Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00176

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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OFPALMBEA CH COUNTY
Combining "0U VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction witfc The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Liu me 4 Number 16
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, August 26,1978
Price 35 Cents
Cultural Exchange
With Russia:
The Big Ripof ff
By JONATHAN BRAUN
Is the United States, by
Lngaging in an organized cultural
Exchange program with the
Soviet Union, undermining the
fause of human rights?
The answer, according to a
the illusion that nothing has
changed is bad," was how one
activist, Carl Gershman, put it in
the wake of the sentencing by a
Soviet court of Anatoly Shar-
ansky, a prominent Jewish dis-
sident, to 13 years in prison.
"ORGANIZED exchanges are
Palestinian Camps Take
Brunt Of Israeli Attack
WORLD OF ART
[growing number of knowledge-
able observers and human rights
lactivists, is an unqualified
"Yes."
"Anything that contributes to
)%*
i
li''i
he ugtvtn
meaningless in terms of really
improving people-to-people rela-
tions," said Gershman, who is
executive director of a small but
influential organization called
Social Democrats, U.S.A.
"The only thing that ulti-
mately works in this regard is
democratization the free flow
of people, information and ideas
which the Soviets, or course
reject."
The key to understanding why
people like Gershman are so
critical of the nearly 20-year-old
Soviet-American cultural ex-
change program lies in the word
"organized."
WHEN THE the Soviets, in
the mid-1950s, after Nikita
Kiushchev's accession to power,
showed interest in resuming cul-
tural traffic with the West
broken off during the Stalin years
Continued on Page 12
Israeli planes attacked two
Palestinian centers in Leba-
non Monday in retaliation for
Sunday's Palestinian grenade
and submachine-gun attack
on an Israeli airline bus in
London.
The retaliation attack
reportedly resulted in the
deaths of three guerrillas and
another 14 wounded. The
retaliation took place on the
Burj el Barajneh refugee camp
on the south side of Beirut,
the Palestinian Liberation
Organization said. The village
school in Damour, 11 miles
south of Beirut, also was
attacked, but there were no
injuries, the report said.
SUNDAYS ATTACK killed
an Israeli stewardess and one
Palestinian attacker. Two other
stewardesses and seven British
bystanders were wounded. One of
the injured stewardesses was in
critical condition.
An Israeli army spokesman
said, "As a response to the
terrorist attack on the El Al bus
in London, Israeli aircraft at-
tacked two terrorist bases in
Lebanon."
Two jets strafed and rocketed
the refugee camp, a stronghold of
Dr. George Habash's Popular
Front for the Liberation of Pales-
tine; three others hit Damour,
witnesses reported.
Jerusalem Viewpoint
Trying to Cope With a Certain
Outcome Makes Sept. 5 Worrisome
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Diplomatic preparations
re in full swing here to
ssure that the meeting
ept. 5 at Camp David
letween Prime Minister
lenachem Begin, Egyp-
lan President Anwar
(adat and President Carter
as at least some modicum
success.
There are reports that a
special Cabinet session has
been scheduled for an initial
discussion of the summit
agenda and the return of
Secretary Cyrus Vance to
the Middle East to help
both sides in their
preparatory work.
ON THE substantive level it
appears that the United States
would want to achieve, at the
Lance Apologizes for Slur
___1.1... cAi Arab investment ii
1st
ATLANTA (JTA) Bert
"ice, who resigned under fire
Jt year as President Carter's
"dget director, apologized here
>r a suggestion that "Jewish
Knership of the press" might be
phind intense media coverage of
U-nch Arabs seeking invest-
ents in the United States.
lUnce made the comment
f?ut Jewish ownership in an
Fcle in the Atlanta Journal -
institution Magazine on Gaith
Pharoan, a wealthy Saudi
Arabian financier who helped
Lance resolve a serious debt
problem by buying Lances
National Bank of Georgia stock
for $2.4 million.
LANCE TOLD reporter Mar-
garet Shannon that multi-
national investments have been
"a strong part" of the American
economy "fora longtime."
He added he understood the
concern developing from growing
Arab investment in
enterprises but said
stances have changed" and that
"there is no special significance
to the word 'Arab.' Then he
said, "I don't know whether all
the hurrah stems from the great
Jewish ownership of the press or
not."
After a two-hour meeting
Monday with Charles Witten-
stein, the Anti-Defamation
Continued on Page 7
PLO CHIEF Yasser Arafat or-
dered all civilians to evacuate
refugee and other areas inhabited
mostly by Palestinians.
The retaliation was the second
Continued on Page 8
very least, the conclusion of the
elusive declaration of principles
that has been sought without
success since the meeting bet-
ween Begin and Sadat at Ismailia
last Christmas Day.
Now, during the buildup before
the Camp David talks, the U.S.
can be expected to press with re-
doubled vigor for Israel to accept
Carter's "Aswan formula" as the
Continued on Page 12
American
'circum-
Temple Emanu-El Choses
Rabbi Jerome Kestenbaum
Dr. Jerome Kestenbaum, for-
merly of Rockville, Maryland,
was elected the new rabbi at
Temple Emanu-El of Palm
Beach, and began his ministry
last week.
During 1949-59, Rabbi Kesten-
baum served congregations in
Orlando and Tampa, and was
Hillel director at the University
of Florida in Gainesville. He also
was auxiliary chaplain at Orlando
Air Force Base, McDill Air Force
Base in Tampa and Cocoa Beach
Air Force Base, and was guest
lecturer at Tampa University.
A GRADUATE of Yeshiva
College with a B. A. degree
Cum Laude, he was elected to
Who's Who in American Colleges
and Universities and was
awarded the Hungarian Society
Medal for excellence in French.
Ordained as rabbi by the Jew-
ish Theological Seminary of
America, Rabbi Kestenbaum was
awarded by the Seminary in 1975
the Doctor of Divinity degree.
His secular degrees include an
M. A. from the University of
Illinois and Doctor of Divinity
from Vanderbilt University.
!
His professional honors in- |
elude: Who's Who in the South-
west and Who's Who in Religion.
While serving in Nashville, .
Tenn., Dr. Kestenbaum was |
selected one of the ten outstand-;
ing citizens in the area and was,
the subject of a Nashville Ten- j
nessean Sunday Magazine article
"The Man Who Makes Words;
Dance". He has also beeni
chaplain of the Rotary Club in I
Tampa and Kiwanis Club in
Nashville and is a frequent
speaker at church and civic
groups.
Rabbi Kestenbaum is married
to Roslyn Weiser, formerly of
Peoria, 111,, and they are the par-
ents of Sherry and Lenny.
Temple Emanu-El is honoring
Rabbi and Mrs. Kestenbaum in
Sept. 10 with a reception at the
Breakers Hotel, hosted by Alan
H. Cummings, president of
Temple Emanu-El, and his wife.
BBC Television Series to Explore
Religious Experiences of the World
The week of Sept. 17 marks the
beginning of the premiere of a 13-
week television series of one-hour
films titled The Long Search,
which explores religious exper-
iences around the world.
Produced by the British
Broadcasting Company. the
series will air nationally over the
Public Broadcasting Service. The
film series is comparable to two
other BBC-TV series previously
seen over PBS. Sir Kenneth
Clark's Civilization, and
Bronowski's The Ascent of Man.
THE FILM ON Judaism, the
fifth in the series, is scheduled for
broadcast the week of Oct. 15.
Ron Eyre is host-narrator for the
entire series. The film searches
out answers to what it means tof
be a Jew.
Among those who providej
some insights are writer-educator'
Elie Wiesel, Dr. Steven Katz,
associate professor of Religion at
Dartmouth College, and Rabbi
Pinchas Peli, a sixth-generation
Orthodox rabbi in Jerusalem.
The Chosen People is both a
primer for the young student ana
a philosophical adventure for the
informed viewer. The film delves
into the Jewish experience as it
relates to the land, people and the
Torah of Israel. It does not at-
tempt to explore the variety of
expressions of Jewish belief,
however, there is heavy visual
emphasis on Orthodox Judaism.
The series presents a cross-
section of the world's religions.


^
Page 2
The Jewish Fbridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August 25,
With the *
Organizations
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Temple Beth David recently
announced its annual open house
to be held Sunday, Aug. 27 at 2
p.m. at Westminister Presbyter-
ian Church, Palm Beach Gardens
in the annex. Interested parties
will be able to meet members of
the board of directors, rabbi and
cantor. There will be discussion
of religious facilities, school
program and social calendar for
the coming year.
MIZRACHI WOMEN
American Mizrachi Women
now has a chapter in West Palm
Beach, known as the American
Mizrachi Women Rishona chap-
ter of the Palm Beaches. New
members are welcome.
The first meeting of the 1978-9
season will be Tuesday, Sept. 12,
at 1 p.m. in the Hospitality room
in Century Village. The first gala
week-end will be held at a hotel in
Miami Beach, the week-end of
Oct. 27-29. HattieThum and Ada
Hellman have additional in-
formation. _,
Royal chapter Women's
American ORT will sponsor a
pizza luncheon and card party at
Pagliacci's restaurant on
Monday, Aug. 28, at 11 a.m.
Pauline Ettinger is in charge of
reservations.
The West Palm Chapter of
ORT will meet Tuesday, Sept. 12,
at 12:30 p.m. at Congregation
Anshei Sholom. The meeting will
include a holiday program and
history of the ORT Bramson
Training Center by Helen Nuss-
baum and Frances Sperber.
Guest Speaker will be Joy
Fridovich whose topic will be
Project Nutrition.
Mid-Palm Chapter will hold a
card party on Monday, Aug. 28
at 1 p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom
in Lake Worth. Ruth Strumpf is
in charge of transportation.
The Delray chapter of
Women's American ORT an-
nounces a regular meeting at the
Community Center, on Wednes-
day, Aug. 30 at 12:30 p.m. Guest
speaker will be former New York
City educator and lecturer, Jack
Bunis. The topic: "The United
States Supreme Court and Free-
dom of Religion.''
PIONEER WOMEN
Theodore Herzl Club will hold
an installation luncheon on Sept.
12 at noon at the Ramada Inn on
Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. A
regular meeting will be held Sept.
19,at 1 p.m. at Home Federal
Savings and Loan across from
Palm Coast Plaza.
HADASSAH
Henrietta Szold group of
Hadassah has arranged a four
day weekend, Nov. 9-12 at the
Lido Spa Hotel in Miami Beach.
Martha Kantor and Ida Gold are
in charge of reservations.
The new Yovel Chapter
Bulletin Calendar listing birth-
days, anniversaries, memorials
and special dates each month will
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
MODERN CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATION
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, AUG. 27, 2-5 P.M.
AT WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH ANNEX
10410 No. Military Trail,
Palm Beach Gardens
We Welcome You to Join Our Growing
Congregation of Northern Palm Beach County
Register for our professionally staffed religious school.
Classes offered Sundays and Wednesdays. Largest on-
going program in northern area.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL
8451134 OR 622-6006
Abourezk
Takes Out
After Begin
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Sen. James Abourezk (D., S.D.)
has charged in NBC's Meet the
Press television program that
"now" Israeli Prime Minister
Menachem Begin "has said that
he will refuse to negotiate any
kind of compromise."
He replied "no" when asked if
"serious peace negotiations can
resume as long as the Begin
government is in power."
THE SENATOR'S comments
were in contrast to Secretary of
State Cyrus Vance's remarks in
Jerusalem and the State Depart-
ment's efforts towards a settle-
ment are "appreciated."
That statement followed the
Israeli government's declaration
that it is prepared to compromise
on territorial issues and discuss
sovereignty on the West Bank.
Abourezk, who was described
in the program's introduction as
"often a spokesman for the Arab
side in the Middle East,"
repeated his charges that "our
policy has by and large been
dictated by Israel and its lobby"
in Washington.
HE SAID that the Carter
administration has gone further
than any other administration
"regarding the approach to the
Arab perception on Middle East
issues, but I am not very happy
with what they have done, or the
lack of what they have done,
really."
Abourezk, who is leaving the
Senate this year, is reported to be
preparing to open law offices in
Washington to represent Arab
interests
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MUNOPAi BONO
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begin in September. Tillie Pottish
and Estelle Lichtenstein are han-
dling details. Hadassah Jewish
New Year Cards can be bought
from Tillie Pottish, Estelle Lich-
tenstein or Martha Ketzis.
A membership luncheon is
scheduled for Oct. 26 at the
Ramada Inn and a Thanksgiving
Weekend is planned Thursday
through Sunday at the Saxony
Hotel in Miami Beach. Rose
Brockman and Bertha Kaplan are
in charge of reservations.
Tikvah Group is holding its
first board meeting of the new
season at the home of Sophie
Handman, on Thursday, Sept. 7
at 10 a.m. On Monday, Sept. 18,
there will be a regular meeting in
the Ben Pulda Room of Con-
gregation Anshei Sholom at
12:30 p.m.
Tikvah Group will be repre-
sented at the Hadassah National
Convention in Israel Sept. 19 to
25 by Frances Rose, Lalira
London and Emma Shipper.
Shalom Hadassah will hold its
first general meeting of the
season on Monday, Sept. 11,
12:30 p.m., at Salvation Army
Citadel. Guest speaker is Max
Thum. nutritionist.
There will also be a presen-
tation of an original script by
Jeanette Greenberg, Getting to
Know You.
The group's third annual
Youth Aliyah Chai Luncheon will
take place Monday, Nov. 6, at
Bernard's in Boynton Bdach with
proceeds going to a new Day
Center in Herzelea. Anne Koffs or
Lillian Dorf are in charge of
reservations.
SISTERHOOD
The first meeting of Temple
Beth El Sisterhood for the fall
season will be held Tuesday.
Sept. 19. at 8 p.m. in Senter Hall.
A noval program entitled
Footsteps In The Sand, Why
We Are Here," will be presented
with members telling stories of
settling in the West Palm Beach
area.
Sisterhood Anshei Sholom is
holding auditions for a January
presentation. Auditions are
Tuesday, Sept. 5 at 10 a.m. at the
HS-79
temple. Nor ma Si rota has in.
formation.
The sisterhood will hold it
board meeting on Monday, Sept
4, at 9:30 a.m. and i(.s regular
membership meeting on Tues-
day. Sept. 19 at 1 p.m. Guest
speaker will be Rabbi Schectman.
Temple Beth Sholom
Sisterhood will meet on Sept. 6
at 12:30 p.m. Frank Colavecchio
will speak on "Hospitals. Health
and Doctors."
YIDDISH CULTURE
The Yiddish Culture Group of
Century Village, West PaJm
Beach will inaugurate its 1978-79
season with a program on Sept
19 at 10 a.m. in the party room of
the clubhouse.
David Altman will play the
concertina accompanied by Tony
Vacaro on the electric guitar,
with a program of Yiddish and
varied selections.
Shirley Fleichman will read
excepts from well known writers.
Max Lubert will sing Yiddish and
Hebrew songs accompnaied by
Mildred Birnbaum, on the piano.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women Mitzvah
Council 518, has begun prepara-
tions for its annual donor lun-
cheon to be held next Jan. 23, at
the Breakers Hotel. A meeting
was held at the home of Shirley
Bloom, co-chairman. Rosalind
Ornstein, chairman presided.
The following are: Raffle chair-
man, Leah Bloom; Calendar ad
book chairman, Millie Fier;
Decorations, Helen Sickerman;
Secretary, Sara Greenstein; and
Chairman of hostesses. Rose
Rosen.
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Wi August 25.1978
The Jewish Fbriduin of Palm Beach County
'age
,ebanon's Faithful Slaughtered
By DAVID HOROWITZ
JN1TED NATIONS A
,H Arab correspondent here at
UN serving Arab media in
Middle East, including
dan and who is a co-officer
[h this writer in the UN cor-
or.dents Association, has
L'nd it incredulous that
Jristian nations and most of
Cjr leaders could have been so
llous as to have blinded them-
Ls to the genocide being com-
fted by the Syrians against the
banese Christian community.
\nd not a voice has been raised
te in this world organization.
one single voice was heard
[that of Prime Minister Mena-
Lm Begin through the Israeli
Ission.
The voung, dynamic Arab cor-
ipondent was so deeply
fturbed by a leading editorial
had read in the Christian
I, ,k i Monitor, a publication he
lough would naturally stand by
1 coreligionists, that he lost no
|u> in cabling his newspapers
following which he had
lowed the writer:
[THE Christian Science
initur. which is well known for
strong Christian orientation,
Jay strongly criticized
Ibanon's Christian community,
Jininc on them the respon-
lility for the development of
Lebanese crisis into uncon-
lled proportions.
l.N ITS editorial, the paper
In that it has inevitably come
1 the conclusion that the civil
|r could have been avoided if
Christian community had had
! foresight and the Christianity
I share power with the more
tmerous Muslims.' The paper
also blasted the Lebanese
Christians for demanding with-
drawal of the Syrians and the
partition of Lebanon into
Christian and Moslem zones.' "
The Arab reporter should have
known that the Monitor, while
the official publication of the
Christian Science religion, has
turned into a commercial enter-
prise not always so friendly to
Israel, in fact, critical of its
policies.
But a true Christian voice was
heard last week not from any
of the delegates here at the UN.
It came from Dr. David Hyatt, a
Catholic, in the form of a sharp
communication sent to Secretary-
General Kurt Waldheim.
DR. HYATT, president of both
the National and International
Council of Christians and Jews,
confronted the UN Chief and the
world with this challenge:
"The killing and slaughter by
the Moslem so-called peace-
keeping' force has now assumed
genocidal proportions in its
actions against Lebanese
Christians, and the fratricidal
warfare between the differing
Christian groups is equally
disturbing.
"As President of the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews, which represents the top
business, labor, civic and govern-
mental leadership of the United
States, and as president-elect of
the International Council of
Christians and Jews, rep-
resenting peoples from 15
member nations, I speak for
thousands of Americans and
other dedicated people through-
out the world who care deeply
about the preservation of human
-NOTE-
\Heaclmg Material and Advertising on this page is not to be
uvnstmi'il as an endorsement by the Jewish Federation of Palm
\ Beach County.
ttate Dep't. Warns Israel Against
Supporting Christian Militia
JVASHINGTON (JTA) -
State Department continued
|warn Israel against supporting
Christian militia in Lebanon
I lashed out at the militia for
Jisting I^ebanese army at-
npts to take over Christian
[ungholds.
The Administration did not
Jicize the Syrian "peace-keep-
army's continued artillery
rocket fire against Christian
ras in Beirut, which has
Plight an overwhelmingly sup-
seen reports that Israel is sup-
ported resolution in the House of
Representatives to cut off foreign
aid to Syria.
A STATE Department
spokesman, Thomas Reston, said
"obviously'' the Department had
plying weapons to the Lebanese
Christians.
"We would be concerned about
the introduction of new arms in
Lebanon," Reston said, because
that would "work against the
defusing'' of the fighting.
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rights in the world community.
As a concerned Christian, I am
personally heartsick over the
current plight in Lebanon.
"I AM shocked by the failure
of the UN Security Council to
take censorious action against
the government of Syria for its
aggressive, brutal and genocidal
treatment of Lebanese Christians
. Clearly this is a crisis that
should be of the highest concern
to the Security Council... I call
upon you and your staff to take
the necessary steps required to
convene a special meeting of the
UN Security Council to bring the
Syrian government to account for
its reckless, dangerous and mur-
derous actions."
Prime Minister Begin's voice,
however, was a Dlea. a call to the
conscience of mankind. "I call
upon the attention of all
Christian nations," he declared.
"I call upon you; help them, for
God's sake. What will become of
our era? An era of massacre,
repeated massacre? First, six
million Jews were massacred in
Europe. Then there was a
massacre in Biafra. Nothing was
done. Now there is a massacre in
Cambodia and in Vietnam
nobody is doing anything .
"My plea is urgent," Begin
continued, "and to all free
nations. Pay heed to what is hap-
pening in Lebanon."
"Pay heed to what is hap-
pening in Lebanon," indeed. The
real tragedy of the situation was
brought home here at the UN last
week when President Elias
Sarkis' envoy. Ambassador to
the UN Ghassan Tueni, was
hurriedly flown to this head-
quarters to confer with UN of-
ficials on what he termed "a new
tragic problem for the world."
SURPRISINGLY, during a
meeting with the press corps,
Sarkis' spokesman Tueni
completely ignored the situation
in the north where the Syrians
are massacring Lebanese
Christians. It was the south that
troubled him.
MAJOR HADAD, leader of
the friendly Christians there, was
"a marginal issue," he stated. He
blamed the Israelis for the latest
clashes, and he called for further
UN intervention to facilitate the
entry into the southern border
area of a newly-formed
"Lebanese" force composed of
questionable elements.
The paradox: Christians are
being murdered in Lebanon, and
the shaky pro-Syrian regime is
unduly worried about the only
real defenders of these
Christians.
4
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JUDGE
MEMBER OF
B'NAI B'RITH, LT. COL. NETANYAHU
LODGE 3041
JEWISH WAR VETERANS POST #408
NANTASCOT LODGE,AF & AM
ALEPPO TEMPLE (SHRINE)
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY, LIFE MEMBER
MEN'S CLUB, TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
JEWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
A.D.L. SOCIETY OF FELlOWS
ARTHUR BOBRICK
Candidate for County Court Judge Group 3
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Primary Election Sept. 12 Ba,|0t Puncn #98
P0 IO> Dy Arthur M BoBnCk Campaign Treasurer


**mm&
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August 25,ljflj
A New Tisha B'Av
Recently we celebrated Tisha B'Av, one of the most
anguish-filled dates in the history of the Jewish calendar.
It is in the spirit of commemorating this date and the
occasion that it recalls, the destruction of the Second
Temple, that we view the upcoming meeting between
Prime Minister Begin and President Sadat at Camp
David.
We can not conceive of a more perilous event and
more perilous consequences to emerge out of it. The
destiny of the Jewish people hangs in the very balance. In
our view, President Carter will not be presiding over peace
talks so much as over a kangaroo court.
President Sadat's position is crystal clear. His
decision to accept the Carter invitation was based on two
things: (1) to force Carter to impose his "solution" to the
Middle East dilemma on Israel; (2) to consolidate his
position in the Arab world which was initially shaken by
the Sadat trip to Jerusalem that is to say, which mis-
understood Sadat's purpose no less than Israel misunder-
stood it but which now sees Sadat as one of them again.
Peace was never Sadat's aim. Amputation was.
A Divided Israel
We consider the Sept. 5 summit in such bleak terms
because Israel is being painted into a corner by its own
shaken resolve. Admittedly, there has been no more
militant a spokesman for the rights of Israel than Prime
Minister Begin in the 30-year history of the state.
This invites pride. But it also invites fear par-
ticularly among leaders of Israel's previous Labor-led
governments who seem all too quick these days to lay
Israel's destiny on the chopping block not only to assure
Israel's salvation as they see it. That would be excusable.
Our quarrel is with those leaders who seem willing to
preside over the amputation of Israel as a means also of
rendering a coup de grace to the Begin premiership. This
kind of politicking is not excusable on such a perilous
occasion.
And so. as the summit date nears, our hearts are
heavy not only because the fate of Israel hangs in the
balance, but because the fate of a divided Israel hangs in
the balance.
President Carter has already indicated that U.S.
interests in the Middle East, meaning oil, will be a
prominent factor in his "broker's" role at the Begin-Sadat
meeting. The die is cast. But it should be a united Israel
that meets this new Tisha B'Av, not a divided Israel.
Death of Pope Paul
The death of so distinguished a leader as Pope Paul
VI invites our sorrow.
There are those who repeatedly compare Paul to his
predecessor. Pope John XXIII. We believe this is not the
time for theological debate.
If we recall Pope John with utter joy, particularly
during the days of the Second Ecumenical Council, we
must also agree with Israel's Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi
Shlomo CJoren that it was Pope Paul who "tried to remove
the chronic hatred between Christianity and Judaism."
For this. Pope Paul deserves a special place in our
hearts. For this, and for his Declaration on Non-Christian
Religions, which refuted the charges "of collective Jewish
guilt for the death of Christ."
During his reign, the Pope also established contact
with Jewish political and intellectual leaders from Israel
and other nations. In addition to receiving Abba Eban and
other Israelis, the Pontiff held an unprecedented meeting
with Prime Minister Golda Meir in January. 1973. the first
audience granted to an Israeli head of state.
Even as late as last year. Pope Paul renounced all
Catholic efforts to proselytize among Jews. And was it not
he who expressed special sadness for "the history and
suffering of the Jewish people"?
Requiescat in pace.
jrewislh Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combinii* "OUR VOICE"nd"FEDERATION REPORTER"
In con junction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc
Combined Jewish Appeal
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
1580 NW 2 Ave Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 388 2001
Printing Office 120 N.E 8th St Miami. Fla 33132 Phone ST3 4806
Seeing World Through Glass Eye
EAST HAMPTON T Dick
Cavett is appearing in per-
formance here. Also, he lives
here, and one can understand
why.
What attracted Scott Fitz-
gerald to the North Shore, and
Serge Rachmaninoff and Walt
Whitman and John Dewey and
Edward Steichen too, brings the
Cavetts and his ilk to the South.
It is peace and landscaped
beauty, the great mansions along
the shore, distant like the
weather-beaten building in a'
lonely Wyeth. It is also money,
oodles of money that fashion the
honeypots of patronage toward
which the aesthetes, made or on
the make, buzz like bees in heat.
SUZANNESHOCHET
Executive Editor
Mindlin
if one can speak accurately of
bees being in heat.
STILL, the metaphor obtains:
RONNITARTAKOW
News Coordinator
KREDK SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
MORTON GILBERT Advertising Representative
The -lewth Floridian Itoes Not (.iiarantee The kaihruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In lu Column*
FORM 3578 returns to The Jewish Floridian.
ISTMN w i Ave Boca Raton. Fla 33432
published Mi Weekly Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton. Fla
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year J7.S0, or by membership to
Jewish Federation ot Palm Beach County, 2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm
Beach, Fla 3140*. Phone *8 5400 (Out ol Town upon Request)
Federation officers: President. Alan L. Shulman. Vice Presidents Dr. Richard
iugarman Dr. Howard Kay. Kenneth Scherer. Jeanne Levy. Jerome Tlshman.
reasurer Stacl Lesser: Secretary Bruce J Daniels. Executive Director. Nor-
an J Schlmelman Submit material for publication to Ronnl Tartakow. Director
of Public Relations.
the artist in search of .
audience, and who attends u,
beauty these days, beauty where
it pays, if not the brokers of in,.
mortality, the names on the
mansions who, at the whim of
their guest lists, make or break
talent on the wing?
Even for a traveler bound for
places far distant from this
paradise, I would not deny the
tug I felt to take a momentary
distant view, sniffing the air of
bourgeois power and the artist,
who ride its coattails. After all
art is big business these days
paper money being what it is, and
like a child with face pressed
against the laden windowpane of
some old-style candy store, I
came to gawk if only for a
moment, to observe the fawning
and the fawned-upon.
I have already mentioned
Steichen, the American
photographer whose interest in
Long Island and the Hamptons
was but momentary in his flight
to Paris where, at the turn of the
century, he committed himself
full-time to the camera and away
from painting, his first call, to
become among the first fabled
workers in that form.
IT WAS on Long Island, not
too far from here, that he picked
his way among the heaths and
birches to make photographic
statements that still shake the
soul. And so, in the last few days,
I have hunted among the
museums to see many of these
Steichen statements, as well as
the work of Alfred Stieglitz,
Edward Weston, Irving Penn,
Ansel Adams, Eliot Porter and a
new grouping of contemporary
young workers who are mainly
anonymous to me.
The hunt was like a descent
into hell, when it should have
been an ascent to the promise of
paradise of East Hampton and
its welcome relief.
1 had hoped to escape the
Continued on Page 9
Thoughts About Jewish Survival
Friday. August 25, 1978
Volume 4
22 AB 5738
Number 17
Before taking a well-deserved
break from columning for the
next few weeks, I was determined
to get off my chest some con-
tinuing concerns about Jewish
survival. The earliest expression
in this column I extracted from a
bulging file on the subject, was
March 8. 1968:
"One of the things we Jews do
so well is complain. Whether it
was their hard life with the
Pharaohs or the softness of
modern suburban living, the
Jews have managed to be dis-
satisfied with their condition.
Maybe this is the secret of sur-
vival everyone has been
seeking," I wrote a decade ago.
The task of retrieval from the
file is one which, at this point, is
more than I care to undertake.
But I have the feeling that
picking the headings as they lie
randomly (and sloppily) in the
folder will provide a good intro-
duction to a crisis theme which is
obviously not new and just as
obviously won't go away.
The one on top is a release from
the Jewish Defense League in
July in which the South Florida
JDL director "warned today that
every Jew must learn to shoot or
chance a repeat of the Holo-
caust." Next, from Polydoxy. the
journal of the Institute of
Creative Judaism, reporting on
the First National Gathering of
ICJ last March:
"'An invisible holocaust." the
leading article begins, "bringing
silent death is consuming
American JewTy." It goes on to
list eight myths which "have
contributed to creating the
mentality that has directed
American Jewry on the ruinous
course it has pursued." Among
them: "The State of Israel and
Russian Jewry are the only
JSSSWIIIB*
*:
Edward
Cohen
endangered Jewish communities:
the very existence of the State of
Israel ensures the survival of
American Jewry; only Orthodox
Judaism will survive; in-
doctrinating and propagandizing
Jewish children in religious
schools, rather than educating
them, will keep them loyal all
their lives to the Jewish com-
munity."
From Reform Judaism of
January. 1978, the headline
"Jews: An Endangered Species,"
without a question mark. And
from Midstream, statistics re-
vealed by Prof. Elihu Bergman
of the Harvard Center tor
Population Studies which project
that in less than 100 years the
American Jewish population will
number somewhere between
10.420 and 994.000 (little chance
for error there, I believe). And the
cause? Jewish infertility. How
that fits in with Martin Marty's
Milwaukee Journal interview
that "Judaism is two generations
away from statistical insig-
nificance and knows it." I leave
to Gallups polls which, as I have
revealed here already hold that
belief.
Next item and it was in the
random order I promised, honest
- was a piece by Amy Stone of
Lilith magazine that bore the
title "The Jewish Fertility
Problem' which "may be
replacing intermarriage as the
qMBtion Jewish social scientists
worry about, and Jewish
federations, synagogues and
community services feel the
impact.-' Non-polemical, I
couldn't resist matching it with 1
an article by Shirley Frank which
appeared in that fine Jewish
feminist magazine headed
"Panic,'' and took to task the|
male community which is "loudly
hitting the old barefoot and
pregnant' motif as if our very j
lives depended on it.'
I find some scratchy nousj
from a lecture by Marshal
Sklare. the prolific writer <
Jewish sociology w^h Pim*
the assets as well as the liabilities
on the balance sheet of Jew""
survival. Divorce, intermarriage.!
financing of institutions,!
declining school population |
among the problems.
Other notes, these with
source, but obviously pertinent!
"Not subject to transmittal. j
Transferring ethnicity is a losisjl
battle to depend on it 1
great error." "No substitute
being Gods witness, for sent*"
study of Judaism, involvement i
community affairs and
isolationism." "Group survrrf|
transcends personal fulfillment
It is appropriate to close
compendium with a vl'w.,
posite to that implicit in the Ji
call to arms. In a recent issuei
American Jewry's best mag**
Moment, Jacob Neusner *t
that "So we are told we should"
Jewish not because God
called us into being but in
to spite Hitler. A more spur
argument has never '*"
forth onto the stage ol J*I
thought, a more ignorant anoj
more destructive conception^
the wellsprings of Judaism
never been drawn befor*
people's eyes."


[7riday. August 25,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
Day School: A Priceless Heritage
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
After serving the Jewish Com-
munity Day School of West Palm
Beach in several capacities, I feel
1 am able to evaluate the attitude
0f our Federation office towards
this most important source of
future leadership in our Jewish
community.
The Jewish Community Day
School was founded five years
ago by a group of devoted
citizens in the Palm Beaches. Its
existence has been a struggle
ever since, with many problems,
and in spite of them this School
has survived and grown because
of the perseverance and the
dedication of a few people. Some
of these people serving on the
Hoard at various times with
traditional Jewish background
had to make compromises on
decisions contrary to their belief,
to accommodate the needs of the
community.
I AM REMINDED of attend-
ing a Federation board of
trustees meeting at which time
they were considering the
subsidy figure for the Jewish
Community Day School, when an
active board member indicated
her reluctance to disclose the
amount of support Federation
was giving the Jewish Com-
munity Day School in fear that it
would reduce the commitment of
a prospective contributor.
On the contrary, as co-
chairman of Century Village, for
U J A, where 15,000 people
reside, I have employed just the
opposite approach. My captains
| were apprised of the facts and
figures as to the distribution of
funds raised by the Federation
office each year. What's more im-
portant, my captains and I made
sure to tell these people how the
school was operating and how
much they depend on the Federa-
tion'-- allocation to make ends
met.
The result of our Federation
I campaign at Century Village
|proved that I was right: and
because of the information given
I to I he contributors, our campaign
figures exceeded those of the year
before. We also learned that most
of the people Would help a school
of learning that teaches the
preservation of our Torah and
| Judaism.
MAX B. SHAPIRO
| EDITOR: The Jewish Floridian:
On Aug. 10, the children from
I the Jewish Community Center of
the Palm Beaches, presented
Fiddler on the Roof in the Anshei
Sholom Synagogue.
The audience consisted of
[children, young adults and senior
Icitizens, people of different inter-
ests and backgrounds. We were
like one, in our pride and joy in
[seeing our Jewish children giving
WANTED
FUNDRAISER
Experienced. Resident of Fort
Lauderdale or Hollywood. Send
Resume: American Committee for
^naare Zadek Hospital of
Jerusalem
305 Lincoln Road Suite 320
Miami Beach, 33139
OUR
ReaoeRs
WRite
/ I lh\ U,,r, II, I..
Ki'hi fci lesiastesi
such an outstanding per-
formance.
LIVING SO far away from our
own grandchildren and missing
so many wonderful occasions
with them, we felt like foster
grandparents. We had so much
nachas and went out and bragged
about unser kinder. Credit must
be given to all the JCC staff who
created this miracle in such a
short time. For those of us who
helped in some way, it was a
labor of love.
The changes in family life-style
causes us concern and we are
fearful sometimes for the future
Jewish generations as well as the
present needs of our older people.
As I walked around and
greeted some of the outstanding
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Jewish leaders of our community,
I was filled with hope that many
wonderful dreams will become
realities in the not too distant
future. This will benefit young
and old alike, so it is of utmost
importance that everyone should
be informed and understand that
it needs the cooperation of all of
us to accomplish this.
SHIRLEY FLEISHMAN
Founding Sisterhood Pres.
of Congregation Anshei Sholom
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Rabbi Irving B. Cohen's
captioned article "Have Times
Really Changed?" in the July 28
issue touches on the relationship
between persons of different
faiths. The conclusion which he
draws is not a pleasant one.
It is disturbing that five
months should have elapsed
without his having received an
acknowledgement to his warm
and friendly congratulatory type
letter which he sent to the newly
appointed minister of The First
Baptist Church.
TWO THOUGHTS occur to
me at this point: 1 Did the
minister actually receive and read
the letter? and 2-Is the
minister's ego and self-esteem
such dominant characteristics of
his make-up that he would use
the first public opportunity he
could to vent his spleen and show
his displeasure at the rabbi's
failure to recognize his presence
earlier?
The expression is often heard:
"People are People" regardless of
their origin or occupation. Our
individual behavior will largely
determine the impression we may
make upon others. And in this
connection, fairness, honesty and
truthfulness are very important
qualities to possess and demon-
strate.
Therefore, in view of the thou-
sands of years that we Jews have
been tortured, ostracized and dis-
criminated against, it could be
argued that more time must
elapse for the wounds to heal.
and that "a decade" passed
since the "Vatican Council II
flashed an historic signal for
brotherly love" is not enough
time from which to draw con-
clusions.
May I mention another in-
teresting development which
may help to further the idea of
fraternity and getting along with
one another. I am referring to
retirement homes such as
Cresthaven East where I am now
residing with co-inhabitants of
other religious faiths and cooper-
ating with an enlightened
management for the common
good. ALEXANDER SIMON
West Palm Beach

-3 3
Another anti-colonial delegation' Patriotic Front or Swapo?
Mf,V?itfba*
The Argus
LIGHTS 13 rag "m". 0.9 mg mcoime. LIGHT
ia'". 10 mg ntcoine. av pet cigarette. FTC Report MAY 78


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August 25,197g
Jewish Community Center Presents
SENIOR NEWS
Transportation: The Compre-
hensive Senior Service Center is
open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The
Center's federally funded by Title
III of Older Americans Act.
Transportation is provided for
diaadvantaged adults in a desig-
nated area from the ocean to the
Turnpike, and 45th Street to
Southern Blvd. Twenty-four
bourse advance notice is
requested.
SECOND TUESDAY
iCIAJB NEWS
!The Second Tuesday Club's
card party will be held on
Sunday. Aug. 27 from 1 to 4 p.m.
at the Center. Sam Rubin, at the
Center, has more information.
Seniors are planning a trip to
Tampa on Sept. 17 and 18.
Names are being put on a waiting
~liat. The Center has more in-
formation.
The regular meeting will be
^held Tuesday. Sept. 12 at 1 p.m.
Ruth Hyde, musical director of
the Ruth Hyde Group, presents
Lillian Kessler. soloist and also
accompanying herself at the
piano, with Sam Sinkelthal and
Phil Herman on the violin.
CLASSES
Adult Education classes begin
the week of Sept. 18. Five classes
are scheduled: Oil painting.
Mondays 9 to noon. Watercolor.
Mondays 1 to 4 p.m., Art-
s Crafts Tuesdays 9 to noon.
Creative Writing Wednesdays 9
to -noon. Financial Estate
Planning. Wednesdays 1 to 3
p.m. Class registration is limited.
Dr Doris Hibel. psychologist,
will speak on Coping with
Stress" on Thursday at 1:30 p.m.
This completes the Health
Education Series provided by the
Palm Beach Countv
Health
Department with Claire
Uhlfelder.
The Consult Your Doctor
series begins Sept. 7 (Thursdays)
1:30 p.m. The program is being
expanded. Chairperson Jean
Gross announces the new name
"Project Good Health" Dr.
Bernard Kimmel returns to open
the season. Discussion will be on
Family Health.
Artist for September is
Sussman Doernberg. He special-
izes in portraits and scenes in
oils.
"The Comprehensive Senior
Service Center needs talent for
display at its quarters in the
Jewish Community Center.
Paintings in all media created by
men or women over 60 are needed
to be displayed in the Artist of
the Month Club. Esther Molat is
chairperson.
Hospitality Corner is open
Monday to Friday, from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m.
Keren Orr
The Keren Orr section of the
JCC announces the following
teachers have been hired to teach
pre-school:
Debra Preiss. for two and a
half-year-olds: Elizabeth Cal-
loway. for three-year-olds: and
Judith Fenekel. for four-year-
olds. Kindergarten class wUl be
taught by Margaret Sims. Aides
are Ruth Kirshner and Herta
Pederson.
The enrichment program will
be directed by Lisa Rubin, who is
presently hiring teachers for
music. dance and body
movement. Registration in-
formation is available at the
Center. School starts Sept. 5.
W ido wed-to- Widowed
Workshop
The Workshop serves recentlv
Andy Bershaw. a CAT in the summer CAPA program, and
David Bryant ion the right), counselor, watch the kite-man fly
30 unusual kites for camp viewers.
JCC Players, Grades 5 through 8, perform at Lakevieu Nursing
'Home. After a rousing performance of excerpts from Oliver,
posed here with Aaron Grodshy, are JCC players (right to left)
Gil Waldman, Roy Levi. Nancy KripiU, Monica Kay, Roneet
Weingarten and Men Consor. ____
bereaved as well as those who
have been without mates for
some time. There are over 300
participants. Chairman is Philip
Weinstein and president is
Charlotte Berlind.
Prime Time Singles
(ages 40-60 yrs.l
Hal Farancz, chairperson,
invites those interested in finding
out about activities, parties and
meetings to call him.
Young Ravakot and Ravakim
(Ages 35 and down)
House parties, swim parties,
dances and barbecues are some of
the programs available. Chair-
person is Roger Rukin.
JCC Bowling League
Limited spaces available to
join the new league, which meets
one Sunday night a month at the
Major League Alley. Games
begin Sunday, Sept. 9. Sue Levi
has registration information.
Duplicate Bridge
Every Sunday evening at 7:30
p.m. bridge players meet with Al
Merion at the JCC for organized
duplicate bridge games. Partners
provided.
Israel Welcomes Florida
The Center will host the Israel
Government Tourist Office's
annual presentation in Palm
Beach County, Sunday, Sept. 10
at 8 p.m
Ms. Gila Ronen will perform.
The program will take place at
Senter Hall. Temple Beth El.
Ru th Kurshner will be an aide.
*
Debra Preiss will be teaching
two and a half-year-olds.
Iris Murray and Debby
Sabarra, co-chairmen of pre-
school and kindergarten com-
mittee announce staff for the
school year 1978-79.
Elizabeth Callaway will
teaching three-vear-olds.
a
Judith Fenakel will
teaching four-year-olds.
-NOTE-
Reading Material and Advertising on this page is not to be
construed as an endorsement by the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach Countv
Mildred Sims will be teaching
the new kindergarten class.
Dear Friends,
Voting is one of the few opportunities most people have to
express their personal point of view.
It is with this in mind that we wholeheartedly solicit your
support of Eleanor Weinstock. Eleanor is running as a
Democrat, for the Florida House of Representatives, District 79.
We know Eleanor to be a person of high integrity and
dedicated service to her community. She has, for the past 20
years, been involved in many areas of political concern. She
has the sensitivity, intelligence, experience and awareness to
represent us well in the legislature.
Please join us in voting for Eleanor Weinstock,
Democratic Candidate for the Florida House of
Representatives, District 79.
Thank you,
Steve Gordon
Stanley Brenner
Bette Gilbert
MM PHtk.i m+m e*.r w*.,t.eii cMMW> r o.m- m.. t


Au
lgU8t25,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
,ish Day School Elects Barry Krischer
Board of Directors of the
'community Day School
m Beach County. Inc., has
4 Barry Krischer its presi-
lAlso elected was a new
Ive committee and board of
L The board will serve
the school's sixth year,
Lher a native of Brooklyn,
L Yeshiva of Flatbush,
Ln College and Brooklyn
chool. He has served in
-g posts in Brooklyn, and
Ith leader and advisor of
I Israel of Flatbush, N.Y.
Lion in N.Y. was with the
County District Attorney,
sentlv First Assistant
State Attorney for Palm Beach
County.
HE HAS HELD numerous
active roles in CRC, past presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith, treasurer of
the Friends of the Jewish Com-
munity Day School, and vice-
president of the Jewish Com-
munity Day School.
Krischer stated that he is,
"looking toward this new year as
the year of challenge and excite-
ment with new school facilities on
the horizon. I am confident that
the competence and fine capab-
ilities of the school's new direc-
tor, Mr. Mordecai Levow will
lead the school into larger enroll-
Beach County Women to Rally
Human Rights for Soviet Jews
I recent trials of Vladimer
b Anatoly Sharansky, Ida
[and Alexander Ginsburg
feize the growing anti-
in the Soviet Union
stated Ida Glassman,
L of Palm Beach County-
i s Plea for Human Rights
lietJews.
|Thursday, Sept. 14, at
a.m. at the Jewish Corn-
Center, a meeting of the
|hip from Jewish women's
ations in Palm Beach
will be held to begin
fig for a massive
tn's Plea for Soviet Jews
EVENT, scheduled for
will coincide with other
ktrations held nationally
bnsorcd by the Leadership
tnce of National Jewish
i's Organizations. The
Golda Meir Club of Pioneer
Women has elected to coordinate
the Palm Beach County project.
Some of the constituent
organizations involved in the na-
tional "Women's Plea" are
American Mizrachi Women,
B'nai B'rith Women, National
Council of Jewish Sisterhoods,
National Ladies Auxiliary-Jew-
ish War Veterans of the U.S.A.
Inc., Pioneer Women's Organiza-
tions, Women's American ORT,
and Women's Division American
Jewish Congress.
"We hope to mobilize all the
Women's organizations in Palm
Beach County" stated Mrs.
Glassman, "to raise their voices
in protest."
Amy Prager is serving as co-
chairman for the rally. All
women's organizations have been
urged to send representatives to
the Sept. 14, meeting.
ments, as well as begin the
planning and implementation of
efforts to permit a systematic
expansion into a high school pro-
gram."
The executive committee con-
sists of Michael Puder-Harris,
vice-president, Joan Tochner,
vice-president, Philip Weinstein,
vice-president, Phillip Siskin,
treasurer, Toby Lewis, secretary.
PAST PRESIDENTS are Ann
Leibovit, Dr. 11 yman J. Roberts,
Max Tochner. Board of Trustees
members are Dr. Riva Bickel, Dr.
Mckinley Cheshire, Judge Harold
Cohen, George Golden, Howard
Goodman, Henry Grossman, Dr.
Howard Kay, Jack L. Kaplan, H.
Irwin Levy, Jeanne Levy, Cynnie
List, Lee Mazer, Bernard
Plisskin, Carol Roberts, Louis
Samet, Rabbi William H.
Shapiro, Dr. Richard G. Shugar-
man, Caroline Simon, Harold
Singer, Theodore Sloane, Dr.
Arthur Virshup, Joseph
Weingard, Dr. Peter Wunsh.
The JCDS is currently utilizing
the facilities at Temple Beth El in
West Palm Beach. The JCDS
program includes pre-kinder-
garten through eighth grade.
Lance Apologizes for Slur
About Alleged 'Jewish Control'
Community Calendar
Sept. 2
Women's American ORT,
party 1:30 p.m.
North Palm Beach card
Sept. 4
Congregation Anshei Sholom Board 9:30 a.m.
Temple Israel Sisterhood Board 10 a.m. Jewish
Community Day School Board 8 p.m.
Sept. 5
Hadassah Henrietta Szold Board 1 p.m.
Sept. 6
Federation Women's Div. Executive 10 a.m.
Women's American ORT, Palm Beach, Executive
v 30 a m. Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood 12:30
p m. Jewish Community Center Board
Sept. 7
UJA International Women's Division Mission B'nai
B'rith Women Medina Board Hadassah Bat
Gurion Board 10 a.m. Hadassah Chai 12:30 p.m.
Hadassah Sholom Board Hadassah Tikvah Board
10 a.m. Women's American ORT, North Palm
Beach cord party 1:30 p.m. Women's American
ORT, Palm Beach 8 p.m. Women's American ORT -
Evening 8 p.m. Hadassah, Golda Meir Board -
noon Hadassah, Convention (Israel)
m
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Continued from Page 1
League's southern counsel and
civil rights director, Lance agreed
to clarify his remarks.
HE READ a statement last
night during his regular broad-
cast as a commentator for
WXIA-TV here in which he
rejected any statement "which
would inflame prejudice and will
continue to express my concern
about the way in which any
person is grouped or
stereotyped."
Lance added: "In my conver-
sation with the author of the
article we had talked in great
detail about foreign ownership of
American assets and I voiced
I concern about our needs to
combat and overcome prejudice.
In the context of the con-
versation I did not perceive this
(Jewish ownership) to be an
offensive remark, and if to the
contrary my statement offended
anyone in any way whatsoever I
truly regret it.
"I SINCERELY hope that in
no way such a statement would
give encouragement to those who
might feel any prejudice toward
the Jewish people. It is neither
relevant nor constructive to talk
about the religious affiliation of
people in the media or any other
vocation or profession and that
was the point I was trying to
make."
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TU-
Page8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August:
Machiavellian Medicine
Attack on Menachem Begin
By RAY SAIDEL
Manchester, N.H.
Union Leader
If you can't match his in-
tellect; if you can't face a man on
issues of factual history or moral
imperative; if you can't answer
him with common sense lie,
slander, undercut plot
against him.
This is the tactic pursued by a
coalition against Israeli Prime
Minister Begin, a strange coali-
tion consisting of Egyptian
dictator Anwar Sadat, President
interviewed by this writer just
before the May, 1977 election)
says snidery, Begins actions are
the "result of medications,"
(joining Washington's smear
campaign).
In a July "feature," Time
Magazine's Jerusalem bureau
chief Donald Neff-launched a
frenzied diatribe against Begin.
This followed a Time tidbit
that Begin had blacked out
during a cabinet meeting, an item
described by Begin's physician.
Dr. Mervyn Gostman, chief of
cardiology, Hadassah Medical
Ray Saide I Says
Carter, a host of tyrants (from
Amin Qaddafi Arafat types to
the Brezhnev Tito variety),
American liberal journalists and
Israeli Labor Party politicians.
Together they conduct a super-
vendetta against Begin orches-
trated in Washington. The lyrics
are new but it has the same old
Middle East tune Away With
Israel.
BEGIN IS in the way, so
Begin must go. But he won't;
stubborn, he refuses to lead his
people over the precipice.
"President" Sadat
fascinating how dictatorships use
"President," "Peoples Demo-
cratic Republic of blah-blah;
etc., and westerners swallow it
without a grimace. In the New
York Times vocabulary.
Lebanese Christians are
"right-wing," but Communists
elements are not "left-wing." The
Times calls 40,000 Syrian in-
vaders demolishing Beirut
"peacekeeping forces."
ANYWAY, Sadat. who
stomped free speech for Egyp-
tians into the ground; Sadat,
whose love affair with media
slowly sickens (as sordid com-
mercial arrangements tend to
do): Sadat, former buddy-buddy
of the Soviets, who aided and
praised Hitler, whose tank com-
pany once beheaded Israeli
women prisoners (parading their
heads in Gaza), who broke every
agreement made with Israel and
called for a Holy War to exter-
minate the Jews this same
Sadat is indignant that Begin
won't give up Sinai, Judea.
Samaria and Gaza (every inch) in
exchange for his "good will." He
is irritated that Begin won't
donate Mount Sinai and El Arish
as advance "gestures."
Nothing doing, says Mena-
chem Begin. Agreements should
involve reciprocity; Israel
doesn't need "Munich" type ar-
rangements. He's been around,
has a memory easily refreshed by
a look across the Lebanese
border. Verbal guarantees? Tell it
in Beirut!
Carter, anxious to pull the UN
and the USSR into Middle East
negotiations, doggedly attacks,
attempting to crush Begin, even
trying to block Israeli support of
the Christian Lebanese, aban-
doned by the civilized (?) world.
Oil is thicker than blood.
Israeli Labor Party chiefs (in
shock since socialism was voted
out after 30 years) toss truth, ex-
perience and patriotism to the
wind trying to regain power.
Allon and Rabin, whose policies
were disastrous, tell Begin what
to do it's always the loser who
can say how "you" should do it.
THEY FORGET: Because of
their policies Israeli voters tossed
THEY FORGET: Because of
their policies Israeli voters tossed
Labor out. Politico Peres nego-
tiates "privately" with enemy
Sadat (Egypt is in a state of war
with Israel); Golda Meir, the
grand old lady (who nearly lost
the country through delay and
bad judgment in 1973) chides
Begin; Shlomo Hillel. former
Labor Party minister of police
(singuarly unimpressive when
Center, as "misleading and, in
my professional view, irresponsi-
ble The articles that have
recently appeared question-
ing the Prime Minister's health
are totally without foundation."
IT SEEMS all Begin's enemies
are out to kill him via voodoo, but
Neff excelled in vicious prejudice.
Pushing hard to discredit Begin,
he wrote that Begin is "known to
have a bad heart condition and
Israeli
Retaliation
Attack
Continued from Page 1
time this month the Israeli air
force struck within hours after a
Palestinian attack on Israeli
civilians. A guerrilla base in
southern Lebanon was hit Aug. 3
after a bomb explosion in a Tel
Aviv market killed a 71-year-old
man and wounded 49 people.
The attack apparently was an
attempt to disrupt the Camp
David summit meeting Sept. 5 of
Israeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin with President Carter and
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt,
Israeli Transport Minister Meir
Amit said.
Three bombs were discovered
in public places in Israel Sunday,
two in Jerusalem and one in a bus
station in Ramlah, five miles
south of Tel Aviv. Police bomb
disposal experts took care of
them.
diabetes, and (get this) rumored
to have just about everything
else.(!"
Neff writes safely from his
office in Israel; if he said this
about Sadat (in Cairo) he'd be out
on his ear.
The New York Times features
anti-Israel-liberal Anthony
Lewis, rumored to be afflicted
with a Jewish self-hate complex
(perhaps Mr. Lewis can enlighten
us on this). He slugs Israel on a
steady basis, but July 10, he
surpassed himself with an article
entitled "In Support of Israel."
It was as supportive as a gal-
lows-trap a typical Anthony
Lewis cutup job on Israel, but
this time cashing in on state-
ments by recent-renegade anti-
Israelis; Ribicoff and Javits.
WHAT'S REALLY going on?
Begin has had heart attacks; to
his enemies dismay, he recovered,
still with the courage to stand his
ground putting first things
first. What comes first with
Begin? Freedom and survival for
his people in a state defensible
and historically proper. You
could offer him Europe, Texas
and Saudi Arabia he prefers
the Land of Israel, his people s
3,000 year-old homeland.
It's strange, the Russians
breath down our neck, our energy
problems are horrendous, and
here is President Carter con-
sumed with a tiny corner of the
Middle East.
Seemingly Carter feels that it
million Arabs, possessing <
million square miles of land i
his help to dictate how
territory Israel should sun
(prior to peace negotiations?
that 3 million Israelis, with 7 o
square miles, should consjd
Sadat's "good will" a suffice
security guarantee.
-NOTE-
Readinif Material and Advertising on this page is not to be
construed as an endorsement by the Jewish Federation of Paim
Beach County.
With Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance Heft) looking on. President Carter and Arthur'
berg's wife, Dorothy, fasten the Presidential Medal of Freedom around the Ambassador si
The presentation was in recognition of Goldberg's contributions as a United States Suprtn
Court Justice and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. The award has been interprtttdi
an answer to Egypt President Sadat's undiplomatic comments about the "Zionist Goldberg'i
recent weeks.
Robert Lock wood
Robert Lockwood To
Seek District 11 Seat
Broward Circuit Court Clerk
Robert Lockwood has announced
his candidacy for the 11th Dis-
trict congressional seat, being
vacated by retiring Democratic
Rep. Paul Rogers.
Lockwood, 56, a Pompano
Beach Democrat, helped bring a '-
Veterans Administration clinic to
Broward County.
mmm SLF0U isky '
Wi Ml DEATH! S4
I'M rwwFn
Zme wearin/tiZr "2" "ft* members *f th< Student Struggle for Soviet M
pZnounledatAenttR pnsonAsu,ts' ** after Anatoly Sharansky's sentence'
Pronounced at Aeroflot Russuxn AtrUnes in New York to offer themselves as "hostage," *


.August 25,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
Totie Laughed Behind Tears;
ras Entertainer to the Very End
| By HERBERT G.LUFT
JOLLYWOOD Totie
Ids who died unexpectedly
t,. 12 in Las Vegas on the day
bre her opening at the Sahara
\A where she was under an
[usive contract for a number
tears, earlier this year joined
Sinatra on a junket to
Frank
Israel.
In spite of her failing health
after two heart attacks, Totie,
whose real name was Sophie
Feldman, remained cheerful,
taking her life and her talent as a
gift from God. Laughing at her-
self, the 4-foot 10-inch fat lady,
MlndHn
The New Breed Sees The
World Through a Glass Eye
Continued from Page 4
Ijty of my own political con-
(usness the never-ending
dy of the games they play in
shington and Moscow, Bonn
London, Jerusalem or any
t'ti capital you may care to
HAD hoped to return to the
isant preoccupation of my
Ith, the photographic world in
jch, in those days, the great
jiggle was waged over whether
ot the camera and its works
|an art medium.
j,ow, with these works so
Idly ensconced in the col-
lions of the world's great
teums. I had expected to come
(the divine grace of my vin-
Wion in my own youthful
laments spelled out in both
Li" and words that, of course,
^tography is art.
lad not the museums finally
ne around to what we, my
llous henchmen and I,
baimed when there was
iulum still on our lips and
rdust in our eyes'.'-
l'0<) BAD that the museums
te come around. The welcome
Id from the world of politics
I not in fact come over me. Hell
Ihell, whether of the soul or
Upuliiik.
|t is no) Steichen or Stieglitz or
ems or Paul Strand or even
I contemporary Irving Penn at
[best who betrays me or the
Mums that have finally
lented lo hanging them.
It is the new breed, the
bnymous young workers,
Jrisi- lazy minds know nothing
Ithc past and whose gluttony
[fame is fed by trickery and the
Dins-- oi the moment and of the
Intent's surface sensuality. It
the new breed who have made
the camera the same pop art as
the guitar strung around the
lerate, unwashed necks of a
lion would-be troubadors.
[n the work of the new breed
fK is not a note of music that
gs, not an image that can
Itain itself except as an in-
palion of the superficial con-
ftusness gazing upon the world
BUgh a glass eye. Despite our
Timitments of old, the feeling is
we fooled ourselves and
It now, through them, we are
linn others.
AND SO here, before flying off
the hell of politics elsewhere, I
linisce with childhood
nories, occasionally clicking
own machine at the lonely
eth mansions upon the lonely
leth dunes, imaging through
("avetts the glass-eyed
Teacher
?> ? qrated program. Requires
tachelor's degree in Education.
|ert,(ble in elementary
Pucation and Judaic studies.
Rust observe Jewish religious
radices. One year's experience
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troubadors buzzing at the honey-
pots of Hampton opportunity.
It is a hell, as I say, all its own,
perhaps even more hellish than
the politics I have sought to
escape momentarily in Washing-
ton and Moscow, Bonn and
London, Jerusalem or any Arab
capital you may care to name.
once weighing 190 pounds, she
made others laugh with her. She
didn't try to get any message
across. "Laughter is the mes-
sage. For people to walk out of
my show and say, 'Boy, I just
had the best time in my life.' "
DUE TO her constantly deter-
iorating health, heart trouble,
diabetes and cancer, she had been
laughing behind tears for the
past two years; yet, she remained
gay and hopeful to the end, only
concerned about other people.
Though her style was very
New Yorkish, Totie was a native
of Hartford, Conn., who began
her professional career as a band
singer at the age of 18, though
she already appeared as a
Wunderkind on radio at the age
of four and toured the Catskill
resort hotels in her teens.
From Georgie Johnston, an
old-time comedian who became
her husband 27 years ago, she
learned her effective mannerism
and timing. Subsequently, he
gave up his own career and be-
came her musical arranger and
conductor. Ed Sullivan, who had
caught her act at New York's
Copacabana, introduced her on
his Sunday night network tele-
vision show and she became an
immediate success, repeating her
appearance with him a full 40
times.
TOTIE BECAME a regular on
a score of talk shows hosted by
Johnny Carson, Merv Griffin,
Joey Bishop and Dinah Shore
and guested 125 times on the
Mike Douglas show aired from
Philadelphia. Only last year, she
bowed in a dramatic role on
CBS's Medical Center series,
which netted her an Emmy
nomination. She also was
honored with the American Guild
of Variety Artists' "Entertainer
of the Year" award.
After a seemingly minor eye
operation in the spring of 1976,
she developed an inflammation of
her left leg, and the doctors had
to amputate to save her life.
Valiantly, she continued to
pursue her career. During a
comeback at the Sahara, where
she was greeted by hundreds of
show business personalities, she
was forced to return to the hos-
pital for eye surgery.
Last fall, she had a breast
operation. Only in June of this
year, she was forced to postpone
a Sahara opening due to an
allergy which turned out to be a
heart attack.
TOTIE FIELDS didn't com
plain. She remained an enter-
tainer to the end. Hollywood was
shocked to hear the news on radio
and television.
-NOTE-
Reading Material and Advertising on this page is not to be
construed as an endorsement by the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
Scmcc3
For The Unaffilioted and Area Visitors At
Temple Beth El's
Senter Hall
Officiated By Rabbi Arnold Lasker
And Cantor Albert Koslow
OCTOBER 1, 2, 3, 10, 11
Limited Seating S35.00 Donation Per Person
Mail Reservations to:
Temple Beth El. 28IS Flogler Drive
West Palm Beoch, Florida 33407
Phone 833-0339
JUDGE EDWARD FINE
COUNTY COURT
GROUP 3
The Only Candidate
Recommended at Qualified
by the Palm Beach County
Judicial Nominating Commission
Appointed County Court Judge by
GOVERNOR REUBEN ASKEW
JUDGE EDWARD FINE
Florida resident for 24 years
Married, one child
Formerly:
Private Practitioner, W. Palm Beach
Prosecutor, Village of Tequesta
Attorney for the Public Defender
of Palm Beach County
"Ask your lawyer about Judge Fine"
Member of:
U. S. Supreme Court U. S. District Court
Florid* Bar Association Palm Beach County Bar Association
(Secretary I Palm Beach County Criminal Defense Lawyers
Committee to Improve Juvenile Facilities
B'nai B'rith (Past-President) Jewish Community Center
JUDGE FINE believes County Court is a people's court everyone has
the right to a full, fair and impartial hearing.
JUDGE FINE supports improving accessibility to the county court.
JUDGE FINE supports the formation of citizen dispute boards.
VOTE SEPTEMBER 12
NON-PARTISAN
Punch #99 For Judge Fine
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August 25,19^1
Jew-Baiting Season
Fear Expressed For
Human Rights Chief
NEW YORK The Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has expressed fear for the
safety of a South American
human rights leader jailed by the
government of Paraguay.
The League reported tnat
Domingo Laino, a former mem-
ber of the Paraguayan Chamber
of Deputies and vice president of
an opposition political party, was
arrested one day after returning
from a recent visit to the United
States. After intensive interroga-
tion he was incarcerated in
Laino in great jeopardy." He
added that this is an obvious
attempt by the regime to silence
'*a courageous voice for human
rights fearlessly proposing that
the government investigate the
Nazi influence in Paraguay and
to revoke the citizenship of the
most infamous of all Nazi war
criminals. Dr. Joseph Mengele,
the sadist who performed in-
human experiments on con-
centration camp victims in
Auschwitz." Mengele was
granted Paraguayan citizenship
in November, 1959.
Latin America
Tacumbo prison in Asuncion to
await trial on charges made
against him and other political
leaders in 1976 of violating law
209 which "defends democracy
and personal freedom.''
ACCORDING to Rabbi Mor-
ton Rosenthal, director of ADL 's
Latin American Affairs Depart-
ment. Laino is in the forefront of
the opposition to sheltering Nazi
war criminals in Paraguay and to
the violations of human rights by
the dictatorial regime of General
Alfredo Stroessner.
Kabbi Rosenthal noted that it
was "ominous" that Laino was
arrested early last month im-
mediately upon his return from a
six-week visit to the United
States during which he publicly
criticized Paraguay's violations
of human rights and its official
hospitality to Nazi war criminals.
While in the United States,
Laino met with officials of the
State Department, members of
both Houses of Congress and the
Human Rights Commission of
the Organization of American
States. "
"THESE ACTIONS." Rabbi
Rosenthal said, have placed
Ordained Rabbi
Young, Dynamic
available
High Holy Days
and/or Weekends
call evenings
(305) 966-0661
Worry for Laino's safety was
intense, Rabbi Rosenthal said,
because officials of the Para-
guayan government at first
denied any knowledge of his
arrest: he was snatched from his
car by men in civilian clothing.
He praised the swift action of
the American ambassador to
Paraguay, Robert White, who
"expressed our government's
concern in urgent terms" and is
maintaining a close observation
of the situation. Rabbi Rosenthal
said that the United States must
maintain its interest in Laino's
treatment to help insure a fair
and open trial.
HE NOTED that in addition to
the United States, several Latin
American governments and
Kuropean leaders have expressed
their concern to Paraguayan offi-
cials and emphasized the im-
portance of international pres-
sure on his behalf.
According to Rabbi Rosenthal.
Laino's arrest highlights the
OAS Human Rights Commis-
sion's report, issued a few weeks
ago, which accused Paraguay of
"constant violation" of human
rights, including illegal imprison-
ment.
CANDLEUGHTING
TIME
7:28
22 AB -5738
S!
I
I
I
TGMPLG MM1U-L
OF PN.M BGhCH
have scheduled High Holy Day Services
to be held at me
ROYdL POINCIMIp, PLdVHOUSG
70 ROYdL POinCUWh PLdZp,
PN.M BGr\CH
Rosh Hashonah October 2, 3
Yom Kippjr October 10, 11
Services Conducted by:
Rabbi Jerome Kestenbaum
Assisted by:
Cantor David Dardashti
$50.00 Donation per person
Temple Emanu-EI is a Conservative Synagogue
and invites the unaffiliated of the Polm Beaches
to join it in membership and worship.
Phone 832 0804 9 A.M. to 1 P.M. for Reservations or write to
Temple Emonu-EI, 190 North County Rood. Palm Beach, Florida 33480

y-y.
W* labtrimcal i
co-ordinated by the
Palm Beach County Rabbinical Council
Editor
Rabbi Hyman Fishman
devoted to discussion of themes and issues
relevant to Jewish life past and present

What If...
By Rabbi Dr. Ben Rosayn
The Free Synagogue
Temple Eternal Light,
Boca Raton
During the long days of
summer, one is apt to lapse into
moments of daydreaming
But what have we sown today?
We shall build us mansions in the
SKV
But what have we built today?
Tis sweet in the idle dreams to
bask;
But here and now, do we our
all our deeds set in motion an
incalculable chain reaction in
human and world history (even if
we only stand by), we would act
more responsibly, and, in many
instances, differently. Moreover
we would have less to regret and
bemoan.
Rabbis often muse that if our
people only knew what their faith
..~-------- __, task? -------u,vu
"What if ..." to thinking yel tnjs is the thing our souls can do for them and what they
to imagining For this reason. ^ust aa^ are in a position to do for their
reading from the Ethics of the wnat have we done today? faith and do not things would
be better and different in Jewish
How true! If we only knew that life!
Fathers is especially a recom-
mended study.
The composer of the familiar
Dayenu, sung at the Seder,
popularized the word ilu. which
means "What if. '. The rabbis
in the Midrash also were given to
cogitating on "what if."
THEY MAKE this point: If
Aaron had but known that Scrip-
ture would, for all time, record of
him "and Moses your brother is
coming to meet you" had
Aaron only known this: Moses,
whom he regarded simply as his
kid brother but who was destined
to be central to the revelation on
Mt. Sinai and as a law giver and
emancipator and chief prophet of
his people this was the poten-
tial and real Moses he was going
to meet.
Had Aaron only known this, he
would have arranged to greet his
brother Moses with drums and
pomp. Similarly, if Boaz would
have known that this ordinary
girl Ruth would later be the
grandmother of King David
Boaz would have fed Ruth not
ordinary food but delicacies.
So it goes.
IF WE would but know the
consequence and result of our
actions we would react dif-
ferently. If only we knew that
what we do or do not do today
can and does have a tremendous
effect on the future we would
think twice and do things dif-
ferently.
It is told that Lincoln, during a
debate, listened to a rebuttal by a
member of the opposing team
who prefaced many arguments
with the phrase: "If only." When
Lincoln's turn came to rebut, he
looked at his opponent and said:
"If only my grandmother had
four wheels, she would have been
a wagon!" Lincoln won the
debate.
More than daydreaming about
what would have been or could
have been or should have been
and "if only .". we ought to
think seriously of what we have
done today! The poet, Nixon
Waterman, wakes up our con-
science and mind.
HIS WORDS read:
We shall do much in the years to
come.
Hut what have we done today'1
V\ shall give our gold in a
princely sum,
Hut what did we give today*'
We shall lift the heart and dry
the tear.
We shall' life the heart and dry
the tear.
We shall plant a hope in the place
of fear.
We shall speak the words of love
and cheer,
But what did we speak today?
We shall be so kind in the after
while,
But have we been today?
We shall bring to each lonely life
a smile,
But what have we brought
today?
We shall give to truth a grander
birth,
And to steadfast faith a deeper
worth.
We shall feed the hungering souls
of earth.
But who have we fed today?
We shall reap such joys in the by
and by,
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
RtfORM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach, Floi
33407
833-8421
Rabbi Irving B Cohen
Joel I Levine
Associate Rabbi
Sabbath Worship Services
Friday at 8:00 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF
BOCA RATON
333 SW Fourth Avenue
Boca Raton, Fl. 33432
391-8900
Rabbi Merle E. Singer
Cantor Martin Rosen
Sabbath services, Friday
8:15p.m.
at
The Reform Hebrew
Congregation of
Delray
At St. Pauls Episcopal
Church, 188 So. Swinton
Ave., Delray
Friday 8 p.m.
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
THE FREE SYNAGOGUE
P.O. Box 3
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
368-1600 391-1111
Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn
Fridays at 8:15 p.rr..
at: Boca West
Community UMC
8900 Boca West GLADES) Rd
(1 Mile West of
Boca Turnpike)________
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SH0L0M
5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
684-3212 Office hours 9 a.m. to
p.m.
Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman
Cantor Arthur B. Rosenwasser
Services: Daily 8:30a.m., 7 p.m.
Friday 8:30 a.m., 5p.m.,
8:15p.m.
Saturday 8:30a.m., 6:30p.m.
CONGREGATION
BETH K0DESH
Boynton Beach, Flo
732 5147
Sabbath Services
Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 9 a m.
Congregational Church
115N Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Dr. ,e
West Palm Beach, Florida
33407
833-0339
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev
Sabbath services Friday at 8:15
p.m.
Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan at 8:15 a.m.,
Sunday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
315 N. "A" St.
Lake Worth, Florida 33460
585-5020
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Cantor Jacob Elman
Services, Mondays and
Thursdays
at 8:15a.m.
Friday at8:15p.m.
Saturday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath services, Friday at 8
p.m.
At Westminister Presbyterian
Church, 10410 N. Military
Trail, Palm Beach Gardens,
321 Northloke Blvd. North
Palm Beach, Flo 33408 Ph
845-1134
Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
N.W. Avenue "G"
Belle Glade, Florida 33430
Jack Stateman, Lay Leader
Sabbath services, Friday at
8:30p.m
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeda Drive
Palm Springs, Flondo 33460
Sabbath services, Friday at 8
p.m.
Saturday at 9 a.m.
President Jacob Front 964-
0034
Mondays and Thursdays at '
a.m.
Services held at Faith United
Presbyterian Church, Pal"1
Springs
B'NAI T0RAH
CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave.
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
392-8566
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Sabbath services Friday *
8:15p.m.
Saturdays at 9:30 a m
TEMPLE EMETH of the
DEIRAT
HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue
Delray Beach, Florida 33446
276-3536
Morris Silbermon, Rabbi
Leonard Price, Cantor
Sabbath services: Friday o1
p m. Saturday ot 9 om
Daily mmyans at 8:45 a*
and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Road
Palm Beach, Florida 33*8
8320804
Rabbi Jerome Kestenbaum
Cantor David Dardashti
Sabbath services. "**!
8:30 p.m.
Saturday at 9o.m_


ty August 25,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
Sex Comes to Israel's Movie Scene
'Lemon Popsicle' Tells Tale of Tel Aviv High Kids
By LARRY PRICE
\mon Popsicle is a film about
j school kids in Tel Aviv
L the late 1950's. It is a love
and has aroused con-
rsy because it is sexy and
^een called the Israeli version
nerican Graffiti.
jizi (Yiftach Katzur) is the
lar-old who hangs out in the
earn parlor with his two
js, chubby Yudela (Zachi
land suave, handsome Momo
(Jonathan Segal).
The boys wear their hair
greased and slicked back, shirts
open to the waist and collars up
- as they talk about which girls
"do and which 'don't," and
what they'd do if they could.
THE TROUBLE begins when
Benzi falls for the new girl in
town, Nili (Anat Atzmon). Nili is
not interested in him, however,
and falls for Momo instead, who
seduces her and makes her preg-
nant. He cruelly abandons her
isan Pan off
ime for Exotic
immer Reading
|jy the Rivers of Babylon. By Nelson DeMille. New York:
Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich, 391 pp., $10.
SUMMER IS the time for exotic, adventuresome and
IfU'n violent fiction. Hang on to your beach hats as
DeMille flies you to the deserts of Iraq and the ancient
ins of Babylon. You must fly on Concorde 02, because
oncoi-de 01 will be blown to bits. But only one person
hows that and he is a coconspirator in murder, hi-
tckingiind terrorism.
Tin- spy gets his, but not before a small band of
Hucuted, cultured men and women must rely on their
himul impulses to survive the terror of siege warfare.
|uile simply: a Palestinian terrorist organization hijacks
l'o Israeli Concorde jets carrying 100 Israeli leaders and
Iplomats headed for the most significant peace talks to
W with Arab leaders. The Israelis are able to catch the
lemy off guard long enough to set up a self-created
|usuda when they reach their destination.
WHAT ENSUES is a military and psychological
fcttle between the outnumbered Israelis, led by Jacob
liUMiet. head of El Al security, and their Palestinian
lackers, war orphans trained as guerrillas since child-
lod. led by Ahmed Rish, a ruthless, psychotic terrorist
lose one obsession is the destruction of Israel.
Complex individual stories begin to develop: a
Irsonal score to be settled between Hausner and Rish,
Jusner and a lady delegate must confront their love-hate
lationship, and Hausner must defend his leadership
Isition in a power struggle among the Israeli govem-
jn\ "s most powerful men.
There are undercurrents too numerous to mention
kn a long-lost community of Iraqi Jews who refuse to
to Israel), but DeMille fashions them in a smoothly
Iwing. fust-moving package.
THIS BOOK is rated R. There are several torture
Dnes brutal enough to bring out the airsickness bag; and
hers which, when left to the imagination, produce the
he result. However, they are an integral part of what
' world has come to know as vicious terrorist behavior.
t)ont' miss this exciting and compelling novel. You'll
il to read it before you see the movie.
Zionist Landmarks: Thirty Documents from the
Central Zionist Archives. Jerusalem: World Zionist
Organization, 85 pp., large format paperback.
ON THE occasion of the thirtieth anniversary of the
* of Israel, Hassifriya Haziyonit, publishing house of
*\ orld Zionist Organization, is presenting a collection
heir most important archives which chronicle the
ory of the Zionist movement and conclude with the
L'amation of the State of Israel.
] Beginning with the statutes of the BILU movement,
pn aimed at the spiritual and national revival of Eretz
w/, these documents include letters, resolution drafts,
jiorandums, and personal accounts of those events
fh contributed to the creation of the State of Israel.
I IN MANY cases, the documents are in Hebrew,
pen or German, but each item is translated into
Pish and accompanied by explanatory notes. This
e is also prepared for the Hebrew reader, as a
Mete description of each item is included in Hebrew.
Jhis is a fascinating teaching tool as well as a
>lete source book for one's personal library.
while love-struck Benzi secures
the money for the abortion.
As the nice guy in the plot, he
nurses her back to health, and
confesses his love for her, only to
find her once again in the arms of
Momo. Benzi, the good buy fin-
ishes on his own, wandering
down a deserted Tel Aviv street,
trying to come to terms with his
rejection.
DURING ALL of this, the
three boys explore their teenage
obsession with the deep myster-
ies of sex. In hilarous adventures,
we follow them as they visit the
local prostitute who gives them
"crabs," have an encounter with
a plump middle-aged Rumanian
lady who loves young boys, and
generally lust after anything in a
skirt which comes their way.
Boaz Davidson, the writer-di-
rector who works frequently for
Menachem Golan on Israeli fea-
tures, could have ended the film
differently, by letting the nice
guy Benzi win the woman he
idealizes.
But, by adding realism to the
story, he develops its drama and
touches a more poignant note, At
the same time, he manages to
evoke the period realistically, ex-
ploring sexual attitudes among
teenagers, and recreates the at-
mosphere of Israel of the late
1950's.
THE MUSIC which runs
through the film is pure nostalgia
of days gone by: Chubby
Checker, The Rondells, and Elvis
Yiftach Katzur comforts Anat Atzmon in "Lemon Popsicle"
ItC
ZAtC
30C
Anat Atzmon and Jonathan
Segal in a passionate love
scene
=MK MX _MK=
forming a constant backdrop for
the action. The music fits and the
story works not as well, per-
haps as in American Graffiti, but
well enough to make for a thor-
oughly enjoyable film.
All's well that ends well, and
the film does end well, providing
Menachem Golan, the king of the
Israeli cinema, with another hit
and bringing two new young
stars to the fore. Yiftach Katzur
is obviously a talented young
actor and Jonathen Segal might
well become the heart throb of
Israeli films for the next decade.
Because of the nudity scenes,
the film is rated adults only. But
the moral of the story is a good
old-fashioned one that love
should be valued above sex and
cheap thrills.
Jewish Week
3IC
30C
30C
Another Nazi
Surfaces
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Manfred Kurt Roeder, a fugitive
German neo-Nazi, has surfaced in
Chile, according to Rabbi Morton
M. Rosenthal, director of the
Latin American affairs depart-
ment of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith.
Roeder, who fled Germany in
April after being ordered to begin
serving a six-month jail sentence
for "defamation of the state and
propaganda for an uncon-
stitutional organization," in-
dicated in a Santiago newspaper
interview that he had no dif-
ficulty entering Chile. The 50-
year-old disbarred attorney has
gained international attention as
head of the German People's
Movement (Deutsche Burger-
initiative), a neo-Nazi group.
FOLLOWING his escape,
Roeder was first discovered in
Latin America by Brazilian
authorities who raided a meeting
of Nazis at the Tyll Hotel in
Itatiaia. The resulting publicity
also led to the identification and
subsequent arrest of Gustav
Franz Wagner, one-time head of
the Sobibor concentration camp.
True to his reputation, accord-
ing to Rosenthal, Roeder picked
up his neo-Nazi efforts in Latin
America where he had left off
prior to his departure from
Germany. '
SHALOM MeMOBTAL PAJTC
Palm Beach County's
Only All Jewish Cemetery
COMPLETE PRE-NEED ARRANGEMENTS
5061 OkeechobeeBlvd.
W. Palm Beech, Fla. 33409
W. Palm684-2277
Delray427-3220
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding prefer, onol counseling agency serving the Jewish
community of Palm Beach County Professional and confidential
help is available for
Problems of the aging Marital counseling
Consultation ond evaluation services Parent child conflicts
Vocational counseling Personal problems
^. Private Offices: 2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
^ >w Weel Pelm Beech, Fie. 33409
^ J^JS Telephone: 684-1991
Kl F[ 3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 206-
Ul L_3 Room 12, Boca Raton, Fla.
llXel 5 Telephone: 395-3640
Moderate fees ore charged in fomily and individual counseling to
those who can pay (fees ore based on income and family size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service it a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Telephone
832-8423 / 4
Jewish Community Day School
Of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
Is now accepting applications for
Pre-School-FulI or Half Day
Kindergarten-Full Day
Grade l-Grade Vl-Elemenlary School
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Transportation throughout Palm Beach County
Admission Tests Required
rw/*.;*
A Beneficiary Agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County


<*&* "-
i infjmi.>" i ujiiuuiii u/
i uiiivuiraaxx^vuniy
n
The Royal Ripoff
Cultural Exchange With Soviets
Continued from Page 1
they insisted that it be only
within the frame work of a formal
and carefully regulated arrange-
ment.
Though the U.S. stressed its
preference for a freer flow of
artistic groups and personalities,
it signed an agreement with the
Soviets in January, 1968, which
has remained virtually un-
changed until the present day.
The agreement, which has
enabled government sponsored
Soviet performers to visit the
U.S., is valid until 1979.
FOR THE first time in almost
two decades of automatic two-
and three-year renewals, the
agreement is running into
trouble. Here's why:
The Soviets have gained
economically from the exchange
program; the Americans have
lost. Soviet acts are paid top dol-
lar in the U.S. current fee for
the Bolshoi ballet, for example, is
roughly $840,000 for a 90-day
tour while Soviet ticket prices
are kept artificially low, minimiz-
ing the box office potential of
Israel Studying
Certain Outcome
Continued from Page 1
basis for a "declaration" on the
Palestinian question and for a
clear-cut acceptance of the "prin-
ciple of withdrawal under
Resolution 242" as applying to
all fronts, including the West
Bank.
Vance, during his talks in the
area last week, highlighted
Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan's
recent Knesset pronouncements
on the West Bank as the har-
binger of a significant and
meaningful shift of Israeli policy.
DAYAN TOLD the Knesset,
following the Leeds Castle talks
in England, that Israel would be
prepared to discuss West Bank
sovereignty after five years and
would be prepared to discuss a
territorial compromise in the area
if the Arab side proposed it.
That went a good deal further,
at least semantically, than
previous Israeli policy state-
ments. Until then Israel had
refused U.S. requests to give a
prior commitment that it would
discuss the sovereignty issue
after five years.
Moreover, Dayan's readiness
to entertain the notion of a West
Bank territorial compromise,
even on the hypothetical plane,
represented his own views, not
necessarily the whole govern-
ment's. Now, however, Day an
made his pronouncements after
clear Cabinet endorsement and
Begin has subsequently reechoed
them.
VANCE WILL now seek to
secure from Israel a specific com-
mitment not just to discuss these
issues, but to be prepared to
renounce soyerignty and control
over parts of the West Bank. For
Begin and Herut, of course, this
poses a tremendous ideological
challenge.
But the U.S. is convinced that
without such clear-cut commit-
ment to "the principle of with-
drawal" it will be impossible to
achieve the declaration of
principles.
Begin, in announcing his
acceptance of Carter's invitation
to join with Carter and Sadat at
the summit conference, denied
rumors that Israel had made any
Change in its negotiating
position. He also denied that
Vance had asked Israel to change
its position when the Secretary
held his talks with Israeli leaders.
SADAT, vin making his an-
nouncement of accepting Carter's
invitation, fielded reporters'
questions as to whether Israel
had changed its stand enough to
justify his meeting Begin. Asked
whether he had received any
private assurances from
Washington to prompt him to
attend the summit, Sadat said:
"All I ask in Camp David is that
President Carter on behalf of the
United States acts as a full
partner. Whenever I am assured
of this, I shall always answer any
invitation from President Car-
ter."
Both Sadat and Vance,
speaking at a joint press con-
ference in Alexandria, made it
clear that the U.S. now is pre-
pared to act as a full partner in
the Mideast talks.
But, Vance added, "as I have
always said on many, many
occasions, the United States will
feel free when it sees obstacles
that are impeding the road to
peace to make suggestions as to
how to bridge those obstacles
that are impeding the road to
peace to make suggestions as to
now to bridge those obstacles."
Sadat also called on all sides to
let bygones be bygones. The
summit "is in my opinion a new
page. Let us not look back," he
said. Similarly, Begin, speaking
in Tel Aviv, said that "what has
happened, has happened" and
"one should open a new page."
even the finest American per-
former or group.
This, together with the fact
that Soviet acts are paid in dol-
lars for their American appear-
ances -r.while U.S. acts are paid
in a mixture of dollars and rubles
makes the program a source of
desperately needed hard currency
for Moscow.
Nobody knows for sure how
much hard currency the Soviets
obtain in this manner; according
to some impresarios and Russian
emigres, the figure could be as
high as four or five million dollars
each year.
FEES FOR Soviet artists are
paid directly to Gosconcert, an
arm of the Soviet treasury, in-
stead of to the artists themselves.
Thus, a Soviet violinist who is
billed out at, say, $6,500 a perfor-
mance, is lucky to take home
$300 in the form of Gosconcert
stipend for his efforts.
Soviet artists are handpicked
by the Soviet government for
travel abroad. Often, criteria
such as how "safe" a given artist
may be or how many family
members he can leave behind as
hostages to discourage defection
to the West weigh heavily
than artistic talent or performing
ability in determining who is sent
overseas.
KGB agents, informers and
intelligence operatives are part
and parcel of the cultural ex-
change program. Such indivi-
duals are included in every Soviet
group that visits America and
evidence indicates that they have
contributed to an increase in
espionage activity in this coun-
try.
THE EXCHANGE program is
an important source of prestige
stratstrot
H. J. Roberts, M. D.
Announces The Association Of
Josef H. Hertz, M. D.
For the Practice of Internal Medicine
Subspecialties
Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases
300 27th Street 832-2408
West Palm Beach, Florida 33407


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FOR THE PHYSICAL SOCIAL. AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING Of OUR RESIDENTS
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^^^^Telephorie: Broword 733-Q6SS
STRICTLY KOSHEF
"Non Sectarian
for the Soviets. "It is terribly
important for them to have their
artists recognized in the West -
especially in New York, the cul-
ture capital of the world," ex-
plains Herbert Kupferberg,
author of The Raised Curtain, a
report on Soviet-American cul-
tural and academic trade pub-
lished by The Twentieth Century
Fund. "The exchanges help the
Soviets to project an image of a
cultivated and artistic society
flourishing under Communism."
What, then, is to be done about
the exchange program? While
few critics are in favor of scuttl-
ing it altogether, the voices
calling for tougher scrutiny of its
aims and achievements and a
revised Soviet-American agree-
ment are almost certin to grow
louder as the Soviets continue
their crackdown on dissidents.
SUCH A campaign is bound to
receive support from those
American artists like v^u
Isaac Stern and playwrigH
ward Albee who have
been critical of the st
Soviet-American cultural u
And, as Herbert Kunfl
reports in The Raised cJ
there is some historic pnW
for the sort of open, genum
change of people and ideas i
people would like to see in,
of the current program.
"In the years followin.
Bolshevik Revolution ut
berg writes, "Soviet' poljc
both travel abroad and en
tion was freer than it was in|
years. A few Russian compj
author and scholars lived!
worked in the West, and a |
number of American s
were able to visit the
Union for lengthy periods!
relative ease and freedom
two-way flow was hardlj
tensive."
Jewij
FAMILY
CHIROPRACTORS
O
A new conceot in hollistic
ealth care for the entire family.

Dr. Saul N. Sherman,
Dr. Wllllj. Behalf
AFFORDABLE CHIROPRACTIC CARE USING
THE COOPERATIVE FEE SYSTEM
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IN THE TRIANGl E BE TWt IN U S 1 8, A 1 A
Insurance & Medicare Accepted.
\]&JJ THE JEWISH aWUNTTY CENTER
OF THE PALM BEACHES INC.
IS NOW ACCEPTING REGISTRATION FOR
our KEREN ORR CtMJNITY PRE-SCHOOL
SEPTEMBER 1WI-7*
PRE-SCHOOL (IVtYRS)
S: 30a.m. -1:00 p.m.
1:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
130 a m. 5 30 p.m.
PRE SCHOOL (3 VRS)
:30a m. 1:00p.m.
130 a.m. 3:00 p.m
S: 30a.m. -5:30p.m.
PRE KINDERGARTEN (4 YRS)
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SIMPER MONTH
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KINDERGARTEN (S YRS)
30 a.m. 3:00 p.m.
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HOOPER MONTH
$135 PER MONTH
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SPACE IS LIMITED .MEMBERSHIP REQUIRED ..TRANSPOUTATI1
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$50 DEPOSIT ... REGISTER NOW ATMfl
IRIS MURRAY, CHAIRPERSON .. THE JCC IS A BENEFICI*
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ENCLOSED PLEASE FIND MY CHECK IN THE AMOUNT OF .
"i^X ENHOI-- MY CHILD IN THE !t7>7 KEREN OR
>LnOOL.
PLEASE CHECK THE FOLLOWING:
PRESCHOOL J'^yr$( ) PRE SCHOOL 3 yr< )
PRE KINDERGARTEN( ) KINDERGARTEN( )
KINDLY MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO:
iS!*S2. COMMUNITY CENTER OF THE PALM EBACHES, INC
MiSOkeichobet Blvd., Wttt Palm Beach, Fla. JJ4#?


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