.29.1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
m
Page 7
P5^
e

"*r
E
X
I Rabbi Eisenberg Attends
I Israel Bond Conference
\Community Day School pre-kindergarten students complete Sabbath unit at a Shabbat
ymplete with the homemade challah.
linstein Recalled as Devoted Jew
itinued from Page 1
he later recalled.
/as nothing that called
ty Jewish sentiments in
that changed when I
Berlin-
climate in Berlin in the
ras one of growing anti-
and Einstein's Jewish
was to a considerable
a reaction to the in-
;ly hostile environment.
|escribed "the grim hatred
Jews prevailing in Ger-
lat the present with such
and in 1924 took what he
to be the moral stand of
the Berlin Jewish
unity as a dues-paying
r.
stein's Judaism was not,
er, traditional. It was in
|>art a projection of his own
pacifist, and socialist
"What unites the Jews,"
|te in 1938, "and has united
>r thousands of years, is in
st place a democratic ideal
al justice, and the idea of
|igalion to mutual help and
nee amongst all mankind.
>nd characteristic trait of
tradition is their high
for every kind of in-
itial endeavor and mental
WAS the universality of
that appealed to Kin-
most strongly. "Judaism
to be concerned almost
sively with the moral at-
in life and to life. The
tit of knowledge for its own
1 an almost fanatical love of
and the desire for per-
independenoe these are
I features of the Jewish
Lion that make me thank my
(that I belong to it."
:reasingly Einstein's
lification with Judaism led
him to Zionism. Starting in 1919,
the Zionists seized the op-
portunity to enlist his magnetism
and fame in their cause. They
convinced him of the vital
necessity of a corporate national
existence for the Jews, and
Einstein became a dedicated (if
qualified) Zionist even though his
version of the creed never quite
coincided with Zionist orthodoxy.
He regarded the growth of
Jewish self-assertion as "being in
the interests of non-Jews as well
as Jews. Zionism involves a
creative function which should
enrich mankind at large."
HE RECONCILED his in-
volvement in Zionism with his
anti-nationalist views by
stressing Palestine as a cultural
center rather than a political
state. As late as 1932, Einstein
still declared himself to be "a
passionate pacifist and anti-
militarist (who opposed)
nationalism even though in the
guise of patriotism."
In 1946, he told the National
Working Committee for
Palestine, "My awareness of the
essential nature of Judaism is
opposed to the idea of a Jewish
state with borders, an army and a
measure of temporal power, no
matter how modest. I am afraid
of the inner damage Judaism will
sustain especially from the
development of a narrow
nationalism within our own
ranks."
The problem of the Palestinian
Arabs and the increasing enmity
between Jew and Arab in
Palestine were of the utmost
concern to him. In 1929 he
asserted: "We shall be able to
establish a friendly and con-
structive cooperation with the
kindred Arab race which will be a
blessing to both sections of the
Increased Pledges Promised
Continued from Page 4
! national vice chairman
Ichel W. Blumberg of
tiington, D.C. in behalf of
president Frank R. Lauten-
who was away in Europe,
Ihe activities of the UJA
of Directors, featuring
taken to strengthen cam-
policy and practices, and to
en community leadership
cipation in the UJA cor-
structure; a presentation
He UJA budget for 1979 by
ander Grass of Harrisburg,
who is chairman of the
et Committee as well as
of the Board of the
ian
Israel Education Fund; a dis-
cussion of "1980 Campaign
Issues and Community Process"
by Irving Bernstein, UJA
executive vice chairman; a pre-
sentation on "The Challenges of
the Eighties" by Rabbi Stanley
Ilabinowitz of Washington, D.C,
chairman-elect of the UJA Rab-
binic Cabinet; and a symposium
on "The Jewish Stake in
American Energy Independence"
by Dr. Elihu Bergman, executive
director, and Clarice Feldman,
general counsel of Americans for
Energy Independence, along with
Yuval Elizur. U.S. correspondent
for Maariu.
DAVID W.FELD, M.D.
Announces His Association With
Theodore F. Gerson, M.D.
William A. Casale, M.D.
Steven D. Silverman, M.D.
)1 No. Flagler Dr.
test Palm Beach
3175 Congress Ave.
Lake Worth
1-5151
population, materially and
spiritually."
UNTIL THE EVE of the War
of Independence, Einstein was
convinced that mutual un-
derstanding would end hostility.
The realities of the mid-century
modified Einstein's views.
Ultimately he came to believe
that the rebirth of Israel was one
of the few political acts in his
lifetime that was of an essentially
moral quality-
The philosophy which guided
Einstein's political and' social
views was the same as that which
guided his scientific discoveries:
it was a realism that took for
granted the existence of an
external world which did not
depend or behave according to
man's knowledge of it.
He taught that nothing in
nature is totally disconnected
from anything else, and in this
world view, Abba Eban sees an
intimate connection between
Einstein's scientific
achievements and his Judaism.
Isrel Digest
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg,
spiritual leader of the Beth
Sholom Congregation in Lake
Worth and president of the Palm
Beach County Rabbinic Asso-
ciation, represented the area
recently at an Israel Bond Con-
ference for Southern Rabbis held
in Atlanta.
Rabbinical leaders from 10
southern states attended the con-
ference and met with represen-
tatives of the Israeli government
regarding the multiple economic
challenges confronting Israel
after the signing of the peace
treaty with Egypt.
Rabbi Eisenberg was among
the rabbis who convened the
meeting at the request of the
Israel government to lay the
groundwork for a major effort
beginning in September tc
mobilize maximum community
wide support for Israel'!
economy.
"Peace with Egypt confronts
the nation of Israel with new and
awesome responsibilities of
transforming the Negev into a
place where people can live and
industry will flourish," Rabbi
Eisenberg stated upon his return
here.
He noted that the resettlement
and redeployment must be com-
pleted in three years, thus
placing "additional burdens upon
the Israel economy above the on-
going development needs which
still exist."
Rabbi Eisenberg emphasises
that "the synagogues provided
the central support for Israel
during crisis periods, particularly
in 1967 and 1973 when we
mobilized our members. We can
do no less to assure the success of
peace, and I am confident that
with inspirational lead of all Palm
Beach County rabbis, we shall
help Israel and ourselves grow
from strength to strength."
Jf WISH fAmilY AMD CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
Jewish community of Palm Beach County. Professional and con-
fidential help is available for
Problems of the aging
Consultation and evaluation services
Vocational counseling
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Private Offices:
2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beech, Flo. 33409
Telephone: 684 1991
Or
^ 3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 226
^ Boca Raton, Fla.
Telephone: 395-3640
Moderate fees are charged in family and individual counseling to
those who can pay (Fees are based on income and fami ly size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Polm Beach County.
the
6*ggS^
Cboo
ar,dHyd>*are
N* rTiT*- ...
>~
lnrtio*s
' >he

<&
review "Jo
ok
00^^^'
difference s IS*.
All Sunshine cc


'-.: A-iasui:;^.\ i(, :._..^:..i.f:.
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 29,1979
Federation Campaign
Continued from Page 1
week season, and the Russian
Resettlement Program, which is
continuing to settle immigrants
in this community with the
assistance of the Jewish Family
and Children's Service, a
Federation beneficiary agency.
SHULMAN concluded his
remarks by extending his ap-
preciation to the United Way of
West Palm Beach, Boca Raton
and the Palm Beach Community
Chest "without whose help we
would be unable to continue to
provide the much needed
programs and services to our
over-all community. A strong
Jewish comunity can only be
developed with the cooperation,
participation and interest of
everyone. The quality of Jewish
life depends on how much you are
willing to work to make it better.
The task is difficult and chal-
lenging, but we can do it together
because we are responsible for
one another."
CAMPAIGN HITS THREE
MILLION DOLLAR MARK
"This has been the most
successful campaign in the
history of Palm Beach County,"
said Robert S. Levy, general chairmen'ShirleyEnselberg and
campaign chairman. "I have Phyllis Cohen. South County
reason to believe that it is the Women's Division co-chairmen,
most successful campaign in the anfj Marilyn Lampert, for their
Appeal President's Mission last
fall. He commented that the
success of the campaign was
largely due to the significant
efforts of the South County com-
munity as well as those of the
Women's Division campaign.
LEVY PRESENTED awards
of appreciation to his two
associate campaign chairmen,
Dr. Richard Shugarman and
Arnold Lampert.
James B. Baer, South County
campaign chairman, reported
that the South County Men's
campaign increased from
$215,000 to $387,340 this year.
Baer thanked the individual
South County campaign workers
and gave special recognition to
Norman Stone for his out-
standing efforts in the 1979
campaign.
Women's Division campaign
vice president Barbara Shulman
reported that the Women's
Division raised $789,593 which
represents a 36 percent increase
over last year's totals. Special
awards were presented to Bar-
bara Shulman, Anne Faivus and
Detra Kay, associate campaign
entire United States this year,
and I proclaim the first $3 million
campaign in the history of the
Palm Beach Jewish Com-
munity."
Levy thanked the workers and
contributors in the campaign for
"a job well done" and pledged
that "we will be just as deter-
mined with the last contributor
as we were with the first."
Levy highlighted the sig-
nificant campaign functions,
which included the Partnership
Reception, the Advanced Gift
Dinner held at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Morris Messing, the
Cameo Mission led by James
Baer and Dr. Richard Shugar-
man, and the United Jewish
"dedicated
Division"
campaign.
service
during
to Women's
the 1979
Shirley Enselberg stated the
South County Women's Division
raised $97,712, a "significant"
104 percent increase over last
year.
MEALS
DAILY
SAFRAS KOSHIt
! AN NELL NOTEL
OPEN ALL YEAR
latcrtt(!, Spatial Matt,
St!, TV, llavetar,
14 Mr. *., Mattel. 'atlas
C1Q50 Daily Par Pera.
DAO Double Occ.
to Nov 4 Holidays Not Included
Free Beach Chair
(700 EUCLID AVE. one
MIAMI BEACH. eQ| -|Ol!
FLORIDA 33139 JO I I I T Ij
RESERVE
NOW FOR
THE HIGH
HOLY DAYS
Tha ocaanfront Algiar's it mor
than a hotel. Ifs a racraationai
resort an over 400' private
sandy beoch, tennis, pools.
volleyball, handball, health
spa. restaurants, lounges. With
a S-OAY "$B>llt Sty- or a com-
plete 13-DAY STAY) 3 strictly
kosher MEALS daily. Prominent
CANTO* officiating at SIRVICf $.
Special Group Rotes too!
CALL MS. 305 538-3333
mal ran attO-327-3147
M PIIMSIS ITMAOOOtM
lier's
OCIANPRONT AT 26th ST.
MIAMI BIACH, FLA. 33140
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHTAND SOLD
I
I ivef"
^stin
oiael Securities,
W^^OAUSTSIN
IStWl SECURITY
iRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE.
#Leumi
Bank law* NHaraai 0.1
18 East 48th Street
New York N.YIOOr
* (212)759-1310
SPECIAL AWARDS GIVEN
ALAN L. SHULMAN pre-
sented a special award to Robert
S. Levy, general campaign chair-
man, who accepted the award on
behalf of Habib Elghenian of
Iran, who was convicted of the
crime of raising funds for Israel
and was executed. "I accept this
award for Habib Elghenian (my
counterpart!," stated Levy,
"myself and all the Habib
ElghenianB, and I rededicate
myself again and I rededicate
everybody here to the meaningful
survival of the Jewish people."
Shulman presented Jeanne
Levy, outgoing president of
Women's Division, with an
award symbolizing education,
justice and peace, stating,
"Jeanne is a woman who gives
herself totally to the community
and to world Jewry. She truly
exemplifies a woman of valor."
Community service awards
were presented to Stephen R.
Gordon, for his work as producer
and co-moderator of Mosaic, the
Federation sponsored TV
program, to John Moss, for his
commitment to the plight of
Soviet Jews and his assistance in
the resettlement program, and to
Jack Stateman, who has volun-
teered his time as a chaplain for
the outlying areas of Palm Beach
County. A special award of
appreciation was given to Robert
Regalbuto, general manager of
WPTV-Channel 5, for "15 years
of public service television" given
to the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTORS REPORT
Norman J. Schimelman,
executive director of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, stated that the com-
munity has experienced "a
growing sense of awareness of
what this community is con-
fronted with" ... we find more
and more men and women have
begun to roll up their sleeves and
join together" to help enhance
the quality of Jewish life in Palm
Beach County.
HE COMMENDED the
"many men and women who
serve on the numerous com-
mittees of Federation." He
stated, however, that there are
"still too few people, spread very
thin, doing more work than they
should ... we need more help .
we must meet the challenge that
is ours ... we must maintain our
partnership with the people of
Israel and Jews throughout the
world who need our help and
we must strengthen our local
institutions to provide the service
that is needed this is our
challenge."
NEW OFFICERS
INSTALLED
George Golden, chairman of
the nominating committee,
placed the slate of officers and
board of directors into
nomination. The slate was
unanimously approved. Rabbi
William Marder of Temple Beth
David, Palm Beach Gardens, was
the installing officer.
Albert Chernin, executive vice
chairman of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council, was the keynote speaker
for the evening. He discussed the
possibility of a tremendous
breakthrough in the policy of the
Kremlin in regard to the exodus |
of Soviet Jews from Russia.
"There are 4,000 Russian Jews!
coming out of the Soviet Union]
every month and it has been]
reported that those who have!
been waiting for over five years!
also will be let out. However," be
stated, "we do not know what
will happen in the Soviet Unkti
after Brezhnev. We are hopir
that they will keep the door
open."
Chernin discussed the enerj
crisis stating that "we have
responsibility to make it aba
lutely clear to the American con
munity that there is a need
create long-range energy plat
ning." The Jewish community
must be made to understand t \
it has a direct stake in this ise
and the end result can creat
serious social and econon
tensions in this country."
Having a
Cousins'
Club?
Don't forget
to invite
the great
taste of
Maxwell
House
Coffee.
r
Maxwell House* Coffee has that rich. Club enjoys noshing. Smart Cousins'
satisfying taste, brewed to be remem- Club hostesses have been serving it for
bered. Serve it with sable and white- over half a century,
fish salad or whatever the Cousins'

t
Good
to tha
Last Drop"
/"la**
J *
Maxweij
* HOUSf
K
Certified
Kosher
u_w


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EHFDV3TRN_X8ZAUD INGEST_TIME 2013-06-11T04:34:11Z PACKAGE AA00014311_00198
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES