Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00175

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
wjewiis*
OFPALMBEA CH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and FEDERATION REPORTER"
n con,unction with Tk. J.wi.h Ftoemtion of Palm Rood, Coonty
wndiii(3i m
kme
4 Number 16
Palm Beach, Florida Friday. August 11,1978
Price 36 Cento
Mondale's
China Card
ouble Deal
|By ROBERT A. COHN
Carter Administration's
kon to "allow" Israel to sell
(fir jet fighters to Taiwan
be an example of "playing
liinese card" not against the
Union, but against Israel
ll as Nationalist China.
|rtly after Vice President
F. Mondale returned from
lideast trip, the White
announced that it has
I to allow Israel to sell 50 or
|ts advanced fighter planes
van.
LEL had sought per-
to sell the Kfir to several
countries, including Taiwan,
Ecuador and Austria, but until
the decision, the United States
had been unwilling to approve
the sales. American law requires
U.S. approval for such sales
because the Kfir is equipped with
an American engine made by
General Electric.
By agreeing to allow the sale,
the Administration has taken
itself off the hook with both
Israel and Taiwan, but has placed
those small, isolated nations in
extremely difficult diplomatic
and military situations in both
Continued on Page 3
IURICE SAMUELSON
)ON (JTA) There
o British legislation
the Arab boycott in the
kble future, it has been
Ihere.
kuse of Lords committee
|idf(l, after four months of
and private hearings,
| supporting early passage
Foreign Boycotts Bill,
modeled on U.S. anti-
I legislation.
[EVER, supporters of the
Insored by Lord Byers, a
} peer, do not regard the
as a failure in their bid
rmi kit British action
the boycott.
| hope that the committee
commend many other
LYMPIC OCTOPUS
Iiiie House Mum
>n Moving of Site
)SEPH POLAKOFF
SHINGTON (JTA| -
Vhite House has tem-
declined to supply Pres-
enter's view on the iden-
esolutions in the Senate
buse urging removal of the
llympics from Moscow to a
Itside the Soviet Union, in
i the Soviet government's
bns of human righto and
(Freedom.
lying to the Jewish Tele-
Jjc Agency's question
w the President agrees or
es with the "sense" of the
ssional resolutions, Presi-
Press Secretory Jody
replied that "it is im-
t we thoroughly consider
pifications in response to
f ion we find deplorable and
re respond in the most
re way."
Israelis See No Pressure From
U.S.; Will Work Together on Issues
tritish Legislation Against Arab
rcott Foreseen, Says Committee
measures which the government
could take short of legislation.
They say British companies
should be left in no doubt of the
government's active abhorrence
of the boycott's discriminatory
effects.
In the past British companies
have been given no protection
against boycott pressures and
have been advised to fend for
themselves in what they regard
as their own commercial in-
terests.
Opponents of the boycott also
want British embassies and trade
missions to cease disseminating
business opportunities con-
taining boycott clauses. The
Foreign Office should stop
authenticating negative cer-
tificates of origin, they add.
PRESIDENT CARTER said
at his last press conference that
he opposed "a boycott" of the
Olympics. The Congressional
sponsors of the resolutions are
not seeking a boycott.
Meanwhile, the International
Harvester Co. disclosed it has
suspended trade negotiations
with the Soviet Union and ap-
pealed to other U.S. firms doing
business with the Soviet Union
for support in protest against the
arrest of Jay Crawford, Har-
vester's representative in
Moscow, who was dragged from
his car on a Moscow street June 1
and held prisoner in Lefortovo
prison.
He was accused of illegally
buying large sums of Soviet cur-
Continued on Page 3
Israeli leaders appear to
have new confidence that the
White House will not pressure
them in their efforts towards
peace in the Middle East.
Israeli Prime Minister
Menachem Begin repeatedly
assured Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance this weekend
that Israel would work with
him to get peace talks with
Egypt resumed.
In their public remarks
since Vance arrived in
Jerusalem last Saturday,
Begin and Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan have been
careful to nurture the views
that Israel is cooperating with
Vance's effort to revive the
Sadat peace initiative, and
that the obstacle to peace now
lies in Egypt.
THE ISRAELIS feel that
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat
has sacrificed his image as a
peacemaker in world opinion, and
particularly in the United States
since he ordered direct talks with
Israel cut off.
"If there will be an atmosphere
in Alexandria as there was in
Jerusalem, then he (Vance) will
succeed," Begin said after
speaking with Vance Sunday.
Israeli leaders "are not crowing
about it, but they do think the
pressure on them is off as a result
of Sadat breaking off talks," an
American official said. "They see
a change in American public
opinion and feel more com-
fortable because of it."
SOUNDING euphoric, Begin
said Sunday night that his
meeting with Vance was "the
best we have ever had" in the
secretary's five trips to the
Middle East. "There was no
American request to Israel to
change its position," Begin
added.
Begin seemed to go to some
length to avoid appearing to be
CRC Alert Issued
On Proselytizing
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Task Force on Missionary
Activity of the Jewish Com-
munity Relations Council (JCRC)
has issued an alert to Jewish
educational institutions, camps,
synagogues, and Jewish
organizations to be alert to a
massive influx of missionary
materials aimed at
proselytization within the Jewish
community.
The JCRC reported that it has
received reports from every
borough in the metropolitan area
indicating that Hebrew-Christian
groups were engaging in a city-
wide campaign to convert Jews,
according to Dr. Seymour Lach-
man, chairman of the Task Force.
"LAST YEAR WE witnessed
the first such massive influx of
personnel and materials. Clearly,
during the past few weeks, the
number of people in the streets is
even greater than ever, with an
all-out saturation campaign
underway," Lachman said.
negative about anything he
discussed with Vance. Begin cast
comments about a hand-written
note than Vance brought from
President Carter to him in
friendly and supportive tones.
Both sides declined to discuss
details of the letter or of Sun-
day's talks.
Asked by reporters about
unconfirmed news accounts of an
American proposal for a summit
in Washington that would bring
Carter, Sadat and Begin together
to break the deadlock, the Israeli
leader said the idea did not come
up during his talks with Vance.
IF IT WERE proposed later,
"I would consider it with great
seriousness," he added. Israel
has traditionally favored the kind
of direct, two-party talks
initiated by Sadat's visit to
Jerusalem last November.
Begin, who appeared relaxed
and joked with reporters, turned
the other cheek to what he called
"the totally negative Egyptian
statements" on new talks and
attacks against him by Egyptian
media. "I do not react, because I
do not want to exacerbate the
situation," Begin said.
Nearly half of the 2'/i-hour
morning sessions centered on
southern Lebanon, where Israeli-
supported Christian militiamen
have refused to let a Lebanese
army battalion move into the
militia-controlled buffer zone on
the Israeli-Lebanese border.
Sadat's Goldberg Slur
Buried on Capitol Hill
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The White House
said here that Secretary of
State Cyrus Vance has
responded "very clearly" to
a disparaging remark by
President Anwar Sadat of
Egypt against the former
United States Ambassador
to the United Nations
Arthur Goldberg but in-
dicated that the Admin-
istration was not consider-
ing a further rebuke to the
Egyptian leader.
(The remark followed on the
heels of Sadat's ouster of Israel's
peace talk delegation which had
been waiting in Cairo to resume
sessions since Sadat broke them
off in January, as well as Sadat's
Arthur Goldberg
formal vow to resume war with
Israel should the occupied ter-
ritories not be returned.)
PRESIDENTIAL Press Sec-
Continued on Page 8
Rabbi Merle E. Singer Appointed
Temple Beth El's Spiritual Leader
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
announces the appointment of
Rabbi Merle E. Singer as its
spiritual leader.
Kabbi Singer is a graduate of
the University of Cincinnati and
the Hebrew Union College
Jewish Institute of Religion,
where he received his bachelor of
Hebrew Letters and master of
arts in Hebrew Letters. He was
ordained in Cincinnati in 1966.
HE SERVED AS assistant
rabbi of Temple Sinai in
Washington D.C. from 1966 to
1971 and has been the rabbi of
Reform Congregation Beth Or,
Spring House Pa., from 1971
until his appointment with Beth
El.
Rabbi Singer was conferred an
honorary degree of Doctor of
Humane Letters by Gwynedd-
Mercy College in the Philadelphia
area. He has been active as a
college lecturer for some years
and has extensive experience in
working with high school and
college students in an advisory
capacity.
Rabbi Merle Singer
Rabbi Singer is a native of
Duluth, Minn. He and his wife
Myra are the parents of four
boys.
He conducted his first Friday
evening Sabbath service at
Temple Beth El July 21.


i nroru tsn rwurtauiriu/ raim D*vcnx,uumy
w i iudy r\ i
CRC Update
It's Not Over for Soviet Dissidents
By JOHN MOSS. Chairmam
Soviet Jewry Task Force
Community Relations Council
In the past several weeks the
trials of Soviet Jews
Sharansky. Slepak. Nudel and
others, brought shocking results
to these people. The following is a
telegram sent to President
Carter:
Sir. We have been hearing
about the possible prison ex-
change of Anatoly Sharansky,
and although it is an imperfect
solution to the overall problem
we heartily endorse the exchange.
We urge if such an exchange is
undertaken that Vladimir Slepak
be included. We understand that
he is suffering from phlebitis and
is now being kept with forty
prisoners in a cell designed to
hold four people.
WE URGE each organization,
temple, synagogue and person, to
send letters and telegrams to the
President. Secy. Vance, senators
and congressmen
On July 24, Mrs Grace
Herskowitz representing the
national office of Pioneer Women
met with me and a committee
regarding Women's Plea for
Soviet Jewry
Each year the different
women's organizations take
responsibility and this year it is
Pioneer Women who will develop
a program to keep our com-
munity aware of the plight of
Soviet Jews. Ida Glassman is
handling information on the
program
AND NOW. IDA Nudel of
Moscow, an engineer-economist,
has been for over six years the
guardian angel'' of Soviet
Jewish Prisoners of Conscience,
many times risking her safety to
secure better conditions or
liberation for the inmates of the
Gulag Archipelago.
On June 1. 19"8. she joined a
women refuseniks protest for
visas to Israel by displaying a
banner from her balcony. The
next day she joined a demon-
stration protesting the arrest of
her good friends Vladimir and
Maria Slepak. and two days
thereafter another action
demanding emigration to Israel.
On June 21. at separate trials.
Ida and Vladimir were sentenced
to four and five years of internal
exile respectively, on the
spurious grounds of malicious
hooliganism". Ida demanded
that her friends also be allowed in
the court; the authorities refused
and forcibly dragged her inside.
The following are. as Ida
defiantly as ever said in court,
her final words". In protest, she
has vowed silence for the balance
of her sentence.
THESE WILL be my final
words, or else my words will have
no meaning." she said. Out of
despair. I carried out an act on
June 1 by which I claimed my
right to express my protest
openly. Although malicious
hooliganism" is the formal
charge. I am not being tried for
this.
Neither my June 1 protest on
my balcony (from which she hung
a banner. KGB. Give me a Visa
to Israel"! nor my participation
in the June 4 demonstration at
Trubny Square (at which she and
eight other refuseniks held aloft
signs Give us Visas to Israel"I
is the real reason for my trial
today.
I am standing trial for the
entire past seven years of mv life.
Moreover, if in a few years I will
have to make a final statement
again. I am absolutely certain I
will say then, as I say now. that
the past seven years of my life for
which I sit in the dock today were
most difficult and yet at the same
time the happiest years of my
life
"DURING THE PAST seven
years I have learned to walk
proudly with my head high as a
human being and as a Jewish
woman. These seven years have
been filled with a daily battle for
myself and others. Every- thro '
was about to help another friend
my heart filled with an ex-
traordinary feeling unlike any-
other. Perhaps the closest such
feeling is that which a woman
feels when giving a new life.
If the remaining years of my
life will be grey and monotonous,
these seven years will warm my
heart with the knowledge that
my life has not been without
purpose. None of you. my judges,
is capable of finding a punish-
ment that would take revenge
and deprive me of the triumph
and victory of these seven
vears."
Statement on Trial
Of Sharansky
By THEODORE R. MANN.
Chairman. National Jewish
Community Relations
Advisory Council
Soviet contempt for human
rights and due process of law
have now been vividly exposed
with the sentencing of Anatoly
Sharansky.
The show which masqueraded
as a trial was a savage mockery
not only of international stan-
dards of justice, but of Soviet law
itself. Sharansky was held in
isolation for 17 months, was not
allowed his own choice of counsel,
nor materials to prepare his own
defense, and could call no wit-
nesses. No independent ob-
servers, let alone representatives
of the world press, were allowed
into the courtroom to witness
this act of Soviet despotism.
THIS UNJUST sentence must
be appealed, and the Soviet
Union should be called upon to
allow jurists from all nations as
observers when the appeal is
heard.
The Soviet regime evidently
considered Sharansky a political
threat of such magnitude that it
was willing to weather the odium
of world condemnation for trvine
him. As a figure prominent in
both the Jewish movement and
the small group trying to monitor
Soviet compliance with its treaty-
obligations on human rights, he
personified protest. The Soviet
regime reckoned that his merely
being at large threatened to
expose the sham of its solemn
international undertakings and
its cynical use for political
purposes of anti-Semitism which
has served the regime well
throughout its history.
Recent years have seen a con-
certed effort to poison the minds
of the Soviet peoples against the
Jews, using every medium of
communication radio,
television, newspapers, maga-
zines, books, pamphlets to
reach even the remotest corners
of the Soviet Union. The Soviet
Union is also the world's prin-
cipal exporter of anti-Semitic
literature, poisoning minds in
much of the world outside,
especially Arab countries and the
Third World.
People everywhere will feel the
utmost revulsion at what the
Soviet legal system has no so
blatantly shown itself to be.
masking injustice and punishing
the innocent.
EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR A
REAL ESTATE LICENSE
FOR SALESMAN OR BROKER
INCLUDING THE REQUIRED
EDUCATIONAL COURSE
IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY.
DPf Bert Rodgers Schools of Real Estate, Inc.
1919 Premier Row Orlando, Florida 32809
Local Classes Throughout Florida
CALL TOLL FREE 800-432-0320
In Orlando Call (305) 855-5441
< NAME
Please send me information concerning:
d Salesman License Course
d Broker License Course
ADDRESS
CITY __
JIP CODE
STATE
TELEPHONE
With the
Organizations
HADASSAH
Shalom Hadassah will sponsor
a flea market Sunday. Aug. 20.
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Miller's
Super Value Parking Lot at Mili-
tary Trail and Southern Boule-
vard. Contributions of mer-
chandise will be accepted. Lillian
Schack and Bertha Rubin have
information concerning pick-up.
Shalom's 1978 Youth Aliyah
Campaign will be launched at a
tea Wednesday. Aug. 16. in the
home of Chairman Anne Koffs.
Lillian Dorf is co-chairman.
Yovel Hadassah has Hadassah
Jewish New Year cards in stock.
Tillie Pottish. Martha Ketzis or
Kst her Lichtenstein are handling
the details.
The new Yovel Bulletin
Calendar listing birthdays,
anniversaries, memorials and
special dates each month will
la-gin in September. Tillie Pottish
and Kstelle Lichtenstein have
more information.
The group's membership
luncheon is scheduled for Oct. 26
and the group is planning a
repeat Thanksgiving Weekend
from Thursday through Sunday
at the Saxony Hotel in Miami
Beach, ttose Brockman and
Bertha Kaplan are in charge of
reservations.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Century chapter of Women's
American ORT is sponsoring a
luncheon and card party at
Christopher Michaels in West
Palm Beach. Wednesday. Aug.
16. at 11:30 a.m. Nettie Pfeffer
has more information.
UNITED ORDER OF
TRUE SISTERS
The United Order of True
Sisters will sponsor Day at
Calder Races" on Aug. 24.
Frances Berger is in charge of
reservations.
SISTERHOOD
The Sisterhood of Temple
F.manu-El of Palm Beach j.1
nounces its new slate of office,, I
inclu.din: us.unny E5|
president: Helen CogpJ'
honorary president; J^l
Johnson, vice president Qerdil
Bettauer. vice president; Sarah
Weissblatt. financial secret *'
Ruth Rudoff recoX
secretary: and Sylvia Rudu'
corresponding secretary.
Board of Trustee members
include: Jen Cohen. Anita Levy 1
Ray Levine. Genevieve SilbeV
man. Regina Basin. R08e|
Schloss. Bertha Miller. Corrmtl
Newman. Janet Popper. Marjoriel
St oil. Dee Cohen. August! I
Sandier. Miriam Krieger, Irene!
Dardashti and Roslynl
Kestenbaum.
PIONEER WOMEN
Pioneer Women will sponsor il
membership tea Aug. 15 at 1 p.m. I
at Home Federal Savings and
Loan, across from Palm Com
Plaza.
MID COUNTY
MEDICAL CENTER
Cresthaven League of Midi
County Medical Center wil
sponsor a luncheon and card]
party. Tuesday. Aug. !5 at I
Emory Center, at noon. Sophie!
Jacobson has more information.
SOVIET JEWISH
MOVEMENT
West Palm Beach has beeal
chosen as a target city for P_
Beach County for a mass rally j
supporting a nationwide women'sI
plea for human rights for Soviet|
Jews.
The Golda Meir Club of I
Pioneer Women, chaired by Ida I
Glassman. co-chaired by Amyl
Prager. will be responsible for
organizing a mass rally involving I
all the organizations in Faln|
Beach County.
Presidents of all organization]
will be contacted soon to join a |
general planning meeting.
Muh <. 9feiboi/it
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER
ACREAGE -HOMES- LOTS- APARTMENTS- INCOME PROPERTY
SSZ KOI 41. PALM V> A\
PALM BEACH. FLORIDA
omii wi
RES: Mt-eiM
INVESTMENT EQUITY CORPORATION
announces the association of
DONALD L. VOGEL
Registered Real Estate Broker-Salesmen
23S2 P.Q.A. Blvd.. Palm Beech Gardens, Fl. 33410
Business 626-5100 Residence 622-4000
First Marine
National Bank and Trust Company
582-5641
114 NO. "J" STREET
LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA c n (
Member F.DJJ
PHILIP WEINSTEIN.FD
sEvitt memorial chapel
Mil OKEECMOBEE BLVD.. WEST PALM BEACH. FLORID*
PHONE NO. Uf (7M .
1 US* WlIT OIXIC HlOHV y. MONTH MIAMI. T LOHIDA fHOH* *'
ItJl PEMSMOKf HOAO. MOLI.VWOOO flOK.OA 33000 rMOHt Ml"
1-11.71
-71
H1-7S


,v. August 11. 1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Mondale s Double Deal
Mondale Deals Double China Deck
Continued from Page 1
[he Middle East and East Asia.
At the present time, the Ad-
ninistration is "putting the
nueeze" on both Israel and the
,tionalist Republic of China
eeime on Taiwan, both formerly
jre allies of the United States.
israel like Nationalist China,
linds itself increasingly isolated
the diplomatic world, and
ing tremendous pressures
om Washington.
IN ISRAEL'S case, the pres-
ires are on the government to
ake concessions to the Arabs in
current stalled peace talks
which Israeli leaders feel are
unacceptable risks to its security.
Taiwan faces the abrogation of
Its mutual defense treaty with
[he United States, and the
ventual breaking of diplomatic
elations in order that the United
slates can establish full dip-
omatic relations with the Com-
nunist People's Republic of
~hina on the mainland.
Israel was given the green light
) sell the Kfir jets to Taiwan
(luring Mondale's recent visit,
the permission was seen as a
esture toward easing tensions
between not only Washington
knd Jerusalem, but between
(Washington and Taipei.
The Nationalist Chinese had
t>een seeking to purchase F-4
Phantom jets from the United
States to bolster its defenses
kgainst a possible attack from
Ihi' mainland.
BUT THE Administration did
Inot want to offend the Peking
Iregime by selling Taipei the F-4
|Phantom, because the fighter
would enable Taiwan to bomb
deep into the Chinese mainland.
The existing F-5 jets now owned
fty Taiwan do not enable it to
lice the straits against new
hinese fighters.
White House officials said that
the Kfir, which means "Lion
Zwh" in Hebrew, was viewed as
jthe ideal plane for Taiwan, since
|it would be useful for patrol and
defensive purposes, but could not
be used to penetrate the
ainland.
lowever, almost immediately
Bfter the Administration an-
ouncement, the Republic of
na Ministry of Defense in
Taipei announced that it had no
plans to buy the Kfir, and was
interested in the all-weather
Phantom F-4. Israel had been
omplaining over American
estrictions on sale of the Kfir,
knd had indicated that Taiwan
|was interested in buying the
Iplane, but until now could not do
ho.
ADMINISTRATION spokes-
Imen said that if Taiwan insisted
lupon the F-4 Phantoms instead
I'f the Kfir, it may end up getting
[neither. The United States, which
lhas been "playing its China
ard" against the Soviet Union,
which hopes to normalize its
elations with the mainland by
January of next year, does not
want to offend Peking by selling
Taiwan the more sophisticated F-
Taiwan's announcement that it
vas not interested in the Israeli
plane has been interpreted as an
bffort by Taiwan not to offend
saudi Arabia, which has supplied
the Nationalist regime with oil,
and which has had warm
relations with Taipei for years.
Relations among the two
Chinese states, the Jewish people
and the State of Israel have been
as complex and confusing as a
Chinese puzzle designed by an
Israeli. There are many
similarities between the Chinese
and Jewish people, two of the
most ancient and respected
cultures in human history. The
Chinese are often called "the
Jews of Asia," and the current
expulsion of Chinese nationals
from Vietnam recalls the ex-
pulsion of the Jews from Ger-
many in the 1930s.
JEWS FIRST settled in China
around 1000 C.E., and a
flourishing Chinese-Jewish com-
munity at Kaifeng lasted until
the end of the 18th century, when
it mostly disappeared through
assimilation. A modern Jewish
community in China originated in
the 1840s, when Sephardi Jews
principally merchants from Iraq,
settled in Shanghai.
They were followed by Russian
Jews, mainly middle-class busi-
ness people who came in large
numbers after the Russo-
Japanese War (1904-05) and the
Russian Revolution (1917).
The various waves of Jewish
settlements resulted in several
fascinating mixed Chinese-
Jewish communities, including
ethnic Chinese as practicing Jews
and Torah scrolls and prayer-
books written in classic Chinese.
The final wave of European
Jewish immigration to China
occurred in 1938-41, when
thousands of Jewish refugees
found refuge in Shanghai from
the Holocaust.
THE NATIONALIST Kuo-
mintang, which established a
republic in 1912, was generally
tolerant of the Jewish com-
munity, and its first leader, Dr.
Sun Yat-Sen in 1920 endorsed the
Zionist movement, the Balfour
Declaration and the creation of a
Jewish State.
By 1937, at the outbreak of the
Sino-Japanese war, the Jewish
population of mainland China
was 20,000. During World War
II, about 20,000 Jewish refugees
augmented that number,
although most of these were to
leave at war's end.
A small number of aged and
infirm Jews from this period have
been allowed to remain in China
and have received aid from
Jewish relief organizations
through the Red Cross through
the years. About 25 to 30 such
persons remain, mostly in
Shanghai.
When the Communist Party of
China under Mao Tse-tung in
these are Jewish businessmen
from the United States and
elsewhere. There are also about
100 U.S. Jewish servicemen
stationed on the island. A Jewish
military congregation was estab-
lished in the early 1960s, and
religious services are also held at
a community center in Taipei. A
Jewish Sunday school in Taipei
recently reported an enrollment
of 15 to 20 students.
When the United Nations
voted to partition Palestine to
enable the creation of a Jewish
State, Nationalist China, which
then held the Chinese seat in the
United Nations, abstained. Until
its expulsion from the United
Nations in 1971, the Nationalists
generally voted with the Arab
bloc on Mideast questions.
primarily to maintain their
cordial relations with Saudi
Arabia.
There were diplomatic
relations between Israel and
Nationalist China until Jan. 12,
1950, when the Government of
Israel became the first Near East
state to grant de facto recog-
nition to the Communist regime
on the mainland. Despite the fact
that Communists did not
reciprocate, the Nationalist
regime broke off diplomatic
relations with Israel.
According to an article by
Meron Medzini which appeared
in Hadassah magazine in 1964,
"The act of recognition (of Com-
munist China), unpopular as
Israel knew it to be among many
of its friends, including the
United States, was purely tech-
nical: recognition was not con-
sidered as meaning an expression
of sympathy for this or that
Continued on Page 12
Olympic Octopus
White House Mum On
Moving Site of Games
Continued from Page 1
1949 overthrew Chiang Kai-
shek's Nationalists, forcing them
to flee to set up a government in
exile on Taiwan (Formosa), the
organized Jewish life of Chinese
Jewry came to an end. By the
mid-1960s, only about 100 Jews
remained, and today it is esti-
mated that there are only about
30 Jews among the entire
800,000,000 population of main-
land China.
Taiwan served for a time as a
temporary haven for Jews from
the mainland, who, like the Jews
of other formerly capitalist
societies which went Communist
left more for economic than
religious reasons. The mainland
regime was never anti-Semitic,
although until recently, the
climate for all religious practices
was inhospitable. Among the 17
million citizens of the Republic of
China on Taiwan, there are at the
most 40 Jews, of whom 30 live in
the capital of Taipei. Most of
rency on the black market. Craw-
ford, who denied all charges, was
released June 27 in the custody of
the U.S. Ambassador and has
been ordered to remain in
Moscow.
HARVESTER'S request for
support was made by the com-
pany's chairman, Brooks
McCormack, in a personal letter
sent to executives July 6 stating,
in part, "We leave it up to the
companies to make whatever
response they wish to make."
At least two other U.S. cor-
porations trading with the USSR
have protested, it was said, and
about 20 other American com-
panies and the International
Chamber of Commerce have sup-
ported Harvester's requests for
support.
When the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency raised the question at the
White House on the President's
reaction to Harvester's cam-
paign, Powell replied that the
President had "indicated two
weeks ago that if American
business did not feel safe from
arbitrary arrests and harrass-
ment in the Soviet Union that
certainly would have unfortunate
effects on the climate of doing
business."
Privately, a top White House
source told the JTA later that
"we thoroughly agree with Har-
vester on this."
AT THE State Department,
spokesman Hodding Carter said
that a Harvester representative
had protested to the State
Department on the arrest of
Crawford, and that Harvester
was informed "it was up to them
to do what they felt they needed
to do in response" to Crawford's
arrest.
"We obviously did not dis-
courage them from their action-
and to let Soviet authorities
know how concerned they felt
about the incident involving Mr.
Crawford," Carter added.
Harvester's action is
significant in that companies
doing business with the Soviet
Union have encouraged more
U.S. trade with it and avoided
criticism in general of Soviet
actions against dissidents and
Soviet Jewry.
HARVESTER was said to
have sold about $32 million in
earth-moving and construction
equipment last year to the Soviet
Union. After the 1972 Brezhnev-
Nixon agreements, 24 U.S. com-
panies opened offices in Moscow.
However, non-agricultural
U.S. exports to the Soviet Union
have dropped this year to about
half their 1976 total. According
to a Commerce Department
estimate, this year's trade total
will be about $400 million, apart
from agriculture.
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ige t
The Jewish Flondian of Palm Beach Count:
. nday. August 1
Our Commitment Weakens
One may consider it a pity, but the pity of it doesn't
diminish the truth that the United States is not com-
mitted to the survival of Israel in the same way that the
Arabs are committed to the destruction of Israel.
The difficulty lies to some extent with our pragmatic
concern for oil we say to some extent. The far larger
factor here is that Americans, and we fear the rest of the
world, are weary of the role they have played since World
War II in behalf of the Jewish cause.
The moral imperatives are no longer as strong as they
used to be. If one were to be clinical about it, the diagnosis
would shift from weariness to frank boredom, and that is a
dangerous condition.
The feeling, at least as we read it, is that people no
longer care to be troubled by the Israel-Arab problem,
which they find increasingly hard to identify as their
problem, too, particularly since the moral imperatives
have weakened so disastrously. Seen in these terms, it
grows perilously clear that what is wanted is a solution to
the problem, no matter what it takes.
In Washington's mind, and we fear others share it as
well, the solution is UN Res. 242 a literal reading of
that very deliberately ambiguously-worded declaration on
the basis of which peace is to be achieved in the Middle
East.
Back in Vietnam Again
Unfortunately, a literal interpretation of 242 can only
mean the amputation of Israel as a part of the world body
politic, and from there it is but a hop, skip and a jump to
Israel's total annihilation the ultimate aim for Israel
that the Arabs have never abandoned.
And so. the Washington-led march on Israel's sur-
vival is sanctified by President Carter's unending preach-
ments about our nation's commitment to that survival at
the same time that he predicates our policies on a course
that can only lead to its opposite.
In a very real sense, we are back in Paris again on the
eve of the 'peace" between North and South Vietnam
reached so perilously after years of negotiation between
Henry Kissinger (U.S.) and Le Due Tho (North Vietnam).
How long did South Vietnam survive these nego-
tiations? Somewhere in the neighborhood of thirty days.
And what did we do about this violation of years of
negotiation? Well. Henry Kissinger got a Nobel Peace
Prize for his troubles, which he shares to his everlasting
shf me with Le Due Tho. We can't recall anything else.
Short-Term Solutions
Last week's plea by Egypt's President Anwar Sadat
for the return of Mt. Sinai and El Arish as "signs" of
Israel's good faith is the ultimate exercise in political
absurdity. Among civilized political minds, it takes on
value only to the extent that there is an urgency to solve
the impasse at any cost to Israel, of course.
Needed is a growing understanding of Israels
significance in the Middle East far beyond her accom-
modation with the Arabs. This is a role neither our own
government nor any of the other free nations has pondered
much about.
The fact is that Israel is as important to our own
security and to the freedom of the western world as we and
the western world are to Israel's survival.
Which means one thing: If we abandon Israel, we cut
off our own nose to spite our face. Short-term solutions
have never solved anything not in Korea or Vietnam.
Or in the Middle East.
''Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE and"FEDERATION REPORTER"
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc.
Combined Jewish Appeal
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
1980 N W 2 Ave Boca Raton. Fla 3M32 Phone JaS 200:
Printing Of flee 120 N E 6th St Miami. Fla S31S2 Phone 373 06
Political Storm Clouds Thicken
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
ALREADY successful in
special Congressional elections in
Washington. Louisiana, and
Minnesota, the new American
political Right expects, with good
reason, to make heavy gains in
1978 and again in 1980.
Watergate kept the fires of
Nixonites and other ultra-
conservatives at low burn for a
while. But now the money is
pouring in and the drive is on to
retire liberal congressmen and to
propel Ronald Reagan into the
White House two years from
now. The fact that Reagan will be
nearly 70 years old during the
1980 campaign seems not to
matter.
KEY FIGURES in the un-
folding drama include Reagan
FREDK SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
RONNITARTAKOW
Newt Coordinator
MORTON GILBERT Advertising Representative
The Jewish Flerfcatea Doe. Not (.uaraalee The Kaaaruta
Of The MereaaasUee Advertise* hi It*Cessnas
FORM 3579 retumi to The Jewish Floridian.
/ ISM N W 2 Ave Boca Raton. Fla JJ4S2
Published Bi Weekly Second Class Postace Paid at Boca Raton FU
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: .Local Area) One Year >.. or by member** fo
Jewish Federal,* each. Fla. JJaae. Phone M* S*M (Out ef Town upon Reaueit)
Federation officers President Alan L Mailman; Vice Praetdants: Dr. Richard
Shujarman Dr Howard Kay. Kenneth Schorer. Joanne l*ry. Jerome Tlahman
Treasurer Steel Leaser. Secretary Bruce J. Daniels. ExecuUve Director Nor
man J Schlmelman Submit material for publication to Ronrd Tartakow Director
of Public Relations.
himself; Richard Viguerie
perhaps the most successful
political fund-raiser in America;
and Joseph Coors. the Colorado
beer baron.
With $1,000,000 left in his till
from his 1976 Presidential try
and huge sums rolling in to the
Reagan-led Citizens For the
Republic each month, that
ambitious political action group
has vowed to replace at least one-
fourth of the nation's new breed
of progressive House members
and to make similar inroads on
the ranks of liberal Senators.
In charge of pulling in con-
tributions. Richard Viguene,
whose slick, direct mail appeals
helped mightUy to finance
George Wallace's various cam-
paigns, is the financial hero of
this ultraconservative hour.
OVA
AND COMING up center
stage with money to spare for
aspirants who want to stamp out
the human services and social
welfare reforms set in motion by
Franklin D. Roosevelt is Joe
Coors, who has backed the Job
Birch Society with a bit of
largesse and would like to do
away with social security, the
graduated income tax, Federal
Communications Commission,
the Security and Exchange Com.
mission, the Federal Power Com-
mission, and the Civil Aero-
nautics Board.
How can this political con.
glomerate fail in this season of
discontent? It draws numbers,
strength, yahoo philosophy, and
precinct organizing skill not only
from the men and women around
Reagan but also from the Gun
Owners of America, the Right to
Keep Arms Fund, the anti-union
Employees' Rights Committee,
Young America's Campaign
Committee, and the Association
of Physicians and Surgeons (men
in white who look upon heads of
the conservative American Medi-
cal Association as red-eyed
liberals).
HOW CAN the neo-right fail
when the abortion issue is
dividing families into warring
Camps, when opposition to the
Equal Rights Amendment has
solidified, when millions of
property owners are so overtaxed
that the weird music of any pied
piper can convert them into blind
followers of untried leaders?
The swing of the political
pendulum is cutting through old
loyalties for both the Republican
and Democratic Parties. In
today'8 computerized world,
smart, young operators are keen
propaganda practitioners, media
users, front organizers.
They avoid the errors of Birch-
men who still pin the label of
Communist on all who disagree;
they don't need a Red scare to
drum up business when festering
inflation, spreading crime,
bureaucratic bungling, escalating
Continued on Page 7
Nice Guys Finish Last
Friday. August 11.1978
Volume 4
8 AB5738
Number 16
Nice guys finish last. Ac-
cording to Christopher Lasch, the
cult of victory proclaimed most
vividly by the late, revered foot-
ball coach, Vince Lombardi. that
winning is everything.'' has
made savages of the players and
rabid chauvinists of their fol-
lowers." That's us. and never
mind the grammar.
Thus I read with no little
cynicism the headline that the
United States Olympic Com-
mittee will "Keep Its Options
Open on 1980 Olympics." You
have read here my views on the
American attitude toward
engaging in Hitler's 1936 sports
spectacular. Somehow, as we
begin the preparations for the
1980 "Games" in Moscow, I am
getting the feeling that 1 have
been there before.
Says the successor to the late
unrevered Avery Brundage as
president of the U.S. Olympic
Committee. "In the event the
International Olympic Com-
mittee failed to follow its rules
and regulations (in the area of
human rights), we would have to
determine if the Games were, in
fact. Olympic Games." Robert
Kane then goes on to analyze the
present situation in which he
says some American political
figures are attempting to use
U.S. participation in the Games
as weapons in the human rights
struggle in Russia.
. "We view the current issue on
human rights." says Kane, "as
one of a political nature, not one
of sports. As such, it is far apart
from sports and the Olympic
Games and should be settled at
the national level." As far as I
know, Kane is unlike the bigoted
Brundage. who at one time before
s
i
Edward
Cohen
laaasssBassesssssesssassaeaeaaseasaaae
the 1936 Games even praised
Hitler, but he is assuredly naive
or hypocritical in making such a
statement. As Rousseau put it so
well. "Those who would treat
politics and morality apart will
never understand the one or the
other."
In his devastating article
entitled "The Corruption of
Sports," Lasch points out that
some critics believe the violence
and partisanship of modern
sports impart militaristic values
to the young, and serve as one of
the strongest bastions of male
chauvinism. In the early days of
this century, with Teddy
Roosevelt as an example, athletic
competition was believed to lay
the foundations of national
greatness and. although we like
to think we know better, this
kind of thinking still prevails.
Which is why we get so disturbed
over the morality and politics of
engaging the Russians or
Cubans in particular, in these
athletic competitions.
It may be the usual nostalgia
of an older man and ex-sports
writer for those good ol' days,
but it seems to me that the
degradation of sports is not
endemic to athletic competition
but its subjection to things like
ultra-patriotism, profit-making.
and even the pursuit of health.
As we hear the demands of Joe
Robbie for a bigger piece of the
beer sales, for Dade taxpayers to
provide expensive stadiums ao
that professional athletes and
their promoters can reap even
greater financial rewards, there is
a great urge to cry out
"Enough."
As I wrote several weeks ago, 1
believe in American boycott -
and the rest of the world, for that
matter of the 1980 Moscow
show. I recognize that this a
selective boycott, much as our
own government at present a
punishing" the Soviets for their
violation of the Helsinki agree-
ments while ignoring all the
violations by right-wing dictator
ships which we support in our
own hypocritical, pious style. 1 m
not perfect, either.
There is the possibility of l
backlash against Jews for *
vocating that our "boys do n
participate in this substituted
war (the violence that has been
part of Olympiads in recent years
is not far from war). It may very
well be joined by those pseuoo-
jock Jews (you know the oMM
they wanted to change iw
Kippur so they could watch'j
football game without g"""-^" |
it's worth the try. if only to
attention on the fact that sportt |
only reflects the morality of ow
society as a whole. As J >ernw
Townley. a local banker, sbki".
the Miami Herald when sW
why Southeast First Nt>"
Bank was joining in a loan
Chile:
if Southeast doesn't
loan to Chile, then Flagship'
other national banks in Mi
will"


Lay.Augustll.1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
%
S
El Al to Fly Out of Miami?
accompanied by
Vice President Walter F. Mondale,
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek, Israel Ambassador Simcha
J)initz and American Ambassador Samuel Lewis visited the
.nergency ward of Shaare Zedek Hospital in Jerusalem during
\he Vice President's recent stay in Israel The Vice President
\isited some of the 26 patients at Shaare Zedek who were
bounded in the Machane Yehudah bombing. One of the vic-
tims, Yosef Oster, 59, told the Vice President that he had "lived
> fear of this happening for a long time." He urged Mondale to
\ell America "to do all it can to prevent such terrorism from
happening in the future."
Sports and Politics
Played on Different
Fields-Olympic Chief
By HASKELL COHEN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
{obert J Kane, president of the
Jnited States Olympic Com-
mittee, said that the current issue
bf human rights in the Soviet
Union is political in nature, not
pne of sports.
"As such, it is far apart from
^ports and the Olympic Games
cheduk'd to take place in
loscow in 1980) and should be
ettled at the national level," he
aid in a statement to the Jewish
("eleKraph ic A gency.
KANE, however, pledged that
Ihc Committee "will continue to
lupptirt the principle of human
fights as it applies to the
)!> mpic- (iames. under the Inter-
national Olympic Committee
Charter."
He warned that "if we impinge
the authority of foreign
Dvernments, the United States
ympic Committee would be
ililty, itself, of infusing politics
the world Olympic
Dvement."
He said that the U.S. Com-
mittee is diametrically opposed
I any organization injecting
ilitics into the Olympic move-
nent" and stated that the Israel
)lympic Committee is also "dis-
tressed al the infusion of politics
i sports. They will resist every
if fort to mix politics and sports."
According to Kane, Soviet
fresident Leonid Brezhnev and
officials of the Moscow
Jlympic Organizing Committee
[have pledged their support of all
International Olympic Com-
nittee rules, as has the President
the United States in sup-
orting the bid of Lake Placid
;Y.) to host the 1980 Olympic
''inter Games."
Kane noted that the U.S.
fommittee is responsive to its
fiandate from the International
fommittee "that we must be
utonomous and must resist all
assures of any kind what-
ever, whether political,
wan."
| CONTINUING, he said: "We
conscious of the many
essures in today's world of
^inK to infuse politics into
roils. However, if any country
elates the accepted rules
Ijntained in the International
Pympic Committee Charter, the
piled States Olympic Com-
[iiiee will exercise its right (as
nave done previously) to bring
question directly to the Inter-
ftional Olympic Committee and
^ist that they enforce the Inter-
Itional Olympic Committee
es. if the Games are to be
fognized as Olympic Games."
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The United States and Israel
have agreed on a new bilateral
civil aviation agreement that is
expected to result in greatly
expanded air service and lower
passenger fares between the two
countries.
A POTENTIAL stumbling
block the possibility of
Western European airlines
competing in fares with the U.S.
and Israel was resolved when
Israel and the U.S. agreed that a
third country's rate for flights
from the U.S. to Israel cannot be
lower than the matching rate for
U.S. and Israel services.
The agreement, announced at
the State Department after three
weeks of negotiations, replaces
the original 1950 U.S.-Israel
arrangement and its amend-
ments. It will be signed early in
August after Israeli Ambassador
Simcha Dinitz, who headed the
Israeli delegation in the
negotiations, returns to
Washington from the Middle
East talks in England and his
consultations afterward in
Jerusalem.
ACCORDING TO the State
Department, the agreement will
permit airlines of Israel and the
U.S. to operate any number of
charter flights between the two
countries. It also provides El Al,
Israel's national airline, with two
additional gateways into the U.S.
upon the signing of the
agreement and two others a year
after the agreement is in effect.
At present El Al operates only in
New York.
A U.S. spokesman said charter
flights will be available "subject
only to conformity with the
charter rule of the country in
which they originate."
Israel has agreed to lower air
fares by U.S. airlines subject only
to the limitation of a rejection by
the two governments and also
charter airflights from anywhere
in the U.S. to Israel.
Up to now either country could
block a new fare rate and charters
are limited from the U.S. to the
West Coast states of California,
Oregon and Washington.
It has been feared that
European airlines would chop
their fare to capture much of the
traffic.
An Israeli Embassy
spokesman welcomed the new
agreement as "very important"
and "the most liberal the U.S.
has ever reached with another
country." He said "we are very
pleased to have reached it."
While TWA is now the only
American airline operating to
Israel, the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency was informed that
National Airlines will apply to fly
DC-10 jumbo jets from Miami to
Tel Aviv via Amsterdam. The
new agreement allows for more
than one U.S. airline to operate to
Israel.
A SPOKESMAN for Sen.
Charles Percy (R., UK) who is
credited with being instrumental
in bringing about the new
agreement said that El Al's
choice for the first two gateways
will be Los Angeles and Chicago.
The next two to come late in the
summer of 1979 will be Miami
and Boston.
El Al will fly twice weekly
wide-bodied 747 jets between Tel
Aviv and Chicago and los
Angeles no later than April of
next year, the spokesman said.
The Chicago-Tel Aviv flights
will have an intermediate stop in
Montreal while the Los Angeles
service will have either London or
Amsterdam as the intermediate
point. The Boston-Tel Aviv
flights by 747s will be non-stop.
Miami's flight will originate in
Mexico City and proceed to Tel
Aviv via Lisbon. This will be a
once-weekly service.
El Al will not be permitted to
fly passengers "locally" between
Mexico City and Miami and
between Los Angeles and
Montreal.
^Smoking.
Here's
what I'm
doing
about it'
"I like the taste of a good cigarette
and I don't intend to settle for less.
But I'm aware of what's being said.
^""Jl So I began searching for
-"*""" a cigarette that could give
me the taste I like with less tar.
I found Vantage. A cigarette that
really gives a lot of taste. And with
much less tar than what I'd
smoked before.
What am I doing about smoking.'
smoking Vantage."
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FILTER IOO'i 10 mg "tat". 0 8 mg nicotine.
FILTER. MENTHOL: II mg. "tn". 0 8 mg nicotine tv pet ogiteite. FTC Report MAY 78


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. August
1.1978
From left, Richard Sipser. a New Yorher residing in Miami;
Susan Berg of South Miami; Alan Singer of Miami Beach; and
Joel Levine of West Palm Beach receive master of social work
degrees at first commencement of Block Education Program at
Yeshiva University's Wurzweiler School of Social Work in New
York.

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Waiting anxiously for a strong gust of wind, boys and girls at the Jewish Federation's Camp
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r August 11.1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
\r an exciting, but tiring kite-flying competition, campers
\ a chance forest.
'Up, Up and Away' go kites designed, built and decorated by
boys and girls at Camp Shalom.
Political
Storm
Continued from Page 4
taxes, and a flood of pornog-
graphy disturb 9o many coun-
trymen.
They have the determination,
the skill, the energy, and the
wherewithal to build a strong
political superstructure on the
foundations of Dixiecratism and
that segment of the populace that
worships property rights at the
expense of human rights.
ONE OF the darlings of this
emerging coalition is Jack Kemp,
who has served suburban Buffalo
in Congress for four terms.
Assiduous with his homework,
this former football star of the
Buffalo Bills is in great demand
as speaker for political fund-
raisers. His present target is high
taxes. He advocates an across the
board tax cut averaging 30
percent. His target beyond that
goal is to retire Sen. Jacob Javits
to private life.
He may bring off that act. If
so, dozens of other political
fortresses may crumble in 1980.
II
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Syria Envoy Denies Ban
On Emigration of Jews
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MIchMl letkowltz tMex SmHow
i-SSitgWi
Conducted
on Premises
By Cantor
LEIFJ RASKIN
IAURICE SAMUELSON
kNDON (JTA) The
In Ambassador to London
lenied that there is an absc-
Iban on the emigration of
from his country and has
that individual ap-
lions would be carefully con-
l by his government.
nan Omran said this to four
In Members of Parliament
|called him to discuss the
of Syrian Jewry. They
[Arthur Latham and James
Ion (Labor) and Cecil
son and Tom Normanton
ervative). Although the
_ took place earlier this
[details only emerged over
kend.
EVIDENCE that Jews
iree to travel abroad, Omran
Berstood to have referred to
ny individuals he had met
Ng in Paris. He estimated
po more than five percent of
pommunity would be in-
I in emigrating, mostly to
(relatives in the United
p. there since the 1940s.
However, Syria restricted emi-
gration by professional people in
categories vital to her security
and economy, but such
restrictions apply to all Syrians,
regardless of religion, Omran
claimed.
The Ambassador repeated this
in a letter to the Bishop of
Birmingham, in which he further
stated that Syrian Jews had
declined in numbers over the past
decade as a result of free emi-
gration in accordance with the
law.
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Candidate for County Court Judgs Group 3
Campaign Contributions Will Not Be Accepted
Primary Election Sept. 12
Pd for by Arthur M Bobrick. Campaign Treasurer


Page*
TheJeansM
^by. August
Jewish Community
Center Presents
KEREN OUt PRE-SCHOOL
Rcgwauoa b ac t*e--^c ac-
otf*ec for the
war TW XV imt>' la*
ana* at Marcam D- Saas for
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Ilia% pfojn i mm >uae*>
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MIXED BOWLING LEAGUE
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JCC Wn$I !( foraatks.
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Capaag cx ScjTs i
Dr Dam HJatL tfoiaaiir. at
ajaag Oa Xag 24 Gfoataaaa
Xnacama- Tr*%i
Ronni Tartakou Camp Shalom welcomes Michael Soil, director of the Jeuil
Community Center Creative and Performing Arts ProgJj
Campers from JCCs camp joined boys and girls from <
Shalom for Israeli Scout Caravan Program at camp grount
the future Camp Shalom will be sponsored and coordinatt
the Jewish Community Center, a beneficiary agency oft
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Count*. '
M6j
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Mayor of Rehoroth Faces
Arrest on Ifribe Charge
As part of an oierall program, boy and girl scouts from hn.
mmer as staff members at Camp Shalom. Pictun
are R:i ka Rabinou itz ilefti and Yalon Farchi. who have sent
:zff members at camp, coordinating programs in Jewii
-..- Both have stayed uith families in the Palm Be
-. nity and have visited other areas in Florida.
- ;: -.
_-. ~ -
-
RTVHTMANN 1>
-
-. .
_
Sadat's Goldberg Slur
Buried on Capitol Hill
< -i
1 arc : tar-* _x ens.? vua:
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turn or ram.
my Towers NO Substitute: Fighting Between Neo-Nazis,
lews Still Chided as Racists
Idavidcapitanchik
ndon Chronicle Syndicate
InDON It is one of the
ironies of the con-
trary academic scene that
who have always been in
Iforefront of progressive,
and socialist movements,
be attacked as racists
Ise of their Zionist sym-
]bs. Over the past few years,
fmpuses up and down the
ty, motions condemning
\m as racism have been
by student assemblies,
notions often phrased in
similar to 'when did you
^eating your wife?"
the outcome of such
has sometimes had
Rations reaching far beyond
tin or loss of a vote; at stake
has been the status of
|h and Israel Societies in the
rsity and the funds and
lies they enjoy by virtue of
membership of the
nts' union. The pressure on
students has sometimes
lenormous, but what about
fcwish academics?
rVISH academics have in-
\d themselves in the
nts* struggles. They give
nts advice, information,
lirt and often they have par-
Ited directly in debates. Like
[students, the academics
: whether or not to identify
kelves as Jews. In my ex-
fire, the choice, while under-
able, is not always easy.
Problems such people might
tare evident in the number,
jrer small, of Jews who are
lincnt in anti-Zionist
at ions. They lend them-
to the most acurillous
ganda against their co-
Inists and seem not to be
jbed when that propaganda
Dver into anti-Semitism.
I his non-Jewish colleagues,
Jewish academic is more
than the man-in- the -
" to read The Times, The
tan and their Sunday
llcnts and to pay attention
more serious news and
L affairs output of the
None of these august pub-
lications can seriously be
described as left-wing. They are
scarcely liberal. But for the
academic, they do represent the
height of informed journalism
and editorial comment in this
country. Yet in all of them cri-
ticism of Israel far outweighs any
favorable, or even neutral,
reporting. So far as the Middle
East is concerned, they purvey
the "trendy" views about Israel's
intransigence, aggression, and ill-
treatment of the Arabs.
SINCE the Israeli elections
last May, and even more so since
Anwar Sadat's visit to Jeru-
salem, criticism has mounted,
and Jews generally, not only
academics, tend to be confused
about the issues at stake and
Israel's position on them. Many
of them, not least the academics,
are themselves critical of Israeli
government policies.
But they are caught in some-
thing of a dilemma. On the one
hand, they fear that any criticism
they express of Israel's policies
will be seized upon by the Arabs
and their supporters as evidence
of the justice of their case, and on
the other hand it will be seen as a
stab in the back by many in
I srael and in the diaspora.
After all, from the comfort of
our British ivory towers, it is
easy to urge Israel to make more
concessions when it is our col-
leagues in Tel Aviv and
Jerusalem who will have to live
with the consequences.
IN VIEW of the above, one
might expect academics to
immerse themselves in their work
and shun political activity. The
situation, however, is somewhat
more encouraging than it seems.
Since 1973, Jewish academics
have become rather more in-
volved in Jewish and Israeli
affairs than hitherto.
Organized visits to Israel, links
with Israeli academics, and
contacts with Jewish students on
the campuses have increased
rather than declined, and recently
an organization called the
Academic Study Group on Israel
and the Middle East was formed
with the aim of furthering these
activities. Jewish academics have
discovered a new unity and sense
of purpose.
One should not exaggerate the
extent and nature of the dilem-
mas, or the recent events on the
campuses. In debates, Jewish
students have more than held
their own in some universities
motions supporting Israel have
been adopted. There is still much
admiration for Israel in the uni-
versities and considerable
acknowledgement of the achieve-
ments of Israel's academics.
And, of course, despite hos-
tility in certain quarters, Israel is
still a most attractive place for
large numbers of non-Jewish
students. Kibbutz holiday
schemes flourish and one meets
many more students who have
been to Israel and sympathize
with her than students who
oppose her.
THE CLIMATE of hostility
and menace towards Jewish aca-
demics and students in the so-
called "Campus Confrontation"
will pass as fashion dictates
concern for some other inter-
national cause. The recent period
has brought benefits as well as
unpleasantness.
What it must not be allowed to
do is recreate a ghetto mentality
among Jews in the universities.
There is no need for Jewish aca-
demics to become either ex-
cessively defensive or aggressive
about either their Jewishness or
their Israeli sympathies. Instead,
they should make every effort to
bring to bear the same qualities
which characterize their academic
concerns to their lives and con-
cerns as Jews.
ByJONFEDLER
BONN (JTA) Ten people, including several police-
men, were injured, some of them seriously, during 40 minutes of
fighting between police and about 100 neo-Nazis who were
meeting illegally in the north German city of Altenstadt over
the weekend.
About 20 members of the Aktionsfront Nationaler
Sozialisten (Action Front of National Socialists) were arrested.
Fighting developed when the participants armed with sticks,
glasses, bottles and other objects tried to resist attempts by
the local police to break up the meeting.
The police had to call for reinforcements from nearby
Hamburg.
JNF World Chairman On
Three Week Tour of U.S.
NEW YORK (JTA) Moshe Rivlin, world chairman of the
Jewish National Fund, has arrived in the United States from Israel on
a three-week tour to discuss with friends and supporters of the JNF
specific projects and programs designed to implement the new five-
year plan recently adopted by the JNF.
Rivlin, who will visit San Francisco, Seattle, Portland, Los
Angeles, San Diego, Denver, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Baltimore and
New York, is in the U.S. in response to an invitation given by Rabbi
William Berkowitz, president of the JNF, when the two leaders
conferred recently in Israel.
THE FIVE-YEAR plan Rivlin will be discussing calls for the
preparation of the sites for 185 new settlements and the reclamation of
40,000 acres of wasteland for intensive agriculture. During the coming
years, 50,000 dunams will be drained and dams will be built to control
flood waters and reservoirs will be constructed to conserve large
amounts of water. In addition, the JNF will break through 2,000
kilometers of new roads and will plant new forests over an area of
150,000 dunams.
During his tour, Rivlin will also review the plans for the con-
struction of the Hubert H. Humphrey Parkway in the American
Bicentennial Park. This joint American-Israel tribute to a champion of
Israel was announced jointly some days after the Senator's death last
January by Rivlin in Jerusalem and by Berkowitz in the U.S. Rivlin
will also discuss current JNF activities in Israel. Upon his return to
New York in mid-August, he will participate in a two-day national
staff conference of JNF national and regional directors.
At the same time, Berkowitz and Rivlin will also hold discussions
dealing with the danger points and crises facing world Jewry, as well
as charting new paths JNF will follow in the next decade.
"JNF has always been and will continue to be a mass of people-to-
people movement dedicated to the land of Israel. Yet in the days ahead
there is a greater need to broaden the base in the areas of Zionist
information and education, and to create personal contact between
Jews so as to reclaim and renew the Jewish soul as well as the Jewish
soil," Berkowitz said.
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August
??Qustion Box??
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX

QUESTION: What is the
reason for the establishment of
the fast day that occurs annually
on the seventeenth day of
Tammuz?
ANSWER: The Mishnah
(Ta'anith 26a) cites five historic
events that allegedly took place
on that date: Moses broke (or
observed the breaking of) the
tablets containing the Ten
Commandments; the daily
sacrifice (Korban Tamid) was
suspended (during the period of
the Second Commonwealth); an
idol was placed inside the First
Temple; and Jerusalem was
captured.
QUESTION: Why does
Jewish tradition require Jews to
observe a three-week period of
mourning beginning with the
seventeenth of Tammiul
ANSWER: The Midrash
(Eichah Rabbati) referred to this
three-week period as a "time of
anguish" when pestilence and the
evil spirit prevail. Rabbi Saadia
Gaon is said to have stated that
the three weeks of fasting and
mourning which the Bible claims
Daniel observed (Daniel 10:2)
were actually these very three
weeks.
Obviously, this was a tragic
period historically (similar to the
seven-week period between the
Passover and Shavuoth
holidays). The beginning of the
three-week period commemorated
the fall of the wall of Jerusalem
while the end of the three-week
period commemorated the actual
destruction of the Temple.
IT CAN be understood that
the intervening three weeks must
have been filled with one disaster
after another. While Jewish
tradition always insisted that life
be enjoyed in its process, it also
asked Jews to temper that joy
with periods of sobriety to
recognize that our lives, as well
as our history, are permeated
with both good fortune and
tragedy.
The wise and the faithful
eventually learn how to take both
of these extremes in stride lo lead
a well-balanced life. The unwise
are either intoxicated with over-
exuberant celebration or drowned
in uncontrollable tragedy. Such a
period of mourning as the three
weeks was meant to institute the
delicate balance between the two.
Worship Program
Set to Be Aired
' A new TV program, Paths of
Peace, will be aired on Channel 5
under the auspices of the Rab-
binical Council of Palm Beach
County, in collaboration with
Channel 5's public service sec-
tion, announced Rabbi Emanuel
Eisenberg. Council president.
Paths of Peace will be aired
Sundays at 9:30 a.m. The
program's format is a worship
service. General arrangements,
music and logo are under
supervision of Rabbi William H.
Shapiro._________
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
Devarim
"Beyond the Jordan, in the land of Moab, took Moses
upon him to expound this law" (Deut. 1.5).
DEVARIM The first few verses introduce the entire
book of Deuteronomy, which contains Moses' address to
the Israelites in Transjordan after the defeat of the
Amorites and Bashan. In this speech Moses summarizes
the Torah as a whole. He reviews the causes that had led
him to appoint judges and officials: "How can I myself
alone bear your cumbrance, and your burden, and your
strife? ... And I charged your judges at that time, saying:
"Hear the causes between your brethren, and judge
righteously between a man and his brother, and the
stranger that is with him. Ye shall not respect persons in
judgment; ye shall hear the small and the great alike.'
(Deuteronomy 1.12-17).
Moses goes on to review the incident of the scouts
sent to spy on Canaan, and the consequences of their
pessimistic report. He reminds the Israelites how they had
skirted Edom. Ammon, and Moab; and mentions the
peoples who had formerly inhabited those regions. Finally,
he recounts the story of the conquest of Transjordan, and
the partition of the area between the tribes of Reuben,
Gad, and half of the tribe of Manasseh.
(The recounts ol the Weekly Portion of Nit Law it extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History ol tht Jewish Heritage,'' edited by P. Wollmin
Tsamir. SIS, published by Shengold The volumt is available at 7S Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10031 Joseph Schlang is president ol the society
distributing the volume.)
Service
For The Unaffihated and Area Visitors At
Temple Beth Els
Senter Hall
Officiated By Rabbi Arnold Lasker
And Cantor Albert Koslow
OCTOBER 1, 2, 3, 10, IT
Limited Seating S35 00 Donation Per Person
Mail Reservations to
Temple Beth El 2815 Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach Florida 3 3407
Phone 833-0339
*t iUibbtmcal (^
:::: co-ordinated by the
Sk Palm Beach County Robbinicol Council
Sp Edi,or
gj| Rabbi Hyman Fishman
devoted to discussion of themes and issues
relevant to Jewish life past and present
Should We Mourn or Forget?
By Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman
Congregation Anshei Sholom
The Jew is in the midst of a
mourning period, the period
between the time the Romans
entered Jerusalem in 70 C.E.,
sacked the city, and after three
weeks, on the 9th day of Av,
burned the Holy Temple to the
ground. This has become a time
when no joyous affairs are
permitted, according to rabbinic
decree.
However, today we hear
opinions that since we have again
recaptured Jerusalem, and we
have our State of Israel, we
should annul that decree and
forget the past.
CAN WE forget the past?
There is a popular voice crying
out against our forgetting the
Holocaust. Such tragedy of our
people cannot and should not be
erased from our minds, because if
we do not remember what our
enemies have perpetrated against
us, we will become nonchalant
toward the Jews trials and
tribulations, and shall not know
how to protect ourselves against
future attempts at our existence,
so that our children and future
generations should not become
victims of genocidal crimes.
Is that not also true about our
attitude toward the great tragedy
that befell our glorious past when
Israel was a great and world
renowned nation, when
Jerusalem was the most beautiful
city in the world, and when the
Jew was esteemed for his lear-
ning, his wisdom and his
teachings?
To no other people or religious
group does Jerusalem have the
same significance as it has to the
Jew. To the other faiths that
claim Jerusalem as their holy
city, it is only a secondary one.
for they have their holy sites in
other cities.
ONLY TO THE Jew is
Jerusalem the only holy city.
Jerusalem is synonymous with
Judaism. It was the capital city
of the Jewish nation for over a
thousand years. It was the center
where our holy temple was twice
established. It contained the
sanctuary to which the Jews
went on their religious
pilgrimages from all over the
country three times a year, by a
divine dictum. It was the city of
David, our immortal king. We
have for centuries continued to
seek the fulfillment of the
prophetic words: Kee me'Tzyon
tayttay Torah, udvar Adoshem
me'Yerushalayim, "For from
Zion shall go forth the Law, and
the word of the Lord from
Jerusalem."
Can we forget the tragic
historic events that twice
destroyed such city, and which
resulted in Jewish exile and
traumatic suffering that has no
equal among other peoples? Even
in the time of our greatest joy we
CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
7:40
8AB- 5738
must remember the warning of
the Psalmist: Im eshkochaych
Yerushalayim, tishkach yemini.
If I forget thee, O Jerusalem,
may my right hand forget its
cunning."
We must, therefore, mourn
with our people, and shed a tear
as we recite the Lamentations of
the prophet. Let us take this
period of sorrow to heart ,
pray that peace should
granted to Jews everywhere, i
that the redemption of Israeli
become the complete rulfilli
of the return of our people u,,
land of our forefathers, for t
our sorrow will be changed I
joy, our mourning to holiday,,
our exile to freedom."
REFORM
0 :
ty. ubitM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida
33407
833-8421
Rabbi Irving B. Cohen
Joel L. Levine
Associate Rabbi
Sobbath Worship Services
Friday at 8:00 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF
BOCA RATON
333 SW. Fourth Avenue
Boca Raton, Fl. 33432
391-8900
Rabbi Merle E. Singer
Cantor Martin Rosen
Sabbath services, Friday at
8 15pm.
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
THE FREE SYNAGOGUE
P.O. Box 3
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
368-1600 391-1111
Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn
Fridays at 8:15 p.rr.
at: Boca West
Community UMC
8900 Boca West GLADES)Rd
(1 Mile West of
Boca Turnpike)
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Grove Street
West Polm Beach, Flo. 33409
684-3212 Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m.
Rabbi Harry Z. Schedman
Cantor Arthur B. Rosenwasser
Services: Doily 8:30a.m., 7 p.m.
Fnday8:30a.m., 5p.m.,
8:15p.m.
Saturday 8:30a.m.. 6:30p.m.
CONGREGATION
BETH K0DESH
Boynton Beach, Flo.
732-5147
Sabbath Services
Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Soturday at 9 a.m.
Congregational Church
1I5N Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Dr. ve
West Palm Beach, Florida
33407
833-0339
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev
Sabbath services Friday at 8:15
p.m.
Saturday at9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyon at 8:15 a.m.,
Sunday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 N. "A" St.
lake Worth, Florida 33460
585-5020
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Contor Jacob Elmon
Services, Mondays and
Thursdays
at 8:15a m
Friday at8:15 p.m.
Soturday at 9 a m
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath services, Fndoy at 8
p.m.
At Westminister Presbyterian
Church. 10410 N Military
Trail, Palm Beach Gardens,
321 Northlake Blvd.. North
Palm Beach, Flo. 33408 Ph
845 1134
Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
N.W. Avenue "G"
Belle Glade, Florida 33430
Jack Slateman, Lay Leader
Sobbath services, Fndoy e* |
8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeda Drive
Palm Springs, Florido 33460
Sabbath services, Friday at
p. m.
Saturday at 9a.m.
President Jacob Front-to*!
0034
Mondays and Thursdays oi |
a.m.
Services held at Faith United
Presbyterian Church, Pal|
Springs
B'NAI TORAH
CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave.
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
392-8566
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Sabbath services: Frictoy |
8:15p.m.
Saturdays at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH of thf
DELRAY
HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlontic Avenue
Delray Beach. Florida 33446
276-3536
Morns SiIbermon, Rabbi
Leonard Price, Contor .
Sabbath services: Friday otJ
p.m. Saturday at9a m.
Daily m.nyans at 8:45 o.j
and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Rood
Palm Beoch, Florida 33480
832-0804
Rabbi Jerome Kestenboum
Cantor David Dardoshti
Sabbath services, Friday
8:30p.m
Saturday at 9 a.m.


ottered Women Say 'Dayenu'
ninniinPHTSTH USED to address arama nf .
llT
By GLORIA DEUTSCH
ondon Chronicle Syndicate
I was brought up to believe
I Jewish men never drank and
beat their wives," says
h Rasnic. one of the most
ulate and outspoken leaders
e Israel Feminist Movement.
be startling statistic of
ween 30.000 and 50,000
Itered wives a year in Israel
ich was recently revealed, was
of the reasons that led Ruth
[found the organization known
lo (No) to combat violence
inst women.
HE FIRST project, the open-
of a shelter in prosperous
ia, will be a haven for
,en and their children whose
bands have made their home
unbearable.
L\o, it's not just the working-
s women who suffer, nor is
beating confined to the
ntal communities," says
h. "I have had cases of high-
ing soldiers* wives, Ash-
zim. and even a doctor's wifp
was constantly assaulted by
husband.".
The extent and seriousness of
problem came home to her
leu she began campaigning in
last elections as No. 2 can-
late on the Women's party list.
address groups of
15 to 20 women and was shocked
by the bitterness and hatred of
men that came out. At one
meeting in a poor neighborhood it
turned out that many women,
from grandmothers to young
wives, had experienced battering.
The main complaint was the total
disregard for them by their
husbands."
Lo, besides providing physical
to Palestine in 1930 from
England became an ardent
feminist- in childhood when
stories of the suffragettes made
her conscious of the injustice
against women in society.
She is, unlike many leaders of
the movement, happily married
to an Englishman who was a
Nahal volunteer in 1948, and they
have three grown children.
Intermarriage Among Jews
May Mean More Jews
Feminine Front
shelter, will also try and give free
legal advice to women and induce
magistrates to hand out heavier
sentences to cruel husbands.
A recent case which made Ruth
see red was that of a taxi-driver
who violently mistreated his wife
because she had asked him to
empty the garbage and change
the baby's nappy.
THE MAN appealed to the
judge "man-to-man" and was
given a suspended sentence. "Do
we have to wait for him to murder
his wife before he gets a proper
sentence?" asked Ruth in a letter
to the Minister of Justice and the
press.
Ruth, whose father emigrated
few Hillel Directors Named
I At 3 Florida Universities
J'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations
i named Morton Aroll. 29, and
Ibbi Dennis E. Wald, 26, as
I ill''! directors at the
iiversitv of Miami and Florida
Itei na luiiidl University
Ipectively.
Iroll, 29, is a graduate of
oklyn College, where he also
eived a master's degree in
lication. He was awarded a
lond M.A. from Yeshiva
|iversiiy in Jewish history.
JEFORE COMING to Miami,
oil served as program director
the B'nai B'rith Hillel
jndation at Brooklyn College.
was also manager of The
Ve, Hillel's popular Israel
Ihtclub on the Brooklyn
|lege campus.
labbi Wald, 26, a graduate of
Iveland State University, was
lained recently from Hebrew
ton College-Jewish Institute of
Jigion in Cincinnati, where he
received an M.A. in Hebrew
letters. He has served
congregations in Louisiana, Ohio.
Iowa, Texas and Virginia.
Also named was Rabbi Mark
S. Kram, who will be director at
the University of South Florida
in Tampa.
RABBI KRAM, 27, was or-
dained recently from Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion in Cincinnati, where he
also received an M.A. in Hebrew
letters. While at the seminary, in
addition to various
congregational assignments, he
served as assistant regional
director, Kentucky-Indiana-Ohio
Region of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization. He is a graduate of
the University of Missouri.
The Hillel program serves
some 2,500 Jewish students and
faculty at the University of
South Florida, more than 2,600 at
the University of Miami, and
another 1,000 at Florida
International University.
SHE LOOKS years younger
than her age of 46, is soft-spoken
and feminine, but militant about
her cause which has taken over
her family, her secretarial and
translating business and reduced
her social life to nil.
When the Israel Feminist
Movement was founded in 1972.
not want to give a get out of
spite, she is powerless. When
people marry they are making the
most binding move in their life
she was its first secretary. Its
aims were clear, the main one
being to work for a change in the
marriage and divorce laws which
make women totally dependent
on their husbands.
"A woman cannot instigate a
divorce, and if the husband does
and they pay less attention to
their legal rights than when they
buy an old car!"
OTHER objectives of the
movement are longer school
hours to enable women to work
full-time, more day-care centers,
equal pay and, one day in the
Utopian future, salaries for
housewives.
"The women will pay out of
their welfare payments for their
keep and the municipality pays
the rent. What we need are
volunteers, more fortunate
women whose domestic lives are
stable and happy, to come and
lend a compassionate ear. Very
often that's all that the ill-treated
wife wants."
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
|An outstanding profev 'Ono/ counseling ogency serving the Jewish
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Telephone: 395-3640
noderate fees are charged in family ond individual counseling to
|hose who con pay (Fees are based on income and family si/e)
[he Jewish Family ond Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
' e Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
JERUSALEM The rising
rate of intermarriage among U.S.
Jews could lead to a net gain in
the country's Jewish population,
the American-Israel "Dialogue"
was told here.
Prof. Fred Massarik of UCLA,
scientific director of the National
Jewish Population Study, told
the American Jewish Congress-
sponsored symposium that the
declining Jewish birthrate in
America not the rising per-
centage of intermarriage posed
the greater threat to Jewish
population growth in the United
States.
There are an estimated 5.7
million Jews in the U.S.
ASSAILING THE
widespread assumption that
American Jews are marrying
themselves out of existence,"
Prof. Massarik cited recent
studies indicating that where the
husband in an intermarriage was
Jewish, nearly two-thirds of the
children were raised as Jews.
Where the wife was Jewish, more
than 95 percent of the children
were raised as Jews.
Thus, despite a current rate of
intermarriage among Jews
approaching 50 percent, Prof.
Massarik said, "we must avoid
the temptation to leap to
doomsday conclusions. Inter-
marriage in its widest sense need
not imply Jewish population loss
nor even inevitable decline in the
quality of Jewish life." He added:
"Precisely because there is a
drift toward Jewishness among
intermarried non-Jews, and a
drift away from Jewishness
among in-married Jews, the
quality of life may be as rich
among some intermarried
families as among many of the in-
married."
THE DECLINING Jewish
birthrate in America was un-
derscored by population figures
presented to the "Dialogue" by
Herbert Bienstock of New York,
Regional U.S. Commissioner of
Labor Statistics, who noted that
Jews were a generally older
population group with a higher
proportion in the non-
childbearing years than the
proportion in the total U.S.
population.
While 48 percent of American
Jews were over the age of 35, only
41 percent of the total population
fell into that category, he said.
Similarly, 22 percent of American
Jews w,ere under the age of 15,
compared to 28 percent of the
total population.
The "Dialogue" session, which
devoted itself to demographics as
a basis for discussion on Jewish
political strength in the U.S. and
Israeli domestic and foreign
policy, also heard presentations
by Bernard Lazerwitz, professor
of sociology at Bar-Han
University, and Rivka Bar-Yosef.
professor of sociology at Hebrew
University.
Mrs. Bar-Yosef described
studies and interviews with
young Israeli women indicating
that while Sephardic girls wanted
fewer children than their parents,
there was an equally-strong
tendency amond Ashkenazi girls
to look forward to larger families
than the ones they had grown up
in.
THERE WAS also a general
decline in religious observance in
both the Ashkenazi and
Sephardic younger generations,
Mrs. Bar-Yosef reported.
At the same time, however, she
said, those Israelis who described
themselves as "secular"
nevertheless took part in many
traditional practices such as
Sabbath candle-lighting, holiday
observance and keeping kosher.
The "Dialogue" session was
highlighted by an exchange
between Midge Decter of New
York, senior editor of Basic
Books, and Dr. David Hartman,
senior lecturer in Jewish
philosophy at Hebrew U niversity.
DECTER CAUTIONED that
immigration to Israel from the
United States was likely to
continue at a low level for the
foreseeable future and urged that
Israel not count on "aliyah from
America."
Concern Mounts for Fate
Of Helsinki Monitors
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Soviet treatment of the 20 im-
prisoned or exiled Helsinki
monitors in the Soviet Union and
the implications of that treat-
ment on Soviet American
relations is arousing increasingly
broad concern in the Congress.
The Commission on Security
and Cooperation in Europe, made
up of congressional members and
administration officials to
examine the results of the
Helsinki Agreement, is focusing
"particular attention" on
Anatoly Sharansky and
Alexander Ginzburg, and another
group member, Maria Slepak.
REP. DANTE B. Fascell (D.,
Fla.), chairman of the com-
mission, and Mrs. Alexander
Solzhenitsyn, wife of the exiled
Nobel Prize winning author, are
among those who have testified
in a session in the House of Rep-
resentatives. She is a founding
member of the Alexander Ginz-
burg Defense Committee.
|Telephone
32-8423 / 4
Jewish Community Day School
Of Palm Beach County, Inc
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
Is now accepting applications for
Pre-School-Full or Half Day
Kindergarten-Full Oay
Grade l-Grade Vl-Elementary School
Grades Vll-VIII-Junior High School
Transportation throughout Palm Beach County
Admission Tests Required
*-iz[ z?-:--
A Beneficiary Agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Meanwhile, Rep. Robert F.
Drinan (D., Mass.), chairman of
the International Commitee for
the Release of Anatoly
Sharansky, said, "I know from
my personal association" with
Sharansky "that he is an honest
individual whose sole 'crime' is
his insistence on monitoring the
compliance of the Soviet Union
with the provisions of the 1975
Helsinki Agreement."
Drinan said the trial of
Sharansky "is the culmination of
a series of efforts by the Soviet
government to imprison or other-
wise silence all or the leaders of
the movement for freedom of
emigration for Soviet Jews."
Pointing to the treason charge
against Sharansky and the
timing of his trial to coincide with
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance's
negotiations with Foreign Min-
ister Andrei Gromyko on nuclear
arms safeguards. Drinan said.
"The decision to place Sharansky
on trial must be seen as part of a
calculated effort by the Soviet
Union to demonstrate to the
United States that the USSR is
immune to criticism of human
rights violations. The
authorities hope in this
discourage further criticism."
Soviet
way to
IN ANOTHER development.
Sen. Alan Cranston (D., Calif.)
disclosed the text of a letter sent
June 26 by 43 senators to Soviet
leader Leonid Brezhnev asking
him to commute the sentences of
Vladimir Slepak and Ida Nudel
and to permit them to emigrate.
JEFFER
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5061 Okeechobee Blvd.
W. Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
W. Palm684-2277
Delray- 427-32201


* IV
Page 12
The Jewish tloridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August
Administration's Idea Is To Isolate Israel Today
Continued from Page &
regime but acceptance of the fact
that the government was in
effective control over the country
in whose name it spoke. Having
faced the problem of recognition
itself only a year before, Israel
attached importance to this
principle."
WHEN THE UN General
Assembly in 1971 voted to seat
Communist China in place of the
Nationalist Chinese delegation,
Israel was one of the few states to
support the futile United States
effort to have both states seated
on a "two-China" basis.
Once again. Israel was opposed
to setting a precedent which
could someday be used to seat a
"Palestinian" state in its place at
the United Nations.
Israel's 1950 recognition of
China was acknowledged with
thanks by the late Premier Chou
en-lai. but before steps toward
full relations could proceed, the
Korean War broke out. and Israel
did not want to offend the United
States by supporting China
during the conflict. Israel, which
had voted in favor of Communist
China's admission to the UN in
1950 and 1951. abstained on the
question through the 1960s.
WHEN THE Korean War
ended in 1953, several efforts by
Israelis and Chinese to normalize
relations between the two states
were made. Contacts between
Israeli and Chinese officials at
the Israeli Legation Rangoon.
Burma were made by David
Hacohen. Israels first minister
and a veteran labor leader, ac-
cording to Medzini's article.
Medzini points out that the
early contacts led to a meeting
between Hacohen and Chou
Later the Chinese government
extended an invitation to Israel
to send a trade mission to China.
Chou told the first National
People's Congress in September.
1954. that "contacts are being
made with a view to establishing
normal relations between China
and Israel"
Hacohen led the trade
delegation to Peking from Jan.
31-Feb. 19.1955. which according
to Medzini was "treated ex-
ceptionally well." Hacohen
cabled then Israeli Prime
Minister Moshe Sharett to press
for a decision of establishing full
diplomatic relations, but Sharett
fearing an adverse American
reaction at a time when Israel
was seeking American military
aid (which it did not get)."
hesitated. Sharett. according to
Medzini, "decided to postpone
action and Israel missed its only
opportunity."
HE GOES ON to point out
that in 1955. at the Bandung
Conference of Non-Aligned
Nations, Chou cast his lot with
the Arabs, thereby ending any
possibility of immediate normal
relations with Israel. Chou met
and formed a friendship with
egypt's late charismatic
president. Gamal Abdel Nasser,
and in May. 1956, Egypt recog-
nized China, and other Arab
states followed suit.
During most of the period that
followed, the Chinese gave lip
service to the Arab side, but they
were never to achieve the extent
of military and political
penetration of the Arab world
that their arch-rivals, the
Soviets, had during the 1960s.
The "radical Arab states" and
the Palestine Liberation
Organization terrorists remained
neutral in the Sino-Soviet
dispute, and China as well as
Russia has provided arms and
training to Arab terrorist groups.
In 1971, following the ad-
mission of Communist China to
the United Nations, Israeli
Foreign Minister Abba Eban
cabled congratulations to Chou
en-lai, who said that China
refused to accept the cable,
saying that "friendly relations
are possible with the people of
Israel but not with a state that
starts aggressive wars."
CHOU WAS referring to
favorable contacts between China
and Matzpen. a small Maoist
Communist faction in Israel.
While China maintained an
especially harsh propaganda line
against the "Zionist aggressors"
in Israel during the period since
its admission, the Chinese
delegates at the United Nations
have not used their veto power to
thwart American-Soviet efforts
to cooperate on Mideast matters.
The Peking Review, China's
English language weekly, con-
fined itself to denouncing Soviet -
American "hegemony," in the
Mideast during this period,
reserving its harshest criticism
for the Soviets. But since the
visit to Peking by former Pres-
ident Richard Nixon in 1971,
China has not attempted to mix
into American interests in the
Mideast.
AS A result of the Nixon visit,
mainland China opened its gates
to American visitors, including
business and industrial leaders
who attend trade fairs; scientists,
scholars and students and to
ordinary American tourists,
including American Jews.
Several American Jews, in-
cluding Dr. Arthur Rosen, a
former St. Louisan, and Dr.
Jerome Cohen of Harvard Uni-
versity, are prominent American
Sinologists who have made
frequent visits to the mainland.
During the tumultuous period
of the "Great Proletarian Cul-
tural Revolution" of the 1960s.
China maintained normal dip-
lomatic relations with Egypt,
even when other nations were
forced to close their embassies.
The present "pragmatic"
leadership in China, Party Chair-
man Hua Kuo-feng and Foreign
Minister Teng Shao-peng, offers
the possibility of eventual
normalization of relations with
Israel, which since 1967 had its
ties severed with the Soviet
Union and its Eastern European
bloc, except Rumania.
IN FEBRUARY of this year,
the Peking Review contained an
article about a cordial meeting
between Chairman Hua and
Hassan el-Tohamy, the special
envoy of Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat, who had completed
his historic peace-making visit to
I srael the previous November.
The article was extremely sup-
portive of Sadat during a period
in which his peace mission was
being harshly denounced by the
Soviet Union and the radical
Arab states. Sadat, an arch-foe of
the Soviet Union, who had ex-
pelled 20.000 Soviet "advisers"
trom Egypt in 1971. warmly wel-
comed the Chinese support.
The article in the Peking
Review matter of factly
referred to Sadat's "negotiations
with Israel," albeit in a negative
context.
ANOTHER significant shift
occurred on Mar. 3, when the
Sew York Times reported that
for the first time "China recog-
nizes Israel's right to exist side
by side with the Arab countries,
providing it abandons its unjus-
tifiable demands" especially
regarding the occupied
territories.
According to the Times, the
Hsinhua Chinese press agency,
China's official press, "for the
first time mentioned Israel's
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right to exist." The Times added:
China has always supported the
Arab cause in the Middle fcast
conflict."
The fact that China officially
and for the first time recognized
Israels "right to exist," in-
dicates that it might be "playing
its Egypt-Israel card" against
the Soviet Union.
IF THE Sadat initiative can be
rescued, and if it leads to a settle-
ment among Israel and the
"moderate" Arab states such as
Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Morocco,
Jordan and the Sudan, the
Chinese could
"moderate"
bloc against th.1
Soviet client states such as InT I
Syria, Libya and South-d
Yemen.
With this complicated skein of I
big power and small power jJ
trigue as a background, one cijl
readily understand whv TafaS
would be reluctant to buy fight* I
jets from Israel at this time H
Taiwan proceeds with the sale ii|
will alienate the Saudis. If lsr~i
proceeds with the sale, it could I
offend the Communist Chine* i
and their friends in Cairo at il
delicate stage in the Mideast!
negotiations. _, .
St. Louis Jewish tig
Dr. Irving Goodman
Chiropractor
Announoas the location of his olftee
lor the practice of Chiropractic
Boynton Plaza
153V2 North Congress Avenue
(North Wast 2nd Avenue)
Boynton Beach
Phone:737-5591
OHIcahoura: Men.. Tims., Wad.. Fri. 9:00-12:00 2:00-5:00
Th.Sat. 9:00-12:00
(Medicare includes Chiropractic)
THE JEWISH amJNTlY CENTER I
OF THE PALM BEACHES INC.
IS NOW ACCEPTING REGISTRATION FOR
our KEREN ORR OTUNIIY PRE-SCHDOL
SEPTEMBER l7(-7
PRE SCHOOL! 2' 7 YRS)
1:30a.m.-1:00 p.m.
1:30a.m. 3:00p.m.
1:30a.m. 530p.m.
PRE SCHOOL (3 YRS)
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30a.m 300p m
t: 30a.m. 5:30 p.m.
PRE KINDERGARTENS YRS)
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KINOERGARTEN(SYRS)
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