Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00196

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
^^^^^^^
& Jewish Fiendlan

of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation off Polm Beach County
line 5 Number 11
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, June 1,1979
Price 35 Cents
'ede ration to Hold Annual Meeting
Ihulman Assumes Second Term as President
t Jewish Federation of Palm
i County will hold its 17th
[meetingon Tuesday, June
7:30 p.m. at the Breakers
Palm Beach. Alan L.
will be installed as Fed-
president for a second
: Shulman's first year as
^t, the Federation's 1978-
nbined Jewish Appeal-
Cmergency Fund cam-
, a record total under the
of Robert Levy,
Campaign Chairman. In
I the Federation acquired
of land on Haverhill
Ihkh will serve as the
of the Jewish Com-
^ay School and a Hebrew
1 Health Care Center for
|, as well as other Jewish
ns.
lighlights from the past
iide Federation'8 move
fices on Flagler Drive,
^lishment of an endow-
the hiring of an
director to staff the
inty area, and an active
Ity Relations Council
| which included a Mid-
kference with Sen. Lowell
an Israel Peace
nee, rallies for Soviet
id the establishment of a
ist Commemoration
Ll Chernin to Speak
[ANNUAL meeting will
lighted with a keynote
I by Albert D. Chernin,
vice chairman of the
Jewish Community
Advisory Council, the
coordinating body for
of community relations
pig 11 major national
I organizations and 102
Councils in cities through-
out the United States. At the
time of his election in 1976, he
was the executive director of the
Jewish Community Relations
Council of Greater Philadelphia.
From 1957 to 1968, Chernin
was a member of the NJCRAC
staff, where he served as the co-
ordinator, the top executive post
of the American Jewish Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, the pre-
decessor to the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry. He is
now a member of the presidium
and secretariat of the World Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry and has
been to the Soviet Union three
times.
Chernin travels frequently to
Israel to confer with members of
the government, the Knesset and
other prominent Israeli decision-
makers and opinion-molders. He
was a member of a recent
delegation which included the
chairman of the NJCRAC and
the top leadership of three NJC-
RAC national member agencies
who went to Israel to convey to
the Israeli government the
findings of the NJCRAC's Israel
Task Force regarding the impact
of Israel's policies on American
public opinion.
In recognition of his efforts
here, President Lyndon Johnson
presented Chernin with the pen
used in signing into law in 1965
the repeal of the national origins
quota system, and in 1977,
President Carter presented him
with the pen used in signing the
comprehensive federal anti-
boycott law.
A PAST president of the
Association of Jewish Com-
munity Relations Workers,
Chernin is regarded as a leading
analyst of matters of concern to
the American Jewish community.
His journal articles have been
published in England and the
United States, and he has lec-
tured widely.
The program also will include
the installation of officers and
board members of the Jewish
Federation, the presentation of
community service awards and
recognition of campaign workers
and volunteers.
The following is the slate of
officers and board members who
will be placed in nomination at
the annual meeting by George
Golden, chairman of the
Nominating Committee:
president, Alan Shulman; vice
presidents, Dr. Richard Shugar-
man, Dr. Howard Kay, Jeanne
Levy, Robert E. List, James B.
Continued on Page 14
Albert Chernin
Alan Shulman
Easy Answers
Begin in London
Calming the Storm
Federation Mourns
wry (Buddy) Sigelman
("Buddy") Sigelman,
stive of Baltimore, Md.,
Bsident of Poinciana Place,
forth, for the past four
[died recently.
Blman served aa captain in
ay during World War II
etired as assistant vice
ent of Merrill Lynch after
with the company for 49
Blman was very active with
Associated Jewish Charities
ptimore, as well as with over
' charitable organizations,
ly was responsible for one
best organized drives at
aa Place and more than
the contributions in the
[Combined Jewish Appeal-
Emergency Fund cam-,
said Robert Levy,
Campaign Chairman,
behalf of the Jewish
ation of Palm Beach
ty. I would like to extend
?fences to the Sigelman
His dedication and
itment to improving the
LONDON Israel
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin arrived here last
weekfor meetings with Sec-
retary of State Vance prior
to Begin's scheduled
"inauguration" of the
Israel-Egypt peace pact
with President Anwar
Sadat on Sunday, when
Israel ia to return El Arish
to Egyptian autonomy.
The Begin Sadat encounter
was the subject of much furor
during the past few days, with
conflicting statements emanating
from both Israel and Egypt on
the nature of relations between
the two countries immediately
upon the transfer of El Arish.
SECRETARY of State Cyrus
Vance will be on hand at the Sun-
day meeting, but Prime Minister
Begin was unequivocally clear in
his stand on his arrival here.
Begin said that the El Arish
meeting will "inaugurate" open
borders between Israel and
Egypt, and to symbolize that
event, he would fly back with
President Sadat to Cairo. Sadat
would then fly to Ben Gurion
Airport in Tel Aviv with him.
But even as Begin prepared for
his summit meeting with Sadat, a
serious rift between himself and
Defense Minister Ezer Weizman
over the 22-point autonomy plan
for the West Bank and Gaza
Strip that a majority of the 11-
man ministerial committee on
autonomy approved last
Thursday.
Weizman objected strenuously
to the plan as far too hardline and
detailed to serve even as Israel's
opening position if the
negotiations are to succeed.
During the tense seven and a
half-hour ministerial committee
Continued on Page 6
Federation Office Closed
The Jewish Federation office will be closed in observance of
Shavuoth, Friday, June 1.
Camp Shalom to Begin 16th Year
Harry Sigelman
quality of Jewish life was un-
surpassed."
Sigelman is survived by his
wife, Sylvia; one daughter, Linda
Rezak of Stamford Conn.; one
son, Edward Sigelman of Balti-
more; and three grandchildren.
Camp Shalom will begin its
16th season on Monday, June 18.
This year the camp will be
operated under the auspices of
the Jewish Community Center.
Joel Levine, M.S.W., has
assumed the position of camp
director. He has an under-
graduate degree in physical
education.
"Many new ideas and events
will be incorporated into the
already fine program," said
Levine. "Many of last year's
counselors will be returning. We
also will have on our staff two
Israeli Girl Scouts who will bring
to the camp program Israeli
music. Scout crafts and
Judaica."
The camp will be divided into
two sections, pre-school and the
Country Day Camp. The children
will participate in the following
activities: tennis, baseball, arts
and crafts, dance, music, drama,
Judaica, swim instructions and
water sports. The camp is
designed for children from 2'/t
through 12.
Camp will begin at 9:15 a.m.
and extend to 3:45 p.m. Trans-
portation will be supplied with
pick-up from central points
throughout the county. The camp
sessions are: Session I (4 weeks)
June 18 July 13; Session II (4
weeks) July 16 Aug. 10; full
session (8 weeks) June 18 Aug.
10. Campers can enroll in either
session or for the full session.
For further information,
contact the Jewish Community
Center.


"
Iflttli. ^Je^VfcrVdia'of /*oin &* Co*y
Friday, June 1, m,
I
C
|
With the
Organizations
TEMPLE BETH
SHOLOM SISTERHOOD
The Sisterhood will hold its
regular meeting June 6 at 12:30
p.m. A Strawberry Festival and
card party are planned.
B'NAI nm WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women. Boynton
Beach Chapter, will attend the
matinee luncheon and show of
"The FanUsticka" at the Royal
Palm Dinner Theater on June 13.
Call Marion Miller for reser-
vations.
PIONEER WOMEN
Theodore Herri Chib of Pioneer
Women will attend the Royal
Palm Dinner Theater matinee
production of "The Fantasticks"
June 16.
HAD ASS AH
Shalom Hadaaaah is joining
Pioneer We aw n in a Mini-Flea
Market on Sunday, June 24, on
the grounds of Atlantic Bank,
Okeechobee Blvd. Hours are 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. For information,
phone Shalom chairpersons
Lillian Schack or Bertha Rubin.
Shalom will publish L'Shana
Tovah greetings in the Septem-
ber issue of Kol Shalom. Send
your listings to Jean Solomon.
Chatam R 355, Century Village.
Population
3,760,000
JERUSALEM Israels
population at the beginning of its
31st anniversary was estimated
i.760.000. it was announced by
the Central Bureau of Statistics
The total figure included ap-
proximately 3.158.000 Jews and
about 600.000 non-Jews, in-
cluding Moslems. Christians.
Ilruze and others.
SHALOM HADASSAH
Shalom Group will participate
in two chapter functions, and
Shalom members and friends are
urged to make reservations now.
On Aug. 8 a luncheon and
theater party is planned at Royal
Palm Dinner Theatre. Boca
Raton, for "Sound of Music."
Call Shalom reservation chair-
person Lillian Schack. Nov. 22 to
25 is Thanksgiving weekend at
Algiers Hotel (kosher). Miami
Beach Phone Shalom reser-
vations chairpersons Bertha
Rubin or Lillian Schack.
PIONEER WOMEN
Grace Herakowitz,
organizational consultant lor
Pioneer Women in North Brow-
ard and Palm Beach Counties,
announces the formation of a
Pioneer Women Club in Palm
Springs. A membership tea will
be held on Monday. June 4, at 1
p.m. at the home of Mrs. Ann
Engelstein of Lakeside Village
Members and other interested
persons can contact Mrs. Engel-
stein for further information. All
are invited. Pioneer Women is a
social service organization
working for women, youth and
children in the United States and
Israel.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
The Breakers Hotel in Palm
Beach will be the setting for the
annual Honor Roll Luncheon of
the Palm Beach County Region
of Women's American ORT
Guest speaker will be Ruth Roth-
farb. president of District VI
The invocation will be given by
Zelda Magid. district vice
president. The luncheon will be
June 13 at noon. The region
Honor Roll chairman is Ida
Friedman.
The Lake Worth Chapter of
Women's American ORT is
having installation of new of-
ficers for the year 1979-1980 and
luncheon on Monday. June 4. at
noon, at the Indian Trail Country
Club in Royal Palm Beach
Village. Mrs David Silverman.
vice president of the region, will
install the officers. The incoming
president is Marion R Sherman;
chairman of the day is Frances
Jacoby.
PHILIP WEINSTEIN.F.D
evitt memorial chapel
Mil OKEECHOBEE BLVD. WEST PALM BEACH. FLORIDA
PHONE NO MV-17M
13385 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY. NORTH MIAMI FL PHONE 949
K17200
Century Chapter, Women's
American ORT, will meet on
Thursday. June 14 at 1 p.m., at
Temple Anshei Sholom. The
featured program will be a
musical entertainment called
"Musical Interview." It is an
original script, written and
directed by Sylvia Sommerfield.
The cast includes Selman Kunin,
Nettie Pfeffer, Eve SteB. Esther
Sugerman, Sylvia Sommerfield,
Pearl Hartman and Sue Garber.
At the piano. Ethel Philips. The
public is invited.
AMERICAN MIZRACHI
WOMEN
Ricnoaa Chapter of the Palm
Beaches will hold its last meeting
of the season. Tuesday. June 12,
at 1 p.m. in the hospitality room.
Fay Adolf, cultural chairwoman,
recently returned from Israel and
will give a report of her visit to
the numerous educational
projects which the group
maintains. All are welcome.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
The Medina Chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women held its instal-
lation of officers on May 8 at the
home of Mrs. Millie Fier in West
Palm Beach Mrs Sylvia Lewis,
director of the local Anti-Defa-
mation League office, was the
installing officer. Mrs. Sheryl
Davidoff was chairman of the
event.
The foUowing officers were
installed: Debbie Sabarra.
president: Naomi RampelL fund-
raising vice president: Sarah
King, program vice president:
Ruth Kirschner. membership vice
president: Mim Levinson. com-
munications vice president:
Leonora Walkover, recording
secretary: Adele Sayles. corres-
ponding secretary: Janet Taylor,
financial secretary': Lillian Ganz.
treasurer; Bertha Goldfine. pub-
licity: and Millie Fier, counselor.
Thursday. June 21. is the date
for Medina Chapter's second
annual Paid-Up Membership
Dinner. It will be held at the
home of Mrs- Ruth Kirschner in
West Palm Beach at 7 p.m.
B'nai B'rith, Century Lodge,
will meet on Tuesday, June 12 at
7:30 p.m. at Congregation
Anshei Sholom at Century
Village. The Ruth Hyde Group
will perform an original cantata,
"The B'nai B'rith Story," written
and narrated by Lee Duchin;
soloist Anne March; accompanist
and musical directress Ruth
Hyde.
BRANDEIS WOMEN
The Defray Beach Chapter of
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee plans a
theater party for Sunday
evening, June 17, at the Caldwell
Playhouse, the professional
theater at the College of Boca
Raton. The musical revue,
"Starting Here, Starting Now",
will be presented.
Call Rose Hoffman for tickets.
B'NAI B'RITH
The Haifa Lodge, B'nai B'rith
in Boynton Beach recently
conducted a Passover fund drive
to help needy Jewish families.
The drive will be a continuing
effort of the lodge. The men in
charge were Jay Kaye, Jack
Walkes and Si Rose
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
The Jewish War Veterans,
TAX FREE BONDS'
AAA RATED-6.50%
AARATED-7.00%
A RATED-8.00%
, (Standard and Poors)
Rating
" Free of federal income tax
J.B. HANAUER AND COMPANY
211 Royal Pomcidno Way
Palm Beach. Hondo 33480
2960 Aveniuia Boulevard
No Miami Beach. Ha 33180 .
i -
3 Please send youi brochure on lax-free municipal bond*
Nome _
Address
State___
ZIP
City.
lei m.
See us dotty
OI4 45 ru
nihfirr51
Miami (30MM2-6M0
Pah* Beach 008) 737-2800
_ nil mi ill c
INrClPAl BOND
SP6CIAUSTS SINCE 1931
Other CMes ia Fla. TeB Fres 800-432-2290
OeteUa ef Fla. Call T#U Pre* 800^27-6740
Hollywood (306) 921-8000
Ft. LaaA-Poaapaao (306) 786-2900
JF/6-1
Post 408 (Blue Ribbon Poet) ,
Pah. Beach Coeaty has elected
the following officers for the ~
1979-1980: eye*
Hyman Shapiro, commander^
William Schachter, senior vie,
commander; Leon Sussman, first
junior vice commander: Morris
Boruck; second junior vice com-
mander; Jordan Crosby. ifj.
jutant; Joseph Ohrenstine
quartermaster; Raymond
Salmon, chief of staff; Sidney
Katz, officer of the day; Dr. Abe
Horn, judge advocate; Rev
Arthur Rosenwasser, chaplain
Morris Siegel P.C., Harry Braun
P.C., Sam Mindel P.C., trustees.
Committee chairmen art:
Morris Boruck, cemetery; Harry
Braun, hospitalization; Sam
Mindel, P.R and social affairs
Ed Turer, historian; Html
Schachter, photographer; Harry'
Goldstein, associate chaplain;*-]
Sam Mindel, liaison; Sidney
KaU, publicity; Irving Horowitz,
service officer; Sidney Sole,
insurance.
Past commander, Ed Hanser
was elected commander of the
Broward and Palm Beach Coun-
cil. A television set was donated
to the Veterans Clinic at Riviera
Beach.
Those interested in becoming
members should call Hyman
Shapiro.
Investment Equity
Real Estate
DON VOGEL
^EA,. ESTATE BROKER SALESMAN
Resident ial-Condominium-lnvestment
2352 PGA Boulevard Business 626-5100
Palm Beacn Gardens. Fla. 33410 Residence 622-4000 .
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a family of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft.Lauderdale(Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
ERiverside
Memorial Chaoel. Inc / Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Kenneth M. Kay/ Arthur Grossberg/ Joseph Rubin
iOOOf AK>nl Wlliutif '


^
mmmmmmmmmmmmm
Friday, June 1.1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
pie Beth El to Celebrate
Sam Schutzer Sabbath
By STACI LESSER
On June 8 and 9, Temple Beth
El, West Palm Beach, will
celebrate "Sam Schutzer Sab-
bath.*' The temple will pay
tribute to the oldest Jewish com-
munal leader in West Palm Beach
by bestowing on him the title of
"honorary member."
Schutzer will be honored with
an oneg shabbat on Friday, June
8, at 8 p.m. Non-members are
welcome to participate in the
services on Friday evening and
.Saturday morning. One of the
lighlights of the service on
Saturday will be Sam Schutzer's
Officiating as the cantor for part
of the service.
In 1900, a boy of 12 left the old
world of his birth and entered a
new world and a new life. Shmuel
Avram Schutzer became Sammy
Schutzer on the streets of New
York.
IN 1907 his family moved from
New York to New Jersey, where
they remained until 1924. On the
Wednesday before Thanksgiving
of that same year Sam moved to
West Palm Beach. On the Friday
night following Thanksgiving,
Sam Schutzer joined Temple
Beth El.
His reminiscences from the
year 1888 till 1924 could fill
volumes. At this time I will only
highlight the years 1924 to the
present.
Sam Schutzer's 55 years in
Palm Beach County have aided
the growth of Jewish life in our
area. Sam published the only
Jewish newspaper in Palm Beach
^County, Our Voice. Our Voice
vas the voice of the Jewish com-
nunity for 42 years. Sam knew
Fevery Jewish person who moved
j into our city, he knew their ac-
tivities, their happiness, their
sorrows. He was the voice that
kept the Jewish community
aware and cohesive.
(Schutzer turned over the
Voice to the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County. The paper
subsequently became part of the
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach
Countv. I
For 20 years Sam Schutzer
served as executive secretary of
the Federated Jewish Charities of
Palm Beach County. Since Sam
knew every Jewish person in
town, he was given the job of
raising funds. He held this
position until 1959. His office
was his home, where he still
resides after 42 vemrn.
IN 1936, Sam instituted a
program for B'nai B'rith dealing
with vocational education. An
contest was held in the two
al high schools on the "im-
portance of vocational education
in Palm Beach County schools."
After the contest, the School
Board voted to establish a
vocational education program.
In 1935, in the name of B'nai
B'rith, Sam helped institute the
first Jewish bookshelf in the
public library.
Sam Schutzer has many
honors to his name from B'nai
B'rith, Temple Bsth El, the
WESTERN
TEEN TOURS
AgM 13-n www OtyaMy fm only
>pkh r WMtam U.S.*. and Ctlfc Daparti *"'
Jum 11th. botftant roUcw. "OS WTO-
Sam Schutzer
Jewish Community Center,
United Jewish Appeal, Temple
Anshei Sholom, Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County,
Temple Beth Sholom, the
American Jewish Press Asso-
ciation, and many more.
Sam tells stories of minyans
held at Goldberg's butcher shop
on Clematis Street, stories of the
first religious school (which he
taught) that was held in rented
stores, stories of the building of a
house of worship.
SAM SCHUTZER'S home is a
living reference of Jewish life in
Palm Beach County. His
meticulous care of records of the
growth of Jewish life is to be
envied by the most renowned his-
torians. One of Sam's papers,
dated 1935, yellowed with age,
fragile to the touch, tells the
Temple Beth El story, beginning
in the year 1923 two sheets of
aged paper tell the beginning of a
synagogue, but more than that,
they tell the story of a man's love
of Jewish life.
To quote Sam's words,
"Inability to meet a mortgage of
about $10,000 caused foreclosure
proceedings by bond holders, and
Temple Beth El was forced to
give up their home but not
their hope and faith."
Of course the temple picture
brightened, and Beth El was re-
vitalized. People like Sam
Schutzer, with faith and hope,
made that happen.
Sam Schutzer's ac-
complishments are many, his
wisdom of a different age and yet
of this day, his wit sharp and his
inner being love.
When Sam walked the streets
collecting money for the
Federated Jewish Charities, he
was asked by a friend about his
poor worn shoes. Sam replied, "It
isn't the shoes, but the soul in
them." Temple Beth El is
honoring Sam by having a Sam
Schutzer Sabbath because of the
"soul" in this man.
For information, contact the
temple office.
FAU HUlel Celebrates
Israel Awareness Week
The HUlel Jewish Student
Union recently celebrated Israel
Awareness Week at Florida
Atlantic University in Boca
Raton.
The week started off with a
solemn observance of Yom
HaShoa (day of remembrance for
the Holocaust) and ended with a
wine and cheese celebration of the
signing of the Egyptian-Israeli
peace treaty.
On April 30, displays were set
up in the university's Gold Coast
Room. Included were photo-
graphs of the camps and Nurem-
berg trials. If more than one
person may have uttered, "Why
don't you people forget already,"
during the day-long display, a
resounding appeal for education
and awareness was prevalent
during the evening's interview of
two Holocaust survivors.
MRS. NINA MEISING of
Kings Point in Delray and Mrs.
Rachel Greenstein of Boca Raton
agreed to share their experiences
with the mostly student
audience. Dr. Samuel Portnoy,
professor of history at FAU, was
the interviewer. Many students
seemed visibly stw. n by the
horrors that the survivors related
to them. All agreed, though, that
it is important that people,
especially young people, try to
understand what occurred during
those black years so that it can
never hsppen sgain. After the
presentations, the sudience asked
many questions until the
emotion-packed evening was
over.
Hillal director Stewart Crane
explained before the interview
began that "it is important to
remember our past, so that we
can understand our present and
Shulman, Mica to Head
JCDS Dedication
Barry Krischer, president of
the Jewish Community Day
School, and Detra Kay, chairman
of the dedication ceremonies,
announced that Alan Shulman,
president of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County,
and Congressman Dan Mica will
highlight the JCDS ground
dedication ceremonies, to be held
on Sunday, June 3, at 11 a.m.
Rabbi Irving Cohen of Temple
Israel will give the invocation
and Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg of
Temple Beth Sholom the
benediction. The Day School
students will lead the Hatikva
and Star Spangled Banner, under
the direction of Judi Hoffman
and Judy Ravitz.
Rabbi William H. Shapiro, sec-
retary of the Rabbinical Council
and secretary of the Ministerial
Fellowship, will present a cer-
tificate to the Jewish Cemetery
Association for their commit-
ment to Judaism by granting the
first $50,000 to the Day School
for the new building. Mrs. Minna
Gladstone will be the recipient of
a presentation by the Day School
for making it possible for the
JCDS to have the land for the
new facilitiy.
Shulman will present the lease
to Krischer, president of the
JCDS, and Mordecai Levow,
director of the JCDS. The un-
veiling of the sign will be done by
Shirley Dellerson, president of
the PTA. The students of the
JCDS will lead the guests of the
dedication in a medley of songs.
This will be the first Jewish
communal building in Palm
Beach County.
USY Group Has Installation
The West Palm Beach Chapter
of the United Synagogue Youth
held its installation of new of-
ficers on May 20 at the Hilton
Inn on Singer Island. The
program was coordinated by
Sandy Klinger, outgoing
president, and Renee Lam pert.
incoming president. The program
included cantorial renditions by
Cantor Elaine Shapiro, and the
D'Var Torah was given by
Michael Chen.
The newly installed officers
are: Renee Lamport, president;
David Goldberg, first vice presi-
dent; Louis Wilson, second vice
president; Stuart Stulberg,
treasurer;
secretary.
and Ilene Lampert,
"The upcoming year promises
to be a tremendous success in
terms of providing our youth
with a solid Jewish identity,
leadership ability and cultural
enrichment," said Michael Bach-
rach, USY advisor. "If there are
any Jewish youth in the com-
munity who are interested in
joining USY, in grades 9 to 12,
their name, address, telephone
number and grade should be sent
to Temple Beth El, USY, 2815
North Flagler Drive, West Palm
Beach, FL 33407.
Many students seemed
visibly shaken by the
horrors that the survivors
related to them.
future."
Dr. Portnoy videotaped the
interview, and it is available for
viewing on the fifth floor of the
FAU library.
Israel Awareness Week con-
tinued on May 1 and 2 with an
Israeli Flea Market outside of the
cafeteria. Hillel members sold
Israeli records, T-shirts, art,
books and felafel.
ON TUESDAY, May 1, Hillel
also began its Israeli Film
Festival with "Traces" the
story of a German girl who learns
she is Jewish. It continued with
"Masada Might Fall Again" on
May 9 and "I Love You Rosa" on
May 17.
The FAU celebration's grand
finale took place on Saturday,
May 5. About 100 students
packed into the Gold Coast Room
where an evening of candlelight
and wine greeted them. The
featured entertainment included
the mellow rock sounds of Aley
and Sam, and the exciting sounds
of "Distant Shores" with their
Israeli folk music and belly
dancer. The evening ended on a
high note with the entire room
dancing the bora. '
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rage^""""

TheJewuh Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 1,1979
Jerusalem and Masada -
The celebration of Yora Yerushalayim spotlights
a point which can never be over-emphasized. And
that is that Jerusalem united shall not fall again.
In this sense, Jerusalem is like Masada, where
heroic Jewish forces held out unsuccessfully against
the onslaught of Roman legions for over three years.
At the foot of Masada today stands the sign,
Shayneet Masada lo teepol, Masada will not fall a
second time. Can Jews say any less for Jerusalem?
The city is at the very core of the Jewish con-
ciousness and the Jewish continuum. Though other
religions lay claim to the city on the basis of events
that occurred there of significance to their faith,
these events are tied to Judaism in an indissoluble
way.
What others have done is to throw the baby
away and keep the bath water. But Judaism's
presence in Jerusalem secular, religious, political
cannot therefore be subject to diminishment.
Theirs was the choice, the choice of others the
choice of children intent on making their way.
But the house of the father has been abandoned
by them, and the father remains. They are not en-
titled to come home again on their terms that the
father be exiled.
It Shall Not Fall Again
All of this is especially significant today as talks
get underway in Beersheba between Israel and
Egypt, the first step in establishing peace between
the two countries. The talks continue in El Arish on
Sunday when Israel relinquishes hegemony over that
city as a gesture of its intent to return the whole of
the Sinai to Egypt in the cause of peace.
It is certain that the status of Jerusalem will be
sharply debated in the months and years ahead at
the same time that Egypt and Israel attempt to
resolve the autonomy problem in Gaza and on the
Golan Heights.
Egypt's position, the world's positions will be
that Jerusalem must be divided again. The pressure
will be profound beyond imagining to achieve this
condition that existed disastrously prior to the 1967
war.
But the pressure must be resisted. Children are
not their fathers. They are free to go, by they are not
free to tell their fathers to go, too.
Jerusalem is the capital of Israel. It is the
spiritual home of Judaism. United, it shall not fall
again.
An Unfortunate Decision
It is unfortunate that the resolutions committee
of the 54th national convention of the American Red
Cross rejected a resolution to have the Red Cross
press for the recognition of Israel's Magen David
Adorn by the International Committee of the Red
Cross and the League of Red Cross Societies.
Observers at the convention in Kansas City, Mo.,
believed the full convention would have adopted it.
The longtime refusal of the IRC to officially
recognize the Israeli organization is inexcusable. The
Red Crescent of Moslem countries and the Red Lion
md Sun of Iran have long been part of the IRC. The
Magen David Adorn provides the same first aid and
other medical services in Israel as do the other
groups in their countries. Added to this is that Israel
:ias cooperated with the IRC, and the relations be-
ween the Israeli unit and the Geneva-based inter-
national group are for the most part good.
Of course, this is another case where (he Arab
countries and their supporters have subverted an
nternational non-political organization as part of
their war against Israel. The long-time neutral status
of the IRC can only be harmed by this policy.
"Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, Inc.
Combined Jewlah Appeal
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
3300 North Federal Highway. Boca Raton. Fla 8S32 Phone 308-3001
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Federation officers: President. Alan L. Shulman. Vice Presidents: Di Richard
SliuKui-mHii. Dr. Howard Kay. Kenneth Scherer. Jeanne Levy, Jerome Tlshman:
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Director of I'uMIC Relations.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year S7.S0, or by membership to
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, S01 So. Flagler Drive, Suite 305, West
Palm Beach, Fl. 33401 PhoneB32-2U6. (Out ol Town Upon Request)
Soviets Are the Common Enemy
I 8AID here last week that
Israel committed a diplomatic
blunder in 1950 when it let its
own best interests go by and
failed to establish friendly rela-
tions with the new Communist
regime in China.
Israel was the first Middle
East nation to formally recognize
Red China, and Chou En-lai
promptly acknowledged Israel's
gesture, but the fear of incurring
American displeasure suddenly
caused Israel to change its policy.
As late as 1954, Chou con-
tinued to hope for friendly ties
with Israel and said so during an
address to the National People's
Assembly on Sept. 23 of that
year.
Leo
Mindlin
BUT THE All-Asia Bandung
conference in April, 1955 was a
desperate turning point, where
Peking suddenly opted to throw
in with the Arab nations instead.
And when the 1956 Suez-Sinai
debacle occurred, Chou for the
first time took a hostile attitude
toward Israel.
Shortly thereafter, China be-
came the first power formally to
recognize the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization. In fact, China
had been providing aid to Arab
terrorists even before the estab-
lishment of the PLO, rendering
assistance to the embryonic Al
Fatah.
The Six-Day War in 1967
exacerbated China's anti-Israel
policy, but Russia's clear expan-
sionist strategy in the Middle
East by then caused the Chinese
to take a second look.
WITH THE growing schism
between Moscow and Peking, in
public China maintained its
adamant refusal to recognize
Israel. For its part, Israel had
come a long way since its dis-
astrous 1950-1954 coyness
toward China and would now
have grabbed at the opportunity
for a diplomatic accord.
Obviously, it was too late.
But in private, as I noted here
last week, changes had begun to
take place, including reports of
contacts between Chinese and
Israeli officials in Paris and else-
where, which the Chinese denied
in official statements tongue-in-
cheek.
In the 1973 war, in the spirit of
this public hardening, Peking
took out after Israel with a
hatchet despite the fact that it
was Egypt that had launched the
war; at the same time, China
policy was such that it did not
join the clangorous United Na-
tions call for a ceasefire, the
implementation of which saved
Egypt's hide.
CLEARLY, the Chinese had
the Russians in mind at the time,
whom they blamed for the war
together with the U.S. The
London Times on September 10,
1973 reported that the Chinese
Continued on Pane 13
Moscow Miracle
Ginzburg Digs Deeply into Thoreau
Friday, June 1, 1979
Volume 5
6SIVAN5739
Number 11
With the release by Moscow of
five-heroic men two Jews, one
Baptist, one Orthodox Christian,
and one Ukrainian nationalist
most who puzzle daily over the
inscrutable ways of the USSR are
speculating on valid reasons for
the sudden decision in the Krem-
lin.
Others are so fascinated with
the drama of liberation that they
fasten on to the words of those
freed so abruptly, and finally find
in an absurd world without
heroes new hope for faltering
mankind.
AND MANY point with op-
timism to recent figures on exit
grants by the Russian govern-
ment, praying that Moscow will
now turn the spigot of emigration
even farther.
First, then, why this Spring-
time miracle? Towering largest
among the reasons are the desire
by the USSR to have SALT II
signed and sealed, the need to
win most-favored-nation trade
agreement, a wish to bring two
key spies back to the Soviet
Union, help in making Russia's
role as host for the Olympics
more palatable, and a determina-
tion not only to keep up with the
Chinese but to outdistance those
new friends of Washington.
Eventually, latent explana-
tions may burst to the surface.
The USSR is a nation of unend-
1 ing surprises: just yesterday,
i Moscow was backing Idi Amin
with vigor; today Tanzania has
the Russian blessing.
As to the joyful thoughts
expressed by the best known
prisoner released, Aleksandr
! Ginzburg turned to Henry
Thoreau for expression of his
thankssgiving: "Under a govern-
ment which imprisons unjustly,
the true place for a just man is
also a prison."
DEEPER INTO Thoreau,
Ginzburg undoubtedly had
found: "Must the citizen ever for
a moment resign his conscience
to the State? Why then has God
given to every man a con-
science?"
Rejoicing in their rush to liber-
ty, the Russian prisoners com-
pared their electrifying exper-
ience with that of astronauts
finding themselves on the moon.
"The heavy weight of unfree-
dom" startled them even as it
brought ecstasy to their hearts.
Eduard Kuznetsov and Mark
Dymshits, the Soviet Jews jailed
for allegedly trying to flee by
hijacked plane in 1970, are now at
home in Israel. Valentin Moroz
( "Don't call me a Russian dissi-
dent; I am an Ukrainian dissi-
dent") appears certain to accept
an offer to study and teach in
Harvard's Ukrainian Research
Institute.
WHEN WE TURN to statis-
tics on emigration of Jews from
the Soviet Union, we need to be
practical: True, some 4,408 Rus-
sian Jews were permitted to leave
in March and approximately
5,000 in April. True, experts in
the field expect a 50,000 total in
1979. some 20,000 above the 1978
figure. But as the crack in the
Russian door widens a bit, the
number emboldened to apply for
visas rises. Hence the percentage
of those actually winning free-
dom compared with the roll of
applicants is not all that encour-
aging.
It is essential also to keep in
mind the importance of Moscow's
desire to gain Most Favored Na-
tion trade status with the U.S.
Congressman Charles A. Vanik
of Ohio, one of the authors of the
Jackson-Vanik trade amend-
ment, has been in Moscow
recently exploring with Russian
leaders their desire to vault over
a portion of the trade restraints
tied to emigration policy by that
law.
SEN. ADLAI Stevenson of
Illinois has introduced a bill that
would grant $2 million in foreign
trade credits to the USSR and
China and replace provisions of
the Jackson-Vanik legislation
requiring assurances of healthier
USSR emigration practices.
Jewish leaders would be disap-
pointed to see the Stevenson
effort succeed. The Jackson-
Vanik amendment, they point
out, already contains a waiver
section for trade credits and Most
Favored Trade benefit on those
occasions when the USSR
behaves as it is now behaving.
Let Moscow continue to try to
water down the U.S. law which,
in the Soviet view, is too tough;
let the rest of us hold firm to that
valuable piece of legislation. And
let us all get on with the task of
bringing Anatoly Sharansky, the
still-imprisoned prisoner of con-
science, to freedom.
h



Friday, June 1,1979
i
..' v.'. yS .
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
OUR
Edelsberg
Sidorsky
Herzog
B'nai B'rith Slates
Institute of Judaism
A trio of personalities in
Jewish life will compose the
faculty of the Institute of
Judaism, sponsored by District
Five of B'nai B'rith, to be held at
the Wildacres Retreat in Little
Switzerland, N.C., from Aug. 16
to Aug. 20.
Although sponsored by B'nai
B'rith, the institute will be open
to the general Jewish public in
the six states, Florida, Georgia,
South Carolina, North Carolina,
Maryland, and Virginia, and the
District of Columbia, which make
up the district.
The faculty will be composed of
Chaim Herzog, who served as
ambassador from the state of
Israel to the United Nations from
1974 to 1978; Herman Edelsberg,
for many years the director of the
International Council of B'nai
B'rith and director of the
Washington office of the Anti-
Defamation League; and Dr.
David Sidorsky, professor of
philosophy at Columbia
University and chairman of the
Board of Trustees of the
American Zionist Youth Foun-
dation.
Each member of the faculty
will deliver three lectures,
followed by discussion, on the
over-all theme of "Israel its
history and relationship to the
United States, the United
Nations, and the Arabs."
Religious services will be
conducted daily. Opportunities
for informal recreation will be
provided during the afternoon,
with lectures and discussion
scheduled for mornings and
evenings.
Further information and
applications for enrollment in the
institute may be secured from
Paul Kulick, who is serving as
chairman of the District Five
Institute. He may be contacted
at 5111 Abercorn, Savannah, GA
31405.
Ethiopian Black Jew
Speaks at FAU
Zecharios Yonah, a black Jew
from Ethiopia, recently appealed
to students at Florida Atlantic
University in Boca Raton and to
the Jewish people "to help their
brothers in Ethiopia" who want
to settle in Israel.
Yonah's lecture was sponsored
by Hillel and SURJE (Students
United for the Rescue of Jewish
Ethiopians). Before the lecture,
Yonah showed Meyer Levin's
film, "The Falashas: Black Jews
of Ethiopia," which depicted the
Falashas in their tribal villages
practicing ancient Jewish
customs.
The Falashas (literally
meaning "stranger") were
thought to have been separated
from mainstream Judaism at
about the time of the destruction
of the first temple. During the
16th century they numbered a
half million and ruled over part of
Ethiopia. But after their down-
fall, they were denied the right to
own land, he said, adding that
they were often slaughtered and
forcibly converted. Today they
are poor sharecroppers and
craftsmen, struggling to survive
in war-torn Ethiopia. Their
numbers have dwindled to
250,000 in the 19th century, to
100,000 in 1900 and finally to
20,000 today.
Yonah is one of only 300
Falashas who have been able to
escape the worsening conditions
in Ethiopia. He settled in Israel
in 1972, is an Israeli citizen and
has served in the Israeli Army.
He is now a student at Tel Aviv
University.
Yonah said both of Israel's
chief rabbis have reaffirmed the
Jewishness of the Falashas. But
he contends that there are certain
elements in the Israeli govern-
ment who are blocking the rescue
of the Falashas. He stated that
Prime Minister Begin has
pledged to rescue the Falashas
and has been instrumental in
getting the 300 or so people out of
Ethiopia that are now in Israel.
In an emotional plea, Yonah,
who still has a sister and parents
in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, asked
the audience to write to Begin at
the Knesset and "confirm your
support for Begin's pledge to
help rescue our people in
Ethiopia." The audience
promptly went to the back of the
room and wrote letters to Prime
Minister Begin.
Yonah is on a nationwide
speaking tour to help publicize
the plight of the Falashas. For
additional information,
literature, and a lecture and slide
program, contact Yuai Yankh
A.C.S.W. at 12680 NE Miami
Ct., North Miami, Florida 33161,
or the American Association for
Ethiopian Jews, 6505 Wilahire
Blvd., Room 802, Los Angeles,
CA 90048.
New Kosher Food Firm Opens
v. Quality Food Systems, a new
**>eher food company, has opened
in the South Florida community
to help fill the need for strictly
kosher prepared foods. Owners
are Michael Pecora and Michael
Selig.
Pecora specialixes in marketing
and sake. Ha said Signature
Catering is the firm's trad* name
for full service social catenae.
Naturally Kosher Brand Pre-
pared Foods offers pre-plated and
pre-portioned dinners to
hospitals, nursing homes, ships
and supermarkets. Naturally
Kosher also specializes in making
party platters and catering to
offices and condos.
Selig, a chef, added, "Moat of
our products an available with
no salt added to meet the needs of
Readers
wRite
! : I II, Hi
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Redwood City, Calif., may be
3,000 miles from Boca Raton, but
when the children attending the
Religious School of Temple Beth
El in Boca Raton learned that
arsonists had completely
destroyed the Temple in the
California city, they started a
project to help.
Each Sunday they contributed
as much as they could, and with
the ending of the school season,
they found that they had saved
$130.
The money has been sent to
help the Redwood City Temple
rebuild. There has been an out-
pouring of help from individuals
and churches in the California
city, and a wave of indignation at
the wanton act. There had been a
half dozen earlier attempts to
burn the Temple before the final
successful attempt. Authorities
and the Temple officers agree
that the act was that of a sick
person, rather than an act of anti-
Semitism.
Redwood City is on the penin-
sula, south of San Francisco. The
Temple lost all of its Torahs but
one, and all of its furnishings.
HERMAN HERST, JR.
P.O. Box 1583
Boca Raton, Fla.
EDITOR: The Jewish Floridian:
A group of us attended a lec-
ture and film recently at Florida
Atlantic University, and I, a non-
Jew, am most concerned about
what we learned about the plight
of a unique people, Beta Yisrael,
black African Jews, who are
being decimated, sold into
slavery, and starving in Ethiopia.
From a population of 250,000,
they now are estimated Co
number 19 to 20,000.
According to Jonah Zecharias,
a Falasha, as they call them-
selves, Prime Minister
Menachem Begin is the only
Israeli who promised support for
their emigration to Israel, but he
has been confronted with many
obstacles from political and
religious factions.
WE HERE feel that the
Falashas' blackness has much to
do with the bias and their lack of
sophistication a hindrance, for
the Israelis want only those who
are productive immediately.
These people go back 2,500
years and have been faithfully
practicing their religion, though
thinking themselves the only
'Jews on earth until just years
ago, but always yearning to go
"home" to Israel. Those few who
have reached Israel are adapting
well and learning.
I have written Prime Minister
Menachem Begin an impassioned
letter on their behalf. We in the
United States, Jew and non-Jew,
have supported Israel in many
ways, and I find it reprehensible
that Israel, of all lands, could
close its eyes, ears and doors to
these people, so much a part of
our religious history.
WE FIGHT to save the whales
and endangered animals how
much more priceless this bit of
humanity?
MRS. TIPI M. MICHAELSON
Boca Raton
Cf9Ae
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For over 125
tasty suggestions,
send for our new cook-
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In it, you'll And everything from
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To get your copy, sand 75* plus the label from a
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.1


,'- .!<-

Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 1,1979
Begin in London Calms Storm
Continued front Page 1
meeting marked by sharp verbal
exchanges between himself and
Begin, he announced that he
would vote against the plan. He
also said he would ask to be
relieved from serving on the team
of six ministers, headed by
Interior Minister Yosef Burg,
which is to conduct the
negotiations with the Egyptians.
THE LATEST crisis between
Begin and Weizman which
was headlined in the Egyptian as
well as the Israeli press over the
weekend came at the worst
possible time for Begins govern-
ment. Coinciding as it does with
mounting public resentment over
runaway inflation, it has given
the Labor Alignment opposition
a potent weapon to attack the
government on both the political
and economic fronts. A public
opinion poll published by Yediot
Achronot over the weekend gave
Likud only a 4 percent lead over
Labor should elections be held
now, its narrowest margin since
Likud's election victory in 1977.
Moreover, the defection of
Weizman on the crucial issue of
autonomy barely a week before
Israelis and Egyptians start their
negotiations on the subject, can
only weaken Israel's position.
Labor Party Chairman Shimon
Peres charged in a telephone
interview with the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency over the
weekend that the Likud govern-
ment was "falling apart" on
political and economic issues.
SEVERAL features of the
autonomy plan are, in fact, con-
siderably tougher than the
program originally proposed by
Begin to the ministerial com-
mittee two weeks ago. It ar-
ticulates specifically Israel's
demand that the "source of
authority" for the autonomous
councils to be elected on the West
Bank and Gaza Strip remain the
Israeli Military Government.
Under Begins doctrine, the
Military Government will be
"withdrawn" the term used
advisedly in the Camp David
accords but not abolished. In
his initial proposal, Begin only
implied that point. But under
pressure from Agriculture
Minister Ariel Sharon and
Education Minister Zevnulun
Hammer, he made it specific in
the final version.
The plan also specified total
Israeli control over government-
owned and uncultivated lands on
the West Bank and over all of the
territory's water sources. It
concludes with two unilateral
declarations: that Israel will
never agree to a Palestinian state
and that it will demand
sovereignty over the West Bank
and Gaza Strip at the end of the
five-year transition period of
autonomy.
MORE MODERATE
ministers were reportedly op-
posed to including these ulti-
matums in a plan that, after all,
is supposed to serve as a
negotiating document. But the
hardliners, with Begin's full
endorsement, prevailed. While
Weizman opposed the plan
almost in its entirety, Foreign
Minister Moshe Dayan and
Deputy Prime Minister Yigael
Yadin voted against those
sections specifying Israeli control
over State lands and water
supplies.
Weizman, for his part, in-
dicated that he would not par-
ticipate in the Cabinet vote on
the autonomy plan as a
demonstration of his lack of con-
fidence in it. His view, stated
vigorously in the ministerial
committee, is that Israel should
enter the talks with Egypt due
to start in Beersheba Friday
without any detailed or binding
paper but rather with broad,
informal guidelines prepared by
the Cabinet to instruct the nego-
tiating team.
He told the ministerial com-
Community Calendar
June 2
Jewish Community Center Women's Leogue
June 3
Jewish Community Doy School Ground Brooking 11 a.m.
June 4
Congregation Anshei Sholom Board 9:30 a.m. Jewish Com-
munity Day School Board 8 p.m. Hadassah Golda Meir Study
Group Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood Board
June 5
American Jewish Congress 12:30 p.m.
June 6
Women's American ORT Palm Beach Executive Board 9:30 a.m.
Jewish Community Center Board
June 7
B'nai B'rith Women Medina Board Hadassah Choi Board 10
a.m. National Council of Jewish Women Board 10 a.m.
Women's American ORT Evening 8 p.m.
June 9
Women's American ORT Evening Theater Night 8 p.m.
June 10
B'nai B'rith Mitzvah 9:30 a.m. Women's American ORT Evening
- Picnic and Swim noon
June 11
Women's American ORT Golden Lakes Board -10 a.m.
June 12
B'nai B'rith Women Menorah 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women -
Masada Board 8 p.m. Hodatsah Henrietta Szold Board 1
p.m. Jewish Community Center Comprehensive Senior Service
Center 1 p.m. Women's American ORT- West Palm Beach -12:30
p.m. Pioneer Women Theodore Herzl Board FEDERATION
ANNUAL MEETING Breakers Hotel 7:30 p.m.
June 13
National Council of Jewish Women Workshop 10a.m. Jewish
Community Center Women's League 8 p.m. Temple Beth El
Sisterhood Board 8 p.m. Jewish Community Day School -
Friends 8 p.m. FEDERATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 8 p.m.
June 14
Hadassah Tikvah Board 10 a.m. Hadassah Yovel -1 p.m.
Temple Beth Sholom Lake Worth Breakfast 9:30 a.m.
American Israeli Lighthouse 1 p.m. American Jewish Congress -
Board 12:30 p.m. Hadassah Golda Meir Board 12:30p.m.
mittee that his views were shared
by the army and the defense
establishment. That drew an
angry rejoinder from Begin that
the Defense Minister did not rep-
resent the army. "You represent
the government toward the
army," Weizman was told.
THE DEFENSE Minister
confirmed in a Yediot Achronot
interview Friday that he does not
intend to participate in the
autonomy negotiations although
he will retain his membership on
the supervising committee of 11
ministers.
Government circles conceded
that they are worried about the
Begin-Weizman clash. Should the
Defense Minister resign from the
Cabinet, the repercussions could
be catastrophic for Begin's
coalition government. But
confidants of Weizman said over
the weekend that he is not
considering resignation.
They said that, on the con-
trary, he will continue to fight
with determination for his views
and expected, ultimately, to
succeed and thereby prevent
Israel from making the same kind
of mistakes that threatened the
peace treaty talks with Egypt
last winter.
These sources said that
Weizman feels that while he and
Dayan Israel's principal nego-
tiators in the treaty process
were often overruled by the
Cabinet, their concepts even-
tually were adopted by the
Cabinet majority. He believes,
however, that the delays and
shifts were harmful to the peace
process and fears a similar
situation will develop in the
autonomy talks.
POLITICAL pundits are wary
of predicting the outcome of a
prolonged quarrel between Begin
and Weizman. While Weizman is
popular in the public opinion
polls, he lacks a firm base of
support within Herut where
Begin's tough approach to
autonomy is certain to win back
some of the waverers and die-
hards who were dissatisfied with
the peace treaty with Egypt.
Herut holds its national
convention next month, and
Begin is expected to easily out-
maneuver his Defense Minister
should Weizman provoke a con-
frontation. Nevertheless, with
the economy in severe trouble
and the government's popularity
declining, according to the
opinion polls, Begin is believed to
want to avoid an all-out clash and
may seek to smooth over his
differences with Weizman at least
for the time being.
Government circles maintain
that no serious threat exists to its
parliamentary majority. That
view is based in part on the
assumption that Yadin's
Democratic Movement will not
rock the boat for fear of new
elections that would probably
wipe it off the political map.
The Labor opposition takes
quite a different view. Many
Laborites are convinced that the
Likud government is now more
vulnerable than ever. In a
statement released today, the
Labor Party leadership heaped
scorn on the autonomy plan
which, they said, is tottering
toward collapse even before the
negotiations with Egypt begin.
IN HIS interview with the
JTA, Peres charged that Begin is
heading blindly for a bi-national
state. By proclaiming there is no
more "green line," the demar-
cation between Israel and the
West Bank, by insisting that
autonomy will apply to people,
not territory, and offering Israeli
citizenship to West Bank and
Gaza Strip Arabs, Begin was
"inviting" them to be part of the
autonomy, Peres said.
"We shall wake up one mor-
ning and find ourselves with a bi-
national state with three million
Jews and two million Arabs," he
said.
Peres accused Begin of pre-
senting a hard-line version of
autonomy for "internal con-
sumption." In practice, he said, it
contravened the Camp David
agreement by retaining the
Military Government as the final
authority and would therefore be
rejected out of hand by the
Egyptians and the U.S.
PERES NOTED that although
the Camp David accords spoke of
"withdrawal" not "abolition" of
the Military Government, in the
same sentence the agreement
stipulated that the "self-
governing authority" is to
"replace the existing Military
Government."
Peres said that if he were in
office he would seek to renew the
dialogue with Jordan, with the
agreement of the Egyptians, to
work out a territorial compromise
on the West Bank. This option
was implicit in the Camp David
agreements in the repeated
references to Security Council
Resolution 242, Peres said. But
Begin's ideological opposition
prevented the present govern
ment from even considering it, he
said. ________
i Local News Notes /
Fine-Gostel
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour A. Fine
of Palm Beach Gardens announce
the engagement of their daughter
Karen Joy to Gary S. Gostel, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Gostel of
Miami.
Miss Fine graduated from
Palm Beach Gardens High
School, attended the University
of Florida for two years and
graduated from the University of
Miami School of Nursing with a
BS degree in nursing. She is a
member of Delta Phi Epsilon
Sorority.
Gostel graduated from the
University of Miami with a J.D.
degree. He is a member of a legal
fraternity.
A September wedding is
planned.
Bar Mitzvahs
ADAM GREENHAUS
On June 8 and June 9 Adam
Greenhaus will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah and participate in Sab-
bath services at Temple Beth
David of Northern Palm Beach
County.
MICHAEL HASNER
On June 15 and June 16
Michael Scott Hasner will par-
ticipate in the Sabbath services
on the occasion of his Bar
Mitzvah at Temple Beth David of
Northern Palm Beach County.
STATE OF
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Holiday Inn Pompano Beach
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Wed., June 6 3:00 p.m.
Holiday Inn Miami Beach
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Fri., JuneB 3:00 p.m.
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rnday, June i, iy The Jewish Floridmn of Palm Beach County
Page 7
To Anti-Semitism
Soviets Introduce the China Factor
WASHINGTON The Soviet
Union has given a "potentially
deadlier edge" to its virulent
anti-Zionism by adding the
"China Factor," Dr. William
Korey, a specialist on Soviet
affairs, charges.
In a report to B'nai B'rith
International, Dr. Korey, the
organization's director of inter-
national policy research, declares
that the coupling of the
Kremlin's "unceasing anti-
Zionist propaganda assault,
which incorporates every anti-
Semitic canard," with its media
attacks against China "only
deepens the anxiety of a Soviet
Jewish community."
DR. KOREY says the "China
Factor" was introduced in 1971
by Vladimir Begun, the Soviet
Union's Julius Streicher. Writing
in the Minsk journal, Belarus,
Begun cited U.S. Secretary of
State Henry' Kissinger's contacts
with Chinese Communist Party
leader Mao Tse-tung and warned
that they were being made under
the banner of the "six-cornered
Star of David."
Because of the publication's
relative obscurity, the "China
Factor" did not gain much
prominence until this year, Dr.
Korey says. "Since January, the
China Factor' has been in-
cessantly repeated and has
become a central element of the
Soviets' anti-Zionist campaign,"
he asserts.
The opening shot was fired by
Toss on Jan. 8. In an English-
language radio broadcast, Tass
declared that China was
preparing to establish diplomatic
relations with Israel, an act
which would demonstrate
"Maoist double-dealing in the
Arab East."
IN AN Arab-language broad-
cast the same day, Radio Moscow
reported that "Peking supports
Israel's demands for annexing
the West Bank, Gaza and the
Golan Heights."
Two weeks later, Dr. Korey
says, the Ukrainian Communist
Youth organ, Komsomolskoye
znamia, claimed that China and
Zionism were intimately linked
by two forces "inherent" in their
ideologies: racism and
domination.
The publication quoted
Chinese Deputy Premier Keng
Piao as having said, "What the
Chinese and the Jewish people
have in common is the fact that
their love for their country is
stronger than that of any other
people" and contended that this
i^^Lkconstituted "open racism."
Peking was also accused of
" nurturing plans for world
hegemony" while Israel was
charged with "trying to dictate
its will to the neighboring
countries," Dr. Korey reports.
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THE SOVIET publication said
that because the Chinese were
trying to establish close ties with
the United States an issue
placed on the agenda of the U.S.
Congress it was inevitable
that Peking would seek "to
assure for itself the support of the
influential pro-Israeli lobby."
Dr. Korey reports that Pravda
put the issue in the spotlight on
Jan. 25. In a leading article, one
of the Soviet Union's principal
anti-Semitic ideologists. Vladimir
Bolshakov, contended that China
was preparing to "normalize"
relations with Israel and that the
United States was "actively sup-
porting these steps" by en-
couraging international Zionism.
He described Zionism as "one of
the shock troops of U.S. im-
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 1, 1979

Jewish Community Center Presents
.- yJM
KEREN ORR COMMUNITY
PRESCHOOL
Iria Murray and Debbie
Sabarra, co-chairpersons, an-
nounce that the Pre-School Com-
mittee has voted to hold the line
on fees for the 1979-80 school
year. They are as follows: Pre-
School: 8:30-1 ($675); 8:30-3
($900), which includes enrich-
ment program from 1-3; 8:30-5
($1,125) includes supervised free
play from 3-5.
Registration already has
begun. Class sizes are limited.
For further information, contact
Fran Witt.
BRIDGE BUFFS
Al Merion conducts duplicate
bridge every Sunday starting at
7:30 p.m. at the Jewish Com-
munity Center. The program is
open to the entire community.
MEN'S ATHLETIC
COUNCIL
Joseph Karp, chairperson of
the Men's Athletic Council,
announces that softball is being
held every Sunday at Lake Lytle
Park at 8:30 a.m. All players are
welcome.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
On Sunday, April 29, the
Jewish Community Center of the
Palm Beaches held its fourth
annual meeting at the Sheraton
Inn. The newly elected Board of
Directors was installed by Cantor
Elaine Shapiro of Temple Beth
El.
Many center volunteers and
workers were commended for
their dedication to center ac-
tivities this past year. President
of the Board, Zelda Pincourt and
chairman of the Board, Robert
Rapaport spoke of the center's
progress and its bright future.
Following dessert, JCC Board
members and staff presented an
original music program entitled,
"Israel Alive and Singing,"
under the direction of Michael
Soil.
The officers for 1979-80 year
are as follows: president, Zelda
Pincourt; chairman of the Board,
Robert D. Rapaport; vice
presidents, Alan Bernstein,
Emanuel Gerstein, Dr. Paul
Klein, Iris Murray, Dr. Howard
Sabarra; treasurer, Dr. Thomas
Davidoff; secretary, Andrea
Weinberg. Board members are
Henry Blum, Stanley Brenner,
Dr. Stanley Dober, Shirley
Enselberg, Anne Faivus, Judge
Edward Fine, Dr. Allan Fox,
Florence Karlsberg, Joseph
Karp, Alan and Bea Keiser,
Stanley Lustig, Joseph Molat,
William Moss, Gail Pariser,
Michael Puder-Harris, Sam
Strow, Anne Tanen, Barbara
Weinstein; honorary trustees:
Madame Bea Alexander,, Alan
and Helene Cummings, Morris
Messing; past presidents: Dr.
Robert Burger, Detra Kay.
SUMMER CAMP PROGRAM
CAMP SHALOM
The Camp Shalom grounds are
now being prepared for this
summer's activities.
The program will include many
sports activities such as archery,
tennis (with a professional
teacher), softball, volleyball,
basketball and two daily swims.
There will be an arts and crafts
specialist, and music and drama
will be incorporated into the
program.
PRE-SCHOOL CAMP
This year for the first time
parents may choose between two
pre-school campsites. The Jewish
Community Center's Pre-School
Camp, under the directorship of
Mrs. Molly Sims, has made
available a limited number of
places at the JCC facility as well
as a larger and comprehensive
program at Camp Shalom.
A half-day program will be
available at the JCC facility only.
Children, registered for the half-
day program, must be picked up
by their parents at 1 p.m. Trans-
portation will not be provided for
half-day participants.
JCC WOMEN'S LEAGUE
Mark your calendar for June 23
when the JCC Women's League
will present Mystery Night. For
further information, contact
Carol Klein.
SENIOR NEWS
Transportation is available
from the Comprehensive Senior
Service Center, Monday to
Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., within
the designated area for transit
disadvantaged seniors, 60 years
or older, to go to doctors' offices,
dentists, lawyers, social service
agencies, food shopping, and
nutrition sites. Call the center for
further information.
Adult Community Education
Classes have ended for the
summer but will resume in
September. Classes will be an-
nounced in August.
Sunday for Seniors will be held
on Sunday, June 10 and June 24
at the center from 1 to 3 p.m. An
afternoon of socialization, games,
conversation and entertainment
is planned.
Project Good Health continues
on Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. Chair-
person Jean Gross announces the
following programs will be of-
fered in June:
June 7, Dr. Kimmel, family
doctor, on "Family Health."
June 14, Social Security ad-
ministrator, Tom Perry, will
speak on Medicare. June 21, Dr.
Alfred Levin, gynecologist, will
speak on "Female Disorders."
Personal Life History Class
will be taught by Jean Scher.
Join with thousands of older
adults in Florida who are
recording their personal life
histories and experiences to share
with their family and friends. The
class is limited to 10 persons and
will continue for six weeks. The
The
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Your Hosts, MICHAEL LEFKOWlTZ A ALEX SMILOW
Resarve Now for die Hi* Holy Days &SuccoHi
Service* CmtKM fcy a Proaipent Cantor
first session will begin on June 6
at 10 a.m. and is open to all.
For men: Round Table
Discussion with Marshall Dan,
discussion leader. Do you want to
sound off and exchange opinions
about the world today? "Round
Table Discussion" begins June 4
at 1:30 p.m. under the leadership
of Marshall Dan.
Films will be held on the
second Wednesday of June, July
and August, at 1:30 p.m.
Second Tuesday Club Sam
Rubin, president, announces:
Second Tuesday Club will be
holding its regular meeting on
Tuesday, June 12, at 1 p.m. Ruth
Hyde, chairperson of entertain-
ment, announces the Ruth Hyde
Group will present Lillian
Kellman and Lillian Pokedoff, a
singing duo.
TRIPS
On July 18 join the crowd for
"Musicana," a night of music
and entertainment. The buses
will leave from the clubhouse of
Century Village and the Jewish
Community Center.
Dec. 2 5, join the group at the
Lido Spa. Call the center and ask
for Bonnie.
Another trip to Sarasota is
planned for Aug. 10, 11, and
return to West Palm Beach on
Aug. 12. The Asolo Theatre
presents on Friday evening
"History of the American
Theatre," a comedy, and on
Saturday, "The Cherry
Orchard," a drama. Call the
center and ask for Bonnie.
Artist of the Month chair-
person, Esther Molat, announces
a special exhibit by the Village
Photographic Society of Century
Village, president Herman
Tauber. The center is open
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Charlotte Berlind, volunteer group worker, admires display of
photographs from the Century VUlage Photographic Society of
which Herman Tauber is president. This display will remain at
the JCC CSSC until the end of June.
Florence Karlsberg and Mimi Kreisler co-chaired the Israel
Independence Day Fashion Show, held at the home of Robert
Rapaport.
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Friday, June 1,1979
The JeuHth FUmdfan of Palm Beach County

A t Stake
Page 9
' The Very Existence of Israel5
Lake Worth Couple
Gets Law Decrees
W
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON Israeli Minister of Justice
Shmuel Tamir cautioned Ameri-
can Jewish community leaders
that "the security of Israel, the
very existence of Israel" are at
stake in the next phase of the
Egyptian-Israeli-American
negotiations opening in El Arish
May 26. He spoke at a dinner
meeting of the American-Israel
Public Affairs Committee.
Alluding to Israel's determina-
tion to maintain its view of
autdhomy for the West Bank,
Tamir said "as highly im-
portant" as the Sinai is "Samaria
and Judaea are intertwined in the
tiny piece of geography" that is
Israel.
Israel "for the goal of peace,
has shown a global viewpoint and
understanding of the free world's
needs," he said, in its peace pro-
posals.
POINTING TO anti-Israel
statements from Syria, the
terrorist Palestine Liberation
Organization and even Egypt in
recent days, Tamir said, "We in
our generation learned to trust
the threats of dictators and the
noises and voices of totalitarian
regimes because they are true.
Hitler lived up to fulfillment of
every threat."
The more than 1,000 men and
women at the dinner meeting at
the Capital Hilton Hotel broke
into applause when Tamir said
that Jerusalem is open for Jews,
Moslems and Christians for "the
first time in 2,000 years" and
"this is the way it will remain."
Tamir, who met here with
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance
and Special Ambassador Robert
Strauss who is heading the U.S.
delegation to the autonomy talks,
left later to address two United
Jewish Appeal functions in Tor-
onto.
President Carter sent greetings
to the AIPAC conference dinner.
Among the guests were Presi-
dential political advisor Hamil-
ton Jordan, Presidential con-
sultant Edward Sanders, Assis-
tant Secretary of State for Near
East and South Asian Affairs
Harold Saunders, White House
Congressional liaison Frank
Moore and two score of Senators
SEN. ALAN Cranston ID-
Calif.), the second ranking leader
of the Senate's Democratic
majority, and Robert Pack wood
IR., Ore.), preceded Tamir in the
speaking program. Referring to
the impending Carter-Brezhnev
conference in mid-June in Vienna,
Cranston indicated that because
of the second SALT agreement,
the Soviet Union "won't actively
subvert" the Egyptian-Israeli
treaty and that the Soviet Union
has shown "restraint" on de-
velopments in Iran.
"The promise of the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment has been sub-
nettle CRk
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applause in his series of attacks
on the Carter Administration's
Middle East policy. With
Saunders and top White House
officials sitting nearby, he
pointed out that "at a time when
we should be strengthening
Israel. Harold Saunders was
telling the Arabs on the West
Bank 'hold on' we will get
Israel out of the West Bank like
did in Sinai."
we
stantially recognized," Cranston
said, regarding increased Soviet
Jewish emigration. "That does
not mean it should be repealed or
amended," he said, but that
"compliance" with the trade law
"has been achieved." He ex-
pressed hope that "much more
comes out' of the summit con-
ference than the SALT agree-
ment.
Packwood aroused storms of
Galilee Settlers Assured by Dulzin
SAFAD (JTA) Uneasy There aie two major areas of
settlers in Galilee received assur- concern. One is that Israel may
ances from Jewish Agency Chair- one.aav withdraw from the Golan
man Leon Dulzin that Israel Heights m tne course of a peace
would never endanger them by ^tlement with Syria, exposing
returning the Golan Heights to tlie uPPer Galilee once again to
Syria and that the problems tne potential threat of Syrian
plaguing the region would be &*ns-
cZLZ S^^Z ulzin' THE OTHER **< with
fej the. TWorld. pon"t priority given to development
Organ zation and Jewish Agency projects in the Negev where the
When Nova University's Law
School recently held its third
annual commencement, Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur Bickel of Lake
Worth both received degrees.
The distinction both have
earned in their professions as well
as their studies over the past
three years, though, is something
no piece of paper, not even a
sheepskin, could ever document.
Arthur Bickel, M.D., carried
nearly a full class load at the Law
School while working full-time as
a pathologist at Bethesda
Hospital in Boynton Beach. With
all that, he still managed to come
out in the top 10 percent of his
class.
Riva Bickel, with a PhD in bio-
chemistry from the University of
Hawaii, did her studying between
taking care of the couple's two
small daughters, and doing free-
lance gag writing for cartoonists
all over the country. She will
graduate first in the class.
Cooperation, rather than com-
petition, has been the key to the
Bickels' astonishing record of
success. Husband and wife at-
tended the same classes ("it was
easier on the commuting"),
studied at different times of the
day so that one of them would
always be available to the
children, and now plan to open a
law office together.
"Going to law school has been
a fantastic experience for both of
us," says Mrs. Bickel. "It hasn't
been easy, of course, but we've
both enjoyed every minute of it."
(
Executives, toured Galilee with
his chief aides and spoke to
representatives of settlements
and towns here and in Tiberias,
Rosh Pina, Carmiel and other
places.
Israeli army and air force will be
deployed after their withdrawal
from Sinai, solutions to Galilee's
urgent economic, housing and
population problems will have to
wait.
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tfWMy-yfrM^-rt^frft *>** "--J -1-
Page 10
.....
The Jewish Fhridian of Palm Beach County

Friday, June 1,1979

Preparing for the symbolic turning of the earth during official groundbreaking ceremonies by
Riverside Memorial Chapels for Broward County's newest and largest Jewish funeral chapel
were (from left) Cantor Maurice Neu of Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise; Rabbi Emanuel Shenk;
Rabbi Bernard Shoter of Temple-in-the-Pines; Rabbi Milton Schlinsky of Sharon Gardens;
Riverside executive vice president Alfred Golden; Rabbi Philip Labowitz of Temple Beth Israel
and president of the North Broward Rabbinical Association; Rabbi Seymour Friedman,
executive director of the United Synagogue of America; Rabbi Sheldon Harr of Plantation
Jewish Center; Rabbi Paul Katz of Temple Sinai, Hollywood; and Rabbi Albert Troy of Sunrise
Jewish Center.
Riverside Memorial Chapels
To Open West Broward Facility
Riverside Memorial Chapels of
Florida has broken ground on
Broward County's newest,
largest and most modern Jewish
funeral chapel, according to
Alfred Golden, executive vice
president of Riverside of Florida.
The West Broward chapel will
be located at Commercial Boule-
vard, just west of NW 66th
Terrace near University Drive,
and will have a seating capacity
of nearly 300 persons. It was
designed by award-winning Coral
Springs architect Morris Simon,
and is scheduled for completion
later this year.
The new Tamarac facility has
been designed to satisfy every
aspect of the Jewish funeral
tradition, and the Orthodox
ritual, when requested, will be
strictly observed, according to
Arthur Grossberg, F.D., vice
president in charge of Riverside's
Broward operations. He added
that the new chapel will have a
mikveh for the ritual washing of
the dead.
Staffing the new Riverside
chapel will be Mark Davis, L.E.,
who will be assisted by Gross-
berg; Leo Hack, vice president
and religious adviser; and Ken-
neth Kay, F.D., vice president in
charge of Dade operations.
This will be the eighth funeral
service location operated in Flor-
ida by Riverside Memorial
Chapels, the largest and one of
the oldest Jewish funeral firms in
the nation, founded in New York
City in 1915 and serving Florida
for more than 40 years. Other
locations are in southwest Miami,
Miami Beach, North Miami
Beach, Hollywood, Sunrise, West
Palm Beach, and five locations in
the metropolitan New York area.
Washington Savings
Unbeatable Rates
and a Free Gift too!
Washington Savings
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
ASSTS EXCEED $950,000,000
CONVENIENT OFFICES SERVING YOU IN FLORIDA
MIAMI REACH
1701 Meridian Avenue/674-6612
1234 Washington Avenue/674-6330
1133 Normandy Drive/674-6563
1500 Bay Road/673-8306
517 Arthur Godfrey Road/674-6710
810 Lincoln Road/674-6868
NORTH MIAMI REACH
633 N.E. 167th Street/652-9200
2221 N.E. 164th Street/940-397 5
CORAL GARLES
520 Biltmore Way/445-7905
AV HARROR ISLANDS
1160 Kane Concourse/865-4344
HOLLYWOOD
450 North Park Road/981-9192
ROCA RATON
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WEST PALM REACH
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VOUR ACCOUNT IS NSURfD UP TO S 40 000 Bv AN AGfNCY Of THf FEOfPAl GOVfRNMF.NI
JACK D GORDON. President ARTHUR H COURSHON. Chairman ol Ihe Board
Israel Hospital Opens
Lauderdale Office

Shaare Zedek Hospital of Jeru-
salem has announced the opening
of a mid-Florida regional office in
Fort Lauderdale, according to an
announcement by Sidney L.
Olson, regional vice president.
Henry Tuchman has been named
to head the operation which will
be located at 3101 North Federal
Highway.
Tuchman, formerly Quebec
director of the Jewish National
Fund and the Israel Bonds
Organization, is a graduate of
New York University.
Shaare Zedek, Jerusalem's 102-
year old hospital is completing
the construction of its new 500-
bed facility in Bayit Vegan, a
suburb of Jerusalem. The new
Medical Center was dedicated
last November and will be open
for patients this year. The $50
million, 10-building complex
incorporates the latest in medical
technology. It replaces a 75-year-
old structure which is located in
the heart of the city.
Almost 100 Floridians and
members of the Southeast Region
of the American Committee for
Shaare Zedek attended the
dedication ceremonies. Several
facilities at the new center have
been made possible by. members
of the region.
The American Committee for
Shaare Zedek Hospital in Jeru-
salem maintains offices in Miami,
New York and in the principal
cities of the United States and in
most European countries.
Bludworth Joins DA's on Israel Tour
David Bludworth of West
Palm Beach was among U.S. dis-
trict attorneys to travel to Israel
recently to make an on-the-scene
study of the Israel judicial
system.
At Bar-Ilan University in
Ramat Gan, they inspected the
largest selection of common law
material in the Near East in the
university's Law Library. They
also inspected its Rabbinic
Response Project, computerized
references to Jewish law.
xXv.\v.^^^v.^^v.\\xxxx:xxxxxx::::^:v:\v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.^^\'............
X'X-X'X'X'X'X'X-X'I'X <&! !''' XrX'XrX'XNV.V.YAV'NSSV'y'V.V-V.NNNV'V.VANWv'X-V'X'X
South County News |
REFORM CONGREGATION
OF DELRAY
The Reform Congregation of
Delray Men's Club breakfast will
be on Sunday, June 10, at 9 a.m.
at McDonalds on US 1, Boynton
Beach. Contact Bemie Etish for
more information. A guest
speaker will discuss chiro-
practics.
TEMPLE EMETH ,
The Temple Emeth Singles
Club of Delray Beach will hold a
picnic on Monday, June 11, at
Morakami Park at 11:30 a.m.
Bring your lunch and a chair. All
mature, single men and women
are welcome. For further in-
formation, call president Marion
Tobins.
The Jewish High Holy Days
begin on Sept. 21. Reservations
for seats are now being accepted
from members at Temple Emeth
in Delray Beach, Monday
through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to
noon.
Daily services are held at 8:45
a.m. and 5 p.m. Late Friday
services are at 8 p.m. and Satur-
day services at 9 a.m. All are
welcome.
So- County Calendar
JlNMl
Shovuoth Services Temple Beth El 10:30 a.m. Temple Beth El
Confirmation -8 p.m.
Jut 4
Temple Beth El Single Parents 8 p.m.
Jowl
Temple Beth El Family Service 8:15 p.m.
JlNMlO
Temple Beth El Brotherhood Breakfast 10 a.m.
JWM.11
Women's American ORT East -1 p.m.
Jwm14
Temple Beth El Executive Board 8 p.m.
tan 11
Temple Beth El College Homecoming Service 8:15 p.m.
Jim 21
Temple Beth El Sisterhood 10 a.m. Temple Beth El Board 8
p.m.
June 25
Women's American ORT East Board 1 p.m.
J


ay, June 1,1979
The Jewish FloridianofPaim Beach County
Page 11
nh Favors U.S. Stand To Withdraw from WHO
pW YORK "The proposal
spend Israel from the World
Organization for political
_b deserves a political
rise. If this United Nations
tlized agency abandons its
litarian purpose, it no
ft deserves the participation
support of peace-loving
Rose E. Matzkin,
Hadassah Medical
lization chairman, said.
|e endorse the stand of
Vanden Heuval, U.S.
ntative to the WHO
|ibly in Geneva, who
that the U.S. will with-
Dm that agency if Israel is
i. Furthermore, we urge
ant Carter to recommend
tigress that the United
: contribution to the WHO
Ithheld until this agency
68 its proper role of
^ting the health of people."
Matzkin released this
lent through the Hadassah
uarters in New York. She is
presently in Jerusalem attending
the 30th anniversary celebration
of the Hebrew University Hadas-
sah Medical School and the
annual meeting of the Board of
Governors of the Hebrew
University.
"EVERY YEAR millions of
people die from natural catas-
trophies such as flood, drought
and earthquakes. Millions more
die from the diseases of poverty
and lack of sanitation, such as
malnutrition, cholera, childbed
fever, leprosy, and so forth. In
this International Year of the
Child, when the World Health
Assembly should be concerned
w_Ith_ Promoting the total health
of children so that they will grow
into intelligent functioning
human beings, a large bloc of the
member states, instead, are
diverting their energies to
carrying on a political battle
against Israel.
"Instead of encouraging the
exchange of medical and scien-
tific knowledge and establishing
regional cooperation to fight
V 1
ifinale of the Israel Independence Day celebration took
" at the West Palm Beach Auditorium where the Florida
ohony Orchestra performed a special Jewish program,
ired from left to right are: Evelyn Blum, mistress of
nonies for the evening; guest speaker, Meir Romem,
ty consul general of Israel; Juanita Kreps, U.S. Secretary
tmmerce; and Robert Rapaport, chairman of the program.
THE FAMILY JACOBS'
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disease, the WHO is used to erect
barriers.
"What is even more ironic is
that, since 1967, the health of the
Arab peoples of the West Bank
and of Gaza under the ad-
ministration of Israel has far out-
stripped that of the surrounding
Arab countries despite their
greater wealth.
"Let me give you some
statistics to compare the quality
of life:
Infant mortality rates per
1,000: Saudi Arabia, 97.9; Israel,
22; Administered Territories, 30.
Population per hospital bed:
Saudi Arabia, 897; Syria, 1,023;
Israel, 180; Administered Ter-
ritories, 405; Egypt, 461.
Education expenditures in
the Administered Territories
from 1968 to 1976 have in-
creased: classrooms, 68 percent;
students, 66 percent; kinder-
garten, 200 percent; elementary
schools, 85 percent; secondary
schools, 135 percent and teaching
training colleges, 838 percent.
While illiteracy in Israel is 12
percent in neighboring countries
it is: Jordan, 68 percent; Saudi
Arabia, 85 percent; Iraq, 74
percent; Syria, 60 percent and
Egypt, 60 percent.
Wages and Standards of
Living: In 1968 Israeli workers
earned double those of the West
Bank and Gaza. In 1976 the daily
net wages in the territories was
50 pounds, and in Israel it was
58, showing clearly that the wage
levels are equalizing.
"Furthermore, it is possible for
humanitarian considerations to
transcend political hostilities for
the benefit of people. For years,
Israel and Jordan have main-
tained an 'Open Bridges' policy
where relatives from both sides of
the river visit each other.
Produce from the West Bank
goes to Jordan, and sick people
needing sophisticated medical
care cross over to be treated at
the Hadassah Hospital."
t Medical students from Arab
countries, still officially at war
with Israel, visit Hadassah every
summer to share knowledge of
medical problems common to the
region and to be brought up-to-
date on the latest medical ad-
vances. Thus Israel implements
the human rights goals of the
World Health Organization and
of UNESCO.
Thousands of Lebanese
families have come through the
'Good Fence' into Israel for
medical care, to shop and even to
work, in order to have food, since
their own country is economically
devastated.
Hadassah doctors serve on
various committees of the WHO
and for years the WHO has dis-
tributed an antibiotic Rifam-
pican for trachoma, and has
advised the use of thalidomide,
an otherwise dangerous drug, for
leprosy both treatments
developed by Hadassah doctors.
Mrs. Matzkin asks, "Should all
of this be denied to people
because of political differences?"
She concluded: "The American
people make a very generous con-
tribution to the specialized
agencies of the United Nations
out of consideration for the
welfare of people and in order to
promote better understanding
and world peace. However, wide-
spread opinion indicates that
they see no reason to contribute
their taxpayer dollars to an
organization whose members not
only betray humanitarian goals
of the UN but which denigrates
our values and incites hostility."
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Page IS.
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
~>
Friday, June 1,1979
Ro~*l
WERE LOOKING
FOR HOLDERS OF
ISRAEL BONDS
ISRAEL
WANTS TO
THANK YOU
BY GIVING YOU
A PREMIUM IN
ADVANCE
INTEREST
<*
If you are the registered owner of a State of Israel Savings
Bond maturing ANY TIME IN 1979, you will receive credit for the
full maturity value of your Bonds NOW-provided that you
REINVEST the entire proceeds in a new Bond of the next higher
level.
You helped Israel in a time of great crisis.
Your investment dollars are needed even more urgently for
the challenges of today.
W you have moved from a northern city where you bought Israel
Bonds In 1M7 (or prior years) and want to re-invest them, call the
special Israel Bond Re-investment Hot Line 659-1782.
For further Information and a prospectus. Reese contact
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
100 Sunrise Avenue
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
659-1445
'>
o-


Leo MindUn
iets Are the Common Enemy
aed from Page 4
felt that the Soviets
Itigating war in the
Cast by an unfettered
ligration Dolic v of Jews
which made it increaa-
Bcult for the Arabs to
Bir "lost territories" a
unsubstantiated by
and other pertinent
alone the anti-Israel
the Soviet Union itself.
|>st recent report of a sub
raeli trade mission to
the culmination of
rowing impatience with
expansionist aims in
le East, as well as a dis-
lent in America's
shout it but failure to do
beyond being con-
^lus its own shedding of
ars that it had elected a
tic Communist course
lonolithic Muscovite
9-
cample, China gave its
tional support to the
Sadat 'peace initiative m
November, 1977 support
which never wavered during the
difficult negotiations that fol-
lowed.
IN PACT, A. Yodfat reports in
"China, Israel and the Arab-
Israeli Conflict" {Beayot Ben-
leumiyot, Vo. 18, No. 1-2) that
even a year before the Sadat
flight to Jerusalem, the Chinese
were already voicing their under-
standing of Israeli interests in
the tace of a mounting world
Palestinian claque intended to
deny them.
Perhaps most significant here,
as defined by Howard Spier, of
the Institute of Jewish Affairs in
London, was that "the Chinese
saw Sadat's initiative essentially
as an attempt to bypass the great
powers," and they could hardly
fail to appreciate the impact of
this especially on Moscow.
Following Israel's 1978 foray
into Lebanon to clean out Pales-
tinian enclaves there, Igor
Belyaev wrote on Aug. 23 in
Literaturnaya Gazeta that the
Cabinet Approves
utonomy Plan;
eizman at Talks
JSALEM (JTA) -
ibinet Monday approved
Minister Begin's
ly proposal, but decided
vould not be submitted to
pyptians as a formal Israeli
i at this stage.
Ithis way, it seemed tb>
rers, the differences be-
Begin and the majority on
ne hand and Defense
let- Ezer Weizman and
pi Minister Moshe Dayan
Tigael Yadin on the other
to a certain extent
ed. Dayan, Weizman and
had opposed the sub-
bn of a hardline and detailed
(to the Egyptians at the
" of the negotiations.
PROPOSALS as ap-
fed Monday will therefore be
Nines" for the negotiating
light of this arrangement,
[of Prime Minister Begin's
personal request to them,
Weizman and Dayan withdrew
their requests not to participate
in the negotiations.
They will attend when the first
round of the autonomy talks
opens at Beersheba on Friday.
The plan as finalized Monday
contains 20 points, but sources
said the 20 encompassed all the
22 submitted by the Prime
Minister. There had been some
stylistic editing but no
alterations of substance.
CABINET Secretary Arye
Naor revealed that the vote on
two of the points had been by 11
to 4 majority. The speculation
was that the two controversial
points were the declaration that
Israel will claim sovereignty over
the West Bank and Gaza in five
years' time, and the proposal
detailing Israel's demand to
retain control over public and
uncultivated lands on the West
Bank.
Soviet Jews Given
Harsh Sentences
5VV YORK (JTA) -
Moldavian Jewish refus-
arrested Jan. 5 in a Beltsy
for brawling with anti-
kitic thugs have received
\h prison sentences for their
in the melee, according to
National Conference on
Bet Jewry (NCSJ). The seven
ligans who provoked the
ient were never arrested.
tleksandr Milner has been
enced to six years in prison,
Be Arkady Feldman and
bkel Groberman each received
^-year terms. Their trial was
13.
UNIDENTIFIED non-
. who came to their defense
hng the fight and was arrested
In them drew an even longer,
Ihough unknown sentence, the
PbJ reported.
The three men, all of whom had
Chinese were setting great store
by "the huge significance" of the
dialogue between Israel and
Egypt, and so the Chinese were
obviously right about Moscow's
unhappy feelings.
AS IF TO underscore Peking's
awareness of the Soviet shadow
over the entire Levant, the
Chinese representative at the UN
met officially with the then
Israeli Ambassador Chaim
Herzog, "the first (meeting) of its
kind," as the Institute of Jewish
Affairs notes, since the 1950s.
On a trip to Peking in Novem-
ber, 1978, U.S. Sen. Richard
Stone (D., Fla.) declared that the
Chinese seemed to be moving
toward "Sadat's approach" in
the Middle East, that is, peace
with Israel under certain condi-
tions.
But Sen. Stone warned that, at
the same time, they were con-
tinuing to cozy up to the PLO
a seeming ambivalence char-
acteristic of the cautious thaw in
China's Israel policy. What we
could hope for, said Stone, was a
time when both countries could
find a common bond "in resisting
Soviet expansion," which is, of
course, what started the thaw ir
the first place.
ALSO IN Peking in November
last year was Howard Squadron,
president of the American Jewish
Congress, who met with Premier
Keng Piao and was told:
t The Chinese and Jewish peo-
ples "have in common more love
for their country than any other
people";
Israel must withdraw from
"most"of the occupied Arab
territories, a qualification
demonstrating a decided soften-
ing of, China's previous position
on a Middle East settlement.
The Soviets responded to this
manifest China-Israel warmup
with commentary on their over-
seas program, Moscow in Arabic,
on Feb. 22 and 23. The London-
based Institute of Jewish Affairs
reports the commentary as
having declared that "Since the
Chinese leaders sought the most
advanced weapons available in
the West they clearly could
not ignore the fact that '60-to-70
per cent' of the American
military-industrial complex was
'supervised by Zionist capital
which is the main support of
Israel.'
AGAINST THIS backdrop
was a secret meeting reported
near Zurich in June, 1978 be-
tween Israel Defense Minister
Ezer Weizman and Chinese For-
eign Minister M. Huang Hua at
which, it is supposed, the Chinese
official expressed his whole-
hearted approval of Israel's
stance in the Middle East.
What does the future hold?
One fact is that China has a mini-
scule Jewish population. Its
Moslem minority, in contrast,
numbers 40 million. This means
that Peking would not, in the
end, accede to a Middle East
peace treaty that fails to include
a Palestinian solution.
On the other hand, Palestin-
ians or no Palestinians, the peace
accord has strengthened the U.S.
hand in the area and significantly
weakened the Soviets. Further-
more, the PLO itself, once a
China friend, is now a foe, par-
ticularly since its condemnation
of China's invasion of Vietnam.
AS THE Institute points out.
even when China was most
closely associated with the PLO.
"she never formally endorsed
that organization's charter. Nor
have the Chinese ever challenged
Israel's right to statehood, and in
1975 they expressed doubt on the
feasibility of the return of the
Palestinian refugees to their
homes."
In the end, two things in
addition favor a China-Israel
accord: an insatiable Soviet
appetite for power, which the
Chinese are bent on controlling.
And then there is Israel's tech-
nology which, in less strategic
areas, Israel is more likely to
share with the Chinese without
the strings that the U.S. would
surely attach to it.
For a China-Israel accord, the
future looks better than ever.
8%
Due: 12/15/2003*
Price: 100%
Callable
$12,000,000
Delaware County Industrial
Development Authority
Delaware County, Pennsylvania
(Martins Run Lifecare Community)
First Mortgage Revenue Bonds
Series of 1979
applied to emigrate to Israel,
were celebrating Feldman's
receipt of his visa at the restaur-
ant when seven youths began to
insult and taunt them with such
statements as "How long must
we put up with you lousy Yids?"
Eventually the Jews were
provoked into defending them-
selves and were aided by the
incensed Russian customer, the
NCSJ said.
GROBERMAN, who was
released from custody prior to the
Apr. 13 trial and was to be a
material witness, actually ap-
peared as one of the accused.
His parents, wife and children,
and Milner's father all live in
Israel. Groberman's exit applica-
tion had been denied on the
grounds that he holds state
secrets as a result of his army
service.
In the opinion of Bond Counsel, interest on the Bonds will be free from federal
income tax and the Bonds and interest thereon will be exempt from
Pennsylvania personal property and income taxes.
Martins Run is designed to provide for the needs of elderly persons for living
accommodations, meals and health care. United Synagogue of America,
Delaware Valley Region, will sponsor religious and cultural activities and
provide dietary supervision for the community, a non-profit, non-denominational
corporation.
A First Mortgage on land and buildings and a security interest on fixed
equipment will be granted by the Authority to secure the bonds.
An Economic Feasibility Study for the project has been prepared by
recognized consultants and is part of the Preliminary Official Statement.
The Groaa Revenues of the facility will be pledged to the payment of Debt
Service.
A Bond Reserve Fund will be established equal to approximately 1.4 times
the average annual Debt Service requirements.
A Separate Reserve Account will be established by Martins Run after
completion and occupancy. Martins Run will be expected to maintain this
reserve at $2,000,000, or more under certain circumstances.
A Trustee Bank will be appointed which will hold the various funds under
the Indenture to pay principal and interest on the bonds and will have the
power to protect the rights of the bondholders.
Proposed tSMSi other era m ail M varying yields and priced ai 100%.
This offering of the Delaware County Industrial Development Authority
Bonds is made only by the Official Statement, a Preliminary copy of which may
be obtained from the Underwriters listed below. Any indication of interest in
response to this advertisement will involve no obligation or commitment of any
kind.
Please tend me a copy of the Preliminary Official Statement for the proposed bond
offering for Martins Run.
NAME
ADORESS
city*:____
-STATE.
.ZIP.
TELEPHONE.
Residence
My Account Executive Is
M-l-Tt
.
Member
York Stock Exchange. Inc.
BUTCHER & SINGER INC.
1 NORTH OCEAN BLVD.
BOCA RATON, FLA. 33432
._____________(305)368-7121


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 1, 1979
Where Do Our KidsGo fromHere? ^f^Sl^fSS
By MORDECAI LEVOW
On Thursday, June 7, nine I
young people will graduate froml
the Jewish Community Day!
School. Some have been with us a
short tune some for a number
of years. They have received a
fine secular education and a fine
Jewish education. We do not yet
have a high school at the Jewish
Community Day School. The big
question is where do our kids
go from here?
Several of our congregations
have religious school con-
firmation programs. Temple Beth
El has a somewhat better
developed high school program.
Little is done, however, on a com-
munity-wide basis for those
students who might be reedy for
a viable, intensive high school of
Jewish studies.
We must continue to challenge
our best minds with our best
Perspectives
on
Jewish Education
The Jewish Family and Chil-
dren's Service of Palm Beach
County needs volunteers to visit
the elderly in local nursing and
boarding homes.
Interested members of the
community may inquire about
this by contacting Stephen ?
Levitt, Executive Director, at f
684-1991. Those interested
should have access to an auto-
mobile and be willing to make a
regular commitment to particular
individuals.
teachers during those formative
adolescent years when life com-
mitments begin to formulate.
We would like to invite the co-
operation of all of those in-
terested in substantive Jewish
education to join in the creation
of such a high school. We
visualize a school, meeting four
hours per week, taught by my
colleagues in the rabbinate, our
Day School staff and other out-
standing faculty.
Interested? Please call me at
832-8423. Let us put it together
for the Fall of 1979.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
Mordecai Levow
Synagogue news
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Temple Beth David of Nor-
thern Palm Beach County will
hold Shavuoth services Friday,
June 1, at 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. The
Saturday Shavuoth service on
June 2 at 10 a.m. will include
Yizhor and memorial prayers. At
the family night service on June 1
the members of Rabbi William
Marder's confirmation class will
be confirmed, followed by a
festive Oneg Shabbat. The con-
gregation currently meets at
Westminster Presbyterian
Church, Palm Beach Gardens.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El is planning a
memorial service for Julie Paul
on Tuesday, June 5, at 5 p.m.
Julie was the treasurer of Temple
Beth El for a number of years,
and a wonderful, warm human
being whose sudden death
shocked the community. The
synagogue mourns his passing
and would like to pay tribute to
him in this way.
mittee meeting of the Rabbinical
Assembly in New York City on
Monday, June 11. On Tuesday,
June 12, he will attend the
meeting of the executive council
of the Rabbinical Assembly, also
in New York.
Temple Beth El Sisterhood has
elected this slate of officers for
1979-1980:
Board Members: president,
Gloria Werner; membership vice
president, Florence Haar; ways
and means, Sheila Holland:
recording secretary, Anne Gitlin;
financial secretary. Shelly
Robinson; treasurer, Sondra
David; youth vice president,
Gelda Cook; corresponding sec-
retary, Fannie Kotick.
Committee Coordinators:
children's parties, Sandy Stein-
berger; Golden Book, Blanche
Rich; telephone squad, Selma
Siegal; donor credit, Esther
Bayer; Leagrams, Eva Green;
gift shop, Gail Pariser; Torah
fund, Blanche Lange.
Temple Israel to Open
N. County School
The closing exercises of
Temple Beth El's religious school
will take place on Thursday, June
7. Members of the eighth grade
class will culminate the
elementary portion of their
education with a presentation of
"What Being Jewish Means to
Them." A script made up of
readings, poems and prayers will
be presented.
Rabbi Bar-Zev will be at-
tending the convention corn-
Temple Israel will open a
North County branch of its
religious school beginning this
September. The school will be
located at 8895 North Bates
Road, one block west of Military
Trail and Northlake Blvd.
A full program for pre-school,
kindergarten, first, second, and
third grades will be offered.
Judaica, Hebrew, music, arts and
crafts and special programs with
the rabbis will be an integral part
of the religious education
sessions.
A key teacher for the North
County school will be liana
Gellis. Mrs. Gellis, a regular
faculty member of the Jewish
Community Day School, has
extensive teaching experience in
Reform Jewish religious schools.
She taught at Temple Israel of
New Rochelle, N.Y., prior to
coming to the Palm Beaches.
A handmade ark and pulpit,
constructed by Temple Israel
member, Ronnie Levinson, will
be part of the North County
facility. This will enhance special
family Sabbath and holiday
celebrations as well as the total
school program.
For more information about
the North County school, contact
the temple office.
Help Needed
With Russian
Families
Tune in
'Mosaic9
boiti
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TUNE IN TO MOSAIC
"Mas**," Jewish Federate, sponsored program
Sunday Mimhfi over WPTV CImmmI 5, ei a.m.
MNMOT MM Steve Gordon.
PROGRAM SCHEDULE
Swtdoy, Jmm 10 Mm* Pecore
On Sunday, June 3, at 10
a.us. WPTV-Caanael 5 will
broadcast "Interrogation la
Budapest The Llle of
<> m <> #
The Jewish Family &
Children's Service is requesting
assistance in the task of re-
settling Jewish families from the
Soviet Union.
Especially needed are people to
drive, to locate housing, to con-
tribute household goods and
personal services, and to provide
social atmosphere for the
newcomers.
For further information, call
the JF ACS.
Federation Meets
Continued from Pag* 1
Baer; treasurer, Myron Nick-
man; secretary, Barbara Tanen.
Board Members with three-year
terms ending June, 1962 are
Bruce Daniels, Dr. Elizabeth
Freilich, Arthur Gladstone, Alan
Gortz, Staci Leaser, Kenneth
Scherer, Charlene Sholl, Jerome
Twhman, David Uchill, Judy
Waltzer, Alvin Wilensky and Dr.
Peter Wunah. Rev. Martin Adolf
has been nominated to fill a
vacancy of a two-year term
ending June, 1961.
Chairperson of the annual
meeting is Cynnie List. The
meeting is open to all members of
the Jewish Federation com-
munity. Reservations may be
made by contacting the Jewish
.Federation office no later than
.June 8. A dessert recaption will
''follow the meeting.
ORTHODOX
Aitz Chaim Congregation Century Village
W. Palm Beach. Telephone: 689-4675. Service Sabbath morning
9a.m.
REFORM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407 833-
8421 Rabbi Irving B. Cohen Joel L. Levine, Associate Rabbi
Sabbath Worship Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday Torah
Seminars at 10:30 a.m
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Fl. 33432 391-8900 Rabbi
Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath services, Friday at
8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah Study with Rabbi Merle E.
Singer* 10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Service
1NE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION OF DELRAT
At St. Pauls Episcopal Church, 188 So. SwintonAve., Delray Friday
at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver President Jerome Gilbert -499-
5563
TEMPLE BETH TORAH OF PALM BEACH C0UNTT
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411 Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.
At St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd. and
Wellington Trace Mailing Address: 11686 Laurel Valley Circle,
West Palm Beach, Fl. 33411 President Joan Moskowitz 793-2700
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
THE FREE SYNAGOGUE, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton, Florida 33432 368-
1600, 391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 8:15 p.m. at
Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West, Glades Rd. (1 Mile
West of Boca Turnpike)
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fl. 33407 833-0339
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sabbath Services:
Fridoy at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Doily Minyan at 8:15
a.m., Sunday at 9 a.m.
C0HGREGATI0H ANSHEISH0L0M
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 684-3212* Office
hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman Cantor Arthur
B. Rosenwasser Services: Daily 8:30 a.m., 7:30 p.m., Friday 8:30
a.m., 5 p.m.; Friday late service 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 8:30 a m 7
p.m.
CONGREGATION BETH K0DESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. 732-2555 Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin Sabbath
Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Congregational
Church, 115 N. Federal Highway.
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
315 N. "A" St., Lake Worth, Fl. 33460 585-5020 Rabbi Emanuel
Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Services: Mondays and Thursdays
at8:15a.m., Friday at 8:15p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services, Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10 a.m. West-
minister Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach
Gardens, 321 Northlake Blvd., North Palm Beach, Fl. 33408 Ph.
845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
224 N.W Avenue "G", Belle Glade, Fl. 33430 Jack Stateman,
Cantor Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275Alemeida Drive, Palm Springs, Fl. 33461 Sabbath Services-
a3a .8m^.So,ur^5La, !am **" Bwnett Brikman,'
967-4962 Mondays and Thursdays at 9 a. m. Service, held at Faith
United Presbyterian Church, Palm Springs.
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fl. 33432 392-8566 Rabbi
Nathan Zelizer Sabbath Service*: Friday at 8:15 p. m., Saturday* at
9:30a.m. '
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE
DELRAY HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 Watt Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, Fl. 33446 276-3536
Morn, S.lberman, Rabbi Leonard Price, Cantor Sabbath Service.-
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Daily mlnyan, 8:45
ana o p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1190 Nofh County Rood, Palm Beach, Fl. 33480 832-0604 Cnnfn,
baQVjd Darda.h,i Sabbath Service.: FHd^30?i?slS-?S


1,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
TaSTIs"
hat the Pope Really Said Operation Redemption Begun for Bonds
By LISA PALMIERI-BILLIG
)ME (JTA) When Magr. Hilarion
pci made a bravado declaration in an interview
lis Papal audience May 8 to the effect that the
"who fought in his country (Poland) against
lazis," had "understood" Capucci's "problem,"
fitted the Pope's reply in their private audience.
kCCORDING TO reliable sources, when
tci told Pope John Paul II, "I defended my
just as you did yours in Poland," the Pope
his finger at him and said, "In Poland we
led morality without engaging in politics
Mis you engaged in politics without taking
(ity into account."
fhile there has been "no comment" by the
tn on Capucci's statements, informed sources
he is being watched very closely because of the
in's honor in holding to its agreement with
I at the time of Capucci's release in 1977. He was
on condition that he would not engage in
lies or return to the Middle East.
Dr. Marvin M. Rosenberg,
general chairman of Israel Bonds
for Palm Beach County, and
Samuel Rothberg, national chair-
man for Israel Bonds, jointly
announced the launching of
"Operation Redemption," the
national campaign for re-invest-
ment of more than SI 10 million in
State of Israel Bonds purchased
in 1967, which have come due this
year.
The bonds were purchased by
concerned Americans in 1967, the
year of the Sinai War. Many
bonds were purchased during the
height of the war.
' The bonds now have come due
and the government of Israel has
placed the proceeds with Chase
Manhattan Bank in New York,
the fiscal agent for Israel Bonds,
per agreement with the Securities
NCJW Holds Legislative Institute
Jational Council of Jewish
in furtherance of its
that responsiveness of
ant to the needs of the
central to a democratic
met in the state capital
ates at its eighth annual
Bee Legislative Institute.
jtes from the Palm
Beach Section were Gertrude
Pesacov, Eugenia Feldman,
Rozanne Risbin and Ann
Madier.
The National Council of Jewish
Women's priorities, chosen in
convention in Dallas, Tex., last
March, include concerns for the
aging, women's issues, justice for
1
fl
)

lei Solomon, national director of institutional sales of the
fc/ Bond drive, with Irving Korn, member of the First
pican Bank of Palm Beach County's management board;
toy Talmo, chairman of the board.
Irst American Bank
Buys Israel Bond
First American Bank of
Beach County has pur-
ed a $250,000 State of Israel
nuel Solomon, national
>r of institutional sales of
I Israel Bond drive from
lungton, D.C., accepted the
at the bank's Palm Beach
i from chairman of the board
/. Talmo.
accepting the check,
ion said this is the largest
received from a financial
tut ion in the Palm Beaches.
Ilomon presented Talmo the
Israel Solidarity Award "in
appreciation of exceptional
leadership in behalf of the
development and strengthening
of the economy of Israel through
the State of Israel Bond cam-
paign to assure a future of peace,
freedom and progress for our
people."
Attending the ceremony were
William Jackson, assistant sales
manager of Florida for the State
of Israel Bonds; Irving Korn,
member of the bank's manage-
ment board and James Elliott,
vice president and manager of the
Palm Beach office.
JEWISH FAMItY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
vlth community of Palm Beach County. Professional and con-
tent ial help is available for
jblems of the aging
pnsultation and evaluation services
caiional counseling
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Private Offices:
2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fta. 33409
Telephone: 684 1991
Or
3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 22a
Boca Raton, Flo.
Telephone: 395-3640
-derate fees are charged in family and individual counseling to
kose who can pay (Fees are based on income and family size)
he Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
ne Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
children, Jewish concerns and
education.
The institute included a
reception for women legislators,
whprp the lawmnlrpf-Q /liwiiaooH
with the NCJW their experiences
"as women" working in the legis-
lature. Another purpose of the
yearly institute was to discuss
with legislators how a volunteer
organization can be helpful to
them. On returning to their
respective cities, the delegates
then educate their members in
the legislative process and urge
them to maintain contact with
their legislators on a year-round
basis.
The National Council of Jewish
Women is a volunteer
organization dedicated in the
spirit of Judaism to advancing
human welfare and the demo-
cratic way of life. Through a co-
ordinated program of education,
service and social action, NCJW
works in the Jewish and general
communities, locally, nationally
and internationally.
and Exchange Commission of the
U.S. government.
Dr. Rosenberg pointed out that
in Palm Beach County there are
many persons who have moved
here from northern cities and who
bought bonds there which now
have come due.
Because of the rapid growth of
the Jewish community here, it is
almost impossible to track down
the thousands of bondholders
who bought bonds at that time
and who now should re-invest
them or file for their money at
Chase Manhattan Bank.
Dr. Rosenberg added that
Israel Bonds which have come
due, do not continue to garner
interest for the bondholder after
New Unit
Chief Named
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Rep. Elizabeth
Holtzman (D., N.Y.), chair-
man of the House Judiciary
subcommittee responsible,
for tracing alleged Nazi war
criminals in the United
States, welcomed the ap-
pointment of a veteran
lawyer, Walter Rockier, as
head of a new investigatory
unit in the Department of
Justice.
NOTING THE appointment of
Rockier is the Justice Depart-
ment's "first step" to "honor its
commitments to me to upgrade
and intensify efforts to bring
Nazi war criminals in this coun-
try to justice," Holtzman added
that the selection of Rockier
"appears to be a good one, parti-
cularly given his experience at
Nuremberg."
Holtzman noted that more
than 175 cases of alleged war
criminals "require further intense
study."
the redemption date.
"Hopefully, Israel Bond-
holders will take the opportunity
to re-invest their redeemed bonds
into new bonds," he said. "But at
the very least, they should file
with Chase Manhattan in order
to get their monies back."
The Israel Bond office in New
York also announced that the
government of Israel, in order to
encourage re-investment, has
made special arrangements for
the redemption and re-invest-
ment of bonds purchased in any
period of 1967 now.
In order to accommodate cus-
tomers, a special Israel Bond re-
investment Hotline 659-1782 has
been set up to answer inquiries.
Persons who wish to discuss the
reinvestment or redemption of
their mature bonds may do so
personally by visiting the Israel
Bond office, 100 Sunrise Ave.,
Palm Beach.
(Dbttitariea
MILDRED K. DANOFF. 60. of 5442 Old
Court Rd.. Randalls town, Md Burial
In Shalom Memorial Park, Lake
Park. Levitt.
TIMOTHY COATES, aged Uiree, of 4127
Foes Rd., Lake Worth. Burial In Hill
I crest Memorial Park, Weat Palm
j Beach. Levitt.
JBOLOMON LEVY. 66. of Camden H-16B,
West Palm Beach. Burial In Shalom
Memorial Park, Lake Park. Levitt.
DIANE LEVINE, 38. of 314 10th St.,
West Palm Beach. Burial In New
York. Levitt.
LEO SIEGAL, 75, of Bedford H-1M.
West Palm Beach. Burial In Illinois.
Levitt.
BELLA MAROOLIS. 79, of 409 Lake
Evelyn Drive, West Palm Beach.
Burial In Royal Palm Memorial
Gardens. Levitt.
DAVID LICHENSTE1N. 74, of Golfs
Edge 19-B. West Palm Beach. Burial
in Shalom Memorial Park. Levitt.
HERMAN LEVENSON, 86, of Monaco
J-433 Kings Point, Delray Beach.
Burial InPlnelawn. NY. Levitt.
BARNEY KAUFMAN. 73. of Somerset
E-83, West Palm Beach Burial In
Royal Palm Memorial Gardens.
Levitt.
BENJAMIN SUSSKIND, 73, of Camden
H 174. West Palm Beach Burial In
Paramua, N.J. Levitt
HARRY SIGEI.MAN. 69. of :161 Poln-
Clana Place, Lake Worth Burial In
Baltimore. Md Levitt.
SAMIEL SCHWARTZ. 70. of Hurgandy
J-464, Delray Beach. I'.uriaJ In
Paramus, N.J. Levitt.
Jewish Community Center
of the Palm Beaches, Inc.
Summer Programs
COUNTRY DAY CAMP: Ages 5-12 (imp Shalom, located one mile West
of the Turnpike on Belvedere Road is a sprawling 18 acre sito
C.A.P.A.: Ages 8 14 A Creative & Performing Arts Program designed
to drveiop your child's special skills in Drama, Dance, Music, Voice. Art a
Costume, undor professional supervision
PKr.-SUfOOL: Ages 2Vj 4' Parents have choice of the Jewish Community
Outer's facilities at 2415 Okeechobee Blvd. or Camp Shalom.
C.A.T. PROGRAM: Ages 13-15 This program is for mature boys and girls who
will at least be entering Rth Grade.
TEEN TRAVEL: Ages 13 16 Featuring two three week tripe to places North
and West.
CAMP FEES
C;tmp Shalom 9'16 A.M. 3 45 PM 4 Weeks SI35 00 $20 00 Reg Pee S Weeks $255.00 $40 00 Keg Fee
CA.P.A. 9 15 AM 3:5 I'M Nol Available 255.00 in in Reg. Fee
Prc-Srhnol Camp 8 45 A M -lOUPM 13500 m oo Reg. Pea 255 0(1 40 00 Reg Fee
CAT. 9 15 AM 3 45 PM Nol Available No Fee
Tern Travel To be Announced
for information and applications
please call 689-7700
-'-


16
The Jewish Fhridian ofPmbn Beach County
rtay.Jnne I,i97|
^s >,
western union
Mailgram

<*.
TO:
FROM:
THE AMERICAN JEWISH CCmJNirf
THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL
nr.rt. ft HUGE TASK AHEAD
ft GIANT STEP TOWARD PEACE, h B -
K fe s&sks SMS-.
A PROCESS BEGUN YESTERDAY WHICH
HUSY ^01&RESEm|st Pr--GE0i0H. YH!S ACOHE
. AHY.CP.YE DAY-YO-OAYT^1Ef ^AHoW COUHYR>ES OF
lZ SSS^-srE m,^*^ P-ES EOR -
?NE0PURTOL1VE AHO WORK. RENEHAL
BRIGHT. ponGRftMS ARE NECESSARY,
ft asSBfe : *,N 5HAP1*THE
&UrI" ISRAEL'S PEOPLE.
TOGEYHER HE HOSY HEEY YHE CHALLENGE.
GIVE TO THE
COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL-ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beaeh County
SOS South Flagler Drive, Suite 305, West Palm Beaeh, Florida 33401
832-2120
Hear of Jewish Renewal of Home and Overseas
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------.......


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