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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County ( January 12, 1979 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
January 12, 1979

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00186

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
January 12, 1979

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00186

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)

Full Text
tzman worried hawks will stonewall doves

EJ> LANDAU
i- (JTA) -
Ezer Weizman
I the Cabinet's
ward renewing
th Egypt and is
Bned that the
He are slipping
Bdline ministers
stonewall against any com-
promise, sources close to the De-
fense Minister have indicated.
Weizman, who with Foreign
Minister Moshe Dayan headed
the Israeli negotiating team at
the Blair House talks in Wash-
ington last month, believes that
the peace talks have been bogged
down needlessly in a morass of
legalisms, the sources said.
AS A CONSEQUENCE, he
has resolved to devote his time
exclusively to defense matters.
Yediot Achronot reported that
Weizman stormed out of a
meeting last week with Prime
Minister Menachem Begin and
Minister of Agriculture Ariel
Sharon, the most outspoken
Cabinet hawk. "1 can't sit with
that man any more," Weizman
was quoted as saying with refer-
ence to Sharon. Eventually Begin
calmed him, the newspaper said.
That was not the first time,
however, that Weizman lost his
temper with Cabinet colleagues
who he thought were dragging
their feet on peace issues. He is
known to have stalked out of at
least one Cabinet meeting in the
past two months and was furious
when, during Begin's absence in
Canada last month, the Cabinet
refused to approve elements of
Continued on Page 11
lewis 111 IFIIoiriidllb! in
OF PALM BE A CH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
iberl
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, January 12, 1979
lirice 35 Cents
, County Launches '79 Campaign
sador Rosolio to Keynote Campaign Dinner
inty Division of
eration of Palm
11 hold a dinner
gift) on behalf
jmbined Jewish
Emergency Fund
28, at the Boca
/note speaker for
be Gen. Shaul

Rosolio,
Mexico.
Israel's Ambassador to
Ambassador Rosolio was
former inspector general of the
Israel State Policy. He was born
and educated in Israel in law and
public administration. He joined
the Hagannah as a school boy
I
of West Palm Beach was part of a group that
\ted Egypt at the invitation of the Egyptian ambas-
United States. Here Stein meets Anwar Sadat.
9W in Cairo
isit of Friendliness
d Apprehension
Note: In February
ilowing an invitation
Egyptian ambassador
\United States, Ashraf
the Synagogue Council
under the leadership
Saul Teplitz and Rabbi
}iegman led a group on a
Egypt- Mr. and Mrs.
}tein of West Palm Beach
it Neck, N.Y., were part
froup.
[By JACOB STEIN
first of Two Article*
Egypt names
| conjure up images of
lids, Pharaohs, belly
rs, mystery and intrigue.
[a Jew, my visit to Egypt
historic significance to me.
was where Joseph was
by his brothers to strangers,
[to become financial advisor
> Pharaohs of Egypt.
are commanded in the
of Zaycher L'tziat Mitt-
to remember the Exodus
'Kypt. The Bible is filled
I the events of the 40 years of
ay across the Egyptian
li desert into the Promised

j-'-M especially sensitive to
I c'. going 30 year war between
m and Egypt, having been an
active participant for four years
in American efforts on behalf of
Israel so that Israel might
successfully resist Egyptian
aggression.
It was this Egypt that my wife
Jean and I were about to visit. As
the T.W.A. Boeing 707 touched
down at Cairo Airport, these were
the thoughts that flooded my
mind, together with a certain
apprehension concerning the
visit.
As past chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organ-
izations, which represents the 36
major Jewish organizations in
this country, it offered me an
opportunity to reply in person to
the letter that Mr. Sadat ad-
dressed to the American Jewish
Community in newspapers here:
A letter which called on the
American Jewish community to
pressure Israel to make con-
cessions.
Cairo is an ancient city, ac-
tually a collection of even more
ancient cities, bound together
into a large metropolis with
tenuous threads of communica-
tion. Although the city was
originally designed to accom-
Continued oa Page 9
and has been involved in military
and security matters ever since.
He was in charge of the Eichman
trial administration as well as the
security of Pope Paul VI's visit
to Israel in 1965. Gen. Rosolio
commanded Israel's Southern
Region and Jerusalem. He has
traveled extensively, several
times representing Israel at
Interpol.
AFTER THE Six Day War,
Gen. Rosolio took over and re-
organized the Jordanian Police in
the West Bank and East
Jerusalem. He was personally in
charge of the security of
Jerusalem and is responsible for
the safety conditions the city is
enjoying. He was a member of
many governmental committees.
. In recent years he has taken an
active part in strengthening the
ties between Israel and American
Jewry. He is married and has
four children, two of whom, a boy
and girl, have served as olticers
in the army.
Members of the South County
Men's Campaign .Cabinet are
James B. Baer, chairman;
Donald Berger, H. Gordon
Brown, Dr. Karl Enselberg, Ben-
jamin Jaffe, David Kend, Harry
Kottler, Milton Kretsky, Curtis
Levine, Jerry Marshall, Samuel
Revits, Dr. Gerald Robinson,
Morris Robinson, Saul Slossberg,
Dr. Donald Snyder, Frank Titel-
man, Philip Zinman; and Phyllis
Cohen and Shirley Enselberg,
South County Women's Division
co-chairpersons.
"This is the first time in the
history of the South County cam-
paign that we will hold such a
prestigious event," stated James
Baer, South County chairman.
"We look toward the entire South
County community to help us
make this event an overwhelming
success."
Gen. Shaul Rosolio
Century Village Campaign
Luncheon To Hear
'All But My Life 'Author
Gerda Weissmann Klein, whose book All But My Life has been
hailed by critics in the United States, England and Holland as "one of
the most moving and beautifully written books of Jewish suffering
and survival," will tell her story at a luncheon sponsored by the
Century Village Division on behalf of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund. The Special Gifts event on Thursday, Jan.
25, at noon at the Palm Beach Gardens Holiday Inn on PGA
Boulevard, serves to launch the 1979 Century Village effort under the
co-chairmanship of Abe Bisgaier and Rev. Martin Adolf.
Born in Poland, Mrs. Klein and her entire family were sent to
concentration camps following the German occupation. The lone
family survivor after years of forced labor and a 1,000 mile march, she
was liberated in May 1945 by a U.S. infantry contingent commanded
by Lt. Kurt Klein whom she married one year later. Her book is a
poignant portrayal of suffering, survival, courage and hope.
Dedicated to the cause of Israel, she now speaks extensively at high
schools, colleges and interfaith meetings along with a heavy schedule
of engagements for the United Jewish Appeal and Hadassah. A
recipient of the Woman of the Year Award of the National Council of
Jewish Women, she was recently honored with a Doctor of Humane
Letters degree from Rosary Hill College in Buffalo where she now
resides.
ASSISTING BISGAIER and
Rev. Adolf in planning the
luncheon and organizing the
drive are the following who to
date have accepted posts as
section chairmen or member of
the campaign committee:
Emanuel Appelbaum, Norman
Axe, Louis Bailey, Mrs. Belle
Bobman, Henry Boodman, Louis
A. Brown, Charles Cahn, Robert
Cahn. Nathan Cohen, Mrs. Ada
Columbus, Louis Dickstein,
Joseph Dorf, Sam Drechsler,
Mrs. Rose Dunitz, Sam Durbin,
Mrs. Rudolph Ehrenpreis,
William Epstein, Sidney Falik,
Sidney Feinstein, Mrs. Isabella
Fink, Sol Ganeles, Manuel
Goldman, Mrs. Millicent
Goldstein, Morris Keller, Max
Kelman.
Also Mrs. Helen Kerdman,
Robert Ketzis. Morris Leader,
Gerda Weissmann Klein
George Levine, Dr. Sandor
Levinsohn, Sol Margolis, Irving
Marks, Mrs. Bertha Ozer, Louis
Perlman, Malcolm Pitkin, Mrs.
Mae Podwol, Mrs. Lil Rosenz-
weig, David Rubin, Mrs. Ger-
trude Rubby, Charles
Schneeweiss, Mrs. Sybil
Senecoff, Morris Shapiro, Mrs.
Harriet Shapiro, Ben Sherman.
Continued on Page 12
I
^=^..


rage^
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, Januar^2^979
Withthr
Organizations
HADASSAH
Tikvah Group of Hadassah
regular meeting will be held on
Monday. Jan. 15 at 12:30 p.m. at
Anshei Sholom. The Jan. 14 get-
together will be a luncheon at the
Inn at Royal Palm Beach at
noon. Proceeds will go to the
Hadassah Medical organization.
There will be food, entertainment
and door prizes. Contact Martha
Sheffrin for details.
The Rishona Group of the
Palm Beach Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its Youth Aliyah Chai
luncheon on Thursday, Jan. 25 at
noon at the Patio Palm Beach,
5706 North Broadway, (U.S. No.
1) West Palm Beach. For
reservations call Helen Brand or
mail to her at 560 South Country
Club Road, Atlantis.
The Tamar Group of Hadassah
will hold an Israel Bond luncheon
on Jan. 16 at the Colonnades on
Singer Island. Ann Hopfian will
be honored. The next general
meeting of Tamar Hadassah will
be held on Jan. 22 at the Village
Hall in Royal Palm Beach. The
speaker will be Joseph T. Shutt
who is a member of the govsruihg
board of Common Cause of
Florida. .H^ebands and guests
are .fivited. Tamar's Sweetheart
Dance will be held at the Ramada
Inn in West Palm Beach, Feb. 11.
The Bat Gurion Hadassah will
hold its Youth Aliyah Luncheon
on Thursday, Jan. 18 at Bernards
in Boynton Beach. Everyone is
welcome. Contact Vicki Bern-
stein or Dee Kaplan. The lun-
cheon begins at 11:30 a.m. The
monthly meeting will be held on
Thursday, Jan. 25.
Yovel Hadassah will hold its
regular meeting on Thursday,
Jan. 18 at Congregation Anshei
Sholom at 1 p.m., highlighting
youth activities in the United
States, known as Hashachar.
Ruth Heyman is chairman.
Slides entitled, "To Everything
There Is a Season," will be
shown; also a humorous skit,
"Life In Century Village, by Bea
Cohen. On Jan. 22, Yovel's
Current Events Meeting will be
held in the Hospitality Room,
Bess Minsky, chairman. The
Annual Sweden House Luncheon
will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 23.
Proceeds go to Hashachar
project. Contact Ruth Heyman
for reservations. The group also
is planning a bus trip to the
Royal Palm Dinner Theatre on
Sunday, Feb. 4 for dinner and to
see the show "Carousel." Call
Esther Colon or Pearl Rosen for
details.
The Chai Group of Hadassah
will hold its regular meeting on
Thursday, Jan. 25 at 12:30 p.m.
at the ChplUnger Country Club.
BabU Emanuel Eisenberg of
Temple Beth Sholom will explain
Havdalah Services. Cantor
Elman will perform. Refresh-
ments will be served prior to the
meeting. A jewelry show will take
place at 11 a.m. Members,
husbands and friends are invited.
BRAN DEIS UNIVERSITY
The Palm Beach West Chapter
of Brandeis University National
Women's Committee will meet at
1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 23 at
Congregation Anshei Sholom.
Prof. Stephen Whitfield will
speak on "The Southern Jew
Old and New." Members are
urged to bring their friends. On
Wednesday, Feb. 14, a luncheon
will be held at 12:30 at the
Ramada Inn.
LABOR ZIONIST
ALLIANCE-POALE-ZION
The next meeting of the Labor
Zionist AUiance-Poale Zion, will
be held on Thursday, Jan. 18 at
1 p.m. in the Social Hall of
Congregation Anshei Sholom.
The main topic will be "Facing
New Realities in Israel" which
will be presented by Harold
Salkind, a board member of the
Histadrut Foundation and a
former city commissioner in
Philadelphia, Pa.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
The monthly meeting of
Temple Israel Sisterhood will be
held on Monday, Jan. 15 in Sch-
wartzberg Hall at noon. Rabbi
Joel L. Levine will review Shosha
by Nobel Prize winning author
Isaac Bashevis Singer. This book
covers the life and times of
Eastern European Jews before
the Holocaust. Lunch will be
served. The Continuous Study
Group will meet in the Music
Room from 10:30 to 11:30 prior
to the regular meeting. Rabbi
Irving B. Cohen and Carolyn
Ring jointly conduct this series of
discussions. All members are
invited to participate.
COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
The Jewish Community Day
School of Palm Beach County,
Inc., will hold its Annual Art
Auction on Saturday, Jan. 13, at
Temple Israel, West Palm Beach.
Preview will be at 7:30 p.m. and
the auction will begin at 8. There
will be no admission charge.
There will be a door prize, raffle
and refreshments will be served.
Proceeds will go to the Jewish
Community Day School.
DEBORAH HOSPITAL
FOUNDATION
Deborah Hospital Foundation
will meet Tuesday, Jan. 16 at
12:30 p.m. at the Citadel. 2122
Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard.
Emanu-El Sisterhood to Hear 'Challenge of Change*
"The Challenge of Change,"
the position of women in Con-
servative Judaism, will be the
subject of the program to be
presented to Temple Emanu-El
Sisterhood at its regular meeting
on Jan. 15, at 12:30, at the
Temple. A special invitation has
been issued to this paid-up
membership meeting to the
husbands of members. A petite
buffet will precede the meeting.
The program will be presented
by Marion Siner Gordon who is
serving on the 13 member Com-
mission established by the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, to study the question of
admitting women to the Rab-
binate. The Commission will
report its findings to the 1979
Convention of the Rabbinical
Assembly to be held in Los
Angeles at the end of January.
Mrs. Gordon attended the
Hebrew Union College Training
School for Teachers, Columbia
University, and was graduated
from the Brooklyn Law School of
St. Lawrence University.
Admitted to the New York Bar,
she practiced in the eastern and
southern districts of the Federal
Court System.
Mrs. Gordon was president
of the Women's League for Con-
servative Judaism, and during
her tenure visited every one of
the then 22 branches in the
United States and Canada,
thereby creating a national
organization.
After leaving the presidency of
Women's League she assumed
the national chairmanship of
Torah Fund, which is Women's
League's educational and fund-
raising activity on behalf of the
Jewish Theological Society.

Marion Gordon
Upon the death of her first
husband, Mrs. Gordon returned
to the practice of law, becoming
Assistant Attorney General of
the state of New York, working in
the field of civil rights. She
retired from that office in 1970
when she and her present
husband established residence in
Florida.

J
Sondra Lobel has donated one of her paintings to the Palm
Beach Chapter of Women's American ORT. There will be a
drawing for this painting at the annual Mother to Another
luncheon being held in the Breakers Hotel Jan. 19 when Mrs
Irving Korn will be honored as Mother of the Year.
The barber shop quartet and
chorus will entertain.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Sholom will have a luncheon and
card party, Wednesday, Jan. 24
at noon at the Vintage
Restaurant, Federal Highway,
Boynton Beach.
The next meeting of the Men's
Club of Temple Sholom will take
place on Sunday morning, Jan.
21. The scheduled speaker is
Judge Edward F. Fine of the
Palm Beach County Court. Judge
Fine also will install the newly
elected officers and members of
the Board of Directors. AH
members are welcome. Refresh-
ments will be served.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
The annual donor event of
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood
will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 6 at
the Breakers Hotel. Following
the luncheon, there will be a
Stanley Nelson fashion show,
featuring the latest arrivals from
Paris and Italy as well as the
United States. A table favor will
be available for each donor, as
well as prizes. Proceeds from the]
annual function will go toward]
Sisterhood's pledge to the'
Temple Building Fund.
THE WORKMEN'S CIRCLE
The Workmen's Circle Branch
1041 will hold its next meeting
Jan. 25 at the Odd Fellows Hall,
410 Datura St., West Palm Beach I
at 12:30 p.m. Refreshments will]
be served. The public is invited.
Workman's Circle Branch 1051
meets the second Wednesday
each month at 1 p.m. at Delray
Beach Community Center?^
Delray Beach (east on Atlantic f
Ave., left onto N.W. 1st Ave).
Next meeting, Wednesday, Feb.!
14. For further information callj
Continued on Page 3
I Sylvia Jaffe, Sculpture ]
I Dolphin Gallery i
J326 Peruvian Palm Beach Marble Rrop/,(
First Marine
National Bank and Trust Company
582-5641
114 NO. "J" STREET
LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA
MemberF.D.I.C.
Investment Equity Corporation
Realtors
DONALD L. VOGEL
msTFRf d w.. 'ATtenrwiB miwn
Residential-Condominium-Investment
2352 PQA Boulevard
Palm Beach Garden*, Fla. 33410
Business 626-5100
Residence 622-4000
#8*.
PALM BEACH 832-021 1
TAPES BUSINESS FORMS
CARTONS TAGS-LABELS
HAN6ERS BAGS BOXES
WIPES POLYETHYLENE
REAL ESTATE LICENSE COURSE
Including Required Educational Course
Broker License Course Begins
PHILIP WEINSTEIN.F.D
PHI
Ievitt memorial chapel
5411 OKEECHOBEE BLVD.. WEST PALM BEACH. FLORIDA
PHONE NO. M9-I700
I335 WEST DIXIE MIGHV.I .'. NOB TM Ml AMI F LOP. ID A PHONE 4t 6316
l21 PEMBROKE ROAD HOLLYWOOD FLORIDA 33020 PHONE Ml 7300
MIAMI SOUTH
January 16
7:00 P.M.
TWICE WEEKLY
Madruga Building
1550 Madruga Avenue, No. 100
Coral Gables
FORTLAUDERDALE
January 22
/.00 P.M.
TWICE WEEKLY
5100 Building
5100 N. Federal Hwy
Suite No. 412
Fort Lauderdale
For registration and further information write or (.ill loll tree
Bert Rodgers Schools of Real Estate
Incorporated
H| -MM Lake Ellenor Drive* Suite 100 .Orlando, I lurida IJHO't
Telephone (305) 855-5441
TOLL FREE 800-432-0320
fipr
P1.13.7*


y, January 12, 1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
emple Beth El Concert To Feature Young Cantors
Fread Sanctuary of
Beth El will be the
for a concert featuring
jrs Elaine Shapiro,
ham M. Mizrahi, and Jacob
H-Zion Mendelson, on Sunday,
4, at 7:30 p.m. These
lists represent a new breed of
kung cantors interested in
reserving and transmitting the
aditional style of Hazzanut and
Jewish music dating back to 586
J.C.E.
Cantor Elaine Shapiro, of
bemple Beth El, is the only
emale cantor in the Conservative
lovement in North America. She
ajored in music at Adelphi
Jniversity of New York, trained
>t the Academy of Vocal Arts in
Philadelphia and is a graduate of
The Seminai y College of Jewish
lusic of the Jewish Theological
eminary. She has performed
extensively throughout the
stern United States and
panada, including Lincoln Center
New York. She has had leading
>les in Cosi Fan Tutte,
\igolttto, and The MerryWidow,
has toured Europe with the
toncordia Youth Chorale.
Cantor Abraham Mizrahi, born
Athens, Greece, studied at
Chicago Musical College,
Cantors' Institute of the Jewish
illogical Seminary and the
allege Conservatory of Music at
ie University of Cincinnati. He
is appeared as the tenor soloist
hth the Israeli Philharmonic, the
Abraham Mizrachi
Zamir Chorale of New York and
Boston at Carnegie Hall, and
with the Cincinnati Chamber
Orchestra. He has trained under
David Koussevitsky and Moshe
Ganchoff.
Cantor Jacob Ben-Zion
Mendelson has attended the
American Opera Center of the'
Julliard School, and the School of
Sacred Music of the Hebrew
Union College. He has appeared
as the tenor soloist with the
Miami Beach Symphony in the
following operas: Elixir of Love
(1976), Pagliacci (1974), La
Traviata (1972), and has had the
leading roles at Julliard in
Organizations
Continued from Page 2
i. Weinstein or E. Meltzer.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
The Palm Beach Section of the
National Council of Jewish
/omen will hold its Annual Na-
onal Support Luncheon on Jan.
at the Hamlet Restaurant.
Lnyone interested should contact
pe NCJW or call Ann Madier of
yest Palm Beach. The need for
ke Council's "Meals on Wheels"
is grown so that they have
^larged its delivery service to
elude Golden Lakes Village.
uyone interested should call the
\wish Federation and ask for
Meals on Wheels Program.
nyone interested in joining
jncil and helping on some of
services, call Mrs. David
^auncey of Lake Worth, and
/one interested in helping on
Picture Lady project, call
fs. Ellis Nadelman of North
1m Beach. If you are a new
^ident of the Palm Beaches or
jw someone who is and would
to be welcomed into the com-
inity, call the Welcome Wagon
l-vice. Mrs. Thomas (Betty)
Lss of Lake Worth.
/OMENS AMERICAN ORT
The Mid-Palm Chapter of
Dmen's American ORT will
111 its general meeting on
Monday, Jan. 22 at 1 p.m. at
Temple Beth Sholom, 315 N. "A"
Street, Lake Worth. The program
"Good Living Through Good
Eating." The guest speaker will
be Ms. Susan Maggio, who will
lecture on foods and then-
nutritional value. Refreshments
will be served.
The Seventh Annual Mother to
Another Luncheon given by the
Palm Beach Chapter of Women's
American ORT will be held on
Thursday, Jan. 18 at noon at the
Breakers Hotel, Palm Beach.
Guest of honor, Mrs. Irving Korn
(Lee) is Mother of the Year.
The guest speaker will be Mrs.
Joseph Wilkes, vice president of
District Six of ORT.
The program will be the
Musicana Singers. Chairpersons
are Mrs. Samuel Harrison and
Mrs. Joseph Brover. For
reservations call Mrs. Mac
Marshall. Proceeds go to fund the
social assistance program.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Temple Beth David, Palm
Beach Gardens, will have a
membership coffee on Sunday,
Jan. 21 at 8:15 p.m. at the home
of Helene and Stanley Lustig,
4588 Juniper St.. Palm Beach
Gardens. All interested people
are invited. Contact the Temple
office.
Invest In
Israel Securities.
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT & SOLD
We're Specialists In Israel Securities.
Transactions Daily
Via. Telex To Israel Stock Exchange.
ILEUMI SECURITIES CORPORATION
\ Suhsidiun "i Kink I itnni Iv-knicl KM macVx
IM INIiSikvi V V.ik N "> imr.iJl.'i ?M.Hi WQU
TOUfWH4Wtf*>0irc> <83- ------ \^
Jacob Mendelson
Madame Butterfly and Jenufa.
He has concertized throughout
the United States and Canada.
The program will feature
Hazzanut, Yiddish, Israeli,
Oriental, operatic selections, and
Elaine Shapiro
duets and trios.
The cultural program is under
the chairpersonship of Barbara
Weinstein and Florence
Karlsberg with Cantor Shapiro as
honorary chairperson.
Mrs. Dorothy Spector, pres-
ident of the South Florida
Region, announces that Mrs.
Pearl Milch, the national pres-
ident of the Women's Division
of the American Technion So-
ciety, will be spending the
next couple of weeks at the
Palm Beach Spa and will be
welcomed by the presidents
of the various chapters in the
South Florida Region.
National UJA Shabbat to Be Celebrated
NEW YORK The third
annual United Jewish Appeal
National Shabbat will be cele-
brated in synagogues throughout
the country on Feb. 24, ac-
cording to an announcement by
Rabbi H. Lookstein, chairman of
the UJA Rabbinic Cabinet. The
date coincides with Shabbat
Shekalim, when the Bible portion
deals with the responsibility of
Jews to sustain Jewish life.
Rabbi Lookstein named
Rabbis Bernard S. Raskas of
Minneapolis and Chaim Stern of
New York co-chairmen of the
UJA Shabbat.
"The word shekalim clearly
points out our responsibility to
translate our commitment into
direct giving," explained Rabbi
Raskas. Focusing on this con-
cept, congregations in most
American communities on Feb.
24 will study the mitzvah (com-
mandment) of tzedakah, par-
ticularly the work of the UJA and
community federations.
This year, with the commem-
oration of the 40th anniversary of
the UJA, the National Shabbat
program also will include a
tribute to members of the com-
munity who were founders and
campaign leaders in National
UJA and their local federations.
Information and materials on
the National Shabbat may be ob-
tained from Rabbi Melvin L.
Libman, director of the UJA
Rabbinic Cabinet.
We wish to thank all of our
friends whose good wishes
and cheery messages an
helping us towards recovery
Rosalie and Hank Grossman
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Right on Target
The State Department lists Jerusalem
separately from Israel in a schedule of sites for a U.S.
Foreign Service examination which was given on
Dec. 10. The American Jewish Congress wants to
know why.
The answer, of course, is obvious. But the
American Jewish Congress does us all a service by
publicly emphasizing the dishonest broker's role our
nation is playing in the Middle East peace
negotiations.
"Are we to understand," asks Phil Baum,
director of the AJC's Commission on International
Affairs, "that for the Department of State,
Jerusalem is no longer a city within the State of
Israel. but rather an independent country?"
How, otherwise, to explain that the booklet
distributed to persons wishing to take the test
groups the cities by country, with the countries listed
alphabetically. Except, of course, for Israel, which is
listed between Ireland and Italy. Jerusalem appears
between Japan and Jordan.
In emphasizing that "This unique, unilateral re-
arrangement of political geography is bewildering"
and that it is "a subtle indication of the insensitivity
and deliberate disregard of political realities" that
repeatedly disfigure official US. pronouncements
concerning Israel, the AJCongress director hits the
nail on the head.
Patience is Name of Game
American Jews were rightly angered by what
was seen as a tilt in favor of Egypt by the Carter
administration. How else can we view President
Carter's statement praising Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat for being forthcoming in the Israeli-
Egyptian peace negotiations and blaming Israel for
the current stalemate?
There have been many reasons offered for the
administration's attitude ranging from the
Machiavellian to a charge that there is a built-in anti-
Israeli bias in the Carter administration. But the real
blame may lie in President Carter's own penchant for
placing deadlines on solving problems.
Perhaps it is his engineering background, but
Carter seems to believe that a time limit can be
placed on dealing with domestic and international
issues. That year it is energy and the Panama Canal
or the Middle East, and next year we deal with
China, Europe and inflation.
Politics is Not Peanuts
The trouble is that politics, national or in-
ternational, is not like growing peanuts. Carter says
he is "very frustrated" by the Middle East
negotiations, but frustration is part of the game.
Carter's setting of deadlines has caused him to give
in on principles he himself set when he sees there is
no other way to meet the deadline. This is what
happened in the Israeli-Egyptian negotiations.
Carter saw that the negotiators would not meet his
Dec. 17 deadline and so gave into the Egyptian
demands and tried to pressure Israel into accepting.
When that did not work, he took his "frustration"
out on Israel.
But diplomatic negotiations take time, and
while goals can be set for trying to complete them
deadlines only put you into a box. Yehuda Blum,
Israel's Ambassador to the United Nations, recently
pointed out as did his predecessor, Chaim Herzog,
that the Panama Canal treaty and the Vietnam
settlement took years to negotiate, and Israeli-
Egyptian talks have only been going on for a year.
President Carter, who likes to expound the
ancient virtues, has not yet learned one of the most
important of them patience.
The Psyche and Soma of Politics
^Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, lm
Combined Jewish Appeal
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
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PrtnUng Office -1 N.E. 6th St. Miami. Fla. 3S182 Phone3TS-460B
FREDK.SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET RONNITARTAKOW
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c^blle^aEXST' "oJortal *>' publlcattai to Roam Tartakow. Director
NEVER IN public life has
there been such an affirmation of
Freudian principles involving the
relationship between the mind
(psyche) and the body (soma) as
when President Carter suffered
an attack of hemorrhoids in mid-
December.
For that was precisely when
his Camp David Express ground
to a screeching halt. Seated there
at the silent throttle of his glory
train, he expressed his bitter
frustration and profound
disappointment in interview after
interview, both in the press and
on television.
And when not even these
presidential intimidations could
get Israel to submit to the
vulgarity of the Washington-
to
Mindlin
Cairo railroad tie, Carter reacted
precisely as Freud explained it.
IN EFFECT, the presidential
posterior promptly pulsated with
a profound and proliferating
pain. His body acted out with
acute symptoms his mental and
[emotional assessment of hi,
' Middle East achievements
date.
i
Understood in these terms I
there is no secret in the meaning
of the common cliche, without
which too many of us would too
often be rendered speechless, that
someone or something gives ui
"a pain in the (expletive
deleted)."
Not everyone, of course, is so
psychosomatically attuned
Unfortunately for him, it appears
that the President is, and judging
by world events, Mr. Carter
should therefore be having a
terribly rough time during the
New Year 1979. Growing
evidence of our national perils as
represented by events in Iran, in
Africa, in the Persian Gulf, at the
tip of the Horn can make for an
acutely painful condition.
ONE ALTERNATIVE might
be for the President to shift his
area of symbolic somatic reaction
to another part of his body.
Typical for the psychosomatic
personality are asthma, dermato-
logies! disturbance or, say,
migraine. All of these are
notorious mind-body symptomo-
logies. On the other hand, it can
not, in the end, be said that any
of them is preferable, even less
painful than hemorrhoids. They
are all a pain.
America'8 realpolitik hence
renders for Mr. Carter an
unhappy prognosis in 1979 if he
will insist upon taking each of our
national perils so personally to
heart, or wherever.
Only in China does it seem, at
least for the moment, that he can
hope for respite from his dilemma
although there have been no
medical bulletins describing in
detail his reaction to Sen. Barry
Goldwater's excommunication of
his foreign policy there.
IN CHINA, as a matter of fact,
things seem to be going swim-
mingly, and all of us, not only the
President, can be proud of our
Continued on Page 9
Spotlight on Barry Krischer
Friday, January 12,1979
Volume 5
13TEVETH5739
Number 1
By RONNI TARTAKOW
Director of Public
Relations, Jewish
Federation of
Palm Beach County
In a time when observance of
the Sabbath has become a rarity,
instead of a way of life, Barry
Krischer, president of the Jewish
Community Day School, and his
family, have continued to carry
out the Jewish traditions that
have unfortunately become a
thing of the past for many young
people. Barry calls himself an
"observant" Jew and he brings
this commitment and involve-
ment to the volunteer work he
does for the Palm Beach County
Jewish community.
Growing up in the Flatbush
section of Brooklyn, Barry at-
tended Yeshiva Flatbush
through high school. In 1961 he
entered Brooklyn College, where
he remained through Law School,
receiving an M.A. in law in 1969.
For three years following his
graduation he worked for the
District Attorney's office in New
York, and in May of 1973 he
moved to West Palm Beach to
join the State Attorney's office
where he is today. In four years
he was promoted to first
assistant to State Attorney
David Bludworth.
BARRY FIRST became in-
volved with the Palm Beach
County Jewish community when
he served on a committee which
eventually developed into the
Community Relations Council of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. He joined B'nai
B'rith, Palm Beach Lodge, and as
its president sat on the Board of
Directors of the Jewish
Federation.
As a Yeshiva graduate it was
only natural that Barry became
Barry Krischer
involved with the Jewish Com-
munity Day School, as he desired
the same quality of Jewish edu-
cation for his own children. In
1975 he servedas treasurer of the
"Friends" organization, the fund-
raising committee for the school.
In 1976 he was elected to the
Executive Board of the school as
treasurer and later vice president.
Barry explains his feelings
about Jewish education by
relating u, a childhood exper-
ience. "When I was a senior in
high school, I found an envelope
with news clippings about World
War II which my father had
saved. Included in the envelope
was a letter to the editor from the
editorial page of The New York
Times. An American wrote that
the Germans were going about
destroying the Jews all wrong. If
you wanted to destroy the Jews,
the letter stated, just leave them
alone and they will have a
propensity to assimilate and lose
their identity.
"If there is a reason for Jewish
education," stated Barry, "that's
it ... if all our children receive a
quality Jewish education, they
would perpetuate the Jewish
identity and not assimilate.''
Barry feels that the best way to
achieve this goal is through a day
school education. "The cur-
riculum at the day school is co-
ordinated in that the secular
studies are tied in with the
Jewish portion of the program.
For example, in geography, the
children learn how to read maps
of Israel, as well as those of
Florida." The day school, which
is now in its sixth year, began
with 30 students and now has an
enrollment of approximately 115.
The school runs on funds from
three sources tuition, fund
raising and monies from the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County's Combined Jewish
Appeal campaign.
'THE DAY school has been
received in a very positive way by
our Jewish community," says
Barry. "We have received
numerous phone calls from
people who wish to move to Palm
Beach County and will only do so
as a result of us having a Jewish
day school program. The school
attracts, because of its Hebrew
studies, a high caliber of Hebrew
instructors and these teachers
become available to the afternoon
Hebrew classes in the Temples
round the area."
Looking towards the future,
the school officials are presently ,
formulating plans for the con- 0
struction of a new school building
on the newly acquired Federation
property located on Haverhill
oad just south of 45th Street
They anticipate a doubling of its
Continued o Page 8


mgs
anuary 12, 1979
TheJevwhtjondianafPalm Beach C'<
oonty
Hanon Bar-On Guest at Technion Event Israel's Athletes Stay
Hanon Bar-On, minister
plenipotentiary of the State of
Israel to the United States, will
be the guest of honor Tuesday,
Jan. 16, at the Palm Beach home
of Mrs. Dorothy Rautbord, 44
Coooanut Row, at 5 p.m.
The cocktail reception is being
given by Mrs. rlautbord, Palm
Beach communal leader, on
behalf of the Greater Palm Beach
County Chapter of the American
Technion Society. The
organization supports the
Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology.
Announcement of Bar-On's
visit here, at which he will review
the current Middle East peace
negotiations, was made by Alan
II. Cummings, president of the
recently-organized Technion
chapter. The reception also will
complete plans for the annual
dinner of the Palm Beach
chapter, scheduled for Sunday,
Feb. 4, at the Breakers Hotel.
Minister Bar-On served in the
British Army during World War
II, and as a member of the
legendary Jewish Brigade,
gained experience which helped
him serve in the Israeli army
when it was formed in 1948.
He served for several years as
Ambassador of Israel to the
Netherlands, and helped
maintain the strong ties between
the Dutch nation and the Jewish
state.
A veteran of 27 years with the
Israeli foreign service, Minister
Bar-On was Consul General of
Israel in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
for three years and later served as
director of the African Division of
the Foreign Ministry in Israel.
For three years, from 1969
until 1972, he was director of the
Director General's Office at the
Foreign Ministry, and has served
as counselor to the Embassy in
Washington and as an executive
Home From Asian Games
Hanon Bar-On
in the Prime Minister's office.
Minister Bar-On is a graduate
of the National Defense College
in Jerusalem and was a member
of Israel's permanent delegation
to the United Nations.
Technion Chapter to Hear Dr. Goldberg
Dr. Alexander Goldberg,
immediate past president of the
Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology in Haifa, will be the
During World War II, he led
the project which developed an
aluminum house for assemblyline
production by Great Britain's
aircraft industry. More than
100,000 units were built in two
years.
In 1948, Dr. Goldberg moved
to Israel and joined Israel
Fertilizers and Chemicals, Ltd. of
Haifa. He was an executive of the
Ministry of Defense during
Israel's War of Independence.
Returning to the civilian sector
after the war, he was the leading
figure in developing Israel's
chemical industry.
In 1962, he was named
chairman of the board of
governors of the Technion,
Israel's oldest institution of
higher learning and its only
technological university. In 1965,
he became president of the Israel
Institute of Technology, and
served for two, four-year terms as
the chief academic and ad-
ministrative officer of Technion.
By HASKELL COHEN
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Asian Games are over, but the
sad memory lingers on here in Tel
Aviv. Israeli sports authorities
are disappointed bitterly that the
local athletes were not invited
because of so-called security
reasons.
Although it comes as no solace,
the local Asian Games
Federation committee has been
advised by John B. Holt of
London, General Secretary of the
International Amateur Athletic
Federation (IAAF), that on Jan.
19 a council meeting will be held
in London to examine the conse-
quences insofar as they affect the
athletes who took part and the
member federations who
authorized their participation in
the Games.
THE IAAF did not issue a
permit previously for the Games
to proceed which meant par-
ticipating athletes concerned,
automatically became ineligible
for the Moscow Olympic Games
in 1980.
As stipulated in Rule 11 in the
IAAF Guide, before exercising
any power under the rule in-
volved, the council must notify
the member of the alleged in-
fringement of the rule and afford
an opportunity to the member of
being heard.
All federations affected,
therefore, have been invited to be
represented at the Jan. 19
meeting. However, for practical
reasons, a proposal is being made
to the Asian officers, who were
present in Bangkok, to nominate
a delegation which will represent
all those members who will be
unable to be present.
HAIM GLOVINSKY,
honorary treasurer of the Israel
Olympic Committee, upon
receiving notice of the hearing,
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency: "We are pleased no end
to witness at least one spoil
federation, namely, the Inter-
national Amateur Athletic
Federation, keep its word in
attempting to punish those
responsible for keeping our
athletes out of the Asian Games.
"We trust that the fellow
members of this august body will
keep its word as to the resolution
passed in Puerto Rico, earlier in
the year, whereby participating
athletes in the now non-
sanctioned Games will be
punished for their activity
contrary to the AAF's dictate."
Dr. Alexander Goldberg
guest of honor at a Friday, Jan.
luncheon meeting at noon in
the Garden Club, Sun and Surf
Building, 130 Sunrise, Palm
Beach.
The session, sponsored by the
board of directors and dinner
committee of the Greater Palm
Beach Chapter of the American
Technion Society, will hear a
special report on activities in
Israel of the Technion.
Dr. Goldberg, a chemical
engineer and a pioneer in the field
of industrial management, is a
graduate of the British Royal
School of Mines.
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tOUAl OWOBTuMTy EMWOVCT


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, January 12,1979
Souffi (Bounty $Zes
on now vw!uh* .i
TEMPLE EMETH
Temple Emeth of Delray will
hold an Art Show and Auction on
Jan. 28 at 8 p.m. All are invited.
The works of Chagall, Picasso,
Miro, Rockwell will be featured.
There will be watercolors, oils,
original lithos, woodcuts, et-
chings, and numbered limited
editions. Champagne punch and
refreshments will be served.
The Temple sponsors a weekly
Monday evening bingo. The
doors open at 6:30 p.m. with
early bird games at 7:45.
Refreshments are served.
B'NAI TORAII
CONGREGATION
Dr. Alan Marcovitz was
elected treasurer of the Southeast
Region of the United Synagogue
of America at its recent con-
vention in Atlanta. United
Synagogue is the organization of
Conservative congregations,
including 850 congregations in
the United States. Of this
number six are in the Southeast
Region, and more than 30
congregations are in Israel. Dr.
Marcovitz also is treasurer of
B'nai Torah Congregation in
Boca Raton.
REFORM HEBREW
CONGREGATION
The Sisterhood of the Reform
Hebrew Congregation of Delray
Beach will hold a meeting on
Monday, Jan. 22 at 12:30 pjn. at
the Jaycee Clubhouse, Lake Ida
Park, Delray Beach. For details
call Marge Aaron.
B'NAI B'RITH
HAIFA LODGE
B"nai B'rith Haifa Lodge of
Boy nton Beach will hold its first
fund raiser of the 1979 year at
the Pompano Raceway on Feb. 7.
A sit-down kosher style dinner
will be served on the fourth floor
in the Founders Room. Tickets
can be obtained from Jay Kaye,
Jim Frankel, Irv Friner or Bill
Lillie.
\
f
George Helman (left) is shown receiving the UJA Leadership
Award for his efforts on behalf of the 1978 campaign in heading
the Palm Greens Division for the Combined Jewish Appeal in
Delray Beach. Presenting the award is the 1979 Delray Beach
Chairman, Milton Kretsky.
II
The Delray Beach committee for the 1979 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund met recently to plan for this
year's campaign. Pictured (left to right) are Louis Levine, Pines
of Delray Campaign Cabinet; Jerry Marshall, vice chairman,
Delray Beach campaign; George Helman, Palm Greens chair-
man; and Milton Kretsky, chairman for Delray Beach cam-
paign.
Ted Comet (center), director of the Overseas Program for the
Council of Jewish Federations, recently addressed the Com-
munity Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. Pictured with him are Marvin Turk (left), co-
chairman of the Israel-Mid East Task Force, and Bruce
Daniels, chairman of the Community Relations Council Comet
discussed the present situation in Iran and the possible
problems that may confront the Jewish population.
So. County Calendar
Jan. 12
JEWISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION Luncheon 10 a.m.
Jan. 13
JEWISH FEDERATION LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT 8 p.m. Women's
American ORT East Nighl of Races
Jan.14
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton Lecture 8 p.m.
Jan.16
B'nai Torah Congregation Yiddish Culture Club 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 17
B'nai Torah Sisterhood 11:30 a.m. Israel Bonds Boca Logo
Jan.18
Temple Beth El Sisterhood 10 a.m.
Jan. 21
B'nai B'rith- 10a.m.
Jan.22
Women's American ORT East Board 1 p.m.
Jan. 23
B'nai Torah Congregation Yiddish Culture Club 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 25
Israel Bond B'nai Torah Congregation

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Friday, January 12,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
iernice Rudnick
Ambassador Blum to Address UJA Conclave
A.L. Levine
muce Rudnick Honored
Einstein College Award
memb
Wdme
More than 400 friends and
supporters of the Albert Einstein
College of Medicine are expected
to attend the College's 24th
Annual Palm Beach dinner at
which the Albert Einstein
Humanitarian Award will be
presented to Mrs. Bern ice
Rudnick, noted Palm Beach and
New York philanthropist and
communal leader. The event will
be held Saturday, Feb. 3, at the
Breakers.
A. L. Levine, president of the
A. L. Levine Organization,
developers and owners of a
national chain of shopping
centers, is dinner chairman.
"Bernice Rudnick is known
among her many friends as a doer
especially when the task at
hand benefits the sick, the needy,
the deprived; she radiates great
joy in helping others," said
Levine. The College of Medicine
lists Mrs. Rudnick among its
Flinders, Overseers, and as a
nber of its Women's Division,
close ties with the College's
len's Division span many
years, during which she served as
president of its New York
Chapter, and as chairman of
numerous major events.
Currently she is a member of the
Bmen's Division's National
rd of Directors.
rs. Rudnick's community
>nsibilities in New York and
Beach encompass a wide
She is active with UJA-
eration as a member of its
men's Cabinet in New York
its Women's National Board.
is chairman of the Campaign
inet of the National Women's
is ion of UJA-Federation in
Beach.
erving on the Board of
jstees of the New York
deration, she also is a member
its Communal Planning
imittee. She serves agencies
^Federation as honorary vice
itident of the Board of Jewish
fucation and as a member of
Board of the New York
Bociation for New Americans.
I In other activities, Mrs.
lidnick is a member of the
tecutive Committee of the
Fomen's Division of the Council
Jewish Federations and
Telfare Funds and is a member
the Commission on Jewish
lucation of the Union of
lerican Hebrew Congre-
itions / Central Conference
American Rabbis. She
serves in fundraising on
phalf of her alma mater,
Mlesley College.
[The dinner chairman, Levine
is an Einstein College
Founder and member of the
Board of Overseers. He serves on
the Board of Governors of the
Palm Beach Country Club and
the YMHA and YWHA of North
Jersey. He also serves on the
Board of Directors of the
Daughters of Miriam Home for
the Aged in Clifton, N.J., and the
Greater Palm Beach Symphony.
Serving as co-chairman of the
event is Sol W. Cantor. Associate
chairmen are Arthur B. Belfer,
James B. Gaynor, Mrs. Grace
Golber, Saul Kramer, Mrs.
Beulah Levine, H. Bert Mack,
Albert Parker, Jack Resnick and
Michael Singer.
Einstein College is rated
among the top medical in-
stitutions in the country for
scientific research, education and
patient care. The College and its
affiliates are located in the
Bronx, N.Y., occupying some 200
acres and representing an in-
vestment of more than $400
million in public and private
funds.
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NEW YORK Ambassador
Yehuda Z. Blum, Israel's new
permanent representative to the
United Nations will be the
featured speaker during the
United Jewish Appeal Southwest
Regional Conference to be held at
the Hyatt Regency in New
Orleans, Jan. 12-14.
Appointed to his post by
Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan,
the Ambassador resumed his
responsibilities at the U.N. in
September. His presentation at
the UJA Southwest Regional
Conference will be his first ad-
dress to a formal gathering of
American Jewish leadership.
A Holocaust survivor,
Ambassador Blum emigrated to
Israel after World War II. He
holds graduate degrees in law
from the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem and the University of
London. He has held positions in
the Foreign Ministry of Israel
and a professorial post the
Hersch Lauterpacht Chair in
International Law at Hebrew
University.
Ambassador Blum has been
visiting professor at a number of
universities in the United States,
including the School of Law at
the University of Texas at
Austin.
Leaders from American Jewish
communities throughout the
Southwest Region will meet
Ambassador Blum at a Saturday
night banquet session of the UJA
Southwest Conference.
Herbert J. Garon of New
Orleans, chairman of the UJA
Southwest Regional Conference,
along with co-chairmen, Marvin
L. Jacobs and Dr. Julius L. Levy,
Jr., president and campaign
chairman respectively of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
New Orleans, have announced
conference highlights including:
a Saturday luncheon session with
a presentation by Irving Bern-
stein, executive vice chairman
of UJA; plenary sessions with
Prof. Leonard Fein, editor and co-
founder with Elie Wiesel of
Moment Magazine, Marshall
Weinberg, vice president of the
American Joint Distribution
Committee and Dr. Aryeh
Nesher, director of UJA "Project
Breakthrough;" as well as a
series of campaign workshops
including those sponsored by
Young Leadership Cabinet,
Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet, and Women's Division
featuring a session with
Mathilda Brailove, former
chairman of UJA Women's
Division.
Mitchell Rasansky, chairman
of the UJA Southwest Regional
Campaign Cabinet, said that the
variety of programs, for both the
plenary and workshop sessions,
was designed to give all par-
ticipants of the Conference an
opportunity to launch their 1979
campaigns under "the most
exciting and informative cir-
Yehuda Blum
cumstances" as well as to present
to the region as a whole the
various facets of this year's UJA
campaign, "Jewish Renewal At
Home and Overseas."
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i. .wn-.. ji i mi utut
TTTT^TTTT
Jewish Community Center Presents
Pr-School
After a successful Chanukah
Program for the parents and a
week's vacation, the pre-
schoolers returned to their class-
rooms and teachers. Some new
2'/j year olders have joined the
group.
Juniors
Several new teachers have
joined the staff of the Jewish
Community Center's after-school
program. If you haven't signed
up for the Ballet, Jazz, Lilliput
Theatre, Karate, Disco for Kids,
Cooking, time is running out.
Tweens & Teens
Teens meet every Tuesday at 7
p.m., and Tweens meet every
Wednesday at 8 p.m. Special
Tween Disco classes will start
Wednesdays at 7 p.m.
Women's League News
The Women's League an-
nounces a special course in Self-
Hypnosis by A. H. Gold,
A.A.E.H.. certified hypnotist.
This course will deal with such
topics as controlling smoking,
improving one's ability to con-
centrate. improving study habits
and memory. This four-session
course will be given four Monday
evenings from 7:30 to 9:30 at the
JCC on Feb. 5, 12. 19 and 26.
Class will be limited in size.
Advance registration a must.
Call the Center for details.
Playground Dedication
There will be a dedication of
the James Gorfinkle Children's
Playground on Jan. 17 at 1 p.m.
The public is invited to join and
view where the children play each
day. Gorfinkle was a Board
member of the Center and spent
time and effort in improving the
playground. A Memorial Fund
was set up by the Board of
Directors in his name for the
purpose of creating this play-
ground.
Flea Market
From 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. there
will be a Flea Market at the
Jewish Community Center on
Sunday. Jan. 28. The proceeds of
this event will go to improve the
lounges at Camp Shalom. If you
have any saleable items for this
event, call Hal at the JCC and
items will be picked up.
'Fourth of February'
"Have a Fourth of July in
Febriary": Come to hear all
about the JCC's Summer
Programs and meet the staff. The
meeting will be at Temple Israel
at 1 p.m. Applications are now
being accepted for Summer Pro-
gram Jobs. Contact Allan
Greene.
Men's Softball
Every Sunday at 9 a.m. the
Men's Athletic Council meets for
a game of so ft ball. Call Joel
Karp.
Jewish Art
Do you have hidden art and
treasures of Jewish content that
could be used for the lobby and
Jewish Museum Room? Call
Allan Greene and items will be
picked up.
Help Help
The Jewish Community Center
needs a lawnmower, electric or
hand type.
THEATRE BUFFS
On March 9-11, the Jewish
Community Center is sponsoring
a weekend in Sarasota. Included
in the program are: Tickets for
two performances: Volpone by
Ben Jonson; followed by a dis-
cussion with cast and director.
Design for Living by Noel
Coward. Admission to the Ring-
ling Brothers Mansion and
Museum: round trip trans-
portation; two-night stay in
motel. Bus will leave JCC Friday,
March 9 at 4 p.m. and return
Sunday, March 10 at 3 p.m. Trip
leaders are Diane and Michael
Soil. Register now.
Irene Govoni will be teaching
ballet for Grades K-2 on Mon-
days at 4 p.m. and jazz for
Grades 3-5 on Mondays at 5 p.m.
Classes will remain small. Sign
up now. Transportation
available.
ARTS FESTIVAL
The JCC announces its First
Annual Cultural Arts Festival at
Temple Beth El. On Saturday,
Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. Jewish enter-
tainer, Bernie Deane, will per-
form his one-man show of the hit
Broadway musical The
Rothschilds. On Sunday, Feb. 18
at 8 p.m., there will be a special
showing of the film, Shop on
Main Street, and a discussion
with special guest, Ida
Kaminska, star of the film.
On Sunday at noon, im-
mediately following religious
school, there will be a special
program for children including
lunch, a film, and ventriloquist,
Stanley Burns. All programs will
take place at Senter Hall at
Temple Beth El, Flagler and 28th
Street.
SENIOR NEWS
Transportation is available at
the Center for transit dis-
advantage seniors 60 years or
older, to go to doctors, hospitals,
nursing homes, shopping, social
service agencies, within a desig-
nated area. Call the Center for
further information.
Classes
Adult Community Education
Classes begin the week of Jan. 15.
Monday, Oil Painting, 9 a.m.,
Monday, Finances, 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday, T.A., 10 a.m. Wed-
nesday, Creative Writing, 9 a.m.
Thursday, When to call the
Doctor, 1:30p.m.
New Dimensions will meet on
Tuesday, Jan. 23 at 1:30. The
program for the day will be "The
Enjoyment of Art" by Freda
Majzlin.
Trips
The bus leaves for the Paddle-
wheel Queen on Feb. 20 at 4:30
p.m. from Century Village and
from the JCC (TBA). The trip
includes bus transportation,
steak dinner and boat cruise. Call
the Center or Sam Rubin for
information or reservations.
The Theatre Party at the Royal
Palm Dinner Theatre for March
28 has been changed to April 25.
Show to be announced in the near
future. Call Sam Rubin or the
Center for additional in-
formation. Transportation
arrangements have been
arranged.
Another Lido Spa trip has been
planned for March 25-28. Reser-
vations are now being accepted.
For further information call the
Center and ask for Bonnie
Silverstein.
Flea Market is set for Sunday,
Jan. 28. Raffles are being sold for
a drawing to be held at 4 p.m. for
a handmade afghan made by
Belle Cohen.
Special Classes
Needle Arts, Mondays, 1:30
p.m. Film Day Israel Today,
Jan. 16, 1:30 p.m. Dedication
Gorfinkle Memorial Playground,
Jan. 17, 1 p.m. Hypertension
Screening, Jan. 22, 1-4 p.m. "90
Minutes," Jan. 24, 1:30 p.m.
Understanding Israel, Jan. 31,
1:30 p.m.
Bonn Envoy Opposes
Ending Statute Limitations,
TEL AVIV (JTA) Hans-Jochen Vogel, the West
German Minister of Justice now visiting Israel, said that
he and the Social Democratic Party opposed ending the
statute of limitations on the prosecution of Nazi war
criminals which is scheduled to expire in exactly one year.
He told representatives of the World Federation of
Polish Jews here that his party would do its utmost to see
to it that Nazi war criminals do not escape justice,
however long it may take to bring them to trial.
VOGEL suggested that Nazi hunter Tuvia Friedman,
head of the war crimes documentation center in Haifa, go
to West Germany with a group of his supporters to ex-
plain to the German public why the statute of limitations
should not be ended.
The statute designates a period of time during which
war criminals may be prosecuted; those who evade trir"
receive automatic immunity after it expires.
an
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Mashgiach on Premises
iSedurim & Services
Spotlight on Barry Krischer
Continued from Page 4
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Barry Krischer foresees the
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The future of Jewish education
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Je w in Cairo
Trip of Apprehension, Agreement
ontinued from Page 1
Ite two to three million
its present population is
ess of eight million.
OVERCROWDING is
to describe. Every form
kblic transportation is filled
bursting point, passengers
ily hang on to the windows
loors as the vehicle moves.
|e to the shortage of housing,
ands of families live among
jmbstones and mausoleums
i Cairo cemeteries.
it a strange sight to see
lines strung from tomb-
to tombstone, with
king flapping in the wind in
kiddle of a cemetery!
many people have found
er among the dead, that four
bis and two post offices have
[set up to serve the residents
i macabre city of the dead.
EGYPTIAN people were
friendly. Practically
^one asked, "Where do you
from?" "America," we said
were told, "Welcome to
t." When the person with
we were conversing
led that I was a Jew, whether
driver, a sales clerk, guide
vaiter, political discussion
ably ensued.
/e want peace. We are tired
of fighting for the Palestinians.
My son was killed," one person
told me, "And I don't want my
younger son to die. We want
peace."
The center of interest in Cairo
for every tourist is the Pyramids.
Before starting the official round
of meetings that were planned,
we made our way to Giza, the site
of three Pyramids and the
Sphinx, nine miles west of Cairo.
As one views the Pyramids,
they appear less impressive than
expected. Each is a massive pile
of stones with the decorative
cover of polished stone removed
through the ages by despoilers.
The largest of the Pyramids at
Giza covers 13 acres and was
built about 2690 B.C. by King
Cheops.
WE ARE told that 100,000
.lie labored for 30 years to
aild this warehouse of the dead.
Without the impressive statistics
of the number and weight of the
stones, the Pyramids lack in-
trinsic appeal. One sees them
instead as a deteriorating relic of
Pharanoic obsession with death.
The Egyptian comprehension
of life in this world at the time
was to prepare for a better
existence in the world to come.
Great emphasis was placed upon
the preparations for the next life.
In all, there are three Pyramids
standing on a small bluff.
For sightseers, the Cairo
Museum is a must. It contains
rooms filled with antiquities of
the Pharaohs, works of art
unsigned of a quality which
Bernie Lamstein, chairperson
of the Fountains Campaign
Division, announced the Foun-
tains will sponsor a tournament
day on behalf of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County's 1979 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign. The program will be
held on Thursday, Jan. 18
The Psyche and Soma
Of Our Foreign Policy
I Continued from Page 4
are. Using a sea of Coca Cola
water, he is going to baptize
|t uncivilized nation into the
ining ways of the west.
The President's psychosomatic
lptoms should be con-
Jerably eased by this except
one thing. Monarch Wine
ripany, the Brooklyn organ-
Uion that produces the
linischewitz line of sacramental
social libations, has just
led an agreement with the
inese to import Tsingtao, a
inese beer, into the United
ktes.
)epending upon whether or
. he sees this new agreement as
^nterrevolutionary or counter-
ptismal by Coke, the President
very well be felled again.
)N A MORE optimistic note,
krnatively, he may be singing
[praises of the Chinese brew in
according to the hallowed
lischewitz tradition so
iliar on Passover: "Man. oh
Fountains Tournament Day
beginning at s:40 a.m. ana will
include golf, tennis and cards.
The tennis tournament will begin
at 9:30 a.m. The cost for the day
will be $75 per person, which will
include golf fees, carts, cocktails
and a luncheon at the clubhouse.
There also will be golf and tennis
prizes, as well as door prizes.
Keynote speaker for the event
will be Alan L. Shulman,
president of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County. "For the first time all
residents of the Fountains are
being contacted for the op-
portunity to participate in this
tournament day," stated Bernie
Lamstein, co-chairperson. "The
golf portion of the tournament
will use 36 holes which will enable
us to accommodate up to 300 men
and women. We are hoping to
double last year's drive. The
residents of the Fountains
deserve great praise for their
enthusiasm."
The program also will include
the presentation of a plaque by
the Jewish Federation to Mrs.
Morton Pauker, in memory of her
husband.
Members of the tournament
day committee are Dorothy
Friedman, Rhoda Katz, Bernie
Lamstein, co-chairpersons. Cards
co-chairpersons, Janet Blum,
Eleanor Jaret, Rose Lieberman
and Ruth Lorber; golf co-chair-
persons, Arnie Mandell and
Bunny Schreiber; tennis co-
chairpersons, Adolph Bergstein
and Jerry Lorber.
would have ensured its creator
immortal fame. Beautiful gold
Death Masks and various gold
articles of ornament fill the
Museum.
In the Museum, 80 percent of
the relics found in the tomb of the
Pharaoh Tut appear to be placed
as a warehouse, rather than for
display. It is strange to realize
that this art was never intended
to be seen by mortal eyes, but
was fashioned and created to be
entombed with the Pharaoh for
use in his next life.
OUR TRIP took us to Luxor,
about 500 miles south of Cairo
along the River Nile. There we
visited the Valley of the Kings
where the Pharaohs and the
Queens are entombed in tombs
which are remarkably well
preserved. Colors appear to be as
bright as the day they were first
applied and show a very high
degree of civilized thought.
Egyptian hieroglyphics
depicted on the walls of the
tombs, contain a recital of magic
words, designed to ward off
demons and to overcome the
obstacles to a safe journey on the
subterranean River Nile.
A visit to the Cairo University
and a meeting with Dr. Soufi
Abow-Taleb, president and
members of the faculty was
impressive. The university has
large schools of Medicine, Law
and Engineering, as well as
schools of the Humanities that
teach Comparative Religions and
the Philosophies of Religion. The
student enrollment is 120,000 and
it is the largest university in the
Arab world. All of the teachings
are heavily influenced by the
religious teachings of Islam.
Our delegation of the
Synagogue Council achieved a
high degree of success in building
a structure for dialogue between
the American Jewish community
and Egyptian Islamic Scholars of
the Cairo University.
Agreements were reached under
which American Jewish scholars
would teach as visiting
professors at Cairo University
and Egyptian Islamic scholars
would be sent on loan to Jewish
colleges in the United States.
AN AGREEMENT was
reached with the Egyptian
Government to permit Jewish
scholars to undertake a survey of
Jewish manuscripts and artifacts
in Cairo and other ancient Jewish
settlements in the Nile Delta
region and to establish a Jewish
Museum in Cairo.
The delegation located the
ancient synagogue and study of
the Jewish philosopher,
Maimomides, and will restore it
as the site of the future national
Jewish Museum.
We negotiated with the
Egyptian Government for the
return of 40 Torah Scrolls to the
Jewish community and obtained
permission from the government
to bring to the United States a
collection of manuscripts and
ceremonial objects from the
Jewish Karaite sects, items never
before available for public
showing and scholarlv analysis.
To be continued next issue.
r.
man, oh Tsingtao." It is difficult
to predict just which track he'll
take.
And that's the trouble Mr.
Carter's unpredictability. That's
where the real pain is at the
"honest broker" turning Camp
David into a victory for Goliath:
his recognition of Peking vying
on the Richter scale with Richard
Nixon's Saturday night
massacre, his playing Russian
roulette by rubbing SALT into
all our wounds. In this sense, his
pain becomes ours.
"For we are born in other's
pain, / And perish in our own,"
said the English poet, Francis
Thompson. And so, it should
serve as a warning to those who
share Mr. Carter's infirmity, who
don't know their psyche from
their soma, that the New Year
1979 may bring medical bills
galore as our nation's affairs
unfold or unravel.
Oh, what a pain. It just makes
you sick.
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*ageiu
The Jewish Fhridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. January 12,1979
* IRabbmf cal o^
co-ordinoted by the
S Polm Beach County Rabbinicol CounciI
::: Editor Rabbi Jerome Kestenbaum
:::::::
dtvottd to discussion of thenes and Usuos
relevont to Jewish life past and present
/ Confess a Bias for Jews
I believe or to feel that if I find a
| formula for promoting brotherly
love among all peoples in the
Middle East (Arabs, Israelis,
Christians, Jews, and Moslems) I
will automatically solve the
problems of the State of Israel.
As a Jew I confess that I am
more deeply touched by the
plight of a graduate of the gas
chambers and of the escapee from
the Soviet "paradise" than I am
by the plight of the homeless
Palestinian, who has been
supported by U.N. funds (largely
By RABBI WILLIAM H.
SHAPIRO, ScD
Secy. Rabbinical Council PBC
The greatest need of the State
of Israel is peace between it and
its hostile Arab neighbors. While
no one doubts this, there are
divisions of opinion on the
method for achieving peace.
There are some who assert that
not an inch of territory now held
by Israel should be given up.
Others feel that it would be wise
to barter some "real estate" for
an assured peace. That there is a
problem with some Palestinians
(vague as the definition of that
name may be) is conceded by
almost all. But most Israelis and
Jews in other lands fed that the
claims of the Palestinians cannot
properly be asserted by a
terrorist group (the PLO) whose
spokesman is the gun-toting,
rabid Israel hater, Yassir Arafat.
ANOTHER GROUP asserts
that the Israelis should talk to
the PLO, that concessions be
made, that we should recognize
the just claims of the
dispossessed Palestinians.
It is interesting to note that
the chief representatives of this
group are persons who have been
(and some still are) members of
the New Left, ardent advocates
of civil rights, champions of the
cause of the underprivileged.
Rabbi William Shapiro
No one can deny that the
passion for social justice and the
desire for peace are basic to
Judaism. The message of the
Jewish prophets was the call to
battle against injustice, to stop
the oppression of the weak and
the poor, to substitute love for
hatred in the relations of people
to one another. No one can find
fault with any sincere effort to
implement the prophetic ideals.
But it is a misguided effort
when one advocates doing what
history has proven to be inef-
fective. Let us be clear on this
matter. Many times in Jewish
history sensitive, well-meaning
individuals or groups have ad-
vised that Jews throw them-
selves totally into movements for
the amelioration of the lot of
suffering human beings. It was
felt that Jewish problems would
automatically be solved if the
problems of the general populace
were solved. We learned to our
dismay that this was not true.
THE FRENCH Revolution
gave to all Frenchmen liberty,
equality, and fraternity, but Jews
did not participate in these
blessings. The Communist
Revolution was described as the
great attempt to bring equality
to all men, yet Jews are precluded
from enjoying its benefits. Jews
threw themselves enthusiasti-
cally into the struggle for civil
rights and often received insults
for their efforts.
Yes, I confess a bias in behalf
of Jews, and I maintain that
members of every ethnic group
are prejudiced in behalf of then-
own. We all have prejudices.
(Intelligent people admit this and
others deny it.) My prejudice
compels me to say that I want to
see the solution of my people's
problems first and then un-
dertake the solution of the dif-
ficulties of others.
I cannot bring myself to
CANDLELIGhfING
#
TIME
<*
5:29
13TEVETH-5739
x.
Bayonets in Bucharest
We Get Along,' Says Rabbi
By LYNNE IANNIELLO
There are soldiers with
bayonets on nearly every corner
of Bucharest. They stand at
attention and watch no one is
sure exactly what they are
watching. Perhaps the worn-
looking women who wear long
aprons and slowly sweep the
streets, stooping again and again
to pick up refuse. Perhaps the
gypsies who sell flowers from
little stands which constitute the
only businesses in the Socialist
Republic of Romania not owned
by the government.
Perhaps the people as they go
to and from work, or shop in
stores which carry identical
merchandise at identical prices,
or sit during the long afternoon
siesta in one of the many beer
gardens. Perhaps the tourists
who buy carved wooden plates,
copper and pewter bowls, ex-
pensive hand-embroidered
peasant blouses and furtively
take photographs of the soldiers
watching.
THE MAIN streets oi
Bucharest are clean and bustling.
There are monuments and
memorials to the Soviet soldiers,
airmen, engineer troops,
"Homeland Heroes" and
"Heroes of the Struggle for the
People's and the Homeland's
Liberty for Socialism" who
"liberated" Romania from fascist
domination. There are museums
and sports centers. There are
monasteries dating as far back as
the 16th Century, Greek and
Russian Orthodox churches, a
Lutheran church and 12
"synagogues" with daily ser-
vices.
"The Jewish community and
the "government get along," the
Chief Rabbi says.
"We give and take, they give
and take the Jews are happy,
the Communist Party is happy
His well-trimmed pointed bear
bobs up and down as he
apologizes for his heavily ac-
cented English. The beard is
white, but he is not an old man.
His name is Moses Rosen.
He is celebrating the 30th
anniversary of his election as
Chief Rabbi, a post which gives
him a seat in the Romanian
Parliament. Nearly 300
representatives of Jewish
communities from all over the
world including every Eastern
European communist country
except the Soviet Union are in
Bucharest to attend the July 3
observance.
OVER THE past 17 years,
with full government support,
Rabbi Rosen has been in-
strumental in the emigration to
Israel of nearly 300. GO*1
Romanian Jews, including 59'
rabbis. He is one of only thre
rabbis who remained. He has also
achieved government support for
the security of the 60,000 to
70.000 Jews he describes as "th
remnant of the Jewish com-
munity in Romania proud
Jews who maintain Jewish in-
stitutions, love Israel and are at
the same time loyal Romanian
citizens."
There is a Jewish community
house which serves kosher meals,
a newspaper published fort-
nightly in a government printing
shop in Romanian, Yiddish and
Hebrew, a Yiddish theatre, a 60-
page calendar with more than
half its pages filled with Jewish
history.
The anniversary observance is
in the 120-year old Choral
Temple, the largest and best
maintained of the 12 synagogues
in the Jewish quarter.
ITS COBBLESTONE
courtyard is crowded with
congregants and visitors. There
are also soldiers and government
"security" guards. Women are
directed to the first balcony; a
choir is on the second balcony.
The procession of participants
makes its way down the center
aisle of the synagogue. Among
them are U.S. Ambassador
Oreson F. Aggrey, high-ranking
Romanian government officials,
as well as representatives of
Romanian Christian
denominations. We see Aba
Geffen, Israel's Ambassador to
Romania and the Chief Rabbis
from Israel. Ireland, Denmark,
France and other nations.
Romanian television records
the event. The cameras focus on a
group of boys and girls who sing
Hebrew and Yiddish songs and
pay tribute to their Rabbi Rosen.
Their clear young voices
reverberate in the nooks and
crannies of the old temple. Their
youth is startling in this place
where 60 percent of the Jewish
community is more than 60 years
old.
The speeches go on for more
than five hours. At each of the
frequent mentions of President
Ceausescu's name, the entire
congregation stands up. A
congregant whispers to an
American: "Sit, sit you don't
have to be afraid."
AMONG THE American
speakers is Abraham Foxman,
director ofleadership for the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. There are 30 ADL
representatives in the temple, the
largest delegation of foreign
participants. The ADL group,
Foxman says, came to Romania
Continued on Page 11
from my country) and whoae
plight is due in large measure to
being exploited by his Arab
brethren.
If I am charged with having
greater love for Jews than for
others, I plead guilty to the
charge. For me there is no choice.
The column in the Rabbinical
Corner in the last issue was
written by Rabbi Harry Z.
Schectman of Congregation
Anshei Shalom, not by Rabbi
William Shapiro as incorrectly
reported.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
REFORM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flogler Drive, West Palm Beoch, Florida 33407 833-
8421 Rabbi I'vinq B Cohen Joel I. Levine, Associate Rabbi "
Sabbath Worship Services, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday Toroh
Seminars at 10:30 o.m
TEMPLE BETN EL OF BOCA IAT0N
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Fl. 33432 391-8900 Rabbi
Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath services, Friday at
8:15p.m.
THE REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION OF DELIAY
At St. Pauls Episcopal Church, 188 So. Swinlon Ave., Delray Friday
at 8 p.m. President Jerome Gilbert 499-5563
TEMPLE BETN T0RAN OF PALM REACH COUNTY

West Palm Beach, Flo 33411 Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:15p.m.
At St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd. and
Wellington Trace Mailing Address: 11686 Laurel Valley Circle,
West Polm Beach, Fl. 33411 President Joan Moskowitz 793-2700
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
THE FREE SYNAGOGUE, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton, Florida 33432 368-
1600, 391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn Fridays at 8:15 p.m. at
Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West, Glades Rd. (I Mile
West of Boca Turnpike)
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SH0L0M
5348 Grove Street. West Palm Beach, Flo. 33409 684-3212 Office
hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman Cantor Arthur
B. Rosenwasser Services: Daily 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8:30
a.m., 5 p.m.; Friday late service 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 8:30 a.m.,
5 p.m.
CONGREGATION BETH R0DESH
Boynton Beach, Fla. 732-5147 Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin Sabbath
Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Congregational
Church, 115 N. Federal Highway.
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fl. 33407 833-0339
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan at 8:15
a.m., Sunday at 9 o.m.
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
315 N. "A" St., Lake Worth, Fl 33460 585-5020 Rabbi tmanuel
Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Services: Mondays and Thursdays
at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15p.m., Saturday at 9a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath Services, Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10 a.m. West-
minister Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach
Gardens, 321 Northlake Blvd., North Palm Beach, Fl. 33408 Ph.
845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
224 N.W. Avenue "G". Belle Glade, Fl. 33430 Jack Statemon, Lay
Leader Sabbath Services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeda Drive. Palm Springs, Fl. 33460 Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. President Jacob Front 964-
0034 Mondays and Thursdays at 9 a.m. Services held at Faith
United Presbyterian Church, Palm Springs.
B'NAI T0RAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fl. 33432 392-8566 Rabbi
Nathan Zel.zer Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15p.m., Saturdays at
9:30a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE
DELRAY HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, Fl. 33440 276-3536
Morris Silberman, Rabbi Leonard Price, Cantor Sabbath Services-
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Daily minyans at 8:45 a m
and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Road, Palm Beoch, Fl. 33480 832-0604 Rabbi
Jerome Kestenbaum Cantor David Dardashti Services Mondavs
and Thursdays at 9 a.m. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 30 o m
Saturday at 9 a.m. K' '*

'


[January 12,1979
The Jewish. Fhoridian of Palm Beach County
<=
Future of 80,000 Jews of Iran
lANY, N.Y. (JTA) A
visitor to Iran who is
with the Jewish corn-
there has told the Jewish
aphic Agency that the
lof Iran are "very appre-
|e" about possible drastic
in government that
take place. According to
art, Irani Jews fear that
t't ions against them would
tiated if a new government
[predominant religious in
> were to come to power.
len Shiite Moslem
Huh Shariatmadri was
hewed by foreign corres-
^nts recently, the visitor
this influential leader ex-
the view that Jews had
Lionally enjoyed the
[lion of the Moslem state,
Ihey would continue to do so
L'i u religion-oriented govern-
ARIATMADRI ADDED,
ver, a proviso to the effect
this would only be the case
kg as the Jewish community
an agreed not to support
urn or the State of Israel.
_Jer the aegis of the Shah,
[isiLoi explained, the Jewish
jiunity and other minorities
enjoyed human rights,
_ous freedom and prosperity.
[rities are recognized and
pented in the Irani Majlis, or
ament, with the Jewish
jiunity served by their
btl representative, Yosef
According to the Shiite
religious edicts, however, Jews
and other non- Moslems are
adversely regarded. For many
such devout Moslems, it has not
been customary to have contacts
with the Jewish community.
THERE WERE instances of
anti-Jewish literature being
distributed in bazaars during the
latest upheavals, the visitor said,
but these supposedly originated
from individual Moslem leaders
and the Moslem religious leader-
ship publicly disassociated itself
from them.
There are approximately
80,000 Jews now living in Iran,
with the majority in Teheran and
also large clusters in the cities of
Shiraz and Isfahan. Under the
Shah, Irani Jews have become
relatively affluent, enjoyed
complete freedom to enter
professions, and established
industries and businesses, with
the encouragement of the
government, the visitor said.
The Jewish community in Iran
is composed of three separate
groups, he explained. The
majority are members of the
Irani Jewish community which is
one of the oldest, if not the oldest,
Jewish communities in the
diaspora. There has been such a
community in parts of Iran ever
since the destruction of the first
Temple.
A SECOND GROUP, an off
Community Calendar
13
B'nlh Women Masada Pompano racetrack 6 p.m. Jewish
nmunity Day School Art Auction 8 p.m. Women's American
Evening
14
B'nlh Mitzvah 9:30 a. m. Hadassah Tikvah dinner dance -
n. Congregation Anshei Sholom Israel Bond Function 2
American Friends, Hebrew University Dinner Breakers
/ISH IE DERATION ENDOWMENT COMMITTEE
1.15
dossuh Henrietta Szold 1 p.m. Hadassah Tikvah 1 p.m.
iple Emanu-EI Sisterhood special program 12:30 p.m.
^iple Israel Sisterhood noon
16
pple Beth David Board 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Menorah
bard 10 a.m. Congregation Anshei Sholom Installation 1
Israel Bond Hadassah lunch noon Temple Israel Board
m. Women's American ORT Boynlon Beach lunch and card
noon Pioneer Women Theodore Herzl Film Women's
|onal Patrons Society Jewish Theological Seminary Reception -
FEDERATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
National Women's Event Women's American ORT Palm
i-9:30 a.m. Jewish Community Day School Friends 8 p.m.
118
nth Women Medina Hadassah Bat Gurion Luncheon
Issah Yovel 1 p.m. Notional Council of Jewish Women 1
] Women's American ORT Evening Board 8 p.m. Labor
1st Alliance Hadassah Golao Meir 12:30 p.m. Women's
[rican ORT Palm Beach Mothei to Another luncheon FED-
IION WOMEN'S DIVISION CABINET 8 p. m.
I. 20
ERATION LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT FIRST YEAR 8 p.m.
1.21
fiple Beth Sholom Men's Club Lake Worth Breakfast 9:30
Jewish Community Center pet show B'nai B'rith #3041 -
kfast
1.22
B'rith Women Boynton Beach board 1 p.m. Women's
ncanORT-No Palm Beach 12:30 p.m.
r. 23
f\ B'rith Women Masada Milzvah donor lunch noon
nen's American ORT Boynton Beach 1 p.m. Hadassah -
lei lunch noon Women's American ORT Golden Lakes -
1.24
anal Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach noon Pioneer
ien Golda Meir board 1 p.m. Temple Beth David S.ster-
8p.m.
[.25
lossah Aliya noon Hadassah Bat Gurion 10 a.m.
lossah Chai 12.30 p.m. American Jewish Committee
fulive Hadassah Golda Meir lunch noon FEDERATION
ITURY VILLAGE SPECIAL GIFTS LUNCHEON PGA HOLIDAY INN -
In Albert Einstein College of Medicine (reception)
l.WVWVN.VV'*
spring of the first, is called the
Mashedi community, originating
in Mashed, one of the cities holy
to the Shiite faith. These Jews
were forced to embrace Islam
about 150 years ago, but kept
Judaism secretly alive and
returned to open practice when
conditions permitted. Because of
its unique history, the visitor
said, this group of 3,000 families
generally keeps to itself. They are
primarily occupied with carpet
dealing, and now have com-
munities outside of Iran, in
Israel, Milan, Italy and
elsewhere.
Iraqi Jews who came to Iran as
recently as the 1930s and 1940s
comprise another small group.
They are usually merchants and
their traditions differ slightly
from those of the other com-
munities.
Until the turn of the century,
Jews in Iran, as in many Moslem
countries, lived in special
quarters or ghettos. Since the
time of the father of the current
Shah, they have been allowed to
live in all parts of Teheran and
other cities.
THE JEWISH community has
a representative body called
Anjumman Kalimian, which is
elected periodically by members
of the community. All matters of
communal life, welfare and
education are administered by
this Jewish committee, the
visitor said. At present, there are
about 80,000 Irani Jews living in
Israel.
Continued from Page 10
to express appreciation as
Americans and Jews for the
munity. We also came to
demonstrate to the Jews of
Romania that the Jewish people
are one, that their joys are our
joys, their hopes our hopes, their
pain and sorrow our pain and
sorrow, their dreams and
.ispirations our dreams and
.ispirations."
lie had voiced the same
sentiments at meetings the ADL
group had with Romanian of-
ficials. The officials talked about
political and economic relations
with Israel, about the large
number of Jews permitted to
emigrate, about the freedom of
those who had stayed, about
Rabbi Rosen's anniversary
and about Romania's need to
import American technological
assistance and to export textiles
and finished products.
"We give and take, they give
and take," Rabbi Rosen had said.
It is a game whose unwritten
rules are understood by all the
players. For "the remnant of the
Romanian Jewish community,"
the name of the game is survival.
Weizmann
Worried Hawks
Stonewall Peace
Continued from Page 1
the draft peace treaty he and
Dayan had worked out with the
Egyptians in Washington.
WEIZMAN REPORTEDLY
rests his hopes on the expectation
that Dayan will eventually take a
firm stand against delaying
tactics by Cabinet ministers.
Dayan is trying to steer the
Cabinet toward a decision that
will make the resumption of talks
possible.
He has spoken of the need for
compromises by both Israel and
Egypt on the key issues in
dispute. This drew the wrath of
, some of his. cojluugueb at a special
w Cabinet session.
At a recent annual meeting of the United Jewish Appeal
Rabbinic Cabinet in Lake Bluff, III, past chairmen of the
Cabinet were honored by their colleagues: Rabbis Irving
Lehrman of Miami Beach (left), Joseph H. Looks tein, chairman
of the Rabbinic Cabinet, Hillel Silverman of Los Angeles,
Robert I. Kahn of Houston. Presenting one of the awards and
chairman of the annual meeting of the Rabbinic Cabinet, Rabbi
Samuel Schafler of Chicago.
Irwin J. Brainen, Attorney, Dies
Irwin J. Brainen of West Palm Graveside services were held at
Beach, formerly of West Orange, Shalom Memorial Park. The
N.J., died Dec. 27 after a long Riverside had charge of
illness. arrangements.
He was a counselor at law in
Essex County, N.J. for 40 years
before retiring. He was a member
of both the Essex County and
New Jersey Bar associations;
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal of the Oranges and
Livingston; member of B'nai
B'rith and treasurer of the
Jefferson Towers Condominium
and a member of the President
Country Club of West Palm
Beach.
Surviving are his wife Sylvia
Lavinsky Brainen; daughters,
Michele Fleisher of Farmington,
Conn.; Karen de Kleinman of
New York City; three grandchil-
dren; brothers, A. Louis of South
Orange and Ben L. of Elizabeth,
N.J.

JEFFER
^v
FUNERAL HOMES, INC.
DIRECTORS
Irwin Jetter Medwin Jetter Alvin Jetter
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188-11 MUSK AVE. HOWS. U. N
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106 611 1164
SPONSORED BY
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- 1901 N. Flagler Dr.
iriHKl West Palm Beach
DATE
Sat. January 13, 1979
PREVIEW
7:30 p.m.
I
AUCTION
8:00 p.m.
REFRESHMENTS, PRIZES, RAFFLE
JEWISH FAMILY AMD CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
Jewish community of Palm Beach County. Professional and con-
fidential help is available for
Problems of the aging
Consultation and evaluation services
Vocational counseling
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
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Moderate fees are charged in family and individual counseling to
those who can pay (f-ees are based on income and family size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
....... .. i .



NJCRA C Charges
U.S.-Pushed Sadat Ante Dims Peaa
NEW YORK The National
Jewiafc Cninaatj Relations
Advisory Council has published a
repwt prepared by Ma Strategy
Committee that charges tiiat As
long as the United States snp-
ports Egypt's stiff demands.
Egypt will be unwilling to
conciliate its position (on a
Middle East peace treaty).'
Full text of the report, in
question-answer form, follows:
Why it there an Impasse in the
Treaty S'egotiations?
On Man 11. Israeli and
Egyptian negotiators agreed on a
treaty drafted by the United
States. Israel's Cabinet, on Nov.
21. approved the Treaty. Sadat
did not. He then sought to reopen
negotiations of the Treaty itself
The United States felt the Treaty
should not be reopened, and.
instead, proposed and Sadat
agreed to the use of "in-
terpretive notes" and an ex-
change of letters on the Treaty.
They then reached agreement on
their content. These "interpretive
notes" which have to be
signed by Israel and Egypt -
and "side letters" would change
the Treaty.
How'
One of the proposed changes
would link the execution of the
Sinai Treaty to the negotiations
for the autonomy plan for the
West Bank and Gaza. Annex III
of the Treaty provides for the
establishment of diplomatic and
consular relations inrltuiing the
exchange of ambassadors on tne
completion of Israel's interim
withdrawal from most of the
Sinai. Sadat's new demands
would make the exchange of
ambassadors dependent upon the
establishment of the Palestinian
Arab self-governing authority. In
other words, if the Palestinian
Arabs succeed in obstructing the
establishment of a self-governing
authority in the West Bank
and/or Gaza, they could block
implementation of the Sinai
Treaty. So peace would depend
upon parties who not only reject
the two Camp David agreements,
but still oppose Sadat's
initiative.
But, Isn't Israel Committed to a
Comprehensive Peace?
Century Village
Continued from Pag* 1
David Simon, Dan Weiner, Louis
Weinstein, Nathan Weinstock,
Morris Weiss, David Welsh.
As the campaign organization
develops, additional section
chairmen will be appointed and
announced.
Reservations for the luncheon
for men and women may be made
by calling the Jewish Federation.
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Yea. and the Treaty which
Israel approved asserts that in
four difteieut paragraphs in the
The Treaty clearly
the commitment to the
goal of achieving a peace
agreement 'between Israel and
each of its other Arab neighbors
which is ptepaied to negotiate
peace on this basis (Camp David
Agreement' ."
It hrael Resisting West Bank
and Gaza S'egotiations?
Israel is ready to give Sadat a
letter pledging that it will start
negotiations within one month of
signing the Treaty on the powers
and responsibilities of the
autonomy council and the
modalities for its election. That's
not surprising since the concent
of Palestinian Arab autonomy
was the proposal Begin presented
to Sadat one year ago at Ismailia.
What Isard rejects is the
potential threat of Egypt's
holding up implementation of the
Sinai Treaty: specifically, linking
the exchange of ambassadors to
conditions fundamentally ex-
ternal to the Treaty and beyond
the control of the two contracting
parties.
/* This the Only Problem of
Linkage?
No. Article VI. Paragraph 2 of
the treaty provides that Egypt
and Israel will "fulfill in good
faith their obligations under this
Treaty, without regard to action
or inaction of any other party and
independently of any instrument
external to this Treaty." This
rules out any effort to make the
obligations of this Treaty
dependent upon the im-
plementation of the West
Bank Gaza automony.
Sadat now wants an "inter-
pretive note" signed by Israel
and Egypt stating that this
provision must be construed in
the context of a comprehensive
settlement. Israel says the goal
of a comprehensive settlement is
already clearly stated in the
Treaty Preamble. What Israel
rejects is legally conditioning the
fulfillment of the Treaty's
obligations on the success of the
West Bank Gaza negotiations.
What About Egypt's Treaty
Obligations to Other Arab
States?
Egypt now has mutual
and military assistance
with other Arab nations .
are still in a state of wer .
Israel. Paragraph 5 of Artidel
of the Treaty was
deliberately to prevent EWI
from using these other tresttl
obligations as justification ||
joining with other Arab siatcsj
concerted military action agio,!
Israel Paragraph 4 of this Altai
also bars Egypt or Israel faj
undertaking any obligation intfcj
future that will conflict withtU
Treaty. The Treaty, of course.,1
no way takes away Israel's J
Egypt's right of individual
collective self-defense um
Article 103 of the U.N. Coin
and is so specified in Article VI,
the Treaty.
>l
The Delta professionals, like Passenger Service Agent
Jerry A. Robertson, run a happy airline.
Delta saves you money day and night with
Super Saver Fares, ^u can get big savings
on round-trip flights to any Delta city in the
continental U.S. There are 7-day advance pur-
chase and other qualifications. And the number
of low-fare seats is limited.
See your Travel Agent for full details on
all Delta's fares and flight reservations. Or call
Delta at 655-5300. Delta and your Travel Agent
accept American Express and all other major
general-purpose credit cards. aDelta
lb Chicago
The most i.onstops and free champagne in
Tourist on every one. Special one-way Night
Coach Fare $72.
To Detroit
More thru-jets than any other airUne- free
champagne in Tourist. Special one-way Night
Coach Fare $70.
To Philadelphia
One-stop thru-jets every afternoon. Super
Saver Night Coach Fares as low as $126
round trip.
To New York
Choose from 9 flight-times daily, with arrivals
at all 3 Metro airports. Super Saver Night
Coach Fares start at $133 round trip.
To Hartford/Springfield
One-stop thru-jet afternoon and night. Super
Saver Night Coach Fares as low as $144
round trip.
To Boston
The most flights, including a champagne non-
stop and 5 thru-jets. Super Saver Night Coach
Fares start at $150 round trip.
To Montreal
The only thru-jet going-Saturday and Sun-
day at 3:28am. Also 3 other flight-times every
day. Our lowest Super Saver Fare, $145.80
round trip.
All fares subject to change without notice.
1
Ddta b ready when you are
Delta also has a big line-up f
one-stop thru-jets and ^35f
to other Northern ^ ^jS^"^
Cincinnati, Columbus,0. and Cleveland.